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Sample records for emulsion experiment nucleus-nucleus

  1. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  2. Observation of direct hadronic pairs in nucleus-nucleus collisions in JACEE emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of high energy ( or = 1 TeV/amu) nucleus-nucleus collisions observed in Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) emulsion chambers, nonrandom spatial association of produced charged particles, mostly hadronic pairs, are observed. Similar narrow pairs are observed in about 100 events at much low energy (20 to 60 GeV/amu). Analysis shows that 30 to 50% of Pair abundances are understood by the Hambury-Brown-Twiss effect, and the remainder seems to require other explanations.

  3. Results on ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions from balloon-borne emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W.; Meegan, C. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of balloon-borne emulsion-chamber measurements on high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei (Burnett et al., 1983) are summarized in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Special consideration is given to seven nucleus-nucleus interaction events at energy in excess of 1 TeV/A with multiplicity greater than 400, and to Fe interactions (53 with CHO, 10 with emulsion, and 14 with Pb) at 20-60 GeV/A.

  4. Fluctuation analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for identifying enhanced fluctuations in the angular distributions of secondary particles produced from relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The method is applied under the assumption that the masses of the produced particles are small compared to their linear momenta. The importance of particles rests in the fact that enhanced fluctuations in the rapidity distributions is considered to be an experimental signal for the creation of the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP), a state of nuclear matter predicted from the quantum chromodynamics theory (QCD). In the approach, Monte Carlo simulations are employed that make use of a portable random member generator that allow the calculations to be performed on a desk-top computer. The method is illustrated with data taken from high altitude emulsion exposures and is immediately applicable to similar data from accelerator-based emulsion exposures.

  5. Nucleus-nucleus potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The significance of a nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed. Information about such potentials obtained from scattering experiments is reviewed, including recent examples of so-called rainbow scattering that probe the potential at smaller distances. The evidence for interactions involving the nuclear spins is summarized, and their possible origin in couplings to non-elastic channels. Various models of the potentials are discussed.

  6. Large area emulsion chamber experiments for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Emulsion-chamber experiments employing nuclear-track emulsions, etchable plastic detectors, metal plates, and X-ray films continue to demonstrate high productivity and potential in the study of cosmic-ray primaries and their interactions. Emulsions, with unsurpassed track-recording capability, provide an appropriate medium for the study of nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy, which will likely produce observations of a phase change in nuclear matter. The many advantages of emulsion chambers (excellent multitrack recording capability, large geometry factor, low apparatus cost, simplicity of design and construction) are complemented by the major advantages of the Space Shuttle as an experiment carrier. A Shuttle experiment which could make a significant advance in both cosmic-ray primary and nucleus-nucleus interaction studies is described. Such an experiment would serve as a guide for use of emulsions during the Space Station era. Some practical factors that must be considered in planning a Shuttle exposure of emulsion chambers are discussed.

  7. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  8. Strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions: Experimental summary

    SciTech Connect

    Odyniec, G.

    1989-02-01

    Rather than attempt to give a complete review of strangeness production in all kinds of experiments, I will dwell on the most interesting and promising aspects of the experimental results from nucleus-nucleus (A + A) experiments, using p + p//bar p/ + p and p + A//bar p/ + A data only as reference when needed. In this paper I will try: to identify the important features of the reaction mechanism; to understand the mechanisms; to learn about quark-gluon plasma formation by comparing nucleus-nucleus collisions with p-nucleus, /bar p/-nucleus, p + p and /bar p/ + p collisions; to see if there is any definite evidence yet supporting quark-gluon plasma formation; and to suggest further needs for experimental and theoretical study. 32 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Sarkar, S.; Singh, G.

    2015-03-01

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from 84Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from 28Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  10. BFKL Pomeron calculus: nucleus-nucleus scattering

    E-print Network

    Carlos Contreras; Eugene Levin; Jeremy S. Miller

    2011-12-19

    In this paper the action of the BFKL Pomeron calculus is re-written in momentum representation, and the equations of motion for nucleus-nucleus collisions are derived, in this representation. We found the semi-classical solutions to these equations, outside of the saturation domain. Inside this domain these equations reduce to the set of delay differential equations, and their asymptotic solutions are derived.

  11. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  12. Global Properties of Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    E-print Network

    Michael Kliemant; Raghunath Sahoo; Tim Schuster; Reinhard Stock; ;

    2008-09-15

    In this lecture note, we discuss the global properties of nucleus-nucleus collisions. After a brief introduction to heavy-ion collisions, we introduce useful kinematics and then discuss the bulk hadron production in A+A collisions. At the end we discuss the hadronization and hadronic freeze-out in A+A collisions. We have tried to cover the topic from very fundamental arguments especially for the beginners in the field. We also give very useful formulae frequently used by experimentalists, from a first principle derivation.

  13. Nucleus-nucleus interactions between 20 and 65 GeV per nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Roberts, F. E.; Watts, J. W.; Oda, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Jones, W. V.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid electronic-counter/emulsion-chamber instrument was exposed to high-energy cosmic rays on a balloon. The data on 105 nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 20-65 GeV/nucleon and for incident nuclear charges Zp in the range of 22 to 28 are presented. Inclusive characteristics of particle production on different targets (plastic, emulsion, and lead) are shown and compared with models based on the superposition of nucleon-nucleus interactions. Features of a subset of the more central collisions with a plastic target and some characteristics of individual events with the highest multiplicity of produced particles are described.

  14. Nuclear emulsions in the OPERA experiment

    E-print Network

    Donato Di Ferdinando; for the OPERA Collaboration

    2008-12-02

    The use of emulsions as particles detector has a long and successful life. The recent development of fast automatized analysis systems has allowed the use of huge amount of emulsions films with no precedence in the history of particle physics. The OPERA experiment, running in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), for the confirmation of the neutrino oscillation in the $\

  15. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  16. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  17. The emulsion chamber technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Photographic emulsion has the unique property of recording tracks of ionizing particles with a spatial precision of 1 micron, while also being capable of deployment over detector areas of square meters or 10's of square meters. Detectors are passive, their cost to fly in Space is a fraction of that of instruments of similar collecting. A major problem in their continued use has been the labor intensiveness of data retrieval by traditional microscope methods. Two factors changing the acceptability of emulsion technology in space are the astronomical costs of flying large electronic instruments such as ionization calorimeters in Space, and the power and low cost of computers, a small revolution in the laboratory microscope data-taking. Our group at UAH made measurements of the high energy composition and spectra of cosmic rays. The Marshall group has also specialized in space radiation dosimetry. Ionization calorimeters, using alternating layers of lead and photographic emulsion, to measure particle energies up to 10(exp 15) eV were developed. Ten balloon flights were performed with them. No such calorimeters have ever flown in orbit. In the ECT program, a small emulsion chamber was developed and will be flown on the Shuttle mission OAST-2 to resolve the principal technological questions concerning space exposures. These include assessments of: (1) pre-flight and orbital exposure to background radiation, including both self-shielding and secondary particle generation; the practical limit to exposure time in space can then be determined; (2) dynamics of stack to optimize design for launch and weightlessness; and (3) thermal and vacuum constraints on emulsion performance. All these effects are cumulative and affect our ability to perform scientific measurements but cannot be adequately predicted by available methods.

  18. Nucleus-nucleus potential with shell-correction contribution

    E-print Network

    V. Yu. Denisov

    2015-02-04

    The full relaxed-density potential between spherical nuclei is considered as a sum of the macroscopic and shell-correction contributions. The macroscopic part of the potential is related to a nucleus-nucleus potential obtained in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi approach with the Skyrme and Coulomb forces and the relaxed-density ansatz for evaluation of proton and neutron densities of interacting nuclei. A simple prescription for the shell-correction part of the total potential is discussed. The parameters of the shell-correction and macroscopic parts of the relaxed-density potential are found by fitting the empirical barrier heights of the 89 nucleus-nucleus systems as well as macroscopic potentials evaluated for 1485 nucleus-nucleus systems at 12 distances around touching points.

  19. Experiment S009: Nuclear Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, F. W.; Shapiro, M. M.; Silberberg, R.; Stiller, B.; Tsao, C. H.; Durgaprasad, N.; Fichtel, C. E.; Guss, D. E.; Reames, D. V.

    1971-01-01

    The first exposure on a spacecraft of a nuclear emulsion apparatus designed to collect 1000 high quality tracks of heavy nuclei under a negligible thickness of matter (0.07 g/sq cm) is described. The cosmic ray detector consisted of a stack of nuclear emulsions that were designed to register at least 400 heavy nuclei tracks for each 10 hours of useful exposure. The spacecraft had to be oriented in a heads-up attitude during the 10-hour period to eliminate atmospheric albedo particles. The results are as follows: (1) a definite odd-even effect, with low abundances for elements of atomic number 7, 9, and 11; (2) a ratio O/C approximately 0.9; (3) Ne/C, Mg/C, and Si/C ratios between 0.2 and 0.3; (4) an abundance gap in the region 15 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 19; and (5) a ratio (20 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28)/C 0.2, with a large concentration at Z = 26. These results are indicative that successful exposures of nuclear emulsions were obtained on the Gemini 11 mission.

  20. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  1. Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  2. Nuclear Emulsion - Skylab Experiment S009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph shows Skylab's Nuclear Emulsion experiment, a Skylab science facility that was mounted inside the Multiple Docking Adapter used to record the relative abundance of primary, high-energy heavy nuclei outside the Earth's atmosphere. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  3. Nucleon emission via electromagnetic excitation in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Re-analysis of the Weizsacker-Williams method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous analyses of the comparison of Weizsacker-Williams (WW) theory to experiment for nucleon emission via electromagnetic (EM) excitations in nucleus-nucleus collisions were not definitive because of different assumptions concerning the value of the minimum impact parameter. This situation is corrected by providing criteria that allows definitive statements to be made concerning agreement or disagreement between WW theory and experiment.

  4. Topics on Hydrodynamic Model of Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    E-print Network

    Y. Hama; T. Kodama; O. Socolowski Jr

    2013-03-10

    A survey is given on the applications of hydrodynamic model of nucleus-nucleus collisons, focusing especially on i) the resolution of hydrodynamic equations for arbitrary configurations, by using the smoothed-particle hydrodynamic approach; ii) effects of the event-by-event fluctuation of the initial conditions on the observables; iii) decoupling criteria; iv) analytical solutions; and others.

  5. Classical initial conditions in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    Yacine Mehtar-Tani

    2008-11-11

    An iterative proceedure is proposed to compute the classical gauge field produced in the collision of two heavy nuclei at high energy. The leading order is obtained by linearizing the Yang-Mills equations in the light-cone gauge, and provides a simple formula for gluon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions. At this order $k_t-$factorization breaks down.

  6. OPERA experiment and its releted emulsion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ariga, Akitaka

    2008-02-21

    The OPERA experiment is designed to clarify neutrino oscillation by detecting appearance of {nu}{sub {tau}} in pure {nu}{sub {mu}} beam through a long baseline method (CNGS beam from cern to the Gran Sasso laboratory). The key technique is the use of emulsion films and their scanning. We developed a new high speed scanning system with speed of 50 cm{sup 2}/h and it was successfully demonstrated in 2006 CNGS commissioning. The new scanning system is not only meant for the OPERA experiment, but it has large potential of applications. For example, measurement of {nu}{sub e} with strong separation power against {pi}{sup 0}. Or a compact emulsion spectrometer for future neutrino experiments.

  7. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential and incompressibility of nuclear matter

    E-print Network

    V. Zanganeh; N. Wang; O. N. Ghodsi

    2012-03-01

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for some fusion reactions are investigated by using the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model with different sets of parameters in which the corresponding incompressibility coefficient of nuclear matter is different. Two new sets of parameters SKP* and IQ3 for the ImQMD model are proposed with the incompressibility coefficient of 195 and 225 MeV, respectively. The measured fusion excitation function for 16O+208Pb and the charge distribution of fragments for Ca+Ca and Au+Au in multi-fragmentation process can be reasonably well reproduced. Simultaneously, the influence of the nuclear matter incompressibility and the range of nucleon-nucleon interaction on the nucleus-nucleus dynamic potential is investigated.

  8. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN: Signatures, physical observables and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions have become available with the recent experiments at CERN utilizing 200 GeV/n oxygen and sulfur beams. Physics motivations for these experiments are presented: a description of predicted signatures for possible formation of a quark-gluon plasma and physical observables that are expected to provide important information for understanding the dynamics of these collisions. A presentation will be made of some of the first experimental results to emerge from this new field. 28 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultra-relativistic energies: Status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1995-04-01

    This paper is based on three lectures presented at the Prague Seminar on Relativistic Heavy-Ion Physics in September 1994. The first lecture, following a general introduction, focuses on three different aspects of the CERN experiment WA80. The author first presents results on global event characteristics deduced primarily from measured distributions of transverse energy and of forward energy. The purpose is to introduce the main general features of nucleus-nucleus reactions at the highest energies currently available. He highlights the role of projectile-target geometry, discusses the degree of nuclear stopping, and estimates the energy densities attained in these reactions. This discussion is followed by a presentation of one of two topics that are unique to the WA80 experiment and which are not addressed by any of the other CERN collaborations that study nucleus-nucleus reactions: direct measurements of photons. The second topic unique to WA80, measurements of proton-proton correlations in the target-fragmentation region, is covered in the first part of the second lecture. The remainder of the second lecture is devoted to a selective overview of results obtained at the AGS accelerator of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The third lecture is devoted to a discussion of the two main experiments, STAR and PHENIX, planned for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, under construction at BNL.

  10. Particle Number Fluctuations and Correlations in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    E-print Network

    V. P. Konchakovski; M. Hauer; M. I. Gorenstein; E. L. Bratkovskaya

    2009-06-17

    Particle number fluctuations and correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions at SPS and RHIC energies are studied within the statistical hadron-resonance gas model in different statistical ensembles and in the Hadron-String-Dynamics (HSD) transport approach. Event-by-event fluctuations of the proton to pion and kaon to proton number ratios are calculated in the HSD model for the samples of most central collision events and compared with the available experimental data. The role of the experimental acceptance and centrality selection is discussed.

  11. The nucleus-nucleus interaction between boosted nuclei

    E-print Network

    Wen Hui Long; Carlos A. Bertulani

    2010-10-19

    The nucleus-nucleus interaction potential has been studied within the relativistic mean field theory. The systematics of the relativistic effects have been investigated by analyzing the relation between the potential and the bombarding energy as a function of the impact parameter. It is shown that the potential barriers are noticeably sensitive to the bombarding energy for a given impact parameter. At large bombarding energies the slope at the potential edge decreases with the impact parameter. Comparisons with a non-relativistic treatment shows that relativistic effects cannot be ignored at bombarding energies around and larger than 100 MeV/nucleon.

  12. Selected Experimental Highlights from Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at RHIC

    E-print Network

    Huan Z. Huang

    2006-08-29

    Nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC produce high temperature and high energy density matter which exhibits partonic degrees of freedom. We will discuss measurements of nuclear modification factors for light hadrons and non-photonic electrons from heavy quark decays, which reflect the flavor dependence of energy loss of high momentum partons traversing the dense QCD medium. The hadronization of bulk partonic matter exhibits collectivity in effective partonic degrees of freedom. Nuclear collisions at RHIC provide an intriguing environment, where many constituent quark ingredients are readily available for possible formation of exotic particles through quark coalescences or recombinations.

  13. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    E-print Network

    Yongying Jiang; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Werner Scheid

    2010-03-06

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions 40Ca+40Ca, 48Ca+208Pb and 126Sn+130Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for 40Ca+40Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depth of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of fusion barrier is also investigated. For heavy fusion system, the fusion pocket becomes shallow and almost disappears for symmetric systems and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  14. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yongying; Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-04-15

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 126}Sn+{sup 130}Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depths of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of the fusion barrier is also investigated. The fusion pocket becomes shallow for a heavy fusion system and almost disappears for heavy nearly symmetric systems, and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  15. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Yongying; Li, Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions 40Ca+40Ca, 48Ca+208Pb and 126Sn+130Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for 40Ca+40Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depth of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of fusion barrier is also investigated. For heavy fusion system, the fusion pocket becomes shallow and almost disappears for symmetric systems and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  16. Study of multiplicity correlations in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohery, M.; Sultan, E. M.; Baz, Shadiah S.

    2015-06-01

    In the present paper, some results on the correlations of the nucleus-nucleus interactions, at high energy, between different particle multiplicities are reported. The correlations between the multiplicities of the different charged particles emitted in the interactions of 22Ne and 28Si nuclei with emulsion at (4.1-4.5)A GeV/c have been studied. The correlations of the compound multiplicity nc, defined as the sum of both numbers of the shower particles ns and grey particles ng, have been investigated. The experimental data have been compared with the corresponding theoretical ones, calculated according to the modified cascade evaporation model (MCEM). An agreement has already been fairly obtained between the experimental values and the calculated ones. The dependence of the average compound multiplicity, on the numbers of shower, grey, black and heavy particles is obvious and the values of the slope have been found to be independent of the projectile nucleus. On the other hand, the variation of the average shower, grey, black and heavy particles is found to increase linearly with the compound particles. A strong correlation has been observed between the number of produced shower particles and the number of compound particles. Moreover, the value of the average compound multiplicity is found to increase with the increase of the projectile mass. Finally, an attempt has also been made to study the scaling of the compound multiplicity distribution showing that the compound multiplicity distribution is nearly consistent with the KNO scaling behavior.

  17. Strangeness production in light and intermediate size nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, M. I.; Greiner, W.; Rustamov, A.

    2014-04-01

    Within the statistical model, the net strangeness conservation and incomplete total strangeness equilibration lead to the suppression of strange particle multiplicities. Furthermore, suppression effects appear to be stronger in small systems. By treating the production of strangeness within the canonical ensemble formulation we developed a simple model which allows to predict the excitation function of K+/?+ ratio in nucleus-nucleus collisions. In doing so we assumed that different values of K+/?+, measured in p + p and Pb + Pb interactions at the same collision energy per nucleon, are driven by the finite size effects only. These predictions may serve as a baseline for experimental results from NA61/SHINE at the CERN SPS and the future CBM experiment at FAIR.

  18. Rheology and microstructure of magmatic emulsions - Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Daniel J.; Spera, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The rheological properties of a dilute mixture of melt plus vapor bubbles, referred to as emulsion, are investigated theoretically and in rheometric experiments on dilute viscous germanium dioxide emulsions at temperatures between 1100 and 1175 C and at 100 kPa pressure in a rotating rod rheometer at shear rates between 0.05/s and 7/s. The results indicate that the emulsions may be described by a power-law constitutive relation when observations cover a sufficient range of shear rates to resolve nonlinear flow.

  19. The Emulsion Scanning System of the OPERA experiment

    E-print Network

    Juget, F

    2010-01-01

    The OPERA experiment has for goal the direct detection of !? ! !! oscilla- tion, using an hybrid apparatus composed of electronic detectors and nuclear photographic emulsions. A charged particle crossing an emulsion layer ion- izes the medium along its path leaving a latent image which leads, after de- velopment, to a sequence of aligned grains. Nuclear emulsions are analyzed by means of optical microscopes to reconstruct the 3D particle tracks. The OPERA collaboration has developed a dedicated system to scan a large num- ber of emulsions (surface of about 1000 m2). The achieved resolution is "1 ?m and "1 mrad allowing to observe directly the short-lived " particles pro- duced in !!CC interactions.

  20. Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment /JACEE/. [high energy cosmic ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, R. W.; Hunter, S. D.; Jones, W. V.; Takahashi, Y.; Ogata, T.; Saito, T.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Wolter, W.; Parnell, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    The instrumentation and results of long duration balloon flights carried out jointly by U.S. and Japan researchers to examine high energy cosmic rays are reported. Basic detector geometries are 2.5 sq m sr with operation at altitudes with 3-4 g/sq cm pressure, with observations thus far of over 100 hr. Energies from 2-100 TeV are recorded for nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus interactions, and searches are made for new particle or interactions. The detector is an emulsion chamber which comprises doubly-coated nuclear emulsions on 800 micron thick methacryl substrates, X-ray films, etchable detectors, low density spacers, and lead sheets. Segmentation of the instrument into a primary charge module, a target section, a spacer section, and a lead-emulsion calorimeter allows accurate charge measurement for primary nuclei, reliable energy resolution, and a large geometrical factor for collecting high energy events. A primary Ca nucleus of 300 TeV has been observed.

  1. Nucleus-nucleus cross-sections and long-range correlations with a local supercritical pomeron

    E-print Network

    M. A. Braun

    2007-11-21

    Nucleus-nucleus scattering is studied in the local Reggeon Field Theory in the quasi-classical approximation with non-eikonal boundary conditions corresponding to the Glauber picture at low energies. Comparison with the commonly used eikonal boundary conditions shows that the new conditions make both the action and nucleus-nucleus total cross-sections lower by $3\\div 5$ %. They also substantially change the behaviour of the solutions of the equations of motion at low energies. Using expressions for the double inclusive cross-sections derived earlier in the Reggeon Field Theory \\cite{CM} long-range rapidity correlations are calculated for the RHIC and LHC energies.

  2. Computer program for parameterization of nucleus-nucleus electromagnetic dissociation cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Badavi, Forooz F.

    1988-01-01

    A computer subroutine parameterization of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented that is suitable for implementation in a heavy ion transport code. The only inputs required are the projectile kinetic energy and the projectile and target charge and mass numbers.

  3. Influence of finite baryon density on hadronization in nucleus-nucleus collisions via recombination

    E-print Network

    C. B. Yang; H. Zheng

    2007-08-14

    In this paper is investigated the influence of net baryon density on baryon and meson yields in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions, based on the recombination model for hadronization. Unitarity condition is used as a constraint on the model. Three cases with different assumptions on the expansion of partonic system are considered and the baryon to meson ratio is calculated for those situations.

  4. High density QCD and nucleus-nucleus scattering deeply in the saturation region

    E-print Network

    Andrey Kormilitzin; Eugene Levin; Jeremy S. Miller

    2011-07-04

    In this paper we solve the equations that describe nucleus nucleus scattering, in high density QCD,in the framework of the BFKL Pomeron calculus. We found that (i) the contribution of short distances to the opacity for nucleus-nucleus scattering dies at high energies, (ii) the opacity tends to unity at high energy, and (iii) the main contribution that survives comes from soft (long distance) processes for large values of the impact parameter. The corrections to the opacity $\\Omega\\Lb Y,b\\Rb = 1$ were calculated and it turns out that they have a completely different form, namely($1 - \\Omega \\to \\exp\\Lb - Const\\,\\sqrt{Y}\\Rb$) than the opacity that stems from the Balisky-Kovchegov equation, which is($1 - \\Omega \\to \\exp\\Lb - Const\\,Y^2\\Rb$). We reproduce the formula for the nucleus-nucleus cross section that is commonly used in the description of nucleus-nucleus scattering, and there is no reason why it should be correct in the Glauber-Gribov approach

  5. Onset of Deconfinement in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions - Past, Present and Future -

    E-print Network

    Marek Gazdzicki

    2007-12-18

    In 2007 Mark I. Gorenstein celebrated his 60th birthday. This report is dedicated to Mark and it sketches the results obtained during the past ten years of our collaboration and friendship. They concern search for and study of the onset of deconfinement in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  6. Toward describing one-nucleon exchange in nucleus-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fadeev, S. N. Gridnev, K. A.

    2010-12-15

    The effect of one-nucleon exchanges on the potential of nucleus-nucleus interaction is considered on the basis of the resonating-group method. Corrections to the folding-model potential are obtained in the semiclassical approximation. Neutron scattering on {sup 4}He nuclei is considered as a model example.

  7. A simple evolution equation for rapidity distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    J. Dias de Deus; J. G. Milhano

    2007-10-24

    We explore the relationship between the Glasma framework and the String Percolation Model by introducing a simple model for the rapidity distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The model is solved for both symmetrical and asymmetrical collisions. The phenomenon of limiting fragmentation is briefly discussed.

  8. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of Nuclear Science and Technologies 6. Nuclear Reactions and Structure of Unstable Nuclei 7. Equation of State of Neutron-Rich Nuclear Matter, Clusters in Nuclei and Nuclear Reactions 8. Fusion and Fission 9. Nuclear Astrophysics 10. New Facilities and Detectors We would like to thank Texas A&M University and Texas A&M University-Commerce for their organizational support and for providing financial support for many students and postdocs and those who had special need. This support helped assure the success of NN2012. Special thanks also go to all members of the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee (listed below) for their great work in advising upon, preparing and executing the NN2012 scientific program as well as the social events that all together made the NN2012 an enjoyable experience for both the participants and their companions. NN2012 International Advisory Committee N Auerbach (Israel) J Aysto (Finland) C Beck (France) S Cherubini (Italy) L Ferreira (Portugal) C Gagliardi (USA) S Gales (France) C Gale (Canada) W Gelletly (Great Britain) Paulo R S Gomes (Brazil) W Greiner (Germany) W Henning (USA) D Hinde (Australia) S Hofmann (Germany) M Hussein (Brazil) B Jacak (USA) S Kailas (India) W G Lynch (USA) Z Majka (Poland) L McLerran (USA) V Metag (Germany) K Morita (Japan) B Mueller (USA) D G Mueller (France) T Motobayashi (Japan) W Nazarewicz (USA) Y Oganessian (Russia) J Nolen (USA) E K Rehm (USA) N Rowley (France) B Sherrill (USA) J Schukraft (Switzerland) W Q Shen (China) A Stefanini (Italy) H Stoecker (Germany) A Szanto de Toledo (Brazil) U van Kolck (USA) W von Oertzen (Germany) M Wiescher (USA) N Xu (USA) N V Zamfir (Romania) W L Zhan (China) H Q Zhang (China) NN2012 Local Organizing Committee Marina Barbui Carlos Bertulani Robert Burch Jr Cheri Davis Cody Folden Kris Hagel John Hardy Bao-An Li (Co-Chair and Scientific Secretary) Joseph Natowitz (Co-Chair) Ralf Rapp Livius Trache Sherry Yennello Editors of NN2012 Proceedings Bao-An Li (Texas A&M University-Commerce) and Joseph Natowitz (Texas A&M Unive

  9. Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix K: Experiment S009 nuclear emulsion (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A series of analyses are presented for Experiment S009, nuclear emulsion (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and postflight conditions. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are included in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

  10. Nonequilibrium distribution functions of nucleons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    D. Anchishkin; V. Naboka; J. Cleymans

    2013-03-25

    The collision smearing of the nucleon momenta about their initial values during relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is investigated. To a certain degree, our model belongs to the transport type, and we investigate the evolution of the nucleon system created at a nucleus-nucleus collision. However, we parameterize this development by the number of collisions of every particle during evolution rather than by the time variable. It is assumed that the group of nucleons which leave the system after the same number of collisions can be joined in a particular statistical ensemble. The nucleon nonequilibrium distribution functions, which depend on a certain number of collisions of a nucleon before freeze-out, are derived.

  11. Classical Gluon Production Amplitude for Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions: First Saturation Correction in the Projectile

    E-print Network

    Giovanni A. Chirilli; Yuri V. Kovchegov; Douglas E. Wertepny

    2015-01-13

    We calculate the classical single-gluon production amplitude in nucleus-nucleus collisions including the first saturation correction in one of the nuclei (the projectile) while keeping multiple-rescattering (saturation) corrections to all orders in the other nucleus (the target). In our approximation only two nucleons interact in the projectile nucleus: the single-gluon production amplitude we calculate is order-g^3 and is leading-order in the atomic number of the projectile, while resumming all order-one saturation corrections in the target nucleus. Our result is the first step towards obtaining an analytic expression for the first projectile saturation correction to the gluon production cross section in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  12. Sensitivity of Cross Sections for Elastic Nucleus-Nucleus Scattering to Halo Nucleus Density Distributions

    E-print Network

    G. D. Alkhazov; V. V. Sarantsev

    2011-07-04

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions of exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the $^6$He and $^{11}$Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in $^6$He and $^{11}$Li.

  13. Sensitivity of cross sections for elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering to halo nucleus density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V.

    2012-12-15

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li.

  14. Full and Partial Thermalization of Nucleons in Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    E-print Network

    D. Anchishkin; A. Muskeyev; S. Yezhov

    2009-02-06

    We propose a mechanism of thermalization of nucleons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Our model belongs, to a certain degree, to the transport ones; we consider the evolution of the system, but we parametrize this development by the number of collisions of every particle in the system rather than by the time variable. We based on the assumption that the nucleon momentum transfer after several nucleon-nucleon (-hadron) collisions becomes a random quantity driven by a proper distribution.

  15. Effect of the Pauli exclusion principle on the potential of nucleus-nucleus interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, V. Yu. Nesterov, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    The dependence of the potentials of nucleus-nucleus interaction on taking into account the antisymmetrization of nucleons and the contribution of the nucleon kinetic energy to the potential is studied within approaches based on the energy-density functional, double-folding model, and the two-center shell model. It is shown that the contribution of the nucleon kinetic energy in colliding nuclei leads to the appearance of a significant core at short distances between the nuclei involved.

  16. Possible detection of quantum-mechanical interferences between gravitational forces and nucleus-nucleus Coulomb forces

    SciTech Connect

    da Silveira, R.; Leclercq-Willain, C.

    1997-02-01

    We report on possible effects of quantum-mechanical interferences between gravitational forces and the nucleus-nucleus Coulomb interaction. We show that, although very small, these effects could be measured on using low-energy scattering between identical heavy nuclei. For the system {sup 208}Pb+{sup 208}Pb(E{sub L}=5MeV). The angular precision needed would be about 0.001{degree}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Multiplicity Fluctuations in Proton-Proton and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    E-print Network

    V. P. Konchakovski; M. I. Gorenstein; E. L. Bratkovskaya

    2007-05-24

    We study the scaled variances of multiplicity fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus collisions at SPS and RHIC energies within the HSD transport model. The HSD results are compared with proton-proton data and with predictions of the hadron-resonance gas statistical model. We find that the HSD scaled variances $\\omega_i$ for negatively, positively, and all charged hadrons in central nucleus-nucleus collisions remain close to the $\\omega_i$ values in proton-proton collisions and increase with collision energy as the corresponding multiplicities per participating nucleon. The statistical model predicts very different behavior of $\\omega_i$. However, a comparison with preliminary NA49 data for the most central Pb+Pb collisions at SPS energies does not permit to distinguish the HSD and statistical model results. New measurements of the multiplicity fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus collisions in a wide energy region with large acceptance are needed to allow for a proper determination of the underlying dynamics.

  18. Nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections, and the nuclear interaction radius

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Ibrahim, Badawy

    2011-04-15

    We study the nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections for stable nuclei, in the energy region from 30A MeV to about 1A GeV, and find them to be in proportion to ({radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 1}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 1}{sup 2/3})+{radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 2}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 2}{sup 2/3})) {sup 2} in the mass range 8 to 100. Also, we find a parameter-free relation that enables us to predict a total reaction cross section for any nucleus-nucleus within 10% uncertainty at most, using the experimental value of the total reaction cross section of a given nucleus-nucleus. The power of the relation is demonstrated by several examples. The energy dependence of the nuclear interaction radius is deduced; it is found to be almost constant in the energy range from about 200A MeV to about 1A GeV; in this energy range and for nuclei with N=Z, R{sub I}(A)=(1.14{+-}0.02)A{sup 1/3} fm.

  19. $?$-scaling and Information Entropy in Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    E-print Network

    G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; K. Wang; B. H. Sa; W. Q. Shen; H. Z. Huang; X. Z. Cai; H. Y. Zhang; Z. H. Lu; C. Zhong; J. G. Chen; Y. B. Wei; X. F. Zhou

    2003-06-09

    The $\\Delta$-scaling method has been applied to ultra-relativistic p+p, C+C and Pb+Pb collision data simulated using a high energy Monte Carlo package, LUCIAE 3.0. The $\\Delta$-scaling is found to be valid for some physical variables, such as charged particle multiplicity, strange particle multiplicity and number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions from these simulated nucleus-nucleus collisions over an extended energy ranging from $E_{lab}$ = 20 to 200 A GeV. In addition we derived information entropy from the multiplicity distribution as a function of beam energy for these collisions.

  20. Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

  1. $?'/?$ ratio in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions : a Measure for the Chiral Symmetry Restoration Temperature ?

    E-print Network

    Heinz Sorge; Edward Shuryak; Ismail Zahed

    1997-05-15

    We argue that a decrease of the chiral scalar meson mass is responsible for re-creation of $\\Psi'$ from $J/\\Psi$ in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. This causes the charmonium yields to freeze out at temperatures close to the chiral symmetry restoration temperature $T_c$. As a result $\\Psi'/\\Psi$ may serve as a thermometer for $T_c$ itself. Results in a detailed reaction model support the conjecture. They show good agreement with recent data of NA38 and NA50 for $J/\\Psi$ and $\\Psi'$ production in S on U and Pb on Pb collisions.

  2. Analysis of nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies and Random Matrix Theory

    E-print Network

    R. G. Nazmitdinov; E. I. Shahaliev; M. K. Suleymanov; S. Tomsovic

    2009-05-07

    We propose a novel statistical approach to the analysis of experimental data obtained in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies which borrows from methods developed within the context of Random Matrix Theory. It is applied to the detection of correlations in momentum distributions of emitted particles. We find good agreement between the results obtained in this way and a standard analysis based on the method of effective mass spectra and two-pair correlation function often used in high energy physics. The method introduced here is free from unwanted background contributions.

  3. Nucleus-nucleus potential, energy dissipation and mass dispersion in fusion and transfer reactions

    E-print Network

    Kouhei Washiyama; Denis Lacroix; Sakir Ayik

    2009-10-12

    The nucleus-nucleus potential and energy dissipation in fusion reactions are obtained from microscopic mean-field dynamics. The deduced potentials nicely reproduce the one extracted from experimental data. Energy dissipation shows a universal behaviour between different reactions. Also, the dispersion of mass distribution in transfer reaction is investigated in a stochastic mean-field dynamics. By including initial fluctuations in collective space, the description of the dispersion is much improved compared to that of mean field only. The result is consistent with the macroscopic phenomenological analysis of the experimental data.

  4. The effect of the relative nuclear size on the nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erofeeva, I. N.; Murzin, V. S.; Sivoklokov, S. Y.; Smirnova, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental data on the interactions of light nuclei (d, He(4), C(12)) at the momentum 4.2 GeV/cA with the carbon nuclei were taken in the 2-m propane bubble chamber. The distributions in the number of interacting nucleons, the spectra of protons, the mean energies of secondary pions and protons, the mean fractions of energy transferred to the pion and nucleon components are presented. The results of the investigation of the mechanism of nucleus-nucleus interactions can be used to calculate the nuclear cascades in the atmosphere.

  5. Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

  6. Jet tomography of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions at next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Vitev, Ivan; Zhang, Ben - Wei

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that jet observables are highly sensitive to the characteristics of the vacuum and the in-medium QCD parton showers and propose techniques that exploit this sensitivity to constrain the mechanism of quark and gluon energy loss in strongly-interacting plasmas. As a first example, we calculate the inclusive jet cross section in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions to {Omicron}({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}). Theoretical predictions for the medium-induced jet broadening and the suppression of the jet production rate due to cold and hot nuclear matter effects in Au+Au and Cu+Cu reactions at RHIC are presented.

  7. Investigation of high p$_{t}$ events in Nucleus-Nucleus collisions using the Hijing event generator

    E-print Network

    Natasha Sharma; Madan M. Aggarwal

    2009-10-29

    In recent years lot of interest has been observed in the nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC energies in phenomena related to high $p_{t}$ physics \\cite{ref1}. The suppression of high $p_{t}$ particles and disappearance of back-to-back jets compared to the scaling with number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions indicates that a nearly perfect liquid is produced in these collisions. Results on self shadowing of high $p_{t}$ events are presented using hadron multiplicity associated to high $p_{t}$ and unbiased events in nucleus-nucleus collisions \\cite{ref2} obtained from the hijing event generator.

  8. The OPERA film: New nuclear emulsion for large-scale, high-precision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Taku; Ariga, A.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, Takako; Fukuda, Tutomu; Fujioka, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hamada, K.; Hayashi, H.; Hiramatsu, S.; Hoshino, K.; Kawada, J.; Koike, N.; Komatsu, M.; Matsuoka, H.; Miyamoto, S.; Miyanishi, K.; Miyanishi, M.; Morishima, K.; Nada, H.; Naganawa, N.; Nakano, T.; Narita, K.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Nonaka, N.; Park, B. D.; Sato, O.; Takahashi, S.; Toshito, T.; Uetake, T.; Nakamura, M.; Kuwabara, K.; Nishiyama, S.; Nonoyama, Y.; Kodama, K.

    2006-01-01

    Industrial mass production of nuclear emulsion film has been realized by the introduction of new photographic technologies. In addition, emulsion-refreshing capability (erasing unwanted tracks before its use) was implemented by controlling the fading characteristics of the gel. The gel properties were optimized in order to satisfy this requirement; rapid track erasing at the erasing condition and minimum fading during the running of experiments. Emulsion films with this capability are crucial for large-scale applications like the long base-line neutrino experiment, OPERA, which intend to detect Tau neutrino appearance at 732 km from the beam source.

  9. Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at Low Energies. The Effects from Non Vacuum Exchange

    E-print Network

    N. V. Radchenko; A. V. Dmitriev

    2010-10-25

    Experimental data on total and differential elastic cross sections for $p+p(\\bar{p})$, $n+p(\\bar{p})$, $K^\\pm+p$, $K^\\pm+n$, $\\pi^\\pm+p$ starting from energy 3.5 GeV in CMS are used to determine parameters of vacuum contribution and parameters of basic non vacuum reggeons: $f$, $\\omega$, $\\rho$ and $A_2$. It is argued that non vacuum contributions to proton-proton and proton-neutron collisions correspond to spectrum in which baryon number is moved from the fragmentation region to central region in rapidity space. In this case it is possible that chemical potential is increased in central region of spectrum of nucleus-nucleus interaction at low energies. This effect might be important for facilities FAIR and NICA.

  10. Nuclear Radii Calculations in Various Theoretical Approaches for Nucleus-Nucleus Interactions

    E-print Network

    C. Merino; I. S. Novikov; Yu. M. Shabelski

    2009-07-10

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend rather strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R_{rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A = 12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of Glauber Theory. We present several examples of R_{rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  11. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  12. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-01

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (Rrms) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of Rrms radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  13. The Nuclear Emulsion Technology and the Analysis of the OPERA Experiment Data

    E-print Network

    Tsutomu Fukuda

    2009-10-17

    OPERA is an experiment that aims at detecting the appearance of tau-neutrino in an almost pure mu-neutrino beam (the CNGS neutrino beam) through oscillation. OPERA is a hybrid detector that associates nuclear emulsions to electronic detectors. The nuclear emulsion provides the resolution necessary to detect tau-neutrino CC interactions. The first physics run started in July and ended in November 2008. In this presentation, the status of the emulsion technology and of the analysis of its data is reported.

  14. Recent results on (anti)nucleus and (anti)hyperon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN SPS energies

    E-print Network

    G. L. Melkumov; for the NA49 collaboration

    2007-09-19

    The NA49 experiment has collected comprehensive data on particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions over the whole SPS beam energies range, the critical energy domain where the expected phase transition to a deconfined phase is expected to occur. The latest results from Pb+Pb collisions between 20$A$ GeV and 158$A$ GeV on baryon stopping and light nuclei production as well as those for strange hyperons are presented. The measured data on $p$, $\\bar{p}$, $\\Lambda$, $\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $\\Xi^-$ and $\\bar{\\Xi}^+$ production were used to evaluate the rapidity distributions of net-baryons at SPS energies and to compare with the results from the AGS and the RHIC for central Pb+Pb (Au+Au) collisions. The dependence of the yield ratios and the inverse slope parameter of the $m_t$ spectra on the collision energy and centrality, and the mass number of the produced nuclei $^3He$, $t$, $d$ and $\\bar{d}$ are discussed within coalescence and statistical approaches. Analysis of the total multiplicity exhibits remarkable agreement between the measured yield for $^3He$ and those predicted by the statistical hadronization model. In addition, new results on $\\Lambda$ and $\\bar{\\Lambda}$ as well as $\\Xi^-$ production in minimum bias Pb+Pb reactions at 40$A$ GeV and 158$A$ GeV and central C+C, Si+Si and Pb+Pb collisions are presented. The system size dependence of the yields of these hyperons was analysed to determine the evolution of strangeness enhancement relative to elementary p+p collisions.

  15. Double hypernuclei experiment with hybrid emulsion method (J-PARC E07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekawa, Hiroyuki; J-APRC E07 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Double hypernuclei are important probes to study the system with strangeness -2. In order to search for double hypernuclei, an upgrade experiment is planned at J-PARC K1.8 beam line. In the experiment, the KURAMA spectrometer system will detect ?- production in the (K- ,K+) reaction on a diamond target. SSDs located the upstream and the downstream of emulsion plates will record ?- tracks which flight toward emulsion plates precisely. Tracks in SSDs and emulsion will be automatically connected by a hybrid method. Discoveries of more than 10 new double hypernuclear species are expected, which enable us to discuss binding energy in terms of mass number dependence. On the other hand, we will also observe X rays from ?- atoms with a Germanium detector array installed close to the emulsion by tagging ?-stopped events. This will be the first measurement in the world and give information on the ?-potential shape at the nuclear surface region. Emulsion production has been completely done and a test experiment for some detectors of KURAMA spectrometer was carried out. In this talk, physics motivation and current status of the J-PARC E07 experiment will be reported.

  16. EOS: A time projection chamber for the study of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, H.G.; Odyniec, G.; Rai, G.; Seidl, P.

    1986-12-01

    The conceptual design is presented for a detector to identify and measure (..delta..p/p approx. = 1%) most of the 200 or so mid-rapidity charged particles (p, d, t, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, ..pi../sup + -/, K/sup + -/) produced in each central nucleus-nucleus collision (Au + Au) at Bevalac energies, as well as K/sub 3//sup 0/ and ..lambda../sup 0/. The beam particles and heavy spectator fragments are excluded from the detection volume by means of a central vacuum pipe. Particle identification is achieved by a combination of dE/dx measurements in the TPC, and of time-of-flight measurements in a scintillator array. The TPC is single-ended and its end cap is entirely covered with cathode pads (about 25,000 pads and about 1000 anode wires). A non-uniform pad distribution is proposed to accommodate the high multiplicity of particles emitted at forward angles. The performance of the detector is assessed with regard to multihit capability, tracking, momentum resolution, particle identification, ..lambda../sup 0/ reconstruction, space charge effects, field non-uniformity, dynamic range, data acquisition rate, and data analysis rate. 72 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Statistical analysis of secondary particle distributions in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The use is described of several statistical techniques to characterize structure in the angular distributions of secondary particles from nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 24 to 61 GeV/nucleon. The objective of this work was to determine whether there are correlations between emitted particle intensity and angle that may be used to support the existence of the quark gluon plasma. The techniques include chi-square null hypothesis tests, the method of discrete Fourier transform analysis, and fluctuation analysis. We have also used the method of composite unit vectors to test for azimuthal asymmetry in a data set of 63 JACEE-3 events. Each method is presented in a manner that provides the reader with some practical detail regarding its application. Of those events with relatively high statistics, Fe approaches 0 at 55 GeV/nucleon was found to possess an azimuthal distribution with a highly non-random structure. No evidence of non-statistical fluctuations was found in the pseudo-rapidity distributions of the events studied. It is seen that the most effective application of these methods relies upon the availability of many events or single events that possess very high multiplicities.

  18. Chemical equilibrium study in nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becattini, F.; Ga?dzicki, M.; Keränen, A.; Manninen, J.; Stock, R.

    2004-02-01

    We present a detailed study of chemical freeze-out in nucleus-nucleus collisions at beam energies of 11.6A , 30A , 40A , 80A , and 158A GeV . By analyzing hadronic multiplicities within the statistical hadronization approach, we have studied the strangeness production as a function of center-of-mass energy and of the parameters of the source. We have tested and compared different versions of the statistical model, with special emphasis on possible explanations of the observed strangeness hadronic phase space undersaturation. We show that, in this energy range, the use of hadron yields at midrapidity instead of in full phase space artificially enhances strangeness production and could lead to incorrect conclusions as far as the occurrence of full chemical equilibrium is concerned. In addition to the basic model with an extra strange quark nonequilibrium parameter, we have tested three more schemes: a two-component model superimposing hadrons coming out of single nucleon-nucleon interactions to those emerging from large fireballs at equilibrium, a model with local strangeness neutrality and a model with strange and light quark nonequilibrium parameters. The behavior of the source parameters as a function of colliding system and collision energy is studied. The description of strangeness production entails a nonmonotonic energy dependence of strangeness saturation parameter ?S with a maximum around 30A GeV . We also present predictions of the production rates of still unmeasured hadrons including the newly discovered ?+ (1540) pentaquark baryon.

  19. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

  20. Coherent production of the long-lived pionium nP states in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    S Gevokyan; O Voskresenskaya

    2015-11-10

    The coherent production of the $nP$ states of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atoms ($A_{2\\pi}$) in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered as a possible source of the $A_{2\\pi}(nP)$ beam for the pionium Lamb-shift measurement. A general expression for estimation of the $A_{2\\pi}(nP)$ yields is derived in the framework of the equivalent photon approximation.

  1. Coherent production of the long-lived pionium nP states in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    Gevokyan, S

    2015-01-01

    The coherent production of the $nP$ states of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atoms ($A_{2\\pi}$) in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered as a possible source of the $A_{2\\pi}(nP)$ beam for the pionium Lamb-shift measurement. A general expression for estimation of the $A_{2\\pi}(nP)$ yields is derived in the framework of the equivalent photon approximation.

  2. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  3. JACEE long duration balloon flights. [Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T.; Iwai, J.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J.; Fountain, W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Jones, W. V.

    1989-01-01

    JACEE balloon-borne emulsion chamber detectors are used to observe the spectra and interactions of cosmic ray protons and nuclei in the energy range 1 to 100A TeV. Experiments with long duration mid-latitude balloon flights and characteristics of the detector system that make it ideal for planned Antarctic balloon flights are discussed.

  4. Central exclusive diffractive Higgs boson production in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    E-print Network

    E. Levin; J. Miller

    2008-01-23

    In this paper, it is shown that in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions, the main source for central exclusive diffractive Higgs production is photon-photon fusion. At the LHC energy, the total cross section for this process is about 0.6 pb (for proton-gold scattering), and 3.9 nb (for gold-gold collision) while the gluon-gluon fusion leads to the value of the cross section for CED Higgs production which is about 0.1 nb and 3.9 pb respectively.

