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Sample records for emulsion experiment nucleus-nucleus

  1. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  2. Observation of direct hadronic pairs in nucleus-nucleus collisions in JACEE emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of high energy ( or = 1 TeV/amu) nucleus-nucleus collisions observed in Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) emulsion chambers, nonrandom spatial association of produced charged particles, mostly hadronic pairs, are observed. Similar narrow pairs are observed in about 100 events at much low energy (20 to 60 GeV/amu). Analysis shows that 30 to 50% of Pair abundances are understood by the Hambury-Brown-Twiss effect, and the remainder seems to require other explanations.

  3. Results on ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions from balloon-borne emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W.; Meegan, C. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of balloon-borne emulsion-chamber measurements on high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei (Burnett et al., 1983) are summarized in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Special consideration is given to seven nucleus-nucleus interaction events at energy in excess of 1 TeV/A with multiplicity greater than 400, and to Fe interactions (53 with CHO, 10 with emulsion, and 14 with Pb) at 20-60 GeV/A.

  4. Fluctuation analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed for identifying enhanced fluctuations in the angular distributions of secondary particles produced from relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The method is applied under the assumption that the masses of the produced particles are small compared to their linear momenta. The importance of particles rests in the fact that enhanced fluctuations in the rapidity distributions is considered to be an experimental signal for the creation of the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP), a state of nuclear matter predicted from the quantum chromodynamics theory (QCD). In the approach, Monte Carlo simulations are employed that make use of a portable random member generator that allow the calculations to be performed on a desk-top computer. The method is illustrated with data taken from high altitude emulsion exposures and is immediately applicable to similar data from accelerator-based emulsion exposures.

  5. Large area emulsion chamber experiments for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Emulsion-chamber experiments employing nuclear-track emulsions, etchable plastic detectors, metal plates, and X-ray films continue to demonstrate high productivity and potential in the study of cosmic-ray primaries and their interactions. Emulsions, with unsurpassed track-recording capability, provide an appropriate medium for the study of nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy, which will likely produce observations of a phase change in nuclear matter. The many advantages of emulsion chambers (excellent multitrack recording capability, large geometry factor, low apparatus cost, simplicity of design and construction) are complemented by the major advantages of the Space Shuttle as an experiment carrier. A Shuttle experiment which could make a significant advance in both cosmic-ray primary and nucleus-nucleus interaction studies is described. Such an experiment would serve as a guide for use of emulsions during the Space Station era. Some practical factors that must be considered in planning a Shuttle exposure of emulsion chambers are discussed.

  6. Nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies: The CERN WA80 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.; Albrecht, R.; Awes, T.C.; Baktash, C.; Beckmann, P.; Berger, F.; Bock, R.; Claesson, G.; Dragon, L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    QCD lattice calculations predict that, at sufficiently high energy densities, hadronic matter undergoes a transition to a new phase of matter, the quark-gluon plasma, in which quarks and gluons are deconfined over a relatively large volume. It has been suggested that collisions between heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies may produce the energy densities, estimated to be greater than 2 to 3 GeV/fm/sup 3/, necessary for this phase transition to occur. An important goal of the first experiments with ultrarelativistic heavy-ion beams at the SPS accelerator at CERN is to investigate the extent to which this suggestion is correct. The primary experimental quantity used for estimating the energy density is the transverse energy, E/sub T/. We present here energies measured at zero degrees, together with transverse energy measurements. Estimates of attained energy densities and preliminary transverse momentum distributions of neutral products are also presented. 24 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Multifractal analysis of nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, K.; Cherry, M.L.; Jones, W.V.; Wefel, J.P. ); Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Olszewski, A.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K. ); Freier, P.S.; Waddington, C.J. )

    1993-10-01

    We have performed a multifractal ([ital G]-moment) analysis of 14.6--200 GeV/nucleon nucleus-nucleus and 200--800 GeV proton-nucleus interactions from KLM and Fermilab E-90 and E-508 emulsion data, including explicit corrections for the finite statistical sample. The corrected slopes of the [ital G] moments for protons, [sup 16]O, [sup 28]Si, and [sup 32]S nuclei show only slight evidence for departures from random behavior, while the normalized entropies appear to show a more consistent departure from randomness, particularly for protons. Given the size of the uncertainties, the results of the fractal analysis are not consistent either with results of intermittency analyses for nucleus-nucleus collisions or with the nonrandom behavior previously reported for leptonic and hadronic collisions. However, because of the effects of statistical noise, the fractal analysis is not as sensitive as the intermittency analysis for detecting nonrandom fluctuations.

  8. Two Neutron Removal in Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for double neutron removal via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work examines the cause of these discrepancies and systematically investigates whether the problem might be due to electromagnetic theory, nuclear contributions, or an underestimate of experimental error. Using cross section systematics from other reactions it is found that the discrepancies can be resolved in a plausible manner.

  9. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A. Sarkar, S.; Singh, G.

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  10. Nucleus-nucleus interaction between boosted nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Long Wenhui; Bertulani, Carlos A.

    2011-02-15

    The nucleus-nucleus interaction potential has been studied within the relativistic mean field theory. The systematics of the relativistic effects have been investigated by analyzing the relation between the potential and the bombarding energy as a function of the impact parameter. It is shown that the potential barriers are noticeably sensitive to the bombarding energy for a given impact parameter. At large bombarding energies, the slope at the potential edge decreases with the impact parameter. Comparisons with a nonrelativistic treatment shows that relativistic effects cannot be ignored at bombarding energies around and larger than 100 MeV/nucleon.

  11. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  12. Nucleus-nucleus interactions between 20 and 65 GeV per nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Roberts, F. E.; Watts, J. W.; Oda, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Jones, W. V.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid electronic-counter/emulsion-chamber instrument was exposed to high-energy cosmic rays on a balloon. The data on 105 nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 20-65 GeV/nucleon and for incident nuclear charges Zp in the range of 22 to 28 are presented. Inclusive characteristics of particle production on different targets (plastic, emulsion, and lead) are shown and compared with models based on the superposition of nucleon-nucleus interactions. Features of a subset of the more central collisions with a plastic target and some characteristics of individual events with the highest multiplicity of produced particles are described.

  13. Transverse Energy in nucleus-nucleus collisions: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Tincknell, M.

    1988-11-15

    The status of Transverse Energy (E/sub T/) in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS is reviewed. The definition of E/sub T/ and its physical significance are discussed. The basic techniques and limitations of the experimental measurements are presented. The acceptances of the major experiments to be discussed are shown, along with remarks about their idiosyncrasies. The data demonstrate that the nuclear geometry of colliding spheres primarily determines the shapes of the observed spectra. Careful account of the acceptances is crucial to comparing and interpreting results. It is concluded that nuclear stopping power is high, and that the amount of energy deposited into the interaction volume is increasing with beam energy even at SPS energies. The energy densities believed to be obtained at the SPS are close to the critical values predicted for the onset of a quark-gluon plasma. 25 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Single nucleon emission in relativistic nucleus-nucleus reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for nucleon emission via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work investigates the hypothesis that these discrepancies have arisen due to uncertainties about how to deduce the experimental electromagnetic cross section from the total measured cross section. An optical-model calculation of single neutron removal is added to electromagnetic cross sections and compared to the total experimental cross sections. Good agreement is found thereby resolving some of the earlier noted discrepancies. A detailed comparison to the recent work of Benesh, Cook, and Vary is made for both the impact parameter and the nuclear cross section. Good agreement is obtained giving an independent confirmation of the parameterized formulas developed by those authors.

  15. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  16. Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  18. Source size determination in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, J.L.; Kumar, B.S.; Bennett, M.J.; Diebold, G.E.; Pope, J.K. ); Sorge, H.; Sullivan, J.P. )

    1994-08-29

    We describe a technique whereby the freeze-out interaction volumes of nucleus-nucleus collisions are extracted from a cascade (plus coalescence) model, after comparison to measured abundances of light nuclei. We conclude that the interaction volume undergoes significant expansion before light nuclei are produced.

  19. Electric quadrupole excitations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations are presented for electric quadrupole excitations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results are compared to an extensive data set and it is found that electric quadrupole effects provide substantial corrections to cross sections, especially for heavier nuclei.

  20. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  1. The emulsion chamber technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Photographic emulsion has the unique property of recording tracks of ionizing particles with a spatial precision of 1 micron, while also being capable of deployment over detector areas of square meters or 10's of square meters. Detectors are passive, their cost to fly in Space is a fraction of that of instruments of similar collecting. A major problem in their continued use has been the labor intensiveness of data retrieval by traditional microscope methods. Two factors changing the acceptability of emulsion technology in space are the astronomical costs of flying large electronic instruments such as ionization calorimeters in Space, and the power and low cost of computers, a small revolution in the laboratory microscope data-taking. Our group at UAH made measurements of the high energy composition and spectra of cosmic rays. The Marshall group has also specialized in space radiation dosimetry. Ionization calorimeters, using alternating layers of lead and photographic emulsion, to measure particle energies up to 10(exp 15) eV were developed. Ten balloon flights were performed with them. No such calorimeters have ever flown in orbit. In the ECT program, a small emulsion chamber was developed and will be flown on the Shuttle mission OAST-2 to resolve the principal technological questions concerning space exposures. These include assessments of: (1) pre-flight and orbital exposure to background radiation, including both self-shielding and secondary particle generation; the practical limit to exposure time in space can then be determined; (2) dynamics of stack to optimize design for launch and weightlessness; and (3) thermal and vacuum constraints on emulsion performance. All these effects are cumulative and affect our ability to perform scientific measurements but cannot be adequately predicted by available methods.

  2. Nucleon emission via electromagnetic excitation in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Re-analysis of the Weizsacker-Williams method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous analyses of the comparison of Weizsacker-Williams (WW) theory to experiment for nucleon emission via electromagnetic (EM) excitations in nucleus-nucleus collisions were not definitive because of different assumptions concerning the value of the minimum impact parameter. This situation is corrected by providing criteria that allows definitive statements to be made concerning agreement or disagreement between WW theory and experiment.

  3. Experiment S009: Nuclear Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, F. W.; Shapiro, M. M.; Silberberg, R.; Stiller, B.; Tsao, C. H.; Durgaprasad, N.; Fichtel, C. E.; Guss, D. E.; Reames, D. V.

    1971-01-01

    The first exposure on a spacecraft of a nuclear emulsion apparatus designed to collect 1000 high quality tracks of heavy nuclei under a negligible thickness of matter (0.07 g/sq cm) is described. The cosmic ray detector consisted of a stack of nuclear emulsions that were designed to register at least 400 heavy nuclei tracks for each 10 hours of useful exposure. The spacecraft had to be oriented in a heads-up attitude during the 10-hour period to eliminate atmospheric albedo particles. The results are as follows: (1) a definite odd-even effect, with low abundances for elements of atomic number 7, 9, and 11; (2) a ratio O/C approximately 0.9; (3) Ne/C, Mg/C, and Si/C ratios between 0.2 and 0.3; (4) an abundance gap in the region 15 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 19; and (5) a ratio (20 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28)/C 0.2, with a large concentration at Z = 26. These results are indicative that successful exposures of nuclear emulsions were obtained on the Gemini 11 mission.

  4. Ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Odyniec, G.

    1989-10-01

    The aim of the NA-35 experiment is to study nuclear matter under extreme conditions. Evidence that conditions reached in 60 GeV/N and 200 GeV/N relativistic heavy ion collisions are adequate for the formation of a quark-gluon plasma where color would no longer be confined to hadronic dimensions is presented. Future plans for experiments in 1990--1991 with {sup 32}S beams and 1993 and up with Pb beams at the SPS are discussed. 26 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Nuclear Emulsion - Skylab Experiment S009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph shows Skylab's Nuclear Emulsion experiment, a Skylab science facility that was mounted inside the Multiple Docking Adapter used to record the relative abundance of primary, high-energy heavy nuclei outside the Earth's atmosphere. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  6. Nonlocal Description of the Nucleus-Nucleus Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chamon, L.C.; Pereira, D.; Hussein, M.S.; Candido Ribeiro, M.A.; Galetti, D.

    1997-12-01

    A parameter-free nonlocal double-folding-inspired interaction is proposed for the nucleus-nucleus systems. Excellent reproductions of elastic scattering differential cross section data were obtained for several systems over a wide range of bombarding energies. Our results should be of value in the description of the scattering of other many-body systems. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Emulsion chamber experiments for the Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, R. J.

    Emulsion chambers offer several unique features for the study of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray interactions and spectra aboard a permanent manned Space Station. Emulsion-chamber experiments provide the highest acceptance/weight ratio of any current experimental technique, are invulnerable to mechanical shocks and temperature excursions associated with space flight, do not employ volatile or explosive components or materials, and are not dependent upon data communications or recording systems. Space-Station personnel would be employed to replace track-sensitive materials as required by background accumulation. Several emulsion-chamber designs are proposed, including both conventional passive calorimetric detectors and a hybrid superconducting-magnetic-spectrometer system. Results of preliminary simulation studies are presented. Operational logistics are discussed.

  8. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN: Signatures, physical observables and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions have become available with the recent experiments at CERN utilizing 200 GeV/n oxygen and sulfur beams. Physics motivations for these experiments are presented: a description of predicted signatures for possible formation of a quark-gluon plasma and physical observables that are expected to provide important information for understanding the dynamics of these collisions. A presentation will be made of some of the first experimental results to emerge from this new field. 28 refs., 9 figs.

  9. TWO-PHOTON PHYSICS IN NUCLEUS-NUCLEUS COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NYSTRAND,J.

    1998-09-10

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ions carry strong electromagnetic and nuclear fields. Interactions between these fields in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions can probe many interesting physics topics. This presentation will focus on coherent two-photon and photonuclear processes at RHIC. The rates for these interactions will be high. The coherent coupling of all the protons in the nucleus enhances the equivalent photon flux by a factor Z{sup 2} up to an energy of {approx} 3 GeV. The plans for studying coherent interactions with the STAR experiment will be discussed. Experimental techniques for separating signal from background will be presented.

  10. OPERA experiment and its releted emulsion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ariga, Akitaka

    2008-02-21

    The OPERA experiment is designed to clarify neutrino oscillation by detecting appearance of {nu}{sub {tau}} in pure {nu}{sub {mu}} beam through a long baseline method (CNGS beam from cern to the Gran Sasso laboratory). The key technique is the use of emulsion films and their scanning. We developed a new high speed scanning system with speed of 50 cm{sup 2}/h and it was successfully demonstrated in 2006 CNGS commissioning. The new scanning system is not only meant for the OPERA experiment, but it has large potential of applications. For example, measurement of {nu}{sub e} with strong separation power against {pi}{sup 0}. Or a compact emulsion spectrometer for future neutrino experiments.

  11. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-01

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  12. Study of multiplicity correlations in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohery, M.; Sultan, E. M.; Baz, Shadiah S.

    2015-06-01

    In the present paper, some results on the correlations of the nucleus-nucleus interactions, at high energy, between different particle multiplicities are reported. The correlations between the multiplicities of the different charged particles emitted in the interactions of 22Ne and 28Si nuclei with emulsion at (4.1-4.5)A GeV/c have been studied. The correlations of the compound multiplicity nc, defined as the sum of both numbers of the shower particles ns and grey particles ng, have been investigated. The experimental data have been compared with the corresponding theoretical ones, calculated according to the modified cascade evaporation model (MCEM). An agreement has already been fairly obtained between the experimental values and the calculated ones. The dependence of the average compound multiplicity, on the numbers of shower, grey, black and heavy particles is obvious and the values of the slope have been found to be independent of the projectile nucleus. On the other hand, the variation of the average shower, grey, black and heavy particles is found to increase linearly with the compound particles. A strong correlation has been observed between the number of produced shower particles and the number of compound particles. Moreover, the value of the average compound multiplicity is found to increase with the increase of the projectile mass. Finally, an attempt has also been made to study the scaling of the compound multiplicity distribution showing that the compound multiplicity distribution is nearly consistent with the KNO scaling behavior.

  13. Higgs and Particle Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe

    We apply a diagrammatic approach to study Higgs boson, a color-neutral heavy particle, pro- duction in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the saturation framework without quantum evolution. We assume the strong coupling constant much smaller than one. Due to the heavy mass and colorless nature of Higgs particle, final state interactions are absent in our calculation. In order to treat the two nuclei dynamically symmetric, we use the Coulomb gauge which gives the appropriate light cone gauge for each nucleus. To further eliminate initial state interactions we choose specific prescriptions in the light cone propagators. We start the calculation from only two nucleons in each nucleus and then demonstrate how to generalize the calculation to higher orders diagrammatically. We simplify the diagrams by the Slavnov-Taylor-Ward identities. The resulting cross section is factorized into a product of two Weizsacker-Williams gluon distributions of the two nuclei when the transverse momentum of the produced scalar particle is around the saturation momentum. To our knowledge this is the first process where an exact analytic formula has been formed for a physical process, involving momenta on the order of the saturation momentum, in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the quasi-classical approximation. Since we have performed the calculation in an unconventional gauge choice, we further confirm our results in Feynman gauge where the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution is interpreted as a transverse momentum broadening of a hard gluons traversing a nuclear medium. The transverse momentum factorization manifests itself in light cone gauge but not so clearly in Feynman gauge. In saturation physics there are two different unintegrated gluon distributions usually encountered in the literature: the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution and the dipole gluon distribution. The first gluon distribution is constructed by solving classical Yang-Mills equation of motion in the McLerran-Venugopalan model, while the second gluon distribution is related to the dipole scattering amplitude. So far, the quantum structure of the dipole gluon distribution has not been thoroughly investigated. Applying the same diagrammatic techniques, we carry out a detail study of the quantum structure of the color dipole gluon distribution, and then compare it with that of the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution.

  14. Fluctuations of the K/{pi} ratio in nucleus-nucleus collisions: Statistical and transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Gorenstein, M. I.; Hauer, M.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2009-02-15

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the kaon to pion number ratio in nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied within the statistical hadron-resonance gas model (SM) for different statistical ensembles and in the hadron-string-dynamics (HSD) transport approach. We find that the HSD model can qualitatively reproduce the measured excitation function for the K/{pi} ratio fluctuations in central Au+Au (or Pb+Pb) collisions from low Super Proton Synchrotron up to top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies. Substantial differences in the HSD and SM results are found for the fluctuations and correlations of the kaon and pion numbers. These predictions impose a challenge for future experiments.

  15. Rheology and microstructure of magmatic emulsions - Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Daniel J.; Spera, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The rheological properties of a dilute mixture of melt plus vapor bubbles, referred to as emulsion, are investigated theoretically and in rheometric experiments on dilute viscous germanium dioxide emulsions at temperatures between 1100 and 1175 C and at 100 kPa pressure in a rotating rod rheometer at shear rates between 0.05/s and 7/s. The results indicate that the emulsions may be described by a power-law constitutive relation when observations cover a sufficient range of shear rates to resolve nonlinear flow.

  16. Nucleus-nucleus interaction above several hundred GeV/n

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) have been investigating high energy nuclear interactions of cosmic ray nuclei by means of balloon-borne emulsion chamber. Current exposure parameters are listed. Analysis of the last two experiments (JACEE4 and JACEE5) are still in progress. A result of semi-inclusive analysis of a sample set of central collision events is presented here, concerning multiplicity, rapidity fluctuation for extremely high multiplicity events and correlation between transverse momentum and estimated energy density.

  17. (Nucleus-nucleus collisions): Foreign trip report, June 5--11, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1988-06-30

    The traveler attended the Third International Conference on Nucleus- Nucleus Collisions in St. Malo, France. The conference was attended by 450 physicists and provided a good review of the status of heavy-ion research from low to ultrarelativistic energies. The traveler was the convenor of the ''Round Table Discussion'' held during the closing session of the conference. The traveler proposed that the Fourth International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions be held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, in 1991. The present and voting members of the International Advisory Committee and of the National Organizing Committee deadlocked 10-10 between the traveler's proposal and a Japanese proposal.

  18. Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment /JACEE/. [high energy cosmic ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggett, R. W.; Hunter, S. D.; Jones, W. V.; Takahashi, Y.; Ogata, T.; Saito, T.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Wolter, W.; Parnell, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    The instrumentation and results of long duration balloon flights carried out jointly by U.S. and Japan researchers to examine high energy cosmic rays are reported. Basic detector geometries are 2.5 sq m sr with operation at altitudes with 3-4 g/sq cm pressure, with observations thus far of over 100 hr. Energies from 2-100 TeV are recorded for nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus interactions, and searches are made for new particle or interactions. The detector is an emulsion chamber which comprises doubly-coated nuclear emulsions on 800 micron thick methacryl substrates, X-ray films, etchable detectors, low density spacers, and lead sheets. Segmentation of the instrument into a primary charge module, a target section, a spacer section, and a lead-emulsion calorimeter allows accurate charge measurement for primary nuclei, reliable energy resolution, and a large geometrical factor for collecting high energy events. A primary Ca nucleus of 300 TeV has been observed.

  19. Pseudorapidity distributions of relativistic singly charged particles in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu-hu, Liu

    1998-05-01

    The pseudorapidity distributions of relativistic singly charged particles produced in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions are described by the thermalized cylinder picture. The calculated results are in agreement with the recent experimental data of gold induced interactions at the Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  20. Computer program for parameterization of nucleus-nucleus electromagnetic dissociation cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Badavi, Forooz F.

    1988-01-01

    A computer subroutine parameterization of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented that is suitable for implementation in a heavy ion transport code. The only inputs required are the projectile kinetic energy and the projectile and target charge and mass numbers.

  1. Development of new-type nuclear emulsion for a balloon-borne emulsion gamma-ray telescope experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, K.; Aoki, S.; Kamada, K.; Kosaka, T.; Mizutani, F.; Shibayama, E.; Takahashi, S.; Tateishi, Y.; Tawa, S.; Yamada, K.; Kawahara, H.; Otsuka, N.; Rokujo, H.

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a new-type of nuclear emulsion that improves the track-finding efficiency of charged particle detection. The emulsion is applied to the GRAINE project, a balloon-borne experiment that observes cosmic γ-rays through an emulsion γ-ray telescope. The new emulsion film dramatically improves the detection efficiency for γ-rays. The nuclear emulsion gel and films for the second GRAINE balloon-borne experiment (GRAINE-2015) were fully self-produced by ourselves. New handling methods for the novel emulsion film have also been developed. Over time, the stored films gradually become desensitized to minimum ionizing particles, but the original sensitivity can be restored by a resetting process. Moreover, the fading of latent images can be arrested by a drying process. To sensitize the new-type films and avoid their fading, emulsion preprocessing was applied immediately prior to GRAINE-2015. A balloon flight with the emulsion γ-ray telescope was successfully completed in Australia on 12th May 2015. By scanning with automated optical microscopes and analyzing the penetrated tracks, we confirmed the high track-finding efficiency (97%) of the mounted films. The analysis of γ-ray event detection, aims at detecting Vela pulsar, is in progress.