  5. GRAINE project: The first balloon-borne, emulsion gamma-ray telescope experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Aoki, Shigeki; Kamada, Keiki; Mizutani, Saki; Nakagawa, Ryo; Ozaki, Keita; Rokujo, Hiroki

    2015-04-01

    The GRAINE project (Gamma-Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion) has been developed for the observation of cosmic ?-rays in the energy range 10 MeV-100 GeV with a precise (0.08°} at 1-2 GeV), polarization-sensitive, large-aperture-area (˜10 m^2) emulsion telescope by repeated long-duration balloon flights. In 2011, the first balloon-borne experiment was successfully performed with a 12.5 × 10cm^2 aperture area and 4.6 hour flight duration for a feasibility and performance test. Systematic detection, energy reconstruction, and timestamping of ?-ray events were performed across the whole area of the emulsion film, up to 45° incident zenith angle, down to 50 MeV ?-ray energy, with 97% detection reliability, 0.2 sec timestamp accuracy, and 98% timestamp reliability. A ?-ray data checking and calibration method was created using the ?-rays produced in the converter. We measured the atmospheric ?-ray flux in the energy range 50-300 MeV and obtained a first understanding of the cosmic ?-ray background. By combining the attitude data, we established a procedure for determining the ?-ray arrival direction in celestial coordinates. The first flight of the balloon-borne emulsion telescope confirmed its potential as a high-performance cosmic ?-ray detector.

  6. QCD motivated approach to soft interactions at high energies: nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    E. Gotsman; A. Kormilitzin; E. Levin; U. Maor

    2009-12-23

    In this paper we consider nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus reactions in the kinematic region: $g A^{1/3} G_{3\\pom} \\exp\\Lb \\Delta Y\\Rb \\approx 1 G^2_{3\\pom} \\exp\\Lb \\Delta Y\\Rb \\approx 1 $, where $G_{3\\pom}$ is the triple Pomeron coupling, $g$ is the vertex of Pomeron nucleon interaction, and 1 + $\\Delta_{\\pom}$ denotes the Pomeron intercept. We find that in this kinematic region the traditional Glauber-Gribov eikonal approach is inadequate. We show that it is necesssary to take into account inelastic Glauber corrections, which can not be expressed in terms of the nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitudes. In the wide range of energies where $\\alpha'_\\pom Y \\ll R^2_A$,the scattering amplitude for the nucleus-nucleus interaction, does not depend on the details of the nucleon-nucleon interaction at high energy. In the formalism we present, the only (correlated) parameters that are required to describe the data are $\\Delta_{\\pom}$, $G_{3\\pom}$ and $g$. These parameters were taken from our description of the nucleon-nucleon data at high energies \\cite{GLMM}.The predicted nucleus modification factor is compared with RHIC Au-Au data at $W = 200 GeV.$ Estimates for LHC energies are presented and discusssed.

  7. Japan - USSR joint emulsion chamber experiment at Pamir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The results are presented for the systematic measurement of cosmic ray showers in the first carbon chamber of Japan-USSR joint experiment at Pamir Plateau. The intensity and the energy distribution of electromagnetic particles, of hadrons and of families are in good agreement with the results of other mountain experiment if the relative error in energy estimation is taken into consideration.

  8. The characteristics of particles emitted in energetic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, H. B.; Freier, P. S.; Waddington, C. J.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis of the interactions of heavy cosmic ray nuclei in nuclear emulsion exposed over Texas is continued, with 500 interactions of nuclei of E greater than 1.5 GeV/nucleon added. In this paper the experimental data correlating meson production with fragmentation of the projectile and target nuclei are given. These data, combined with earlier results, are also used to reexamine the problem of the mean free path of secondary fragments. Using the same techniques of analysis used for the accelerator ions, evidence is found for anomalously short mean free paths of secondary fragments in the first centimeter after production.

  9. Kinematical analysis with the Emulsion Cloud Chamber in the OPERA experiment

    E-print Network

    Di Capua, F

    2010-01-01

    The OPERA experiment aims at measuring for the first time neutrino oscil- lation in appearance mode through the detection of ni-tau in an almost pure ni? beam produced at CERN SPS (CNGS), 730 km far from the detector. The ni-tau appearance signal is identified through the measurement of the decay daughter particles of the " lepton produced in CC ni-tau interactions. Since the short-lived " particle has, at the energy of the beam, an average decay length shorter than a 1 mm, a micrometric detection resolution is needed. The OPERA appara- tus is hybrid, using nuclear emulsion as high precision tracker and electronic detectors for the time stamp, event localization in the target and muon recon- struction. The Emulsion Cloud Chamber technique fulfils the requirement of a microscopic resolution together with a large target mass. The kinematical analysis allowed by this technique is described.

  10. Recent Emulsion Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ariga, A.

    2011-10-06

    Emulsion technologies are very much developed in the last decade and still developing in both the emulsion gel and the data taking. Emulsion detectors are suitable for the neutrino experiments because they can distinguish all 3 flavors of neutrino. The OPERA experiment, a recent pillar in the emulsion experiments aiming at the first observation of the neutrino oscillation in CNGS beam in appearance mode, is running, showing the good capability to separate 3 flavor neutrino interactions. In this poster, the recent developments and prospects of the emulsions for the next generation experiments are reported.

  11. Longitudinal boost-invariance of charge balance function in hadron-hadron and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    Na LI Zhiming LI Yuanfang WU

    2009-10-10

    Using Monte Carlo generators of the PYTHIA model for hadron-hadron collisions and a multi-phase transport (AMPT) model for nucleus-nucleus collisions, the longitudinal boost-invariance of charge balance function and its transverse momentum dependence are carefully studied. It shows that the charge balance function is boost-invariant in both {\\it p}+{\\it p} and Au+Au collisions in these two models, consistent with experimental data. The balance function properly scaled by the width of the pseudorapidity window is independent of the position or the size of the window and is corresponding to the balance function of the whole pseudorapidity range. This longitudinal property of balance function also holds for particles in small transverse momentum ranges in the PYTHIA and the AMPT default models, but is violated in the AMPT with string melting. The physical origin of the results are discussed.

  12. Dielectron Cross Section Measurements in Nucleus-Nucleus Reactions at 1.0{ital A} GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, R.J.; Bossingham, R.; Gong, W.G.; Heilbronn, L.; Huang, H.Z.; Krebs, G.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Matis, H.S.; Miller, J.; Naudet, C.; Roche, G.; Schroeder, L.S.; Seidl, P.; Wilson, W.K.; Yegneswaran, A.; Beedoe, S.; Carroll, J.; Huang, H.Z.; Igo, G.; Bougteb, M.; Manso, F.; Prunet, M.; Roche, G.; Kirk, P.; Wang, Z.F.; Wilson, W.K.

    1997-08-01

    We present measured dielectron production cross sections for Ca+Ca, C+C, He+Ca, and d+Ca reactions at 1.0 A GeV . Statistical uncertainties and systematic effects are smaller than in previous dilepton spectrometer (DLS) nucleus-nucleus data. For pair mass M{le}0.35 GeV/c{sup 2} we obtain (1) the Ca+Ca cross section is larger than the previous DLS measurement and current model results, (2) the mass spectra suggest large contributions from {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} Dalitz decays, and (3) d{sigma}/dM{proportional_to}A{sub P}A{sub T}. For M{gt}0.5 GeV/c{sup 2} the Ca+Ca to C+C cross section ratio is significantly larger than the ratio of A{sub P}A{sub T} values. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Production of Kaon and $\\Lambda$ in nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultra-relativistic energy from a blast wave model

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Song; Chen, Jin-Hui; Zhong, Chen

    2014-01-01

    The particle production of Kaon and $\\Lambda$ are studied in nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energy based on a chemical equilibrium blast-wave model. The transverse momentum spectra of Kaon and $\\Lambda$ at the kinetic freeze-out stage from our model are in good agreement with the experimental results. The kinetic freeze-out parameters of temperature ($T_{kin}$) and radial flow parameter $\\rho_{0}$ are presented for the FOPI, RHIC and LHC energies. And the resonance decay effect is also discussed. The systematic study for beam energy dependence of the strangeness particle production will help us to better understand the properties of the matter created in heavy-ion collisions at the kinetic freeze-out stage.

  14. Production of Kaon and $?$ in nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultra-relativistic energy from a blast wave model

    E-print Network

    Song Zhang; Yu-Gang Ma; Jin-Hui Chen; Chen Zhong

    2014-11-06

    The particle production of Kaon and $\\Lambda$ are studied in nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energy based on a chemical equilibrium blast-wave model. The transverse momentum spectra of Kaon and $\\Lambda$ at the kinetic freeze-out stage from our model are in good agreement with the experimental results. The kinetic freeze-out parameters of temperature ($T_{kin}$) and radial flow parameter $\\rho_{0}$ are presented for the FOPI, RHIC and LHC energies. And the resonance decay effect is also discussed. The systematic study for beam energy dependence of the strangeness particle production will help us to better understand the properties of the matter created in heavy-ion collisions at the kinetic freeze-out stage.

  15. Formation of dense partonic matter in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC: Experimental evaluation by the PHENIX collaboration

    E-print Network

    Adcox, K; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S V; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Yu A; Botelho, S S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N L; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V A; Bunce, G M; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S K; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Chenawi, K F; Enyo, H; Esumi, S C; Ewell, L A; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Zeev; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Sen-Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R S; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B A; Khanzadeev, A V; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Bösing, C; Klinksiek, S A; Kochenda, L M; Kochetkov, D; Kochetkov, V; Köhler, D; Kohama, T; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R A; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu Zu Ping; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J R; Makdisi, Y I; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A M; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P O; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V A; Oskarsson, A; Österman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, Thomas; Petridis, A; Pinkenburg, C H; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M E; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R K; Shea, T K; Shein, I V; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiryak, Yu; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sørensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H A; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E A; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2004-01-01

    Extensive experimental data from high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions were recorded using the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The comprehensive set of measurements from the first three years of RHIC operation includes charged particle multiplicities, transverse energy, yield ratios and spectra of identified hadrons in a wide range of transverse momenta (p_T), elliptic flow, two-particle correlations, non-statistical fluctuations, and suppression of particle production at high p_T. The results are examined with an emphasis on implications for the formation of a new state of dense matter. We find that the state of matter created at RHIC cannot be described in terms of ordinary color neutral hadrons.

  16. Hadron multiplicities and chemical freeze-out conditions in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    Vovchenko, V; Gorenstein, M I

    2015-01-01

    New results of the NA61/SHINE Collaboration at the CERN SPS on mean hadron multiplicities in proton-proton (p+p) interactions are analyzed within the transport models and the hadron resonance gas (HRG) statistical model. The chemical freeze-out parameters in p+p interactions and central Pb+Pb (or Au+Au) collisions are found and compared with each other in the range of the center of mass energy of the nucleon pair $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=3.2-17.3$~GeV. The canonical ensemble formulation of the HRG model is used to describe mean hadron multiplicities in p+p interactions and the grand canonical ensemble in central Pb+Pb and Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperatures in p+p interactions are found to be larger than the corresponding temperatures in central nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  17. Systematic study of rapidity dispersion parameter in high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Swarnapratim; Haiduc, Maria; Neagu, Alina Tania; Firu, Elena

    2014-03-01

    A systematic study of rapidity dispersion parameter as a quantitative measure of clustering of particles has been carried out in the interactions of 16O, 28Si and 32S projectiles at 4.5 A GeV/c with heavy (AgBr) and light (CNO) groups of targets present in the nuclear emulsion. For all the interactions, the total ensemble of events has been divided into four overlapping multiplicity classes depending on the number of shower particles. For all the interactions and for each multiplicity class, the rapidity dispersion parameter values indicate the occurrence of clusterization during the multiparticle production at Dubna energy. The measured rapidity dispersion parameter values are found to decrease with the increase of average multiplicity for all the interactions. The dependence of rapidity dispersion parameter on the average multiplicity can be successfully described by a relation D(?) = a + b + c2. The experimental results have been compared with the results obtained from the analysis of Monte Carlo simulated (MC-RAND) events. MC-RAND events show weaker clusterization among the pions in comparison to the experimental data.

  18. Forward-backward emission of target evaporated fragments in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Ma, Tian-Li; Zhang, Dong-Hai

    2015-10-01

    The multiplicity distribution, multiplicity moment, scaled variance, entropy and reduced entropy of target evaporated fragments emitted in forward and backward hemispheres in 12 A GeV 4He, 3.7 A GeV 16O, 60 A GeV 16O, 1.7 A GeV 84Kr and 10.7 A GeV 197Au -induced emulsion heavy target (AgBr) interactions are investigated. It is found that the multiplicity distribution of target evaporated fragments emitted in both forward and backward hemispheres can be fitted by a Gaussian distribution. The multiplicity moments of target evaporated particles emitted in the forward and backward hemispheres increase with the order of the moment q, and the second-order multiplicity moment is energy independent over the entire energy range for all the interactions in the forward and backward hemisphere. The scaled variance, a direct measure of multiplicity fluctuations, is close to one for all the interactions, which indicate a correlation among the produced particles. The entropy of target evaporated fragments emitted in both forward and backward hemispheres are the same within experimental errors. Supported by National Science Foundation of China (11075100), Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province (2011011001-2) and the Shanxi Provincial Foundation for Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, (2011-058)

  19. Simulation of Nucleus-Nucleus Interactions in the Framework of the FRITIOF Model at the Energy of 3.3 GeV/nucleon

    E-print Network

    A. S. Galoyan; A. Polanski; V. V. Uzhinskii

    2000-11-04

    The intranuclear cascade model overestimates the multiplicity of produced mesons in nucleus-nucleus interactions without taking into account meson and baryon resonance production. Inclusion of the resonances leads to decreasing multiplicity of mesons, neutrons and protons. In order to overcome the problem, it is proposed to use the FRITIOF model adapted to low energies in a combination with the reggeon theory inspired model of nuclear destruction. It is shown that the combination allows one to reproduce satisfactory the meson and baryon yields in the nucleus-nucleus collisions at the energy of 3.3 GeV/nucleon. The combined model works faster than typical quantum molecular dynamic model, and allows one to estimate the data needed for creation of electro-nuclear amplifier.

  20. Fish oil–based lipid emulsions in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: An ongoing positive experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, in the use of FOLE in treatment of P...

  1. Collective flow and azimuthal correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; EOS Collaboration

    1993-09-01

    The EOS experiment at the Bevalac has recently carried out exclusive event-by-event measurements of relativistic heavy ion collisions with a variety of projectile, target and beam energy combinations. The data was obtained using the EOS Time Projection Chamber. We present preliminary results on inclusive spectra, collective flow and azimuthal correlations obtained from a study of Au + Au reactions with beam energies covering 0.6 {minus} 1.2 A GeV.

  2. The horn, the hadron mass spectrum and the QCD phase diagram - the statistical model of hadron production in central nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    A. Andronic; P. Braun-Munzinger; J. Stachel

    2009-11-25

    We present the status of the description of hadron production in central nucleus-nucleus collisions within the statistical model . The recent inclusion of very high-mass resonances and the sigma meson leads to an improved description of the data, in particular the energy dependence of the K+/pi+ ratio at SPS energies (``the horn''). The connection to the QCD phase diagram is discussed.

  3. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent 'fusion by diffusion' model

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.

    2011-05-15

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section {sigma}{sub cap}(l), the fusion probability P{sub fus}(l), and the survival probability P{sub surv}(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of P{sub fus}(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of P{sub fus}(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  4. Cold breakup of spectator residues in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energy

    SciTech Connect

    Aichelin, J.; Huefner, J.; Ibarra, R.

    1984-07-01

    Inclusive data from fragmentation reactions of the type A/sub P/+A/sub T/..-->..Z+X are analyzed and a reaction mechanism is proposed. A projectile A/sub P/ (p, He, ..cap alpha.., or Ne) collides with a target nucleus A/sub T/ (Au) and one fragment with charge Z and energy E is observed at a solid angle ..cap omega... Projectile energies vary between 84A MeV and several A GeV. We propose a parametrization for the triple differential cross section d/sup 3/sigma/d..cap omega.. dE dZ with six free parameters. The parametrization generalizes the two-vector model which is often used to describe spallation products in proton-nucleus collisions. By fitting data from various experiments we establish a systematics of the six parameters. The experimental values of the parameters can be quantitatively understood in a model where the target nucleus breaks into several fragments similar to the shattering of glass.

  5. Analysis of variances of quasirapidities in collisions of gold nuclei with track-emulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gulamov, K. G.; Zhokhova, S. I.; Lugovoi, V. V. Navotny, V. S. Saidkhanov, N. S.; Chudakov, V. M.

    2012-08-15

    A new method of an analysis of variances was developed for studying n-particle correlations of quasirapidities in nucleus-nucleus collisions for a large constant number n of particles. Formulas that generalize the results of the respective analysis to various values of n were derived. Calculations on the basis of simple models indicate that the method is applicable, at least for n {>=} 100. Quasirapidity correlations statistically significant at a level of 36 standard deviations were discovered in collisions between gold nuclei and track-emulsion nuclei at an energy of 10.6 GeV per nucleon. The experimental data obtained in our present study are contrasted against the theory of nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  6. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2012: Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, Markus; Caines, Helen; Calderón de la Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Fries, Rainer; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphaël; Hippolyte, Boris; Mischke, André; Mócsy, Ágnes; Petersen, Hannah; Ruan, Lijuan; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2013-09-01

    The 5th edition of the Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Hot Quarks 2012) was held in Copamarina, Puerto Rico from 14-20 October 2012. As in previous years, this meeting gathered more than 70 participants in the early years of their scientific careers. This issue contains the proceedings of the workshop. As in the past, the Hot Quarks workshop offered a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion and interpretation of the current measurements from high energy nuclear collisions. Recent results and upgrades at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) were presented. Measurements from the proton-led run at the CERN-LHC were shown for the first time at this meeting. Recent theoretical developments were also extensively discussed, as well as the proposals for future facilities such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, the Electron-Ion Collider at Brookhaven, and the LHeC. The conference's goal to provide a platform for young researchers to learn and foster their interactions was successfully met. We wish to thank the sponsors of the Hot Quarks 2012 Conference, who supported the authors of this volume: Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Switzerland), European Research Council (EU), ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI (Germany), Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (Germany), IN2P3/CNRS (France) and the European Research Council via grant #259612, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (USA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA), National Science Foundation (USA), and Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (Netherlands). Marcus BleicherAndré Mischke Goethe-University Frankfurt and HIC4FAIRUtrecht University and Nikhef Amsterdam GermanyThe Netherlands Helen CainesÁgnes Mócsy Yale UniversityPratt Institute and Brookhaven National Laboratory USAUSA Manuel Calderón de la Barca SánchezHannah Petersen UC DavisFIAS USAGermany Rainer J FriesLijuan Ruan Texas A&M UniversityBrookhaven National Laboratory USAUSA Raphaël Granier de CassagnacCarlos A Salgado CNRS-IN2P3 and Ëcole polytechniqueUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela FranceSpain Boris Hippolyte CNRS-IN2P3 and Université de Strasbourg France The PDF also contains the conference poster.

  7. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2014: Workshop for young scientists on the physics of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-05-01

    The 6th edition of the Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Hot Quarks 2014) was held in Las Negras, Spain from 21-28 September 2014. Following the traditions of the conference, this meeting gathered more than 70 participants in the first years of their scientific careers. The present issue contains the proceedings of this workshop. As in the past, the Hot Quarks workshop offered a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion and interpretation of the current measurements from high energy nuclear collisions. Recent results and upgrades at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) were presented. Recent theoretical developments were also extensively discussed as well as the perspectives for future facilities such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt and the Electron-Ion Collider at Brookhaven. The conference's goal to provide a platform for young researchers to learn and foster their interactions was successfully met. We wish to thank the sponsors of the Hot Quarks 2014 Conference, who supported the authors of this volume: Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), CPAN (Spain), Czech Science Foundation (GACR) under grant 13-20841S (Czech Republic), European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Switzerland), European Research Council under grant 259612 (EU), ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI (Germany), Helmholtz Association and GSI under grant VH-NG-822, Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (Germany), National Science Foundation under grant No.1359622 (USA), Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR (Czech Republic), Patronato de la Alhambra y Generalife (Spain) and the Universidad de Granada (Spain). Javier López Albacete, Universidad de Granada (Spain) Jana Bielcikova, Nuclear Physics Inst. and Academy of Sciences (Czech Republic) Rainer J. Fries, Texas A&M University (USA) Raphaël Granier de Cassagnac, CNRS-IN2P3 and École polytechnique (France) Boris Hippolyte, CNRS-IN2P3 and Université de Strasbourg (France) Jiangyong Jia, Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) André Mischke, Utrecht University and Nikhef Amsterdam (The Netherlands) Ágnes Mócsy, Pratt Institute and Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) Hannah Petersen, Goethe University, FIAS and GSI (Germany) Lijuan Ruan, Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) Sevil Salur, Rutgers University, (USA)

  8. Optics laboratory experiments with laser-heated samples of crude oils and oil-in-water emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Costa, Germán.

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the present paper is to describe incorporation of basic industrial research results into current University study programs in Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering. The Laboratory of Optics and Fluids (LOF) of University Simon Bolivar (USB) leads a research program on applications of Photonics technology in the Petroleum Industry. More precisely, the main research subject at the (LOF) is development of optical procedures allowing determination of conditions of stability of oil-in-water emulsions. In several countries (for example, Canada and Venezuela) there exist important reservoirs of heavy crude oils, whose high viscosity impede their transportation through pipelines. Therefore, emulsions of heavy oils in water were developed in order to allow their commercialization. Though those emulsions are stable in current environmental conditions, high temperature or velocity gradients frequently provoke their coalescence. In typical experiments conducted at the (LOF) temperature gradients are induced in oil-water emulsions and in crude oil samples by irradiation with a CW laser beam. In crude oil samples the strong dependence of the liquid surface tension and refractive index on the local liquid temperature gives rise to long-range deformation of the liquid free surface. The latter cited thus behaves as an interferometrically smooth liquid mirror, which gives rise in turn to phase and intensity variations in the reflected light beam. In emulsion samples the inhomogeneous heating gives rise to thermoconvective flow, which is clearly observed as a moving speckle pattern in the reflected light beam. These are typical phenomena of self-interaction of a laser beam incident upon a material medium. In the present paper we discuss these optical phenomena, first studied in a basic research context, from an educational viewpoint.

  9. System-size dependence of strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at squareroot[sNN]=17.3 GeV.

    PubMed

    Alt, C; Anticic, T; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Bia?kowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Bunci?, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Farantatos, G; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Ga?dzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; G?adysz, E; Grebieszkow, K; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kliemant, M; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Kornas, E; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, P; Litov, L; Lungwitz, B; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczy?ski, St; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R; Richard, A; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczy?ski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitar, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Trubnikov, V; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vrani?, D; Wetzler, A; W?odarczyk, Z; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2005-02-11

    Emission of pi+/-, K+/-, phi, and Lambda was measured in near-central C+C and Si+Si collisions at 158 AGeV beam energy. Together with earlier data for p+p, S+S, and Pb+Pb, the system-size dependence of relative strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions is obtained. Its fast rise and the saturation observed at about 60 participating nucleons can be understood as the onset of the formation of coherent systems of increasing size. PMID:15783629

  10. Analysis of hadron production in nucleus-nucleus interactions up to and out of kinematical limit of free NN-collisions in the frame of FRITIOF model

    E-print Network

    A. S. Galoyan; G. L. Melkumov; V. V. Uzhinskii

    2002-01-10

    In the framework of the modified FRITIOF model, the inclusive spectra of the cumulative $\\pi ^0$-, $\\pi ^- $-mesons and protons produced in the nucleus-nucleus interactions at 4.5 GeV/c/nucleon and 4.2 GeV/c/nucleon are calculated. It is shown that the model reproduces qualitatively, and in some cases quantitatively the main experimental regularities of $\\pi$-mesons production, and "soft" part of the proton spectra. According to the model the production of the cumulative particles is connected with the mechanism of the "soft" nucleon-nucleon interaction.

  11. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R&D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  12. Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Therapy for Acute Synthetic Cannabinoid Intoxication: Clinical Experience in Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Aksel, Gökhan; Güneysel, Özlem; Ta?yürek, Tanju; Kozan, Ergül; Çevik, ?ebnem Eren

    2015-01-01

    There is no specific antidote for intoxication with synthetic cannabinoids. In this case series, we considered the efficiency of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy in four cases, who presented to emergency department with synthetic cannabinoid (bonzai) intoxication. The first patient had a GCS of 3 and a left bundle branch block on electrocardiography. The electrocardiography revealed sinus rhythm with normal QRS width after the treatment. The second patient had bradycardia, hypotension, and a GCS of 14. After intravenous lipid emulsion therapy, the bradycardia resolved, and the patient's GCS improved to 15. The third patient presented with a GCS of 8, and had hypotension and bradycardia. After the treatment, not only did the bradycardia resolve, but also the GCS improved to 15. The fourth patient, whose electrocardiography revealed accelerated junctional rhythm, had a GCS of 13. The patient's rhythm was sinus after the treatment. Cardiovascular recovery was seen in all four cases, and neurological recovery was also seen in three of them. Based on the fact that intravenous lipid emulsion is beneficial in patients intoxicated with lipophilic drugs, unstable patients presenting to the emergency department with acute synthetic cannabinoid intoxication may be candidates for intravenous lipid emulsion treatment. PMID:26078891

  13. Unusual interactions above 100 TeV: A review of cosmic ray experiments with emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yodh, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    A method is given for analyzing the space correlated collection of jets (gamma ray families) with energies greater than 100 TeV in Pb or Fe absorber sampled by photosensitive layers in an emulsion chamber. Events analyzed indicate large multiplicities of particles in the primary hadron-air interaction, and a marked absence of neutral pions.

  14. Pseudorapidity configurations in collisions between gold nuclei and track-emulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gulamov, K. G.; Zhokhova, S. I.; Lugovoi, V. V. Navotny, V. S. Chudakov, V. M.

    2010-07-15

    A method of parametrically invariant quantities is developed for studying pseudorapidity configurations in nucleus-nucleus collisions involving a large number of secondary particles. In simple models where the spectrum of pseudorapidities depends on three parameters, the shape of the spectrum may differ strongly from the shape of pseudorapidity configurations in individual events. Pseudorapidity configurations in collisions between gold nuclei of energy 10.6 GeV per nucleon and track-emulsion nuclei are contrasted against those in random stars calculated theoretically. An investigation of pseudorapidity configurations in individual events is an efficient method for verifying theoretical models.

  15. Workshop on Cosmic Ray and High Energy Gamma Ray Experiments for the Space Station Era, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, October 17-20, 1984, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V. (editor); Wefel, J. P. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    The potential of the Space Station as a platform for cosmic-ray and high-energy gamma-ray astronomy is discussed in reviews, reports, and specific proposals. Topics examined include antiparticles and electrons, science facilities and new technology, high-energy nuclear interactions, nuclear composition and energy spectra, Space Shuttle experiments, Space Station facilities and detectors, high-energy gamma rays, and gamma-ray facilities and techniques. Consideration is given to universal-baryon-symmetry testing on the scale of galactic clusters, particle studies in a high-inclination orbit, balloon-borne emulsion-chamber results on ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions, ionization states of low-energy cosmic rays, a large gamma-ray telescope for point-source studies above 1 GeV, and the possible existence of stable quark matter.

  16. Investigation of gamma-ray families originating from nucleus-nucleus interactions at ultrahigh energies E{sub 0} in excess of 10{sup 16} eV

    SciTech Connect

    Yuldashbaev, T. S.; Nuritdinov, Kh.

    2013-12-15

    Various spatial and energy features of gamma-ray families originating from the interactions of primary nuclei of galactic cosmic rays with nuclei of atmospheric atoms (AA interactions) are studied. The mass composition of galactic cosmic rays is analyzed on the basis of data from x-ray emulsion chambers of the Pamir experiment with the aid of a criterion for selecting gamma-ray families originating from AA interactions (A families) at energies E{sub 0} of primary galactic cosmic rays in excess of 10{sup 16} eV. According to the results obtained in this way only the experimental spatial parameters R{sub 1E} and ? differ from their counterparts in the MC0 model.

  17. Forward-backward multiplicity correlation in high-energy nucleus-nucleus interactions at a few AGeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Swarnapratim; Haiduc, Maria; Neagu, Alina Tania; Firu, Elena

    2014-07-01

    We have presented a systematic study of two-particle rapidity correlations in terms of investigating the dynamical fluctuation observable \\sigma _c^2 in the forward-backward pseudo-rapidity windows by analyzing the experimental data of {}_{}^{16} O{--}AgBr interactions at 4.5 AGeV/c, {}_{}^{22} Ne{--}AgBr interactions at 4.1 AGeV/c, {}_{}^{28} Si{--}AgBr and {}_{}^{32} S{--}AgBr interactions at 4.5 AGeV/c. The experimental results have been compared with the results obtained from the analysis of event sample simulated (MC-RAND) by generating random numbers and also with the analysis of events generated by the UrQMD and AMPT model. Our study confirms the presence of strong short-range correlations among the produced particles in the forward and the backward pseudo-rapidity region. The analysis of the simple Monte Carlo-simulated (MC-RAND) events signifies that the observed correlations are not due to mere statistics only; explanation of such correlations can be attributed to the presence of dynamical fluctuations during the production of charged pions. Comparisons of the experimental results with the results obtained from analyzing the UrQMD data sample indicate that the UrQMD model cannot reproduce the experimental findings. The AMPT model also cannot explain the experimental results satisfactorily. Comparisons of our experimental results with the results obtained from the analysis of higher energy emulsion data and with the results of the RHIC data have also been presented.

  18. Search for anomalous C-jets in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumano, H.

    1985-01-01

    Anomalous C-jets were measured in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber No.17. Measurement of 150 C-jets nuclear interactions occured in the target layer in the chamber itself with total visible energy greater than 5 TeV was completed. they are recorded in area of 11 sq m, corresponding to 17.1 sq m year exposure. Among them, seven events have no pinaught and two events are peculiar in that three showers out of four show abnormal cascade development. Two show remarkable characteristics indicating that they are coming from exotic interactions in the target layer. Illustrations of these events are presented and the thresholds of this type of event are discussed.

  19. Pion production in nucleus-nucleus collisions below a few GeV/nucleon: past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1980-07-01

    A general review of experimental data on pion production in A-A collisions for incident energies below a few GeV/nucleon is presented. Early data on inclusive pion spectra, which served as the genesis for present pion measurements, are discussed. The majority of the paper is devoted to present pion experiments, with an emphasis being placed on what such experiments tell about the general features of high-energy A-A collisions. Particular attention is given to multipion production as studied in recent streamer chamber experiments. The review ends with projections on future experiments with the heavier beams that will be available in 1982 at Berkeley, and the higher-energy beams that will hopefully be available in the not too distant future. 39 figures.

  20. Emulsion Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibette, Jerome; Leal-Calderon, F.; Schmitt, V.; Poulin, P.

    This book will present the basic physics that governs both the compressibility and the shear elasticity of dense emulsions as a function of droplet packing. The role of disorder has been revealed to be of great importance and to dictate the subtle scaling of the shear elastic modulus. The production of emulsions is certainly one of the most important aspects related to the industrial use of these materials. After a brief review of the currently employed techniques, this book aims to present recent advances in making controlled-size emulsions on a large scale and at a high production rate. It will be shown that controlled shear applied to a polydisperse emulsion can transform it into a calibrated emulsion through a Rayleigh instability. Finally, the very rich domain of double emulsions is discussed. The book presents a quite detailed description of these materials, owing to their very promising potential in various applications, in addition to their remarkable contribution in understanding the metastability of thin films.

  1. On the halo events observed by Mount Fuji and Mount Kanbala Emulsion Chamber Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, J. R.; Kuang, H. H.; Huo, A. X.; Lu, S. L.; Su, S.; Wang, Y. X.; Xue, Y. G.; Wang, C. R.; He, M.; Zhang, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    The intensity of big gamma-ray families associated by halo is obtained from Mt. Fuji experiment (650 g/sq.cm. atmospheric depth) and Mt. Kanbala experiment (515 g/sq.cm.). The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculation based on several assumptions on interaction mechanisms and the primary cosmic ray composition. The results suggest more than 3 times lower proton abundance among primaries than that of 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 13th eV region within the framework of quasi-scaling model of multiple production.

  2. The experimental feature on the data of the primary proton identification in stratospheric X-ray emulsion chambers at energies >10 TeV (RUNJOB experiment)

    E-print Network

    I. S. Zayarnaya

    2006-10-02

    The RUNJOB balloon-born emulsion chamber experiments have been carried out for investigating the composition and energy spectra of primary cosmic rays at energies 10-1000 TeV/nucleon. On the data of the treatment of RUNJOB` X-ray emulsion chambers exposed since 1995 to 1999 year about 50 % proton tracks were identified. In remained half of the events from proton group the one charged primary tracks were not found in the search area determined with high accuracy by the triangulation method using the several background heavy tracks. Considered methodical reasons in this paper could not explain this experimental result. The one from the probable physical reasons that is the neutrons in cosmic ray flux does not explain it too.

  3. Charm studies in emulsion

    E-print Network

    Kalinin, Sergey

    Neutrino-nucleon scattering is an effective way to investigate the inner structure of the nucleon, to extract the Standard Model parameters and to explore heavy quarks production dynamics. In the last decades, several experiments have been constructed to study weak interactions of neutrinos with nucleons. One of them was CERN-WA95 experiment operated by the CHORUS collaboration. It is based on a hybrid detector with nuclear emulsion as a target followed by electronic devices. Nuclear emulsion provides three dimensional spatial information with an outstanding resolution of the order of one micron. Therefore, it is ideal to detect short-lived particles. A special technique has been developed to reconstruct events in the emulsion which allows to perform a detailed investigation of events such as charmed hadrons production by neutrinos. As a result, the backround in the selected charm sample is up to six times lower compared to similar experiments. Such a method also permits to make direct measurements of some qu...

  4. Static versus energy-dependent nucleus-nucleus potential for description of sub-barrier fusion dynamics of {}_{8}^{16}O+{}^{112,116,120}\\!\\!\\!\\!\\!\\!{}_{50}Sn reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjeet Singh, Gautam

    2015-11-01

    The static and energy-dependent nucleus-nucleus potentials are simultaneously used along with the Wong formula for exploration of fusion dynamics of {}816O+{}112,116,120{}50Sn reactions. The role of internal structure degrees of freedom of colliding pairs, such as inelastic surface vibrations, are examined within the context of coupled channel calculations performed using the code CCFULL. Theoretical calculations based on the static Woods-Saxon potential along with the one-dimensional Wong formula fail to address the fusion data of {}816O+{}112,116,120{}50Sn reactions. Such discrepancies can be removed if one uses couplings to internal structure degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei. However, the energy-dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) accurately describes the sub-barrier fusion enhancement of {}816O+{}112,116,120{}50Sn reactions. Therefore, in sub-barrier fusion dynamics, energy dependence in the nucleus-nucleus potential governs barrier modification effects in a closely similar way to that of the coupled channel approach. Supported by Dr. D. S. Kothari Post-Doctoral Fellowship Scheme sponsored by University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India

  5. Results from NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Usai, G.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.

    2006-07-11

    The NA60 experiment studies open charm and prompt dimuon production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN SPS. During 2003 the experiment collected data in Indium-Indium collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon. In this paper the first results on low mass dimuons, intermediate mass dimuons and J/{psi} suppression are presented.

  6. Emulsions Droplet Capture Mechanism in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidani, Khalil; Polikar, Marcel

    2006-03-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the physics of emulsion flow in porous media. The objective of experiments were to study the applicability of oil-in-water emulsion as a plugging agent in the vicinity of the well bore for thousands of Canadian gas wells that are continuously leaking gas to surface. The motion of oil droplets and the capture mechanisms were investigated through visualized experiments. Well-characterized emulsions were injected into a micro model resembling a two parallel plate model packed with glass beads. Effects of emulsion properties and wettability of the medium were studied on a plugging mechanism. The results demonstrate the reduction in permeability mainly due to droplets size exclusion compared to the pore constrictions. Also, smaller droplets may lodge and coalesce in pores crevices thereby accelerating the blockage process. Moreover, more viscous emulsions are more effective compared with the less viscous ones due to combined effects of capillary and viscous forces. The deposition of droplets was adjusted through utilizing different preflush solutions. Criteria were set for enhancing emulsion penetration depth thereby defining the extent of the blocked region. In conclusion, this work characterizes the physics of emulsion flow in porous media and demonstrates its application as a novel sealant in near well bore region. The novelty, which constitutes a step-change in technology, is a method that emplaces an emulsion at a desired location in underground media.

  7. Experimental study of forces between quasi-two-dimensional emulsion droplets near jamming

    E-print Network

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Experimental study of forces between quasi-two- dimensional emulsion droplets near jamming Kenneth of quasi-two-dimensional emulsions. Our experiments consist of oil- in-water emulsion droplets confined, emulsions, foams, and sand. In general the jamming transition is due to an increase in the particle

  8. Hydraulic resistance to emulsion flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ermakov, V.I.; Blokhin, A.V.; Shevelev, A.V.

    1984-03-01

    This article demonstrates how the starting emulsion viscosity can be used to calculate hydraulic resistance. The emulsions for the experiments were prepared by saturating the liquid in an apparatus with a stirrer by a gas or a second liquid (water) acting as the disperse phase. The hydraulic resistance in emulsion flow through straight tubes was determined by measuring the pressure differential in a 1-m-long tube section in a circulation type apparatus by using tubes of different diameters. Water-in-oil type emulsion is formed in oil exploitation and desalination processes as well as in polymer synthesis when the polymer and its solution is washed off the catalyst residues with water. It is determined that in calculating the hydraulic resistance it is proper to use the starting emulsion viscosity since the end value under real conditions will be unknown because it depends on the initial state of dispersion of the water drops and the packing parameters which determine the packing capacity from drop enlargements.

  9. Characteristics of alpha projectile fragments emission in interaction of nuclei with emulsion

    E-print Network

    M. K. Singh; Ramji Pathak; V. Singh

    2010-08-12

    The properties of the relativistic alpha fragments produced in interactions of 84^Kr at around 1 A GeV in nuclear emulsion are investigated. The experimental results are compared with the similar results obtained from various projectiles with emulsion interactions at different energies. The total, partial nuclear cross-sections and production rates of alpha fragmentation channels in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions and their dependence on the mass number and initial energy of the incident projectile nucleus are investigated. The yields of multiple alpha fragments emitted from the interactions of projectile nuclei with the nuclei of light, medium and heavy target groups of emulsion-detector are discussed and they indicate that the projectile-breakup mechanism seems to be free from the target mass number. It is found that the multiplicity distributions of alpha fragments are well described by the Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) scaling presentation. The mean multiplicities of the freshly produced newly created charged secondary particles, normally known as shower and secondary particles associated with target in the events where the emission of alpha fragments were accompanied by heavy projectile fragments having Z value larger than 4 seem to be constant as the alpha fragments multiplicity increases, and exhibit a behavior independent of the alpha fragments multiplicity.

  10. Fast automated scanning of OPERA emulsion films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirri, G.; Opera Collaboration

    2007-10-01

    The use of nuclear emulsions to record tracks of charged particles with an accuracy of better than 1 micron is possible in large physics experiments thanks to the recent improvements in the industrial production of emulsions and to the development of fast automated microscopes. The European Scanning System (ESS) is a fast automatic system developed for the mass scanning of the emulsions of the OPERA experiment, which requires microscopes with scanning speeds of about 20 cm 2/h. Recent improvements in the technique and measurements with ESS are reported.

  11. An instrument employing electronic counters and an emulsion chamber for studying heavy cosmic ray interactions (JACEE-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, R. W.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Selig, W. J.; Watts, J. W.; Burnett, T. H.; Iwai, J.; Lord, J. J.; Strauscz, S.; Wilkes, R. J.; Jones, W. V.

    1983-01-01

    A JACEE-3 instrument was flown on a balloon in June 1982 for 6.1 sq m sr hr exposure at an average atmospheric depth of 5 gm/sq cm in order to study the cosmic ray spectra, composition, and interactions above 1 TeV. The nucleus-nucleus interactions were studied above 20 GeV/amu from z = 6 to z = 26. The electronic counters contained gas Cerenkov structures with a 1.0-cm thick lead glass and a 1.27-cm thick Teflon radiator. A comparison to the instrument prototype is made. Based on the electronic counter event data, the finding efficiency of the hodoscope is noted to be near 100 percent for z greater than or equal to 22. A comparison is made between the hodoscope-predicted position and track found at P3 in an emulsion chamber.

  12. Multiple emulsions High-Order Multiple Emulsions Formed in

    E-print Network

    Multiple emulsions High-Order Multiple Emulsions Formed in Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Microfluidics** A. R. Abate and D. A. Weitz* Multiple emulsions are nested sets of drops.[1,2] Drops of one kind of yet another fluid. Such ``emulsions within emulsions'' are very useful for many applications

  13. Emulsion Droplet Combustion in Microgravity: Water/Heptane Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews a series of experiments to further examine parametric effects on sooting processes of droplet flames in microgravity. The particular focus is on a fuel droplet emulsified with water, specifically emulsions of n-heptane as the fuel-phase and water as the dispersed phase. Water was selected as the additive because of its anticipated effect on soot formation, and the heptane fuel phase was chosen to theoretically reduce the likelihood of microexplosions because its boiling point is nearly the same as that of water: 100 C for water and 98 C for heptane. The water content was varied while the initial droplet diameter was kept within a small range. The experiments were carried out in microgravity to reduce the effects of buoyancy and to promote spherical symmetry in the burning process. Spherically symmetric droplet burning is a convenient starting point for analysis, but experimental data are difficult to obtain for this situation as evidenced by the fact that no quantitative data have been reported on unsupported emulsion droplet combustion in a convection-free environment. The present study improves upon past work carried out on emulsion droplet combustion in microgravity which employed emulsion droplets suspended from a fiber. The fiber can be instrusive to the emulsion droplet burning process as it can promote coalescence of the dispersed water phase and heterogeneous nucleation on the fiber. Prior work has shown that the presence of water in liquid hydrocarbons can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the combustion process. Water is known to reduce soot formation and radiation heat transfer to combustor walls Gollahalli (1979) reduce flame temperatures and thereby NOx emissions, and encourage secondary droplet atomization or microexplosion. Water also tends to retard ignition and and promote early extinction. The former effect restricted the range of water volume fractions as discussed below.

  14. Flow of Super-Concentrated Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalova, Irina; Malkin, Alexander Ya.

    2006-05-01

    Super concentrated emulsions, e.g., emulsion explosives, are two-phase systems consisting of aqueous droplets dispersed in an oil phase. The concentration of the disperse phase is 92-96 w.%, liquid droplets, containing a supersaturated aqueous solution of inorganic oxidizer salts. The flow of such emulsions is determined by their Theological properties as well as the time-dependent processes of "aging" which take place due to the thermodynamic instability of these emulsions. This work presents the results of experimental studies of the main effects that accompany the flow of such materials: non-Newtonian flow behavior, rheopexy which manifests as a slow increase of viscosity in the low shear rate domain, linear viscoelastic behavior, and the transition of elastic modulus to non-linearity at high amplitudes of deformation. The emulsions under study are non-Newtonian liquids. Experiments with the shear rate sweep demonstrate that the upward and downward branches of the flow curves coincide above some specific shear rate value. The upward experiments show the existence of a Newtonian section of the flow curve in the low-shear-rate domain, while the effect of yielding is observed on the downward curve. The wall slip in the flow of the emulsions under study is negligible. The elastic modulus is constant over a wide frequency range. Hence, viscoelastic relaxation processes might be expected at characteristic times of either >>100s or <0.01s. Strong non-linear behavior was observed in high amplitude experiments. The elastic modules (measured in oscillating testing and in elastic recovery) as well as the yield stress are proportional to D-2, while the Newtonian viscosity is proportional to D-1. Concentration dependence of rheological parameters is also discussed. The possible mechanism of emulsion flow is proposed. Aging leads to enhancement of the solid-like properties of emulsions, which can be treated as an "emulsion-to-suspension transition". However, this transition is incomplete because dispersions retain an ability to flow at stresses exceeding the yield stress value. It is shown that the aging of emulsions is caused by the slow crystallization of a supercooled salt solution without any noticeable coalescence effect. The evolution of mechanical properties of emulsions is correlated with the kinetics of structural changes during aging. The problem of transport characteristics of such emulsions is also discussed. It is shown that the choice of the flow curve fitting equation is not crucial for pipe flow design. The result can be used for practical applications in designing pipe transportation systems.

  15. Method of breaking and emulsion and an emulsion-emulsion breaker composition

    SciTech Connect

    Salathiel, W. M.

    1985-05-14

    This invention relates to a composition of matter and to a method for producing a controllable, residue-free break of an emulsion or a dispersion of a water-in-oil emulsion. An emulsion breaker is incorporated into the emulsion. It is temporarily-protected (deactivated) so that breaking of the emulsion is initially avoided. By removing the protection, the breaker becomes active, and it acts to break the emulsion into its separate phases.

  16. Multidimensional analysis of data obtained in experiments with X-ray emulsion chambers and extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chilingaryan, A. A.; Galfayan, S. K.; Zazyan, M. Z.; Dunaevsky, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Nonparametric statistical methods are used to carry out the quantitative comparison of the model and the experimental data. The same methods enable one to select the events initiated by the heavy nuclei and to calculate the portion of the corresponding events. For this purpose it is necessary to have the data on artificial events describing the experiment sufficiently well established. At present, the model with the small scaling violation in the fragmentation region is the closest to the experiments. Therefore, the treatment of gamma families obtained in the Pamir' experiment is being carried out at present with the application of these models.

  17. Microfluidics with Gel Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Craig; Surenjav, Enkhtuul; Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf

    2006-03-01

    Microfluidic processing is usually achieved using single phase liquids. Instead, we use monodisperse emulsions to compartment liquids within microchannel geometries. At low continuous phase volume fractions, droplets self-organize to form well-defined arrangements, analogous to foam. While it is well-known that confined geometries can induce rearrangement of foam compartments at the millimeter-scale, similar dynamics are also expected for gel emulsions. We have studied online generation, organization and manipulation of gel emulsions using a variety of microchannel geometries. ``Passive'' reorganization, based on fixed channel geometries, can be supplemented by ``active'' manipulation by incorporating a ferrofluid phase. A ferromagnetic phase facilitates reorganization of liquid compartments on demand using an electromagnetic trigger. Moreover, coalescence between adjacent compartments within a gel emulsion can be induced using electrical potential. Microfluidics using gel emulsions will be well-suited for combinatorial chemistry, DNA sequencing, drug screening and protein crystallizations.

  18. Rheology of emulsions.

    PubMed

    Derkach, Svetlana R

    2009-10-30

    The review is devoted to the historical and modern understanding of rheological properties of emulsions in a broad range of concentration. In the limiting case of dilute emulsions, the discussion is based on the analogy and differences in properties of suspensions and emulsions. For concentrated emulsions, the main peculiarities of their rheological behaviour are considered. Different approaches to understand the concentration dependencies of viscosity are presented and compared. The effects of non-Newtonian flow curves and the apparent transition to yielding with increasing concentration of the dispersed phase are discussed. The problem of droplet deformation in shear fields is touched. The highly concentrated emulsions (beyond the limit of closest packing of spherical particles) are treated as visco-plastic media, and the principle features of their rheology (elasticity, yielding, concentration and droplet size dependencies) are considered. A special attention is paid to the problem of shear stability of drops of an internal phase starting from the theory of the single drop behaviour, including approaches for the estimation of drops' stability in concentrated emulsions. Polymer blends are also treated as emulsions, though taking into account their peculiarities due to the coexistence of two interpenetrated phases. Different theoretical models of deformation of polymer drops were discussed bearing in mind the central goal of predictions of the visco-elastic properties of emulsions as functions of the properties of individual components and the interfacial layer. The role of surfactants is discussed from the point of view of stability of emulsions in time and their special influence on the rheology of emulsions. PMID:19683219

  19. Topical delivery of acetyl hexapeptide-8 from different emulsions: influence of emulsion composition and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hoppel, Magdalena; Reznicek, Gottfried; Kählig, Hanspeter; Kotisch, Harald; Resch, Günter P; Valenta, Claudia

    2015-02-20

    Acetyl hexapeptide-8 (AH-8) is a well-known component of anti-aging products and was recently explored as a promising topical treatment of blepharospasm. Although AH-8 appears in a variety of cosmetic products, its skin penetration is sparsely studied and controversially discussed. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the vehicle type on the AH-8 delivery to the skin. Besides skin permeation experiments with Franz type diffusion cells, the spatial distribution of AH-8 in the stratum corneum after a real in-use application was investigated by in vitro tape stripping on porcine ear skin. By applying LC-MS/MS for quantification of AH-8, we demonstrated that a multiple water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsion can significantly increase penetration of AH-8 into porcine skin compared to simple O/W and W/O emulsions. The internal structure of the developed multiple emulsion was confirmed by electron microscopic investigations and NMR self diffusion studies. In general, a clear superiority of water-rich W/O/W and O/W emulsions over an oil-rich W/O emulsion in terms of dermal delivery of AH-8 was found. This enhanced delivery of AH-8 could be explained by an increased absorption of the water-rich emulsions into the skin, confirmed by combined ATR-FTIR and tape stripping experiments. PMID:25497319

  20. Development of fat emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wretlind, A

    1981-01-01

    The studies on the possibility of preparing IV fat emulsions began in the 1920's; since then, a very large number of emulsions with various fats and emulsifiers have been investigated. However, none of the early fat emulsions could be used safely in man. By the trial and error technique, a method was finally found to prepare soybean oil and egg yolk phospholipids to make a fat emulsion that had a low incidence of adverse reactions. A newly devised biological test system based on nutritional concepts was of crucial importance. It meant that any energy supplying nutrient should be tested in animals in relation to the energy requirement of the species used and not identical to the human dose/kg body weight as in the "classical" toxicity and tolerance tests. With the development of well-tolerated IV fat emulsions it has been possible to devise a TPN regimen that is adequate from a nutritional point of view as well as an adequate alternative to the ordinary oral food. This regimen, which can be administered by the peripheral route, means that the original aims for developing IV fat emulsions were finally achieved. PMID:6788972

  1. Isotachophoresis with emulsions.

    PubMed

    Goet, G; Baier, T; Hardt, S; Sen, A K

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study on isotachophoresis (ITP) in which an emulsion is used as leading electrolyte (LE) is reported. The study aims at giving an overview about the transport and flow phenomena occurring in that context. Generally, it is observed that the oil droplets initially dispersed in the LE are collected at the ITP transition zone and advected along with it. The detailed behavior at the transition zone depends on whether or not surfactants (polyvinylpyrrolidon, PVP) are added to the electrolytes. In a system without surfactants, coalescence is observed between the droplets collected at the ITP transition zone. After having achieved a certain size, the droplets merge with the channel walls, leaving an oil film behind. In systems with PVP, coalescence is largely suppressed and no merging of droplets with the channel walls is observed. Instead, at the ITP transition zone, a droplet agglomerate of increasing size is formed. In the initial stages of the ITP experiments, two counter rotating vortices are formed inside the terminating electrolyte. The vortex formation is qualitatively explained based on a hydrodynamic instability triggered by fluctuations of the number density of oil droplets. PMID:24404037

  2. Statistical Analysis For Nucleus/Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes use of several statistical techniques to charactertize angular distributions of secondary particles emitted in collisions of atomic nuclei in energy range of 24 to 61 GeV per nucleon. Purpose of statistical analysis to determine correlations between intensities of emitted particles and angles comfirming existence of quark/gluon plasma.

  3. Linear oil displacement by the emulsion entrapment process. [Dissertation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Lack of mobility control is one of the major impediments to successful enhanced oil recovery, especially for high viscosity oils. This work presents experimental and theoretical results for linear secondary oil displacements using dilute, stable suspensions of oil drops. The major hypothesis is that emulsions provide mobility control through entrapment or local permeability reduction, not through viscosity ratio improvement. In order to describe the displacement process, previous emulsion filtration theory is extended to longer cores and to two-phase flow. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is satisfactory for continuous secondary oil displacement with various drop-size emulsions in unconsolidated sand packs of permeabilities ranging from 0.7 ..mu..m/sup 2/ to 3.3 ..mu..m/sup 2/. Linear emulsion floods are shown to be most effective when the mean drop-size to pore-size ratio is in the region between straining and interception at the emulsion shock. Floods are more effective when the emulsion concentration is high which minimizes retention lag. Additionally, a parallel flooding apparatus is utilized to determine qualitatively the macroscopic benefits of emulsion mobility control. Direct analogies are established between augmented oil recovery with dilute emulsions and with entrapping polymers.

  4. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  5. Magnetofluid emulsion: New magnetocontrolled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashtovoi, Victor G.; Yarmolchik, Yuri P.

    1994-03-01

    This study has shown that flow dynamics of emulsion consisting of magnetic and nonmagnetic fluids depends on applied magnetic field. So these emulsions may be considered as a magnetic field controlled medium, and in particular as a magnetic field controlled heat carrier. The new dates on rheological properties of these emulsions in the presence of magnetic field are described.

  6. LEHIGH UNIVERSITY EMULSION POLYMERS INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Gilchrist, James F.

    LEHIGH UNIVERSITY EMULSION POLYMERS INSTITUTE LIAISON PROGRAM MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION AND AGREEMENT This Application and Agreement for Liaison Program Membership in the Emulsion Polymers Institute (EPI) at Lehigh Coordinator: The University coordinator of the Emulsion Polymers Institute's Industrial Liaison Program is Dr

  7. Stability criteria for emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibette, J.; Morse, D. C.; Witten, T. A.; Weitz, D. A.

    1992-10-01

    The coalescence of monodisperse silicone oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate has been studied. We report the existence of a sharp destabilization threshold, controlled by surfactant chemical potential, osmotic pressure, and droplet diameter, at which the rate of coalescence increases dramatically. We present evidence that the stability of the emulsions can be characterized by two microscopic parameters: a minimum stable value of the surfactant chemical potential and a maximum value of the pressure exerted upon a droplet-droplet interface.

  8. Emulsion detectors for the antihydrogen detection in AEgIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistillo, C.; Aghion, S.; Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Belov, A.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Chlouba, K.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Demetrio, A.; Derking, H.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ereditato, A.; Ferragut, R.; Fontana, A.; Gerber, S.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S.; Haider, S.; Hogan, S.; Holmestad, H.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E. J.; Kawada, J.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kimura, M.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Lehner, S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V.; Mazzotta, Z.; Nebbia, G.; Nédélec, P.; Oberthaler, M.; Pacifico, N.; Penasa, L.; Petrá?ek, V.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Ravelli, L.; Riccardi, C.; Røhne, O.; Rosenberger, S.; Rotondi, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santoro, R.; Scampoli, P.; Simon, M.; Špa?ek, M.; Storey, J.; Strojek, I. M.; Subieta, M.; Testera, G.; Widmann, E.; Yzombard, P.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zmeskal, J.

    2015-08-01

    The AEgIS experiment at CERN aims to perform the first direct measurement of gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter by measuring the deviation of a cold antihydrogen beam in the Earth gravitational field. The design of the experiment has been recently updated to include emulsion films as position sensitive detector. The submicrometric position accuracy of emulsions leads indeed to a significant improvement of the experimental sensitivity. We present results of preliminary tests and discuss perspectives for the final measurement.

  9. Lipid Emulsion in Treatment of Local Anesthetic Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Collins, Shawn; Neubrander, Judy; Vorst, Zachary; Sheffield, Brad

    2015-08-01

    Epidural, spinal, regional, local, and intravenous administration of local anesthetics (LAs) is a cornerstone of anesthetic practice. LA toxicity is a grave consequence that is of great significance to anesthesia providers. Outcomes of LA toxicity range from inconvenient symptoms such as tinnitus, twitching, and hypotension to seizures; cardiovascular or respiratory collapse; and death. Lipid emulsion has emerged as a potential "magic bullet" in treating LA toxicity. This literature review provides background information and proposed mechanisms of action for LAs and lipid emulsion as well as animal experiments and a case report that speak to the effectiveness of lipid emulsion in the face of LA toxicity. PMID:26210562

  10. Transport and Retention of Emulsion Droplets in Sandy Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esahani, S. G.; Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Emulsions are commonly used as amendments during remediation; yet, the processes controlling the distribution of droplets within the subsurface are not well understood. Given that inadequate spatial and/or temporal delivery of amendments often leads to ineffective treatment, there is a need to better understand emulsion transport. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the transport and retention of emulsion droplets in columns containing Ottawa sands. Breakthrough curves and deposition profiles from these experiments were interrogated using a mathematical model capable of describing attachment, detachment, and straining to begin to elucidate the physical processes controlling delivery. Emulsions were constructed by stabilizing soybean oil droplets within a continuous aqueous phase. Physical properties of the resulting oil-in-water emulsions were favorable for subsurface delivery (nominal properties: 1 g/mL density; 10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 ?m droplet d50). Emulsions were introduced to the columns for approximately two pore volumes and followed by an extended flush of background solution. Effluent droplet size distributions did not vary significantly over the course of the experiment and remained similar to those measured for the influent emulsion. Emulsion breakthrough curves exhibited tailing, and deposition profiles were found to be hyper-exponential and unaffected by extended periods of background flow. Depending on emulsion composition and flow characteristics, 10-30% of the injected emulsion was retained on the sand suggesting a non-negligible influence on accessible porosity over the course of the experiment. Experimental results were further interpreted using a droplet transport model that accounts for temporal and spatial variation in porosity due to the retention of the emulsion droplets. At present the model assumes a uniform size distribution of inelastic emulsion droplets which are transported by advection and dispersion, and exchanged with the solid phase through attachment, detachment, and straining processes. Results examine the relative roles of attachment-detachment and straining in reducing the accessible porosity. Evaluation of how the porosity change influences the flow regime for moderately and slightly clogged media is currently under investigation.

  11. THE PROJECTILE FRAGMENTS IN NUCLEAR EMULSION F.G.Lepekhin, O.V.Levitskaya, B.B.Simonov

    E-print Network

    Titov, Anatoly

    THE PROJECTILE FRAGMENTS IN NUCLEAR EMULSION F.G.Lepekhin, O.V.Levitskaya, B.B.Simonov 1 was EMU01 experiment which used nuclear emulsion as a target and as a detector for produced particles and projectile fragments. The emulsion technique with its superior spatial resolution is very well suited

  12. Depletion interactions and fluid-solid equilibrium in emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibette, J.; Roux, D.; Nallet, F.

    1990-11-01

    Silicon-oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), have been studied. They exhibit practically no coalescence, whereas for high surfactant concentrations a ``creaming'' of the emulsion is observed. We demonstrate that this behavior is related to a fluid-solid phase transition due to an attractive interaction induced by the depletion of SDS micelles. A simple model for the fluid-solid transition is proposed, in quantitative agreement with experiment.

  13. Lipid injectable emulsions: 2006.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, David F

    2006-08-01

    Lipid injectable emulsions are an essential source of fatty acids, as well as a daily source of calories. They have been used in the clinical setting for almost 40 years, but despite this, there are no established official standards governing pharmaceutical quality. After 15 years of development, the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), which writes such standards for all FDA-approved pharmaceuticals, is poised to adopt an official monograph for lipid injectable emulsions that sets pharmaceutical requirements on all manufacturers placing limits on pH, free fatty acid concentrations and globule size (both mean droplet size and the population of large fat globules larger than 5 micrometers). Recent animal data has shown pathophysiologic changes in vital organs for lipids that fall outside the USP-proposed globule size limits. From a clinical perspective, newer lipid injectable emulsions show great promise in certain patient settings, most notably in the intensive care unit in both adults and infants. The clinical use of alternative oils, such as medium-chain triglycerides, fish oil and olive oil show benefits over conventional soybean oil formulations. In adults, for example, the administration of omega-fatty acids via soybean oil-based lipids produces a heightened inflammatory response via production of 2-series prostaglandins, whereas substitution of a portion of the lipid with omega-3 fatty acids via fish oil can favorably dampen the inflammatory response. In infants, for example, substitution of soybean oil with fish oil has recently been shown to reverse parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. These advances should lead to safer infusion therapy in patients receiving lipid injectable emulsions. PMID:16870806

  14. Liquid films, foams and emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, D.

    1999-06-01

    Studies of thin liquid films, made from surfactant solutions, are presented. The film drainage and the interaction between film surfaces are characterized with an experimental device called "Thin Film Balance". Cases where film stratification is observed will be discussed. These experiments allow to model thin films which form between bubbles and drops in foams and emulsions respectively. Nous présentons des études de films liquides formés à partir de solutions de tensioactifs. Nous avons étudié le drainage et les forces entre surfaces à l'aide d'un dispositif expérimental appelé "Balance à Films". Dans certains cas, on observe des phénomènes de stratification que l'on décrira. Ces expériences permettent de modéliser les films entre bulles et gouttes que l'on rencontre dans les mousses et les émulsions respectivement.

  15. Oil-in-oil emulsions stabilised solely by solid particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-01-21

    A brief review of the stabilisation of emulsions of two immiscible oils is given. We then describe the use of fumed silica particles coated with either hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon groups in acting as sole stabilisers of emulsions of various vegetable oils with linear silicone oils (PDMS) of different viscosity. Transitional phase inversion of emulsions, containing equal volumes of the two oils, from silicone-in-vegetable (S/V) to vegetable-in-silicone (V/S) occurs upon increasing the hydrophobicity of the particles. Close to inversion, emulsions are stable to coalescence and gravity-induced separation for at least one year. Increasing the viscosity of the silicone oil enables stable S/V emulsions to be prepared even with relatively hydrophilic particles. Predictions of emulsion type from calculated contact angles of a silica particle at the oil-oil interface are in agreement with experiment provided a small polar contribution to the surface energy of the oils is included. We also show that stable multiple emulsions of V/S/V can be prepared in a two-step procedure using two particle types of different hydrophobicity. At fixed particle concentration, catastrophic phase inversion of emulsions from V/S to S/V can be effected by increasing the volume fraction of vegetable oil. Finally, in the case of sunflower oil + 20 cS PDMS, the study is extended to particles other than silica which differ in chemical type, particle size and particle shape. Consistent with the above findings, we find that only sufficiently hydrophobic particles (clay, zinc oxide, silicone, calcium carbonate) can act as efficient V/S emulsion stabilisers. PMID:26549699

  16. Hardware performance of a scanning system for high speed analysis of nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrabito, L.; Barbuto, E.; Bozza, C.; Buontempo, S.; Consiglio, L.; Coppola, D.; Cozzi, M.; Damet, J.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, D.; Esposito, L. S.; Giacomelli, G.; Grella, G.; Hauger, M.; Juget, F.; Kreslo, I.; Giorgini, M.; Ieva, M.; Laktineh, I.; Manai, K.; Mandrioli, G.; Marotta, A.; Manzoor, S.; Migliozzi, P.; Monacelli, P.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pistillo, C.; Pozzato, M.; Royole-Degieux, P.; Romano, G.; Rosa, G.; Savvinov, N.; Schembri, A.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Sorrentino, G.; Strolin, P.; Tioukov, V.; Waelchli, T.

    2006-12-01

    The use of nuclear emulsions in very large physics experiments is now possible thanks to the recent improvements in the industrial production of emulsions and to the development of fast automated microscopes. In this paper the hardware performances of the European Scanning System (ESS) are described. The ESS is a very fast automatic system developed for the mass scanning of the emulsions of the OPERA experiment, which requires microscopes with scanning speeds of ˜20 cm2/h in an emulsion volume of 44 ?m thickness.

  17. Showing Emulsion Properties with Common Dairy Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Diaz, Carlos; Gonzalez-Romero, Elisa

    1996-09-01

    Foods are mixtures of different chemical compounds, and the quality we sense (taste, texture, color, etc.) are all manifestations of its chemical properties. Some of them can be visualized with the aid of simple, safe and inexpensive experiments using dairy products that can be found in any kitchen and using almost exclusively kitchen utensils. In this paper we propose some of them related with food emulsions. Food emulsions cover an extremely wide area of daily-life applications such as milk, sauces, dressings and beverages. Experimentation with some culinary recipes to prepare them and the analyisis of the observed results is close to ideal subject for the introduction of chemical principles, allowing to discuss about the nature and composition of foods, the effects of additives, etc. At the same time it allows to get insights into the scientific reasons that underlie on the recipes (something that it is not usually found in most cookbooks). For example, when making an emulsion like mayonnaise, why the egg yolks and water are the first materials in the bowl , and the oil is added to them rather than in the other way around? How you can "rescue" separate emulsions (mayonnaise)? Which parameters affect emulsion stability? Since safety, in its broad sense, is the first requisite for any food, concerns about food exist throughout the world and the more we are aware of our everyday life, the more likely we will be to deal productively with the consequences. On the other hand, understanding what foods are and how cooking works destroys no delightful mystery of the art of cuisine, instead the mystery expands.

  18. Experimental feature in the primary-proton flux at energies above 10 TeV according to the results of searches for primary particles in nuclear emulsions exposed in the stratosphere (RUNJOB Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2008-02-15

    In the RUNJOB experiment, a long-term exposure of x-ray emulsion chambers in the stratosphere from 1995 to 1999 with the aim of studying the composition and spectra of primary cosmic particles in the energy range 10-1000 TeV per nucleon revealed about 50% proton tracks. The remaining events of the proton group did not feature any candidate for a track of a singly charged particle within the search region determined from measurements of the coordinates of background nuclei going close to the sought track. Methodological factors that could explain this experimental observation are considered. A possible physical reason associated with the presence of a neutral component in the flux of primary protons in the energy region above 10 TeV is also analyzed.

  19. Characterization of flaxseed oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-En; Choo, Wee-Sim

    2015-07-01

    The emulsifying capacity of surfactants (polysorbate 20, polysorbate 80 and soy lecithin) and proteins (soy protein isolate and whey protein isolate) in flaxseed oil was measured based on 1 % (w/w) of emulsifier. Surfactants showed significantly higher emulsifying capacity compared to the proteins (soy protein isolate and whey protein isolate) in flaxseed oil. The emulsion stability of the flaxseed oil emulsions with whey protein isolate (10 % w/w) prepared using a mixer was ranked in the following order: 1,000 rpm (58 min)???1,000 rpm (29 min)???2,000 rpm (35 min) >2,000 rpm (17.5 min). The emulsion stability of the flaxseed oil emulsions with whey protein isolate (10 % w/w) prepared using a homogenizer (Ultra Turrax) was independent of the speed and mixing time. The mean particle size of the flaxseed oil emulsions prepared using the two mixing devices ranged from 23.99?±?1.34 ?m to 47.22?±?1.99 ?m where else the particle size distribution and microstructure of the flaxseed oil emulsions demonstrated using microscopic imaging were quite similar. The flaxseed oil emulsions had a similar apparent viscosity and exhibited shear thinning (pseudoplastic) behavior. The flaxseed oil emulsions had L* value above 70 and was in the red-yellow color region (positive a* and b* values). PMID:26139903

  20. Produced fluid emulsions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, C.F.; Himmelblau, A.; Trom, L.

    1984-09-01

    Emulsion production and stabilization may be due to one or more of several phenomenon including water-oil ratio, oil and brine chemistry, and surfactant and polymer type and concentration. They may influence emulsification either independently or with dependence on one or more of the other factors. Task One has tried to define which factors are dominant and what effect variations in them will have on the emulsion characteristics for each of the fields investigated. Emulsions were produced using a hand homogenizer at a fixed setting for a specific length of time to ensure all samples were produced uniformly. A du Nouy apparatus was used to measure surface and interfacial tensions and a binocular microscope was used in the micro-visual studies. The emulsions were treated in a similar manner with a wide variety of materials to not only break them, but also to help define which mechanisms are responsible for the stabilization of a particular emulsion. Core floods in Task Two utilized a six-foot sand-pack for a mixing medium. A six-inch long Berea core which followed, provided shear similar to that of the reservoir. The choice of oil, brine, surfactant and polymer were chosen to correlate to the Task One studies. Similarities and differences in the results between the bench-top and core flood studies are noted. The conditions of emulsion production and characteristics and the effectiveness of emulsion breakers are compared to help determine the mechanism of emulsion stabilization. 8 figures, 85 tables.

  1. Rubberized asphalt emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, E.

    1986-09-02

    A method is described of making a rubberized asphalt composition which comprises the steps of: (a) combining asphalt with a hydrocarbon oil having a flash point of 300/sup 0/F. or more to provide a homogenous asphalt-oil mixture or solution, (b) then combining the asphalt-oil mixture with a particulate rubber at a temperature sufficient to provide a homogenous asphalt-rubber-oil gel, and (c) emulsifying the asphalt-rubber-oil gel by passing the gel, water, and an emulsifying agent through a colloid mill to provide an emulsion.

  2. A quality by design approach to optimization of emulsions for electrospinning using factorial and D-optimal designs.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Mariam A; El-Khordagui, Labiba K

    2014-07-16

    Emulsion electrospinning is a multifactorial process used to generate nanofibers loaded with hydrophilic drugs or macromolecules for diverse biomedical applications. Emulsion electrospinnability is greatly impacted by the emulsion pharmaceutical attributes. The aim of this study was to apply a quality by design (QbD) approach based on design of experiments as a risk-based proactive approach to achieve predictable critical quality attributes (CQAs) in w/o emulsions for electrospinning. Polycaprolactone (PCL)-thickened w/o emulsions containing doxycycline HCl were formulated using a Span 60/sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) emulsifier blend. The identified emulsion CQAs (stability, viscosity and conductivity) were linked with electrospinnability using a 3(3) factorial design to optimize emulsion composition for phase stability and a D-optimal design to optimize stable emulsions for viscosity and conductivity after shifting the design space. The three independent variables, emulsifier blend composition, organic:aqueous phase ratio and polymer concentration, had a significant effect (p<0.05) on emulsion CQAs, the emulsifier blend composition exerting prominent main and interaction effects. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of emulsion-electrospun NFs and desirability functions allowed modeling of emulsion CQAs to predict electrospinnable formulations. A QbD approach successfully built quality in electrospinnable emulsions, allowing development of hydrophilic drug-loaded nanofibers with desired morphological characteristics. PMID:24704153

  3. Programmed emulsions for sodium reduction in emulsion based foods.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Natalie; Hewson, Louise; Fisk, Ian; Wolf, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    In this research a microstructure approach to reduce sodium levels in emulsion based foods is presented. If successful, this strategy will enable reduction of sodium without affecting consumer satisfaction with regard to salty taste. The microstructure approach comprised of entrapment of sodium in the internal aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. These were designed to destabilise during oral processing when in contact with the salivary enzyme amylase in combination with the mechanical manipulation of the emulsion between the tongue and palate. Oral destabilisation was achieved through breakdown of the emulsion that was stabilised with a commercially modified octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-starch. Microstructure breakdown and salt release was evaluated utilising in vitro, in vivo and sensory methods. For control emulsions, stabilised with orally inert proteins, no loss of structure and no release of sodium from the internal aqueous phase was found. The OSA-starch microstructure breakdown took the initial form of oil droplet coalescence. It is hypothesised that during this coalescence process sodium from the internalised aqueous phase is partially released and is therefore available for perception. Indeed, programmed emulsions showed an enhancement in saltiness perception; a 23.7% reduction in sodium could be achieved without compromise in salty taste (p < 0.05; 120 consumers). This study shows a promising new approach for sodium reduction in liquid and semi-liquid emulsion based foods. PMID:25865459

  4. Preparation of Pickering double emulsions using block copolymer worms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Mable, Charlotte J; Lane, Jacob A; Derry, Mathew J; Fielding, Lee A; Armes, Steven P

    2015-04-14

    The rational formulation of Pickering double emulsions is described using a judicious combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic block copolymer worms as highly anisotropic emulsifiers. More specifically, RAFT dispersion polymerization was utilized to prepare poly(lauryl methacrylate)-poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 20% w/w solids in n-dodecane and poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate)-poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 13% w/w solids in water by polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions can be readily prepared with mean droplet diameters ranging from 30 to 80 ?m using a two-stage approach. First, a w/o precursor emulsion comprising 25 ?m aqueous droplets is prepared using the hydrophobic worms, followed by encapsulation within oil droplets stabilized by the hydrophilic worms. The double emulsion droplet diameter and number of encapsulated water droplets can be readily varied by adjusting the stirring rate employed during the second stage. For each stage, the droplet volume fraction is relatively high at 0.50. The double emulsion nature of the final formulation was confirmed by optical and fluorescence microscopy studies. Such double emulsions are highly stable to coalescence, with little or no change in droplet diameter being detected over storage at 20 °C for 10 weeks as judged by laser diffraction. Preliminary experiments indicate that the complementary o/w/o emulsions can also be prepared using the same pair of worms by changing the order of homogenization, although somewhat lower droplet volume fractions were required in this case. Finally, we demonstrate that triple and even quadruple emulsions can be formulated using these new highly anisotropic Pickering emulsifiers. PMID:25834923

  5. Preparation of Pickering Double Emulsions Using Block Copolymer Worms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rational formulation of Pickering double emulsions is described using a judicious combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic block copolymer worms as highly anisotropic emulsifiers. More specifically, RAFT dispersion polymerization was utilized to prepare poly(lauryl methacrylate)–poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 20% w/w solids in n-dodecane and poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)–poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate)–poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 13% w/w solids in water by polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions can be readily prepared with mean droplet diameters ranging from 30 to 80 ?m using a two-stage approach. First, a w/o precursor emulsion comprising 25 ?m aqueous droplets is prepared using the hydrophobic worms, followed by encapsulation within oil droplets stabilized by the hydrophilic worms. The double emulsion droplet diameter and number of encapsulated water droplets can be readily varied by adjusting the stirring rate employed during the second stage. For each stage, the droplet volume fraction is relatively high at 0.50. The double emulsion nature of the final formulation was confirmed by optical and fluorescence microscopy studies. Such double emulsions are highly stable to coalescence, with little or no change in droplet diameter being detected over storage at 20 °C for 10 weeks as judged by laser diffraction. Preliminary experiments indicate that the complementary o/w/o emulsions can also be prepared using the same pair of worms by changing the order of homogenization, although somewhat lower droplet volume fractions were required in this case. Finally, we demonstrate that triple and even quadruple emulsions can be formulated using these new highly anisotropic Pickering emulsifiers. PMID:25834923

  6. Status of Salerno Laboratory (Measurements in Nuclear Emulsion)

    E-print Network

    S. Amendola; E. Barbuto; C. Bozza; C. D'Apolito; A. Di Bartolomeo; M. Funaro; G. Grella; G. Iovane; P. Pelosi; G. Romano

    1999-01-25

    A report on the analysis work in the Salerno Emulsion Laboratory is presented. It is related to the search for nu_mu->nu_tau oscillations in CHORUS experiment, the calibrations in the WANF (West Area Neutrino Facility) at Cern and tests and preparation for new experiments.

  7. The Preparation and Testing of a Common Emulsion and Personal Care Product: Lotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabrouk, Suzanne T.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical analysis of lotions, which comprises of categorizations of moisturizers and emulsions, with the preparation and testing of three lotions, is done. The experiment piques students' interest in preparing lotions and emulsions, and proves the value of chemistry in satisfying the needs of everyday life.

  8. Particle Identification in Nuclear Emulsion by Measuring Multiple Coulomb Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Than Tint, Khin; Nakazawa, Kazuma; Yoshida, Junya; Kyaw Soe, Myint; Mishina, Akihiro; Kinbara, Shinji; Itoh, Hiroki; Endo, Yoko; Kobayashi, Hidetaka; E07 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We are developing particle identification techniques for single charged particles such as Xi, proton, K and ? by measuring multiple Coulomb scattering in nuclear emulsion. Nuclear emulsion is the best three dimensional detector for double strangeness (S = -2) nuclear system. We expect to accumulate about 10000 Xi-minus stop events which produce double lambda hypernucleus in J-PARC E07 emulsion counter hybrid experiment. The purpose of this particle identification (PID) in nuclear emulsion is to purify Xi-minus stop events which gives information about production probability of double hypernucleus and branching ratio of decay mode. Amount of scattering parameterized as angular distribution and second difference is inversely proportional to the momentum of particle. We produced several thousands of various charged particle tracks in nuclear emulsion stack via Geant4 simulation. In this talk, PID with some measuring methods for multiple scattering will be discussed by comparing with simulation data and real Xi-minus stop events in KEK-E373 experiment.

  9. Thermocapillary Motion in an Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukhnachov, Vladislav V.; Voinov, Oleg V.

    1996-01-01

    The phenomenological model for the motion of an emulsion or a gas-liquid mixture exposed to thermocapillary forces and micro-acceleration is formulated. The analytical and numerical investigation of one-dimensional flows for these media is fulfilled, the structure of discontinuous motion is studied. The stability conditions of a space-uniform state and of the interface between an emulsion and a pure liquid are obtained.

  10. Modeling of metallurgical emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zuohua; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    1994-12-01

    Emulsification behavior caused by gas bubbles rising through a slag/metal interface has been studied in both a thin-slice model and a three-dimensional model using low-temperature oil/aqueous and oil/mercury analogues. A generalized model characterizing the transitional volume of droplets entrained in the upper phase in the emulsification process was developed. The transient volume of “metal” entrained, V d(t), following the start of bubbling followed the relation V d(t) = V ?(1 - e (t/?)). This model is also of general significance to other metallurgical emulsification processes, such as those induced by iron ore reduction and top blowing, regardless of the mechanisms of droplet generation. Based on this model, the birth rate and mean residence time of droplets dispersed by rising bubbles can be quantified. Dimensional analysis was used to express the volume of lower liquid carried up into the emulsion per bubble, thereby allowing better estimates of the droplet birth rate in a practical emulsification process induced by bottom blowing. Emulsification behaviors in industrial in-bath smelting processes were interpreted with the present modeling results.

  11. Hadrons registration in emulsion chamber with carbon block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaszewski, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear-electro-magnetic cascade (NEC) in X-ray emulsion chambers with carbon block, which are usually used in the Pamir experiment, was Monte-Carlo simulated. Going over from optical density to Summary E sub gamma is discussed. The hole of NEC in the interpretation of energy spectra is analyzed.

  12. Arrested of coalescence of emulsion droplets of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Burke, Christopher; Blair, Donald W.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    With applications ranging from food products to cosmetics via targeted drug delivery systems, structured anisotropic colloids provide an efficient way to control the structure, properties and functions of emulsions. When two fluid emulsion droplets are brought in contact, a reduction of the interfacial tension drives their coalescence into a larger droplet of the same total volume and reduced exposed area. This coalescence can be partially or totally hindered by the presence of nano or micron-size particles that coat the interface as in Pickering emulsions. We investigate numerically the dependance of the mechanical stability of these arrested shapes on the particles size, their shape anisotropy, their polydispersity, their interaction with the solvent, and the particle-particle interactions. We discuss structural shape changes that can be induced by tuning the particles interactions after arrest occurs, and provide design parameters for the relevant experiments.

  13. Micromixers to produce cosmetic emulsions.

    PubMed

    Tromeur, M; Mahé, C; Schwesinger, N; Tranchant, J-F

    2003-04-01

    In the cosmetics industry, emulsions play a key-role in active solubilization and texture/efficacy optimization. However, depending on their physico-chemical properties, the active ingredients are often more stable in a single phase: for example, Vitamin A is more stable in an oily phase than in a water phase. We have developed a special mixing device which produces an emulsion in the body of the pump, immediately before application on the skin. The mixing unit consists of two silicon chips. Each chip has several Y-shaped microchannels and intersections etched on its upper surface. When the two etched surfaces are bonded together, they produce series of interconnecting micromixing elements which permit the repeat mixing of the two phases, thus producing an extremely homogenous emulsion. These micromixers require carefully designed formulae in which the physico-chemical properties of each raw material are essential to obtain a spontaneous emulsion. This device has been incorporated into a spray pack and optimized to deliver the spontaneous emulsion when finger pressure is applied. PMID:18494875

  14. Emulsion properties of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) proteins.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Sergio; van Konigsveld, Gerrit A; Vereijken, Johan M; Merck, Karin B; Gruppen, Harry; Voragen, Alphons G J

    2005-03-23

    Emulsions were made with sunflower protein isolate (SI), helianthinin, and sunflower albumins (SFAs). Emulsion formation and stabilization were studied as a function of pH and ionic strength and after heat treatment of the proteins. The emulsions were characterized with respect to average droplet size, surface excess, and the occurrence of coalescence and/or droplet aggregation. Sunflower proteins were shown to form stable emulsions, with the exception of SFAs at neutral and alkaline pH values. Droplet aggregation occurred in emulsions made with SI, helianthinin, and SFAs. Droplet aggregation and subsequent coalescence of emulsions made with SFAs could be prevented at pH 3. Calcium was found to cause droplet aggregation of emulsions made with helianthinin, at neutral and alkaline pH values. Treatments that increase conformational flexibility of the protein molecule improved the emulsion properties of sunflower proteins. PMID:15769166

  15. Rapid crystallization and morphological adjustment of zeolite ZSM-5 in nonionic emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ying; Jin Chao

    2011-01-15

    Zeolite ZSM-5 was synthesized for the first time in a nonionic emulsion composed of polyoxyethylated alkylphenol, butanol, cyclohexane and tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAOH)-containing zeolite synthesis mixture. The crystallization kinetics in the emulsion was investigated and the ZSM-5 product was characterized in detail by XRD, SEM, FT-IR, TG, N{sub 2} adsorption and CHN analysis techniques. Compared with the conventionally hydrothermal synthesis with the same structure directing agent TEAOH, the emulsion system allows rapid crystallization of ZSM-5. The ZSM-5 product exhibits unusual agglomerated structure and possesses larger specific surface area. The FT-IR, TG results plus CHN analysis show the encapsulation of a trace of emulsion components in the emulsion ZSM-5. Control experiments show the emulsion system exerts the crystallization induction and morphological adjustment effects mainly during the aging period. The effects are tentatively attributed to the confined space domains, surfactant-water interaction as well as surfactant-growing crystals interaction existing in the emulsion. -- Graphical abstract: The nonionic emulsion synthesis allows rapid crystallization and morphological adjustment of zeolite ZSM-5 compared with the conventional hydrothermal synthesis. Display Omitted

  16. Modeling of the centering force in a compound emulsion to make uniform plastic shells for laser fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Norimatsu, T.; Izawa, Y.; Mima, K.; Gresho, P.M.

    1999-03-01

    In laser fusion experiment, fuel capsules with high sphericity and high wall-thickness uniformity are often fabricated by the emulsion method. To understand the process of forming the uniform wall by the emulsion method and to further improve the thickness uniformity, the formulated a model to simulate the centering process of a water globule in a compound emulsion. The authors newly added a thermodynamic force to the centering force in addition to previous hydrodynamic forces. The results indicate that nonuniform emulsion turns to be uniform by repeating instantaneous deformations followed with continuous rotation around the horizontal axis.

  17. Microwave emulsion treater with internal coalescer

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, N.O.; Seidner, D.S.

    1989-08-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a microwave-based emulsion treating system comprising a microwave energy source and a microwave energy applicator having an inlet for an oil and water emulsion to be treated with microwave energy and an outlet for discharge of treated oil and water. The improvement comprising a coalescer medium having a dielectric constant at 2450 MHz of from about 0.1 to about 15 and a loss factor of less than 2 positioned inside the applicator for contacting the emulsion simultaneously with treatment of the emulsion by microwave energy wherein the emulsion contacts the coalescer medium while the emulsion contains the most heat energy from the microwave source to enhance separation of the water from the emulsion.

  18. Adelphi-Goddard emulsified fuel project. [using water/oil emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Thermal efficiency and particle emissions were studied using water/oil emulsions. These studies were done using number 2 and number 6 fuel oil. The number 6 oil had a sulfur content greater than one percent and experiments were conducted to remove the sulfur dioxide from the stack gases. Test findings include: (1) emulsion effected a reduction in soot at a low excess air levels; (2) a steam atomizing system will produce a water/oil emulsion. The fuel in the study was emulsified in the steam atomization process, hence, pre-emulsification did not yield a dramatic reduction in soot or an increase in thermal efficiency.

  19. Measurement of event-by-event transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations using strongly intensive measures ? [PT,N ] and ? [PT,N ] in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anticic, T.; Baatar, B.; Bartke, J.; Beck, H.; Betev, L.; Bia?kowska, H.; Blume, C.; Boimska, B.; Book, J.; Botje, M.; Bun?i?, P.; Christakoglou, P.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J.; Eckardt, V.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Friese, V.; Ga?dzicki, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Höhne, C.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kolesnikov, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kresan, D.; Laszlo, A.; Lacey, R.; van Leeuwen, M.; Ma?kowiak-Paw?owska, M.; Makariev, M.; Malakhov, A.; Melkumov, G.; Mitrovski, M.; Mrówczy?ski, S.; Pálla, G.; Panagiotou, A.; Pluta, J.; Prindle, D.; Pühlhofer, F.; Renfordt, R.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rybczy?ski, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, A.; Rustamov, A.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T.; Seyboth, P.; Siklér, F.; Skrzypczak, E.; S?odkowski, M.; Stefanek, G.; Stock, R.; Ströbele, H.; Susa, T.; Szuba, M.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vrani?, D.; W?odarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; NA49 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Results from the NA49 experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) are presented on event-by-event transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations of charged particles, produced at forward rapidities in central Pb + Pb interactions at beam momenta 20 A , 30 A , 40 A , 80 A , and 158 A GeV/c, as well as in systems of different sizes (p +p , C + C, Si + Si, and Pb + Pb) at 158 A GeV/c. This publication extends the previous NA49 measurements of the strongly intensive measure ?p T by a study of the recently proposed strongly intensive measures of fluctuations ? [PT,N ] and ? [PT,N ] . In the explored kinematic region transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations show no significant energy dependence in the SPS energy range. However, a remarkable system size dependence is observed for both ? [PT,N ] and ? [PT,N ] , with the largest values measured in peripheral Pb + Pb interactions. The results are compared with NA61/SHINE (SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) measurements in p +p collisions, as well as with predictions of The Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics and EPOS models.

  20. Scaling properties of fractional momentum loss of high-pT hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ from 62.4 GeV to 2.76 TeV

    E-print Network

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; R. Akimoto; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; M. Alfred; H. Al-Ta'ani; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; H. Asano; E. C. Aschenauer; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; N. S. Bandara; B. Bannier; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; S. Baumgart; A. Bazilevsky; M. Beaumier; S. Beckman; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; J. Bryslawskyj; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; C. M. Camacho; S. Campbell; P. Castera; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; C. -H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; S. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; C. R. Cleven; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; D. Danley; K. Das; A. Datta; M. S. Daugherity; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. DeBlasio; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; L. Ding; A. Dion; P. B. Diss; J. H. Do; M. Donadelli; L. D'Orazio; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; N. Feege; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; K. Gainey; C. Gal; P. Gallus; P. Garg; A. Garishvili; I. Garishvili; H. Ge; F. Giordano; A. Glenn; H. Gong; X. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; L. Guo; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; H. F. Hamilton; R. Han; S. Y. Han; J. Hanks; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; S. Hasegawa; T. O. S. Haseler; K. Hashimoto; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; R. S. Hollis; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; Y. Hori; D. Hornback; T. Hoshino; N. Hotvedt; J. Huang; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; J. Ide; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; J. Imrek; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; A. Iordanova; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanishchev; B. V. Jacak; M. Javani; M. Jezghani; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; S. Kanda; M. Kaneta; S. Kaneti; B. H. Kang; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; H. Kanou; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; J. A. Key; V. Khachatryan; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; B. I. Kim; C. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; E. -J. Kim; G. W. Kim; H. J. Kim; K. -B. Kim; M. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; Y. K. Kim; B. Kimelman; E. Kinney; K. Kiriluk; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; R. Kitamura; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klatsky; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; D. Kleinjan; P. Kline; T. Koblesky; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; Y. Komatsu; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; F. Krizek; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; B. Lee; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. K. Lee; S Lee; S. H. Lee; S. R. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; M. Leitgab; E. Leitner; B. Lenzi; B. Lewis; X. Li; P. Liebing; S. H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; R. Luechtenborg; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; M. Makek; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; A. Manion; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; S. Masumoto; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; C. McKinney; N. Means; A. Meles; M. Mendoza; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; D. K. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; Y. Miyachi; S. Miyasaka; S. Mizuno; A. K. Mohanty; S. Mohapatra; P. Montuenga; H. J. Moon; T. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; S. Motschwiller; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; T. Murakami; J. Murata; A. Mwai; T. Nagae; S. Nagamiya; K. Nagashima; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; H. Nakagomi; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; C. Nattrass; A. Nederlof

    2015-09-22

    Measurements of the fractional momentum loss ($S_{\\rm loss}\\equiv{\\delta}p_T/p_T$) of high-transverse-momentum-identified hadrons in heavy ion collisions are presented. Using $\\pi^0$ in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=62.4$ and 200 GeV measured by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and and charged hadrons in Pb$+$Pb collisions measured by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, we studied the scaling properties of $S_{\\rm loss}$ as a function of a number of variables: the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$, the number of quark participants, $N_{\\rm qp}$, the charged-particle density, $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$, and the Bjorken energy density times the equilibration time, $\\varepsilon_{\\rm Bj}\\tau_{0}$. We find that the $p_T$ where $S_{\\rm loss}$ has its maximum, varies both with centrality and collision energy. Above the maximum, $S_{\\rm loss}$ tends to follow a power-law function with all four scaling variables. The data at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV and 2.76 TeV, for sufficiently high particle densities, have a common scaling of $S_{\\rm loss}$ with $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$ and $\\varepsilon_{\\rm Bj}\\tau_{0}$, lending insight on the physics of parton energy loss.

  1. Scaling properties of fractional momentum loss of high-pT hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ from 62.4 GeV to 2.76 TeV

    E-print Network

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Ta'ani, H; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Castera, P; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörg?, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Deaton, M B; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Mohapatra, S; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagae, T; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Nederlof, A; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the fractional momentum loss ($S_{\\rm loss}\\equiv{\\delta}p_T/p_T$) of high-transverse-momentum-identified hadrons in heavy ion collisions are presented. Using $\\pi^0$ in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=62.4$ and 200 GeV measured by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and and charged hadrons in Pb$+$Pb collisions measured by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, we studied the scaling properties of $S_{\\rm loss}$ as a function of a number of variables: the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$, the number of quark participants, $N_{\\rm qp}$, the charged-particle density, $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$, and the Bjorken energy density times the equilibration time, $\\varepsilon_{\\rm Bj}\\tau_{0}$. We find that the $p_T$ where $S_{\\rm loss}$ has its maximum, varies both with centrality and collision energy. Above the maximum, $S_{\\rm loss}$ tends to follow a power-law function with all four scaling variables. The data at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV and ...

  2. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to concentration and micellization of the surfactant. At the same time, the silica solidifies around the surfactant structures, forming equally sized mesoporous particles. The procedure can be tuned to produce well-separated particles or alternatively particles that are linked together. The latter allows us to create 2D or 3D structures with hierarchical porosity. Oil, water, and surfactant liquid mixtures exhibit very complex phase behavior. Depending on the conditions, such mixtures give rise to highly organized structures. A proper selection of the type and concentration of surfactants determines the structuring at the nanoscale level. In this work, we show that hierarchically bimodal nanoporous structures can be obtained by templating silica microparticles with a specially designed surfactant micelle/microemulsion mixture. Tuning the phase state by adjusting the surfactant composition and concentration allows for the controlled design of a system where microemulsion droplets coexist with smaller surfactant micellar structures. The microemulsion droplet and micellar dimensions determine the two types of pore sizes (single nanometers and tens of nanometers). We also demonstrate the fabrication of carbon and carbon/platinum replicas of the silica microspheres using a "lost-wax" approach. Such particles have great potential for the design of electrocatalysts for fuel cells, chromatography separations, and other applications. It was determined that slight variations in microemulsion mixture components (electrolyte concentration, wt% of surfactants, oil to sol ratio, etc.) produces strikingly different pore morphologies and particle surface areas. Control over the size and structure of the smaller micelle-templated pores was made possible by varying the length of the hydrocarbon block within the trimethyl ammonium bromide surfactant and characterized using X-ray diffraction. The effect of emulsion aging was studied by synthesizing particles at progressive time levels from a sample emulsion. It was discovered surface pore size increases after just a few hours, with

  3. Mass Production of Large-sized Nuclear Emulsion Plates for J-PARC E07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroki; Endo, Yoko; Hoshino, Kaoru; Than Tint, Khin; Kinbara, Shinji; Kobayashi, Hidetaka; Mishina, Akihiro; Kyaw Soe, Myint; Xue, Yaling; Yoshida, Junya; Hai, Zhang Dong; Nakazawa, Kazuma

    In the E07 experiment at J-PARC, we systematically study double strangeness (S = -2) systems on ?-? and ?--N interaction via S = -2 nuclei such as double ? hypernuclei and twin ? hypernuclei with hybrid-emulsion method. The number of S = -2 nuclei is planned to be about 102 which is 10 times or more events than that of the E373 experiment at KEK-PS. We have to prepare for large-scale emulsion plates by huge amount of emulsion gel with weight of 2.1 t, which is about 3 times' quantity used for E373. To make it possible, we have developed methods for treatment of supporting films and for making emulsion plates. We have successfully produced 1500 plates.