  2. Calorimetry applied to nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1988-01-01

    A general introduction to high-energy calorimetry is presented, together with brief descriptions of the two types of cascades relevant to calorimetric measurements. This is followed by a discussion of ''compensation'' and of the ''e/h'' ratio. A detailed description of two calorimeters designed and constructed for the CERN WA80 experiment are also given. 16 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of Nuclear Science and Technologies 6. Nuclear Reactions and Structure of Unstable Nuclei 7. Equation of State of Neutron-Rich Nuclear Matter, Clusters in Nuclei and Nuclear Reactions 8. Fusion and Fission 9. Nuclear Astrophysics 10. New Facilities and Detectors We would like to thank Texas A&M University and Texas A&M University-Commerce for their organizational support and for providing financial support for many students and postdocs and those who had special need. This support helped assure the success of NN2012. Special thanks also go to all members of the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee (listed below) for their great work in advising upon, preparing and executing the NN2012 scientific program as well as the social events that all together made the NN2012 an enjoyable experience for both the participants and their companions. NN2012 International Advisory Committee N Auerbach (Israel) J Aysto (Finland) C Beck (France) S Cherubini (Italy) L Ferreira (Portugal) C Gagliardi (USA) S Gales (France) C Gale (Canada) W Gelletly (Great Britain) Paulo R S Gomes (Brazil) W Greiner (Germany) W Henning (USA) D Hinde (Australia) S Hofmann (Germany) M Hussein (Brazil) B Jacak (USA) S Kailas (India) W G Lynch (USA) Z Majka (Poland) L McLerran (USA) V Metag (Germany) K Morita (Japan) B Mueller (USA) D G Mueller (France) T Motobayashi (Japan) W Nazarewicz (USA) Y Oganessian (Russia) J Nolen (USA) E K Rehm (USA) N Rowley (France) B Sherrill (USA) J Schukraft (Switzerland) W Q Shen (China) A Stefanini (Italy) H Stoecker (Germany) A Szanto de Toledo (Brazil) U van Kolck (USA) W von Oertzen (Germany) M Wiescher (USA) N Xu (USA) N V Zamfir (Romania) W L Zhan (China) H Q Zhang (China) NN2012 Local Organizing Committee Marina Barbui Carlos Bertulani Robert Burch Jr Cheri Davis Cody Folden Kris Hagel John Hardy Bao-An Li (Co-Chair and Scientific Secretary) Joseph Natowitz (Co-Chair) Ralf Rapp Livius Trache Sherry Yennello Editors of NN2012 Proceedings Bao-An Li (Texas A&M University-Commerce) and Joseph Natowitz (Texas A&M University) 7 January 2013, Texas, USA

  4. Momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Ferdous; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    An optical model description, based on multiple scattering theory, of longitudinal momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The crucial role of the imaginary component of the nucleon-nucleon transition matrix in accounting for longitudinal momentum transfer is demonstrated. Results obtained with this model are compared with Intranuclear Cascade (INC) calculations, as well as with predictions from Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VUU) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. Comparisons are also made with experimental data where available. These indicate that the present model is adequate to account for longitudinal momentum transfer in both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies.

  5. Heavy-flavour dynamics in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardi, M.; Beraudo, A.; De Pace, A.; Monteno, M.; Prino, F.

    2016-01-01

    We present recent results for heavy-quark observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies, obtained by the POWLANG transport setup. The initial creation of c c ¯ and b b ¯ pairs is simulated with a perturbative QCD approach (POWHEG+PYTHIA) and validated through comparison to experimental data of proton-proton collisions. In the nucleus-nucleus case, the propagation of the heavy quarks in the plasma is studied with the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport-coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow v2 of the final D mesons, as well as D - h correlations, and compare our results to experimental data from the ALICE and CMS Collaborations.

  6. Sensitivity of cross sections for elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering to halo nucleus density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V.

    2012-12-15

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li.

  7. Multiplicity fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus collisions: Dependence on energy and atomic mass number

    SciTech Connect

    Konchakovski, V. P.; Lungwitz, B.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2008-08-15

    Event-by-event multiplicity fluctuations in central C+C, S+S, In+In, and Pb+Pb as well as p+p collisions at bombarding energies from 10 to 160 AGeV are studied within the hadron string dynamics and ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics microscopic transport approaches. Our investigation is directly related to the future experimental program of the NA61 Collaboration at the SPS for a search of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point. The dependence on energy and atomic mass number of the scaled variances for negative, positive, and all charged hadrons is presented and compared to the results of the model of independent sources. Furthermore, the nucleus-nucleus results from the transport calculations are compared to inelastic proton-proton collisions for reference. We find a dominant role of the participant number fluctuations in nucleus-nucleus reactions at finite impact parameter b. To reduce the influence of the participant numbers fluctuations on the charged particle multiplicity fluctuations only the most central events have to be selected. Accordingly, the samples of the 1% most central nucleus-nucleus collisions with the largest numbers of the projectile participants are studied. The results are compared with those for collisions at zero impact parameter. A strong influence of the centrality selection criteria on the multiplicity fluctuations is pointed out. Our findings are essential for an optimal choice of colliding nuclei and bombarding energies for the experimental search of the QCD critical point.

  8. Nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections, and the nuclear interaction radius

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Ibrahim, Badawy

    2011-04-15

    We study the nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections for stable nuclei, in the energy region from 30A MeV to about 1A GeV, and find them to be in proportion to ({radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 1}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 1}{sup 2/3})+{radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 2}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 2}{sup 2/3})) {sup 2} in the mass range 8 to 100. Also, we find a parameter-free relation that enables us to predict a total reaction cross section for any nucleus-nucleus within 10% uncertainty at most, using the experimental value of the total reaction cross section of a given nucleus-nucleus. The power of the relation is demonstrated by several examples. The energy dependence of the nuclear interaction radius is deduced; it is found to be almost constant in the energy range from about 200A MeV to about 1A GeV; in this energy range and for nuclei with N=Z, R{sub I}(A)=(1.14{+-}0.02)A{sup 1/3} fm.

  9. Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix K: Experiment S009 nuclear emulsion (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A series of analyses are presented for Experiment S009, nuclear emulsion (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and postflight conditions. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are included in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

  10. Jet Tomography of High-Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at Next-to-Leading Order

    SciTech Connect

    Vitev, Ivan; Zhang Benwei

    2010-04-02

    We demonstrate that jet observables are highly sensitive to the characteristics of the vacuum and the in-medium QCD parton showers and propose techniques that exploit this sensitivity to constrain the mechanism of quark and gluon energy loss in strongly interacting plasmas. As a first example, we calculate the inclusive jet cross section in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions to O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}). Theoretical predictions for the medium-induced jet broadening and the suppression of the jet production rate due to cold and hot nuclear matter effects in Au+Au and Cu+Cu reactions at RHIC are presented.

  11. Subthreshold pion production from nucleus-nucleus collisions around 100 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalá, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.

    1993-12-01

    Several global variables were tested with the aim to determine the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions producing pions at incident energies around 100 MeV/nucleon. The experimental set-up includes the MEDEA multidetector, part of which is used as a π 0 spectrometer, and an additional hodoscope of plastic scintillators to cover very forward angles. A statistical model was used to generate both inclusive and pion-triggered events. Selection of well measured events was made through the measured total parallel momentum. Among the different global variables which were tested, the average parallel velocity was seen to give the best correlation with the impact parameter.

  12. Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

  13. Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

  14. Applicability of fluid-dynamical modeling of nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazineh, Dean; Auvinen, Jussi; Nahrgang, Marlene; Bass, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    At sufficiently high temperatures and densities, similar to the conditions found in the early universe, QCD matter forms a deconfined state called the quark gluon plasma (QGP). This state of matter can be created in collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy-ions, and RHIC data suggests that this QGP behaves similar to an ideal fluid. Viscous relativistic fluid dynamics therefore is one of the preferred theoretical tools to model the time-evolution and properties of the QGP. As the collision energy or the system size is decreased, the range of applicability of viscous fluid dynamics becomes smaller as the length scale of the interaction among the basic constituents is similar to the overall scale of the collision system itself. In order to investigate the validity of fluid-dynamical modeling of proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC and RHIC, we conduct an analysis of the spatial and temporal evolution of the Knudsen number, i.e. the ratio of the microscopic mean free path to the macroscopic length scale of the system. We show results for large and small collision systems, as a function of the specific shear viscosity, and discuss the range of applicability of fluid-dynamical modeling in relativistic proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at different energies.

  15. Effects of a chiral three-nucleon force on nucleus-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minomo, Kosho; Toyokawa, Masakazu; Kohno, Michio; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the effects of next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) chiral three-nucleon force (3NF) on nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering, using a standard prescription based on the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock method and the g -matrix folding model. The g -matrix calculated in nuclear matter from the next-to-next-to-next-to leading order (N3LO) chiral two-nucleon forces (2NF) is close to that from the Bonn-B 2NF. Since the Melbourne group has already developed a practical g -matrix interaction by localizing the nonlocal g -matrix calculated from the Bonn-B 2NF, as this first attempt we consider the effects of chiral 3NF by modifying the local Melbourne g matrix according to the difference between the g matrices of the chiral 2NF and 2NF+3NF. For nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering, the 3NF corrections make the folding potential less attractive and more absorptive. The latter effect is due to the enhanced tensor correlations in triplet channels. These changes reduce the differential cross section at middle and large angles and improve the agreement with the experimental data for 16O-16O scattering at 70 MeV/nucleon and 12C-12C scattering at 85 MeV/nucleon.

  16. Effect of repulsive and attractive three-body forces on nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Furumoto, T.; Sakuragi, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2009-10-15

    The effect of the three-body force (TBF) is studied in nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering on the basis of Brueckner theory for nucleon-nucleon (NN) effective interaction (complex G matrix) in the nuclear matter. A new G matrix called CEG07 proposed recently by the present authors includes the TBF effect and reproduces a realistic saturation curve in the nuclear matter, and it is shown to well reproduce proton-nucleus elastic scattering. The microscopic optical potential for the nucleus-nucleus system is obtained by folding the G matrix with nucleon density distributions in colliding nuclei. We first analyze in detail the {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O elastic scattering at E/A=70 MeV. The observed cross sections are nicely reproduced up to the most backward scattering angles only when the TBF effect is included. The use of the frozen-density approximation (FDA) is essentially important to properly estimate the effect of the TBF in nucleus-nucleus scattering. Other prescriptions for defining the local density have also been tested, but only the FDA prescription gives a proper description of the experimental cross sections as well as the effect of the TBF. The effects of the three-body attraction and the {omega}-rearrangement term are also analyzed. The CEG07 interaction is compared with CDM3Y6, which is a reliable and successful effective density-dependent NN interaction used in the double-folding model. The CEG07 G matrix is also tested in the elastic scattering of {sup 16}O by the {sup 12}C, {sup 28}Si, and {sup 40}Ca targets at E/A=93.9 MeV, and in the elastic scattering of {sup 12}C by the {sup 12}C target at E/A=135 MeV with great success. The decisive effect of the TBF is clearly seen also in those systems. Finally, we have tested CEG07a, CEG07b, and CEG07c for the {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O system at various energies.

  17. Experiments and network model of flow of oil-water emulsion in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Mao Illich; Carvalho, Marcio S.; Alvarado, Vladimir

    2011-10-01

    Transport of emulsions in porous media is relevant to several subsurface applications. Many enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes lead to emulsion formation and as a result conformance originating in the flow of a dispersed phase may arise. In some EOR processes, emulsion is injected directly as a mobility control agent. Modeling the flow of emulsion in porous media is extremely challenging due to the complex nature of the associated flows and numerous interfaces. The descriptions based on effective viscosity are not valid when the drop size is of the same order of magnitude as the pore-throat characteristic length scale. An accurate model of emulsion flow through porous media should describe this local change in mobility. The available filtration models do not take into account the variation of the straining and capturing rates with the local capillary number. In this work, we present experiments of emulsion flow through sandstone cores of different permeability and a first step on a capillary network model that uses experimentally determined pore-level constitutive relationships between flow rate and pressure drop in constricted capillaries to obtain representative macroscopic flow behavior emerging from microscopic emulsion flow at the pore level. A parametric analysis is conducted to study the effect of the permeability and dispersed phase droplet size on the flow response to emulsion flooding in porous media. The network model predictions qualitatively describe the oil-water emulsion flow behavior observed in the experiments.

  18. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  19. On the geometric nature of high energy nucleus-nucleus reaction cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Bidasaria, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Within the context of a high energy double-folding optical potential approximation to the exact nucleus-nucleus multiple-scattering series, eikonal scattering theory is used to investigate the validity of geometric reaction cross sections in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The potential used includes a finite range interaction and nuclear single-particle densities extracted from nuclear charge distributions by unfolding the finite proton charge distribution. Pauli correlation effects are also included in an approximate way. The sensitivity of the predictions to the assumed interaction, Pauli correlation approximation, and nuclear density distributions is investigated. These results are in agreement with early predictions concerning the geometric nature of relativistic heavy ion collisions and in disagreement with a recent analysis, utilizing the zero range approximation, which suggested otherwise. Reasons for the lack of agreement between the analyses are also presented. Finally, approximate applicability limits for geometric reaction cross sections are determined.

  20. Recent developments in the study of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2014-05-01

    Deconfinement refers to the creation of a state of quasi-free quarks and gluons in strongly interacting matter. Model predictions and experimental evidence for the onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions were discussed in our first review on this subject. These results motivated further experimental and theoretical studies. This review addresses two subjects. First, a summary of the past, present and future experimental programmes related to discovery and study of properties of the onset of deconfinement are presented. Second, recent progress is reviewed on analysis methods and preliminary experimental results for new strongly intensive fluctuation measures are discussed, which are relevant for current and future studies of the onset of deconfinement and searches for the critical point of strongly interacting matter.

  1. PROCEEDINGS: Jet energy loss and bulk parton collectivity in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan-Zhong

    2009-06-01

    Nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC produce high temperature and high energy density matter which exhibits partonic degrees of freedom. We will discuss measurements of nuclear modification factors for light hadrons and non-photonic electrons from heavy quark decays, which reflect the flavor dependence of energy loss of high momentum partons traversing the dense QCD medium. The dense QCD medium responds to energy loss of high momentum partons in a pattern consistent with that expected from a hydrodynamic fluid. The hadronization of bulk partonic matter exhibits collectivity with effective partonic degrees of freedom. Nuclear collisions at RHIC provide an intriguing environment, where many constituent quark ingredients are readily available for possible formation of exotic particles through quark coalescence or recombinations.

  2. Forward-backward correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions: Baseline contributions from geometrical fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Konchakovski, V. P.; Hauer, M.; Torrieri, G; Gorenstein, M. I.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2009-03-15

    We discuss the effects of initial collision geometry and centrality bin definition on correlation and fluctuation observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions. We focus on the forward-backward correlation coefficient recently measured by the STAR Collaboration in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Our study is carried out within two models: the Glauber Monte Carlo code with a 'toy' wounded-nucleon model and the hadron-string dynamics (HSD) transport approach. We show that strong correlations can arise from averaging over events in one centrality bin. We, furthermore, argue that a study of the dependence of correlations on the centrality bin definition as well as the bin size may distinguish between these trivial correlations and correlations arising from new physics.

  3. Nucleus-nucleus Bremsstrahlung from scattering angle selected Cl-Sn collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gaukler, G.; Nolte, G.; Schuch, R.

    1986-01-01

    Continuum X rays above the K lines of Sn were measured at 90 and 0/sup 0/ angle relative to the incident beam direction in coincidence with C1 projectiles scattered at very large laboratory angles between 8 and 164/sup 0/. By varying the isotope mass of the projectile ions (/sup 35/Cl and /sup 37/Cl) and of the target atoms (/sup 112/Sn and /sup 118/Sn) the radiation at scattering angles >10/sup 0/ could be clearly identified as Bremsstrahlung from the elementary scattering process of the two nuclei. The intensity of the radiation emitted at 0 and 90/sup 0/ relative to the beam direction can be reasonably well described by a quantum mechanical calculation of nucleus-nucleus Bremsstrahlung which includes the interference between dipole and quadrupole radiation amplitude. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. a Unified Approach to Hadron-Hadron Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at High Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    The problem of multiparticle production in high -energy hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied systematically in the framework of the Geometrical Branching Model (GBM). The model is based on the geometrical properties of nucleons and the stochastic nature of the interaction among the soft partons. The eikonal formalism is used to relate the elastic and inelastic cross sections and AGK cutting rule is used in connection with the multiparticle production process. The stochastic process of Furry branching is employed to describe the proliferation and hadronization of partons which lead to the produced particles. The approach describes hh, hA and AA collisions in a unified formalism for c.m. energies less than 100 GeV. The result of multiplicity distribution of produced particles exhibits Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) scaling. The universality of KNO scaling breaks down due to the different geometrical sizes of the hadron and nuclei. For hA and AA collisions, the formalism of GBM allows the hadron to be broken (to h^') by the first collision; indeed, it is the attention given to h^'h and h ^'h^' collisions that distinguishes this work from other earlier investigations on the subject. All of the calculated results are in good agreement with experiments. A general Monte Carlo simulation of GBM for multiparticle production in hh, hA and AA collisions is also given. The particle productivity in particular is studied in detail and is contrasted from the case where quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is produced in the AA collisions. This work forms a definitive description of hadronic and nuclear collisions that can serve as a basis from which exotic features such as the formation of QGP can be recognized as signatures deviating from the normal background.

  5. Multiple-scattering effects in nucleus-nucleus reactions with Glauber theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Shinya; Ebata, Shuichiro; Horiuchi, Wataru; Kimura, Masaaki

    2014-09-01

    A study of new unstable nuclei has become possible in new radioactive beam facilities. In order to understand the relationship between reaction observables and nuclear structure, we need reaction theory which exactly reflects the nuclear structure. The Glauber theory is a powerful tool of analyzing high energy nuclear reactions. The theory describes the multiple scattering processes, whereas the optical limit approximation (OLA), which is widely used, ignores those processes. Those effects are expected to play an important role in the nuclear collision involving unstable nuclei (see for example Phys. Rev. C 54, 1843 (1996)). Here we apply the Glauber theory to nucleus-nucleus reactions. The wave functions are generated by the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method and are expressed in a Slater determinant that allows us to evaluate the complete Glauber amplitude easily. We calculate total reaction cross sections, elastic cross sections and differential elastic cross sections for 16~24O, 40~70Ca, 56,58Ni, 100~140Sn, 190~214Pb on proton, 4He, 12C targets and compare with experimental data. The Glauber theory gives much better description than the OLA, especially at larger scattering angles.

  6. Search for ντ Interactions with the Nuclear Emulsion Films of the Opera Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupilli, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    The OPERA experiment aims at measuring the νμ → ντ oscillation through the ντ appearance in an almost pure νμ beam (CNGS). For the direct identification of the short-lived τ lepton, produced in ντ CC interactions, a micrometric detection resolution is needed. Therefore the OPERA detector makes use of nuclear emulsion films, the highest spatial resolution tracking device, combined with lead plates in an emulsion cloud chamber (ECC) structure called `brick'. In this paper the nuclear emulsion analysis chain is reported; the strategy and the algorithms set up will be described together with their performances.

  7. Fat emulsion for intravenous administration: clinical experience with intralipid 10%.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L M; Hardie, B S; Hidalgo, J

    1976-01-01

    A 10% soybean oil emulsion (Intralipid 10%), used extensively in Europe for intravenous alimentation, has now been clinically evaluated in the United States. Controlled studies have shown that the soybean oil emulsion can be substituted for glucose to supply one-third to two-thirds of the total calories, and can be administered peripherally without significant vein irritation. Essential fatty acid deficiencies, frequently encountered in patients dependent on parenteral alimentation with fat-free solutions, are prevented and corrected by use of this preparation. Data on long-term tolerance to Intralipid 10% infusions are presented for 292 patients treated for more than 6,000 patient days. The soybean oil emulsion was usually well tolerated. Side effects were reported in two of 133 adults and 12 of 159 pediatric patients. PMID:820291

  8. Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

  9. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  10. Formation of dense partonic matter in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC: Experimental evaluation by the PHENIX Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcox, K.; Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Amirikas, R.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Arai, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, R.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Barrette, J.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Bellaiche, F. G.; Belyaev, S. T.; Bennett, M. J.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhagavatula, S.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Borenstein, S.; Botelho, S.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Carey, T. A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chand, P.; Chang, J.; Chang, W. C.; Chavez, L. L.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christ, T.; Chujo, T.; Chung, M. S.; Chung, P.; Cianciolo, V.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Cussonneau, J. P.; D'Enterria, D.; Dahms, T.; Das, K.; David, G.; Deák, F.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dietzsch, O.; Dinesh, B. V.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Dubey, A. K.; Du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Ebisu, K.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; El Chenawi, K.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Ferdousi, T.; Fields, D. E.; Finck, C.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Gadrat, S.; Garpman, S.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Ghosh, T. K.; Glenn, A.; Godoi, A. L.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, S. K.; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadjhenni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, A. G.; Hara, H.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, N.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hibino, M.; Hidas, P.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Ho, D. S.; Hobbs, R.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Hur, H. M.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inuzuka, M.; Ippolitov, M. S.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jang, W. Y.; Jeong, Y.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kann, M.; Kapoor, S. S.; Katou, K.; Kawabata, T.; Kawagishi, T.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, E.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinney, E.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kiss, A.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kiyoyama, K.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Klinksiek, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kohara, R.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Ladygin, V.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lauret, J.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X. H.; Li, Z.; Lim, D. J.; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Maguire, C. F.; Mahon, J.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Mark, S. K.; Markacs, S.; Martinez, G.; Marx, M. D.; Masaike, A.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McCain, M. C.; McGaughey, P. L.; Melnikov, E.; Merschmeyer, M.; Messer, F.; Messer, M.; Miake, Y.; Milan, J.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R. E.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mühlbacher, F.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nakada, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, B. K.; Nara, M.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nikkinen, L.; Nilsson, P.; Nishimura, S.; Norman, B.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, H.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Österman, L.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Paffrath, L.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, A.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Penev, V.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petridis, A. N.; Pierson, A.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Pitukhin, P.; Plasil, F.; Pollack, M.; Pope, K.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Qualls, J. M.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rose, A. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sadler, M. E.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, M.; Sakai, S.; Sako, H.; Sakuma, T.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Sangster, T. C.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schlei, B. R.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shaw, M. R.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Shimomura, M.; Shin, Y. H.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Sibiriak, I. G.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Simon-Gillo, J.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Skutnik, S.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Starinsky, N.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugioka, M.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sumi, Y.; Sun, Z.; Suzuki, M.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Taniguchi, E.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tepe, J. D.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Thomas, T. L.; Tian, W.; Togawa, M.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tsvetkov, A. A.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Uam, T. J.; Ushiroda, T.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Velissaris, C.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Vertesi, R.; Veszprémi, V.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Volkov, M. A.; Vorobyov, A.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, Y.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Witzig, C.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yagi, K.; Yang, Y.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudkte, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, S. J.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.; Zong, X.; Phenix Collaboration

    2005-08-01

    Extensive experimental data from high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions were recorded using the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The comprehensive set of measurements from the first three years of RHIC operation includes charged particle multiplicities, transverse energy, yield ratios and spectra of identified hadrons in a wide range of transverse momenta ( p), elliptic flow, two-particle correlations, nonstatistical fluctuations, and suppression of particle production at high p. The results are examined with an emphasis on implications for the formation of a new state of dense matter. We find that the state of matter created at RHIC cannot be described in terms of ordinary color neutral hadrons.