  4. Analysis of emulsion stability in acrylic dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions either micro or nano permit transport or solubilization of hydrophobic substances within a water-based phase. Different methods have been introduced at laboratory and industrial scales: mechanical stirring, high-pressure homogenization, or ultrasonics. In digital imaging, toners may be formed by aggregating a colorant with a latex polymer formed by batch or semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. Latex emulsions are prepared by making a monomer emulsion with monomer like Beta-carboxy ethyl acrylate (?-CEA) and stirring at high speed with an anionic surfactant like branched sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonates , aqueous solution until an emulsion is formed. Initiator for emulsion polymerization is 2-2'- azobis isobutyramide dehydrate with chain transfer agent are used to make the latex. If the latex emulsion is unstable, the resulting latexes produce a toner with larger particle size, broader particle size distribution with relatively higher latex sedimentation, and broader molecular weight distribution. Oswald ripening and coalescence cause droplet size to increase and can result in destabilization of emulsions. Shear thinning and elasticity of emulsions are applied to determine emulsion stability.

  5. Deflagration products from emulsion explosive unconventional nano-powders from ion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinghua; Zhu, Jing; Zhou, Huisheng

    2009-09-01

    The present situation of detonation synthesis and emulsion explosives is summarized. To solve the problems in research for lithium ion batteries, we suggested that zinc and lithium oxides should be used as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. So, we design unconventional emulsion explosives, and synthesize zinc and lithium oxides by means of deflagration firstly. Also, microstructures and morphology of nanometer thin sheets in the deflagration soot of emulsion explosives are measured in our experiments; namely, we surveyed and analyzed products with the implement of XRD, TEM and FTIR. It is concluded that nanoparticles of lithium and zinc oxides can be synthesized through deflagration of the unconventional emulsion explosive. Main contents and research results are as follows: First, unconventional emulsion explosives for synthesis of zinc and lithium oxides are designed firstly, and we also discuss mechanics of deflagration. In the final analysis, we succeeded in synthesizing nano-sheets of zinc and lithium oxides by deflagrating at the fist time. Second, we tested microstructures of nanometer thin sheets of lithium and zinc composite oxides. Third, by contrast to industrial emulsion explosives, we analyzed the deflagration mechanics of the unconventional emulsion explosives. Last, zinc and lithium nanooxides are successfully collected and validated by XRD, TEM and FTIR exactly.

  6. Use of micro-emulsion technology for the directed evolution of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Buhr, Diane L; Acca, Felicity E; Holland, Erika G; Johnson, Katie; Maksymiuk, Gail M; Vaill, Ada; Kay, Brian K; Weitz, David A; Weiner, Michael P; Kiss, Margaret M

    2012-09-01

    Affinity reagents, such as antibodies, are needed to study protein expression patterns, sub-cellular localization, and post-translational modifications in complex mixtures and tissues. Phage Emulsion, Secretion, and Capture (ESCape) is a novel micro-emulsion technology that utilizes water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions for the identification and isolation of cells secreting phage particles that display desirable antibodies. Using this method, a large library of antibody-displaying phage will bind to beads in individual compartments. Rather than using biopanning on a large mixed population, phage micro-emulsion technology allows us to individually query clonal populations of amplified phage against the antigen. The use of emulsions to generate microdroplets has the promise of accelerating phage selection experiments by permitting fine discrimination of kinetic parameters for binding to targets. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of phage micro-emulsion technology to distinguish two scFvs with a 300-fold difference in binding affinities (100nM and 300pM, respectively). In addition, we describe the application of phage micro-emulsion technology for the selection of scFvs that are resistant to elevated temperatures. PMID:22819852

  7. Demulsification of oil-in-water emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Roark, D.N.

    1986-09-30

    This patent describes a process of demulsifying an oil-in-water emulsion which comprises admixing with the emulsion a water-soluble polymer of monoallylamine that causes formation of and separation between an oil phase and an aqueous phase to occur. The emulsion has a pH in the range of about 5 to about 10 and the polymer has a weight average molecular weight of at least 1000 and contains at least 95% by weight of monoallylamine.

  8. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  9. Flow of Oil-Water Emulsion Through Constricted Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos, S.; Carvalho, M. S.; Alvarado, V.

    2008-07-01

    The flow of oil-in-water emulsions through a constricted capillary tube was analyzed by experiments and theory. The experiments consisted of flow visualization and pressure drop measurements of the flow. A number of different emulsions were prepared using synthetic oils and deionized water. The average drop size varied from smaller to larger than the neck radius. Fluid mobility, defined as flow rate over pressure drop, was used to quantify the magnitude of the pore-blocking caused by drops larger than the constriction radius. The effect of the interfacial tension and viscosity ratio between the two phases on the changes of the local mobility was determined by solving the free surface flow of an infinite oil drop immersed in water flowing through a constricted capillary tube by Finite Element Method.

  10. Spreading of Emulsions on Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2012-11-01

    The wettability of emulsions is an important factor with explicit influence in an extensive variety of industrial applications ranging from the petroleum to food industries. Surprisingly, there is no comprehensive study of emulsion spreading to date; this is due to the complexity of the structure of the emulsions and non-homogeneity of the dispersed phase bubbles in size as well as distribution through the emulsion. The spreading of water/silicone oil emulsions on glass substrates was investigated. The emulsions were prepared with varying volume fractions of water dispersed in silicone oil, with addition of small amounts of surfactant to stabilize the emulsion structure. The time dependent variation of dynamic contact angle, base diameter, and the spreading rate of the droplets of an emulsion are different from a pure substance. The effect of water/silicone oil weight percentage as well as the droplet size and dispersed phase bubble size were also investigated. The weight percentage of water/silicone oil emulsion and droplet size did not have significant influence on the spreading dynamics; however the dispersed phase drop size affected the spreading dynamics substantially.

  11. Observations of vaporizing water-in-fuel emulsion droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Baer, M.R.; Denison, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    These observations in a Leidenfrost-type experiment allowed one to distinguish between different mechanisms in the emulsion combustion process. Three events were observed: disruptions, heterogeneously nucleated vapor explosions, and homogeneously nucleated vapor explosions. The last event greatly enhances combustion. The cenospheres, carbospheres or oil-coke particles formed will be reduced or eliminated by the vapor explosions, and any small solid fragments are likely to be consumed in the enhanced combustion processes. (DLC)

  12. A new method to correct deformations in emulsion using a precise photomask

    E-print Network

    M. Kimura; H. Ishida; H. Shibuya; S. Ogawa; T. Matsuo; C. Fukushima; G. Takahashi; K. Kuge; Y. Sato; I. Tezuka; S. Mikado

    2012-10-04

    A new method to correct the emulsion deformation, mainly produced in the development process, is developed to recover the high accuracy of nuclear emulsion as a tracking device. The method is based on a precise photomask and a careful treatment of the emulsion films. A position measurement accuracy of 0.6 {\\mu}m is obtained over an area of 5 cm x 7 cm. The method allows to measure positions of track segments with submicron accuracy in an ECC brick with as few as 10 reference tracks for alignment. Such a performance can be important for hybrid emulsion experiments at underground laboratories where only a small number of reference tracks for alignment are available.

  13. A new fast scanning system for the measurement of large angle tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Buonaura, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Galati, G.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Pupilli, F.; Shchedrina, T.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear emulsions have been widely used in particle physics to identify new particles through the observation of their decays thanks to their unique spatial resolution. Nevertheless, before the advent of automatic scanning systems, the emulsion analysis was very demanding in terms of well trained manpower. Due to this reason, they were gradually replaced by electronic detectors, until the '90s, when automatic microscopes started to be developed in Japan and in Europe. Automatic scanning was essential to conceive large scale emulsion-based neutrino experiments like CHORUS, DONUT and OPERA. Standard scanning systems have been initially designed to recognize tracks within a limited angular acceptance (? lesssim 30°) where ? is the track angle with respect to a line perpendicular to the emulsion plane. In this paper we describe the implementation of a novel fast automatic scanning system aimed at extending the track recognition to the full angular range and improving the present scanning speed. Indeed, nuclear emulsions do not have any intrinsic limit to detect particle direction. Such improvement opens new perspectives to use nuclear emulsions in several fields in addition to large scale neutrino experiments, like muon radiography, medical applications and dark matter directional detection.

  14. Subthreshold Antiproton Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions 

    E-print Network

    Ko, Che Ming; Xia, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    , Tianjin, People's Republic of China. ~ J. B.Carrol et al. , Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 1829 (1989). 2A. Shor, V. Perez-Mendez, and K. Ganezer, Lawrence Berke- ley Laboratory Report No. LBL-17067, 1984 (unpublished). 3C. M. Ko and X. Ge, Phys. Lett. B 205...

  15. The LHC as a Nucleus-Nucleus Collider

    E-print Network

    Jowett, John M

    2008-01-01

    This paper begins with a summary of the status of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, including the lead-ion injector chain and the plans for the first phases of commissioning and operation with colliding proton beams. In a later phase, the LHC will collide lead nuclei at centre-of-mass energies of 5.5 TeV per colliding nucleon pair. This leap to 28 times beyond what is presently accessible will open up a new regime, not only in the experimental study of nuclear matter, but also in the beam physics of hadron colliders. Ultraperipheral and hadronic interactions of highly-charged beam nuclei will cause beam losses that dominate the luminosity decay and may quench superconducting magnets, setting upper limits on luminosity and stored beam current. Lower limits are set by beam instrumentation. On the other hand, coherent radiation by the nuclear charges should provide natural cooling to overcome intra-beam scattering. As with protons, a flexible, staged approach to full performance will test the limits and make op...

  16. Minijet production in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kajantie, K.; Landshoff, P.V.; Lindfors, J.

    1987-11-30

    Uranium-uranium collisions at the energy of the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (100+100 GeV per nucleon) are predicted to produce an average of nearly 100 jets with p/sub T/>3 GeV. These jets will on average carry off 70 GeV of transverse energy E/sub T/ per unit rapidity. Central collisions produce more transverse energy than this; the E/sub T/ distribution extends up to about 5A/sup 4/3//p/sub Tmin//sup 3/ GeV per unit rapidity (p/sub T/ in GeV), which is 4 times the average. It is estimated that the minijets are likely to undergo further collisions and become thermalized.

  17. Relativistic nucleus nucleus collisions: from the BEVALAC to RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Reinhard

    2004-08-01

    I briefly describe the initial goals of relativistic nuclear collision research, focusing on the LBL Bevatron/Bevalac facility in the 1970s. An early concept of high hadronic density fireball formation, and subsequent isentropic decay (preserving information of the high-density stage), led to an outline of physics observables that could determine the nuclear matter equation of state at several times the nuclear ground state matter density. With the advent of QCD the goal of locating and characterizing the hadron-parton deconfinement phase transformation suggested the need for higher \\sqrt{s} , the research thus shifting to the BNL AGS and CERN SPS, and finally to RHIC at BNL. A set of physics observables is discussed where present data span the entire \\sqrt{s} domain, from Bevalac and SIS at GSI, to high RHIC energy. Referring, selectively, to data concerning bulk hadron production, the overall \\sqrt{s} evolution of directed and radial flow observables, and of pion pair Bose-Einstein correlation is discussed. The hadronization process is studied in the grand canonical statistical model. The resulting hadronization points in the plane T versus mgrB converge onto the parton-hadron phase boundary predicted by finite mgrB lattice QCD, from high SPS to RHIC energy. At lower SPS and high AGS energy a steep strangeness maximum occurs at which the Wroblewski parameter lgrsap 0.6; a possible connection to the QCD critical point is discussed. Finally the unique new RHIC physics is addressed: high-pT hadron suppression and jet 'tomography'.

  18. Subthreshold Antiproton Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions 

    E-print Network

    LI, GQ; Ko, Che Ming; Fang, X. S.; Zheng, Y. M.

    1994-01-01

    .abundance, resp r rimordial antipro- the ot er o t annihilation. raccount anni h dti rotons can tic calculationd. The schematicbe detecte 'h'lation is 90 0, tor of 2?3. ni ' b bo t f to assumes l d d' 1 fh 't is high. Antiprotons ~ c when the mat...

  19. Treatment of oil-in-water emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Presley, C.T.; Harrison, R.J.

    1980-01-08

    Petroleum is separated from an oil-in-water emulsion containing water-soluble polymer such as polyacrylamide prior to refining by adding amphoteric metal cations (Zn, Al, Sn, and Co) to the emulsion to form a flocculate and then treating the resulting flocculate with a strong base to recover the oil and metal. 11 claims.

  20. Treatment of oil-in-water emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, R.J.; Presley, C.T.

    1980-01-08

    Petroleum is separated from an ''oil-in-water'' emulsion containing water-soluble polymer prior to refining by adding amphoteric metal cations to the emulsion to form a flocculate and then treating the resulting flocculate with a strong base to recover the oil and metal.

  1. Dynamic modeling of emulsion polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Penlidis, A.; Hamielec, A.E.; MacGregor, J.F.

    1985-06-01

    This paper is a survey of recent published works on the dynamic and steady state modeling of emulsion homo- and copolymerization in batch, semicontinuous , and continuous latex reactors. Contributions to our understanding of diffusion-controlled termination and propagation reactions, molecular weight, long chain branching and crosslinking development, polymer particle nucleation, and of the dynamics of continuous emulsion polymerization are critically reviewed.

  2. Kinetics of crosslinking in emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghielmi, A.; Fiorentino, S.; Morbidelli, M.

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model for evaluating the chain length distribution of nonlinear polymers produced in emulsions is presented. The heterogeneous emulsion polymerization process is described. The aim of the analysis is the distribution of active polymer chains and pairs of chains with a given growth time in latex particles in state.

  3. 8. Particle detectors 8.1 Emulsions

    E-print Network

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    8. Particle detectors 8.1 Emulsions Nuclear emulsions can be used to give 3-dimensional information-altitude balloons. A second way of measuring energetic charged particles involves scintillation detectors. Here of the detectors is low, so they are not ideal at particle energies below about 100 keV, but they are simple

  4. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties. PMID:26274171

  5. Flows of Wet Foamsand Concentrated Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemer, Martin B.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project was is to advance a microstructural understanding of foam and emulsion flows. The dynamics of individual surfactant-covered drops and well as the collective behavior of dilute and concentrated was explored using numerical simulations. The long-range goal of this work is the formulation of reliable microphysically-based statistical models of emulsion flows.

  6. Metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haorong; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Medforth, Craig J

    2013-10-29

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  7. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  8. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16–240 ?m diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  9. Coalescence in concentrated Pickering emulsions under shear.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Catherine P; Krebsz, Melinda

    2014-07-21

    We have investigated the rheology of concentrated oil-in-water emulsions stabilised by silanised silica nanoparticles. The emulsions behave like highly elastic solids in response to small, uniform strains. They become unstable and begin to break down, however, on yielding. We show that the emulsion elasticity is correlated with the salt concentration in the water and hence the particle aggregation in emulsions at a given drop volume fraction. A supporting observation is that destabilisation is favoured by minimising the attractive interactions between the particles. Microscopic observations revealed that coalesced drops have anisotropic shapes and wrinkled surfaces, direct evidence of the interfacial particle layer acting like a mechanical barrier to bulk emulsion destabilisation. PMID:24862445

  10. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  11. Aging mechanism in tunable Pickering emulsion

    E-print Network

    S. Fouilloux; A. Thill; J. Daillant; F. Malloggi

    2015-04-16

    We study the stability of a model Pickering emulsion system. A special counter-flow microfluidics set-up was used to prepare monodisperse Pickering emulsions, with oil droplets in water. The wettability of the monodisperse silica nanoparticles (NPs) could be tuned by surface grafting and the surface coverage of the droplets was controlled using the microfluidics setup. A surface coverage as low as 23$\\%$ is enough to stabilize the emulsions and we evidence a new regime of Pickering emulsion stability where the surface coverage of emulsion droplets of constant size increases in time, in coexistence with a large amount of dispersed phase. Our results demonstrate that the previously observed limited coalescence regime where surface coverage tends to control the average size of the final droplets must be put in a broader perspective.

  12. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  13. A surfactantless emulsion as a model for the liquid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Katherine Mary

    An electrochemically polarised liquid-liquid interface in the form of a surfactantless oil-in-water emulsion has been developed, and its creation, stabilisation and use as a model liquid-liquid system for structural characterisation using Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) are described. The emulsion, composed of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE)-in-D20, was created using a condensation method and the two main processes of destabilisation, sedimentation and coalescence, were minimised using density-matching and electrochemistry. The stabilised emulsion interface was then studied with SANS, using the Dll and D22 diffractometers at the ILL and LOQ at ISIS. This was to determine structural information regarding a layer of adsorbed Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein at the interface with and without stabilising salts and the only analysable results were obtained using Dll, due to the lower Q-range accessible. The BSA layer thickness was determined to be 40 and 48 A for emulsions with and without salts respectively, and this was comparable with the literature thickness of 40 A. Another use for the surfactantless emulsion would be for electrodeless electrodeposition of metals at the interface, utilising the interfacial potential, and preliminary experiments were carried out using both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions.

  14. Cometabolic Degradation of TCE Vapors in a Foamed Emulsion

    E-print Network

    Cometabolic Degradation of TCE Vapors in a Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor E U N S U N G K A N A N D M)vaporsinanovelgas-phasebioreactorcalledthefoamed emulsion bioreactor (FEBR) was demonstrated. Toluene vapors were used as the primary growth substrate-phase bioreactor called the foamed emulsion bioreactor (FEBR) was developed (20). The FEBR consists of an emulsion

  15. Supporting Information Self-Assembled Liquid Crystal Gels in Emulsion

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Yue

    Supporting Information Self-Assembled Liquid Crystal Gels in Emulsion Xia Tong,1 Jong Won Chung,2 emulsion. Fig. S1. Image a is the photomicrograph (reflection mode) of an emulsion cast on a glass slide. Polarizing photomicrographs showing (a) the droplets of liquid crystal emulsion without gelator and (b

  16. Drops deformation and magnetic permeability of a ferrofluid emulsion

    E-print Network

    Arthur Zakinyan; Yury Dikansky

    2011-04-17

    In the paper the novel soft magnetic composite system is investigated. A ferrofluid emulsion studied demonstrates the strong magnetic properties which are atypical for commonly known emulsions. Interaction of ferrofluid emulsions with a magnetic field is considered. Structural transformations in these media, such as deformation of emulsion microdroplets and emulsion inversion, are studied. The changes in the relative permeability of emulsion associated with structural transformations are investigated. The theory of the observed phenomena is developed, and the feasibility of effectively controlling the magnetic properties of ferrofluid emulsions by applying a magnetic field is demonstrated.

  17. Isotope Identification in Nuclear Emulsion Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinbara, Shinji; Endo, Yoko; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Itoh, Hiroki; Moh Moh Theint, Aye; Than Tint, Khin; Kobayashi, Hidetaka; Kyaw Soe, Myint; Mishina, Akihiro; Ueno, Hideki; Yoshida, Junya; Nakazawa, Kazuma

    We carried out the E373 experiment at KEK and detected seven double-? hypernuclear events. Only the NAGARA event was uniquely identified as a ??6He hypernucleus among them. For some events among the other six events, unique interpretation of the nuclide would be possible if one of daughter particles from production or decay vertex was identified uniquely. In order to obtain more information about the ?-? interaction, we planned to detect about one hundred double-? hypernuclei in the J-PARC E07 experiment, and obtain new knowledge for the ?-? interaction, which is independent of the information obtained from the NAGARA event. To study the ?-? interaction with more nuclei which are uniquely assigned, we are developing a particle identification (PID) method which identified daughter isotopes by the measurement of energy losses in the emulsion. Track width which reflects energy-losses will be measured from stopping point up to ~100 µm with an image processing method. Under the assumption of tracks to be made of many cylinders with length of 1 µm, track volume values given by the width are summed up and expected to distinguish light nuclear species such as H, He, Li, Be or B.

  18. The morphology of emulsion polymerized latex particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wignall, G.D.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Linne, M.A.; Klein, A.; Sperling, L.H.; Wai, M.P.; Gelman, R.A.; Fatica, M.G.; Hoerl, R.H.; Fisher, L.W.

    1987-11-01

    Under monomer starved feed conditions, emulsion polymerization of perdeuterated methyl methacrylate and styrene in the presence of preformed polymethylmethacrylate latexes resulted in particles with a core-shell morphology, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis for a hollow sphere. The locus of polymerization of the added deuterated monomer is therefore at the particle surface. In similar measurements a statistical copolymer of styrene and methyl methacrylate was used as seed particles for further polymerization of trideuteromethyl methacrylate. The resulting polymer latex was again shown to have a core-shell morphological structre as determined by SANS. SANS experiments were also undertaken on polystyrene latexes polymerized by equilibrium swelling methods, with deuterated polymer forming the first or second step. The experiments covered a molecular weight range of 6 x 10/sup 4/ < M < 6 x 10/sup 6/ g/mol. For M > 10/sup 6/ the molecular weights are consistent with the experimental errors, indicating that the deuterium labeled molecules are randomly distributed in the latex. These results led to the finding that the polymer chains were constrained in the latex particles by factors of 2 to 4 from the relaxed coil dimensions. For M < 10/sup 6/ g/mol SANS gave zero angle scattering intensities much higher than expected on the basis of a random distribution of labeled molecules. Several models were examined, including the possible development of core-shell structures at lower molecular weights. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Physico-chemical characterization of Intralipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, M; Rubin, M; Bor, A; Meyuhas, D; Talmon, Y; Lichtenberg, D

    1991-11-27

    Fat emulsions containing soy triacylglycerols (100-300 g/l) and egg-yolk phospholipids (12 g/l) are often used for intravenous feeding. Previous studies have shown that these emulsions contain chylomicron-like emulsion particles of diameters of 300-400 nm and excess phospholipids aggregated as vesicles (liposomes), which remain in the infranatant upon floatation of the emulsion particles by ultracentrifugation. This work is devoted to the characterization of the commercial lipid emulsions commonly denoted Intralipids, with special emphasis on the presently ill-defined liposomes. The lipid particles composing commercial lipid emulsions (10%, 20% and 30% Intralipids, Kabivitrum Nutrition) were characterized by the combined use of physical and chemical methods. Each of the emulsions was fractionated by ultracentrifugation in saline into a 'cream' layer which floats to the top of the dispersion upon ultracentrifugation and a relatively transparent infranatant. The cream layer contains large emulsion particles of diameters ranging from 300 to 400 nm, in agreement with theoretical considerations based on their chemical composition as determined by chemical analysis. The infranatants contain about 1 g/l triacylglycerols in addition to phospholipids (from 7.2 g/l in 10% Intralipid to 2.4 g/l in 30% Intralipid) in the form of smaller particles of 70-100 nm diameter. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy shows that the infranatants contain vesicles (mostly unilamellar) at the side of residual small emulsion particles. This conclusion is also consistent with the distribution of phospholipids between outer and inner lamellae, as determined by 31P-NMR. PMID:1742317

  20. Pump safety tests regarding emulsion explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Perlid, H.

    1996-12-31

    In the handling of emulsion explosives pumping is a key operation. A number of serious accidents has shown that pumping can be a risky operation and should be carefully considered and investigated. This is the background behind a series of pump tests carried out by Nitro Nobel. This paper refers to pump safety tests with an eccentric screw pump (progressive cavity) and emulsion explosives. A selection of emulsions unsensitized as well as sensitized were tested. The tests were performed in a circulation system against dead head and as dry pumping.

  1. Double emulsions in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannacci, Nicolas; Lockhart, Thibaut; Willaime, Hervé; Tabeling, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Double emulsions (emulsion of two liquids dispersed in a third liquid phase) are widely used in cosmetics, medicine or food industry. We are interested in producing very well controlled double emulsions in a microfluidic device and predicting the morphology (complete engulfing, non-engulfing or partial engulfing called ``janus'') from classical energetic considerations. We use a double flow focusing geometry with a 100 micrometers cross section for the PDMS microsystem. We compare theoretical and experimental morphologies flowing thirty triplets of immiscible fluids. We observe quite a good agreement and show that microfluidic technology may permit to get non standard objects.

  2. Directional Search for Isospin-Violating Dark Matter with Nuclear Emulsion

    E-print Network

    Keiko I. Nagao; Tatsuhiro Naka

    2012-05-22

    Some of direct dark matter searches reported not only positive signals but also annual modulation of the signal event. However, the parameter spaces have been excluded by other experiments. Isospin violating dark matter solves the contradiction by supposing different coupling to proton and neutron. We study the possibility to test the favored parameter region by isospin violating dark matter model with the future detector of dark matter using the nuclear emulsion. Since the nuclear emulsion detector has directional sensitivity, the detector is expected to examine whether the annual modulations observed other experiments is caused by dark matter or background signals.

  3. Hydrodynamic model for drying emulsions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huanhuan; Sprakel, Joris; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-08-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model for film formation in a dense oil-in-water emulsion under a unidirectional drying stress. Water flow through the plateau borders towards the drying end leads to the buildup of a pressure gradient. When the local pressure exceeds the critical disjoining pressure, the water films between droplets break and the droplets coalesce. We show that, depending on the critical pressure and the evaporation rate, the coalescence can occur in two distinct modes. At low critical pressures and low evaporation rates, coalescence occurs throughout the sample, whereas at high critical pressures and high evaporation rate, coalescence occurs only at the front. In the latter case, an oil layer develops on top of the film, which acts as a diffusive barrier and slows down film formation. Our findings, which are summarized in a state diagram for film formation, are in agreement with recent experimental findings. PMID:26382507

  4. Hydrodynamic model for drying emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huanhuan; Sprakel, Joris; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-08-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model for film formation in a dense oil-in-water emulsion under a unidirectional drying stress. Water flow through the plateau borders towards the drying end leads to the buildup of a pressure gradient. When the local pressure exceeds the critical disjoining pressure, the water films between droplets break and the droplets coalesce. We show that, depending on the critical pressure and the evaporation rate, the coalescence can occur in two distinct modes. At low critical pressures and low evaporation rates, coalescence occurs throughout the sample, whereas at high critical pressures and high evaporation rate, coalescence occurs only at the front. In the latter case, an oil layer develops on top of the film, which acts as a diffusive barrier and slows down film formation. Our findings, which are summarized in a state diagram for film formation, are in agreement with recent experimental findings.

  5. Biomedical Applications of Emulsion Templated Scaffolds 

    E-print Network

    Moglia, Robert Scott

    2014-03-28

    . To this end, we have utilized emulsion templating to create injectable polyHIPE scaffolds that are biodegradable, highly porous, polymerize at body temperature, and possess appropriate and tunable mechanical properties for tissue regeneration. Poly...

  6. Multi-body coalescence in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Haitao; Jing, Benxin; Liu, Fang; Burns, Peter C.; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions have shown unusual behaviours such as the formation of non-spherical droplets and the sudden halt of coalescence between individual droplets. Here we report another unusual behaviour of Pickering emulsions—the simultaneous coalescence of multiple droplets in a single event. Using latex particles, silica particles and carbon nanotubes as model stabilizers, we show that multi-body coalescence can occur in both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. The number of droplets involved in the nth coalscence event equals four times the corresponding number of the tetrahedral sequence in close packing. Furthermore, coalescence is promoted by repulsive latex and silica particles but inhibited by attractive carbon nanotubes. The revelation of multi-body coalescence is expected to help better understand Pickering emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications.

  7. Multi-body coalescence in Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Haitao; Jing, Benxin; Liu, Fang; Burns, Peter C; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions have shown unusual behaviours such as the formation of non-spherical droplets and the sudden halt of coalescence between individual droplets. Here we report another unusual behaviour of Pickering emulsions-the simultaneous coalescence of multiple droplets in a single event. Using latex particles, silica particles and carbon nanotubes as model stabilizers, we show that multi-body coalescence can occur in both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. The number of droplets involved in the nth coalscence event equals four times the corresponding number of the tetrahedral sequence in close packing. Furthermore, coalescence is promoted by repulsive latex and silica particles but inhibited by attractive carbon nanotubes. The revelation of multi-body coalescence is expected to help better understand Pickering emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications. PMID:25581366

  8. Aging properties of Kodak type 101 emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohne, B.; Feldman, U.; Neupert, W.

    1984-01-01

    Aging tests for several batches of Kodak type 101 emulsion show that storage conditions significantly influence how well the film will maintain its sensitometric properties, with sensitivity and density increasing to a maximum during this period. Any further aging may result in higher fog levels and sensitivity loss. It is noted that storage in an environment free of photographically active compounds allows film property optimization, and that film batches with different sensitivities age differently. Emulsions with maximum 1700-A sensitivity are 2.5 times faster than those at the low end of the sensitivity scale. These sensitive emulsions exhibit significantly accelerated changes in aging properties. Their use in space applications requires careful consideration of time and temperature profiles, encouraging the use of less sensitive emulsions when the controllability of these factors is limited.

  9. Concentrated emulsions of perflubron in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Habif, S S; Rosano, H L; Oleksiak, C B

    1994-01-01

    Flocculation of o/w emulsions consisting of a perfluorochemical (PFC) emulsified by either phospholipids or decaglyceroldioleate (10-2-O) was assessed both by direct observation and through photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and viscoelasticity measurements in unsteady oscillatory flow. Flocculation gives rise to emulsion instability but can be prevented (a) by the addition of a negatively charged surfactant to either phosphatidylcholine (PC) or 10-2-O, respectively the zwitterionic phospholipid and the nonionic surfactant used as primary emulsifiers, or (b) by using a saccharide solution as the continuous phase. The study indicates that both electrostatic (Coulombic) repulsive forces and hydration (steric) forces play a role in preventing flocculation. Various minor components of the egg yolk phospholipids (EYP) used in commercial emulsion preparation probably stabilize the emulsion by increasing both electrostatic and hydration repulsion. PMID:7849940

  10. Bond Graph Modeling and Validation of an Energy Regenerative System for Emulsion Pump Tests

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilei; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    The test system for emulsion pump is facing serious challenges due to its huge energy consumption and waste nowadays. To settle this energy issue, a novel energy regenerative system (ERS) for emulsion pump tests is briefly introduced at first. Modeling such an ERS of multienergy domains needs a unified and systematic approach. Bond graph modeling is well suited for this task. The bond graph model of this ERS is developed by first considering the separate components before assembling them together and so is the state-space equation. Both numerical simulation and experiments are carried out to validate the bond graph model of this ERS. Moreover the simulation and experiments results show that this ERS not only satisfies the test requirements, but also could save at least 25% of energy consumption as compared to the original test system, demonstrating that it is a promising method of energy regeneration for emulsion pump tests. PMID:24967428

  11. Bond graph modeling and validation of an energy regenerative system for emulsion pump tests.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilei; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    The test system for emulsion pump is facing serious challenges due to its huge energy consumption and waste nowadays. To settle this energy issue, a novel energy regenerative system (ERS) for emulsion pump tests is briefly introduced at first. Modeling such an ERS of multienergy domains needs a unified and systematic approach. Bond graph modeling is well suited for this task. The bond graph model of this ERS is developed by first considering the separate components before assembling them together and so is the state-space equation. Both numerical simulation and experiments are carried out to validate the bond graph model of this ERS. Moreover the simulation and experiments results show that this ERS not only satisfies the test requirements, but also could save at least 25% of energy consumption as compared to the original test system, demonstrating that it is a promising method of energy regeneration for emulsion pump tests. PMID:24967428

  12. Shear-stabilized emulsion flooding process

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, C.W.; Reed, R.L.

    1982-06-29

    Additional amounts of crude oil are recovered from a subterranean formation by flooding with a translucent emulsion comprising an upper- or middle-phase microemulsion as an external phase and a polymer-containing brine solution as an internal phase. The translucent emulsion tends to coalesce into its component phases under conditions of no shear, but is stabilized by low shears such as those imposed on fluids flowing through a subterranean formation.

  13. The Use of Fish Oil Lipid Emulsion in the Treatment of Intestinal Failure Associated Liver Disease (IFALD)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Melissa I.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, fish oil based lipid emulsions have been used in the treatment of intestinal failure associated liver disease, with a noticeable impact on decreasing the incidence of morbidity and mortality of this often fatal condition. With this new therapy, however, different approaches have emerged as well as concerns about potential risks with using fish oil as a monotherapy. This review will discuss the experience to date with this lipid emulsion along with the rational for its use, controversies and concerns. PMID:23363993

  14. Method for treating tar sands emulsion and apparatus therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Bialek, R.F.

    1986-04-15

    A method is described for resolving a hot bitumen emulsion comprised primarily of bitumen, water and chemical diluents. The method consists of: providing separate but communicated emulsion mixing, and emulsion settling chamber, passing the hot bitumen emulsion through a first elongated mixing passage in the mixing chamber wherein a rapidly flowing stream of recycled emulsion is combined with a minor portion of unrecycled bitumen emulsion, to form a combined bitumen emulsion stream, thereafter passing the combined bitumen emulsion stream into an elongated discontinuous mixing passage comprised of vertically arranged and interconnected mixing passages within the emulsion mixer, where in the combined bitumen emulsion stream passes at a slower rate than in the first elongated mixing passage, passing the combined bitumen emulsion stream into an overflow passage communicated with the second elongated mixing passage, introducing a part of the combined emulsion stream from the overflow passage into the emulsion settling chamber, recycling the remainder of the combined emulsion stream from the overflow passage into the first elongated mixing passage, and removing separated flows of bitumen and water from the settling chamber.

  15. Future Experiments with HADES at FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Tlusty, P.

    2010-12-28

    The Dielectron Spectrometer HADES installed at GSI Darmstadt recently provided new intriguing results on production of electron pairs and strangeness from elementary and nucleus-nucleus collisions. The obtained data call for further systematic investigations of heavier systems and/or at higher energies.For this purpose, the HADES spectrometer has been upgraded with a high-granularity RPC time-of-flight wall. In addition, a completely new detector read-out and data-acquisition system has been implemented which will greatly improve our data-taking rates. We describe the current status of the HADES spectrometer and our plans for experiments on heavy system collisions at energies up to 10 A GeV on the upcoming FAIR facility.

  16. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber... manufacture of emulsion crumb rubber, other than acrylonitrilebutadiene rubber....

  17. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber... manufacture of emulsion crumb rubber, other than acrylonitrilebutadiene rubber....

  18. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  19. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber... manufacture of emulsion crumb rubber, other than acrylonitrilebutadiene rubber....

  20. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  1. Water-in-oil emulsions prepared by peptide-silicone hybrid polymers as active interfacial modifier: effects of silicone oil species on dispersion stability of emulsions.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Iijima, Satoshi; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Endo, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Yamashita, Yuji; Natsuisaka, Makoto; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakamoto, Kazutami

    2013-01-01

    We have recently proposed a new general concept regarding amphiphilic materials that have been named as "active interfacial modifier (AIM)." In emulsion systems, an AIM is essentially insoluble in both water and organic solvents; however, it possesses moieties that are attracted to each of these immiscible liquid phases. Hence, an AIM practically stays just at the interface between the two phases and makes the resulting emulsion stable. In this study, the effects of silicone oil species on the dispersion stability of water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions in the presence of an AIM sample were evaluated in order to understand the destabilization mechanism in such emulsion systems. The AIM sample used in this study is an amphiphilic polymer consisting of a silicone backbone modified with hydrocarbon chains and hydrolyzed silk peptides. The Stokes equation predicts that the sedimentation velocity of water droplets dispersed in a continuous silicone oil phase simply depends on the expression (? - ??)/? assuming that the droplet size is constant (where ? is the density of the dispersed water phase, ?? is the density of the continuous silicone oil phase, and ? is the viscosity of the oil phase). The experimental results shown in this paper are consistent with the Stokes prediction: i.e., in the low-viscous genuine or quasi-Newtonian fluid region, the dispersion stability increases in the following order: dodecamethylpentasiloxane (DPS) < decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D?) ? dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D?). This order agrees well with the order obtained by using the expression (? - ??)/? as DPS > D? > D?. This indicates that our emulsion system experiences destabilization through sedimentation, but hardly any coalescence occurs owing to the presence of an additional third phase consisting of the AIM that stabilizes the silicone oil/water interface in the emulsions. PMID:23823917

  2. Kinetic Release of Alkalinity from Particle-Containing Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are typically employed during remediation to promote biotic reduction of contaminants. Emulsions, however, hold promise for encapsulated delivery of many types of active ingredients required for successful site remediation or long-term site stewardship. Our research is currently focused on using alkalinity-containing particles held within oil-in-water emulsions to sustain control of subsurface pH. Here we describe results from laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling conducted to quantify the kinetics associated with the emulsion delivery and alkalinity release process. Kinetically stable oil-in-water emulsions containing (~60 nmCaCO3 or ~100 nm MgO particles) were previously developed using soybean oil and Gum Arabic as a stabilizing agent. Batch and column experiments were employed to assess the accessibility and release of the alkalinity from the emulsion. Successive additions of HCl were used in batch systems to produce several pH responses (pH rebounds) that were subsequently modeled to elucidate release mechanisms and rates for varying emulsion compositions and particle types. Initial results suggest that a linear-driving-force model is generally able to capture the release behavior in the batch system when the temporally-constant, lumped mass-transfer coefficient is scaled by the fraction of particle mass remaining within the droplets. This result suggests that the rate limiting step in the release process may be the interphase transfer of reactive species at the oil-water interface. 1-d column experiments were also completed in order to quantify the extent and rate of alkalinity release from emulsion droplets retained in a sandy medium. Alkalinity release from the retained droplets treated a pH 4 influent water for 25-60 pore volumes (the duration depended on particle type and mass loading), and the cessation in treatment corresponded to exhaustion of the particle mass held within the oil. Column experiments were simulated using a transport code containing the linear-driving-force expression evaluated in the batch experiments. In these simulations the lumped mass transfer coefficient was fit and compared with values predicted using existing correlations for liquid-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces in porous media.

  3. S-190 exposure verification flight test. [photographic emulsions and film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, L.

    1973-01-01

    A flight test was conducted to determine the optimum exposures for the Skylab S-190A experiment. An aircraft multispectral photographic system (AMPS) which is installed in the NASA Earth Resources aircraft NP3A was used to simulate the S-190A system. The same film emulsions to be used for S-190A were used in the flight test. These rolls were on factory-loaded spools for use in the AMPS camera system. It was found that some variation is to be expected between these rolls and the S-190A flight loads.

  4. Emulsions stability, from dilute to dense emulsions -- role of drops deformation.

    PubMed

    Sanfeld, Albert; Steinchen, Annie

    2008-07-01

    The present paper starts with a review of fundamental descriptions based on physico-chemical laws derived for emulsions with a special interest for eventual evidences of drops deformation. A critical analysis of theories and experiments is given that leads the authors to propose new static and dynamic models for the approach to flocculation and coalescence of two deformable drops in dense and dilute environments of other neighboring drops. The model developed is based on an old paper by Albers and Overbeek for W/O dense emulsions with non-deformable particles, that has been improved recently first by Sengupta and Papadopoulos and then by Mishchuk et al. to account for all the interaction forces (electrostatic, van der Waals and steric). The basic idea here rests in the assumption that the flat surface area of the two coalescing drops, interacting in the field of other particles, increases when the distance between the particles decreases according to an exponential law with a characteristic length related to the disjoining force in the inter-particle film and to the capillary pressure that opposes flattening. The difficulty lies, indeed, in manifold interpretations on experimental observations so that no clear conclusion can be derived on mechanisms responsible for the deformation of droplets. This is why, from a pure theoretical and physical point of view, according to rather complicated models, we propose a much more simple approach that permits to define a capillary length as part of virtual operations. In a static approach, this length is based on analogy with electricity, namely repulsion leads to flatness while attraction to hump. Therefore this brings us to a definition of a length depending on the maximum value of the disjoining pressure in competition with the capillary pressure. Gravity also promotes flocculation, therefore we compare the maximum values of the surface forces acting between the surfaces of two floculating particles to gravity. Finally, considering that in most publications on emulsions foams and colloidal systems, much attention is paid on the role of the drainage in the stability process, we devote the last section to the drainage between flattened drops. We first describe briefly Taylor's approach and extend Reynolds revisited formulae taking into account the viscous friction, the disjoining pressure, the film elasticity and the wetting angle weighting the capillary pressure through the characteristic length. Our calculated values are compared to some experimental data. In conclusion to make this long paper as useful as possible for research purposes, we have the hope that our understanding of emulsion stability is not only based on knowledge of numerous theoretical and experimental works sometimes controversial given in a critical way but that it gives a new approach based on an interpretation of the drop deformation in terms of a characteristic length linked to a deformation number analogous to a Bond number. PMID:18313631

  5. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Park, Jinhee

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat.

  6. The atomization of water-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Broniarz-Press, L.; Ochowiak, M.; Rozanski, J.; Woziwodzki, S.

    2009-09-15

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies on atomization of the emulsions flowing through twin-fluid atomizers obtained by the use of the digital microphotography method. The main elements of the test installation were: nozzle, reservoir, pump and measurement units of liquid flow. The photographs were taken by a digital camera with automatic flash at exposure time of 1/8000 s and subsequently analyzed using Image Pro-Plus. The oils used were mineral oils 20-90, 20-70, 20-50 and 20-30. The studies were performed at flow rates of liquid phase changed from 0.0014 to 0.011 (dm{sup 3}/s) and gas phase changed from 0.28 to 1.4 (dm{sup 3}/s), respectively. The analysis of photos shows that the droplets being formed during the liquid atomization have very different sizes. The smallest droplets have diameters of the order of 10 {mu}m. The experimental results showed that the changes in physical properties of a liquid phase lead to the significant changes in the spray characteristics. The analysis of the photos of water and emulsions atomization process showed that the droplet sizes are dependent on gas and liquid flow rates, construction of nozzle and properties of liquid. The differences between characteristics of atomization for water and emulsions have been observed. Analysis of photos on forming the droplets in air-water and air-emulsions systems showed that droplets are bigger in air-emulsion system (at the same value of gas to liquid mass ratio). The values of Sauter mean diameter (SMD) increased with increase of volume fraction of oil in emulsion. The droplet size increased with emulsion viscosity. (author)

  7. Incorporation of triterpenic derivatives within an o/w/o multiple emulsion: structure and release studies.

    PubMed

    Laugel, C; Baillet, A; Ferrier, D; Grossiord, J L; Marty, J P

    1998-06-01

    Triterpenic derivatives stimulate the total collagen synthesis of skin fibroblasts. Their incorporation within an o/ w/o multiple emulsion should protect them against oxidation, particularly for unsaturated derivatives and should lead to a modulated release after topical application. The influence of the incorporation of madecassic acid, asiaticoside and asiatic acid on the viscosity and the stability of a multiple o/w/o emulsion was studied. Rheological analyses were carried out by flow experiments in order to obtain the apparent viscosity and by the oscillatory technique to calculate the basic visceolastic parameters. The comparative stability study was assessed by the tracer release method with phthalic acid diethyl ester previously incorporated in the internal phase of the emulsions. Six months storage at room temperature and at 40 degrees C did not affect the stability of emulsions with triterpenic substances. The in vitro percutaneous absorption of triterpenic derivatives was investigated by Franz diffusion cells in hairless rats. Triterpenic derivatives were analysed in stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis, by liquid chromatography. Correlations were established between the triterpenic derivatives structure (glycosylated or not) and their percutaneous absorption. O/w/o multiple emulsion seems to be an efficient vehicle to preserve these active substances and to control their distribution in the skin. PMID:18505502

  8. Shock Compression and Recovery of Microorganism-Loaded Broths and AN Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazell, P. J.; Beveridge, C.; Groves, K.; Stennett, C.

    2009-12-01

    The microorganisms Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Zygosaccharomyces bailii and an oil-based emulsion, have been subjected to shock compression using the flyer-plate technique to initial pressures of 0.8 GPa (in the suspension). In each experiment, a stainless steel capsule was used to contain the broths and allow for recovery without contamination. Where cavitation was mostly suppressed by virtue of simultaneous shock and dynamic compression, no kill was observed. By introducing an air gap behind the suspension, limited kill was measured in the yeast. Results also suggest that stable emulsification occurs in coarse oil-based emulsions that are subjected to shock.

  9. Annatto Polymeric Microparticles: Natural Product Encapsulation by the Emulsion-Solvent Evaporation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Zaine; Duran, Nelson; Guterres, Silvia S.

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, the extract from annatto seeds was encapsulated in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) particles by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The particles were washed and centrifuged to remove excess stabilizer and then freeze-dried. The main compound of annatto seeds, bixin, has antioxidant properties as well…

  10. Prospects for measuring the gravitational free-fall of antihydrogen with emulsion detectors

    E-print Network

    AEgIS Collaboration; S. Aghion; O. Ahlén; C. Amsler; A. Ariga; T. Ariga; A. S. Belov; G. Bonomi; P. Bräunig; J. Bremer; R. S. Brusa; L. Cabaret; C. Canali; R. Caravita; F. Castelli; G. Cerchiari; S. Cialdi; D. Comparat; G. Consolati; J. H. Derking; S. Di Domizio; L. Di Noto; M. Doser; A. Dudarev; A. Ereditato; R. Ferragut; A. Fontana; P. Genova; M. Giammarchi; A. Gligorova; S. N. Gninenko; S. Haider; J. Harasimovicz; S. D. Hogan; T. Huse; E. Jordan; L. V. Jørgensen; T. Kaltenbacher; J. Kawada; A. Kellerbauer; M. Kimura; A. Knecht; D. Krasnický; V. Lagomarsino; A. Magnani; S. Mariazzi; V. A. Matveev; F. Moia; G. Nebbia; P. Nédélec; M. K. Oberthaler; N. Pacifico; V. Petrácek; C. Pistillo; F. Prelz; M. Prevedelli; C. Regenfus; C. Riccardi; O. Røhne; A. Rotondi; H. Sandaker; P. Scampoli; A. Sosa; J. Storey; M. A. Subieta Vasquez; M. Spacek; G. Testera; D. Trezzi; R. Vaccarone; C. P. Welsch; S. Zavatarelli

    2013-06-24

    The main goal of the AEgIS experiment at CERN is to test the weak equivalence principle for antimatter. AEgIS will measure the free-fall of an antihydrogen beam traversing a moir\\'e deflectometer. The goal is to determine the gravitational acceleration g for antihydrogen with an initial relative accuracy of 1% by using an emulsion detector combined with a silicon micro-strip detector to measure the time of flight. Nuclear emulsions can measure the annihilation vertex of antihydrogen atoms with a precision of about 1 - 2 microns r.m.s. We present here results for emulsion detectors operated in vacuum using low energy antiprotons from the CERN antiproton decelerator. We compare with Monte Carlo simulations, and discuss the impact on the AEgIS project.

  11. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOEpatents

    Ruhe, Thomas C. (Duquesne, PA); Rao, Pilaka P. (Baghlingampalli, IN)

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  12. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524.802 ...ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications...milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor ....

  13. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524.802 ...ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications...milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor ....

  14. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524.802 ...ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications...milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor ....

  15. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524.802 ...ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications...milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor ....

  16. Emulsion characteristics associated with an alkaline water flooding process

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M.M.; Wasan, D.T.