  11. JACEE long duration balloon flights. [Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T.; Iwai, J.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J.; Fountain, W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Jones, W. V.

    1989-01-01

    JACEE balloon-borne emulsion chamber detectors are used to observe the spectra and interactions of cosmic ray protons and nuclei in the energy range 1 to 100A TeV. Experiments with long duration mid-latitude balloon flights and characteristics of the detector system that make it ideal for planned Antarctic balloon flights are discussed.

  12. GRAINE project: The first balloon-borne, emulsion gamma-ray telescope experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Aoki, Shigeki; Kamada, Keiki; Mizutani, Saki; Nakagawa, Ryo; Ozaki, Keita; Rokujo, Hiroki

    2015-04-01

    The GRAINE project (Gamma-Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion) has been developed for the observation of cosmic γ-rays in the energy range 10 MeV-100 GeV with a precise (0.08°} at 1-2 GeV), polarization-sensitive, large-aperture-area (˜10 m^2) emulsion telescope by repeated long-duration balloon flights. In 2011, the first balloon-borne experiment was successfully performed with a 12.5 × 10cm^2 aperture area and 4.6 hour flight duration for a feasibility and performance test. Systematic detection, energy reconstruction, and timestamping of γ-ray events were performed across the whole area of the emulsion film, up to 45° incident zenith angle, down to 50 MeV γ-ray energy, with 97% detection reliability, 0.2 sec timestamp accuracy, and 98% timestamp reliability. A γ-ray data checking and calibration method was created using the γ-rays produced in the converter. We measured the atmospheric γ-ray flux in the energy range 50-300 MeV and obtained a first understanding of the cosmic γ-ray background. By combining the attitude data, we established a procedure for determining the γ-ray arrival direction in celestial coordinates. The first flight of the balloon-borne emulsion telescope confirmed its potential as a high-performance cosmic γ-ray detector.

  13. Extra-large crystal emulsion detectors for future large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariga, T.; Ariga, A.; Kuwabara, K.; Morishima, K.; Moto, M.; Nishio, A.; Scampoli, P.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2016-03-01

    Photographic emulsion is a particle tracking device which features the best spatial resolution among particle detectors. For certain applications, for example muon radiography, large-scale detectors are required. Therefore, a huge surface has to be analyzed by means of automated optical microscopes. An improvement of the readout speed is then a crucial point to make these applications possible and the availability of a new type of photographic emulsions featuring crystals of larger size is a way to pursue this program. This would allow a lower magnification for the microscopes, a consequent larger field of view resulting in a faster data analysis. In this framework, we developed new kinds of emulsion detectors with a crystal size of 600-1000 nm, namely 3-5 times larger than conventional ones, allowing a 25 times faster data readout. The new photographic emulsions have shown a sufficient sensitivity and a good signal to noise ratio. The proposed development opens the way to future large-scale applications of the technology, e.g. 3D imaging of glacier bedrocks or future neutrino experiments.

  14. Dielectron Cross Section Measurements in Nucleus-Nucleus Reactions at 1.0{ital A} GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, R.J.; Bossingham, R.; Gong, W.G.; Heilbronn, L.; Huang, H.Z.; Krebs, G.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Matis, H.S.; Miller, J.; Naudet, C.; Roche, G.; Schroeder, L.S.; Seidl, P.; Wilson, W.K.; Yegneswaran, A.; Beedoe, S.; Carroll, J.; Huang, H.Z.; Igo, G.; Bougteb, M.; Manso, F.; Prunet, M.; Roche, G.; Kirk, P.; Wang, Z.F.; Wilson, W.K.

    1997-08-01

    We present measured dielectron production cross sections for Ca+Ca, C+C, He+Ca, and d+Ca reactions at 1.0 A GeV . Statistical uncertainties and systematic effects are smaller than in previous dilepton spectrometer (DLS) nucleus-nucleus data. For pair mass M{le}0.35 GeV/c{sup 2} we obtain (1) the Ca+Ca cross section is larger than the previous DLS measurement and current model results, (2) the mass spectra suggest large contributions from {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} Dalitz decays, and (3) d{sigma}/dM{proportional_to}A{sub P}A{sub T}. For M{gt}0.5 GeV/c{sup 2} the Ca+Ca to C+C cross section ratio is significantly larger than the ratio of A{sub P}A{sub T} values. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Japan - USSR joint emulsion chamber experiment at Pamir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The results are presented for the systematic measurement of cosmic ray showers in the first carbon chamber of Japan-USSR joint experiment at Pamir Plateau. The intensity and the energy distribution of electromagnetic particles, of hadrons and of families are in good agreement with the results of other mountain experiment if the relative error in energy estimation is taken into consideration.

  16. Experiments on Rearrangements and Forces in 2D Emulsion Hopper Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xia; Desmond, Kenneth; Chen, Dandan; Weeks, Eric

    2012-11-01

    We conduct experiments with a quasi-two-dimensional binary emulsion flowing through a hopper. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsions confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. In this system, there is only viscous friction and no static friction between droplets. The hopper flow induces a high rate of rearrangement events allowing us to understand how stresses and forces change during the process. By imaging the droplets during flow, we observed T1 events, which are topological changes when droplets exchange neighbors. Simultaneously, we measure forces between the droplets using a technique we have developed. We study the evolution of forces between droplets during rearrangements, finding that rearrangements decrease the inter-droplet forces of nearby droplets.

  17. Experiments on Rearrangements and Forces in 2D Emulsion Hopper Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xia; Desmond, Kenneth; Chen, Dandan; Weeks, Eric

    2012-02-01

    We did experiments with a quasi-two-dimensional binary emulsion flowing through a hopper. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsion confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. In this system, there is only viscous friction and no static friction between droplets. The hopper flow induces a high rate of rearrangement events allowing us to understand how stresses and forces change during the process. By imaging the droplets during flow, we observed T1 events, which are topological changes when droplets exchange neighbors. Simultaneously, we measured forces between the droplets using a technique we have developed and studied the evolution of forces between droplets during rearrangements.

  18. Recent Emulsion Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ariga, A.

    2011-10-06

    Emulsion technologies are very much developed in the last decade and still developing in both the emulsion gel and the data taking. Emulsion detectors are suitable for the neutrino experiments because they can distinguish all 3 flavors of neutrino. The OPERA experiment, a recent pillar in the emulsion experiments aiming at the first observation of the neutrino oscillation in CNGS beam in appearance mode, is running, showing the good capability to separate 3 flavor neutrino interactions. In this poster, the recent developments and prospects of the emulsions for the next generation experiments are reported.

  19. Hybrid experiments with air-shower array and emulsion chamber at high mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besshapov, S. P.; Cherdintseva, K. V.; Chubenko, A. P.; Nesterova, N. M.; Nikolskaya, N. M.; Pavluchenko, V. P.; Shaulov, S. B.; Nam, R. A.; Piskal, V. V.; Vildanov, N. G.; Vildanova, L. I.; Janseitova, J. K.; Aoki, H.; Honda, K.; Inoue, N.; Kawasumi, N.; Martinic, N.; Ochi, N.; Ohmori, N.; Ohsawa, A.; Tamada, M.; Ticona, R.

    2009-12-01

    Characteristics of air-shower-triggered atmospheric families detected in the hybrid experiments together with emulsion chamber and AS-array at high mountains are compared with those of simulations. The analysis of families accompanied by air-showers with N≥10 shows that the experimental family-energy distribution favors a proton-dominant chemical composition of primary cosmic-rays but the lateral distribution favors a heavy-dominant composition. Thus no simulations can describe the overall characteristics of the data of hybrid experiments.

  20. Light-isotope production in relativistic Au-induced nucleus-nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Joseph Kyle

    1998-11-01

    We present measurements of p,d,3He, and 4He nuclei produced in collisions of 11.5 A GeV/c Au projectiles with Au and Pb nuclei. The data were recorded at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS facility by two magnetic-spectrometer experiments, E864 and E878. The produced particles are measured at rapidities near the center of mass for low transverse momenta (pT < 400 MeV/c per nucleon). We compare the measurements from E864 and E878 with one another and with preliminary proton and deuteron measurements from AGS experiment E866. We observe an excess of protons in the E864 data as compared to the E878 data; this excess can be partly explained by the differing sensitivities of the two experiments to protons produced in hyperon decays. We find reasonable agreement between the nucleus yields in all three experiments. We discuss the mass dependence of the proton and light- nucleus yields in the 10% most-central collisions. We compute coalescence ratios, and examine their dependence on the transverse momenta of the produced nuclei, the size and kinetic energy of the colliding system, and the centrality of the collision. We also compare the data with the predictions of coalescence calculations based on microscopic cascade models; this theoretical framework is found to describe proton and deuteron production adequately for certain combinations of parameters, but fails to reproduce the yields of heavier species.

  1. Collective flow and azimuthal correlations in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Bevalac

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; EOS Collaboration

    1993-09-01

    The EOS experiment at the Bevalac has recently carried out exclusive event-by-event measurements of relativistic heavy ion collisions with a variety of projectile, target and beam energy combinations. The data was obtained using the EOS Time Projection Chamber. We present preliminary results on inclusive spectra, collective flow and azimuthal correlations obtained from a study of Au + Au reactions with beam energies covering 0.6 {minus} 1.2 A GeV.

  2. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent ``fusion by diffusion'' model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Wilczyński, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section σcap(l), the fusion probability Pfus(l), and the survival probability Psurv(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of Pfus(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of Pfus(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  3. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent 'fusion by diffusion' model

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.

    2011-05-15

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section {sigma}{sub cap}(l), the fusion probability P{sub fus}(l), and the survival probability P{sub surv}(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of P{sub fus}(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of P{sub fus}(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  4. Fish oil–based lipid emulsions in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: An ongoing positive experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, in the use of FOLE in treatment of P...

  5. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2014: Workshop for young scientists on the physics of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-05-01

    The 6th edition of the Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Hot Quarks 2014) was held in Las Negras, Spain from 21-28 September 2014. Following the traditions of the conference, this meeting gathered more than 70 participants in the first years of their scientific careers. The present issue contains the proceedings of this workshop. As in the past, the Hot Quarks workshop offered a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion and interpretation of the current measurements from high energy nuclear collisions. Recent results and upgrades at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) were presented. Recent theoretical developments were also extensively discussed as well as the perspectives for future facilities such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt and the Electron-Ion Collider at Brookhaven. The conference's goal to provide a platform for young researchers to learn and foster their interactions was successfully met. We wish to thank the sponsors of the Hot Quarks 2014 Conference, who supported the authors of this volume: Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), CPAN (Spain), Czech Science Foundation (GACR) under grant 13-20841S (Czech Republic), European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Switzerland), European Research Council under grant 259612 (EU), ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI (Germany), Helmholtz Association and GSI under grant VH-NG-822, Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (Germany), National Science Foundation under grant No.1359622 (USA), Nuclear Physics Institute ASCR (Czech Republic), Patronato de la Alhambra y Generalife (Spain) and the Universidad de Granada (Spain). Javier López Albacete, Universidad de Granada (Spain) Jana Bielcikova, Nuclear Physics Inst. and Academy of Sciences (Czech Republic) Rainer J. Fries, Texas A&M University (USA) Raphaël Granier de Cassagnac, CNRS-IN2P3 and École polytechnique (France) Boris Hippolyte, CNRS-IN2P3 and Université de Strasbourg (France) Jiangyong Jia, Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) André Mischke, Utrecht University and Nikhef Amsterdam (The Netherlands) Ágnes Mócsy, Pratt Institute and Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) Hannah Petersen, Goethe University, FIAS and GSI (Germany) Lijuan Ruan, Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) Sevil Salur, Rutgers University, (USA)

  6. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2012: Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, Markus; Caines, Helen; Calderón de la Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Fries, Rainer; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphaël; Hippolyte, Boris; Mischke, André; Mócsy, Ágnes; Petersen, Hannah; Ruan, Lijuan; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2013-09-01

    The 5th edition of the Workshop for Young Scientists on the Physics of Ultrarelativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Hot Quarks 2012) was held in Copamarina, Puerto Rico from 14-20 October 2012. As in previous years, this meeting gathered more than 70 participants in the early years of their scientific careers. This issue contains the proceedings of the workshop. As in the past, the Hot Quarks workshop offered a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion and interpretation of the current measurements from high energy nuclear collisions. Recent results and upgrades at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) were presented. Measurements from the proton-led run at the CERN-LHC were shown for the first time at this meeting. Recent theoretical developments were also extensively discussed, as well as the proposals for future facilities such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, the Electron-Ion Collider at Brookhaven, and the LHeC. The conference's goal to provide a platform for young researchers to learn and foster their interactions was successfully met. We wish to thank the sponsors of the Hot Quarks 2012 Conference, who supported the authors of this volume: Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), European Laboratory for Particle Physics CERN (Switzerland), European Research Council (EU), ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI (Germany), Helmholtz International Center for FAIR (Germany), IN2P3/CNRS (France) and the European Research Council via grant #259612, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (USA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA), National Science Foundation (USA), and Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (Netherlands). Marcus BleicherAndré Mischke Goethe-University Frankfurt and HIC4FAIRUtrecht University and Nikhef Amsterdam GermanyThe Netherlands Helen CainesÁgnes Mócsy Yale UniversityPratt Institute and Brookhaven National Laboratory USAUSA Manuel Calderón de la Barca SánchezHannah Petersen UC DavisFIAS USAGermany Rainer J FriesLijuan Ruan Texas A&M UniversityBrookhaven National Laboratory USAUSA Raphaël Granier de CassagnacCarlos A Salgado CNRS-IN2P3 and Ëcole polytechniqueUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela FranceSpain Boris Hippolyte CNRS-IN2P3 and Université de Strasbourg France The PDF also contains the conference poster.

  7. Nucleus-nucleus collisions at 60 to 200 GeV/nucleon: Results from the WA80 experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.; Awes, T.C.; Baktash, C.; Ferguson, R.L.; Lee, I.Y.; Saini, S.; Tincknell, M.L.; Young, G.R. ); Obenshain, F.E.; Sorensen, S.P. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN ); Albrecht, R.; Bock, R.; Claesson, G.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Kolb, B.W.; Lund, I.; Schmidt, H.R.; Siemiarczuk, T. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germa

    1990-05-01

    Results from {sup 16}O- and {sup 32}S-induced reactions obtained by the WA80 collaboration at the CERN SPS are presented with reference to global event characteristics such as collision geometry, the degree of nuclear stopping, and the energy density attained. Transverse momentum spectra of neutral pions and of direct photons are also presented. At an accuracy within 15{percent} limits, all observed photons are accounted for by known hadronic decays. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Analysis of variances of quasirapidities in collisions of gold nuclei with track-emulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gulamov, K. G.; Zhokhova, S. I.; Lugovoi, V. V. Navotny, V. S. Saidkhanov, N. S.; Chudakov, V. M.

    2012-08-15

    A new method of an analysis of variances was developed for studying n-particle correlations of quasirapidities in nucleus-nucleus collisions for a large constant number n of particles. Formulas that generalize the results of the respective analysis to various values of n were derived. Calculations on the basis of simple models indicate that the method is applicable, at least for n {>=} 100. Quasirapidity correlations statistically significant at a level of 36 standard deviations were discovered in collisions between gold nuclei and track-emulsion nuclei at an energy of 10.6 GeV per nucleon. The experimental data obtained in our present study are contrasted against the theory of nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  9. Optics laboratory experiments with laser-heated samples of crude oils and oil-in-water emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Costa, Germán.

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the present paper is to describe incorporation of basic industrial research results into current University study programs in Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering. The Laboratory of Optics and Fluids (LOF) of University Simon Bolivar (USB) leads a research program on applications of Photonics technology in the Petroleum Industry. More precisely, the main research subject at the (LOF) is development of optical procedures allowing determination of conditions of stability of oil-in-water emulsions. In several countries (for example, Canada and Venezuela) there exist important reservoirs of heavy crude oils, whose high viscosity impede their transportation through pipelines. Therefore, emulsions of heavy oils in water were developed in order to allow their commercialization. Though those emulsions are stable in current environmental conditions, high temperature or velocity gradients frequently provoke their coalescence. In typical experiments conducted at the (LOF) temperature gradients are induced in oil-water emulsions and in crude oil samples by irradiation with a CW laser beam. In crude oil samples the strong dependence of the liquid surface tension and refractive index on the local liquid temperature gives rise to long-range deformation of the liquid free surface. The latter cited thus behaves as an interferometrically smooth liquid mirror, which gives rise in turn to phase and intensity variations in the reflected light beam. In emulsion samples the inhomogeneous heating gives rise to thermoconvective flow, which is clearly observed as a moving speckle pattern in the reflected light beam. These are typical phenomena of self-interaction of a laser beam incident upon a material medium. In the present paper we discuss these optical phenomena, first studied in a basic research context, from an educational viewpoint.

  10. Muon radiography in Russia with emulsion technique. First experiments future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A. B.; Bagulya, A. V.; Chernyavsky, M. M.; Konovalova, N. S.; Managadze, A. K.; Orurk, O. I.; Polukhina, N. G.; Roganova, T. M.; Shchedrina, T. V.; Starkov, N. I.; Tioukov, V. E.; Vladymyrov, M. S.; Zemskova, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic ray muon radiography is a novel technique for imaging the internal structures of massive objects. It exploits the capability of high energy muons from cosmic-rays in order to obtain a density map of investigated object and trying to guess information on the variation in the density distribution. Nuclear emulsions are tracking detectors well suited to be employed in this context since they have an excellent angular resolution (few mrad), they are cheap, compact and robust, easily transportable, able to work in harsh environments, and do not require power supply. This work presents the first successful results in the field of muon radiography in Russia with nuclear emulsions.

  11. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R&D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  12. Influence of the nucleon-nucleon collision geometry on the determination of the nuclear modification factor for nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jiangyong

    2009-11-01

    The influence of the underlying nucleon-nucleon collision geometry on evaluations of the nuclear overlap function (TAB) and number of binary collisions (Ncoll) is studied. A narrowing of the spatial distribution of the hard-partons with large light-cone fraction x in nucleons leads to a downward correction for Ncoll and TAB, which in turn, results in an upward correction for the nuclear modification factor RAB. The size of this correction is estimated for several experimentally motivated nucleon-nucleon overlap functions for hard-partons. It is found to be significant in peripheral nucleus-nucleus and nucleon-nucleus collisions, and is much larger at the LHC energy of √{ s} = 5.5 TeV than for the RHIC energy of √{ s} = 200 GeV. The implications for experimental measurements are also discussed.

  13. Influence of the nucleon-nucleon collision geometry on the determination of the nuclear modification factor for nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, J.i.

    2009-11-01

    The influence of the underlying nucleon-nucleon collision geometry on evaluations of the nuclear overlap function (TAB) and number of binary collisions (Ncoll) is studied. A narrowing of the spatial distribution of the hard-partons with large light-cone fraction x in nucleons leads to a downward correction for Ncoll and TAB, which in turn, results in an upward correction for the nuclear modification factor RAB. The size of this correction is estimated for several experimentally motivated nucleon-nucleon overlap functions for hard-partons. It is found to be significant in peripheral nucleus-nucleus and nucleon-nucleus collisions, and is much larger at the LHC energy of {radical}s = 5.5 TeV than for the RHIC energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV. The implications for experimental measurements are also discussed.

  14. Unusual interactions above 100 TeV: A review of cosmic ray experiments with emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yodh, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    A method is given for analyzing the space correlated collection of jets (gamma ray families) with energies greater than 100 TeV in Pb or Fe absorber sampled by photosensitive layers in an emulsion chamber. Events analyzed indicate large multiplicities of particles in the primary hadron-air interaction, and a marked absence of neutral pions.

  15. Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Therapy for Acute Synthetic Cannabinoid Intoxication: Clinical Experience in Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Aksel, Gökhan; Güneysel, Özlem; Taşyürek, Tanju; Kozan, Ergül; Çevik, Şebnem Eren

    2015-01-01

    There is no specific antidote for intoxication with synthetic cannabinoids. In this case series, we considered the efficiency of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy in four cases, who presented to emergency department with synthetic cannabinoid (bonzai) intoxication. The first patient had a GCS of 3 and a left bundle branch block on electrocardiography. The electrocardiography revealed sinus rhythm with normal QRS width after the treatment. The second patient had bradycardia, hypotension, and a GCS of 14. After intravenous lipid emulsion therapy, the bradycardia resolved, and the patient's GCS improved to 15. The third patient presented with a GCS of 8, and had hypotension and bradycardia. After the treatment, not only did the bradycardia resolve, but also the GCS improved to 15. The fourth patient, whose electrocardiography revealed accelerated junctional rhythm, had a GCS of 13. The patient's rhythm was sinus after the treatment. Cardiovascular recovery was seen in all four cases, and neurological recovery was also seen in three of them. Based on the fact that intravenous lipid emulsion is beneficial in patients intoxicated with lipophilic drugs, unstable patients presenting to the emergency department with acute synthetic cannabinoid intoxication may be candidates for intravenous lipid emulsion treatment. PMID:26078891

  16. Investigation of gamma-ray families originating from nucleus-nucleus interactions at ultrahigh energies E{sub 0} in excess of 10{sup 16} eV

    SciTech Connect

    Yuldashbaev, T. S.; Nuritdinov, Kh.

    2013-12-15

    Various spatial and energy features of gamma-ray families originating from the interactions of primary nuclei of galactic cosmic rays with nuclei of atmospheric atoms (AA interactions) are studied. The mass composition of galactic cosmic rays is analyzed on the basis of data from x-ray emulsion chambers of the Pamir experiment with the aid of a criterion for selecting gamma-ray families originating from AA interactions (A families) at energies E{sub 0} of primary galactic cosmic rays in excess of 10{sup 16} eV. According to the results obtained in this way only the experimental spatial parameters R{sub 1E} and ρ differ from their counterparts in the MC0 model.

  17. Droplet freezing experiments in stearic acid-water emulsions, role of the droplet-medium interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiez, J.P.; Grange, G.; Mutaftschiev, B.

    1982-02-01

    Droplets of stearic acid emulsions in water, stabilized with cationic or anionic emulsifiers, undergoing freezing-melting cycles with constant temperature scanning rate, freeze as monocrystals and independently from one another, even when visible clustering takes place. The study of the nucleation kinetics by differential scanning calorimetry shows that nucleation threshold (critical undercooling) depends on the nature of the emulsifier, adsorbed at the droplet-medium interface. 30 references.

  18. A search for the production of direct leptons in nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, P.N.

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: subthreshold production experiment; testing and selection of PCOS amplifiers; transverse energy detector; development of a sensitive new amplifiers; single-lepton experiment. (LSP)

  19. Pseudorapidity configurations in collisions between gold nuclei and track-emulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gulamov, K. G.; Zhokhova, S. I.; Lugovoi, V. V. Navotny, V. S. Chudakov, V. M.