    1980-01-01

    This work presents the results of an investigation of emulsions containing an acidic crude oil from Wilmington field, California, and sodium hydroxide/sodium orthosilicate solutions. The effect of alkaline water formulation on emulsion characteristics was determined. The characteristics of emulsions were evaluated as a function of salinity, alkali type, and alkali concentrations in the aqueous phase. Emulsion stability, as defined by the coalescence rate of oil droplets in water-external emulsion, was determined as a function of salinity and alkali type. The results indicate that there is some optimum salinity in the aqueous phase which needs to be maintained to minimize the problems associated with viscous emulsions. Also, the emulsions formed with sodium hydroxide are different from those formed with sodium orthosilicate, especially in the presence of divalent ion salts, so that different salinities are required to minimize the shear viscosity of emulsions for the 2 systems. 18 references.

  17. Stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsions: recent advances and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juntao; Quinlan, Patrick James; Tam, Kam Chiu

    2015-05-14

    Pickering emulsions possess many advantages over traditional surfactant stabilized emulsions. For example, Pickering emulsions impart better stability against coalescence and, in many cases, are biologically compatible and environmentally friendly. These characteristics open the door for their use in a variety of industries spanning petroleum, food, biomedicine, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Depending on the application, rapid, but controlled stabilization and destabilization of an emulsion may be necessary. As a result, Pickering emulsions with stimuli-responsive properties have, in recent years, received a considerable amounts of attention. This paper provides a concise and comprehensive review of Pickering emulsion systems that possess the ability to respond to an array of external triggers, including pH, temperature, CO2 concentration, light intensity, ionic strength, and magnetic field. Potential applications for which stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsion systems would be of particular value, such as emulsion polymerization, enhanced oil recovery, catalyst recovery, and cosmetics, are discussed. PMID:25864383

  18. Acoustically aided coalescence of droplets in aqueous emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangu, Gautam D.

    An acoustic-field assisted process intended to recover the oil phase from aqueous emulsions has been previously developed. It applies a resonant ultrasonic wavefield to the emulsion flowing through a rectangular chamber. The oil droplets migrate to pressure antinodes of the standing wave-field. Rapid coalescence and plating out of droplets on the internal surfaces of the chamber occurs. To obtain a fundamental understanding of the bulk coalescence of droplets away from any solid surface in acoustic field, a microscopic mathematical model was developed that predicts the relative trajectory of a pair of droplets in an acoustic field by considering pertinent body forces and interdroplet effects. This trajectory analysis was used to compute the rate of volume cleared by the coalescence of different droplet pairs as a function of various operating conditions. The results of the droplet pair model were used as a basis to develop a global model for coalescence rates. The expressions for volume cleared by coalescence of different droplet pairs were incorporated into standard population balance equations to determine the rate of collisions of different droplet pairs. This analysis led to the formulation of a predictive model that could track evolution of drop sizes in a given droplet population coalescing in an acoustic field. The droplet pair model was validated by designing an experimental system to visualize the interaction between two coalescing droplets in an emulsion subjected to a standing acoustic field. The experimentally observed trajectories were compared with those determined by the droplet-pair model. The predicted and observed trajectories matched reasonably well without any model parameter adjustment. The match between relative trajectories predicted by the model and those observed experimentally was further improved via adjustments in the energy density values used in the model. The predictions of the global model were validated by experimentally tracking the size-evolution of emulsions subjected to an acoustic field and comparing it with the predictions of the global model. It was observed that the model consistently underpredicted the coalescence rate in the experimental system. This was attributed to energy density gradients within the chamber that could give rise to lateral acoustic forces. These forces tend to concentrate the droplets in the regions of local energy density maxima, thereby enhancing the rate of coalescence over that predicted by the model. The existence of energy density gradients in the experimental system was confirmed by performing parallel band line-up and disruption experiments with polystyrene suspensions. An effective energy density value was computed for each of the experiments, and this enabled the model predictions to agree very well with the experimental observations. The inclusion of lateral acoustic forces in the model may improve the accuracy of its predictions.

  19. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 84, 041404 (2011) Rheology of attractive emulsions

    E-print Network

    2011-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E 84, 041404 (2011) Rheology of attractive emulsions Sujit S. Datta,1 Dustin D show how attractive interactions dramatically influence emulsion rheology. Unlike the repulsive case, attractive emulsions below random close packing, RCP, can form soft gel-like elastic solids. However, above

  20. Polymersomes Fabrication of Polymersomes using Double-Emulsion

    E-print Network

    Polymersomes Fabrication of Polymersomes using Double-Emulsion Templates in Glass-Coated Stamped-stabilized water/organic solvent/water (W/O/W) double emulsions in microfluidic devices.[10,11] The assembly of the copolymers is directed by the double-emulsion droplets during evaporation of the organic solvent in which

  1. Continuous Operation of Foamed Emulsion Bioreactors Treating Toluene Vapors

    E-print Network

    Continuous Operation of Foamed Emulsion Bioreactors Treating Toluene Vapors Eunsung Kan, Marc A called the foamed emulsion bioreactor (FEBR) has been investigated. The effect of several liquid feeding have developed a new vapor phase bioreactor named the foamed emulsion bioreactor (FEBR) that over

  2. Modeling of a Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor: II. Model Parametric Sensitivity

    E-print Network

    ARTICLE Modeling of a Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor: II. Model Parametric Sensitivity Eunsung Kan: The sensitivity of a conceptual model of a foam emulsion bioreactor (FEBR) used for the control of toluene vapors high perfor- mance bioreactor system called the foamed emulsion bioreactor (FEBR). The FEBR consists

  3. Method for selective plugging using resin emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R.H.

    1982-10-05

    Methods and compositions are provided for selectively plugging the water-rich strata of subterranean formations, including injection into the formation of a water-insoluble, oil-soluble resin emulsion. A series of chemical reactions is initiated insitu such that the emulsion demulsifies, resulting in the coalescence of resin droplets. The coalesced water-insoluble, oil-soluble resin droplets are effective to selectively plug the water-rich strata over a relatively long distance and over a relatively long period of time.

  4. Emergent hyperuniformity in periodically-driven emulsions

    E-print Network

    Joost H. Weijs; Raphaël Jeanneret; Rémi Dreyfus; Denis Bartolo

    2015-04-28

    We report the emergence of large-scale hyperuniformity in microfluidic emulsions. Upon periodic driving confined emulsions undergo a first-order transition from a reversible to an irreversible dynamics. We evidence that this dynamical transition is accompanied by structural changes at all scales yielding macroscopic yet finite hyperuniform structures. Numerical simulations are performed to single out the very ingredients responsible for the suppression of density fluctuations. We show that as opposed to equilibrium systems the long-range nature of the hydrodynamic interactions are not required for the formation of hyperuniform patterns, thereby suggesting a robust relation between reversibility and hyperuniformity which should hold in a broad class of periodically driven materials.

  5. Emulsions stabilised by whey protein microgel particles: towards food-grade Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Rouvet, Martine; Gehin-Delval, Cécile; Schmitt, Christophe; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-09-28

    We have investigated a new class of food-grade particles, whey protein microgels, as stabilisers of triglyceride-water emulsions. The sub-micron particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at all pH with and without salt. All emulsions creamed but exhibited exceptional resistance to coalescence. Clear correlations exist between the properties of the microgels in aqueous dispersion and the resulting emulsion characteristics. For conditions in which the particles were uncharged, fluid emulsions with relatively large drops were stabilised, whereas emulsions stabilized by charged particles contained smaller flocculated drops. A combination of optical microscopy of the drops and spectrophotometry of the resolved aqueous phase allowed us to estimate the interfacial adsorption densities of the particles using the phenomenon of limited coalescence. We deduce two classes of particle arrangement. Complete adsorption of the particles was obtained when they were neutral or when their charges were screened by salt resulting in at least one particle monolayer at the interface. By contrast, only around 50% of the particles adsorbed when they were charged with emulsion drops being covered by less than half a monolayer. These findings were supported by direct visualization of drop interfaces using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Uncharged particles were highly aggregated and formed a continuous 2-D network at the interface. Otherwise particles organized as individual aggregates separated by particle-free regions. In this case, we suggest that some particles spread at the interface leading to the formation of a continuous protein membrane. Charged particles displayed the ability to bridge opposing interfaces of neighbouring drops to form dense particle disks protecting drops against coalescence; this is the main reason for the flocculation and stability of emulsions containing sparsely covered drops. PMID:24675994

  6. Phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Xu, Zhiguang; Cai, Zengxiao; Guo, Qipeng

    2015-06-28

    Herein, we report the phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) induced by salt concentration and pH changes. The ionomers are sulfonated polystyrenes (SPSs) with different sulfonation degrees. The emulsion types were determined by conductivity measurements, confocal microscopy and optical microscopy, and the formation of HIPE organogels was verified by the tube-inversion method and rheological measurements. SPSs with high sulfonation degrees (water-soluble) and low sulfonation degrees (water-insoluble) can stabilize oil-in-water emulsions; these emulsions were transformed into water-in-oil HIPEs by varying salt concentrations and/or changing the pH. SPS, with a sulfonation degree of 11.6%, is the most efficient, and as low as 0.2 (w/v)% of the organic phase is enough to stabilize the HIPEs. Phase inversion of the oil-in-water emulsions occurred to form water-in-oil HIPEs by increasing the salt concentration in the aqueous phase. Two phase inversion points from oil-in-water emulsions to water-in-oil HIPEs were observed at pH 1 and 13. Moreover, synergetic effects between the salt concentration and pH changes occurred upon the inversion of the emulsion type. The organic phase can be a variety of organic solvents, including toluene, xylene, chloroform, dichloroethane, dichloromethane and anisole, as well as monomers such as styrene, butyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. Poly(HIPEs) were successfully prepared by the polymerization of monomers as the continuous phase in the ionomer-stabilized HIPEs. PMID:26028420

  7. Probing Interfacial Emulsion Stability Controls using Electrorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuyu; Brandvik, Amy; Alvarado, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    The stability of water-in-oil emulsions is controlled by interfacial mechanisms that include oil film rheology of approaching drops and the strength of drop interfaces. Film drainage is mainly a function of the continuous phase rheology. Temperature is used to regulate the viscosity of the continuous phase and hence determine its effect on emulsion stability through film drainage, in contrast with interfacial strength. In this study, one crude oil is used to formulate water-in-oil emulsions. Oil-water interfacial tension is measured to gauge other interfacial changes with temperature. The critical field value, used as proxy of emulsion stability, approaches a plateau value for each crude oil- aqueous solution pair, at sufficiently high temperature (50 ^oC), which is interpreted to reflect the intrinsic drop-coating film resistance to coalescence. Interfacial tension does vary significantly with either aqueous phase composition or temperature. From comparison with previous results, we speculate that drop coating film is composed of a fraction of asphaltic compunds.

  8. Sequential statistical optimization of a positively-charged submicron emulsion of miconazole.

    PubMed

    Wehrle, P; Korner, D; Benita, S

    1996-04-01

    A positively charged oil/water (O/W) emulsion containing an antifungal agent was developed for ophthalmic use. An attempt was made using a sequential statistical methodology to optimize the O/W emulsion by varying both formulation and process parameters to obtain the smallest droplet size emulsion that can remain stable for a long period of time. During the first step of the study, not less than 7 parameters were found to be important--drug content, amount of lipophilic phase, poloxamer concentration, quantity of the phospholipids-stearylamine couple, pH adjustment, time of coarse emulsification and time of high pressure homogenization. A screening approach based on Hadamard's matrix was used to select the parameters displaying the most significant effects on response parameters. A first set of 8 experiments proved efficient enough to define the concentration of poloxamer and the quantity of the couple phospholipids-stearylamine, which confer the overall positive charge to the emulsified droplet, as the most significant parameters affecting the final droplet size of the emulsions formed. A 2k-type experimental design was then built with the two main factors in order to evaluate a first-order polynomial model with interaction. Poor analysis of variance results after an additional center experiment was performed revealed the lack of fit of the linear model as well as the importance of the response surface curvature due to a close optimum location. To find the optimal operating conditions the design was sequentially completed with 4 more experiments according to the Box and Wilson method. The response surfaces in 3-dimensional representation and their corresponding contour plots proved helpful in analyzing the validated models and in highlighting the precise optimum location. The optimized positive submicron emulsion is now under in vivo investigation. PMID:9552336

  9. Immune modulation by parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A; Calder, Philip C

    2007-05-01

    Total parenteral nutrition is the final option for nutritional support of patients with severe intestinal failure. Lipid emulsions constitute the main source of fuel calories and fatty acids (FAs) in parenteral nutrition formulations. However, adverse effects on patient outcomes have been attributed to the use of lipids, mostly in relation to impaired immune defenses and altered inflammatory responses. Over the years, this issue has remained in the limelight, also because technical advances have provided no safeguard against the most daunting problems, ie, infectious complications. Nevertheless, numerous investigations have failed to produce a clear picture of the immunologic characteristics of the most commonly used soybean oil-derived lipid emulsions, although their high content of n-6 polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) has been considered a drawback because of their proinflammatory potential. This concern initiated the development of emulsions in which part of the n-6 FA component is replaced by less bioactive FAs, such as coconut oil (rich in medium-chain saturated FAs) or olive oil (rich in the n-9 monounsaturated FA oleic acid). Another approach has been to use fish oil (rich in n-3 PUFA), the FAs of which have biological activities different from those of n-6 PUFAs. Recent studies on the modulation of host defenses and inflammation by fish-oil emulsions have yielded consistent data, which indicate that these emulsions may provide a tool to beneficially alter the course of immune-mediated conditions. Although most of these lipids have not yet become available on the US market, this review synthesizes available information on immunologic characteristics of the different lipids that currently can be applied via parenteral nutrition support. PMID:17490951

  10. Pickering emulsions: what are the main parameters determining the emulsion type and interfacial properties?

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Gineste, Stéphane; Laurichesse, Eric; Tanner, Hugo; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Héroguez, Valérie; Schmitt, Véronique

    2014-08-12

    We synthesized surface-active lipophilic core-hydrophilic shell latex particles, and we probed their efficiency as emulsion stabilizers. The relative weight percentage of the shell, RS/P, was varied to trigger the balance between lipophilicity and hydrophilicity of the particles. Particle wettability could concomitantly be tuned by the pH of the aqueous phase determining the surface charge. Emulsions covering a wide range of RS/P and pH values were fabricated, and their type, oil-in-water (O/W) or water-in-oil (W/O), and kinetic stability were systematically assessed. By adapting the particle gel trapping technique to pH-variable systems and by exploiting the limited coalescence process, we were able to determine the proportion of oil/water interfacial area, C, covered by the particles as well as their contact angle, ?. All of these data were gathered into a single generic diagram showing good correlation between the emulsion type and the particle contact angle (O/W for ? < 90° and W/O for ? > 90°) in agreement with the empirical Finkle rule. Interestingly, no stable emulsion could be obtained when the wettability was nearly balanced and a "bipolar"-like behavior was observed, with the particles adopting two different contact angles whose average value was close to 90°. For particles such that ? < 90°, O/W emulsions were obtained, and, depending on the pH of the continuous phase, the same type of particles and the same emulsification process led to emulsions characterized either by large drops densely covered by the particles or by small droplets that were weakly covered. The two metastable states were also accessible to emulsions stabilized by particles of variable origins and morphologies, thus proving the generality of our findings. PMID:25055160

  11. Double emulsion solvent evaporation techniques used for drug encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Zafar, Nadiah; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2015-12-30

    Double emulsions are complex systems, also called "emulsions of emulsions", in which the droplets of the dispersed phase contain one or more types of smaller dispersed droplets themselves. Double emulsions have the potential for encapsulation of both hydrophobic as well as hydrophilic drugs, cosmetics, foods and other high value products. Techniques based on double emulsions are commonly used for the encapsulation of hydrophilic molecules, which suffer from low encapsulation efficiency because of rapid drug partitioning into the external aqueous phase when using single emulsions. The main issue when using double emulsions is their production in a well-controlled manner, with homogeneous droplet size by optimizing different process variables. In this review special attention has been paid to the application of double emulsion techniques for the encapsulation of various hydrophilic and hydrophobic anticancer drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotic drugs, proteins and amino acids and their applications in theranostics. Moreover, the optimized ratio of the different phases and other process parameters of double emulsions are discussed. Finally, the results published regarding various types of solvents, stabilizers and polymers used for the encapsulation of several active substances via double emulsion processes are reported. PMID:26522982

  12. Double-? hypernuclei at J-PARC - E07 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, K.; Yoshida, J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear emulsion was used to search for double-? hypernuclei for a half century. We have nine events showing sequential decay of two units of ? hyperon in nucleus, however our knowledge of ?-? interaction is still poor, so far. Based on knowhow given by the past emulsion experiments, the E07 experiment at J-PARC is expected to present the events in ~102 and ~103 with Hybrid-emulsion and Overall-scanning method, respectively.

  13. Feasibility of low frequency ultrasound for water removal from crude oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Antes, Fabiane G; Diehl, Liange O; Pereira, Juliana S F; Guimarães, Regina C L; Guarnieri, Ricardo A; Ferreira, Bianca M S; Dressler, Valderi L; Flores, Erico M M

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of indirect application of low frequency ultrasound for demulsification of crude oil was investigated without using chemical demulsifiers. Experiments were performed in an ultrasonic bath with frequency of 35 kHz. Synthetic emulsions with water content of 12%, 35% and 50% and median of droplet size distribution (DSD), median D(0.5), of 5, 10 and 25 ?m were prepared from crude oil with API density of 19 (heavy crude oil) and submitted to the proposed ultrasound-assisted demulsification procedure. Experimental conditions as temperature, time of exposition to ultrasound and ultrasonic power were evaluated. Separation of water from crude oil emulsion was observed for all emulsions investigated. Demulsification efficiency up to 65% was obtained for emulsion with 50% of water content and DSD of 10 ?m. Higher efficiency of demulsification was achieved using US temperature of 45 °C and ultrasound power of 160 W by 15 min. Results obtained in this study showed that ultrasound could be considered a promising technology for industrial crude oil treatment and respective water removal. PMID:25640680

  14. Measurement of $??$ Decay-Simulating Events in Nuclear Emulsion with Molybdenum Filling

    E-print Network

    V. D. Ashitkov; A. S. Barabash; V. Ya. Bradnova; V. A. Ditlov; V. V. Dubinina; N. P. Egorenkova; S. I. Konovalov; E. A. Pozharova; N. G. Polukhina; V. A. Smirnitsky; N. I. Starkov; M. M. Chernyavsky; T. V. Shchedrina; V. I. Umatov

    2011-09-28

    The measurement of positron--nucleus collisions was used to estimate the possibility of suppressing background events that simulate $\\beta\\beta$ decay in the emulsion region adjacent to molybdenum conglomerates. The range of the escape of two relativistic particles from the interaction was found to be $ = (0.60\\pm 0.03) ~\\mu$m, which approximately corresponds to the grain size of developed nuclear emulsion. No correlation of the values of d with the angle between two relativistic particles was observed. It was shown that it was possible to exclude $\\beta\\beta$ decay background from electrons emerging in the decay of elements of naturally occurring radioactive chains. The background from $\\beta$ decays of $^{90}$Sr and $^{40}$K available in emulsion around Mo conglomerates was determined by the ratio of the volume $(\\sim d^3)$ to the total volume of emulsion and was found to be $1.5\\cdot 10^{-2}$. It was shown that the backgrounds from $^{40}$K, $^{90}$Sr and natural radioactivity could be significantly suppressed and would not limit the sensitivity of the experiment with 1 kg $^{100}$Mo.

  15. Deformation of double emulsions under conditions of flow cytometry hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaohua; Huck, Wilhelm T S; Balabani, Stavroula

    2015-10-27

    Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) microfluidics double emulsions offer a new route to compartmentalise reagents into isolated aqueous microenvironments while maintaining an aqueous carrier fluid phase; this enables compatibility with commercial flow cytometry systems such as fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Double emulsion (inner core) deformation under hydrodynamic focusing conditions that mimic the environment double emulsions experience in flow cytometry applications is of particular importance for droplet stability and cell viability. This paper reports on an experimental study of the dynamic deformation of aqueous cores of w/o/w double emulsions under hydrodynamic focusing, with the sheath flow directed at 45° to the sample flow. A number of factors affecting the inner core deformation and recovery were examined. Deformation was found to depend significantly on the core or shell viscosity, the droplet-to-sheath flow velocity ratio, and core and shell sizes. Core deformation was found to depend more on the type of surfactant rather concentration with high molecular weight surfactant exhibiting a negligible effect on deformation whereas low molecular weight surfactant enhancing deformation at low concentrations due to their lateral mobility at the interface. PMID:26394745

  16. Ultrasonic attenuation spectroscopy of emulsions with droplet sizes greater than 10 microm.

    PubMed

    Richter, Andreas; Voigt, Tino; Ripperger, Siegfried

    2007-11-15

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurement is a frequently used tool for non-destructive determination of dispersion characteristics. Useful information like particle or droplet size and their concentration can be obtained, if the relation between size and attenuation of the dispersion is known. In this work, the theoretical model by Faran for the intermediate sound wave regime (IWR) is presented in combination with experimental data. In the IWR, the acoustic behavior is governed by elastic scattering rather than by dissipative effects. Experiments with emulsion of droplet sizes greater than 10 mum were carried out. Silicone oil, sunflower oil and olive oil were selected for the disperse phase of the oil-in-water emulsions. First, emulsions having droplets in the micrometer range were created. Afterwords, attenuation measurements of different concentrated emulsion were carried out. Some adjustments reflecting concentration influence were performed to outline the agreement between calculations and measurements. The validity of the model can be confirmed, if the volume fraction of the disperse phase is considered as a variable. Finally, droplet size distributions from theoretical attenuation spectra could be calculated based on a log-normal distribution. PMID:17720180

  17. Effect of fibrous filter properties on the oil-in-water-emulsion separation and filtration performance.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Swarna; von Arnim, Volkmar; Stegmaier, Thomas; Planck, Heinrich

    2011-06-15

    Separation of secondary emulsions of dispersed droplet size less than 10 ?m, by means of fibrous medium is a very complex but important process. The study investigates the influence of thin fibrous filter properties, i.e. surface energy, pore size and porosity on the separation performance of an isooctane in water emulsion (0.2%, mean drop size 2 ?m). Experiments were carried out on five different filter media with a wide variation in their pore size (2-51 ?m), surface energy (14-46 mN/m) and porosity (0.46-0.87) at similar process conditions. Filter media with different wettability are obtained by applying various hydrophobic and hydrophilic coatings. All the used coatings contain nanoparticles (25 nm) to impart nanoscale surface roughness at the single fiber surface. Besides emulsion properties and operating conditions, the phase separation mechanism and performance highly depends on pore size, surface energy and porosity of the filter media. More complete coalescence takes place at reduced pore size and at a surface preferentially wetted by the dispersed phase. Whereas when the pore size equals to the influent droplet size, then the surface wettability of filter is less effective and the separation mechanism is governed by inflow velocity. The emulsion inflow velocity and pressure drop are significantly affected by the filter media air permeability but do not depend on filter surface energy. PMID:21459510

  18. Ultrasonication-assisted preparation and characterization of emulsions and emulsion gels for topical drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay K; Behera, Baikuntha; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal

    2015-03-01

    The current study describes the use of ultrasonication for the preparation of biphasic emulsions and emulsion gels for topical drug delivery. Sorbitan monostearate (SMS) was used as the surfactant for stabilizing the interface of sesame oil (apolar phase) and water (polar phase). Emulsions were formed at lower concentrations of SMS, whereas emulsion gels were formed at higher concentrations of SMS. The formulations were characterized by fluorescent microscopy, X-ray diffraction, viscosity, stress relaxation, spreadability, and differential scanning calorimetry studies. Fluorescence microscopy suggested formation of oil-in-water type of formulations. There was an increase in the viscosity, bulk resistance, and firmness of the formulations as the proportions of SMS was increased. The emulsion gels were viscoelastic in nature. Thermal studies suggested higher thermodynamic stability at higher proportions of either SMS or water. Metronidazole, a model antimicrobial drug, was incorporated within the formulations. The release of the drug from the formulations was found to be diffusion mediated. The drug-loaded formulations showed sufficient antimicrobial efficiency to be used as carriers for topical antimicrobial drug delivery. PMID:25470664

  19. A comparative study of the physicochemical properties of a virgin coconut oil emulsion and commercial food supplement emulsions.

    PubMed

    Khor, Yih Phing; Koh, Soo Peng; Long, Kamariah; Long, Shariah; Ahmad, Sharifah Zarah Syed; Tan, Chin Ping

    2014-01-01

    Food manufacturers are interested in developing emulsion-based products into nutritional foods by using beneficial oils, such as fish oil and virgin coconut oil (VCO). In this study, the physicochemical properties of a VCO oil-in-water emulsion was investigated and compared to other commercial oil-in-water emulsion products (C1, C2, C3, and C4). C3 exhibited the smallest droplet size of 3.25 µm. The pH for the emulsion samples ranged from 2.52 to 4.38 and thus were categorised as acidic. In a texture analysis, C2 was described as the most firm, very adhesive and cohesive, as well as having high compressibility properties. From a rheological viewpoint, all the emulsion samples exhibited non-Newtonian behaviour, which manifested as a shear-thinning property. The G'G'' crossover illustrated by the VCO emulsion in the amplitude sweep graph but not the other commercial samples illustrated that the VCO emulsion had a better mouthfeel. In this context, the VCO emulsion yielded the highest zeta potential (64.86 mV), which was attributed to its strong repulsive forces, leading to a good dispersion system. C2 comprised the highest percentage of fat among all emulsion samples, followed by the VCO emulsion, with 18.44% and 6.59%, respectively. PMID:24988188

  20. Continuous phases in emulsions of three liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman ); Johnson, G.K. ); Dadyburjor, D.B. )

    1993-08-01

    For three-phase (macro)emulsions formed by the top (T), middle (M), and bottom (B) phases of amphiphile/oil/water systems, it has been variously stated in the literature either (1) that the continuous phase is always M or (2) that the continuous phase is B below the phase inversion temperature (PIT) and T above the PIT. We show by means of isothermal electrical conductivity measurements at various temperatures on emulsions of known phase volume fractions that neither hypothesis is generally correct. For our experimental conditions the [open quotes]choice[close quotes] of continuous phase depends on the phase volume fractions, and at all temperatures - by appropriate choice of phase volume fractions - any of T, M, or B may be made the continuous phase. 21 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Emergent Hyperuniformity in Periodically Driven Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijs, Joost H.; Jeanneret, Raphaël; Dreyfus, Rémi; Bartolo, Denis

    2015-09-01

    We report the self-organization of microfluidic emulsions into anomalously homogeneous structures. Upon periodic driving confined emulsions undergo a first-order transition from a reversible to an irreversible dynamics. We evidence that this dynamical transition is accompanied by structural changes at all scales yielding macroscopic yet finite hyperuniform structures. Numerical simulations are performed to single out the very ingredients responsible for the suppression of density fluctuations. We show that, as opposed to equilibrium systems, the long-range nature of the hydrodynamic interactions are not required for the formation of hyperuniform patterns, thereby suggesting a robust relation between reversibility and hyperuniformity which should hold in a broad class of periodically driven materials.

  2. Emulsion Chamber Densitometry by Macroscopic Digital Imaging

    E-print Network

    E. L. Zager; R. J. Wilkes; J. J. Lord

    1999-09-15

    Spot density is commonly used as an indication of shower energy in emulsion chambers. In a system originally developed for JACEE analysis, the optical density of a spot on x-ray film is estimated from macroscopic digital images. The spot's size is used to compensate for the lack of dynamic range obtainable with digital imaging hardware. These densities are compared to manually measured densities.

  3. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  4. Turbulent flow of oil-water emulsions with polymer additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhai, V. N.; Monkam Clovis Le Grand, Monkam; Abdousaliamov, A. V.

    2014-08-01

    The article outlines direct and reverse oil-water emulsions. Microphotography study of these emulsions was carried out. The effect of water-soluble and oil soluble polymers on the emulsion structure and their turbulent flow velocity in cylindrical channel was investigated. It has been experimentally proven that if the fluid being transported is not homogeneous, but a two-phase oil-water emulsion, only the polymer that is compatible with dispersion medium and capable of dissolving in this medium can reduce the hydrodynamic resistance of the fluid flow. Thus, the resistance in direct emulsions can be reduced by water- soluble polyacrylamide, while oil-soluble polyhexene can be applied for reverse emulsions.

  5. PEGylated Nanoparticles Obtained through Emulsion Polymerization as Paclitaxel Carriers.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Claudio; Morosi, Lavinia; Bello, Ezia; Ferrari, Raffaele; Licandro, Simonetta Andrea; Lupi, Monica; Ubezio, Paolo; Morbidelli, Massimo; Zucchetti, Massimo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Moscatelli, Davide; Frapolli, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Polymer nanoparticles (NPs) represent a promising way to deliver poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs without the use of unwanted excipients, whose presence can be the cause of severe side effects. In this work, a Cremophor-free formulation for paclitaxel (PTX) has been developed by employing PEGylated polymer nanoparticles (NPs) as drug delivery carriers based on modified poly(?-caprolactone) macromonomers and synthesized through free radical emulsion polymerization. Paclitaxel was loaded in the NPs in a postsynthesis process which allowed to obtain a drug concentration suitable for in vivo use. In vivo experiments on drug biodistribution and therapeutic efficacy show comparable behavior between the NPs and the Cremophor formulation, also showing good tolerability of the new formulation proposed. PMID:26623665

  6. Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Fibrotic Profile of Fish Oil Emulsions Used in Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Clerigues, Alfonso; Marti-Bonmati, Ezequiel; Milara, Javier; Almudever, Patricia; Cortijo, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (PN) is associated with many complications including severe hepatobiliary dysfunction. Commercial ?-6 fatty acid-soybean based-lipid emulsions in PN may mediate long term PN associate liver disease (PNALD) whereas ?-3-fish oil parenteral emulsions have shown to reverse PNALD in children. However, its clinical effectiveness in adults has been scarcely reported. In this work, we study the role of soybean and fish oil lipid commercial emulsions on inflammatory and profibrotic liver markers in adults with long term PNALD and in in vitro cellular models. Inflammatory and profibrotic markers were measured in serum of ten adults with long term PNALD and in culture supernatants of monocytes. Liver epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) was induced by transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF?1) to evaluate in vitro liver fibrosis. Omegaven®, a 100% fish oil commercial emulsion, was infused during four months in two patients with severe long term PNALD reversing, at the first month, the inflammatory, profibrotic and clinical parameters of PNALD. The effect was maintained during the treatment course but impaired when conventional lipid emulsions were reintroduced. The other patients under chronic soybean oil-based PN showed elevated inflammatory and profibrotic parameters. In vitro human monocytes stimulated with lipopolysaccharide induced a strong inflammatory response that was suppressed by Omegaven®, but increased by soybean emulsions. In other experiments, TGF?1 induced EMT that was suppressed by Omegaven® and enhanced by soybean oil lipid emulsions. Omegaven® improves clinical, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic parameters in adults with long-term home PNALD. PMID:25502575

  7. Clinical applications of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy.

    PubMed

    Muller, Sam H; Diaz, James H; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-12-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE; Intralipid) therapy, a standard treatment in local anesthetic toxicity, has demonstrated therapeutic efficacies for a number of different drug class-mediated toxicities. Some of these varied drug groups include antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiarrhythmics, and calcium channel blockers. To meet the objective of describing the growing number of indications for Intralipid therapy and any diverse effects and/or failures of Intralipid therapy in reversing multiple drug toxicities, we queried several Internet search engines with the key words "intravenous lipid emulsion therapy," "Intralipid," "lipid emulsion," and "local anesthetic systemic toxicity," resulting in the identification of 31 case reports for descriptive analysis. These case reports included 49 separate drug overdose cases involving ten separate drug classes which were successfully reversed with Intralipid. The education of clinicians regarding the beneficial and varied roles of Intralipid therapy in different clinical settings is warranted, particularly in terms of the potential for Intralipid therapy to reverse the toxicities of non-local anesthetic drugs. PMID:26049929

  8. 78 FR 58318 - Clinical Trial Design for Intravenous Fat Emulsion Products; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ...Intravenous Fat Emulsion Products.'' This workshop will...registration of intravenous fat emulsion products. Date and Time: The public...design for intravenous fat emulsions. Stakeholders, including industry sponsors, academia,...

  9. Monodisperse Emulsion Generation via Drop Break Off in a Coflowing Stream

    E-print Network

    Monodisperse Emulsion Generation via Drop Break Off in a Coflowing Stream P. B. Umbanhowar,*, V monodisperse emulsions (with minimum achievable polydispersities tension of the two phases. Emulsions composed of a variety of fluids and with drop sizes ranging from 2

  10. Emulsion-Based Synthesis of Reversibly Swellable, Magnetic Nanoparticle-Embedded Polymer Microcapsules

    E-print Network

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Emulsion-Based Synthesis of Reversibly Swellable, Magnetic Nanoparticle-Embedded Polymer mixture containing liquid prepolymer and MPs in chloroform solution, double emulsions comprising emulsions converted to microcapsules with a polymerized composite shell. The evolution from the double

  11. Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

    1981-09-01

    Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

  12. Microwave Enhanced Separation of Water-In-Oil Emulsions 

    E-print Network

    Fang, C. S.; Lai, P.

    1992-01-01

    SEPARATION OF WATER-IN-oIL EMULSIONS C.S. FANG DEPAR'lMENT OF rnEMICAL ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHWESTERN LOUISIANA LAFAYE'ITE, IDUISIANA ABSTRACT The experimental data showed that viscous and stable water-in-oil emulsions can be separated... to dlscharge emulslons to a dump site, it is necessary to break the emulsion, and separate water fran oil to discharge water. The recovered oil can be recycled. If it must be disposed of, its VOlume is less than that of original emulsion, and conse quently...

  13. Performance evaluation of organic emulsion liquid membrane on phenol removal

    E-print Network

    Ng, Y S; Hashim, M A

    2014-01-01

    The percentage removal of phenol from aqueous solution by emulsion liquid membrane and emulsion leakage was investigated experimentally for various parameters such as membrane:internal phase ratio, membrane:external phase ratio, emulsification speed, emulsification time, carrier concentration, surfactant concentration and internal agent concentration. These parameters strongly influence the percentage removal of phenol and emulsion leakage. Under optimum membrane properties, the percentage removal of phenol was as high as 98.33%, with emulsion leakage of 1.25%. It was also found that the necessity of carrier for enhancing phenol removal was strongly dependent on the internal agent concentration.

  14. Method and apparatus for recovering oil from waste oil emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Srivatsa, S.R.; Zuerner, E.C.

    1984-01-24

    A method for recovering oil from a waste oil emulsion or sludge where the waste oil emulsion is heated and chemicals are added to obtain oil-water resolution, which includes conducting bottle and beaker tests on waste oil emulsion samples to obtain a trend which depicts a drop in viscosity as a function of the type and dosage of chemical added, and apparatus for utilizing the waste oil emulsion viscosity trend in the operation of a waste oil cooker or recovery vessel to add type and dosage of chemicals.

  15. The effect of fat emulsion on essential fatty acid deficiency during intravenous hyperalimentation in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, T; Ogata, H; Yokoyama, H; Mashima, Y; Iwasaki, I

    1975-04-01

    A series of experiments on puppies and two newborn infants indicates that Intralipid which covered only 4% of the total caloreis, prevented or improved essential fatty acid deficiency in puppies and infants on hyperalimentation. This means that the intravenous fat emulsion, which covers about 2% of the total caloric intake with linoleic acid, still satisfies the essential fatty acid requirement, since half of the fatty acid composition of Intralipid is linoleate. PMID:804543

  16. The SPHINX code for simulation of processes in X-ray emulsion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamedshin, R. A.

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo program is elaborated for simulations of processes in X-ray emulsion chambers and measurement procedures used in experiments both aboard stratospheric balloons and at mountain altitudes. The code is applicable from ˜ 1 GeV to extremely high energies (˜ 10 PeV) for arbitrary type of chamber design including lead, carbon, rubber, air, e.g. The code is easy in use and of access for all the persons via Internet.

  17. An electro-coalescence chip for effective emulsion breaking in droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chokkalingam, Venkatachalam; Ma, Yujie; Thiele, Julian; Schalk, Werner; Tel, Jurjen; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2014-07-21

    Droplet-based microfluidics is increasingly used for biological applications, where the recovery of cells or particles after an experiment or assay is desirable. Here, we present an electro-demulsification chip which circumvents the use of harsh chemicals and multiple washing/centrifugation steps and offers a mild way for extracting cells and polymer particles into an aqueous phase from microfluidic water-in-oil emulsions. PMID:24889537

  18. A multivariate screening analysis of W/O emulsions in high external electric fields as studied by means of dielectric time domain spectroscopy. 2: Model emulsions stabilized by interfacially active fractions from crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Foerdedal, H.; Midttun, O.; Sjoeblom, J.; Kvalheim, O.M.; Schildberg, Y.; Volle, J.L.

    1996-09-01

    The electrically induced coalescence of water-in-oil emulsions stabilized by interfacially active fractions from crude oils has been studied by means of time domain dielectric spectroscopy at high electric fields. The experiments were designed with a 2{sup 7-3} reduced factorial design. Regression analysis clearly shows that the choice of organic solvent and the amount of asphaltenes, as well as the interplay between these variables, are the most significant parameters for determining the stability of these emulsions. It should be pointed out that the asphaltenes were the only surface active fraction tested. No interplay between, for instance, asphaltenes and resins was investigated. The nonlinearity found in the regression analysis is explained by different aggregation states of asphaltenes in aliphatic and aromatic solvents. The influence of the variables upon the emulsion stability is discussed.

  19. A novel approach to dark matter search based on nanometric emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Asada, T.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Furuya, S.; Gentile, V.; Hakamata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Katsuragawa, T.; Kuwabara, K.; Machii, S.; Naka, T.; Pupilli, F.; Sirignano, C.; Tawara, Y.; Tioukov, V.; Umemoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2014-12-01

    The most convincing candidate as main constituent of the dark matter in the Universe consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP). WIMPs must be electrically neutral and interact with a very low cross-section (? < 10-40 cm2) which makes them detectable in direct searches only through the observation of nuclear recoils induced by the WIMP rare scatterings. In the experiments carried out so far, recoiled nuclei are searched for as a signal over a background produced by Compton electrons and neutron scatterings. Signal found by some experiments have not been confirmed by other techniques. None of these experiments is able to detect the track, typically less than one micron long, of the recoiled nucleus and therefore none is able to directly detect the incoming direction of WIMPs. We propose an R&D program for a new experimental method able to observe the track of the scattered nucleus based on new developments in the nuclear emulsion technique: films with nanometric silver grains, expansion of emulsions and very fast completely automated scanning systems. Nuclear emulsions would act both as the WIMP target and as the tracking detector able to reconstruct the direction of the recoiled nucleus. This unique characteristic would provide a new and unambiguous signature of the presence of the dark matter in our galaxy.

  20. Induction of Infection in Sesbania exaltata by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene Formulated in an Invert Emulsion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In greenhouse experiments, an experimental invert emulsion (MSG 8.25) was tested as an adjuvant with spores of the mycoherbicidal fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene, a highly virulent pathogen of the leguminous weed Aeschynomene virginica (northern jointvetch), but non-pathoge...

  1. Crude oil emulsions containing a compatible fluorochemical surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Karydas, A.; Rodgers, J.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a crude oil in water emulsion, which is stable to both breakdown and phase inversion up to at least about 50{degrees} C., the emulsion containing an effective, compatible, emulsion stabilizing amount of a fluorochemical surfactant of the formula (R{sub {ital f}}){sub {ital n}}A{sub {ital m}}Q wherein R{sub {ital f}} is an inert, stable, oleophobic and hydrophobic fluoroaliphatic group having up to about 20 carbon atoms; n is an integer from 1 to 3; A is a direct bond or an organic linking group and is covalently bonded to both R{sub {ital f}} and Q; Q is an anionic, nonionic or amphoteric group; and m is an integer from 1 to 3; wherein the amount of weight of the fluorochemical surfactant present in the emulsion being between about 0.001 and 1% by weight of the emulsion, in the presence of absence of up to about 2% by weight of a crude oil emulsion promoting hydrocarbon surfactant, with the proviso that at least about 0.005% by weight total fluorochemical and hydrocarbon surfactant is present, based upon the weight of emulsion, and wherein the emulsion contains bout 15 to about 90 percent by weight water, based upon the weight of emulsion, such that the viscosity of the emulsion is less than about 50% of the viscosity of the crude oil, and wherein the emulsion spontaneously breaks down into an aqueous and crude oil phase at a temperature between about 55{degrees} and 75{degrees} C.

  2. Rheological properties of heavy oils and heavy oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M.R.

    1996-06-01

    In this study, the author investigated the effects of a number of process variables such as shear rate, measurement temperature, pressure, the influence of pretreatment, and the role of various amounts of added water on the rheology of the resulting heavy oil or the emulsion. Rheological properties of heavy oils and the corresponding emulsions are important from transportation and processing standpoints.

  3. Maximizing the stability of pyrolysis oil/diesel fuel emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several emulsions consisting of biomass pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) in diesel fuel were produced and analyzed for stability over time. An ultrasonic probe was used to generate microscopic droplets of bio-oil suspended in diesel fuel, and this emulsion was stabilized using surfactant chemicals. The most...

  4. Nanoscale and Microscale Iron Emulsions for Treating DNAPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Cherie L.

    2002-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using emulsified nanoscale and microscale iron particles to enhance dehalogenation of (Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid) DNAPL free-phase. The emulsified system consisted of a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable oil-in-water emulsion with nanoscale or microscale iron particles contained within the emulsion droplets. It was demonstrated that DNAPLs, such as trichloroethene (TCE), diffuse through the oil membrane of the emulsion particle whereupon they reach an aqueous interior and the surface of an iron particle where dehalogenation takes place. The hydrocarbon reaction by-products of the dehalogenation reaction, primarily ethene (no chlorinated products detected), diffuse out of the emulsion droplet. This study also demonstrated that an iron-emulsion system could be delivered in-situ to the DNAPL pool in a soil matrix by using a simulated push well technique. Iron emulsions degraded pure TCE at a rate comparable to the degradation of dissolved phase TCE by iron particles, while pure iron had a very low degradation rate for free-phase TCE. The iron-emulsion systems can be injected into a sand matrix where they become immobilized and are not moved by flowing water. It has been documented that surfactant micelles possess the ability to pull pooled TCE into emulsion droplets where degradation of TCE takes place.

  5. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Gelger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water, The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles.

  6. Emulsion separation rate enhancement with high frequency energy

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.R.

    1997-06-01

    The preponderance of stable oil/water emulsions, commonly encountered as pit oils or tank bottoms and known as sludges, presents an ever worsening remediation problem to oil producers and refiners. As the world`s crudes become heavier, the problem of emulsion generation becomes larger. Increasing regulatory and worldwide environmental controls also drive the need for cost effective reclamation of emulsions and sludges. Traditional methods of heating emulsions to force them to separate are difficult to practice. Emulsions can be hard to pump or may leave residue on heat transfer surfaces. High temperature processing can lead to loss of valuable volatiles. Revolutionary, cost effect technology for high frequency (RFM) energy separation of oil emulsions has been developed by Imperial Petroleum Recovery Corporation. RFM energy energizes the aqueous, surfactant and solid particulate components selectively, providing differential energy input. Proper choice of frequency provides dynamic coupling of the energy field to the natural frequency of the water component of the emulsion, accelerating coalescence of the water droplets into a separated phase. Field results have demonstrated the unique capabilities of RFM energy to accelerate separation of oil/water emulsions.

  7. Coalescence of oil in oil/water emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D.B.; Walker, B.

    1980-04-22

    This invention relates to a method for the removal of oil from an oil in water emulsion by passing the emulsion through a fibrous structure comprising fibres having finely divided particles having an average size of one micron or less and which exhibit oleophilic and hydrophobic properties adhered to and penetrating their outer surfaces, and removing the coalesced oil droplets so formed.

  8. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524.802 Section 524.802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications. Each...

  9. Synthesis of metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Haorong (Albuquerque, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

    2011-12-13

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  10. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524.802 Section 524.802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications. Each...

  11. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524.802 Section 524.802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications. Each...

  12. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water. The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles

  13. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524.802 Section 524.802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications. Each...

  14. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shivangi; Dabral, Prashant; Rana, Vinod; Upadhaya, Kumud; Bhardwaj

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug. PMID:23066192

  15. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shivangi; Dabral, Prashant; Rana, Vinod; Upadhaya, Kumud; Bhardwaj

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug. PMID:23066192

  16. Mannans as stabilizers of oil-in-water beverage emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant polysaccharides and gums such as gum arabic (GA) are commonly used as stabilizers of oil-in-water emulsions. O-acetyl-galactoglucomannan (GGM), a by-product from mechanical pulping of spruce wood, is able to stabilize colloidal wood resin emulsions (Hannuksela and Holmbom, 2004), but its use a...

  17. Emulsion design to improve the delivery of functional lipophilic components.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian

    2010-01-01

    The food industry has used emulsion science and technology for many years to create a diverse range of food products, such as milk, cream, soft drinks, nutritional beverages, dressings, mayonnaise, sauces, dips, deserts, ice cream, margarine, and butter. The majority of these food products are conventional oil-in-water (O/W) or water-in-oil (W/O) type emulsions. Recently, there has been increasing interest within the food industry in either improving or extending the functional performance of foods using novel structured emulsions. This article reviews recent developments in the creation of structured emulsions that could be used by the food and other industries, including nanoemulsions, multiple emulsions, multilayer emulsions, solid lipid particles, and filled hydrogel particles. These structured emulsions can be produced from food-grade [generally recognized as safe (GRAS)] ingredients (e.g., lipids, proteins, polysaccharides, surfactants, and minerals), using simple processing operations (e.g., mixing, homogenizing, and thermal processing). The structure, production, performance, and potential applications of each type of structured emulsion system are discussed. PMID:22129337

  18. Perfluorochemical emulsions decrease Kupffer cell phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottalico, L.A.; Betensky, H.T.; Min, Y.B.; Weinstock, S.B. )

    1991-07-01

    One drawback to using perfluorochemical emulsions as blood substitutes is that perfluorochemical particles are cleared from the blood by the reticuloendothelial system, primarily liver and spleen. The authors measured the impact of two perfluorochemical emulsions on clearance of colloidal carbon (less than 1 microns) and 51Cr-sheep red blood cells (about 8 microns) by the reticuloendothelial system in vivo and in the isolated perfused liver. Male rats were injected with 2 ml/100 gm body wt of Fluosol-DA or Oxypherol-ET for 4 consecutive days. Carbon (1 ml/100 gm body wt) or sheep red blood cells (0.05 ml of 5% vol/vol/100 gm body wt) were then injected intravenously (in vivo) or added to perfusate. Samples were taken at several time points for 1 hr. In the isolated perfused liver, carbon clearance was depressed by 25% 1 day after treatment. Rates returned to control levels by 12 days in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but remained depressed by 67% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats. Sheep red blood cell (8 microns) clearance was two to five times slower than carbon clearance and depressed by 40% in livers from Fluosol-DA rats 1 day and 12 days after treatment. Added serum did not improve phagocytosis. In vivo carbon clearance remained normal in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but decreased by 74% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats 1 day after treatment, returning to normal by 12 days. Clearance rates were similar in control rats in vivo and in the perfused liver. They conclude that the isolated perfused liver is a good model to measure liver clearance function. Although low doses of perfluorochemical emulsions may depress Kupffer cell phagocytosis, general reticuloendothelial system function is not significantly compromised.