    2010-07-15

    A method of parametrically invariant quantities is developed for studying pseudorapidity configurations in nucleus-nucleus collisions involving a large number of secondary particles. In simple models where the spectrum of pseudorapidities depends on three parameters, the shape of the spectrum may differ strongly from the shape of pseudorapidity configurations in individual events. Pseudorapidity configurations in collisions between gold nuclei of energy 10.6 GeV per nucleon and track-emulsion nuclei are contrasted against those in random stars calculated theoretically. An investigation of pseudorapidity configurations in individual events is an efficient method for verifying theoretical models.

  20. Workshop on Cosmic Ray and High Energy Gamma Ray Experiments for the Space Station Era, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, October 17-20, 1984, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V. (Editor); Wefel, J. P. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The potential of the Space Station as a platform for cosmic-ray and high-energy gamma-ray astronomy is discussed in reviews, reports, and specific proposals. Topics examined include antiparticles and electrons, science facilities and new technology, high-energy nuclear interactions, nuclear composition and energy spectra, Space Shuttle experiments, Space Station facilities and detectors, high-energy gamma rays, and gamma-ray facilities and techniques. Consideration is given to universal-baryon-symmetry testing on the scale of galactic clusters, particle studies in a high-inclination orbit, balloon-borne emulsion-chamber results on ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions, ionization states of low-energy cosmic rays, a large gamma-ray telescope for point-source studies above 1 GeV, and the possible existence of stable quark matter.

  1. Search for anomalous C-jets in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumano, H.

    1985-01-01

    Anomalous C-jets were measured in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber No.17. Measurement of 150 C-jets nuclear interactions occured in the target layer in the chamber itself with total visible energy greater than 5 TeV was completed. they are recorded in area of 11 sq m, corresponding to 17.1 sq m year exposure. Among them, seven events have no pinaught and two events are peculiar in that three showers out of four show abnormal cascade development. Two show remarkable characteristics indicating that they are coming from exotic interactions in the target layer. Illustrations of these events are presented and the thresholds of this type of event are discussed.

  2. Attained energy densities and neutral pion spectra in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.; Albrecht, R.; Awes, T.C.; Baktash, C.; Beckmann, P.; Berger, F.; Bock, R.; Claesson, G.; Clewing, G.; Dragon, L.

    1989-01-01

    The main goal of the CERN heavy-ion experiments is the search for an indication that the predicted state of deconfined quarks and gluons, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), has been produced. The quantity most crucial to the probability of QGP formation is the thermalized energy density attained during the heavy-ion reaction. The amount of energy radiated transverse to the beam direction is the experimental quantity which is believed to be a measure of the amount of energy deposition in the reaction, and hence to reflect the energy density attained. In this presentation we consider the systematics of transverse energy production at CERN SPS energies, and we use the results to make estimates, under various assumptions, of attained energy densities. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Determination of the cross sections for the production of fragments from relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions. II. Parametric fits

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.R.; Binns, W.R.; Garrard, T.L.; Israel, M.H.; Klarmann, J.; Stone, E.C.; Waddington, C.J. Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO )

    1990-12-01

    Measurements of the partial charge-changing cross sections for the fragmentation of relativistic iron, lanthanum, holmium, and gold nuclei of several different energies incident on targets of polyethylene, carbon, aluminum, and copper have been reported in an accompanying paper. This paper describes the systematics of the variations of these cross sections with energy, projectile, target, and fragment. We have been able to generate a seven-parameter global fit to 795 measured cross sections for the heavy targets which fits the data with a standard deviation of 7%. We have also generated a similar global fit to 303 measured cross sections for a hydrogen target which fits the data with a standard deviation of 10%. These representations imply that the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation is only accurate to some 20--30 %. Weak factorization can apply, but fits that are marginally better, and more physically plausible, can be obtained without factorization. We have identified, and discussed, a number of caveats to the applicability of these fits outside, and inside, the range of energies and masses covered. Excessively large cross sections for the loss of a single proton from the projectile nuclei suggest electromagnetic dissociation. The cross sections for fragments that experience large charge changes appear to become independent of the size of the charge change. Very heavy projectiles have a significant probability of experiencing fission.

  4. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions prevent and reverse parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: the Boston experience.

    PubMed

    de Meijer, Vincent E; Gura, Kathleen M; Le, Hau D; Meisel, Jonathan A; Puder, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is the most prevalent and most severe complication of long-term parenteral nutrition. Its underlying pathophysiology, however, largely remains to be elucidated. The currently approved parenteral lipid emulsions in the United States contain safflower or soybean oils, both rich in omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Mounting evidence indicates that the omega-6 PUFAs originating from plant oils in these lipid emulsions may play a role in the onset of liver injury. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions, in contrast, are primarily composed of omega-3 PUFAs, thus providing a promising alternative. The authors review the literature on the role of lipid emulsions in the onset of PNALD and discuss prevention and treatment strategies using a fish oil-based lipid emulsion. They conclude that a fish oil-based emulsion is hepatoprotective in a murine model of PNALD, and it appears to be safe and efficacious for the treatment of this type of liver disease in children. A prospective randomized trial that is currently under way at the authors' institution will objectively determine the place of fish oil monotherapy in the prevention of PNALD. PMID:19571170

  5. Fish oil-based lipid emulsions in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: an ongoing positive experience.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Muralidhar H; Carter, Beth A; Hawthorne, Keli M; King, Kristi; Abrams, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas in the use of FOLE in treatment of PNALD as presented at the 2013 Experimental Biology meeting. We describe the findings of a single center, prospective, observational study of infants <6 mo of age with PNALD who received parenteral FOLE as monotherapy. A total of 97 infants received FOLE under the compassionate-use protocol for the treatment of PNALD. Eighty-three (86%) survived with resolution of cholestasis and 14 (14%) died. The median conjugated bilirubin (CB) concentration at the initiation of FOLE therapy was 4.8 mg/dL (range 2.1-26). The median time to resolution of cholestasis was 40 d (range 3-158). Compared with infants with mild cholestasis (CB of 2.1-5 mg/dL at the initiation of FOLE), nonsurvivors were significantly more premature and took longer to resolve their cholestasis. Gestational age at birth correlated inversely with CB at the beginning of FOLE and peak CB. Infants with an initial CB >10 mg/dL had a higher mortality rate than infants with an initial CB <5 mg/dL (35% vs. 6%; P < 0.05). Our experience with the use of FOLE in PNALD continues to be encouraging. Prematurity continues to be a major determinant in mortality and severity of cholestasis. This calls for further controlled studies designed to optimize dose and timing of intervention in the use of FOLE in neonates. PMID:24425724

  6. On the halo events observed by Mount Fuji and Mount Kanbala Emulsion Chamber Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, J. R.; Kuang, H. H.; Huo, A. X.; Lu, S. L.; Su, S.; Wang, Y. X.; Xue, Y. G.; Wang, C. R.; He, M.; Zhang, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    The intensity of big gamma-ray families associated by halo is obtained from Mt. Fuji experiment (650 g/sq.cm. atmospheric depth) and Mt. Kanbala experiment (515 g/sq.cm.). The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculation based on several assumptions on interaction mechanisms and the primary cosmic ray composition. The results suggest more than 3 times lower proton abundance among primaries than that of 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 13th eV region within the framework of quasi-scaling model of multiple production.

  7. Static versus energy-dependent nucleus-nucleus potential for description of sub-barrier fusion dynamics of {}_{8}^{16}O+{}^{112,116,120}\\!\\!\\!\\!\\!\\!{}_{50}Sn reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjeet Singh, Gautam

    2015-11-01

    The static and energy-dependent nucleus-nucleus potentials are simultaneously used along with the Wong formula for exploration of fusion dynamics of {}816O+{}112,116,120{}50Sn reactions. The role of internal structure degrees of freedom of colliding pairs, such as inelastic surface vibrations, are examined within the context of coupled channel calculations performed using the code CCFULL. Theoretical calculations based on the static Woods-Saxon potential along with the one-dimensional Wong formula fail to address the fusion data of {}816O+{}112,116,120{}50Sn reactions. Such discrepancies can be removed if one uses couplings to internal structure degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei. However, the energy-dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) accurately describes the sub-barrier fusion enhancement of {}816O+{}112,116,120{}50Sn reactions. Therefore, in sub-barrier fusion dynamics, energy dependence in the nucleus-nucleus potential governs barrier modification effects in a closely similar way to that of the coupled channel approach. Supported by Dr. D. S. Kothari Post-Doctoral Fellowship Scheme sponsored by University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India

  8. Results from NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Usai, G.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.

    2006-07-11

    The NA60 experiment studies open charm and prompt dimuon production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN SPS. During 2003 the experiment collected data in Indium-Indium collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon. In this paper the first results on low mass dimuons, intermediate mass dimuons and J/{psi} suppression are presented.

  9. Multiple emulsions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Khan, Azhar Yaqoob; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Iqbal, Zeenat; Ahmed, Farhan Jalees; Khar, Roop Krishan

    2006-10-01

    Multiple emulsions are complex polydispersed systems where both oil in water and water in oil emulsion exists simultaneously which are stabilized by lipophillic and hydrophilic surfactants respectively. The ratio of these surfactants is important in achieving stable multiple emulsions. Among water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) and oil-in-water-in-oil (o/w/o) type multiple emulsions, the former has wider areas of application and hence are studied in great detail. Formulation, preparation techniques and in vitro characterization methods for multiple emulsions are reviewed. Various factors affecting the stability of multiple emulsions and the stabilization approaches with specific reference to w/o/w type multiple emulsions are discussed in detail. Favorable drug release mechanisms and/or rate along with in vivo fate of multiple emulsions make them a versatile carrier. It finds wide range of applications in controlled or sustained drug delivery, targeted delivery, taste masking, bioavailability enhancement, enzyme immobilization, etc. Multiple emulsions have also been employed as intermediate step in the microencapsulation process and are the systems of increasing interest for the oral delivery of hydrophilic drugs, which are unstable in gastrointestinal tract like proteins and peptides. With the advancement in techniques for preparation, stabilization and rheological characterization of multiple emulsions, it will be able to provide a novel carrier system for drugs, cosmetics and pharmaceutical agents. In this review, emphasis is laid down on formulation, stabilization techniques and potential applications of multiple emulsion system. PMID:17076645

  10. Emulsion Droplet Combustion in Microgravity: Water/Heptane Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews a series of experiments to further examine parametric effects on sooting processes of droplet flames in microgravity. The particular focus is on a fuel droplet emulsified with water, specifically emulsions of n-heptane as the fuel-phase and water as the dispersed phase. Water was selected as the additive because of its anticipated effect on soot formation, and the heptane fuel phase was chosen to theoretically reduce the likelihood of microexplosions because its boiling point is nearly the same as that of water: 100 C for water and 98 C for heptane. The water content was varied while the initial droplet diameter was kept within a small range. The experiments were carried out in microgravity to reduce the effects of buoyancy and to promote spherical symmetry in the burning process. Spherically symmetric droplet burning is a convenient starting point for analysis, but experimental data are difficult to obtain for this situation as evidenced by the fact that no quantitative data have been reported on unsupported emulsion droplet combustion in a convection-free environment. The present study improves upon past work carried out on emulsion droplet combustion in microgravity which employed emulsion droplets suspended from a fiber. The fiber can be instrusive to the emulsion droplet burning process as it can promote coalescence of the dispersed water phase and heterogeneous nucleation on the fiber. Prior work has shown that the presence of water in liquid hydrocarbons can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the combustion process. Water is known to reduce soot formation and radiation heat transfer to combustor walls Gollahalli (1979) reduce flame temperatures and thereby NOx emissions, and encourage secondary droplet atomization or microexplosion. Water also tends to retard ignition and and promote early extinction. The former effect restricted the range of water volume fractions as discussed below.

  11. Abrupt changes in pentobarbital sensitivity in preBötzinger complex region, hypoglossal motor nucleus, nucleus tractus solitariius, and cortex during rat transitional period (P10–P15)

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Sara M. F.; Johnson, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    On postnatal days P10–P15 in rat medulla, neurotransmitter receptor subunit composition shifts towards a more mature phenotype. Since medullary GABAARs regulate cardiorespiratory function, abrupt alterations in GABAergic synaptic inhibition could disrupt homeostasis. We hypothesized that GABAARs on medullary neurons become more resistant to positive allosteric modulation during P10–P15. Medullary and cortical slices from P10–P20 rats were used to record spontaneous action potentials in pre-Botzinger Complex (preBötC-region), hypoglossal (XII) motor nucleus, nucleus tractus solitariius (NTS), and cortex during exposure to pentobarbital (positive allosteric modulator of GABAARs). On P14, pentobarbital resistance abruptly increased in preBötC-region and decreased in NTS, but these changes in pentobarbital resistance were not present on P15. Pentobarbital resistance decreased in XII motor nucleus during P11–P15 with a nadir at P14. Abrupt changes in pentobarbital resistance indicate changes in GABAergic receptor composition and function that may compensate for potential increased GABAergic inhibition and respiratory depression that occurs during this key developmental transitional period. PMID:25550216

  12. An instrument employing electronic counters and an emulsion chamber for studying heavy cosmic ray interactions (JACEE-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, R. W.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Selig, W. J.; Watts, J. W.; Burnett, T. H.; Iwai, J.; Lord, J. J.; Strauscz, S.; Wilkes, R. J.; Jones, W. V.

    1983-01-01

    A JACEE-3 instrument was flown on a balloon in June 1982 for 6.1 sq m sr hr exposure at an average atmospheric depth of 5 gm/sq cm in order to study the cosmic ray spectra, composition, and interactions above 1 TeV. The nucleus-nucleus interactions were studied above 20 GeV/amu from z = 6 to z = 26. The electronic counters contained gas Cerenkov structures with a 1.0-cm thick lead glass and a 1.27-cm thick Teflon radiator. A comparison to the instrument prototype is made. Based on the electronic counter event data, the finding efficiency of the hodoscope is noted to be near 100 percent for z greater than or equal to 22. A comparison is made between the hodoscope-predicted position and track found at P3 in an emulsion chamber.

  13. Forward backward studies of Ne-22(Si-28)-emulsion interactions at (4.1-4.5) AGeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, S. S.

    2006-10-01

    The characteristics of nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies are investigated for the interaction of Ne-22 and Si-28 with emulsion nuclei . The multiplicity and correlations of the forward (theta < 90 degrees) and backward (theta >= 90 degrees) secondary particles emitted are calculated according to the modified cascade and modified Fritiof models. The predictions of the two models are compared with experimental data at an incident momentum of (4.1-4.5) GeV/c per nucleon. Both models depend on the Monte Carlo techniques where the modified cascade model implies the superposition of nucleon-nucleon interactions, and the modified Fritiof model utilizes the Regge theory for the description of the cascading process. Comparison with data shows no clear preference of one model over the other. However, the modified Fritiof model seems to be nearer to the experimental data than the modified cascade model.

  14. Study of the diffusion of an emulsion in the human skin by pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy: experiment and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamar, N.; Lahjomri, F.; Chatri, E.; Leblanc, R. M.

    2004-12-01

    We previously used the Pulsed Photoacoustic Spectroscopy to quantify sunscreen chromophore diffusion into human skin, and suggested a methodology to evaluate the time and the depth diffusion profile into human skin. In the present study we present the results obtained for the diffusion of an emulsion in human skin, which is used in the sunscreen compositions. This study shows, for the first time, a particular behaviour due to a chemical reaction inside the skin during the diffusion process. This result brings a particularly interesting technique through the PPAS spectroscopy, to evaluate in situ, the eventual chemical reactions that can occur during drug diffusion into human skin. Numerical simulation allows us to understand the impact of thermal, optical and geometrical parameters on the photoacoustic signal and thus the physics of the diffusion phenomenon. The present simulation shows clearly that the tmax values corresponding to the maximum of the photoacoustic signal magnitude, Δ P max, decrease when the thickness, ell , of the sample decrease. Conclusions about possibilities and limitations of the considered model are discussed.

  15. Latest Developments in Nuclear Emulsion Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. These trajectories are recorded as tracks consist of a lot of silver grains. The size of silver grain is about 1 μm, so that nuclear emulsion has submicron three-dimensional spatial resolution, which gives us a few mrad three-dimensional angular resolution. The important technical progress was speed-up of the read-out technique of nuclear emulsions built with optical microscope system. We succeeded in developing a high-speed three-dimensional read-out system named Super Ultra Track Selector (S-UTS) with the operating read-out speed of approximately 50 cm2/h. Nowadays we are developing the nuclear emulsion gel independently in Nagoya University by introducing emulsion gel production machine. Moreover, we are developing nuclear emulsion production technologies (gel production, poring and mass production). In this paper, development of nuclear emulsion technologies for the OPERA experiment, applications by the technologies and current development are described.

  16. Fluctuations in transverse energy and mulitplicity, energy densities, and neutral pion spectra in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The main goal of the CERN heavy-ion experiments is the search for an indication that the predicted state of deconfined quarks and gluons, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), has been produced. The quantity most crucial to the probability of QGP formation is the thermalized energy density attained during the heavy-ion reaction. The amount of energy radiated transverse to the beam direction is the experimental quantity which is believed to be a measure of the amount of energy deposition in the reaction, and hence to reflect the energy density attained. In this presentation we consider the systematics of transverse energy production at CERN SPS energies, and we use the results to make estimates, under various assumptions, of attained energy densities.

  17. Oil emulsions of fluorosilicone fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, J. W.

    1985-08-27

    Emulsions of fluorosilicone fluids in mineral oil are disclosed. These emulsions are stabilized by a polydimethylsiloxane-polybutadiene copolymer or a polydimethylsiloxane-hydrogenated polybutadiene copplymer. The emulsions are an effective foam suppressant for organic liquids, especially crude petroleum.

  18. Resonant ultrasonic attenuation in emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Thomas; Mascaro, Benoit; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Raffy, Simon; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Leng, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    We report the achievement of scattering resonant emulsions devoted to the frequency-control of acoustic attenuation in the megahertz range. By means of robotics, we produced highly monodisperse, in both size and shape, fluorinated-oil droplet suspensions, providing experimental evidence of several Mie scattering resonances. Ultrasonic experiments performed in such complex media are compared, with an excellent quantitative agreement, to theoretical predictions derived within the framework of the independent scattering approximation.

  19. Method of breaking and emulsion and an emulsion-emulsion breaker composition

    SciTech Connect

    Salathiel, W. M.

    1985-05-14

    This invention relates to a composition of matter and to a method for producing a controllable, residue-free break of an emulsion or a dispersion of a water-in-oil emulsion. An emulsion breaker is incorporated into the emulsion. It is temporarily-protected (deactivated) so that breaking of the emulsion is initially avoided. By removing the protection, the breaker becomes active, and it acts to break the emulsion into its separate phases.

  20. Microfluidics with Gel Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Craig; Surenjav, Enkhtuul; Herminghaus, Stephan; Seemann, Ralf

    2006-03-01

    Microfluidic processing is usually achieved using single phase liquids. Instead, we use monodisperse emulsions to compartment liquids within microchannel geometries. At low continuous phase volume fractions, droplets self-organize to form well-defined arrangements, analogous to foam. While it is well-known that confined geometries can induce rearrangement of foam compartments at the millimeter-scale, similar dynamics are also expected for gel emulsions. We have studied online generation, organization and manipulation of gel emulsions using a variety of microchannel geometries. ``Passive'' reorganization, based on fixed channel geometries, can be supplemented by ``active'' manipulation by incorporating a ferrofluid phase. A ferromagnetic phase facilitates reorganization of liquid compartments on demand using an electromagnetic trigger. Moreover, coalescence between adjacent compartments within a gel emulsion can be induced using electrical potential. Microfluidics using gel emulsions will be well-suited for combinatorial chemistry, DNA sequencing, drug screening and protein crystallizations.

  1. Multidimensional analysis of data obtained in experiments with X-ray emulsion chambers and extensive air showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chilingaryan, A. A.; Galfayan, S. K.; Zazyan, M. Z.; Dunaevsky, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Nonparametric statistical methods are used to carry out the quantitative comparison of the model and the experimental data. The same methods enable one to select the events initiated by the heavy nuclei and to calculate the portion of the corresponding events. For this purpose it is necessary to have the data on artificial events describing the experiment sufficiently well established. At present, the model with the small scaling violation in the fragmentation region is the closest to the experiments. Therefore, the treatment of gamma families obtained in the Pamir' experiment is being carried out at present with the application of these models.

  2. Magnetoresistive Emulsion Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  3. Isotachophoresis with emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Goet, G.; Baier, T.; Hardt, S.; Sen, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study on isotachophoresis (ITP) in which an emulsion is used as leading electrolyte (LE) is reported. The study aims at giving an overview about the transport and flow phenomena occurring in that context. Generally, it is observed that the oil droplets initially dispersed in the LE are collected at the ITP transition zone and advected along with it. The detailed behavior at the transition zone depends on whether or not surfactants (polyvinylpyrrolidon, PVP) are added to the electrolytes. In a system without surfactants, coalescence is observed between the droplets collected at the ITP transition zone. After having achieved a certain size, the droplets merge with the channel walls, leaving an oil film behind. In systems with PVP, coalescence is largely suppressed and no merging of droplets with the channel walls is observed. Instead, at the ITP transition zone, a droplet agglomerate of increasing size is formed. In the initial stages of the ITP experiments, two counter rotating vortices are formed inside the terminating electrolyte. The vortex formation is qualitatively explained based on a hydrodynamic instability triggered by fluctuations of the number density of oil droplets. PMID:24404037

  4. Topical delivery of acetyl hexapeptide-8 from different emulsions: influence of emulsion composition and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hoppel, Magdalena; Reznicek, Gottfried; Khlig, Hanspeter; Kotisch, Harald; Resch, Gnter P; Valenta, Claudia

    2015-02-20

    Acetyl hexapeptide-8 (AH-8) is a well-known component of anti-aging products and was recently explored as a promising topical treatment of blepharospasm. Although AH-8 appears in a variety of cosmetic products, its skin penetration is sparsely studied and controversially discussed. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the vehicle type on the AH-8 delivery to the skin. Besides skin permeation experiments with Franz type diffusion cells, the spatial distribution of AH-8 in the stratum corneum after a real in-use application was investigated by in vitro tape stripping on porcine ear skin. By applying LC-MS/MS for quantification of AH-8, we demonstrated that a multiple water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsion can significantly increase penetration of AH-8 into porcine skin compared to simple O/W and W/O emulsions. The internal structure of the developed multiple emulsion was confirmed by electron microscopic investigations and NMR self diffusion studies. In general, a clear superiority of water-rich W/O/W and O/W emulsions over an oil-rich W/O emulsion in terms of dermal delivery of AH-8 was found. This enhanced delivery of AH-8 could be explained by an increased absorption of the water-rich emulsions into the skin, confirmed by combined ATR-FTIR and tape stripping experiments. PMID:25497319

  5. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  6. Magnetofluid emulsion: New magnetocontrolled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashtovoi, Victor G.; Yarmolchik, Yuri P.