  19. Photographic Surveillance Using Kodak Scientific Type Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Luther M.

    1983-06-01

    Belonging to courts of judicature or to public discussion and debate, is the common definition of forensic. Forensic photography as used by law enforcement agencies, the fire services and industrial security employs a variety of camera equipment as well as numerous types of photographic emulsions. Identification of persons, objects and activities, often under adverse lighting conditions, make use of photographic materials that originally and normally were intended for entirely different purposes. The liberal attitude of the courts in todays society makes the use of photography imperative. Special techniques using filters, modified developers and specific light sources allow photography to play an ever increasing role in law enforcement.

  20. Measurement of Stress Redistribution in Flowing Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmond, Kenneth W.; Weeks, Eric R.

    2015-08-01

    We study how local rearrangements alter droplet stresses within flowing dense quasi-two-dimensional emulsions at area fractions ? ?0.88 . Using microscopy, we measure droplet positions while simultaneously using their deformed shape to measure droplet stresses. We find that rearrangements alter nearby stresses in a quadrupolar pattern: stresses on neighboring droplets tend to either decrease or increase depending on location. The stress redistribution is more anisotropic with increasing ? . The spatial character of the stress redistribution influences where subsequent rearrangements occur. Our results provide direct quantitative support for rheological theories of dense amorphous materials that connect local rearrangements to changes in nearby stress.

  1. Development of an Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Ultrasound Drug Delivery Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Sebastian, Ian E.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-03-01

    Many therapeutic applications of ultrasound (US) include the use of pefluorocarbon (PFC) microbubbles or emulsions. These colloidal systems can be activated in the presence of US, which in the case of emulsions, results in the production of bubbles—a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). ADV can be used as a drug delivery mechanism, thereby yielding the localized release of toxic agents such a chemotherapeutics. In this work, emulsions that contain PFC and chlorambucil, a chemotherapy drug, are formulated using albumin or lipid shells. For albumin droplets, the oil phase—which contained CHL—clearly enveloped the PFC phase. The albumin emulsion also displayed better retention of CHL in the absence of US, which was evaluated by incubating Chinese hamster ovary cells with the various formulations. Thus, the developed emulsions are suitable for further testing in ADV-induced release of CHL.

  2. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, was used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improve the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study were: (1) Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems. (2) Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system. (3) Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit. (4) Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system. and (5) Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts (not completed due to lack of funds)

  3. Emulsion Chamber with Big Radiation Length for Detecting Neutrino Oscillations

    E-print Network

    A. E. Asratyan; G. V. Davidenko; A. G. Dolgolenko; V. S. Kaftanov; M. A. Kubantsev; V. S. Verebryusov

    2000-02-07

    A conceptual scheme of a hybrid-emulsion spectrometer for investigating various channels of neutrino oscillations is proposed. The design emphasizes detection of $\\tau$ leptons by detached vertices, reliable identification of electrons, and good spectrometry for all charged particles and photons. A distributed target is formed by layers of low-Z material, emulsion-plastic-emulsion sheets, and air gaps in which $\\tau$ decays are detected. The tracks of charged secondaries, including electrons, are momentum-analyzed by curvature in magnetic field using hits in successive thin layers of emulsion. The $\\tau$ leptons are efficiently detected in all major decay channels, including \\xedec. Performance of a model spectrometer, that contains 3 tons of nuclear emulsion and 20 tons of passive material, is estimated for different experimental environments. When irradiated by the $\

  4. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of photoactive matter — Applications to photographic emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohá?, L.; Fiala, J.; Pelant, I.; Sladký, P.; Vacek, K.

    1982-01-01

    A new technique — the photoacoustic spectroscopy with microphone detection has been successfully applied to the studies of spectral sensitivity of silver halide emulsions. Regardless of the fact that the sensitivity of photographic emulsions is greater or comparable with the detectivity of real photoacoustic transducers (i.e. the photoacoustic cell with microphone or piezoelectric transducer), absorption-like spectra of strongly diffusive and nontransparent silver halide emulsions can be readily recorded. Applications of this new technique for the studies of silver halide emulsions bears full potential advantages of photoacoustic spectroscopy. Particularly we demonstrate priority of the new technique over the conventional photographic sensitometry or reflectance spectroscopy both in qualitative and quantitative manner. Photoacoustic measurements of photochemical decomposition rates are shown and suggestions for the measurements of excitation energy transfer efficiencies are given. The results clearly show a unique applicability of the technique in fundamental as well as industrial research and process control of the photographic emulsion production.

  5. Temperature dependence of emulsion morphologies and the dispersion morphology diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H. ); Covatch, G.C.; Lim, Kyunghee )

    1991-02-07

    The recently constructed dispersion morphology diagram predicts that for amphiphile/oil/water systems there exists a range of concentrations within which only OL/AQ (oil-in-water) emulsions form and another range of concentrations for which the emulsion morphology is always AQ/OL (water-in-soil), regardless of whether the temperature is below the lower critical end-point temperature, above the upper critical end point, or between these two temperatures. These predictions contradict the PIT (phase inversion temperature) idea, that below the PIT amphiphile/oil/water systems for only oil-in-water emulsions and above the PIT they form only water-in-oil emulsions. By using electrical conductivity measurements to determine the emulsion morphologies at different temperatures for systems of constant composition, the authors show for the system studied that the previous predictions of the dispersion morphology diagram are correct.

  6. Experimental data in support of continuous microwave effect on emulsion polymerization of styrene.

    PubMed

    Ergan, Ba?ak Temur; Bayramo?lu, Mahmut; Özcan, Seval

    2015-09-01

    This article contains original experimental data, figures and methods to the study of Microwave-assisted emulsion polymerization of styrene under the frame of "Enhanced Microwave Synthesis" (EMS), has been examined to investigate the advantages of Microwave (MW) power use in emulsion polymerization (Ergan et al., Eur. Polym. J. 69, 2015, 374-384). For comparative purpose, MW and conventional heating (CH) method experiments were conducted under similar conditions. By externally cooling the reaction vessel with 1,4-dioxane, constant and continuous MW power was successfully applied at isothermal condition during the polymerization. Here we give the MW power calibration data of MW-experimental system, the complete set of the experimental polymerization data and the analysis data obtained from different polymer characterization test devices (GPC, DSC and Viscometer). PMID:26306319

  7. Experimental data in support of continuous microwave effect on emulsion polymerization of styrene

    PubMed Central

    Ergan, Ba?ak Temur; Bayramo?lu, Mahmut; Özcan, Seval

    2015-01-01

    This article contains original experimental data, figures and methods to the study of Microwave-assisted emulsion polymerization of styrene under the frame of “Enhanced Microwave Synthesis” (EMS), has been examined to investigate the advantages of Microwave (MW) power use in emulsion polymerization (Ergan et al., Eur. Polym. J. 69, 2015, 374–384). For comparative purpose, MW and conventional heating (CH) method experiments were conducted under similar conditions. By externally cooling the reaction vessel with 1,4-dioxane, constant and continuous MW power was successfully applied at isothermal condition during the polymerization. Here we give the MW power calibration data of MW-experimental system, the complete set of the experimental polymerization data and the analysis data obtained from different polymer characterization test devices (GPC, DSC and Viscometer). PMID:26306319

  8. Phase transition pathways for the production of 100 nm oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Sonneville-Aubrun, O; Babayan, D; Bordeaux, D; Lindner, P; Rata, Gabriel; Cabane, B

    2009-01-01

    Oil/water emulsions can be produced through phase inversion, by adding water to a reverse water/oil microemulsion. According to small angle neutron scattering experiments and visual observations performed during phase inversion, the stages of this process are as follows: (i) upon water addition, the microemulsion gives way to a highly swollen lamellar phase; (ii) the transient lamellar phase breaks up to yield an array of droplets; (iii) the droplets loses the correlations of the lamellar phase. This emulsion is already present less than one minute after the initial addition of water, and it reaches the final size distribution in one hour. The final population of oil droplets is homogenous with a mean diameter below 100 nm. PMID:19081913

  9. ESR studies of semicontinuous emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, W.; Westmoreland, D.G.

    1993-12-31

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is used in the detection and quantification of propagating radicals during a semicontinuous emulsion polymerization. The propagating radical concentration is crucial for the determination of kinetic parameters of the emulsion polymerization process. A flow reactor was built which involves a closed-loop flow system that circulates latex from the polymerization reactor through the ESR cavity for free-radical measurements and back to the reactor. With the continuous measurement of the radical concentrations during a polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), {bar n} (average number of radicals per particle) and k{sub p} (propagating rate constant), are measured throughout the entire polymerization. For the polymerization of the MMA system studied, the authors observed a gradual increased in n and decrease in k{sub p} during the run, suggesting a diffusionally controlled process and that the polymerization is not occurring homogeneously throughout the polymer particles. In the glassy pMMA matrix, radicals can be {open_quotes}trapped{close_quotes} within a minimum volume and remain unterminated.

  10. In-line monitoring of batch emulsion polymerization by fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khanbashi, Abdullah Saad

    Raman spectroscopy has been recognized as an excellent technique for monitoring polymerization reaction systems. It provides direct information of the changes in the chemical bonds as the monomers polymerize. The use of optical fibers makes it possible to conduct the measurements in remote. However, major limitations in the availability of adequate probes have prevented the implementation of the technique in industrial processes. In this research, the interaction of emulsion systems with several probe designs was evaluated. Multi-fiber probe designs were found to suffer from strong fiber interferences that mask the emulsions' Raman scattering signals. However, the major problems associated with multi-fiber probes were eliminated by the use of filter-based probes. First, the filter rejects the interferences produced from the interaction of the excitation source with the excitation fiber. Second, it blocks the elastic scattering (Rayleigh and Mie) from the sample from entering the collection fiber and thus masks the Raman signal from the sample. Experiments were conducted to monitor emulsion reactions using a Raman system coupled to a filter-based fiber-optic probe. An emulsion reaction of styrene-butyl acrylate copolymerization was studied. The total concentration of monomers was found to correlate with the Raman peak at 1,631 cmsp{-1}. The styrene monomer concentration was found to correlate with the Raman peak at 1,412 cmsp{-1} attributed solely to the styrene monomer. A methyl methacrylate emulsion polymerization system was also monitored with a Raman system coupled to a filter-based fiber-optic probe. Two methyl methacrylate reactions were run under similar conditions and both were monitored with Raman spectroscopy. The monomer concentration was determined using two different regions of the spectra. A model for the concentration of the first region using the peak at 1,644 cmsp{-1} was built using a univariate technique. The second region between 805-855 cmsp{-1} contained two peaks; one at 840 cmsp{-1} attributed to the monomer, and the second at 820 cmsp{-1} attributed to the polymer. A model for the concentration of the second region was built using a multivariate technique. These two regions gave similar monomer profiles for each reaction. The concentration models built using the data of one reaction were capable of predicting the concentration profile of the second reaction. This study showed the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy coupled with a filter-based probe to monitor in real time the progress of emulsion polymerization batch reactions.

  11. VISCOELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF POLYMER-THICKENED WATER-IN-OIL EMULSIONS

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    VISCOELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF POLYMER-THICKENED WATER-IN- OIL EMULSIONS MONTESI PEÑA HIRASAKI PASQUALI to compressed. Emulsions avec polymère , émulsions eau dans huile , PIB Polymer-thickened emulsions, water une phase compressée. #12;VISCOELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF POLYMER-THICKENED WATER-IN-OIL EMULSIONS 1

  12. Atomization and Sprays, 21 (5): 391410 (2011) COMPARISON OF WATER-IN-OIL EMULSION

    E-print Network

    Heydari, Payam

    2011-01-01

    Atomization and Sprays, 21 (5): 391­410 (2011) COMPARISON OF WATER-IN-OIL EMULSION ATOMIZATION investigates the atomization characteristics of various water-in-diesel fuel emulsions stabilized where these emulsions were introduced through a high-flow-capacity nozzle. The emulsions, generated

  13. pubs.acs.org/Langmuir On the Possible Role of Surface Elasticity in Emulsion Stability

    E-print Network

    Weeks, Eric R.

    pubs.acs.org/Langmuir On the Possible Role of Surface Elasticity in Emulsion Stability Daniela monodisperse oil-in-water emulsions with the same surfactants and monitored the time evolution of the emulsion) and alkanes with different chain lengths. The emulsion drop size evolution is first controlled by Ostwald

  14. Temperature dependence of emulsion morphologies and the dispersion morphology diagram. 2. Three-phase emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Johnson, G.K.

    1995-07-06

    Using several different compositions of the (pseudo)ternary amphiphile/oil/`water` system C{sub 6}H{sub 13}(OC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}-OH/n-tetradecane/aqueous 10 mM NaCl, we show by means of electrical conductivity measurements that the temperature dependencies of the emulsion morphologies were consistent with predictions from isothermal dispersion morphology diagrams, thus contradicting phase inversion temperature ideas. 26 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Further progress for a fast scanning of nuclear emulsions with Large Angle Scanning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2014-02-01

    The LASSO (Large Angle Scanning System for OPERA) is a scanning system designed in the framework of the OPERA experiment as a result of several R&Ds aimed to improve the performance of the European Scanning System (ESS) by increasing the scanning speed, the angular acceptance and the efficiency in microtrack reconstruction. The novel Continuous Motion (CM) scanning approach allows to double the ESS nominal speed without any changes in the hardware set-up. The LASSO modular design makes the system easily adaptable to new hardware. The novel microtrack reconstruction algorithm has been developed to be efficient in both standard Stop&Go (SG) and CM modes, performing a number of corrections during the processing like corrections for vibrations, optical distortions, field of view curvature. As an intermediate step it reconstructs silver grains positions inside emulsion layer to make a transition from 2D images to real 3D traces of a charged particle. This allows the algorithm to have no internal limits on the slope of microtracks being equally efficient on all angles. The LASSO has been used for about one year for mass production scanning of emulsion films of OPERA, Muon Radiography and also of films employed to study nuclear fragmentation of ion beams used in medical physics. More than 50000 cm2 of the emulsion surface have been analyzed during this period.

  16. Novel stabilization of emulsions via the heteroaggregation of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Liu, Wenhui; Rodrigues, Jhonny A

    2008-05-01

    The stabilization of emulsions by a mixture of oppositely charged nanoparticles is investigated in relation to their behavior in water before emulsification. No emulsion can be prepared using either negatively or positively charged silica particles alone because the particles are too hydrophilic. Certain mixtures of the two particle types lead to heteroaggregation and a lowering of the net charge. Such mixtures, of increased hydrophobicity as verified by contact angle measurements, are capable of forming stable oil-in-water emulsions of excellent coalescence stability. The increased viscosity of the continuous phase also contributes to such stability. PMID:18361536

  17. Automated method of tracing proton tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Jin-lu; Li, Hong-yun; Song, Ji-wen; Zhang, Jian-fu; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Zhong-bing; Liu, Jin-liang; Liu, Lin-yue

    2015-07-01

    The low performance of the manual recognition of proton-recoil tracks in nuclear emulsions has limited its application to energy spectrum measurement of a pulsed neutron source. We developed an automated microscope system to trace proton-recoil tracks in nuclear emulsions. Given a start point on the proton track of interest, the microscope system can automatically trace and record the entire track using an image processing algorithm. Tests indicate that no interaction of the operator is needed in tracing the entire track. This automated microscope greatly reduces the labor of the operator and increases the efficiency of track data collection in nuclear emulsion.

  18. Temperature dependence of emulsion morphologies and the dispersion morphology diagram for three-phase emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Johnson, G.K.

    1995-12-31

    Using several different compositions of the (pseudo)ternary amphiphile/oil/{open_quotes}water{close_quotes} system C{sub 6}H{sub 13}(OC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}OH/n-tetradecane/aqueous 10 mM NaCl that form oil-rich top phases (J), water-rich bottom phases ({Beta}), and middle-phase microemulsions (m), we showed by means of electrical conductivity measurements that the temperature dependencies of the three-phase emulsion morphologies were consistent with predictions from isothermal dispersion morphology diagrams, thus contradicting ideas derived from the PIT (phase inversion temperature) model for two-phase emulsions. In particular, we formed three-phase emulsions in which either (1) the continuous phase was an oil-rich phase (actually, m) below the PIT and the water-rich phase ({Beta}) above that temperature; (2) the water-rich phase was continuous both below and above the PIT; or (3) oil-rich phase was the continuous phase both below and above the PIT.

  19. Wall slip and fluidity in emulsion flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, José; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    The microscopic origin of apparent wall slip is studied systematically using a confocal laser scanning microscope coupled to a rheometer. We obtain flow curves on a model emulsion from classical macroscopic measurements that are compared with flow curves obtained from microscopic measurements. By controlling the wetting properties of the shearing walls, we show that the characteristic length used in the so-called fluidity model, proposed by Goyon et al. [Nature (London) 454, 84 (2008), 10.1038/nature07026], can be understood in terms of roughness induced by adsorbed droplets on the surface. Additionally, we disentangle two different effects that contribute to the difference between micro- and macrorheology. Both effects manifest themselves as gap-dependent viscosities due to either the formation of a lubricating layer close to the shearing walls or cooperative effects when the flow is strongly confined. Finally, we show that the cooperative effects can also be translated into an effective slip velocity.

  20. Cationic acrylamide emulsion polymer brine thickeners

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, P.A.; Piccoline, M.A.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a thickened, solids free, aqueous drilling and servicing brine having a density of at least 14.4 ppg. comprising (a) an aqueous solution of at least one water-soluble salt of a multivalent metal, and (b) a cationic water-in-oil emulsion polymer of acrylamide or methacrylamide and a cationic monomer selected from the group consisting of a dialkylaminoalkyl acrylamide or methacrylamide, a trialkylaminoalkyl acrylamide or methacrylamide, a trialkylaminoalkyl acrylate or methacrylate, and a dialkyldialkyl ammonium halide. The acrylamide or methacrylamide to cationic monomer molar ratio of the polymer is about 70:30 to 95:5, the polymer having an I.V. in 1.0N KCl of about 1.0 to 7.0 dl/g and being present in a compatible and viscosifying amount; the thickened brine characterized by being substantially non-dilatent.

  1. Biofilm Formation in Microscopic Double Emulsion Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Connie; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    In natural, medical, and industrial settings, there exist surface-associated communities of bacteria known as biofilms. These highly structured films are composed of bacterial cells embedded within self-produced extracellular matrix, usually composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids; this matrix serves to protect the bacterial community from antibiotics and environmental stressors. Here, we form biofilms encapsulated within monodisperse, microscopically-sized double emulsion droplets using microfluidics. The bacteria self-organize at the inner liquid-liquid droplet interfaces, multiply, and differentiate into extracellular matrix-producing cells, forming manifold three-dimensional shell-within-a-shell structures of biofilms, templated upon the inner core of spherical liquid droplets. By using microfluidics to encapsulate bacterial cells, we have the ability to view individual cells multiplying in microscopically-sized droplets, which allows for high-throughput analysis in studying the genetic program leading to biofilm development, or cell signaling that induces differentiation.

  2. Stability of cellulose lyotropic liquid crystal emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixier, T.; Heppenstall-Butler, M.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2005-12-01

    We studied a new kind of W/O emulsions based on a lyotropic liquid crystal as the aqueous droplet phase. The cholesteric phase, a solution hydroxypropyl cellulose in water was dispersed in the continuous oil matrix, paraffin oil or heptane. We made a specific choice of surfactant in order to impose director anchoring conditions at the oil-water interface and orient the liquid crystal inside the droplet. The strong anchoring conditions resulted in a topological defect inside the droplets of size above the critical value R^*. The defect elastic energy creates a barrier against droplet coalescence, the effect of topological size selection. We have studied the orientation of the director inside the droplets and their size distribution.

  3. Oscillation patterns in active emulsion networks

    E-print Network

    Shashi Thutupalli; Stephan Herminghaus

    2012-06-13

    We study water-in-oil emulsion droplets, running the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, that form a new type of active matter unit. These droplets, stabilised by surfactants dispersed in the oil medium, are capable of internal chemical oscillations and also self-propulsion due to dynamic interfacial instabilities that result from the chemical reactions. The chemical oscillations can couple via the exchange of activator and inhibitor type of reaction intermediates across the droplets under precise conditions of surfactant bilayer formation between the droplets. Here we present the synchronization behaviour of networks of such chemical oscillators and show that the resulting dynamics depend on the network topology. Further, we demonstrate that the motion of droplets can be synchronized with the chemical oscillations inside the droplets, leading to exciting possibilities in future studies of active matter.

  4. Physical chemistry of highly concentrated emulsions.

    PubMed

    Foudazi, Reza; Qavi, Sahar; Masalova, Irina; Malkin, Alexander Ya

    2015-06-01

    This review explores the physics underlying the rheology of highly concentrated emulsions (HCEs) to determine the relationship between elasticity and HCE stability, and to consider whether it is possible to describe all physicochemical properties of HCEs on the basis of a unique physical approach. We define HCEs as emulsions with a volume fraction above the maximum closest packing fraction of monodisperse spheres, ?m=0.74, even if droplets are not of polyhedron shape. The solid-like rheological behavior of HCEs is characterized by yield stress and elasticity, properties which depend on droplet polydispersity and which are affected by caging at volume fractions about the jamming concentration, ?j. A bimodal size distribution in HCEs diminishes caging and facilitates droplet movement, resulting in HCEs with negligible yield stress and no plateau in storage modulus. Thermodynamic forces automatically move HCEs toward the lowest free energy state, but since interdroplet forces create local minimums - points beyond which free energy temporarily increases before it reaches the global minimum of the system - the free energy of HCEs will settle at a local minimum unless additional energy is added. Several attempts have been undertaken to predict the elasticity of HCEs. In many cases, the elastic modulus of HCEs is higher than the one predicted from classical models, which only take into account spatial repulsion (or simply interfacial energy). Improved models based on free energy calculation should be developed to consider the disjoining pressure and interfacial rheology in addition to spatial repulsion. The disjoining pressure and interfacial viscoelasticity, which result in the deviation of elasticity from the classical model, can be regarded as parameters for quantifying the stability of HCEs. PMID:25869114

  5. Transport of Nitric Oxide by Perfluorocarbon Emulsion

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Daniel; Briceño, Juan C.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions can transport and release various gases based on concentration gradients. The objective of this study was to determine the possibility of carrying and delivering exogenous nitric oxide (NO) into the circulation by simply loading PFC emulsion with NO prior infusion. PFC was equilibrated with room air (PFC) or 300 ppm NO (PFC-NO) at atmospheric pressure. Isotonic saline solution was used as a volume control (Saline). PFC and PFC-NO were infused at a dose of 3.5 mL/kg in the hamster window chamber model. Blood chemistry, and systemic and microvascular hemodynamic response were measured. Infusion of PFC preloaded with NO reduced blood pressure, induced microvascular vasodilation and increased capillary perfusion; although these changes lasted less than 30 min post infusion. On the other hand, infusion of PFC (without NO) produced vasoconstriction; however, the vasoconstriction was followed by vasodilatation at 30 min post infusion. Plasma nitrite and nitrate increased 15 min after infusion of NO preloaded PFC compared to PFC, 60 min after infusion nitrite and nitrate were not different, and 90 min after infusion plasma S-nitrosothiols increased in both groups. Infusion of NO preloaded PFC resulted in acute vascular relaxation, where as infusion of PFC (without NO) produced vasoconstriction, potentially due to NO sequestration by the PFC micelles. The late effects of PFC infusion are due to NO redistribution and plasma S-nitrosothiols. Gas solubility in PFC can provide a tool to modulate plasma vasoactive NO forms availability and improve microcirculatory function and promote increased blood flow. PMID:23966236

  6. On mini-cluster observed by Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tati, T.

    1985-01-01

    Bundles of electromagnetic showers with very small tranverse momenta (approx. 10 MeV) accompanied by decay products of Chiron-type fireballs, have been observed. These bundles are called Miniclusters. This phenomenon supports the picture of fireballs made up of hadronic matter and based on the theory of the finite degree of freedom.

  7. Relation between viscosity and stability for heavy oil emulsions 

    E-print Network

    Ye, Sherry Qianwen

    1998-01-01

    The relation between viscosity and stability has been hics. found by investigating the effect of surfactant concentration on emulsion stability. Based on the Bingham plastic model for viscosity as a function of shear rate, two parameters were found...

  8. The choice of homogenisation equipment affects lipid oxidation in emulsions.

    PubMed

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Søgaard; Horsewell, Andy; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2012-09-15

    Milk proteins are often used by the food industry because of their good emulsifying properties. In addition, they can also provide oxidative stability to foods. However, different milk proteins or protein components have been shown to differ in their antioxidative properties, and their localisation in emulsions has been shown to be affected by the emulsification conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of homogenisation equipment (microfluidizer vs. two-stage valve homogeniser) on lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared with two different milk proteins. Emulsions were prepared at pH 7 with similar droplet sizes. Results showed that the oxidative stability of emulsions prepared with sodium caseinate was not influenced by the type of homogeniser used. In contrast, the type of homogenisation equipment significantly influenced lipid oxidation when whey protein was used as emulsifier, with the microfluidizer resulting in lower levels of oxidation. PMID:23107694

  9. Conductivity factor in the electrostatic coalescence of crude oil emulsions 

    E-print Network

    Nelson, James B

    1998-01-01

    parameter on the rate of coalescence. Using previously established procedures, the potential for enhancement of the electrostatic coalescence rate for oil/water emulsions of highly refined oils and different grades of crude oils was explored using a 2-L...

  10. Chemical Demulsification of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurahman; Nour, H.; Mohd Yunus, Rosli; Jemaat, Zulkifly

    Demulsification (emulsion breaking) is necessary in many practical applications such as the petroleum industry, painting and waste-water treatment in environmental technology. Chemical demulsification is the most widely applied method of treating water-in-crude oil emulsions and involves the use of chemical additives to accelerate the emulsion breaking process. The effect of chemical demulsification operations on the stability and properties of water-in-crude oil emulsions was assessed experimentally. In this regard, Amine Demulsifier, Polyhydric Alcohol, Acid and Polymeric demulsifiers were used. Using samples of w/o, the data presented for several commercial-type demulsifiers show a strong connection (correlation) between good performance (fast coalescence) and the demulsifiers. The relative rates of water separation were characterized via beaker tests. The amine group demulsifiers promoted best coalescence of droplets. In contrast, polymeric demulsifier group is the least in water separation.

  11. Emulsion Polymerization of Butyl Acrylate: Spin Trapping and EPR Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.; Westmoreland, D.

    1994-01-01

    The propagating radical in the emulsion polymerization reaction of butyl acrylate was detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy using two spin trapping agents, 2-methyl-2nitrosopropane and alpha -N-tert-butylnitrone.

  12. Modular ‘Click-in-Emulsion’ Bone-Targeted Nanogels

    E-print Network

    Heller, Daniel A.

    A new class of nanogel demonstrates modular biodistribution and affinity for bone. Nanogels, ~70 nm in diameter and synthesized via an astoichiometric click-chemistry in-emulsion method, controllably display residual, free ...

  13. Nuclear emulsion with molybdenum filling for observation of $??$ decay

    E-print Network

    V. D. Ashitkov; A. V. Bagulya; A. S. Barabash; V. Ya. Bradnova; M. M. Chernyavsky; S. I. Konovalov; N. M. Okat'eva; G. I. Orlova; N. G. Polukhina; E. A. Pozharova; V. A. Smirnitsky; N. I. Starkov; M. S. Vladimirov; V. I. Umatov

    2010-02-15

    The usage of nuclear emulsion with molybdenum filling for observation of $\\beta\\beta$ decay are shown to be possible. Estimates for 1 kg of $^{100}$Mo with zero background give the sensitivity for the $0\

  14. A Scalable Method toward Superhydrophilic and Underwater Superoleophobic PVDF Membranes for Effective Oil/Water Emulsion Separation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tao; Meng, Jianqiang; Hao, Tingyu; Wang, Zihong; Zhang, Yufeng

    2015-07-15

    A superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic PVDF membrane (PVDFAH) has been prepared by surface-coating of a hydrogel onto the membrane surface, and its superior performance for oil/water emulsion separation has been demonstrated. The coated hydrogel was constructed by an interfacial polymerization based on the thiol-epoxy reaction of pentaerythritol tetrakis (3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP) with diethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE) and simultaneously tethered on an alkaline-treated commercial PVDF membrane surface via the thio-ene reaction. The PVDFAH membranes can be fabricated in a few minutes under mild conditions and show superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic properties for a series of organic solvents. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis shows that the hydrogel coating was efficient throughout the pore lumen. The membrane shows superior oil/water emulsion separation performance, including high water permeation, quantitative oil rejection, and robust antifouling performance in a series oil/water emulsions, including that prepared from crude oil. In addition, a 24 h Soxhlet-extraction experiment with ethanol/water solution (50:50, v/v) was conducted to test the tethered hydrogel stability. We see that the membrane maintained the water contact angle below 5°, indicating the covalent tethering stability. This technique shows great promise for scalable fabrication of membrane materials for handling practical oil emulsion purification. PMID:26104101

  15. Process for oil recovery from subterranean deposits by emulsion flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Balzer, D.; Kosswig, K.

    1984-07-03

    Extensively emulsion-free oil is recovered from a subterranean reservoir of medium or high salinity by forcing an emulsion, e.g., of oil, into an injection well. Carboxymethylated ethoxylate is utilized as the emulsifier and is selected so that the phase inversion temperature of the system:oil of reservoir/formation water/tenside/optical additives lies 0/sup 0/-10/sup 0/ C. above the reservoir temperature.

  16. Control of emulsion drop production in flow focusing microfluidics 

    E-print Network

    Kim, Haejune

    2009-05-15

    OF EMULSION DROP PRODUCTION IN FLOW FOCUSING MICROFLUIDICS A Thesis by HAEJUNE KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2007 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering CONTROL OF EMULSION DROP PRODUCTION IN FLOW FOCUSING MICROFLUIDICS A Thesis by HAEJUNE KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  17. Development of Large Area Emulsion Chamber Methods with a Super Conducting Magnet for Observation of Cosmic Ray Nuclei from 1 GeV to 1,000 TeV (Emulsion Techniques)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Gregory, John C.; Tominaga, Taka; Dong, Bei Lei

    1997-01-01

    The research developed the fundamental techniques of the emulsion chamber methods that permit measurements of the composition and energy spectra of cosmic rays at energies ranging from 1 GeV/n to over 1,000 TeV/n. The research program consisted of exploring new principles and techniques in measuring very high energy cosmic nuclei with large-area emulsion chambers for high statistics experiments. These tasks have been accomplished and their use was essential in successful analysis of the balloon-borne emulsion chamber experiments up to 10(exp 14) eV. It also provided the fundamental technologies for designing large-area detectors that are aimed at measuring the composition at above 1015 eV region. The latter is now partially succeeded by a NASA Mission Concept, Advanced Cosmic Composition Experiments on the Space Station (ACCESS). The cosmic ray group at the University of Alabama in Huntsville has performed technological R & D as well as contributing to the Japanese-American-Emulsion-Chamber-Experiments (JACEE) Collaboration with the regular data analysis. While primary research support for other institutions' efforts in the JACEE experiments came from NSF and DOE, primary support for the University of Alabama in Huntsville was this contract. Supplemental tasks to standardize the data base and hardware upgrades (automatized microscope) had this institutions cooperation. Investigation of new techniques in this program consisted of development of a fast calorimetry, magnetic/scattering selection of high momentum tracks for a pairmeter, and high statistics momentum measurements for low energy nuclei (E < 1 TeV/n). The highest energy calorimetry and a pairmeter have been considered as strawman instruments by the GOAL (Galactic Origin and Acceleration Limit) proposal of the NASA Cosmic Ray Working Group for long- duration balloon flights. We accomplished the objectives of the GOAL program with three circumpolar, Antarctic JACEE balloon flights during 1992 - 1994.

  18. Stabilization Mechanisms of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nour, Abdurahman H.; Suliman, A.; Hadow, Mahmmoud M.

    During the lifting and production of crude oil, water/oil emulsions are created. They are stabilized by asphaltenes and resins which are colloidally dispersed in the crude oil. Asphaltenes consist mainly of polar heterocompounds. It is known that they decrease the interfacial tension between oil and water and form stable interfacial films. Both effects favour the formation and stabilization of emulsions. Resins are complex high-molecular-weight compounds that are not soluble in ethylacetate, but are soluble in n-heptane. Their interfacial activity is less than that of asphaltenes. The role of resins in stabilizing emulsions has also been debated in literature. This study reports the results of experimental investigation of various factors affecting the stability of emulsions which are considered to be undesirable for a number of reasons, including both up-stream and down-stream operation in the petroleum industry. It was found that, the (R/A) ratio affects the emulsion and dispersion stabilities. High resin/asphaltene ratios decrease the emulsion stability.

  19. Droplet-based microfluidics and the dynamics of emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baret, Jean-Christophe; Brosseau, Quentin; Semin, Benoit; Qu, Xiaopeng

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions are complex fluids already involved for a long time in a wide-range of industrial processes, such as, for example, food, cosmetics or materials synthesis [1]. More recently, applications of emulsions have been extended to new fields like biotechnology or biochemistry where the compartmentalization of compounds in emulsion droplets is used to parallelise (bio-) chemical reactions [2]. Interestingly, these applications pinpoint to fundamental questions dealing with surfactant dynamics, dynamic surface tension, hydrodynamic interactions and electrohydrodynamics. Droplet-based microfluidics is a very powerful tool to quantitatively study the dynamics of emulsions at the single droplet level or even at the single interface level: well-controlled emulsions are produced and manipulated using hydrodynamics, electrical forces, optical actuation and combination of these effects. We will describe here how droplet-based microfluidics is used to extract quantitative informations on the physical-chemistry of emulsions for a better understanding and control of the dynamics of these systems [3].[4pt] [1] J. Bibette et al. Rep. Prog. Phys., 62, 969-1033 (1999)[0pt] [2] A. Theberge et al., Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed. 49, 5846 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.-C. Baret et al., Langmuir, 25, 6088 (2009)

  20. Analyzing Benzene and Cyclohexane Emulsion Droplet Collisions on Ultramicroelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Deng, Haiqiang; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2015-11-01

    We report the collisions of single emulsion oil droplets with extremely low dielectric constants (e.g., benzene, ? of 2.27, or cyclohexane, ? of 2.02) as studied via emulsion droplet reactor (EDR) on an ultramicroelectrode (UME). By applying appropriate potentials to the UME, we observed the electrochemical effects of single-collision signals from the bulk electrolysis of single emulsion droplets. Different hydrophobic redox species (ferrocene, decamethyl-ferrocene, or metalloporphyrin) were trapped in a mixed benzene (or cyclohexane) oil-in-water emulsion using an ionic liquid as the supporting electrolyte and emulsifier. The emulsions were prepared using ultrasonic processing. Spike-like responses were observed in each i-t response due to the complete electrolysis of all of the above-mentioned redox species within the droplet. On the basis of these single-particle collision results, the collision frequency, size distribution, i-t decay behavior of the emulsion droplets, and possible mechanisms are analyzed and discussed. This work demonstrated that bulk electrolysis can be achieved in a few seconds in these attoliter reactors, suggesting many applications, such as analysis and electrosynthesis in low dielectric constant solvents, which have a much broader potential window. PMID:26461801

  1. Structure and Dynamics of Ferrofluid Emulsion in Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing

    1996-03-01

    Ferrofluid emulsion is an oil-in-water suspension where each oil droplet contains thousands of magnetic grains. An applied magnetic field induces a magnetic dipole moment in each droplet. When the dipole-dipole interaction energy exceeds the thermal energy, a structural transition occurs as the randomly dispersed droplets form chains and chains further coalesce to form columns or other larger structures. This field-induced structures increase viscosity of the fluid dramatically and give rise to finite yield stress, leading to many potential applications such as active vibration damper. The mechanism of the chain coarsening to columns is the key in understanding the physics of this novel material and its application. I will discuss the chain dynamics studied by dynamic light scattering in a dilute system and column formation studied by optical microscopy and static light scattering in a denser system. I will then show the comparison of the experiments with theoretical models based on chain fluctuation to understand the chain dynamics and the chain coarsening mechanism.

  2. Wide-gap Couette flows of dense emulsions: Local concentration measurements, and comparison between macroscopic and local constitutive law measurements through magnetic resonance imaging

    E-print Network

    Guillaume Ovarlez; Stéphane Rodts; Alexandre Ragouilliaux; Philippe Coussot; Julie Goyon; Annie Colin

    2008-10-20

    Flows of dense emulsions show many complex features among which long range nonlocal effects pose a problem for macroscopic characterization. In order to get around this problem, we study the flows of several dense emulsions in a wide-gap Couette geometry. We couple macroscopic rheometric experiments and local velocity measurements through MRI techniques. As concentration heterogeneities can be expected, we designed a method to measure the local droplet concentration in emulsions with a MRI device. In contrast to dense suspensions of rigid particles where very fast migration occurs under shear, we show that no migration takes place in dense emulsions even for strains as large as 100 000 in our systems. As a result of the absence of migration and of finite size effect, we are able to determine very precisely the local rheological behavior of several dense emulsions. As the materials are homogeneous, this behavior can also be inferred from purely macroscopic measurements. We thus suggest that properly analyzed purely macroscopic measurements in a wide-gap Couette geometry can be used as a tool to study the local constitutive laws of dense emulsions. All behaviors are basically consistent with Herschel-Bulkley laws of index 0.5, but discrepancies exist at the approach of the yield stress due to slow shear flows below the apparent yield stress in the case of a strongly adhesive emulsion. The existence of a constitutive law accounting for all flows contrasts with previous results obtained within a microchannel by Goyon et al. (2008): the use of a wide-gap Couette geometry is likely to prevent here from nonlocal finite size effects; it also contrasts with the observations of B\\'ecu et al. (2006).

  3. Asphaltene and solids-stabilized water-in-oil emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztukowski, Danuta M.

    Water-in-crude oil emulsions are a problem in crude oil production, transportation, and processing. Many of these emulsions are stabilized by asphaltenes and native oilfield solids adsorbed at the oil-water interface. Design of effective emulsion treatments is hampered because there is a lack of understanding of the role asphaltenes and solids play in stabilizing these emulsions. In this work, the structural, compositional and rheological properties of water/hydrocarbon interfaces were determined for model emulsions consisting of water, toluene, heptane, asphaltenes and native oilfield solids. The characteristics of the interface were related to the properties of asphaltenes and native solids. Emulsion stability was correlated to interfacial rheology. A combination of vapour pressure osmometry, interfacial tension and emulsion gravimetric studies indicated that asphaltenes initially adsorb at the interface as a monolayer of self-associated molecular aggregates. It was demonstrated why it is necessary to account for asphaltene self-association when interpreting interfacial measurements. The interfacial area of Athabasca asphaltenes was found to be approximately 1.5 nm2 and did not vary with concentration or asphaltene self-association. Hence, more self-associated asphaltenes simply formed a thicker monolayer. The interfacial monolayer observed in this work varied from 2 to 9 nm in thickness. The asphaltene monolayer was shown to adsorb reversibly only at short interface aging times. The film gradually reorganizes at the interface to form a rigid, irreversibly adsorbed network. The elastic and viscous moduli can be modeled using the Lucassen-van den Tempel (LVDT) model when the aging time is less than 10 minutes. An increase in film rigidity can be detected with an increase in the total elastic modulus. Increased film rigidity was shown to reduce the rate of coalescence in an emulsion and increase overall emulsion stability (reduce free water resolution). The rate of coalescence and the free water resolution of emulsions decreased when the interface aging time increased, the heptane fraction in heptol increased, and the asphaltene concentration decreased. For systems in which asphaltenes do not leave the interface during coalescence, the rate of coalescence correlated to the measured total modulus over a range of asphaltene concentrations, solvent qualities, and interface aging times. For systems in which asphaltenes leave the interface during coalescence, the correlation under-predicted the coalescence rate because the total modulus increases as material leaves the interface. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Effect of protein source and homogenization pressure on storage stability of retort processed dilute whey protein emulsions 

    E-print Network

    Bhatia, Sachin

    2001-01-01

    Emulsions stabilized with acid whey or sweet whey were prepared using homogenization pressures of 30 or 90MPa. The emulsions were then canned and sterilized at 250F for 5 minutes. Emulsion stability, particle size and ...

  5. Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray iron nucleus observed with emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Y.; Shimada, E.; Ohta, I.; Tasaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Sugimoto, H.; Taira, K.; Tateyama, N.

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray Fe-nucleus has been measured from 4 GeV per nucleon to beyond 100 GeV per nucleon. The data were obtained using emulsion chambers on a balloon from Sanriku, Japan. The energies were estimated by the opening angle method after calibrated using 1.88 GeV per nucleon Fe collisions. The spectrum of Fe is approximately E-2.5 in the range from 10 to 200 GeV per nucleon. This result is in good agreement with those of other experiments.

  6. Development of novel zein-sodium caseinate nanoparticle (ZP)-stabilized emulsion films for improved water barrier properties via emulsion/solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Juan; Yin, Ye-Chong; Yin, Shou-Wei; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Shi, Wei-Jian; Tang, Chuan-He; Wang, Jin-Mei

    2013-11-20

    This work attempted to develop novel high barrier zein/SC nanoparticle (ZP)-stabilized emulsion films through microfluidic emulsification (ZPE films) or in combination with solvent (ethyl acetate) evaporation techniques (ZPE-EA films). Some physical properties, including tensile and optical properties, water vapor permeability (WVP), and surface hydrophobicity, as well as the microstructure of ZP-stabilized emulsion films were evaluated and compared with SC emulsion (SCE) films. The emulsion/solvent evaporation approach reduced lipid droplets of ZP-stabilized emulsions, and lipid droplets of ZP-stabilized emulsions were similar to or slightly lower than that of SC emulsions. However, ZP- and SC-stabilized emulsion films exhibited a completely different microstructure, nanoscalar lipid droplets were homogeneously distributed in the ZPE film matrix and interpenetrating protein-oil complex networks occurred within ZPE-EA films, whereas SCE films presented a heterogeneous microstructure. The different stabilization mechanisms against creaming or coalescence during film formation accounted for the preceding discrepancy of the microstructures between ZP-and SC-stabilized emulsion films. Interestingly, ZP-stabilized emulsion films exhibited a better water barrier efficiency, and the WVP values were only 40-50% of SCE films. A schematic representation for the formation of ZP-stabilized emulsion films was proposed to relate the physical performance of the films with their microstructure and to elucidate the possible forming mechanism of the films. PMID:24175664

  7. Mechanism of oil-bank formation, coalescence in porous media, and emulsion stability. Third annual report, June 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1983-09-01

    In this report we present results of a basic study of the various mechanisms of oil bank formation and propagation in chemical flooding processes involving surfactants and alkaline agents. Also presented are the results of modeling and simulation studies of our microwave monitored laboratory core flooding experiments in alkaline flooding and in drainage and stability of thin surfactant films associated with foam and emulsion systems. This work encompasses two topics: 1) Alkaline Flooding, and 2) Surfactant Flooding. 59 references, 63 figures, 19 tables.

  8. Phytosterol colloidal particles as Pickering stabilizers for emulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu; Tang, Chuan-He

    2014-06-01

    Water-insoluble phytosterols were developed into a kind of colloidal particle as Pickering stabilizers for emulsions by a classic anti-solvent method using 100% ethanol as the organic phase to solubilize the phytosterols and whey protein concentrate (WPC) as the emulsifier. The colloidal particles in the dispersion, with morphology of stacked platelet-like sheets, had a mean diameter of 44.7 and 24.7 ?m for the volume- and surface-averaged sizes, respectively. The properties and stability of the emulsions stabilized by these colloidal particles were highly dependent upon the applied total solid concentration (c; in the dispersion) and oil fraction (ø). The results indicated that (1) at a low c value (<1.0%, w/v) the emulsions were susceptible to phase separation, even at a low ø of 0.2, (2) at low ø values (e.g., 0.2 or 0.3) and a relatively high c value (1.0%, w/v, or above), a severe droplet flocculation occurred for the emulsions, and (3) when both c and ø were appropriately high, a kind of self-supporting gel-like emulsions could be formed. More interestingly, a phase inversion of the emulsions from the oil-in-water to water-in-oil type was observed, upon the ø increasing from 0.2 to 0.6 (especially at high c values, e.g., 3.0%, w/v). The elaborated Pickering emulsions stabilized by the phytosterol colloidal particles with a gel-like behavior would provide a candidate to act as a novel delivery system for active ingredients. PMID:24848560

  9. Fluorochemical emulsion APE-LM substantially improves cardiac preservation.

    PubMed

    Segel, L D; Minten, J M; Schweighardt, F K

    1992-09-01

    We determined the efficacy of a novel fluorochemical emulsion for long-term hypothermic preservation of hearts. Rat hearts were preserved for 12 h at 12 degrees C with use of continuous low-pressure coronary perfusion with one of three oxygenated media (n = 6 hearts/groups): an "extracellular" crystalloid solution; APE-LM, a novel fluorochemical emulsion of perfluoroperhydrophenanthrene in egg yolk phospholipid; and FC-43, the Fluosol-43 (Oxypherol) fluorochemical emulsion of perfluorotributylamine in Pluronic F68. The emulsion media contained the same components as the crystalloid medium. All three media contained 0.5% albumin. An isolated working heart perfusion system was used to quantify the function of preserved hearts and controls (fresh hearts, n = 6). The APE-LM-preserved hearts were not significantly different from control hearts in contractile function, output, and energetics during a 4-h 37 degrees C reperfusion period. The control and APE-LM-preserved hearts had significantly better performance than crystalloid- and FC-43-preserved hearts. All preserved hearts gained fluid during preservation. The edema of APE-LM-preserved hearts, but not that of the other two preserved groups, was reversed during 37 degrees C reperfusion. These data provide the first evidence that a unique fluorochemical emulsion improves long-term preservation of cardiac tissue and produces significantly better recovery of cardiac function after preservation. This salutary effect was specifically associated with APE-LM emulsion and may result from its high O2 capacity, its biologically compatible emulsifier, and its superior physical properties, which include very small emulsion particle size (0.1-0.15 micron), low viscosity, and minimal toxicity. PMID:1415597

  10. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Zarzar, Lauren D; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M; Kalow, Julia A; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M

    2015-02-26

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets (that is, droplets with faces of differing chemistries) and multiple emulsions, are of increasing importance in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules for food, in chemical separations, in cosmetics, and in dynamic optics. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets' physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have great utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with controllably reconfigurable morphologies and the potential to create a wide range of responsive materials. PMID:25719669

  11. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-02-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets (that is, droplets with faces of differing chemistries) and multiple emulsions, are of increasing importance in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules for food, in chemical separations, in cosmetics, and in dynamic optics. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets' physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have great utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with controllably reconfigurable morphologies and the potential to create a wide range of responsive materials.