    1994-03-01

    This study has shown that flow dynamics of emulsion consisting of magnetic and nonmagnetic fluids depends on applied magnetic field. So these emulsions may be considered as a magnetic field controlled medium, and in particular as a magnetic field controlled heat carrier. The new dates on rheological properties of these emulsions in the presence of magnetic field are described.

  7. Stability criteria for emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibette, J.; Morse, D. C.; Witten, T. A.; Weitz, D. A.

    1992-10-01

    The coalescence of monodisperse silicone oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate has been studied. We report the existence of a sharp destabilization threshold, controlled by surfactant chemical potential, osmotic pressure, and droplet diameter, at which the rate of coalescence increases dramatically. We present evidence that the stability of the emulsions can be characterized by two microscopic parameters: a minimum stable value of the surfactant chemical potential and a maximum value of the pressure exerted upon a droplet-droplet interface.

  8. Linear oil displacement by the emulsion entrapment process. [Dissertation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Lack of mobility control is one of the major impediments to successful enhanced oil recovery, especially for high viscosity oils. This work presents experimental and theoretical results for linear secondary oil displacements using dilute, stable suspensions of oil drops. The major hypothesis is that emulsions provide mobility control through entrapment or local permeability reduction, not through viscosity ratio improvement. In order to describe the displacement process, previous emulsion filtration theory is extended to longer cores and to two-phase flow. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is satisfactory for continuous secondary oil displacement with various drop-size emulsions in unconsolidated sand packs of permeabilities ranging from 0.7 ..mu..m/sup 2/ to 3.3 ..mu..m/sup 2/. Linear emulsion floods are shown to be most effective when the mean drop-size to pore-size ratio is in the region between straining and interception at the emulsion shock. Floods are more effective when the emulsion concentration is high which minimizes retention lag. Additionally, a parallel flooding apparatus is utilized to determine qualitatively the macroscopic benefits of emulsion mobility control. Direct analogies are established between augmented oil recovery with dilute emulsions and with entrapping polymers.

  9. Nano-emulsions of fluorinated trityl radicals as sensors for EPR oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, N.; Driesschaert, B.; Wauthoz, N.; Beghein, N.; Préat, V.; Amighi, K.; Marchand-Brynaert, J.; Gallez, B.

    2009-04-01

    This article reports the development and evaluation of two nano-emulsions (F45T-03/HFB and F15T-03/PFOB) containing fluorinated trityl radicals dissolved in perfluorocarbons. Preparation with a high-pressure homogenizer conferred sub-micronic size to both nano-emulsions. In vitro and in vivo EPR spectroscopy showed that the nano-emulsions had much greater oxygen sensitivity than the hydrophilic trityl, CT-03. In vivo experiments in rodents confirmed the ability of the nano-emulsions to follow the changes in oxygen concentration after induced ischemia. Histological evaluation of the tissue injected with the nano-emulsions revealed some acute toxicity for the F45T-03/HFB nano-emulsion but none for the F15T-03/PFOB nano-emulsion. These new formulations should be considered for further EPR oximetry experiments in pathophysiological situations where subtle changes in tissue oxygenation are expected.

  10. Transport and Retention of Emulsion Droplets in Sandy Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esahani, S. G.; Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Emulsions are commonly used as amendments during remediation; yet, the processes controlling the distribution of droplets within the subsurface are not well understood. Given that inadequate spatial and/or temporal delivery of amendments often leads to ineffective treatment, there is a need to better understand emulsion transport. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the transport and retention of emulsion droplets in columns containing Ottawa sands. Breakthrough curves and deposition profiles from these experiments were interrogated using a mathematical model capable of describing attachment, detachment, and straining to begin to elucidate the physical processes controlling delivery. Emulsions were constructed by stabilizing soybean oil droplets within a continuous aqueous phase. Physical properties of the resulting oil-in-water emulsions were favorable for subsurface delivery (nominal properties: 1 g/mL density; 10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet d50). Emulsions were introduced to the columns for approximately two pore volumes and followed by an extended flush of background solution. Effluent droplet size distributions did not vary significantly over the course of the experiment and remained similar to those measured for the influent emulsion. Emulsion breakthrough curves exhibited tailing, and deposition profiles were found to be hyper-exponential and unaffected by extended periods of background flow. Depending on emulsion composition and flow characteristics, 10-30% of the injected emulsion was retained on the sand suggesting a non-negligible influence on accessible porosity over the course of the experiment. Experimental results were further interpreted using a droplet transport model that accounts for temporal and spatial variation in porosity due to the retention of the emulsion droplets. At present the model assumes a uniform size distribution of inelastic emulsion droplets which are transported by advection and dispersion, and exchanged with the solid phase through attachment, detachment, and straining processes. Results examine the relative roles of attachment-detachment and straining in reducing the accessible porosity. Evaluation of how the porosity change influences the flow regime for moderately and slightly clogged media is currently under investigation.

  11. Role of continuous phase protein on the oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Habibollah; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2004-07-14

    Whey protein isolate (WPI), soy protein isolate (SPI), and sodium caseinate (CAS) can inhibit lipid oxidation when they produce a positive charge at the interface of emulsion droplets. However, when proteins are used to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions, only a fraction of them actually absorb to the emulsion droplets, with the rest remaining in the continuous phase. The impact of these continuous phase proteins on the oxidative stability of protein-stabilized emulsions is not well understood. WPI-stabilized menhaden oil-in-water emulsions were prepared by high-pressure homogenization. In some experiments WPI was removed from the continuous phase of the emulsions through repeated centrifugation and resuspension of the emulsion droplets (washed emulsion). Unwashed emulsions were more oxidatively stable than washed emulsions at pH 7.0, suggesting that continuous phase proteins were antioxidative. The oxidative stability of emulsions containing different kinds of protein in the continuous phase decreased in the order SPI > CAS > WPI, as determined by both hydroperoxide and headspace propanal formation. Iron-binding studies showed that the chelating ability of the proteins decreased in the order CAS > SPI > WPI. The free sulfhydryls of both WPI and SPI were involved in their antioxidant activity. This research shows that continuous phase proteins could be an effective means of protecting omega-3 fatty acids from oxidative deterioration. PMID:15237967

  12. Double Emulsion Templated Celloidosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriaga, Laura R.; Marquez, Samantha M.; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Chang, Connie; Wilking, Jim; Monroy, Francisco; Marquez, Manuel; Weitz, David A.

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel approach for fabricating celloidosomes, which represent a hollow and spherical three-dimensional self-assembly of living cells encapsulating an aqueous core. Glass- capillary microfluidics is used to generate monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion templates using lipids as stabilizers. Such templates allow for obtaining single but also double concentric celloidosomes. In addition, after a solvent removal step the double emulsion templates turn into monodisperse lipid vesicles, whose membrane spontaneously phase separates when choosing the adequate lipid composition, providing the adequate scaffold for fabricating Janus-celloidosomes. These structures may find applications in the development of bioreactors in which the synergistic effects of two different types of cells selectively adsorbed on one of the vesicle hemispheres may be exploited.

  13. FINE GRAIN NUCLEAR EMULSION

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, A.J.

    1962-04-24

    A method of preparing nuclear track emulsions having mean grain sizes less than 0.1 microns is described. The method comprises adding silver nitrate to potassium bromide at a rate at which there is always a constant, critical excess of silver ions. For minimum size grains, the silver ion concentration is maintained at the critical level of about pAg 2.0 to 5.0 during prectpitation, pAg being defined as the negative logarithm of the silver ion concentration. It is preferred to eliminate the excess silver at the conclusion of the precipitation steps. The emulsion is processed by methods in all other respects generally similar to the methods of the prior art. (AEC)

  14. Oil-in-oil emulsions stabilised solely by solid particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-01-21

    A brief review of the stabilisation of emulsions of two immiscible oils is given. We then describe the use of fumed silica particles coated with either hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon groups in acting as sole stabilisers of emulsions of various vegetable oils with linear silicone oils (PDMS) of different viscosity. Transitional phase inversion of emulsions, containing equal volumes of the two oils, from silicone-in-vegetable (S/V) to vegetable-in-silicone (V/S) occurs upon increasing the hydrophobicity of the particles. Close to inversion, emulsions are stable to coalescence and gravity-induced separation for at least one year. Increasing the viscosity of the silicone oil enables stable S/V emulsions to be prepared even with relatively hydrophilic particles. Predictions of emulsion type from calculated contact angles of a silica particle at the oil-oil interface are in agreement with experiment provided a small polar contribution to the surface energy of the oils is included. We also show that stable multiple emulsions of V/S/V can be prepared in a two-step procedure using two particle types of different hydrophobicity. At fixed particle concentration, catastrophic phase inversion of emulsions from V/S to S/V can be effected by increasing the volume fraction of vegetable oil. Finally, in the case of sunflower oil + 20 cS PDMS, the study is extended to particles other than silica which differ in chemical type, particle size and particle shape. Consistent with the above findings, we find that only sufficiently hydrophobic particles (clay, zinc oxide, silicone, calcium carbonate) can act as efficient V/S emulsion stabilisers. PMID:26549699

  15. Showing Emulsion Properties with Common Dairy Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Diaz, Carlos; Gonzalez-Romero, Elisa

    1996-09-01

    Foods are mixtures of different chemical compounds, and the quality we sense (taste, texture, color, etc.) are all manifestations of its chemical properties. Some of them can be visualized with the aid of simple, safe and inexpensive experiments using dairy products that can be found in any kitchen and using almost exclusively kitchen utensils. In this paper we propose some of them related with food emulsions. Food emulsions cover an extremely wide area of daily-life applications such as milk, sauces, dressings and beverages. Experimentation with some culinary recipes to prepare them and the analyisis of the observed results is close to ideal subject for the introduction of chemical principles, allowing to discuss about the nature and composition of foods, the effects of additives, etc. At the same time it allows to get insights into the scientific reasons that underlie on the recipes (something that it is not usually found in most cookbooks). For example, when making an emulsion like mayonnaise, why the egg yolks and water are the first materials in the bowl , and the oil is added to them rather than in the other way around? How you can "rescue" separate emulsions (mayonnaise)? Which parameters affect emulsion stability? Since safety, in its broad sense, is the first requisite for any food, concerns about food exist throughout the world and the more we are aware of our everyday life, the more likely we will be to deal productively with the consequences. On the other hand, understanding what foods are and how cooking works destroys no delightful mystery of the art of cuisine, instead the mystery expands.

  16. Geranyl acetate emulsions: surfactant association structures and emulsion inversion.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Stig E; Al-Bawab, Abeer; Bozeya, Ayat; Aikens, Patricia A

    2009-08-01

    Three emulsions of geranyl acetate (GA)-in-water (W) with identical GA/W ratios and varying surfactant (S), Laureth 4, a commercial C(12)EO (4) compound, fractions were investigated for nature and stability. The emulsions with up to 6% surfactant were W/O, as expected with respect to the solubility of the surfactant in the oil. At 10% surfactant, the aqueous phase became the continuous one and the apparent stability of the emulsion was significantly enhanced. Analysis of the phase diagram and experimental evidence showed the high water content emulsion to be a liquid crystal-in-water emulsion; a kind that did not change even at extreme O/W and LC/W ratios. PMID:19409570

  17. Experimental feature in the primary-proton flux at energies above 10 TeV according to the results of searches for primary particles in nuclear emulsions exposed in the stratosphere (RUNJOB Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2008-02-15

    In the RUNJOB experiment, a long-term exposure of x-ray emulsion chambers in the stratosphere from 1995 to 1999 with the aim of studying the composition and spectra of primary cosmic particles in the energy range 10-1000 TeV per nucleon revealed about 50% proton tracks. The remaining events of the proton group did not feature any candidate for a track of a singly charged particle within the search region determined from measurements of the coordinates of background nuclei going close to the sought track. Methodological factors that could explain this experimental observation are considered. A possible physical reason associated with the presence of a neutral component in the flux of primary protons in the energy region above 10 TeV is also analyzed.

  18. Electromagnetic scale models using emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Glenn S.; Scott, Waymond R., Jr.

    1989-04-01

    The electrical constitutive parameters of materials in a scale model and the corresponding full-sized system must satisfy certain relationships. Thus, it is desirable to have a series of materials with a range of electrical parameters or mixtures of materials with adjustable electrical parameters for use in scale models. Simple emulsions are examined as materials with adjustable electrical constitutive parameters. These emulsions are mixtures of soil, saline solution, and a suitable stabilizing agency (emulsifier). Since the relative permittivities of oil and water are around two and eighty, respectively, a large range of permittivity can be obtained for the emulsions. The conductivity of the emulsions can be adjusted by changing the normality of the saline solution. A series of oil-in-water emulsions (oil droplets in water), suitable for use in scale models, is developed; this includes the selection of an appropriate emulsifier. The electrical constitutive parameters of these emulsions are adjustable over wide ranges, and are predictable from a simple formula. As an example, an emulsion that is a scale model for red clay earth is described. This emulsion matches the electrical constitutive parameters of the clay, including the dispersion in the conductivity, over a ten-to-one frequency range.

  19. Programmed emulsions for sodium reduction in emulsion based foods.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Natalie; Hewson, Louise; Fisk, Ian; Wolf, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    In this research a microstructure approach to reduce sodium levels in emulsion based foods is presented. If successful, this strategy will enable reduction of sodium without affecting consumer satisfaction with regard to salty taste. The microstructure approach comprised of entrapment of sodium in the internal aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water emulsions. These were designed to destabilise during oral processing when in contact with the salivary enzyme amylase in combination with the mechanical manipulation of the emulsion between the tongue and palate. Oral destabilisation was achieved through breakdown of the emulsion that was stabilised with a commercially modified octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA)-starch. Microstructure breakdown and salt release was evaluated utilising in vitro, in vivo and sensory methods. For control emulsions, stabilised with orally inert proteins, no loss of structure and no release of sodium from the internal aqueous phase was found. The OSA-starch microstructure breakdown took the initial form of oil droplet coalescence. It is hypothesised that during this coalescence process sodium from the internalised aqueous phase is partially released and is therefore available for perception. Indeed, programmed emulsions showed an enhancement in saltiness perception; a 23.7% reduction in sodium could be achieved without compromise in salty taste (p < 0.05; 120 consumers). This study shows a promising new approach for sodium reduction in liquid and semi-liquid emulsion based foods. PMID:25865459

  20. A quality by design approach to optimization of emulsions for electrospinning using factorial and D-optimal designs.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Mariam A; El-Khordagui, Labiba K

    2014-07-16

    Emulsion electrospinning is a multifactorial process used to generate nanofibers loaded with hydrophilic drugs or macromolecules for diverse biomedical applications. Emulsion electrospinnability is greatly impacted by the emulsion pharmaceutical attributes. The aim of this study was to apply a quality by design (QbD) approach based on design of experiments as a risk-based proactive approach to achieve predictable critical quality attributes (CQAs) in w/o emulsions for electrospinning. Polycaprolactone (PCL)-thickened w/o emulsions containing doxycycline HCl were formulated using a Span 60/sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) emulsifier blend. The identified emulsion CQAs (stability, viscosity and conductivity) were linked with electrospinnability using a 3(3) factorial design to optimize emulsion composition for phase stability and a D-optimal design to optimize stable emulsions for viscosity and conductivity after shifting the design space. The three independent variables, emulsifier blend composition, organic:aqueous phase ratio and polymer concentration, had a significant effect (p<0.05) on emulsion CQAs, the emulsifier blend composition exerting prominent main and interaction effects. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of emulsion-electrospun NFs and desirability functions allowed modeling of emulsion CQAs to predict electrospinnable formulations. A QbD approach successfully built quality in electrospinnable emulsions, allowing development of hydrophilic drug-loaded nanofibers with desired morphological characteristics. PMID:24704153

  1. Preparation of Pickering Double Emulsions Using Block Copolymer Worms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rational formulation of Pickering double emulsions is described using a judicious combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic block copolymer worms as highly anisotropic emulsifiers. More specifically, RAFT dispersion polymerization was utilized to prepare poly(lauryl methacrylate)–poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 20% w/w solids in n-dodecane and poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)–poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate)–poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 13% w/w solids in water by polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions can be readily prepared with mean droplet diameters ranging from 30 to 80 μm using a two-stage approach. First, a w/o precursor emulsion comprising 25 μm aqueous droplets is prepared using the hydrophobic worms, followed by encapsulation within oil droplets stabilized by the hydrophilic worms. The double emulsion droplet diameter and number of encapsulated water droplets can be readily varied by adjusting the stirring rate employed during the second stage. For each stage, the droplet volume fraction is relatively high at 0.50. The double emulsion nature of the final formulation was confirmed by optical and fluorescence microscopy studies. Such double emulsions are highly stable to coalescence, with little or no change in droplet diameter being detected over storage at 20 °C for 10 weeks as judged by laser diffraction. Preliminary experiments indicate that the complementary o/w/o emulsions can also be prepared using the same pair of worms by changing the order of homogenization, although somewhat lower droplet volume fractions were required in this case. Finally, we demonstrate that triple and even quadruple emulsions can be formulated using these new highly anisotropic Pickering emulsifiers. PMID:25834923

  2. Preparation of Pickering double emulsions using block copolymer worms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Mable, Charlotte J; Lane, Jacob A; Derry, Mathew J; Fielding, Lee A; Armes, Steven P

    2015-04-14

    The rational formulation of Pickering double emulsions is described using a judicious combination of hydrophilic and hydrophobic block copolymer worms as highly anisotropic emulsifiers. More specifically, RAFT dispersion polymerization was utilized to prepare poly(lauryl methacrylate)-poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 20% w/w solids in n-dodecane and poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate)-poly(benzyl methacrylate) worms at 13% w/w solids in water by polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions can be readily prepared with mean droplet diameters ranging from 30 to 80 μm using a two-stage approach. First, a w/o precursor emulsion comprising 25 μm aqueous droplets is prepared using the hydrophobic worms, followed by encapsulation within oil droplets stabilized by the hydrophilic worms. The double emulsion droplet diameter and number of encapsulated water droplets can be readily varied by adjusting the stirring rate employed during the second stage. For each stage, the droplet volume fraction is relatively high at 0.50. The double emulsion nature of the final formulation was confirmed by optical and fluorescence microscopy studies. Such double emulsions are highly stable to coalescence, with little or no change in droplet diameter being detected over storage at 20 °C for 10 weeks as judged by laser diffraction. Preliminary experiments indicate that the complementary o/w/o emulsions can also be prepared using the same pair of worms by changing the order of homogenization, although somewhat lower droplet volume fractions were required in this case. Finally, we demonstrate that triple and even quadruple emulsions can be formulated using these new highly anisotropic Pickering emulsifiers. PMID:25834923

  3. Protein Fibrils Induce Emulsion Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jinfeng; Simon, Joana Ralfas; Venema, Paul; van der Linden, Erik

    2016-03-01

    The behavior of an oil-in-water emulsion was studied in the presence of protein fibrils for a wide range of fibril concentrations by using rheology, diffusing wave spectroscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results showed that above a minimum fibril concentration depletion flocculation occurred, leading to oil droplet aggregation and enhanced creaming of the emulsion. Upon further increasing the concentration of the protein fibrils, the emulsions were stabilized. In this stable regime both aggregates of droplets and single droplets are present, and these aggregates are smaller than the aggregates in the flocculated emulsion samples at the lower fibril concentrations. The size of the droplet aggregates in the stabilized emulsions is independent of fibril concentration. In addition, the droplet aggregation was reversible upon dilution both by a pH 2 HCl solution and by a fibril solution at the same concentration. The viscosity of the emulsions containing fibrils was comparable to that of the pure fibril solution. Neither fibril networks nor droplet gel networks were observed in our study. The stabilization mechanism of emulsions containing long protein fibrils at high protein fibril concentrations points toward the mechanism of a kinetic stabilization. PMID:26882086

  4. The Preparation and Testing of a Common Emulsion and Personal Care Product: Lotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabrouk, Suzanne T.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical analysis of lotions, which comprises of categorizations of moisturizers and emulsions, with the preparation and testing of three lotions, is done. The experiment piques students' interest in preparing lotions and emulsions, and proves the value of chemistry in satisfying the needs of everyday life.

  5. Thermocapillary Motion in an Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukhnachov, Vladislav V.; Voinov, Oleg V.

    1996-01-01

    The phenomenological model for the motion of an emulsion or a gas-liquid mixture exposed to thermocapillary forces and micro-acceleration is formulated. The analytical and numerical investigation of one-dimensional flows for these media is fulfilled, the structure of discontinuous motion is studied. The stability conditions of a space-uniform state and of the interface between an emulsion and a pure liquid are obtained.

  6. Responsiveness of emulsions stabilized by lactoferrin nano-particles to simulated intestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Meshulam, Dafna; Lesmes, Uri

    2014-01-01

    There is an upsurge of interest in the use of nano-particles to fabricate emulsions and modulate their functionality, with particular emphasis on modulating emulsion digestive fate. Food grade nano-particles formed through controlled processing and electrostatic biopolymer interactions are yet to be systematically studied for their ability to stabilize emulsions and modulate emulsion digestibility. This study focused on the responsiveness of emulsions stabilized by lactoferrin (LF) nano-particles (NPs) and dietary fibers to key digestive parameters. Compared to native LF, LF-NPs comprised emulsion exhibited elevated creaming rates as evident from accelerated stability tests performed by analytical centrifugation. The electrostatic deposition of alginate or carrageenan onto the LF-NPs significantly improved the stability of the corresponding emulsions. Further, the use of various nano-particles showed to have both beneficial and deleterious effects on emulsion responsiveness to pH (2.0 < pH < 10.0), CaCl2 (0-40 mM) and bile (0-25 mg mL(-1)). Simulated pH-stat lipolysis experiments show that the use of LF or LF-NPs had no marked effect on lipolysis. Intriguingly, the use of LF-NPs and alginate reduced emulsion lipolysis by 14% while the use of LF-NPs and carrageenan increased lipolysis by 10%. Microscopy images as well as droplet characterization in terms of size and charge indicate that the altered emulsion responsiveness may be due to physical differences in emulsion properties (e.g. droplet size) and overall organization during digestion (e.g. aggregation vs. coalescence). Overall, this study's insights could prospectively be used to harness protein nano-particles to tweak emulsion behavior during digestion. PMID:24247725

  7. Mechanism of nanocapsules formation by the emulsion-diffusion process.

    PubMed

    Moinard-Chécot, Delphine; Chevalier, Yves; Briançon, Stéphanie; Beney, Laurent; Fessi, Hatem

    2008-01-15

    A detailed investigation into the mechanisms of nanocapsule formation by means of the two stages "emulsion-diffusion" process is reported. Such widely used process is still poorly understood. An emulsion of oil, polymer and ethyl acetate is fabricated as a first step; dilution with pure water allows ethyl acetate to diffuse out from the droplets, leaving a suspension of nanocapsules at the end. It has been shown that the size of nanocapsules was related to the chemical composition of the organic phase and the size of primary emulsion through a simple geometrical relationship. As a consequence, most of the properties of the nanocapsules were decided at the emulsification step. The influence of several formulation and processing parameters of the primary emulsion was studied accordingly. The thin polymer membrane of nanocapsules was observed by means of cryo-fracture electron microscopy. Finally two experiments were designed for a mechanistic investigation of the diffusion step. A step-by-step diffusion of the organic solvent takes place by successive partition equilibria of ethyl acetate between the droplets and aqueous phase. A time-resolved experiment shows the fast diffusion (less than 20 ms) related to the small droplet size of the emulsion. PMID:17936772

  8. Particle Identification in Nuclear Emulsion by Measuring Multiple Coulomb Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Than Tint, Khin; Nakazawa, Kazuma; Yoshida, Junya; Kyaw Soe, Myint; Mishina, Akihiro; Kinbara, Shinji; Itoh, Hiroki; Endo, Yoko; Kobayashi, Hidetaka; E07 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We are developing particle identification techniques for single charged particles such as Xi, proton, K and ? by measuring multiple Coulomb scattering in nuclear emulsion. Nuclear emulsion is the best three dimensional detector for double strangeness (S = -2) nuclear system. We expect to accumulate about 10000 Xi-minus stop events which produce double lambda hypernucleus in J-PARC E07 emulsion counter hybrid experiment. The purpose of this particle identification (PID) in nuclear emulsion is to purify Xi-minus stop events which gives information about production probability of double hypernucleus and branching ratio of decay mode. Amount of scattering parameterized as angular distribution and second difference is inversely proportional to the momentum of particle. We produced several thousands of various charged particle tracks in nuclear emulsion stack via Geant4 simulation. In this talk, PID with some measuring methods for multiple scattering will be discussed by comparing with simulation data and real Xi-minus stop events in KEK-E373 experiment.

  9. Rheology of Sodium Caseinate Stabilized Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    PubMed

    Dickinson; Golding

    1997-07-01

    We report on shear rheological measurements at 30°C of fine oil-in-water emulsions (volume-surface average diameter < 0.5 &mgr;m) prepared at pH 6.8 with sodium caseinate as the sole emulsifier (1-6 wt%) and n -tetradecane as the dispersed phase (10, 35, or 45 vol%). Strong sensitivity of rheological behavior to total protein concentration was indicated by both steady-state viscometry and small-deformation oscillatory experiments. The behavior can be classified into three types, depending on the protein/oil ratio. (1) Emulsions containing insufficient protein for (near-) saturation protein surface coverage develop a time-dependent increase in low-stress apparent viscosity and associated shear-thinning behavior; this can be attributed to bridging flocculation. (2) Emulsions having full protein surface coverage but relatively little excess unadsorbed protein in the continuous phase are stable Newtonian liquids. (3) Emulsions containing a substantial excess of unadsorbed sodium caseinate exhibit considerable pseudoplasticity which can be attributed to depletion flocculation. Taken as a whole, the time-dependent rheological properties for this set of emulsions as a function of protein content and oil volume fraction are largely consistent with our previous results on the creaming stability and the particle gel microstructure for these same emulsion systems. In particular, the reversible flocculation of emulsion samples of high protein content is readily explicable in terms of depletion flocculation of droplets by unadsorbed protein existing in the form of approximately spherical caseinate submicelles. PMID:9241217

  10. The effect of oil components on the physicochemical properties and drug delivery of emulsions: tocol emulsion versus lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chi-Feng; Fang, Chia-Lang; Liao, Mei-Hui; Fang, Jia-You

    2007-04-20

    An emulsion system composed of vitamin E, coconut oil, soybean phosphatidylcholine, non-ionic surfactants, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives (referred to as the tocol emulsion) was characterized in terms of its physicochemical properties, drug release, in vivo efficacy, toxicity, and stability. Systems without vitamin E (referred to as the lipid emulsion) and without any oils (referred to as the aqueous micelle system) were prepared for comparison. A lipophilic antioxidant, resveratrol, was used as the model drug for emulsion loading. The incorporation of Brij 35 and PEG derivatives reduced the vesicle diameter to <100nm. The inclusion of resveratrol into the emulsions and aqueous micelles retarded the drug release. The in vitro release rate showed a decrease in the order of aqueous micelle system>tocol emulsion>lipid emulsion. Treatment of resveratrol dramatically reduced the intimal hyperplasia of the injured vascular wall in rats. There was no significant difference in this reduction when resveratrol was delivered by either emulsion or the aqueous micelle system. The percentages of erythrocyte hemolysis by the emulsions and aqueous micelle system were approximately 0 and approximately 10%, respectively. Vitamin E prevented the aggregation of emulsion vesicles. The mean vesicle size of the tocol emulsion remained unchanged during 30 days at 37 degrees C. The lipid emulsion and aqueous micelle system, respectively, showed 11- and 16-fold increases in vesicle size after 30 days of storage. PMID:17129692

  11. Reduction of oxygen from electrolyte emulsions with high oxygen contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberger, H.; Bruckner, K.; Fabjan, Ch

    The kinetics of oxygen reduction from electrolyte emulsions containing oxygen carriers was studied with respect to fuel cell applications. Electrochemical experiments including stationary and nonstationary measurements under defined hydrodynamic conditions at a rotating platinum disk electrode revealed that diffusion-controlled limiting currents can be increased significantly at high oxygen concentrations. Additionally, the limiting currents show a strong correlation with the composition and the structure of the emulsions. In particular, the average droplet size of the organic phase and its distribution depends on the nature of the emulsifying agents used for stabilisation. The complex hydrodynamic behaviour of two-phase electrolyte emulsions and the influence of different surfactants seem to outweigh the effect of the total oxygen concentration on the transport kinetics of oxygen.

  12. Arrested of coalescence of emulsion droplets of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Burke, Christopher; Blair, Donald W.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    With applications ranging from food products to cosmetics via targeted drug delivery systems, structured anisotropic colloids provide an efficient way to control the structure, properties and functions of emulsions. When two fluid emulsion droplets are brought in contact, a reduction of the interfacial tension drives their coalescence into a larger droplet of the same total volume and reduced exposed area. This coalescence can be partially or totally hindered by the presence of nano or micron-size particles that coat the interface as in Pickering emulsions. We investigate numerically the dependance of the mechanical stability of these arrested shapes on the particles size, their shape anisotropy, their polydispersity, their interaction with the solvent, and the particle-particle interactions. We discuss structural shape changes that can be induced by tuning the particles interactions after arrest occurs, and provide design parameters for the relevant experiments.

  13. High speed automated microtomography of nuclear emulsions and recent application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tioukov, V.; Aleksandrov, A.; Consiglio, L.; De Lellis, G.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-12-01

    The development of high-speed automatic scanning systems was the key-factor for massive and successful emulsions application for big neutrino experiments like OPERA. The emulsion detector simplicity, the unprecedented sub-micron spatial resolution and the unique ability to provide intrinsically 3-dimensional spatial information make it a perfect device for short-living particles study, where the event topology should be precisely reconstructed in a 10-100 um scale vertex region. Recently the exceptional technological progress in image processing and automation together with intensive R&D done by Italian and Japanese microscopy groups permit to increase the scanning speed to unbelievable few years ago m2/day scale and so greatly extend the range of the possible applications for emulsion-based detectors to other fields like: medical imaging, directional dark matter search, nuclear physics, geological and industrial applications.

  14. Hadrons registration in emulsion chamber with carbon block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaszewski, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear-electro-magnetic cascade (NEC) in X-ray emulsion chambers with carbon block, which are usually used in the Pamir experiment, was Monte-Carlo simulated. Going over from optical density to Summary E sub gamma is discussed. The hole of NEC in the interpretation of energy spectra is analyzed.

  15. Interfacial mechanisms in active emulsions.

    PubMed

    Herminghaus, Stephan; Maass, Corinna C; Krüger, Carsten; Thutupalli, Shashi; Goehring, Lucas; Bahr, Christian

    2014-09-28

    Active emulsions, i.e., emulsions whose droplets perform self-propelled motion, are of tremendous interest for mimicking collective phenomena in biological populations such as phytoplankton and bacterial colonies, but also for experimentally studying rheology, pattern formation, and phase transitions in systems far from thermal equilibrium. For fuelling such systems, molecular processes involving the surfactants which stabilize the emulsions are a straightforward concept. We outline and compare two different types of reactions, one which chemically modifies the surfactant molecules, the other which transfers them into a different colloidal state. While in the first case symmetry breaking follows a standard linear instability, the second case turns out to be more complex. Depending on the dissolution pathway, there is either an intrinsically nonlinear instability, or no symmetry breaking at all (and hence no locomotion). PMID:24924906

  16. Scaling properties of fractional momentum loss of high-pT hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions at √{sN N} from 62.4 GeV to 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Ta'Ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, T. W.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deaton, M. B.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K.-B.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimamyi, J.; Zolin, L.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of the fractional momentum loss (Sloss≡δ pT/pT ) of high-transverse-momentum-identified hadrons in heavy-ion collisions are presented. Using π0 in Au +Au and Cu +Cu collisions at √{sNN}=62.4 and 200 GeV measured by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and and charged hadrons in Pb +Pb collisions measured by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, we studied the scaling properties of Sloss as a function of a number of variables: the number of participants, Npart, the number of quark participants, Nqp, the charged-particle density, d Nch/d η , and the Bjorken energy density times the equilibration time, ɛBjτ0 . We find that the pT, where Sloss has its maximum, varies both with centrality and collision energy. Above the maximum, Sloss tends to follow a power-law function with all four scaling variables. The data at √{sNN}=200 GeV and 2.76 TeV, for sufficiently high particle densities, have a common scaling of Sloss with d Nch/d η and ɛBjτ0 , lending insight into the physics of parton energy loss.

  17. Advances with holographic DESA emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünkel, Lothar; Eichler, Jürgen; Schneeweiss, Claudia; Ackermann, Gerhard

    2006-02-01

    DESA emulsions represent layer systems based on ultra-fine grained silver halide (AgX) technology. The new layers have an excellent performance for holographic application. The technology has been presented repeatedly in recent years, including the emulsion characterization and topics of chemical and spectral sensitization. The paper gives a survey of actual results referring to panchromatic sensitization and other improvements like the application of silver halide sensitized gelatine (SHSG) procedure. These results are embedded into intensive collaborations with small and medium enterprises (SME's) to commercialize DESA layers. Predominant goals are innovative products with holographic components and layers providing as well as cost effectiveness and high quality.

  18. Rapid crystallization and morphological adjustment of zeolite ZSM-5 in nonionic emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ying; Jin Chao

    2011-01-15

    Zeolite ZSM-5 was synthesized for the first time in a nonionic emulsion composed of polyoxyethylated alkylphenol, butanol, cyclohexane and tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAOH)-containing zeolite synthesis mixture. The crystallization kinetics in the emulsion was investigated and the ZSM-5 product was characterized in detail by XRD, SEM, FT-IR, TG, N{sub 2} adsorption and CHN analysis techniques. Compared with the conventionally hydrothermal synthesis with the same structure directing agent TEAOH, the emulsion system allows rapid crystallization of ZSM-5. The ZSM-5 product exhibits unusual agglomerated structure and possesses larger specific surface area. The FT-IR, TG results plus CHN analysis show the encapsulation of a trace of emulsion components in the emulsion ZSM-5. Control experiments show the emulsion system exerts the crystallization induction and morphological adjustment effects mainly during the aging period. The effects are tentatively attributed to the confined space domains, surfactant-water interaction as well as surfactant-growing crystals interaction existing in the emulsion. -- Graphical abstract: The nonionic emulsion synthesis allows rapid crystallization and morphological adjustment of zeolite ZSM-5 compared with the conventional hydrothermal synthesis. Display Omitted

  19. Modeling of the centering force in a compound emulsion to make uniform plastic shells for laser fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Norimatsu, T.; Izawa, Y.; Mima, K.; Gresho, P.M.

    1999-03-01

    In laser fusion experiment, fuel capsules with high sphericity and high wall-thickness uniformity are often fabricated by the emulsion method. To understand the process of forming the uniform wall by the emulsion method and to further improve the thickness uniformity, the formulated a model to simulate the centering process of a water globule in a compound emulsion. The authors newly added a thermodynamic force to the centering force in addition to previous hydrodynamic forces. The results indicate that nonuniform emulsion turns to be uniform by repeating instantaneous deformations followed with continuous rotation around the horizontal axis.

  20. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of ‘minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions. PMID:26797564

  1. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of `minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions.

  2. Nucleus-nucleus collisions at very high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, O.

    1990-01-01

    The present report covers the material of two lectures. The first part, contains a collection of useful formulae from relativistic kinematics and deals with invariant cross sections and multiplicities. The remainder of the paper is on strangeness production in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Some elementary rules for particle production in nucleon-nucleon interactions are presented. This paper also contains arguments on why one expects enhanced strange particle production from the quark-gluon plasma. Next is presented some selected data on strangeness production in Si + Au and other interactions at 14.6 GeV/c per nucleon and from S + S at 200 GeV/c per nucleon. Some conclusions drawn from the experimental results are presented. 10 refs.

  3. Barrier distribution for a ‘superheavy’ nucleus nucleus collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntshangase, S. S.; Rowley, N.; Bark, R. A.; Förtsch, S. V.; Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lindsay, R.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Maliage, S. M.; Mudau, L. J.; Mullins, S. M.; Ndwandwe, O. M.; Neveling, R.; Sletten, G.; Smit, F. D.; Theron, C.

    2007-07-01

    Large-angle quasielastic scattering has been studied in a high- ZZ nuclear reaction of the type leading to superheavy-element production by cold fusion. We show that despite the presence of strongly dissipative channels, and the complete absence of fusion, the notion of an external barrier distribution, determined by strong coupling to collective excitations of target and projectile, is still valid. Furthermore, our method allows us to deduce some properties of the deep-inelastic processes in this system.

  4. Adelphi-Goddard emulsified fuel project. [using water/oil emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Thermal efficiency and particle emissions were studied using water/oil emulsions. These studies were done using number 2 and number 6 fuel oil. The number 6 oil had a sulfur content greater than one percent and experiments were conducted to remove the sulfur dioxide from the stack gases. Test findings include: (1) emulsion effected a reduction in soot at a low excess air levels; (2) a steam atomizing system will produce a water/oil emulsion. The fuel in the study was emulsified in the steam atomization process, hence, pre-emulsification did not yield a dramatic reduction in soot or an increase in thermal efficiency.

  5. Analysis of emulsion stability in acrylic dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions either micro or nano permit transport or solubilization of hydrophobic substances within a water-based phase. Different methods have been introduced at laboratory and industrial scales: mechanical stirring, high-pressure homogenization, or ultrasonics. In digital imaging, toners may be formed by aggregating a colorant with a latex polymer formed by batch or semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. Latex emulsions are prepared by making a monomer emulsion with monomer like Beta-carboxy ethyl acrylate (β-CEA) and stirring at high speed with an anionic surfactant like branched sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonates , aqueous solution until an emulsion is formed. Initiator for emulsion polymerization is 2-2'- azobis isobutyramide dehydrate with chain transfer agent are used to make the latex. If the latex emulsion is unstable, the resulting latexes produce a toner with larger particle size, broader particle size distribution with relatively higher latex sedimentation, and broader molecular weight distribution. Oswald ripening and coalescence cause droplet size to increase and can result in destabilization of emulsions. Shear thinning and elasticity of emulsions are applied to determine emulsion stability.

  6. Measurement of dileptons with the CBM experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhne, C.

    2014-11-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will explore the phase diagram of nuclear matter at very high net-baryon densities and moderate temperatures in nucleus-nucleus collisions at beam energies up to 45 A GeV. One of the key diagnostic probes is electromagnetic radiation. In order to minimize systematic errors of this challenging measurement, CBM aims at an investigation of dielectron and dimuon pairs in the full mass range from the photon point up to charmonium. The results of performance studies for dilepton measurements and the status of the detector developments are presented.

  7. The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddiki, Sélim

    2014-04-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a next-generation fixed-target detector which will operate at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The goal of this experiment is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net baryon densities using high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Its research program includes the study of the equation-of-state of nuclear matter at high baryon densities, the search for the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions and the search for the QCD critical point. The CBM detector is designed to measure both bulk observables with a large acceptance and rare diagnostic probes such as charm particles, multi-strange hyperons, and low mass vector mesons in their di-leptonic decay. The physics program of CBM will be summarized, followed by an overview of the detector concept, a selection of the expected physics performance, and the status of preparation of the experiment.

  8. The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddiki, Sélim; Cbm Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is a next-generation fixed target detector which will operate at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The goal of this experiment is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net baryon densities using high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Its research program includes the study of the equation-of-state of nuclear matter at high baryon densities, the search for the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions and the search for the QCD critical point. The CBM detector is designed to measure both bulk observables with a large acceptance and rare diagnostic probes such as charm particles, multi-strange hyperons, and low mass vector mesons in their di-leptonic decay. The physics program of CBM will be summarized, followed by an overview of the detector concept, a selection of the expected physics performance, and the status of preparation of the experiment.

  9. Formation of curcumin nanoparticles by flash nanoprecipitation from emulsions.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Katherine; Magdassi, Shlomo; Lee, Han Seung; Macosko, Christopher W

    2014-11-15

    Nanometric particles of a model hydrophobic substance curcumin were prepared by a novel method, namely, flash nanoprecipitation from a coarse oil-in-water emulsion. The method employs turbulent co-mixing of water with curcumin-loaded emulsion using manually-operated confined impingement jets mixer. A clear and stable dispersion of nanoparticles was formed in this process, and could be converted to dry, easily water-dispersible powder by spray drying. The mean size of the particles was about 40 nm by DLS, confirmed by Cryo-TEM. The obtained particles contained 20.4 wt% curcumin, X-ray analysis showed it was amorphous. The significant advantages of the studied process are its feasibility, speed and low cost. It does not require any special high-energy input equipment to reduce the droplet size of the initial emulsion as required by the vast majority of other methods, and relies on rapid turbulent mixing and on flow-induced shear stress formed in the simple, manually-operated mixer. Control experiments clearly indicate that employing emulsion, instead of a plain solution and flash nanoprecipitation instead of a simple antisolvent precipitation are advantageous in terms of particle size and stability. PMID:25168584

  10. Dynamics of Sheared Polydisperse Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xin; Desmond, Kenneth; Chen, Dandan; Edmond, Kazem; Weeks, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Polydispersity is an important parameter in the jamming transition of soft materials which has not been well understood yet. In our work, we study the elastic response of a high volume fraction polydisperse emulsion to a periodic shear stress. The droplets' dynamics is imaged by confocal microscopy. Our results reveal that most of the droplets in the emulsion exhibit an elastic and periodic motion under the shear stress. However, the smaller droplets often move with anomalously large or small amplitudes compared to the mean motion. Some droplets also move nearly perpendicular to the mean flow field. The broad distribution of the amplitudes and phases of the smaller droplets' motions can be attributed to the motion the larger droplets and the distribution of the droplet sizes.

  11. Emulsion PCR: Techniques and Applications.

    PubMed

    Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Emulsion PCR (EmPCR) is a commonly employed method for template amplification in multiple NGS-based sequencing platforms. The basic principle of emPCR is dilution and compartmentalization of template molecules in water droplets in a water-in-oil emulsion. Ideally, the dilution is to a degree where each droplet contains a single template molecule and functions as a micro-PCR reactor. Here, we discuss the basic principles, advantages, and challenges of applications of emPCR in clinical testing. We describe the methods of preparation and enrichment of template-positive Ion PGM™ Template OT2 200 Ion Sphere™ Particles (ISPs) on the Ion Personal Genome Machine(®) (PGM™) System. For routine clinical testing, following library generation, we employ the automated Ion OneTouch™ System that includes the Ion OneTouch™ 2 and the Ion OneTouch™ ES instruments for template generation and enrichment of template-positive ISPs, respectively. PMID:26843044

  12. Treatment of coal tar emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Cukier, S.

    1983-07-26

    The present invention relates to a process for the treatment of stable emulsions of water and quinoline insolubles in coal tar comprising thoroughly mixing the coal tar with at least one of a specific class of surface-active compositions, followed by a separation of water and quinoline insoluble components from the mixture. The invention also relates to a method of eliminating or minimizing the build-up of coal tar-derived deposits on surfaces in contact with the coal tar.

  13. Use of micro-emulsion technology for the directed evolution of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Buhr, Diane L; Acca, Felicity E; Holland, Erika G; Johnson, Katie; Maksymiuk, Gail M; Vaill, Ada; Kay, Brian K; Weitz, David A; Weiner, Michael P; Kiss, Margaret M

    2012-09-01

    Affinity reagents, such as antibodies, are needed to study protein expression patterns, sub-cellular localization, and post-translational modifications in complex mixtures and tissues. Phage Emulsion, Secretion, and Capture (ESCape) is a novel micro-emulsion technology that utilizes water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions for the identification and isolation of cells secreting phage particles that display desirable antibodies. Using this method, a large library of antibody-displaying phage will bind to beads in individual compartments. Rather than using biopanning on a large mixed population, phage micro-emulsion technology allows us to individually query clonal populations of amplified phage against the antigen. The use of emulsions to generate microdroplets has the promise of accelerating phage selection experiments by permitting fine discrimination of kinetic parameters for binding to targets. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of phage micro-emulsion technology to distinguish two scFvs with a 300-fold difference in binding affinities (100nM and 300pM, respectively). In addition, we describe the application of phage micro-emulsion technology for the selection of scFvs that are resistant to elevated temperatures. PMID:22819852

  14. Changing Emulsion Dynamics with Heterogeneous Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Peichun Amy; Meng, Qiang; Zhang, Yali; Li, Jiang; Lammertink, Rob; Chen, Haosheng

    2015-11-01

    We elucidate the effect of heterogeneous surface wettability on the morphology and dynamics of microfluidic emulsions, generated by a co-flowing device. We first design a useful methodology of modifying a micro-capillary with desired heterogeneous wettability, such as alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Subsequently, the effects of flow rates and heterogeneous wettability on the emulsion morphology and motion in the micro-capillary are investigated. Our experimental data reveal a universal critical time scale of advective emulsions, above which the microfluidic emulsions remain intact, whereas below this time-scale emulsions become adhesive or inverse. A simple model based on a force balance can be used to explain this critical transition. These results show a control of emulsion dynamics by tuning the droplet size and the Capillary number, the ratio of viscous to surface effects, with heterogeneous surface wettability.

  15. A Novel Monodisperse Emulsion Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbanhowar, P. B.; Weitz, D. A.

    1998-03-01

    A simple mechanical device for the production of emulsions with droplet sizes ranging from 1 to 100 μm and with typical droplet polydispersity of less than 4 percent will be described. The device consists of a micro-pipette with diameter less than or comparable to the desired droplet size and a rotating cylindrical container. The continuous phase of the emulsion is placed in the container and the micro-pipette brought into contact with the rotating fluid. The fluid to be dispersed is slowly forced through the micro-pipette; droplets detach from the tip when the drag force exceeds the interfacial tension. Droplet size is determined by the tip diameter, interfacial tension, continuous phase viscosity, and flow velocity, but not the extrusion rate as long as it is kept below the critical rate for jet formation. In general, any dispersed phase that forms a stable emulsion can be used. However, to avoid the formation of small satellite droplets, the viscosity ratio of the dispersed to the continuous phase should be small. High viscosity fluids can be dispersed by mixing them with low viscosity solvents which diffuse into and then evaporate from the continuous phase.