  12. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    PubMed Central

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including multiple emulsions and Janus droplets which contain hemispheres of differing material, are of increasing importance1 in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics2, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules3–5 for food6, in chemical separations7, in cosmetics8, and in dynamic optics9. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets’ physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes10, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods11,12. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have greatly increased utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with controllably reconfigurable morphologies and the potential to create a wide range of responsive materials. PMID:25719669

  13. Phagocytosis of immunoglobulin-coated emulsion droplets.

    PubMed

    Ben M'Barek, Kalthoum; Molino, Diana; Quignard, Sandrine; Plamont, Marie-Aude; Chen, Yong; Chavrier, Philippe; Fattaccioli, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    Phagocytosis by macrophages represents a fundamental process essential for both immunity and tissue homeostasis. The size of targets to be eliminated ranges from small particles as bacteria to large objects as cancerous or senescent cells. Most of our current quantitative knowledge on phagocytosis is based on the use of solid polymer microparticles as model targets that are well adapted to the study of phagocytosis mechanisms that do not involve any lateral mobility of the ligands, despite the relevance of this parameter in the immunological context. Herein we designed monodisperse, IgG-coated emulsion droplets that are efficiently and specifically internalized by macrophages through in-vitro Fc?R-mediated phagocytosis. We show that, contrary to solid polymeric beads, droplet uptake is efficient even for low IgG densities, and is accompagnied by the clustering of the opsonins in the zone of contact with the macrophage during the adhesion step. Beyond the sole interest in the design of the material, our results suggest that lateral mobility of proteins at the interface of a target greatly enhances the phagocytic uptake. PMID:25771017

  14. Dynamics of oppositely charged emulsion droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhou; Wyss, Hans M.; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of two pinned droplets under the influence of an applied electric stress. We find that at a sufficiently strong field, this stress is sufficient to induce contact of the droplets. Interestingly, upon such contact, the dynamic behavior sensitively depends on the separation distance between the droplets. Besides the classical "coalescence" regime, we identify two other dynamic regimes: "fuse-and-split" and "periodic non-coalescence." In the "fuse-and-split" regime, the droplets first fuse to form a jet, which subsequently breaks up into two droplets. In the "periodic non-coalescence" regime, the droplets contact and bounce away periodically without coalescence. Further analysis indicates that while the electric stress stretches the droplets into shapes that depend on the initial droplet separation, the surface tension stress dominates over the electric stress as soon as the droplets touch. We show that the shapes of the contacting droplets determine their subsequent dynamics. Our work provides a rationale for understanding the interplay between surface tension and electric stresses that govern the behavior of charged droplets and could inspire new methods for characterizing emulsion stability and surfactant performance.

  15. Evaluation of percutaneous permeation of repellent DEET and sunscreen oxybenzone from emulsion-based formulations in artificial membrane and human skin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Miller, Donald; Burczynski, Frank; Gu, Xiaochen

    2014-01-01

    Insect repellent DEET and sunscreen ingredient oxybenzone play an essential role in minimizing vector-borne diseases and skin cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of emulsion type, addition of thickening agent and droplet size in three emulsion-based lotions on percutaneous permeation of DEET and oxybenzone using in vitro diffusion experiments, in order to minimize overall systemic permeation of the substances. Formulation C (water-in-oil emulsion) significantly increased overall permeation of DEET through human skin (56%) compared to Formulation A (oil-in-water emulsion). Formulation B (oil-in-water emulsion with thickening agent xanthan gum) significantly decreased the size of oil droplet containing DEET (16%), but no effect on oil droplets containing oxybenzone. Adding xanthan gum also increased overall permeation of DEET and oxybenzone (21% and 150%) when compared to Formulation A; presence of both ingredients in Formulation B further increased their permeation (36% and 23%) in comparison to its single counterparts. Overall permeation of oxybenzone through LDPE was significantly higher by 26%–628% than that through human skin; overall permeation of DEET through human skin was significantly higher by 64%–338% than that through LDPE.

  16. Hemp Sesbania (Sesbania exaltata) control in rice (Oryza sativa) with the bioherbicidal fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene formulated in an invert emulsion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In greenhouse and field experiments, an invert emulsion (MSG 8.25) was tested with dried, formulated spores of the bioherbicidal fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene, a highly virulent pathogen of the leguminous weed Aeschynomene virginica (northern jointvetch), but considered “...

  17. Phase Behavior and Emulsion Stability of the Aot/Decane/ Water/NaCl System at Very Low Volume Fractions of Oil

    E-print Network

    Yithanllili Bastidas; Lisset Hernaandez; Issarly Rivas; Kareem Rahn-Chique; German Urbina-Villalba

    2014-10-09

    The stability of a ternary system composed of decane/water/Aerosol-OT and salt is revisited. Phase diagrams and emulsions similar in composition to those previously studied by Hofman and Stein [Hofman, 1991] were made. Ac- cording to our results, and contrary to the common experience, these systems exhibit a maximum of stability very close to the balance zone.

  18. Oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium phosphorylated chitosan.

    PubMed

    Chongprakobkit, Suchada; Maniratanachote, Rawiwan; Tachaboonyakiat, Wanpen

    2013-07-01

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions with sodium phosphorylated chitosan (PCTS) were obtained via simple emulsification. PCTS in aqueous solution was amphiphilic with a hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) of 19 and a critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of 0.13% w/v. The emulsifying efficiency and emulsion stability of PCTS over oil droplets were evaluated in terms of the droplet size, droplet size distribution and microscopic observation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. PCTS preferred to cover oil droplets to produce an O/W emulsion and formed long term stable particles (90 days storage at room temperature) when using PCTS concentrations from above the CAC to 3% w/v. However, emulsions formed from PCTS concentrations below the CAC or over 3% w/v were unstable with particle agglomeration by flocculation after only 7 days storage, although they reverted to individual droplets that retained their integrity in acidic conditions. Overall, PCTS forms effective stable O/W encapsulated particles with potential applications in lipophilic drug encapsulation via a simple emulsion system. PMID:23688457

  19. Mixed-monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles for emulsion stabilization.

    PubMed

    Kubowicz, Stephan; Daillant, Jean; Dubois, Monique; Delsanti, Michel; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2010-02-01

    Nanometer-sized gold nanoparticles have been prepared and surface-modified in order to stabilize alkane-in-water emulsions. A mixed hexane-undecanol ligand layer at the surface of the nanoparticles allowed us to tune their wettability and thus the adsorption at the oil-water interface. Oil droplets of the stable emulsions have been evidenced by confocal fluorescence microscopy, freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Prepared emulsions were stable during performed cooling-heating cycles, in which the temperature stability of the emulsions has been studied by means of dynamic light scattering. The interfacial structure of the oil droplets was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering. The obtained area per nanoparticle at the oil droplet interface was 30 nm(2). The investigation of the nanoparticle adsorption at the curved interface of the emulsion droplets is in agreement with our previous study at a planar oil-water interface, in which the nanoparticles started to interact with each other at about the same area per particle. PMID:19924989

  20. Investigation of different emulsion systems for dermal delivery of nicotinamide.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Sakine; Özer, Özgen

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide (NA) has been shown to have beneficial effects on several skin diseases such as tumor, acne vulgaris, photodamage, cellulite and atopic dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to develop a multiple emulsion and a microemulsion formulation as delivery systems for NA. A two-step process was used to prepare the W/O/W multiple emulsion. Optimum microemulsion formulation was selected by using construction of pseudo-ternary phase diagram. The physicochemical properties such as droplet size and viscosity measurements, stability studies were also evaluated. Ex-vivo permeation studies were performed with Franz-type diffusion cells and the samples were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The permeation data showed that there was no significant difference between multiple emulsion and microemulsion (p > 0.05). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured. As a result of TEWL studies, a slight increase of TEWL values was observed for microemulsion formulation on rat skin when compared with multiple emulsion and commercial formulation. The results suggested that microemulsion and multiple emulsion formulations could be new and alternative dosage forms for topical application of NA. PMID:23742727

  1. Treatment methods for breaking certain oil and water emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Sealock, Jr., L. John (W. Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed are treatment methods for breaking emulsions of petroleum oil and salt water, fatty oil and water, and those resulting from liquefication of organic material. The emulsions are broken by heating to a predetermined temperature at or above about 200.degree. C. and pressurizing to a predetermined pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the predetermined temperature to produce a heated and pressurized fluid. The heated and pressurized fluid is contained in a single vessel at the predetermined temperature and pressure for a predetermined period of time to effectively separate the emulsion into substantially distinct first and second phases, the first phase comprising primarily the petroleum oil, the second phase comprising primarily the water. The first and second phases are separately withdrawn from the vessel at a withdraw temperature between about 200.degree. C. and 374.degree. C. and a withdraw pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the withdraw temperature. Where solids are present in the certain emulsions, the above described treatment may also effectively separate the certain emulsion into a substantially distinct third phase comprising primarily the solids.

  2. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, is used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improving the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study are: Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems; Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system; Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit; Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system; Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts; Work for the coming year will focus on the determination of toxicity of various solvents, selection of the emulsifying agents, as well as characterizing the mass transfer of hollow-fiber contactors.

  3. Spontaneous spreading of particle monolayers from unstable Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hsin-Ling; Velankar, Sachin

    2009-03-01

    Partially-wettable particles can adsorb at liquid/liquid interfaces and give stable Pickering emulsions. However, if there are insufficient particles, then the emulsion is unstable. In such an unstable emulsion, we document a remarkable phenomenon, viz. coalescence of an oil/water/particle Pickering emulsion contained in a vial induces a particle film to climb up the walls of the vial. While this has been noted previously with nanoparticles, we show that such film-climbing is highly general and can be induced by a variety of particle types, particle sizes ranging from a few nm to a few microns, and different emulsion types. Many of the features of film growth described previously with nm-sized particles are found to remain true even with the far larger particles studied here. Binks et al., Langmuir, 22, 4100, 2006, have postulated that the particle films that climb up the walls of a vial are actually comprised of one oil layer and one water layer, with particles adsorbed at the interface between them. We confirmed this ``sandwich'' structure experimentally and also show that such interfacially-adsorbed particles can easily exert the very modest surface pressure necessary to sustain the weight of the film. Finally, while some climbing films are tightly-packed particle monolayers, tight packing is not essential; even sparsely-populated monolayers can display film climbing.

  4. Ca2+ ion responsive pickering emulsions stabilized by PSSMA nanoaggregates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunhua; Tan, Junjun; Li, Wei; Tong, Kun; Xu, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2013-11-26

    A novel Ca(2+) ion responsive particulate emulsifier, which is based on copolymer nanoaggregates, is reported in this work. Results from dynamic light scattering (DLS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) indicate that the formation of poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt (PSSMA) nanoaggregates is strongly dependent on Ca(2+) concentration. The PSSMA copolymer only aggregates above a critical Ca(2+) concentration (0.2 M) with an average diameter of 10-40 nm. After dilution with water, PSSMA nanoaggregates are rapidly redissolved again. On the basis of the properties of PSSMA nanoaggregates, Ca(2+) ion responsive Pickering emulsions were successfully prepared. At high Ca(2+) concentrations, the emulsions with high stability against coalescence can be prepared with the size in the submicrometer range as determined by DLS. Cryo-TEM and dynamic interfacial tension results confirm the adsorption of PSSMA nanoaggregates at the interface, which is the key to the stability of the emulsions. More importantly, rapid demulsification can be achieved by dilution with water on demand. It is because, upon dilution with water, PSSMA nanoaggregates undergo a transition from stable nanoaggregates to individual polymer chains, which leads to interfacial desorption of nanoaggregates and rapid demulsification of emulsions. Thus, this finding presents a new manipulation on emulsion stability and is expected to provide a useful guidance in the fields of oil recovery, food science, environment protection, and so on. PMID:24188032

  5. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes at the Interface of Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Nicholas M; Weston, Javen S; Li, Brian; Venkataramani, Deepika; Aichele, Clint P; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Crossley, Steven P

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit very unique properties in biphasic systems. Their interparticle attraction leads to reduced droplet coalescence rates and corresponding improvements in emulsion stability. Here we use covalent and noncovalent techniques to modify the hydrophilicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and study their resulting behavior at an oil-water interface. By using both paraffin wax/water and dodecane/water systems, the thickness of the layer of MWNTs at the interface and resulting emulsion stability are shown to vary significantly with the approach used to modify the MWNTs. Increased hydrophilicity of the MWNTs shifts the emulsions from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. The stability of the emulsion is found to correlate with the thickness of nanotubes populating the oil-water interface and relative strength of the carbon nanotube network. The addition of a surfactant decreases the thickness of nanotubes at the interface and enhances the overall interfacial area stabilized at the expense of increased droplet coalescence rates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the interfacial thickness of modified carbon nanotubes has been quantified and correlated to emulsion stability. PMID:26549532

  6. Stability determination of crude oil emulsions by electrorheological measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Vladimir; Wang, Xiuyu; Plancher, Henry

    2008-11-01

    Emulsion stability is paramount to the success of many industrial applications and the remediation of naturally undesirable occurring fluid-fluid dispersions. Bottle tests and critical electric field (Ec) measurements are two commonly used techniques to interpret emulsion stability. In the former, the amount of water resolved after gravitational settling test or centrifugation as a function of time is used as an indicator of stability. Generally, the lower the total water fraction resolved, the higher the emulsion stability. In the second method, the value of Ec leading to drop coalescence is used as an indicator of stability. A larger value of Ec is a reflection of a more stable dispersion. The value of Ec is usually determined by measuring a sudden increase in electrical conductivity in water-crude oil emulsions as the field value is increased. In this work, an electrorheological test is used to establish the value of Ec and hence the stability criterion. Results of electrorheological measurements are compared to results of bottle tests for water-crude oil emulsions with or without stabilizing solid micro-particles. Results will show the consistency among the different measuring techniques, for a wide range of ionic strength and composition of the water phase and two crude oils.

  7. Size analysis of nanoparticles extracted from W/O emulsions.

    PubMed

    Nagelreiter, C; Kotisch, H; Heuser, T; Valenta, C

    2015-07-01

    Nanosized particles are frequently used in many different applications, especially TiO2 nanoparticles as physical filters in sunscreens to protect the skin from UV radiation. However, concerns have arisen about possible health issues caused by nanoparticles and therefore, the assessment of the occurrence of nanoparticles is important in pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations. In a previous work of our group, a method was presented to extract nanoparticles from O/W emulsions. But to respond to the needs of dry and sensitive skin, sunscreens of the water-in-oil emulsion type are available. In these, assessment of present nanoparticles is also an important issue, so the present study offers a method for extracting nanoparticles from W/O emulsions. Both methods emanate from the same starting point, which minimizes both effort and cost before the beginning of the assessment. By addition of NaOH pellets and centrifugation, particles were extracted from W/O emulsions and measured for their size and surface area by laser diffraction. With the simple equation Q=A/S a distinction between nanoparticles and microparticles was achieved in W/O emulsions, even in commercially available samples. The present method is quick and easy to implement, which makes it cost-effective. PMID:25907509

  8. Structure and rheology of highly concentrated emulsions: a modern look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, A. Ya; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2015-08-01

    The review concerns modern physicochemical, chemical and physical approaches to research into structural features that determine the rheological properties of highly concentrated emulsions. The structures and properties of various systems (suspensions, emulsions as well as transient forms including micellar colloidal solutions) are considered. The formation of highly concentrated emulsions is treated as the concentration glass transition leading to suppression of the molecular and supermolecular mobility and, subsequently, to the existence of a solid-like state of the systems in question. The emphasis is placed on analysis of visco-plasticity which manifests itself in the possibility for emulsions (unlike suspensions) to undergo irreversible deformation (to flow) at stresses exceeding some threshold (critical value) called the yield stress. The thixotropic nature of the transition through the yield stress, governed by the kinetics of the breakup/recovery of the inherent structure is considered in detail. It has been shown that structure formation in highly concentrated emulsions can extend to a macroscopic level and result in the onset of heterogeneity of a flow in the form of shear bands. The bibliography includes 202 references.

  9. Effect of milk fat globule membranes on emulsion stability of recombined sterilized milk 

    E-print Network

    Hernandez, Gabriela Perez

    2001-01-01

    was lower with this emulsifier compared to lecithin and the mixture of emulsifiers. Monoglycerides promote coalescence or flocculation of the fat globules, but emulsion stability was greatest in emulsions that contained monoglycerides compared...

  10. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin and silver sulfadiazine otic emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Enrofloxacin and silver sulfadiazine otic emulsion. 524.802...DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin and silver sulfadiazine otic emulsion. (a) Specifications...milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor....

  11. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428... EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20...

  12. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428... EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20...

  13. Monte Carlo computer simulations and electron microscopy of colloidal cluster formation via emulsion droplet evaporation

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, Matthias

    emulsion droplet evaporation Ingmar Schwarz, Andrea Fortini, Claudia Simone Wagner, Alexander Wittemann. 135, 234503 (2011) Transient cage formation around hot gold colloids dispersed in polymer solutions J) Monte Carlo computer simulations and electron microscopy of colloidal cluster formation via emulsion

  14. Study on Formation of High Performance Ice Slurry by Emulsion in Ice Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Oikawa, Ken; Okada, Masashi; Teraoka, Yoshikazu; Kawagoe, Tetsuo

    This study is focused on an emulsion as a new thermal storage material for ice storage. Two types of emulsions are made of oil-water mixture with a little additive. Oils used are silicone, light and lump oils. Water contents of emulsions are 70,80 and 90 %. The additive is amino group modified silicone oil, and there is no depression of freezing point for the emulsions because of its hydrophobic property. In order to know structures of emulsions, those electric resistances were measured. And components of liquids separating from emulsions were investigated. From above results, it was found that one was W/O type and the other was O/W type. And then, adaptability of two emulsions to the ice storage was discussed, and then, it was found that a high performance ice slurry could be formed by the W/O type emulsion.

  15. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed. PMID:24892245

  16. The complexity of prescribing intravenous lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky; Torrinhas, Raquel Susana

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsions (LEs) are relevant for patients receiving parenteral nutrition because they prevent the depletion of essential fatty acids (FAs) and, as a highly dense energy source, enable the reduction of glucose provision, thereby decreasing the risks of hyperglycemia and hepatic impairment. The prescription of LEs is complex, due mainly to their distinct FA components, which may alter the immune response in different ways and distinctly influence inflammation, oxidative stress and blood coagulation according to their biochemical properties. In addition, an excess of other LE components, such as phospholipids and phytosterols, may be associated with hepatic steatosis and dysfunction. These associations do not represent direct risks or obstacles to LE use in metabolically stable patients but can render the choice of the best LE for hypermetabolic patients difficult. The infusion of LEs according to the available guidelines provides more benefit than harm and should be part of exclusive parenteral nutrition regimens or complement enteral nutrition when appropriate. The patient's metabolic profile should guide the type of FA and amount of lipids that are provided. For critically ill hypermetabolic patients, growing evidence indicates that standard LEs based solely on soybean oil should be avoided in favor of new LEs containing medium-chain triglycerides, olive oil, or fish oil to decrease the provision of potentially oxidative, inflammatory/immunosuppressive, and prothrombotic n-6 FAs. In addition, as sources of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, LEs containing fish oil may be important for critically ill patients because they allow better modulation of the immune response and likely reduce the length of intensive care unity stay. However, current evidence precludes the recommendation of a specific LE for clinical use in this patient population. PMID:25471811

  17. Glycerol: major contributor to the short term protein sparing effect of fat emulsions in normal man.

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, M F; Fitzpatrick, G F; Cohen, K H; Moore, F D

    1975-01-01

    Intravenous fat emulsions have been advocated as acceptable alternatives to hyperosmolar glucose solutions in parenteral nutrition. The ability of a fat emulsion (soy bean oil suspended in glycerol) to produce nitrogen sparing in the absence of nitrogen intake was examined in normal man. The protein conservation obtained by the fat emulsion can be duplicated by the infusion of glycerol alone in the same amount as that available from the fat emulsion. PMID:1180577

  18. Phase and emulsion morphology diagrams of nonionic- amphiphile/oil/water systems and their interrelationships

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Kyunghee Lim

    1992-09-01

    For two-phase, non-multiple emulsions, the emulsion morphology diagram shows, as a function of temperature and phase or component concentration, which phase is dispersed and which is the continuous one, as well as the temperatures and compositions at which inversions occur. The emulsion morphology diagram plays for emulsions a role that is similar to the role played by phase diagrams for phases.

  19. Phase and emulsion morphology diagrams of nonionic- amphiphile/oil/water systems and their interrelationships

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H. ); Kyunghee Lim . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    For two-phase, non-multiple emulsions, the emulsion morphology diagram shows, as a function of temperature and phase or component concentration, which phase is dispersed and which is the continuous one, as well as the temperatures and compositions at which inversions occur. The emulsion morphology diagram plays for emulsions a role that is similar to the role played by phase diagrams for phases.

  20. Behavior of Malondialdehyde in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Vandemoortele, Angelique; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2015-06-17

    The impact of temperature, emulsifier, and protein type on the reactivity of malondialdehyde in oil-in-water emulsions was elucidated. Malondialdehyde recoveries in aqueous buffer, protein solutions, saturated oil, and fully hydrogenated coconut oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by whey proteins or Tween 20 at 4 or 40 °C were compared. At both temperatures, the reactivity of malondialdehyde in aqueous buffer was the same. In protein solutions, malondialdehyde concentrations were reduced further and its decrease was protein-dependent. Similar trends were found for emulsions. Surprisingly, malondialdehyde was very reactive in saturated oil because only 15% was recovered at 40 °C. However, the degradation in oil proved to be strongly temperature-dependent; at 4 °C, losses amounted to only 8%. This study revealed that malondialdehyde is a very reactive molecule, both in the presence and absence of proteins. Its use as a general oxidation marker should therefore be considered with care. PMID:26016781

  1. Inverse Pickering Emulsions with Droplet Sizes below 500 nm.

    PubMed

    Sihler, Susanne; Schrade, Anika; Cao, Zhihai; Ziener, Ulrich

    2015-09-29

    Inverse Pickering emulsions with droplet diameters between 180 and 450 nm, a narrow droplet size distribution, and an outstanding stability were prepared using a miniemulsion technique. Commercially available hydrophilic silica nanoparticles were used to stabilize the emulsions. They were hydrophobized in situ by the adsorption of various neutral polymeric surfactants. The influence of different parameters, such as kind and amount of surfactant as hydrophobizing agent, size and charge of the silica particles, and amount of water in the dispersed phase, as well as the kind of osmotic agent (sodium chloride and phosphate-buffered saline), on the emulsion characteristics was investigated. The systems were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM), thermogravimetric analysis, and semiquantitative attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. Cryo-SEM shows that some silica particles are obviously rendered hydrophilic and form a three-dimensional network inside the droplets. PMID:26348090

  2. Destabilising Pickering emulsions by drop flocculation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Catherine P; Khairul Anwar, Hunainah; Hughes, James

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated how emulsions of water drops coated by organoclay particles destabilise in organic solvents. The drops destabilise and the emulsions undergo a fluid-solid transition if the particles are poorly wetted by the solvent. We show that the drops adhere together and form three-dimensional networks as the fraction of the poor-quality solvent in the mixture increases. Microscopic observations revealed that the drops coalesce into buckled, non-spherical shapes in mixtures rich in poor-quality solvent. A key finding is that destabilisation is favoured under conditions where the energy of adhesion between the particle layers coating drops is comparable to the energy required to detach the particles from the drops. Rupture of the interfacial layer produces particle flocs and uncoated, unstable water drops that settle out of the emulsion. PMID:26674231

  3. Synthesis of Fluorosurfactants for Emulsion-Based Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microemulsion represents an attractive platform for fundamental and applied biomedical research because the emulsified droplets can serve as millions of compartmentalized micrometer-sized reactors amenable to high-throughput screening or online monitoring. However, establishing stable emulsions with surfactants that are compatible with biological applications remains a significant challenge. Motivated by the lack of commercially available surfactants suitable for microemulsion-based biological assays, this study describes the facile synthesis of a biocompatible fluorosurfactant with nonionic tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl (Tris) polar head groups. We have further demonstrated compatibility of the developed surfactant with diverse emulsion-based applications, including DNA polymeric nanoparticle synthesis, enzymatic activity assay, and bacterial or mammalian cell culture, in the setup of both double- and multiphases of emulsions. PMID:24646088

  4. The jamming elasticity of emulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Scheffold, Frank; Wilking, James N; Haberko, Jakub; Cardinaux, Frédéric; Mason, Thomas G

    2014-07-28

    Oil-in-water emulsions composed of colloidal-scale droplets are often stabilized using ionic surfactants that provide a repulsive interaction between neighboring droplet interfaces, thereby inhibiting coalescence. If the droplet volume fraction is raised rapidly by applying an osmotic pressure, the droplets remain disordered, undergo an ergodic-nonergodic transition, and jam. If the applied osmotic pressure approaches the Laplace pressure of the droplets, then the jammed droplets also deform. Because solid friction and entanglements cannot play a role, as they might with solid particulate or microgel dispersions, the shear mechanical response of monodisperse emulsions can provide critical insight into the interplay of entropic, electrostatic, and interfacial forces. Here, we introduce a model that can be used to predict the plateau storage modulus and yield stress of a uniform charge-stabilized emulsion accurately if the droplet radius, interfacial tension, surface potential, Debye screening length, and droplet volume fraction are known. PMID:24913542

  5. Structures of octenylsuccinylated starches: effects on emulsions containing ?-carotene.

    PubMed

    Sweedman, Michael C; Hasjim, Jovin; Schäfer, Christian; Gilbert, Robert G

    2014-11-01

    Starches with different amylopectin contents and different molecular sizes prepared using acid hydrolysis were hydrophobically modified using octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA). The OSA-modified starches were used as surfactants to stabilize emulsions of ?-carotene and canola oil dispersed in water. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between starch molecular structure and the chemical stability of the emulsified ?-carotene, as well as the colloidal stability of emulsion droplets during storage. The oil droplet size in emulsions was smaller when starch had (a) lower hydrodynamic volume (Vh) and (b) higher amylopectin content. The oxidative stability of ?-carotene was similar across samples, with higher results at increased amylopectin content but higher Vh. Steric hindrance to coalescence provided by adsorbed OSA-modified starches appears to be improved by more rigid molecules of higher degree of branching. PMID:25129720

  6. Study of hadron interactions in a lead-emulsion target

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Hirokazu; Kajiwara, Takafumi; Kodama, Koichi; Komatsu, Masahiro; Matsuo, Tomokazu; Mikado, Shoji; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Ogawa, Satoru; Sheshukov, Andrey; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Sudou, Jun; Suzuki, Taira; Tsuchida, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Topological and kinematical characteristics of hadron interactions have been studied using a lead-emulsion target exposed to 2, 4 and 10 GeV/c hadron beams. A total length of 60 m $\\pi^-$ tracks was followed using a high speed automated emulsion scanning system. A total of 318 hadron interaction vertices and their secondary charged particle tracks were reconstructed. Measurement results of interaction lengths, charged particle multiplicity, emission angles and momenta of secondary charged particles are compared with a Monte Carlo simulation and appear to be consistent. Nuclear fragments emitted from interaction vertices were also detected by a newly developed emulsion scanning system with wide-angle acceptance. Their emission angle distributions are in good agreement with the simulated distributions. Probabilities of an event being associated with at least one fragment track are found to be greater than 50% for beam momentum $P > 4$ GeV/c and are well reproduced by the simulation. These experimental results v...

  7. Automated Track Recognition and Event Reconstruction in Nuclear Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deines-Jones, P.; Cherry, M. L.; Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Jones, W. V.; Kolganova, E. D.; Kudzia, D.; Nilsen, B. S.; Olszewski, A.; Pozharova, E. A.; Sengupta, K.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Waddington, C, J.; Wefel, J. P.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.

    1998-01-01

    The major advantages of nuclear emulsion for detecting charged particles are its submicron position resolution and sensitivity to minimum ionizing particles. These must be balanced, however, against the difficult manual microscope measurement by skilled observers required for the analysis. We have developed an automated system to acquire and analyze the microscope images from emulsion chambers. Each emulsion plate is analyzed independently, allowing coincidence techniques to be used in order to reject back- ground and estimate error rates. The system has been used to analyze a sample of high-multiplicity Pb-Pb interactions (charged particle multiplicities approx. 1100) produced by the 158 GeV/c per nucleon Pb-208 beam at CERN. Automatically reconstructed track lists agree with our best manual measurements to 3%. We describe the image analysis and track reconstruction techniques, and discuss the measurement and reconstruction uncertainties.

  8. Development of a frozen yogurt fortified with a nano-emulsion containing purple rice bran oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate a frozen yogurt (FY) fortified with a nano-emulsion containing purple rice bran oil (NPRBO). A nano-emulsion with a droplet size range of 150-300 nm was produced by sonication followed by ultra-shear homogenization. The nano-emulsion was mi...

  9. APS/123-QED Phase switching of ordered arrays of liquid crystal emulsions

    E-print Network

    - tal droplets suspended in a polymer matrix. However, these liquid crystal emulsions are typicallyAPS/123-QED Phase switching of ordered arrays of liquid crystal emulsions D. Rudhardt, A. Fern of a hexagonal close- packed array of monodisperse emulsion drops of nematic liquid crystal, embedded

  10. Thermodynamically Stable Pickering Emulsions S. Sacanna, W. K. Kegel, and A. P. Philipse*

    E-print Network

    Weeks, Eric R.

    to retard the droplet coalescence that eventually demixes the emulsion into separate oil and water phases oil-in-water emulsions with monodisperse droplet diameters in the range of 30­150 nm. This observation.70.Kj, 89.75.Fb Two categories of oil-in-water emulsions are presently known: transparent microemulsions

  11. A Novel Process for Demulsification of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions by Dense Carbon Dioxide

    E-print Network

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    coalescence. The stability of many water- in-oil (w/o) emulsions is known to arise from the formationA Novel Process for Demulsification of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions by Dense Carbon Dioxide Nael N and water-in-model oil emulsions stabilized by asphaltenic films. The stability of asphaltenic films

  12. ISSN:1369 7021 Elsevier Ltd 2008APRIL 2008 | VOLUME 11 | NUMBER 418 Designer emulsions

    E-print Network

    Rowat, Amy C.

    of small drops in another liquid that forms a continuous phase1­4. Common types of emulsions include oil of emulsions: the surfactant molecules migrate to the liquid-liquid interface and inhibit droplet coalescence1. Polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic devices are also used to generate picoliter-scale water-in-oil emulsions at rates

  13. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  14. Assembly of Latex Particles by Using Emulsion Droplets. 3. Reverse (Water in Oil) System

    E-print Network

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Assembly of Latex Particles by Using Emulsion Droplets. 3. Reverse (Water in Oil) System O. D recently by using microemulsion droplets5,11 or vesicles.5,12 The use of emulsions as compartamentalized the precipitation of submicrometer organic particles inside emulsion droplets.13 Recently, we proposed to use

  15. Assembly of Latex Particles by Using Emulsion Droplets as Templates. 1. Microstructured Hollow Spheres

    E-print Network

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Assembly of Latex Particles by Using Emulsion Droplets as Templates. 1. Microstructured Hollow, colloid-size 2D or 3D space provided by emulsion droplets. The process is carried out by multiple surfaces but without homocoagulation; (2) adsorption and structure formation around the emulsion drops (at

  16. Eect of the surfactant concentration on the kinetic stability of thin foam and emulsion lms

    E-print Network

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Eect of the surfactant concentration on the kinetic stability of thin foam and emulsion Ðlms K. PÐa, Bulgaria The thinning and the lifetime of foam and emulsion Ðlms formed in a model experimental cell have polyoxyethylene-2 sulfate. The emulsion Ðlms contained either Tween 20 or Span 20. The time of hydrodynamic

  17. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  18. The Effects of Inorganic Solid Particles on Water and Crude Oil Emulsion Stability

    E-print Network

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    The Effects of Inorganic Solid Particles on Water and Crude Oil Emulsion Stability Andrew P, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905 Small inorganic particles strongly enhance water-crude oil emulsion-stabilization effective- ness. Emulsion stabilities were determined by the extent of water resolved after centrifugation

  19. A mathematical model of crystallization in an emulsion Daniel L. Felthama

    E-print Network

    Feltham, Daniel

    A mathematical model of crystallization in an emulsion Daniel L. Felthama Centre for Polar of the important processes at work in the crystallization of emulsions is presented. The model describes nucleation within the discontinuous domain of an emulsion, precipitation in the continuous domain, transport

  20. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  1. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the...

  2. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  3. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber...

  4. Model System for Surfactant-free Emulsion Copolymerization of Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic

    E-print Network

    Wu, Chi

    Model System for Surfactant-free Emulsion Copolymerization of Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Monomers-free emulsion copolymerization. The formation and stabilization of such particles were studied by a combination microphase inversion procedure was adopted.7 Such particles resemble those formed in surfactant-free emulsion

  5. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory. This subpart applies to dischargers of pollutants to waters of the United States...

  6. ON-CHIP DOUBLE EMULSION DROPLET ASSEMBLY USING ELECTROWETTING-ON-DIELECTRIC AND

    E-print Network

    Jones, Thomas B.

    ON-CHIP DOUBLE EMULSION DROPLET ASSEMBLY USING ELECTROWETTING-ON-DIELECTRIC AND DIELECTROPHORESIS W emulsion (DE) droplets used for fabri- cation of cryogenic foam targets for inertial confinement fusion energies. KEYWORDS: double emulsion droplet, electrowetting-on- dielectric, dielectrophoresis Note: Some

  7. Effects of petroleum resins on asphaltene aggregation and water-in-oil emulsion formation

    E-print Network

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    Effects of petroleum resins on asphaltene aggregation and water-in-oil emulsion formation P in mixtures of heptane and toluene with added resins to determine aggregate sizes. Water-in-oil emulsions aggregates rendered the aggregates less interfacially active and thus reduced emulsion stability

  8. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory. This subpart applies to dischargers of pollutants to waters of the United States...

  9. Modified Structural Model for Predicting Particle Size in the Microemulsion and Emulsion Polymerization of

    E-print Network

    Wu, Chi

    Modified Structural Model for Predicting Particle Size in the Microemulsion and Emulsion and emulsion polymerization of styrene at 70 °C in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, surfactant.Laserlightscatteringwasusedtocharacterizetheresultantpolystyrenelatexparticles formed at different polymerization stages. The influence of the initial emulsion composition, that is

  10. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory. This subpart applies to dischargers of pollutants to waters of the United States...

  11. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the...

  12. Forming concentric double-emulsion droplets using electric fields Z.-M. Bei a

    E-print Network

    Jones, Thomas B.

    Forming concentric double-emulsion droplets using electric fields Z.-M. Bei a , T.B. Jones a,*, A Accepted 31 December 2008 Available online xxx Keywords: Double-emulsion droplets Laser targets Dipole/dipole interactions Dielectrophoresis a b s t r a c t Double-emulsion droplets may be assembled into highly concentric

  13. Thixotropy and Physical Aging in Acrylic Emulsion Paint Bharat Baldewa, Yogesh M. Joshi

    E-print Network

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Thixotropy and Physical Aging in Acrylic Emulsion Paint Bharat Baldewa, Yogesh M. Joshi Department thixotropic and time-dependent rheological behavior of commercial acrylic emulsion paint using a framework of soft glassy rheology. We observe that acrylic emulsion paint, which shows thix- otropic rheological

  14. Cold in-place recycling with bitumen emulsion Animesh Das1

    E-print Network

    Das, Animesh

    Cold in-place recycling with bitumen emulsion Animesh Das1 Introduction The cold in-place recycling and binder in cold form (emulsion or cutback or foamed bitumen) is added. Externally acquired Reclaimed briefly discusses the mix design and construction related considerations of emulsion based CIPR process

  15. Modeling of a Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor: I. Model Development and Experimental Validation

    E-print Network

    ARTICLE Modeling of a Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor: I. Model Development and Experimental Validation, a new type of bioreactor for air pollution control referred to as the foamed emulsion bior- eactor (FEBR) has been developed. The process relies on the emulsion of an organic phase with a suspension

  16. Pervaporation of Emulsion Droplets for the Templated Assembly of Spherical Particles: A Population Balance Model

    E-print Network

    Pervaporation of Emulsion Droplets for the Templated Assembly of Spherical Particles: A Population in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) The emulsion droplet solvent evaporation method is used is presented to describe this transport of solvent from nanocrystal- or polymer- laden droplets in an emulsion

  17. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800918 Double Emulsion-Templated Nanoparticle Colloidosomes

    E-print Network

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200800918 Double Emulsion-Templated Nanoparticle Colloidosomes with Selective phase of a water-in-oil emulsion. The particles self-assemble at the interface between the two, as polydisperse emulsions are typically used as templates. A narrow size distribution for colloidosomes

  18. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  19. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  20. Uniform and accurate single-cell sequencing based on emulsion whole-genome amplification

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yanyi

    Uniform and accurate single-cell sequencing based on emulsion whole-genome amplification Yusi Fua for SNV identifica- tion. Here, we report emulsion WGA (eWGA) to overcome these problems. We divide single | sequencing | microfluidics | emulsion Single-cell sequencing, characterization the genome of indi- vidual

  1. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber...

  2. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  3. Long-Ranged Electrostatic Repulsion and Crystallization of Emulsion Droplets in an Ultralow Dielectric Medium Supercritical

    E-print Network

    Long-Ranged Electrostatic Repulsion and Crystallization of Emulsion Droplets in an Ultralow in an ultralow dielectric medium, CO2 ( ) 1.5), at elevated pressures. The morphology of the water/CO2 emulsion the sedimentation profile measured by laser diffraction. Thus, the long-ranged stabilization of the emulsion may

  4. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  5. Photoinduced demulsification of emulsions using a photoresponsive gemini surfactant.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Fukuyasu, Kengo; Horiuchi, Tatsuya; Kondo, Yukishige; Stroeve, Pieter

    2014-01-14

    This Article reports on the influence of light irradiation on the stability of emulsions prepared using a photoresponsive gemini surfactant (C7-azo-C7) having an azobenzene skeleton as a spacer. When mixtures of trans C7-azo-C7 aqueous solution and n-octane are homogenized, stable emulsions are obtained in a specific region of weight fraction and surfactant concentration. Fluorescence microscopy observations using a small amount of fluorescent probes show that the stable emulsions are oil-in-water (O/W)-type. UV irradiation of stable O/W emulsions promotes the cis isomerization of trans C7-azo-C7 and leads to the coalescence of the oil (octane) droplets in the emulsions, that is, demulsification. While the equilibrated interfacial tension (IFT) between aqueous trans C7-azo-C7 solution and octane is almost the same as that between aqueous cis C7-azo-C7 and octane, the occupied area per molecule for C7-azo-C7 at octane/water interface decreases with the cis photoisomerization of trans isomer. Dynamic IFT measurement shows that UV irradiation to the interface between aqueous trans C7-azo-C7 solution and octane brings about an increase in the interfacial tension, indicating that the Gibbs free energy at the interface increases. From these results, the cis isomerization of trans C7-azo-C7 molecules at the O/W interface due to UV irradiation leads to direct contact between the water and octane phases, because of the reduction of molecular area at the interface, and subsequently makes the emulsions demulsified. PMID:24354334

  6. Determination of mean droplet sizes of water-in-oil emulsions using an Earth's field NMR instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Flux, Louise S.; Johns, Michael L.

    2012-08-01

    The use of the Earth's magnetic field (EF) to conduct nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments has a long history with a growing list of applications (e.g. ground water detection, diffusion measurements of Antarctic sea ice). In this paper we explore whether EFNMR can be used to accurately and practically measure the mean droplet size () of water-in-oil emulsions (paraffin and crude oil). We use both pulsed field gradient (PFG) measurements of restricted self-diffusion and T2 relaxometry, as appropriate. T2 relaxometry allows the extension of droplet sizing ability below the limits set by the available magnetic field gradient strength of the EFNMR apparatus. A commercially available bench-top NMR spectrometer is used to verify the results obtained using the EFNMR instrument, with good agreement within experimental error, seen between the two instruments. These results open the potential for further investigation of the application of EFNMR for emulsion droplet sizing.

  7. Development of Single-Sided Silicon Detectors in the Emulsion-Hybrid System at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Ahn, J. K.; Ekawa, H.; Han, Y. C.; Hasegawa, S.; Hayakawa, S.; Hayakawa, T.; Hosomi, K.; Hwang, S. H.; Imai, K.; Ito, K.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, S. H.; Kiuchi, R.; Moon, T. J.; Nakazawa, K.; Oue, K.; Sako, H.; Sato, S.; Sugimura, H.; Tanida, K.; Watabe, T.

    A new single-sided silicon micro-strip detector (SSD) is being developed at the J-PARC K1.8 beam line for an emulsion-counter hybrid experiment (J-PARC E07). The SSD will be mainly used for vetex measurements in emulsion plates. Two prototypes of SSD have been fabricated to check the performance of the circuit board and silicon sensors. The first prototype consists of only one layer of a silicon sensor whereas the second prototype consists of two layers of silicon sensors. The final product will be a stack of 4 layers of silicon sensors in the order of X-Y-X-Y. The first and second prototypes of SSD have been tested and the final product will be fabricated based on the test result.

  8. Rapid and medium setting high float bituminous emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, P.; Schreuders, H.G.

    1987-06-30

    This patent describes a rapid set high float aqueous bituminous emulsion-comprising bitumen, water, and from about 0.4% to about 0.6%, based on the weight of the emulsion, of an anionic emulsifier comprised of an alkaline solution of a combination of (1) 20% to 80% fatty acids selected from the group consisting of tall oil fatty acids, tallow fatty acids, and mixtures. (2) 20% to 80% of a product of the reaction of the fatty acids with a member of the group consists of acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, fumaric acid, and maleic anhydride.

  9. Bicontinuous emulsion gels induced by partial coalescence: Kinetics and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thivilliers, F.; Drelon, N.; Schmitt, V.; Leal-Calderon, F.

    2006-10-01

    We describe a gelation process based on the unrelaxed coalescence of partially crystallised droplets in a primary oil-in-water emulsion. Under the effect of a gentle thermal treatment, fluid emulsions turned into hard gels whose evolution was arrested by the solid nature of the droplets. The kinetic evolution of the bulk elastic modulus G' during the thermal treatment was interpreted within the frame of percolation theory. The experimental data support the conclusion that coalescence involves irreversible bridging between crystallised and melted patches in the thin liquid films.

  10. Numerical analysis of electromagnetic cascades in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plyasheshnikov, A. V.; Vorobyev, K. V.

    1985-01-01

    A new calculational scheme of the Monte Carlo method assigned for the investigation of the development of high and extremely high energy electromagnetic cascades (EMC) in the matter was elaborated. The scheme was applied to the analysis of angular and radial distributions of EMC electrons in the atmosphere. By means of this scheme the EMC development in dense medium is investigated and some preliminary data are presented on the behavior of EMC in emulsion chambers. The results of more detailed theoretical analysis of the EMC development in emulsion chambers are discussed.

  11. Viscoelastic properties of sterically stabilised emulsions and their stability.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Tharwat

    2015-08-01

    The interaction forces between emulsion droplets containing adsorbed polymeric surfactants and the theory of steric stabilisation are briefly described. The results for the viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions that are stabilised with partially hydrolysed poly(vinyl acetate) that is commonly referred to as poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 4% vinyl acetate are given. The effect of the oil volume fraction, addition of electrolytes and increasing temperature is described. This allows one to obtain various parameters such as the adsorbed layer thickness, the critical flocculation concentration of electrolyte (CFC) and critical flocculation temperature (CFT) at constant electrolyte concentration. The viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyethylene oxide (A) and polypropylene oxide (B) are described. These emulsions behave as viscoelastic liquids showing a cross-over-point between G' (the elastic component of the complex modulus) and G? (the viscous component of the complex modulus) at a characteristic frequency. Plots of G' and G? versus oil volume fraction ? show the transition from predominantly viscous to predominantly elastic response at a critical volume fraction ?(c). The latter can be used to estimate the adsorbed layer thickness of the polymeric surfactants. Results are also shown for W/O emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyhydroxystearic acid (PHS, A) and polyethylene oxide (PEO, B). The viscosity volume fraction curves could be fitted to the Dougherty-Krieger equation for hard-spheres. The results could be applied to give an estimate of the adsorbed layer thickness ? which shows a decrease with increase of the water volume fraction. This is due to the interpenetration and/or compression of the PHS layers on close approach of the water droplets on increasing the water volume fraction. The last section of the review gives an example of O/W emulsion stability using an AB(n) graft copolymer of polyfructose (A) to which several C12 alkyl chains are grafted. The emulsions are stable both at high temperature and in the presence of high electrolyte concentrations (2 mol dm(-3) NaCl). This high stability is due to the strong adsorption ("anchoring") of the graft copolymer with several C12 alkyl chains and the strong hydration of the polyfructose chains both in water and in the presence of high electrolyte concentrations and temperature. Evidence for this high stability is obtained using disjoining pressure measurements which show a highly stable film between the emulsion droplets and absence of its rupture up to high pressures. PMID:25900262

  12. Dynamics of step-emulsification: From a single to a collection of emulsion droplet generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Nitesh; Cohen, Céline; Bibette, Jérôme; Bremond, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Microfluidics has proven to be an efficient tool for making fine and calibrated emulsion droplets. The parallelization of drop makers is required for producing large amounts. Here, we investigate the generation of emulsion drops along a series of shallow microchannels emerging in a deep one, in other words the step-emulsification process. The dynamics of a single drop maker is first characterized as a function of interfacial tension and viscosities of both phases. The characteristic time scale of drop formation, namely, the necking time that finally sets drop size, is shown to be principally governed by the outer phase viscosity to interfacial tension ratio with a minor correction linked to the viscosity ratio. The step emulsification process experiences a transition of fragmentation regime where both the necking time and drop size suddenly raise. This transition, that corresponds to a critical period of drop formation and thus defines a maximum production rate of small droplets, is observed to be ruled by the viscosity ratio of the two phases. When drops are produced along an array of microchannels with a cross flow of the continuous phase, a configuration comparable to a one-dimensional membrane having rectangular pores, a drop boundary layer develops along the drop generators. In the small drop regime, the local dynamics of drop formation is shown to be independent on the emulsion cross flow. Moreover, we note that the development of the drop boundary layer is even beneficial to homogenize drop size along the production line. On the other hand, in the large drop regime, drop collision can trigger fragmentation and thus lead to size polydispersity.