  16. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  17. Observations of vaporizing water-in-fuel emulsion droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Baer, M.R.; Denison, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    These observations in a Leidenfrost-type experiment allowed one to distinguish between different mechanisms in the emulsion combustion process. Three events were observed: disruptions, heterogeneously nucleated vapor explosions, and homogeneously nucleated vapor explosions. The last event greatly enhances combustion. The cenospheres, carbospheres or oil-coke particles formed will be reduced or eliminated by the vapor explosions, and any small solid fragments are likely to be consumed in the enhanced combustion processes. (DLC)

  18. A new method to correct deformations in emulsion using a precise photomask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Ishida, H.; Shibuya, H.; Ogawa, S.; Matsuo, T.; Fukushima, C.; Takahashi, G.; Kuge, K.; Sato, Y.; Tezuka, I.; Mikado, S.

    2013-05-01

    A new method to correct the emulsion deformation, mainly produced in the development process, is developed to recover the high accuracy of nuclear emulsion as a tracking device. The method is based on a precise photomask and a careful treatment of the emulsion films. A position measurement accuracy of 0.6 μm is obtained over an area of 5 cm×7 cm. The method allows to measure positions of track segments with submicron accuracy in an ECC brick with as few as 10 reference tracks for alignment. Such a performance can be important for hybrid emulsion experiments at underground laboratories where only a small number of reference tracks for alignment are available.

  19. A new fast scanning system for the measurement of large angle tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Buonaura, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Galati, G.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Pupilli, F.; Shchedrina, T.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear emulsions have been widely used in particle physics to identify new particles through the observation of their decays thanks to their unique spatial resolution. Nevertheless, before the advent of automatic scanning systems, the emulsion analysis was very demanding in terms of well trained manpower. Due to this reason, they were gradually replaced by electronic detectors, until the '90s, when automatic microscopes started to be developed in Japan and in Europe. Automatic scanning was essential to conceive large scale emulsion-based neutrino experiments like CHORUS, DONUT and OPERA. Standard scanning systems have been initially designed to recognize tracks within a limited angular acceptance (θ lesssim 30°) where θ is the track angle with respect to a line perpendicular to the emulsion plane. In this paper we describe the implementation of a novel fast automatic scanning system aimed at extending the track recognition to the full angular range and improving the present scanning speed. Indeed, nuclear emulsions do not have any intrinsic limit to detect particle direction. Such improvement opens new perspectives to use nuclear emulsions in several fields in addition to large scale neutrino experiments, like muon radiography, medical applications and dark matter directional detection.

  20. Treatment of oil-in-water emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, R.J.; Presley, C.T.

    1980-01-08

    Petroleum is separated from an ''oil-in-water'' emulsion containing water-soluble polymer prior to refining by adding amphoteric metal cations to the emulsion to form a flocculate and then treating the resulting flocculate with a strong base to recover the oil and metal.

  1. Treatment of oil-in-water emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Presley, C.T.; Harrison, R.J.

    1980-01-08

    Petroleum is separated from an oil-in-water emulsion containing water-soluble polymer such as polyacrylamide prior to refining by adding amphoteric metal cations (Zn, Al, Sn, and Co) to the emulsion to form a flocculate and then treating the resulting flocculate with a strong base to recover the oil and metal. 11 claims.

  2. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties. PMID:26274171

  3. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  4. Kinetics of crosslinking in emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghielmi, A.; Fiorentino, S.; Morbidelli, M.

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model for evaluating the chain length distribution of nonlinear polymers produced in emulsions is presented. The heterogeneous emulsion polymerization process is described. The aim of the analysis is the distribution of active polymer chains and pairs of chains with a given growth time in latex particles in state.

  5. Metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Haorong; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Medforth, Craig J

    2013-10-29

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  6. Flows of Wet Foamsand Concentrated Emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemer, Martin B.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project was is to advance a microstructural understanding of foam and emulsion flows. The dynamics of individual surfactant-covered drops and well as the collective behavior of dilute and concentrated was explored using numerical simulations. The long-range goal of this work is the formulation of reliable microphysically-based statistical models of emulsion flows.

  7. Destabilization of emulsions by natural minerals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Songhu; Tong, Man; Wu, Gaoming

    2011-09-15

    This study developed a novel method to destabilize emulsions and recycle oils, particularly for emulsified wastewater treatment. Natural minerals were used as demulsifying agents, two kinds of emulsions collected from medical and steel industry were treated. The addition of natural minerals, including artificial zeolite, natural zeolite, diatomite, bentonite and natural soil, could effectively destabilize both emulsions at pH 1 and 60 °C. Over 90% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be removed after treatment. Medical emulsion can be even destabilized by artificial zeolite at ambient temperature. The mechanism for emulsion destabilization by minerals was suggested as the decreased electrostatic repulsion at low pH, the enhanced gathering of oil microdroplets at elevated temperature, and the further decreased surface potential by the addition of minerals. Both flocculation and coalescence were enhanced by the addition of minerals at low pH and elevated temperature. PMID:21784583

  8. Aging mechanism in model Pickering emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouilloux, Sarah; Malloggi, Florent; Daillant, Jean; Thill, Antoine

    We study the stability of a model Pickering emulsion system. A special counter-flow microfluidics set-up was used to prepare monodisperse Pickering emulsions, with oil droplets in water. The wettability of the monodisperse silica nanoparticles (NPs) could be tuned by surface grafting and the surface coverage of the droplets was controlled using the microfluidics setup. A surface coverage as low as 23$\\%$ is enough to stabilize the emulsions and we evidence a new regime of Pickering emulsion stability where the surface coverage of emulsion droplets of constant size increases in time, in coexistence with a large amount of dispersed phase. Our results demonstrate that the previously observed limited coalescence regime where surface coverage tends to control the average size of the final droplets must be put in a broader perspective.

  9. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  10. Photothermal Breaking of Emulsions Stabilized with Graphene.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Matthew D J; Vu, Khu; Madden, Stephen; Notley, Shannon M

    2016-04-27

    Pristine graphene particles prepared using an aqueous phase exfoliation technique have been used to promote the stabilization of emulsions through adsorption at the oil-water interface. Highly localized phase separation of these ultrastable emulsions could, however, be induced through photothermal heating of the graphene particles at the interface exposed to near-infrared light. The graphene wettability, which is a key determinant in preventing droplet coalescence was altered through the adsorption of nonionic block copolymer surfactants. Varying the aqueous solution conditions influenced the hydration of the hydrophilic component of the surfactant providing a further opportunity to alter the overall particle wettability and, hence, stability of the emulsion. In this way, highly stable-oil-in water emulsions were produced with decane; however, water-in-oil emulsions were formed with toluene as the oil phase. PMID:27054548

  11. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Lane, Jacob A; Derry, Matthew J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-04-21

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16-240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  12. Non-aqueous Isorefractive Pickering Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non-aqueous Pickering emulsions of 16–240 μm diameter have been prepared using diblock copolymer worms with ethylene glycol as the droplet phase and an n-alkane as the continuous phase. Initial studies using n-dodecane resulted in stable emulsions that were significantly less turbid than conventional water-in-oil emulsions. This is attributed to the rather similar refractive indices of the latter two phases. By utilizing n-tetradecane as an alternative oil that almost precisely matches the refractive index of ethylene glycol, almost isorefractive ethylene glycol-in-n-tetradecane Pickering emulsions can be prepared. The droplet diameter and transparency of such emulsions can be systematically varied by adjusting the worm copolymer concentration. PMID:25844544

  13. Evaluating factors affecting the permeability of emulsions used to stabilize radioactive contamination from a radiological dispersal device.

    PubMed

    Fox, Garey A; Medina, Victor F

    2005-05-15

    Present strategies for alleviating radioactive contamination from a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or dirty bomb involve either demolishing and removing radioactive surfaces or abandoning portions of the area near the release point. In both cases, it is imperative to eliminate or reduce migration of the radioisotopes until the cleanup is complete or until the radiation has decayed back to acceptable levels. This research investigated an alternative strategy of using emulsions to stabilize radioactive particulate contamination. Emergency response personnel would coat surfaces with emulsions consisting of asphalt or tall oil pitch to prevent migration of contamination. The site can then be evaluated and cleaned up as needed. In order for this approach to be effective, the treatment must eliminate migration of the radioactive agents in the terror device. Water application is an environmental condition that could promote migration into the external environment. This research investigated the potential for water, and correspondingly contaminant, migration through two emulsions consisting of Topein, a resinous byproduct during paper manufacture. Topein C is an asphaltic-based emulsion and Topein S is a tall oil pitch, nonionic emulsion. Experiments included water adsorption/ mobilization studies, filtration tests, and image analysis of photomicrographs from an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and a stereomicroscope. Both emulsions were effective at reducing water migration. Conductivity estimates were on the order of 10(-80) cm s(-1) for Topein C and 10(-7) cm s(-1) for Topein S. Water mobility depended on emulsion flocculation and coalescence time. Photomicrographs indicate that Topein S consisted of greater and more interconnected porosity. Dilute foams of isolated spherical gas cells formed when emulsions were applied to basic surfaces. Gas cells rose to the surface and ruptured, leaving void spaces that penetrated throughout the emulsion. These experiments indicate that emulsions may be a viable means for containing RDD residuals; however, improvements are needed for optimal performance. PMID:15952383

  14. Emulsion-based encapsulation and delivery of nanoparticles for the controlled release of alkalinity within the subsurface environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsburg, C. A.; Muller, K.; Gill, J.

    2012-12-01

    Many current approaches to managing groundwater contamination rely on further advances in amendment delivery in order to initiate and sustain contaminant degradation or immobilization. In fact, limited or ineffective delivery is often cited when treatment objectives are not attained. Emulsions, specifically oil-in-water emulsions, have demonstrated potential to aid delivery of remediation amendments. Emulsions also afford opportunities to control the release of active ingredients encapsulated within the droplets. Our research is currently focused on the controlled release of nanoparticle-based buffering agents using oil-in-water emulsions. This interest is motivated by the fact that chemical and biological processes employed for the remediation and stewardship of contaminated sites often necessitate control of pH during treatment and, in some cases, long thereafter. Alkalinity-release nanoparticles (e.g., CaCO3, MgO) were suspended within soybean oil and subsequently encapsulated by through the creation of oil-in-water emulsions. These oil-in-water emulsions are designed to have physical properties which are favorable for subsurface delivery (nominal properties: 1 g/mL density; 10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet diameter). Buffer capacity titrations suggest that MgO particles are moderately more accessible within the oil phase and nearly twice as effective (on a per mass basis) at releasing alkalinity (as compared to the CaCO3 particles). Results from experiments designed to assess the release kinetics suggest that a linear driving force model is capable of describing the release process and mass transfer coefficients are constant through the reactive life of the emulsion. The release kinetics in emulsions containing MgO particles were found to be three orders of magnitude faster than those quantified for emulsions containing CaCO3. The slower release kinetics of the emulsions containing CaCO3 particles may prove beneficial when considering pH control at sites where acid fluxes are lower. The ability of emulsions to sustain alkalinity release within porous media was preliminarily examined using a series of 1-D column experiments. Emulsions were introduced for 2 pore volumes in a medium sand at Darcy velocities of approximately 0.8 cm/hr. Following the emulsion pulse, a pH 4 solution (adjusted with HCl) was introduced into the column and the effluent was monitored for pH, oil content, and droplet size distributions. All un-retained emulsion (~20% wt. was retained) was flushed from the column within approximately 2 pore volumes of terminating the emulsion pulse. The effluent pH at quasi-steady state and the reactive life of the emulsion depended on the retention characteristics, as well as the type and loading of nanoparticles employed within the emulsion. For the scenarios considered here, quasi-steady effluent pHs were observed to be between 6.5 and 10, and reactive lifetimes (i.e., the number of pore volumes for which the retained emulsion resulted in the effluent pH exceeding that of the influent) were between 15 and 100 pore volumes. These results demonstrate the ability of the emulsion to offer longer-term release and highlight the ability to tune the alkalinity release rate to match site characteristics by adjusting the emulsion content. Current research is directed toward evaluation release properties in heterogeneous aquifer cell experiments.

  15. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  16. Nucleation rate measurement of colloidal crystallization using microfluidic emulsion droplets.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tieying; Shen, Jingyi; Hu, Zhibing; Marquez, Manuel; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2007-03-13

    An emulsion crystallization method has been demonstrated to measure the nucleation rate of a thermoresponsive colloidal poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) system. The colloidal PNIPAM suspension was injected into a microfluidic flow-focusing device to generate monodispersed droplets in oil. The temperature was controlled to fine tune the volume fraction of the PNIPAM particles, and the microfluidic flow rate was varied to change the droplet sizes, thus altering the nucleation volume. Using independent droplets, we can isolate the nucleation events to eliminate the interactions among crystallites that existed in bulk or large droplet systems. Therefore, we were able to carry out accurate nucleation rate measurements of colloidal crystals. This emulsion crystallization method is promising for bridging the gap among theories, simulations, and experiments for nucleation kinetics studies. PMID:17305378

  17. Avalanches of Rearrangements in 2D Emulsion Hopper Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xia; Desmond, Kenneth; Chen, Dandan; Weeks, Eric; Weeks'lab at Emory University Team

    2014-03-01

    We conduct experiments with a quasi-two-dimensional binary emulsion flowing through a hopper. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsions confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. In this system, there is only viscous friction and no static friction between droplets. By imaging the droplets during flow, we observed T1 events, which are topological rearrangement events when droplets exchange neighbors. Avalanche like flow behavior has been found by controlling the flow velocity and area fraction. We study the statistics of rearrangements as a function of the control parameters and observe a fairly smooth transition from avalanche-dominated flow to continuous flow.

  18. Optimization of cell-wall skeleton derived from Mycobacterium bovis BCG Tokyo 172 (SMP-105) emulsion in delayed-type hypersensitivity and antitumor models.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, M; Murata, M; Fukushima, A; Sato, T; Nakagawa, M; Fujii, T; Koseki, N; Chiba, N; Kashiwazaki, Y

    2012-08-01

    Cell-wall skeleton prepared from Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG-CWS) is known as a potent adjuvant and has been shown to possess antitumor activity in many non-clinical and clinical studies. As there are no approved BCG-CWS formulations for cancer therapy, we investigated the potential for cancer immunotherapy of SMP-105, our originally produced BCG-CWS. For optimizing SMP-105 emulsion, we compared the effects of drakeoland squalane-based SMP-105 emulsions on IFN-γ production in rats and evaluated their ability to induce skin reaction in guinea pigs. Both emulsions had the same activity in both experiments. We selected squalane as base material and produced two types of squalane-based formulations (vialed emulsion and pumped emulsion) that can easily be prepared as oil-in-water emulsions. Although the vialed emulsion showed the same pattern of distribution as a usual homogenized emulsion, the pumped emulsion showed more uniform distribution than the other two emulsions. Whereas both emulsions enhanced strong delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in a mouse model, the pumped emulsion induced slightly smaller edema. Data on oil droplet size distribution suggest that few micrometer oil droplet size might be appropriate for oil-in-water microemulsion of SMP-105. The antitumor potency of SMP-105 emulsion was stronger than that of some of the launched toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists (Aldara cream, Picibanil, and Immunobladder). Aldara and Picibanil showed limited antitumor effectiveness, while Immunobladder had almost the same effect as SMP-105 at the highest dose, but needed about 10 times the amount of SMP-105. These findings first indicate that SMP-105 has great potential in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23006993

  19. Emulsions of oil from Adenanthera pavonina L. seeds and their protective effect.

    PubMed

    Jaromin, Anna; Zarnowski, Robert; Kozubek, Arkadiusz

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we developed very stable formulations of submicron oil-in-water emulsions from Adenanthera pavonina L. (family Leguminosae, subfamily Mimosoideae) seed oil, stabilised with soybean lecithin (SPC). Continuing our research, we introduced an additional co-emulsifier, Tween 80, to those formulations in order to decrease the size of the emulsion particles and improve their stability. Formulations with a mean particle size ranging from 43.6 to 306.5 nm and a negative surface charge from -45.3 to -28.5 mV were obtained. Our stability experiments also revealed that most of the tested formulations had a very good degree of stability over a 3-month storage period, both at 4 degrees C and at room temperature. Since many intravenous injectable drugs exhibit lytic activity against erythrocytes, we examined this activity for the emulsion form of cardol, a natural compound with already proven hemolytic properties. The incorporation of this agent into the emulsion caused an evident decrease in hemolytic activity (97-99%). This highly protective effect, observed against sheep erythrocytes, was independent of both the composition and the particle size of the emulsions used. Our studies suggest that nonionic surfactant/phospholipid-based emulsions containing this edible oil of A. pavonina L. may be useful as an alternative formulation matrix for pharmaceutical, nutritional or cosmetic applications of otherwise membrane-acting components. PMID:16874455

  20. Heat Transfer in Boiling Dilute Emulsion with Strong Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburg, Eric Thomas

    Little attention has been given to the boiling of emulsions compared to that of boiling in pure liquids. The advantages of using emulsions as a heat transfer agent were first discovered in the 1970s and several interesting features have since been studied by few researchers. Early research focuses primarily on pool and flow boiling and looks to determine a mechanism by which the boiling process occurs. This thesis looks at the boiling of dilute emulsions in fluids with strong buoyant forces. The boiling of dilute emulsions presents many favorable characteristics that make it an ideal agent for heat transfer. High heat flux electronics, such as those seen in avionics equipment, produce high heat fluxes of 100 W/cm2 or more, but must be maintained at low temperatures. So far, research on single phase convection and flow boiling in small diameter channels have yet to provide an adequate solution. Emulsions allow the engineer to tailor the solution to the specific problem. The fluid can be customized to retain the high thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of the continuous phase while enhancing the heat transfer coefficient through boiling of the dispersed phase component. Heat transfer experiments were carried out with FC-72 in water emulsions. FC-72 has a saturation temperature of 56 °C, far below that of water. The parameters were varied as follows: 0% ≤ epsilon ≤ 1% and 1.82 x 1012 ≤ RaH ≤ 4.42 x 1012. Surface temperatures along the heated surface reached temperature that were 20 °C in excess of the dispersed phase saturation temperature. An increase of ˜20% was seen in the average Nusselt numbers at the highest Rayleigh numbers. Holography was used to obtain images of individual and multiple FC-72 droplets in the boundary layer next to the heated surface. The droplet diameters ranged from 0.5 mm to 1.3 mm. The Magnus effect was observed when larger individual droplets were injected into the boundary layer, causing the droplets to be pushed outside the boundary layer. Vaporization of FC-72 droplets in the boundary layer next to the heated surface was not observed.

  1. High acyl gellan as an emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-03-30

    High acyl gellan (0.01-0.2% w/w) was used as stabilizer in oil in water emulsions containing 30% (w/w) of sunflower oil and prepared under different process conditions. Stable emulsions to phase separation could be obtained using high acyl gellan (HA) content above 0.05% (w/w), while low acyl gellan (LA) prepared at the same conditions could not stabilize emulsions. Emulsions properties depended on the process used to mix the oil and gellan dispersion since high pressure homogenization favored stabilization while very high energy density applied by ultrasound led to systems destabilization. Emulsions prepared using high pressure homogenization showed zeta potential values ranging from -50 up to -59 mV, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion could be contributing to the systems stability. Rheological properties of continuous phase were also responsible for emulsions stabilization, since HA gellan dispersions showed high viscosity and gel-like behavior. The high viscosity of the continuous phase could be associated to the presence of high acyl gellan microgels/aggregates. Disentanglement of these aggregates performed by ultrasound strongly decreased the viscosity and consequently affected the emulsions behavior, reducing the stability to phase separation. PMID:26794954

  2. Emulsions on demand using microsturctured devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahe, Christian; Tranchant, Jean Francois; Tromeur, Melanie; Schwesinger, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    Emulsions are very common in the field of cosmetics. Unfortunately, most emulsions contain ineffective substances to increase the stability of the products for a long time. These stabilizers can cause some severe healthy problems in several cases. One possible solution is the production of emulsions on demand to prevent the use of stabilizers. Stable emulsion can be achieved if the diameters of the droplets of one solution surrounded by a second solution are smaller than 1μm. Microstructured devices are suited in principle to generate such droplet distributions. Basic task of the development was a micro emulsifier that can be integrated into cosmetic flacons and that can deliver emulsions on demand by pressing a human fingertip onto a part of the flacon. Standardized cosmetic flacons have been used as basic devices. They consist of two separate glass bottles for two different liquid phases and two mechanical pumps integrated in a multifunctional cap. Regarding the viscosity ranges of the two liquids different microemulsifier structures have been developed. External dimensions and connections of the device have been chosen in a way that allows an integration of the devices into the cap. The second design conists of several streaming paths in parallel that allow a reduction of the pressure drop. Furthermore, it consists of three structured silicon chips bonded together. Emulsions with a stability of about 15-30 min have been achieved without any stabilizers. External forces of less than 10N were sufficient to generate emulsions on demand.

  3. Physico-chemical characterization of Intralipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, M; Rubin, M; Bor, A; Meyuhas, D; Talmon, Y; Lichtenberg, D

    1991-11-27

    Fat emulsions containing soy triacylglycerols (100-300 g/l) and egg-yolk phospholipids (12 g/l) are often used for intravenous feeding. Previous studies have shown that these emulsions contain chylomicron-like emulsion particles of diameters of 300-400 nm and excess phospholipids aggregated as vesicles (liposomes), which remain in the infranatant upon floatation of the emulsion particles by ultracentrifugation. This work is devoted to the characterization of the commercial lipid emulsions commonly denoted Intralipids, with special emphasis on the presently ill-defined liposomes. The lipid particles composing commercial lipid emulsions (10%, 20% and 30% Intralipids, Kabivitrum Nutrition) were characterized by the combined use of physical and chemical methods. Each of the emulsions was fractionated by ultracentrifugation in saline into a 'cream' layer which floats to the top of the dispersion upon ultracentrifugation and a relatively transparent infranatant. The cream layer contains large emulsion particles of diameters ranging from 300 to 400 nm, in agreement with theoretical considerations based on their chemical composition as determined by chemical analysis. The infranatants contain about 1 g/l triacylglycerols in addition to phospholipids (from 7.2 g/l in 10% Intralipid to 2.4 g/l in 30% Intralipid) in the form of smaller particles of 70-100 nm diameter. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy shows that the infranatants contain vesicles (mostly unilamellar) at the side of residual small emulsion particles. This conclusion is also consistent with the distribution of phospholipids between outer and inner lamellae, as determined by 31P-NMR. PMID:1742317

  4. The morphology of emulsion polymerized latex particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wignall, G.D.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Linne, M.A.; Klein, A.; Sperling, L.H.; Wai, M.P.; Gelman, R.A.; Fatica, M.G.; Hoerl, R.H.; Fisher, L.W.