  13. Spectra, composition, and interactions of nuclei with magnet interaction chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parneil, T. A.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Roberts, F. E.; Tabuki, T.; Watts, J. W.; Burnett, T. H.; Cherry, M. C.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.

    1990-01-01

    Emulsion chambers will be flown in the Astromag Facility to measure the cosmic ray composition and spectra to 10 exp 15 eV total energy and to definitively study the characteristics of nucleus-nucleus interactions above 10 exp 12 eV/n. Two configurations of emulsion chambers will be flown in the SCIN/MAGIC experiment. One chamber has an emulsion target and a calorimeter similar to those recently flown on balloons for composition and spectra measurements. The other has an identical calorimeter and a low-density target section optimized for performing rigidity measurements on charged particles produced in interactions. The transverse momenta of charged and neutral mesons, direct hadronic pairs from resonance decays and interference effects, and possible charge clustering in high-density states of matter will be studied.

  14. A Simple Experiment Illustrating the Structure of Association Colloids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friberg, Stig. E.; Bendiksen, Beverly

    1979-01-01

    The experiment described is intended to illustrate the intermolecular phenomena involved in association colloids. These are normal and inverse micelles and lyotropic liquid crystals. Solubilization, microemulsion and emulsion are discussed. (Author/SA)

  15. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of negative pions in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chkhaidze, L. V. Djobava, T. D.; Kharkhelauri, L. L.; Kladnitskaya, E. N.

    2012-07-15

    Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of {pi}{sup -} mesons have been studied in dC, HeC, CC, CNe, MgMg, (d, He)Ta, CCu, CTa, and OPb collisions at momentum of 4.2, 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon within the standard transverse momentum analysis method of P. Danielewicz and G. Odyniec. The data were obtained by SKM-200-GIBS and Propane Bubble Chamber Collaborations of JINR. The axis has been selected in the phase space and with respect to this axis {pi}{sup -} meson correlations were observed. The values of the coefficient of the correlations linearly depend on the mass numbers of projectile (A{sub P}) and target (A{sub T}) nuclei. The Quark-Gluon String Model satisfactorily describes the experimental results.

  16. Relativistic Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck Equation for Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions 

    E-print Network

    LI, Q.; Wu, J. Q.; Ko, Che Ming.

    1989-01-01

    As in Ref. 14, the nucleon Careen's function G (x?x, ) and self-energy X,(x?x, ) can be written as G(x?x,.)=8(t?t,. )G (xi,x, . )+8(ti, t, )G (x?x, ), X,(x?x, )=8(t?t,. )X (x?x, )+8(t, t, )X (x?x,.), (6) where 8(t], t, ) is 1 or 0 depending on whether t...

  17. Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions 

    E-print Network

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy baryon/meson ratios Lambda(c)/D(0) and Lambda(b)/(B) over bar (0) in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the quark coalescence model. For heavy baryons, we include production from coalescence of heavy quarks with free light quarks...

  18. Search for a Signal on QCD Critical Point in Central Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    E-print Network

    M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; K. Ahmed; Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; Farida Tahir; Y. H. Huseynaliyev; M. Ajaz; K. H. Khan; Z. Wazir

    2008-04-19

    We discuss that the QCD critical point could appear in central collisions in percolation cluster. We suggest using the nuclear transparency effect and the one of the light nuclear production to identify the critical point.

  19. Remnants of Initial Anisotropic High Energy Density Domains in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    E-print Network

    F. Wang; H. Sorge

    1998-12-19

    Anisotropic high energy density domains may be formed at early stages of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, e.g. due to phase transition dynamics or non-equilibrium phenomena like (mini-)jets. Here we investigate hadronic observables resulting from an initially created anisotropic high energy density domain. Based on our studies using a transport model we find that the initial anisotropies are reflected in the freeze-out multiplicity distribution of both pions and kaons due to secondary hadronic rescattering. The anisotropy appears to be stronger for particles at high transverse momenta. The overall kaon multiplicity increases with large fluctuations of local energy densities, while no change has been found in the pion multiplicity.

  20. Production of Strange Clusters and Strange Matter in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the AGS

    E-print Network

    P. Braun-Munzinger; J. Stachel

    1994-12-23

    Production probabilities for strange clusters and strange matter in Au+Au collisions at AGS energy are obtained in the thermal fireball model. The only parameters of the model, the baryon chemical potential and temperature, were determined from a description of the rather complete set of hadron yields from Si+nucleus collisions at the AGS. For the production of light nuclear fragments and strange clusters the results are similar to recent coalescence model calculations. Strange matter production with baryon number larger than 10 is predicted to be much smaller than any current experimental sensitivities.

  1. Origin of the low-mass electron pair excess in light nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    The HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; A. Blanco; M. Böhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Braun-Munzinger; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; J. Díaz; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Fröhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzón; R. Gernhäuser; A. Gil; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. González-Díaz; F. Guber; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kämpfer; T. Karavicheva; D. Kirschner; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; F. Krizek; R. Krücken; W. Kühn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; E. Morinière; J. Mousa; C. Müntz; L. Naumann; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Ströbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wüstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; P. Zhou

    2009-10-30

    We report measurements of electron pair production in elementary p+p and d+p reactions at 1.25 GeV/u with the HADES spectrometer. For the first time, the electron pairs were reconstructed for n+p reactions by detecting the proton spectator from the deuteron breakup. We find that the yield of electron pairs with invariant mass Me+e- > 0.15 GeV/c2 is about an order of magnitude larger in n+p reactions as compared to p+p. A comparison to model calculations demonstrates that the production mechanism is not sufficiently described yet. The electron pair spectra measured in C+C reactions are compatible with a superposition of elementary n+p and p+p collisions, leaving little room for additional electron pair sources in such light collision systems.

  2. Origin of the low-mass electron pair excess in light nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agakichiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A. V.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chernenko, S.; Christ, T.; Destefanis, M.; Díaz, J.; Dohrmann, F.; Dybczak, A.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O. V.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gil, A.; Gilardi, C.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kirschner, D.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kotte, R.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Lang, S.; Lange, J. S.; Lapidus, K.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Otwinowski, J.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Sudol, M.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y. V.; Zhou, P.; HADES Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We report measurements of electron pair production in elementary p+p and d+p reactions at 1.25 GeV/u with the HADES spectrometer. For the first time, the electron pairs were reconstructed for n+p reactions by detecting the proton spectator from the deuteron breakup. We find that the yield of electron pairs with invariant mass M>0.15 GeV/c2 is about an order of magnitude larger in n+p reactions as compared to p+p. A comparison to model calculations demonstrates that the production mechanism is not sufficiently described yet. The electron pair spectra measured in C+C reactions are compatible with a superposition of elementary n+p and p+p collisions, leaving little room for additional electron pair sources in such light collision systems.

  3. Origin of the low-mass electron pair excess in light nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agakichiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A. V.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chernenko, S.; Christ, T.; Destefanis, M.; Díaz, J.; Dohrmann, F.; Dybczak, A.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O. V.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gil, A.; Gilardi, C.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kirschner, D.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kotte, R.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Lang, S.; Lange, J. S.; Lapidus, K.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Otwinowski, J.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Sudol, M.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y. V.; Zhou, P.; Hades Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We report measurements of electron pair production in elementary p+p and d+p reactions at 1.25 GeV/u with the HADES spectrometer. For the first time, the electron pairs were reconstructed for n+p reactions by detecting the proton spectator from the deuteron breakup. We find that the yield of electron pairs with invariant mass Mee>0.15 GeV/c is about an order of magnitude larger in n+p reactions as compared to p+p. A comparison to model calculations demonstrates that the production mechanism is not sufficiently described yet. The electron pair spectra measured in C+C reactions are compatible with a superposition of elementary n+p and p+p collisions, leaving little room for additional electron pair sources in such light collision systems.

  4. Energy Dependence of Particle Ratios in High Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions: A USTFM Approach

    E-print Network

    Inam-ul Bashir; Saeed Uddin

    2015-10-20

    We study the identified particle ratios produced at mid-rapidity in heavy ion collisions, along with their correlations with the collision energy. We employ our earlier proposed Unified Statistical Thermal Freeze-out Model (USTFM), which incorporates the effects of both longitudinal as well as transverse hydrodynamic flow in the hot hadronic system. A fair agreement seen between the experimental data and our model results confirms that the particle production in these collisions is of statistical nature. The variation of the chemical freeze-out temperature and the baryon chemical potential with respect to collision energies is studied. The chemical freeze-out temperature is found to be almost constant beyond the RHIC energy and is found to be close to the QCD predicted phase transition temperature suggesting that the chemical freeze-out occurs soon after the hadronization takes place. The vanishing value of chemical potential at LHC indicates very high degree of nuclear transparency in the collision.

  5. Energy Dependence of Particle Ratios in High Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions: A USTFM Approach

    E-print Network

    Bashir, Inam-ul

    2015-01-01

    We study the identified particle ratios produced at mid-rapidity in heavy ion collisions, along with their correlations with the collision energy. We employ our earlier proposed Unified Statistical Thermal Freeze-out Model (USTFM), which incorporates the effects of both longitudinal as well as transverse hydrodynamic flow in the hot hadronic system. A fair agreement seen between the experimental data and our model results confirms that the particle production in these collisions is of statistical nature. The variation of the chemical freeze-out temperature and the baryon chemical potential with respect to collision energies is studied. The chemical freeze-out temperature is found to be almost constant beyond the RHIC energy and is found to be close to the QCD predicted phase transition temperature suggesting that the chemical freeze-out occurs soon after the hadronization takes place. The vanishing value of chemical potential at LHC indicates very high degree of nuclear transparency in the collision.

  6. Schroedinger cats, quantum slings and azimuthal effects in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-print Network

    I. M. Dremin; V. I. Man'ko

    1998-07-21

    Confinement of a chromodynamical string can result in specific effects in scattering processes and multiparticle production. In particular, due to its rotation secondary fragments of the splitting apart string can move like stones thrown from a sling. That would be detected as the azimuthal asymmetry of particle distributions in individual events. Thus we propose to explain the elliptic flow observed in AA-collisions as a sling-effect. It can provide information about confinement of quarks inside particles or binding forces in nuclei. Nonclassical states of the created particles like the Schroedinger cats are produced. Some classical and quantum-mechanical estimates of possible effects are given. Experimental facts which can be used for their verification are discussed.

  7. Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions: Zone of Reactions and Space-Time Structure of a Fireball

    E-print Network

    Dmitry Anchishkin; Anton Muskeyev; Stanislav Yezhov

    2010-04-03

    A zone of reactions is determined and then exploited as a tool in studying the space-time structure of an interacting system formed in a collision of relativistic nuclei. The time dependence of the reaction rates integrated over spatial coordinates is also considered. Evaluations are made with the help of the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The relation of the boundaries of different zones of reactions and the hypersurfaces of sharp chemical and kinetic freeze-outs is discussed.

  8. Relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Zone of reactions and space-time structure of fireball

    SciTech Connect

    Anchishkin, D.; Muskeyev, A.; Yezhov, S.

    2010-03-15

    A zone of reactions is determined and then exploited as a tool in studying the space-time structure of an interacting system formed in a collision of relativistic nuclei. The time dependence of the reaction rates integrated over spatial coordinates is also considered. Evaluations are made with the help of the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The relation of the boundaries of different zones of reactions and the hypersurfaces of sharp chemical and kinetic freeze-outs is discussed.

  9. Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions: Zone of Reactions and Space-Time Structure of a Fireball

    E-print Network

    Anchishkin, Dmitry; Yezhov, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    A zone of reactions is determined and then exploited as a tool in studying the space-time structure of an interacting system formed in a collision of relativistic nuclei. The time dependence of the reaction rates integrated over spatial coordinates is also considered. Evaluations are made with the help of the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The relation of the boundaries of different zones of reactions and the hypersurfaces of sharp chemical and kinetic freeze-outs is discussed.

  10. Multiplicity fluctuations and percolation of strings in hadron-hadron and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brogueira, Pedro; Dias de Deus, Jorge

    2005-10-01

    We argue that recent NA49 results on multiparticle distributions and fluctuations, as a function of the number of participant nucleons, suggest that percolation plays an important role in particle production at high densities.

  11. What are the early degrees of freedom in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions?

    E-print Network

    Moreau, Pierre; Cassing, Wolfgang; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics (PHSD) transport model is used to study the impact on the choice of initial degrees of freedom on the final hadronic and electromagnetic observables in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV. We find that a non-perturbative system of massive gluons (scenario I) and a system of dominantly quarks and antiquarks (scenario II) lead to different hadronic observables when imposing the same initial energy-momentum tensor $T_{\\mu \

  12. Probing Excited Nuclear Matter Using Particle Yields from Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Alan J.

    Nuclear fragment yields from central Au + Au collisions are presented at the Bevalac beam energies of 0.25, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.15A GeV using the EOS Time Projection Chamber. For these central events, we reconstruct almost all of the charge in the forward hemisphere, y _{cm}>0. The accuracy of yield measurements and particle identification performance can be improved by fully understanding the systematics of the energy loss signal provided by the detector. With appropriate corrections, excellent hydrogen and helium isotopic identification can be achieved. These measurements are compared with the predictions from two theoretical models. One of these models is based on a statistical disassembly and is called the Quantum Statistical Model (QSM). This model is used to extract an entropy per nucleon (S/A) as a function of bombarding energy. These entropy values were found to be most sensitive to the yields of light fragments and steadily increased up to an energy of 1.15A GeV. Methods to constrain the breakup densities are discussed with the hope to reduce the uncertainty in determining the S/A values. These yield measurements have also been compared to those predicted by the microscopic transport theory Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD). QMD is the only model that attempts the ambitious goal of dynamically simulating fragment formation. This model significantly underpredicts the yield of composite fragments and poorly reproduces the shape of their distribution as a function of rapidity. However, it does match the aggregate abundance of nucleons as a function of rapidity, especially for the higher energies. Furthermore, QMD performs better than the QSM model in predicting the abundance of heavier mass fragments (A > 4) for central collisions, especially at the higher energies.

  13. Vorticity Alignment and Negative Normal Stresses in Sheared Attractive Emulsions Alberto Montesi, Alejandro A. Pen~a,* and Matteo Pasquali

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    and retard coalescence and other destabilizing mechanisms. Emulsions can be regarded as repulsive water-in-oil emulsions with increasing vol- ume fraction of the dispersed (water) phase . EmulsionsVorticity Alignment and Negative Normal Stresses in Sheared Attractive Emulsions Alberto Montesi

  14. Immunomodulatory and Physical Effects of Oil Composition in Vaccine Adjuvant Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Christopher B.; Baldwin, Susan L.; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Reed, Steven G.; Vedvick, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Squalene-based oil-in-water emulsions have been used for years in some seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. However, concerns have been expressed regarding squalene source and potential biological activities. Little information is available regarding the immunomodulatory activity of squalene in comparison with other metabolizable oils in the context of oil-in-water emulsions formulated with vaccines. The present work describes the manufacture and physical characterization of emulsions composed of different classes of oils, including squalene, long chain triglycerides, a medium chain triglyceride, and a perfluorocarbon, all emulsified with egg phosphatidylcholine. Some differences were apparent among the non-squalene oils in terms of emulsion stability, including higher size polydispersity in the perfluorocarbon emulsion, more rapid visual instability at 60 °C for the long-chain triglyceride and perfluorocarbon emulsions, and an increased creaming rate in the medium-chain triglyceride emulsion at 60 °C as detected by laser scattering optical profiling. The biological activity of each of these emulsions was compared when formulated with either a recombinant malaria antigen or a split-virus inactivated influenza vaccine. Overall, vaccines containing the squalene emulsion elicited higher antibody titers and more abundant long-lived plasma cells than vaccines containing emulsions based on other oils. Since squalene-based emulsions show higher adjuvant potency compared to the other oils tested, non-squalene oils may be more suitable as carriers of amphiphilic or hydrophobic immunostimulatory molecules (such as TLR agonists) rather than as stand-alone adjuvants. PMID:21906648

  15. Intravenous lipid emulsion for treating permethrin toxicosis in a cat

    PubMed Central

    DeGroot, Whitney D.

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old cat was presented with acute onset seizures, tremors, and hypersalivation. Permethrin toxicity was diagnosed based on a history of recent flea treatment. Measures were taken to minimize further absorption of permethrin, and methocarbamol and intravenous lipid emulsion were used to control tremors. The cat recovered and was discharged within 42 h. PMID:24381347

  16. Electron-beam cured emulsion pressure-sensitive adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Mallya, P.; Plamthottam, S.S.; Ozari, Y.

    1993-08-03

    A cured pressure-sensitive adhesive is described which comprises a branched chain emulsion polymer having a glass transition temperature of at least 20 C below the use temperature, and formed by emulsion polymerization of at least one first monomer which, when homo polymerized, has a glass transition temperature less than [minus]25 C and at least one second monomer which, when homo polymerized, has a glass transition temperature greater than [minus]25 C., and said emulsion polymer being cured in the presence of from about 0.2 to about 10% by weight based on the weight of the emulsion-polymer of a multifunctional additive and exposure to electron beam radiation at a dosage of up to 100 kGy and sufficient to provide a 70 C shear of at least 10 kiloseconds and a 180 C peel of at least about 250 N/m, and a loop tack of at least about 200 N/m at a coat weight of from about 40 to 60 g/m[sup 2].

  17. Emulsion technologies for multicellular tumour spheroid radiation assays.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kay S; McCluskey, Anthony G; Sorensen, Annette; Boyd, Marie; Zagnoni, Michele

    2016-01-01

    A major limitation with current in vitro technologies for testing anti-cancer therapies at the pre-clinical level is the use of 2D cell culture models which provide a poor reflection of the tumour physiology in vivo. Three dimensional cell culture models, such as the multicellular spheroid, provide instead a more accurate representation. However, existing spheroid-based assessment methods are generally labour-intensive and low-throughput. Emulsion based technologies offer enhanced mechanical stability during multicellular tumour spheroid formation and culture and are scalable to enable higher-throughput assays. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of emulsion-based techniques for the formation and long term culture of multicellular UVW glioma cancer spheroids and apply these findings to assess the cytotoxic effect of radiation on spheroids. Our results showed that spheroids formed within emulsions had similar morphological and growth characteristics to those formed using traditional methods. Furthermore, we have identified the effects produced on the proliferative state of the spheroids due to the compartmentalised nature of the emulsions and applied this for mimicking tumour growth and tumour quiescence. Finally, proof of concept results are shown to demonstrate the scalability potential of the technology for developing high-throughput screening assays. PMID:26456100

  18. Mannan-stabilized oil-in-water beverage emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stabilizing effect of spruce galactoglucomannan (GGM) on a model beverage emulsion system was studied and compared to that of guar gum and locust bean gum galactomannans, konjac glucomannan, and corn arabinoxylan. In addition, enzymatic modification was applied on guar gum to examine the effect ...

  19. Development of Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor for Air Pollution Control

    E-print Network

    Development of Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor for Air Pollution Control Eunsung Kan, Marc A. Deshusses: 10.1002/bit.10767 Abstract: A new type of bioreactor for air pollution con- trol has been developed used bioreactors for air pollution control. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 84: 240

  20. Azeotropic Distillation as a Technique for Emulsion Size Reduction

    E-print Network

    Petta, Jason

    Azeotropic Distillation as a Technique for Emulsion Size Reduction Taylor Emanuelle Sweet 2013 Prism/PCCM #12;Overview -Intro- What is Microfluidics? What is Heterogeneous Azeotropic Distillation microns in size and use Binary Heterogeneous Azeotropic Distillation to shrink droplets to 5-10 microns

  1. Wettability of Freon hydrates in crude oil/brine emulsions.

    PubMed

    Høiland, S; Askvik, K M; Fotland, P; Alagic, E; Barth, T; Fadnes, F

    2005-07-01

    The surface energy of petroleum hydrates is believed to be a key parameter with regard to hydrate morphology and plugging tendency in petroleum production. As of today, the surface energy of natural gas hydrates is unknown, but will depend on the fluids in which they grow. In this work, the wettability of Freon hydrates is evaluated from their behavior in crude oil emulsions. For emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles, the particle wettability is a governing parameter for the emulsion behavior. The transition between continuous and dispersed phases as a function of brine volume in crude oil-brine emulsions containing Freon hydrates has been determined for 12 crude oils. Silica particles are used for comparison. The results show that phase inversion is highly dependent on crude oil properties. Based on the measured points of phase inversion, the wettability of the Freon hydrates generated in each system is evaluated as being oil-wet, intermediate-wet, or water-wet. Generation of oil-wet hydrates correlates with low hydrate plugging tendency. The formation of oil-wet hydrates will prevent agglomeration into large hydrate aggregates and plugs. Hence, it is believed that the method is applicable for differentiating oils with regard to hydrate morphology. PMID:15914170

  2. The influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction of ghee.

    PubMed

    Newton, Angela E; Fairbanks, Antony J; Golding, Matt; Andrewes, Paul; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2015-04-15

    Food systems, such as cream and butter, have an emulsion or emulsion-like structure. When these food emulsions are heated to high temperatures to make products such as ghee, the Maillard reaction forms a range of volatile flavour compounds. The objective of this paper was to unravel the specific influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction pathways that occur during the cooking of ghee using model systems. Switching the dispersed phase from oil to water provided a means of altering the ratios of volatile compounds produced in the cooked samples. The oil-in-water emulsion generated a volatile compound profile similar to that of the fat containing two phase model matrix, whereas the water-in-oil emulsion produced a different ratio of these compounds. The ability to generate different volatile compound profiles through the use of inverted emulsion structures could point to a new avenue for control of the Maillard reaction in high temperature food systems. PMID:25466150

  3. Non-coalescence of oppositely charged droplets in pH-sensitive emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Seiffert, Sebastian; Thiele, Julian; Abate, Adam R.; Weitz, David A.; Richtering, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Like charges stabilize emulsions, whereas opposite charges break emulsions. This is the fundamental principle for many industrial and practical processes. Using micrometer-sized pH-sensitive polymeric hydrogel particles as emulsion stabilizers, we prepare emulsions that consist of oppositely charged droplets, which do not coalesce. We observe noncoalescence of oppositely charged droplets in bulk emulsification as well as in microfluidic devices, where oppositely charged droplets are forced to collide within channel junctions. The results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions between droplets do not determine their stability and reveal the unique pH-dependent properties of emulsions stabilized by soft microgel particles. The noncoalescence can be switched to coalescence by neutralizing the microgels, and the emulsion can be broken on demand. This unusual feature of the microgel-stabilized emulsions offers fascinating opportunities for future applications of these systems. PMID:22203968

  4. The FASES instrument development and experiment preparation for the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picker, Gerold; Gollinger, Klaus; Greger, Ralf; Dettmann, Jan; Winter, Josef; Dewandre, Thierry; Castiglione, Luigi; Vincent-Bonnieu, Sebastien; Liggieri, Libero; Clausse, Daniele; Antoni, Mickael

    The FASES experiments target the investigation of the stability of emulsions. The main objec-tives are the study of the surfactant adsorption at the liquid / liquid interfaces, the interaction of the droplets as well as the behaviour of the liquid film between nearby drops. Particular focus is given to the dynamic droplet evolution during emulsion destabilisation. The results of the experiments shall support development of methods for the modelling of droplet size distri-butions, which are important to many industries using stable emulsions like food production, cosmetics and pharmaceutics or unstable emulsions as required for applications in waste water treatment or crude oil recovery. The development of the experimental instrumentation was initiated in 2002. The flight instru-ment hardware development was started in 2004 and finally the flight unit was completed in 2009. Currently the final flight preparation is proceeding targeting a launch to the International Space Station (ISS) with Progress 39P in September 2010. The experiment setup of the instrument is accommodated in a box type insert called Experiment Container (EC), which will be installed in the Fluid Science Laboratory part of the European Columbus module of the ISS. The EC is composed of two diagnostics instruments for the investigation of transparent and opaque liquid emulsion. The transparent emulsions will be subject to the experiment called "Investigations on drop/drop interactions in Transparent Emulsions" (ITEM). The opaque emulsion samples will be studied in the experiment called "Investigations on concentrated or opaque Emulsions and on Phase Inversions" (EMPI). The thermal conditioning unit (TCU) allows performing homogeneous thermalization, tem-perature sweeps, emulsion preparation by stirrer, and optical diagnostics with a scanning mi-croscope. The objective of the instrument is the 3D reconstruction of the emulsion droplet distribution in the liquid matrix in terms of the droplet sizes, location and their time depen-dent evolution. The TCU will be used for the stability experiment ITEM-S and the droplet freezing experiment ITEM-F. The Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) will give an information about the evolution of the emulsion through the droplet size distribution and the dispersion state of the droplets within the emulsion during a controlled temperature sweep by measuring the latent heat of droplet freezing and melting during the EMPI experiments. For this purpose the calorimeter is equipped with a reference sample filled with a pure liquid matrix and a similar measurement sample filled with the specific emulsion under investigation. The differential heat flux between measurement sample and reference sample is measured with a sensitive heat flux sensor. Each instrument is serviced by a robotic sample stowage system, which accommodates in total 44 different ITEM and EMPI emulsion samples each filled with a specific composition of the emulsion. Currently the flight preparation is ongoing with particular focus on the preparation of the emulsion flight sample set and the instrument's operating parameters. The FASES flight instrument was developed by ASTRIUM Space Transportation Germany with support of RUAG Aerospace Wallisellen under ESA / ESTEC contract. The science team of FASES is supported by ESA/ESTEC (Microgravity Application Programme, AO99-052).

  5. Control of the volumetric and viscosity ratios of iron-silicate emulsion on the core formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Sumita, I.

    2007-12-01

    In a vigorously convecting magma ocean, shearing motion would cause an iron-silicate emulsion to form. Iron or silicate droplets would eventually settle or rise to form the core and the mantle. Volumetric and viscosity ratios of the droplet to continuous phase can vary but how these control the phase separation process is not understood. Here we report on a series of experiments using an oil droplet in water or hydroxyethylcellulose solution (all Newtonian) to study how these ratios govern the gravitational phase separation process. First, we changed the volumetric fraction of oil. From tracking the boundary between the layer of solution and emulsion, we find that the initial phase separation rate depends strongly on oil fraction, and can be modelled by a buoyancy driven permeable flow using the Blake-Kozeny-Carman permeability formula. Next, we changed the droplet to continuous phase viscosity ratio (?) and find that there are two distinct regimes with different styles of phase separation. Cases with ? < 100 are characterized by a sharp lower boundary and a vertically homogeneous mixture layer. On the other hand, cases with ? > 100 are characterized by a diffuse lower boundary and a large vertical gradient of composition resulting from efficient droplet coalescence. As a result, polyhedral foam structure develops at the top of the mixture layer which is slow to rupture and to transform into a uniform oil layer. We interpret these differences to arise from a faster coalescence rate relative to the separation rate at large ?, where the droplet deformation which inhibits coalescence becomes very small. We simultaneously measured electrical resistivity in order to monitor the temporal change of the mean composition in the mixture layer and found that the measurements were consistent with the visual observation. To summarize, we find that the separation rate is controlled by the permeable flow velocity, whereas the vertical compositional structure within the emulsion layer is controlled by the viscosity ratio. If the above viscosity ratio criterion can be applied to silicate-iron emulsion, the case where iron percolates through silicate droplets (? >> 1) would yield a strongly stratified mantle, compared to the case where iron droplets sink (? << 1). Future separation experiment using iron-silicate emulsion is needed to confirm this. Sato, M. and Sumita, I., Experiments on gravitational phase separation of binary immiscible fluids, J. Fluid Mech., (in press)

  6. Nuclear research emulsion neutron spectrometry at the Little-Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C.

    1985-10-01

    Nuclear research emulsions (NRE) have been used to characterize the neutron spectrum emitted by the Little-Boy replica. NRE were irradiated at the Little-Boy surface as well as approximately 2 m from the center of the Little-Boy replica using polar angles of 0/sup 0/, 30/sup 0/, 60/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/. For the NRE exposed at 2 m, neutron background was determined using shadow shields of borated polyethylene. Emulsion scanning to date has concentrated exclusively on the 2-m, 0/sup 0/ and 2-m, 90/sup 0/ locations. Approximately 5000 proton-recoil tracks have been measured in NRE irradiated at each of these locations. Neutron spectra obtained from these NRE proton-recoil spectra are compared with both liquid scintillator neutron spectrometry and Monte Carlo calculations. NRE and liquid scintillator neutron spectra generally agree within experimental uncertainties at the 2-m, 90/sup 0/ location. However, at the 2-m, 0/sup 0/ location, the neutron spectra derived from these two independent experimental methods differ significantly. NRE spectra and Monte Carlo calculations exhibit general agreement with regard to both intensity as well as energy dependence. Better agreement is attained between theory and experiment at the 2-m, 90/sup 0/ location, where the neutron intensity is considerably higher. 14 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Comparative studies of salinomycin-loaded nanoparticles prepared by nanoprecipitation and single emulsion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Wu, Puyuan; Ren, Wei; Xin, Kai; Yang, Yang; Xie, Chen; Yang, Chenchen; Liu, Qin; Yu, Lixia; Jiang, Xiqun; Liu, Baorui; Li, Rutain; Wang, Lifeng

    2014-07-01

    To establish a satisfactory delivery system for the delivery of salinomycin (Sal), a novel, selective cancer stem cell inhibitor with prominent toxicity, gelatinase-responsive core-shell nanoparticles (NPs), were prepared by nanoprecipitation method (NR-NPs) and single emulsion method (SE-NPs). The gelatinase-responsive copolymer was prepared by carboxylation and double amination method. We studied the stability of NPs prepared by nanoprecipitation method with different proportions of F68 in aqueous phase to determine the best proportion used in our study. Then, the NPs were prepared by nanoprecipitation method with the best proportion of F68 and single emulsion method, and their physiochemical traits including morphology, particle size, zeta potential, drug loading content, stability, and in vitro release profiles were studied. The SE-NPs showed significant differences in particle size, drug loading content, stability, and in vitro release profiles compared to NR-NPs. The SE-NPs presented higher drug entrapment efficiency and superior stability than the NR-NPs. The drug release rate of SE-NPs was more sustainable than that of the NR-NPs, and in vivo experiment indicated that NPs could prominently reduce the toxicity of Sal. Our study demonstrates that the SE-NPs could be a satisfactory method for the preparation of gelatinase-responsive NPs for intelligent delivery of Sal.

  8. Experimental study of forces between quasi-two-dimensional emulsion droplets near jamming

    E-print Network

    Kenneth W. Desmond; Pearl J. Young; Dandan Chen; Eric R. Weeks

    2012-10-04

    We experimentally study the jamming of quasi-two-dimensional emulsions. Our experiments consist of oil-in-water emulsion droplets confined between two parallel plates. From the droplet outlines, we can determine the forces between every droplet pair to within 8% over a wide range of area fractions $\\phi$. We study three bidisperse samples that jam at area fractions $\\phi_c \\approx 0.86$. Our data show that for $\\phi > \\phi_c$, the contact numbers and pressure have power-law dependence on $\\phi-\\phi_c$ in agreement with the critical scaling found in numerical simulations. Furthermore, we see a link between the interparticle force law and the exponent for the pressure scaling, supporting prior computational observations. We also observe linear-like force chains (chains of large inter-droplet forces) that extend over 10 particle lengths, and examine the origin of their linearity. We find that the relative orientation of large force segments are random and that the tendency for force chains to be linear is not due to correlations in the direction of neighboring large forces, but instead occurs because the directions are biased towards being linear to balance the forces on each droplet.

  9. Lipid emulsions – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 6

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, M.; Heller, A. R.; Koch, T.; Koletzko, B.; Kreymann, K. G.; Krohn, K.; Pscheidl, E.; Senkal, M.

    2009-01-01

    The infusion of lipid emulsions allows a high energy supply, facilitates the prevention of high glucose infusion rates and is indispensable for the supply with essential fatty acids. The administration of lipid emulsions is recommended within ?7 days after starting PN (parenteral nutrition) to avoid deficiency of essential fatty acids. Low-fat PN with a high glucose intake increases the risk of hyperglycaemia. In parenterally fed patients with a tendency to hyperglycaemia, an increase in the lipid-glucose ratio should be considered. In critically ill patients the glucose infusion should not exceed 50% of energy intake. The use of lipid emulsions with a low phospholipid/triglyceride ratio is recommended and should be provided with the usual PN to prevent depletion of essential fatty acids, lower the risk of hyperglycaemia, and prevent hepatic steatosis. Biologically active vitamin E (?-tocopherol) should continuously be administered along with lipid emulsions to reduce lipid peroxidation. Parenteral lipids should provide about 25–40% of the parenteral non-protein energy supply. In certain situations (i.e. critically ill, respiratory insufficiency) a lipid intake of up to 50 or 60% of non-protein energy may be reasonable. The recommended daily dose for parenteral lipids in adults is 0.7–1.3 g triglycerides/kg body weight. Serum triglyceride concentrations should be monitored regularly with dosage reduction at levels >400 mg/dl (>4.6 mmol/l) and interruption of lipid infusion at levels >1000 mg/dl (>11.4 mmol/l). There is little evidence at this time that the choice of different available lipid emulsions affects clinical endpoints. PMID:20049078

  10. Upgrade of the ALICE Experiment: Letter Of Intent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; ALICE Collaboration; et al.

    2014-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-2019. These plans are presented in the ALICE Upgrade Letter of Intent, submitted to the LHCC (LHC experiments Committee) in September 2012. In order to fully exploit the physics reach of the LHC in this field, high-precision measurements of the heavy-flavour production, quarkonia, direct real and virtual photons, and jets are necessary. This will be achieved by an increase of the LHC Pb-Pb instant luminosity up to 6×1027 cm-2s-1 and running the ALICE detector with the continuous readout at the 50 kHz event rate. The physics performance accessible with the upgraded detector, together with the main detector modifications, are presented.

  11. Fast parallelized kalman filter based reconstruction of charged particle trajectories for the compressed baryonic matter experiment on a many-core server at the laboratory of information technologies, JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablyazimov, T. O.; Zyzak, M. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Kisel, P. I.

    2014-07-01

    The charged particle trajectory online reconstruction in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment (GSI, Germany) is an extremely difficult task. It is conditioned by a high rate of the ion beam-tar-get collisions (up to 107/s), high track multiplicity in each nucleus-nucleus collision (up to 1000 particles), and charged-particle trajectory registration with the coordinate detectors located in a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field. Such a problem could be solved only by using modern high-performance computers. This work scrutinizes a Kalman filter based track reconstruction algorithm implemented using different parallelization approaches. To perform the analysis, a many-core hybrid server with two Intel Xeon X5660 CPUs and a NVidia GTX 480 GPU (JINR LIT) was used.

  12. Hierarchical polymerized high internal phase emulsions synthesized from surfactant-stabilized emulsion templates.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ling L C; Villafranca, Pedro M Baiz; Menner, Angelika; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-05-21

    In building construction, structural elements, such as lattice girders, are positioned specifically to support the mainframe of a building. This arrangement provides additional structural hierarchy, facilitating the transfer of load to its foundation while keeping the building weight down. We applied the same concept when synthesizing hierarchical open-celled macroporous polymers from high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) templates stabilized by varying concentrations of a polymeric non-ionic surfactant from 0.75 to 20 w/vol %. These hierarchical poly(merized)HIPEs have multimodally distributed pores, which are efficiently arranged to enhance the load transfer mechanism in the polymer foam. As a result, hierarchical polyHIPEs produced from HIPEs stabilized by 5 vol % surfactant showed a 93% improvement in Young's moduli compared to conventional polyHIPEs produced from HIPEs stabilized by 20 vol % of surfactant with the same porosity of 84%. The finite element method (FEM) was used to determine the effect of pore hierarchy on the mechanical performance of porous polymers under small periodic compressions. Results from the FEM showed a clear improvement in Young's moduli for simulated hierarchical porous geometries. This methodology could be further adapted as a predictive tool to determine the influence of hierarchy on the mechanical properties of a range of porous materials. PMID:23617331

  13. Effect of the degree of substitution of octenyl succinic anhydride-banana starch on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, Luis A; Bello-Flores, Christopher A; Nuñez-Santiago, María del Carmen; Coronel-Aguilera, Claudia P; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2015-11-01

    Banana starch was esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) at different degree substitution (DS) and used to stabilize emulsions. Morphology, emulsion stability, emulsification index, rheological properties and particle size distribution of the emulsions were tested. Emulsions dyed with Solvent Red 26 showed affinity for the oil phase. Backscattering light showed three regions in the emulsion where the emulsified region was present. Starch concentration had higher effect in the emulsification index (EI) than the DS used in the study because similar values were found with OSA-banana and native starches. However, OSA-banana presented greater stability of the emulsified region. Rheological tests in emulsions with OSA-banana showed G'>G" values and low dependence of G' with the frequency, indicating a dominant elastic response to shear. When emulsions were prepared under high-pressure conditions, the emulsions with OSA-banana starch with different DS showed a bimodal distribution of particle size. The emulsion with OSA-banana starch and the low DS showed similar mean droplet diameter than its native counterpart. In contrast, the highest DS led to the highest mean droplet diameter. It is concluded that OSA-banana starch with DS can be used to stabilize specific emulsion types. PMID:26256319

  14. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro gastrointestinal digestibility of oil-in-water emulsion-agar gels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Neves, Marcos A; Kobayashi, Isao; Uemura, Kunihiko; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2013-01-01

    Soybean oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion-agar gel samples were prepared and their digestibility evaluated by using an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion model. Emulsion-agar sols were obtained by mixing the prepared O/W emulsions with a 1.5 wt % agar solution at 60 °C, and their subsequent cooling at 5 °C for 1 h formed emulsion-agar gels. Their gel strength values increased with increasing degree of polymerization of the emulsifiers, and the relative gel strength increased in the case of droplets with an average diameter smaller than 700 nm. Flocculation and coalescence of the released emulsion droplets depended strongly on the emulsifier type; however, the emulsifier type hardly affected the ?-potential of emulsion droplets released from the emulsion-agar gels during in vitro digestion. The total FFA content released from each emulsion towards the end of the digestion period was nearly twice that released from the emulsion-agar gel, indicating that gelation of the O/W emulsion may have delayed lipid hydrolysis. PMID:23470750

  15. Lipid emulsion rapidly restores contractility in stunned mouse cardiomyocytes: A comparison with therapeutic hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Fettiplace, Michael; Sy-Jou, Chen; Steinhorn, Benjamin; Shao, Zuohui; Zhu, Xiangdong; Li, Changqing; Harty, Shaun; Weinberg, Guy; Vanden Hoek, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cooling following cardiac arrest can improve survival significantly. However, delays in achieving target temperature may decrease the overall benefits of cooling. Here we test whether lipid emulsion, a clinically approved drug reported to exert cardioprotection, can rescue heart contractility in the setting of delayed cooling in stunned mouse cardiomyocytes. Design Cell culture study Setting Academic research laboratory Subjects Cardiomyocytes isolated from 1–2-day old C57BL6 mice Interventions Cardiomyocytes were exposed to 30 minutes of ischemia followed by 90 minutes reperfusion and 10 minutes isoproterenol with nine interventions: 1) no additional treatment; 2) intra-ischemic cooling at 32°C initiated 10 min prior to reperfusion; 3) delayed cooling started 20 minutes after reperfusion; 4) lipid emulsion + delayed cooling; 5) lipid emulsion (0.25%) administered at reperfusion; 6) lipid emulsion + intra-ischemic cooling; 7) delayed lipid emulsion; 8) lipid emulsion + delayed cooling + Akt inhibitor (API-2, 10 ?M) and 9) lipid emulsion + delayed cooling + Erk inhibitor (U0126, 10 ?M). Inhibitors were given to cells 1 h prior to ischemia. Measurements and Main Results Contractility was recorded by real-time phase-contrast imaging and analyzed with pulse image velocimetry in MATLAB. Ischemia diminished cell contraction. The cardioprotective effect of cooling was diminished when delayed but was rescued by lipid emulsion. Further, lipid emulsion on its own improved recovery of the contractility to an equal extent as intra-ischemic cooling. However, co-treatment of lipid emulsion and intra-ischemic cooling did not further improve the recovery compared to either treatment alone. Moreover, Akt and Erk inhibitors blocked lipid emulsion-induced protection. Conclusion Lipid emulsion improved contractility and rescued contractility in the context of delayed cooling. This protective effect required Akt and Erk signaling. Lipid emulsion might serve as a treatment or adjunct to cooling in ameliorating myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:25402294

  16. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Fine Particles for Ocean and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan

    2006-07-08

    This semi-annual progress report includes our latest research on deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) emulsions stabilized by pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}). We describe a practical system that could be employed for the release of a dense C/W emulsion. The heart of the system is a Kenics-type static mixer. The testing and evaluation of a static mixer in the NETL High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility was described in the previous semi-annual report. The release system could be deployed from a floating platform over the open ocean, or at the end of an off-shore pipe laying on the continental slope. Because the emulsion is much denser than ambient seawater, modeling shows that upon release the plume will sink much deeper from the injection point, increasing the sequestration time for CO{sub 2}. When released in the open ocean, a plume containing the output of a 500 MW{sub el} coal-fired power plant will typically sink hundreds of meters below the injection point. When released from a pipe on the continental shelf, the plume will sink about twice as much because of the limited entrainment of ambient seawater when the plume flows along the sloping seabed. Furthermore, the plume is slightly alkaline, not acidic. The disadvantage is that the creation of the emulsion requires significant amounts of pulverized limestone, on the order of 0.5-0.75 weight ratio of limestone to CO{sub 2}. While pulverized limestone with particle size appropriate for creating C/W emulsions can be purchased for $38 per ton, it is shown in this report that it may be more economic to purchase raw limestone from quarries and pulverize it in situ using grinding mills. In this case the major cost elements are the capital and operating costs of the grinding mills, resulting in a total cost of about $11 per ton of pulverized limestone, including the cost of raw material and shipping. Because we need approximately 0.75 ton of pulverized limestone per ton of liquid CO2 to create a stable C/W emulsion, the total cost of preparing the emulsion on site is about $8.5 per ton of liquid CO{sub 2}, not including the cost of the emulsion mixer. Currently, the cost estimates of capturing and liquefying CO{sub 2} at a coal-fired power plant range from $15 to 75/t CO{sub 2}. Thus, the preparation of C/W emulsions stabilized by pulverized limestone particles would add about 10 to 50% to the capture cost of CO{sub 2}. At this juncture the primary research objectives of this Co-operative Agreement are shifting toward geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. Experiments are underway to create micro-emulsions of CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) and Water-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) stabilized by ultrafine particles ranging from sub-micrometer to a few micrometer in size. Such microemulsions are expected to readily penetrate deep geologic formations, such as porous sedimentary layers, including saline aquifers and semi-depleted oil and gas fields. Injections of (C/W) and (W/C) type micro-emulsions may prove to be less prone to leakage from the formations compared to injections of neat liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2}.

  17. A Novel Submicron Emulsion System Loaded with Doxorubicin Overcome Multi-Drug Resistance in MCF-7/ADR Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W. P.; Hua, H. Y.; Sun, P. C.; Zhao, Y. X.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop the Solutol HS15-based doxorubicin submicron emulsion with good stability and overcoming multi-drug resistance. In this study, we prepared doxorubicin submicron emulsion, and examined the stability after autoclaving, the in vitro cytotoxic activity, the intracellular accumulation and apoptpsis of doxorubicin submicron emulsion in MCF-7/ADR cells. The physicochemical properties of doxorubicin submicron emulsion were not significantly affected after autoclaving. The doxorubicin submicron emulsion significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin submicron emulsion and enhanced cytotoxic activity and apoptotic effects of doxorubicin. These results may be correlated to doxorubicin submicron emulsion inhibitory effects on efflux pumps through the progressive release of intracellular free Solutol HS15 from doxorubicin submicron emulsion. Furthermore, these in vitro results suggest that the Solutol HS15-based submicron emulsion may be a potentially useful drug delivery system to circumvent multi-drug resistance of tumor cells.

  18. Amphoteric water-in-oil self-inverting polymer emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Lipowski, S. A.

    1985-11-12

    An amphoteric water-in-oil self-inverting polymer emulsion is prepared which contains a copolymer of a nonionic vinyl monomer and an amphoteric vinyl monomer or a terpolymer of a nonionic vinyl monomer, an anionic vinyl monomer and a cationic vinyl monomer in the aqueous phase, a hydrocarbon oil for the oil phase, a water-in-oil emulsifying agent and an inverting surfactant. An example of a copolymer is a copolymer of a nonionic vinyl monomer such as acrylamide or methacrylamide and an amphoteric vinyl monomer such as a reaction product of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and monochloracetic acid. An example of a terpolymer is a terpolymer of a nonionic vinyl monomer such as acrylamide or methacrylamide, an anionic vinyl monomer such as sodium acrylate and a cationic vinyl monomer such as triethyl ammonium ethyl methacrylate methosulfate salt. The emulsion is useful in papermaking, treatment of sewage and industrial wastes, drilling muds and secondary and tertiary recovery of petroleum by water flooding.

  19. Lateral distortions of electromagnetic cascades in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, L. G.; Levit, L. B.; Jones, W. V.; Huggett, R. W.; Barrowes, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    Electromagnetic cascades in a lead-emulsion chamber have been studied to determine the effect of air gaps on the upstream sides of the emulsions. Such air gaps cause a change in the form of the radial distribution of electron tracks, making cascades appear older and giving incorrect energy estimates. The number of tracks remaining within a radius r was found to vary as exp(-g/G), where g is the gap thickness. The characteristic gap thickness in mm is G = 3.04 + 1.30 ln (Err per GeV per sq mm) where E is the energy of the initiating gamma ray. Use of this relation provides a significant correction to cascade-energy estimates and allows one to calculate the effect of different gap thicknesses on the energy threshold for visual detection of cascades.

  20. Poly(isobutylene) nanoparticles via cationic polymerization in nonaqueous emulsions.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Thomas; Golling, Florian E; Krumpfer, Joseph W; Wagner, Manfred; Graf, Robert; Alsaygh, Abdulhamid A; Klapper, Markus; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of poly(isobutylene) (PIB) nanoparticles via cationic emulsion polymerization is presented. As a requirement, an oil-in-perfluoroalkane nonaqueous emulsion is developed, which is inert under the carbocationic polymerization conditions. To stabilize the dichloromethane/hexane droplets in the fluorinated, continuous phase, an amphiphilic block copolymer emulsifier is prepared containing PIB and 1H,1H-perfluoroalkylated poly(pentafluorostyrene) blocks. This system allows for the polymerization of isobutylene with number-average molecular weights (Mn) up to 27,000 g mol(-1). The particle morphologies are characterized via dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. For Mn > 20,000 g mol(-1), the particles exhibit shape-persistence at room temperature and are ?100 nm in diameter. PMID:25250857