    1987-11-01

    Under monomer starved feed conditions, emulsion polymerization of perdeuterated methyl methacrylate and styrene in the presence of preformed polymethylmethacrylate latexes resulted in particles with a core-shell morphology, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis for a hollow sphere. The locus of polymerization of the added deuterated monomer is therefore at the particle surface. In similar measurements a statistical copolymer of styrene and methyl methacrylate was used as seed particles for further polymerization of trideuteromethyl methacrylate. The resulting polymer latex was again shown to have a core-shell morphological structre as determined by SANS. SANS experiments were also undertaken on polystyrene latexes polymerized by equilibrium swelling methods, with deuterated polymer forming the first or second step. The experiments covered a molecular weight range of 6 x 10/sup 4/ < M < 6 x 10/sup 6/ g/mol. For M > 10/sup 6/ the molecular weights are consistent with the experimental errors, indicating that the deuterium labeled molecules are randomly distributed in the latex. These results led to the finding that the polymer chains were constrained in the latex particles by factors of 2 to 4 from the relaxed coil dimensions. For M < 10/sup 6/ g/mol SANS gave zero angle scattering intensities much higher than expected on the basis of a random distribution of labeled molecules. Several models were examined, including the possible development of core-shell structures at lower molecular weights. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The Morphology of Emulsion Polymerized Latex Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wignall, G. D.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Linne, M. A.; Klein, A.; Sperling, L. H.; Wai, M. P.; Gelman, R. A.; Fatica, M. G.; Hoerl, R. H.; Fisher, L. W.

    1987-11-01

    Under monomer starved feed conditions, emulsion polymerization of perdeuterated methyl methacrylate and styrene in the presence of preformed polymethylmethacrylate latexes resulted in particles with a core-shell morphology, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis for a hollow sphere. The locus of polymerization of the added deuterated monomer is therefore at the particle surface. In similar measurements a statistical copolymer of styrene and methyl methacrylate was used as seed particles for further polymerization of trideuteromethyl methacrylate. The resulting polymer latex was again shown to have a core-shell morphological structure as determined by SANS. SANS experiments were also undertaken on polystyrene latexes polymerized by equilibrium swelling methods, with deuterated polymer forming the first or second step. The experiments covered a molecular weight range of 6 x 10{sup 4} 10{sup 6} the molecular weights are consistent with the experimental errors, indicating that the deuterium labeled molecules are randomly distributed in the latex. These results led to the finding that the polymer chains were constrained in the latex particles by factors of 2 to 4 from the relaxed coil dimensions. For M < 10{sup 6} g/mol SANS gave zero angle scattering intensities much higher than expected on the basis of a random distribution of labeled molecules. Several models were examined, including the possible development of core-shell structures at lower molecular weights.

  6. Hydrodynamic model for drying emulsions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huanhuan; Sprakel, Joris; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-08-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model for film formation in a dense oil-in-water emulsion under a unidirectional drying stress. Water flow through the plateau borders towards the drying end leads to the buildup of a pressure gradient. When the local pressure exceeds the critical disjoining pressure, the water films between droplets break and the droplets coalesce. We show that, depending on the critical pressure and the evaporation rate, the coalescence can occur in two distinct modes. At low critical pressures and low evaporation rates, coalescence occurs throughout the sample, whereas at high critical pressures and high evaporation rate, coalescence occurs only at the front. In the latter case, an oil layer develops on top of the film, which acts as a diffusive barrier and slows down film formation. Our findings, which are summarized in a state diagram for film formation, are in agreement with recent experimental findings. PMID:26382507

  7. Hydrodynamic model for drying emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huanhuan; Sprakel, Joris; van der Gucht, Jasper

    2015-08-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model for film formation in a dense oil-in-water emulsion under a unidirectional drying stress. Water flow through the plateau borders towards the drying end leads to the buildup of a pressure gradient. When the local pressure exceeds the critical disjoining pressure, the water films between droplets break and the droplets coalesce. We show that, depending on the critical pressure and the evaporation rate, the coalescence can occur in two distinct modes. At low critical pressures and low evaporation rates, coalescence occurs throughout the sample, whereas at high critical pressures and high evaporation rate, coalescence occurs only at the front. In the latter case, an oil layer develops on top of the film, which acts as a diffusive barrier and slows down film formation. Our findings, which are summarized in a state diagram for film formation, are in agreement with recent experimental findings.

  8. Aging properties of Kodak type 101 emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohne, B.; Feldman, U.; Neupert, W.

    1984-01-01

    Aging tests for several batches of Kodak type 101 emulsion show that storage conditions significantly influence how well the film will maintain its sensitometric properties, with sensitivity and density increasing to a maximum during this period. Any further aging may result in higher fog levels and sensitivity loss. It is noted that storage in an environment free of photographically active compounds allows film property optimization, and that film batches with different sensitivities age differently. Emulsions with maximum 1700-A sensitivity are 2.5 times faster than those at the low end of the sensitivity scale. These sensitive emulsions exhibit significantly accelerated changes in aging properties. Their use in space applications requires careful consideration of time and temperature profiles, encouraging the use of less sensitive emulsions when the controllability of these factors is limited.

  9. Jamming of quasi-2D emulsion droplets: Analogies with granular jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Eric R.; Desmond, Kenneth W.; Young, Pearl J.; Chen, Dandan

    2012-11-01

    We experimentally study the jamming of quasi-two-dimensional emulsions. Our experiments consist of oil-in-water emulsion droplets confined between two parallel plates. These are somewhat analogous to granular photoelastic disks, although they are softer and do not experience static friction. From the droplet outlines, we can determine the forces between every droplet pair to within 8% over a wide range of area fractions. Using the data, we observe critical scaling behaviors of the contact numbers and pressure as the jamming transition is approached from above. The scaling behavior agrees well with simulations and is similar to what has been seen previously with photoelastic disks.

  10. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials. PMID:25463186

  11. Hexagonal phase based gel-emulsion (O/H1 gel-emulsion): formation and rheology.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Mydul; Aramaki, Kenji

    2008-11-01

    The formation, stability, and rheological behavior of a hexagonal phase based gel-emulsion (O/H1 gel-emulsion) have been studied in water/C12EO8/hydrocarbon oil systems. A partial phase behavior study indicates that the oil nature has no effect on the phase sequences in the ternary phase diagram of water/C12EO8/oil systems but the domain size of the phases or the oil solubilization capacity considerably changes with oil nature. Excess oil is in equilibrium with the hexagonal phase (H1) in the ternary phase diagram in the H1+O region. The O/H1 gel-emulsion was prepared (formation) and kept at 25 degrees C to check stability. It has been found that the formation and stability of the O/H1 gel-emulsion depends on the oil nature. After 2 min observation (formation), the results show that short chain linear hydrocarbon oils (heptane, octane) are more apt to form a O/H1 gel-emulsion compared to long chain linear hydrocarbon oils (tetradecane, hexadecane), though the stability is not good enough in either system, that is, oil separates within 24 h. Nevertheless, the formation and stability of the O/H1 gel-emulsion is appreciably increased in squalane and liquid paraffin. It is surmised that the high transition temperature of the H1+O phase and the presence of a bicontinuous cubic phase (V1) might hamper the formation of a gel-emulsion. It has been pointed out that the solubilization of oil in the H1 phase could be related to emulsion stability. On the other hand, the oil nature has little or no effect on the formation and stability of a cubic phase based gel-emulsion (O/I1 gel-emulsion). From rheological measurements, it has found that the rheogram of the O/H1 gel-emulsion indicates gel-type structure and shows shear thinning behavior similar to the case of the O/I1 gel-emulsion. Rheological data infer that the O/I1 gel-emulsion is more viscous than the O/H1 gel-emulsion at room temperature but the O/H1 gel-emulsion shows consistency at elevated temperature. PMID:18847293

  12. Formation of complex emulsion in microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang-Hyung; Kim, Jongmin; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2012-02-01

    We first report a novel emulsification method using two binary mixtures that produces complex emulsion by phase separation, triggered by external diffusion of separation agent dissolved in continuous phase. A disperse phase consists of monomer and D-solvent (good solvent for disperse phase), while mixture of separation-triggering agent (SA) and C-solvent (good solvent for continuous phase) is used as a continuous phase. Individual droplet was formed by microfluidic system, allowing how the separation dynamically occurs as a function of time. This system consists of the three major steps involving the transformation of a single droplet into the complex emulsion. In the first, when two immiscible phases meet at cross-junction, droplets are generated and dispersed in continuous phase containing the SA. Since the SA is only selectively soluble in the monomer of disperse phase, external diffusion of SA into the droplets through the interface occurs which initiates phase separation. In transient state, the external diffusion of the SA generates both partial separated region and SA/monomer complex at the near interface of partial separated region. In the last step, where the phase separation fully occurs, single droplets transform into complex emulsion such as double emulsion or multiple emulsion with high order. In addition, we demonstrate a capability for generation of complex emulsions gives a great opportunity to fabricate functional materials using template synthesis.

  13. Method for treating tar sands emulsion and apparatus therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Bialek, R.F.

    1986-04-15

    A method is described for resolving a hot bitumen emulsion comprised primarily of bitumen, water and chemical diluents. The method consists of: providing separate but communicated emulsion mixing, and emulsion settling chamber, passing the hot bitumen emulsion through a first elongated mixing passage in the mixing chamber wherein a rapidly flowing stream of recycled emulsion is combined with a minor portion of unrecycled bitumen emulsion, to form a combined bitumen emulsion stream, thereafter passing the combined bitumen emulsion stream into an elongated discontinuous mixing passage comprised of vertically arranged and interconnected mixing passages within the emulsion mixer, where in the combined bitumen emulsion stream passes at a slower rate than in the first elongated mixing passage, passing the combined bitumen emulsion stream into an overflow passage communicated with the second elongated mixing passage, introducing a part of the combined emulsion stream from the overflow passage into the emulsion settling chamber, recycling the remainder of the combined emulsion stream from the overflow passage into the first elongated mixing passage, and removing separated flows of bitumen and water from the settling chamber.

  14. Bond Graph Modeling and Validation of an Energy Regenerative System for Emulsion Pump Tests

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilei; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    The test system for emulsion pump is facing serious challenges due to its huge energy consumption and waste nowadays. To settle this energy issue, a novel energy regenerative system (ERS) for emulsion pump tests is briefly introduced at first. Modeling such an ERS of multienergy domains needs a unified and systematic approach. Bond graph modeling is well suited for this task. The bond graph model of this ERS is developed by first considering the separate components before assembling them together and so is the state-space equation. Both numerical simulation and experiments are carried out to validate the bond graph model of this ERS. Moreover the simulation and experiments results show that this ERS not only satisfies the test requirements, but also could save at least 25% of energy consumption as compared to the original test system, demonstrating that it is a promising method of energy regeneration for emulsion pump tests. PMID:24967428

  15. Bond graph modeling and validation of an energy regenerative system for emulsion pump tests.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilei; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    The test system for emulsion pump is facing serious challenges due to its huge energy consumption and waste nowadays. To settle this energy issue, a novel energy regenerative system (ERS) for emulsion pump tests is briefly introduced at first. Modeling such an ERS of multienergy domains needs a unified and systematic approach. Bond graph modeling is well suited for this task. The bond graph model of this ERS is developed by first considering the separate components before assembling them together and so is the state-space equation. Both numerical simulation and experiments are carried out to validate the bond graph model of this ERS. Moreover the simulation and experiments results show that this ERS not only satisfies the test requirements, but also could save at least 25% of energy consumption as compared to the original test system, demonstrating that it is a promising method of energy regeneration for emulsion pump tests. PMID:24967428

  16. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  17. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions... the rolling with emulsions subcategory....

  18. Controlled release of insect sex pheromones from paraffin wax and emulsions.

    PubMed

    Atterholt, C A; Delwiche, M J; Rice, R E; Krochta, J M

    1999-02-22

    Paraffin wax and aqueous paraffin emulsions can be used as controlled release carriers for insect sex pheromones for mating disruption of orchard pests. Paraffin can be applied at ambient temperature as an aqueous emulsion, adheres to tree bark or foliage, releases pheromone for an extended period of time, and will slowly erode from bark and biodegrade in soil. Pheromone emulsions can be applied with simple spray equipment. Pheromone release-rates from paraffin were measured in laboratory flow-cell experiments. Pheromone was trapped from an air stream with an adsorbent, eluted periodically, and quantified by gas chromatography. Pheromone release from paraffin was partition-controlled, providing a constant (zero-order) release rate. A typical paraffin emulsion consisted of 30% paraffin, 4% pheromone, 4% soy oil, 1% vitamin E, 2% emulsifier, and the balance water. Soy oil and vitamin E acted as volatility suppressants. A constant release of oriental fruit moth pheromone from paraffin emulsions was observed in the laboratory for more than 100 days at 27 degreesC, with release-rates ranging from 0.4 to 2 mg/day, depending on the concentration and surface area of the dried emulsion. The use of paraffin emulsions is a viable method for direct application of insect pheromones for mating disruption. Sprayable formulations can be designed to release insect pheromones to the environment at a rate necessary for insect control by mating disruption. At temperatures below 38 degreesC, zero-order release was observed. At 38 degreesC and higher, pheromone oxidation occurred. A partition-controlled release mechanism was supported by a zero-order pheromone release-rate, low air/wax partition coefficients, and pheromone solubility in paraffin. PMID:9895411

  19. Impact of model fat emulsions on sensory perception using repeated spoon to spoon ingestion.

    PubMed

    Appelqvist, I A M; Poelman, A A M; Cochet-Broch, M; Delahunty, C M

    2016-06-01

    Eating is a dynamic behaviour, in which food interacts with the mechanical and physiological environment of the mouth. This dynamic interaction changes the oral surfaces leaving particles of food and building up a film on the oral surfaces, which may impact on the temporal perception during the eating experience. The effect of repeated spoon to spoon ingestion of oil in water emulsion products (2%-50% w/w oil) was evaluated using descriptive in-mouth and after swallowing sensory attributes. Descriptive sensory analysis indicated that fatty mouthfeel and afterfeel perception (measured post swallowing) increased with the number of spoonfuls for emulsions containing 50% fat. This effect is likely due to the build-up of oil droplet layers deposited on the mouth surfaces. There was an enhancement of fatty afterfeel intensity for 50% fat emulsions containing the more lipophilic aroma ethylhexanoate compared to ethyl butanoate, indicating a cross-modal interaction. No increase in these attributes from spoon to spoon was observed for the low oil emulsions; since most of the oil in the emulsion was swallowed and very little oil was likely to be left in the mouth. Sweetness perception increased as fat level increased in the emulsion due to an increase in the effective concentration of sugar in the aqueous phase. However, the sweetness perceived did not change from spoon to spoon, suggesting that any oil-droplets deposited on the oral surfaces did not form a complete barrier, restricting access of the sucrose to the taste buds. This study highlights the importance of measuring the dynamic nature of eating and demonstrated change in sensory perception occurring with repeated ingestion of model emulsions, which was likely due to a change in mouth environment. PMID:27063245

  20. A model for the prediction of droplet size in Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged particles.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Trivikram; Mani, Ethayaraja; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2014-08-12

    Colloidal particles irreversibly adsorb at fluid-fluid interfaces stabilizing what are commonly called "Pickering" emulsions and foams. A simple geometrical model, the limited coalescence model, was earlier proposed to estimate droplet sizes in emulsions. This model assumes that all of the particles are effective in stabilization. The model predicts that the average emulsion drop size scales inversely with the total number of particles, confirmed qualitatively with experimental data on Pickering emulsions. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in synthesizing emulsions with oppositely charged particles (OCPs). In our experimental study, we observed that the drop size varies nonmonotonically with the number ratio of oppositely charged colloids, even when a fixed total number concentration of colloids is used, showing a minimum. We develop a mathematical model to predict this dependence of drop size on number ratio in such a mixed particle system. The proposed model is based on the hypothesis that oppositely charged colloids form stable clusters due to the strong electrostatic attraction between them and that these clusters are the effective stabilizing agents. The proposed model is a two-parameter model, parameters being the ratio of effective charge of OCPs (denoted as k) and the size of the aggregate containing X particles formed due to aggregation of OCPs. Because the size of aggregates formed during emulsification is not directly measurable, we use suitable values of parameters k and X to best match the experimental observations. The model predictions are in qualitative agreement with experimentally observed nonmonotonic variation of droplet sizes. Using experiments and theory, we present a physical insight into the formation of OCP stabilized Pickering emulsions. Our model upgrades the existing Wiley's limited coalescence model as applied to emulsions containing a binary mixture of oppositely charged particles. PMID:25054284

  1. Water-in-oil emulsions prepared by peptide-silicone hybrid polymers as active interfacial modifier: effects of silicone oil species on dispersion stability of emulsions.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Iijima, Satoshi; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Endo, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Yamashita, Yuji; Natsuisaka, Makoto; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakamoto, Kazutami

    2013-01-01

    We have recently proposed a new general concept regarding amphiphilic materials that have been named as "active interfacial modifier (AIM)." In emulsion systems, an AIM is essentially insoluble in both water and organic solvents; however, it possesses moieties that are attracted to each of these immiscible liquid phases. Hence, an AIM practically stays just at the interface between the two phases and makes the resulting emulsion stable. In this study, the effects of silicone oil species on the dispersion stability of water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions in the presence of an AIM sample were evaluated in order to understand the destabilization mechanism in such emulsion systems. The AIM sample used in this study is an amphiphilic polymer consisting of a silicone backbone modified with hydrocarbon chains and hydrolyzed silk peptides. The Stokes equation predicts that the sedimentation velocity of water droplets dispersed in a continuous silicone oil phase simply depends on the expression (ρ - ρ₀)/η assuming that the droplet size is constant (where ρ is the density of the dispersed water phase, ρ₀ is the density of the continuous silicone oil phase, and η is the viscosity of the oil phase). The experimental results shown in this paper are consistent with the Stokes prediction: i.e., in the low-viscous genuine or quasi-Newtonian fluid region, the dispersion stability increases in the following order: dodecamethylpentasiloxane (DPS) < decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D₅) ≤ dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D₆). This order agrees well with the order obtained by using the expression (ρ - ρ₀)/η as DPS > D₅ > D₆. This indicates that our emulsion system experiences destabilization through sedimentation, but hardly any coalescence occurs owing to the presence of an additional third phase consisting of the AIM that stabilizes the silicone oil/water interface in the emulsions. PMID:23823917

  2. The atomization of water-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Broniarz-Press, L.; Ochowiak, M.; Rozanski, J.; Woziwodzki, S.

    2009-09-15

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies on atomization of the emulsions flowing through twin-fluid atomizers obtained by the use of the digital microphotography method. The main elements of the test installation were: nozzle, reservoir, pump and measurement units of liquid flow. The photographs were taken by a digital camera with automatic flash at exposure time of 1/8000 s and subsequently analyzed using Image Pro-Plus. The oils used were mineral oils 20-90, 20-70, 20-50 and 20-30. The studies were performed at flow rates of liquid phase changed from 0.0014 to 0.011 (dm{sup 3}/s) and gas phase changed from 0.28 to 1.4 (dm{sup 3}/s), respectively. The analysis of photos shows that the droplets being formed during the liquid atomization have very different sizes. The smallest droplets have diameters of the order of 10 {mu}m. The experimental results showed that the changes in physical properties of a liquid phase lead to the significant changes in the spray characteristics. The analysis of the photos of water and emulsions atomization process showed that the droplet sizes are dependent on gas and liquid flow rates, construction of nozzle and properties of liquid. The differences between characteristics of atomization for water and emulsions have been observed. Analysis of photos on forming the droplets in air-water and air-emulsions systems showed that droplets are bigger in air-emulsion system (at the same value of gas to liquid mass ratio). The values of Sauter mean diameter (SMD) increased with increase of volume fraction of oil in emulsion. The droplet size increased with emulsion viscosity. (author)

  3. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Park, Jinhee; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  4. Emulsion Mapping in Pork Meat Emulsion Systems with Various Lipid Types and Brown Rice Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Park, Jinhee

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate emulsion mapping between emulsion stability and cooking yields, apparent viscosity, and hardness of reduced-fat pork emulsion systems. The reduced-fat emulsion systems were supplemented with different lipid types and brown rice bran fiber (BRF) concentrations. Compared to the control with 30% back fat, lower emulsion stability and higher cooking yield of meat emulsion systems were observed in T1 (30% back fat+1% BRF), T2 (30% back fat+2% BRF), T3 (30% back fat+3% BRF), T4 (30% back fat+6% BRF), and T15 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF). Lower emulsion stability and higher apparent viscosity were observed in T1, T2, T3, T4, and T8 (20% back fat+3% BRF) compared to the control. Lower emulsion stability and higher hardness was detected in all treatments compared with the control, except T5 (20% back fat), T10 (10% back fat+10% canola oil+2% BRF), T11 (10% back fat+10% olive oil+2% BRF), T12 (10% back fat+10% grape seed oil+2% BRF), and T13 (10% back fat+10% soybean oil+2% BRF). This approach has been found particularly useful for highlighting differences among the emulsified properties in emulsion meat products. Thus, the results obtained with emulsion mapping are useful in making emulsified meat products of desired quality characteristics, partially replacing pork back fat with a mix of 10% back fat, 10% canola oil and 2% BRF was most similar to the control with 30% pork back fat. PMID:26761836

  5. Emulsions stability, from dilute to dense emulsions -- role of drops deformation.

    PubMed

    Sanfeld, Albert; Steinchen, Annie

    2008-07-01

    The present paper starts with a review of fundamental descriptions based on physico-chemical laws derived for emulsions with a special interest for eventual evidences of drops deformation. A critical analysis of theories and experiments is given that leads the authors to propose new static and dynamic models for the approach to flocculation and coalescence of two deformable drops in dense and dilute environments of other neighboring drops. The model developed is based on an old paper by Albers and Overbeek for W/O dense emulsions with non-deformable particles, that has been improved recently first by Sengupta and Papadopoulos and then by Mishchuk et al. to account for all the interaction forces (electrostatic, van der Waals and steric). The basic idea here rests in the assumption that the flat surface area of the two coalescing drops, interacting in the field of other particles, increases when the distance between the particles decreases according to an exponential law with a characteristic length related to the disjoining force in the inter-particle film and to the capillary pressure that opposes flattening. The difficulty lies, indeed, in manifold interpretations on experimental observations so that no clear conclusion can be derived on mechanisms responsible for the deformation of droplets. This is why, from a pure theoretical and physical point of view, according to rather complicated models, we propose a much more simple approach that permits to define a capillary length as part of virtual operations. In a static approach, this length is based on analogy with electricity, namely repulsion leads to flatness while attraction to hump. Therefore this brings us to a definition of a length depending on the maximum value of the disjoining pressure in competition with the capillary pressure. Gravity also promotes flocculation, therefore we compare the maximum values of the surface forces acting between the surfaces of two floculating particles to gravity. Finally, considering that in most publications on emulsions foams and colloidal systems, much attention is paid on the role of the drainage in the stability process, we devote the last section to the drainage between flattened drops. We first describe briefly Taylor's approach and extend Reynolds revisited formulae taking into account the viscous friction, the disjoining pressure, the film elasticity and the wetting angle weighting the capillary pressure through the characteristic length. Our calculated values are compared to some experimental data. In conclusion to make this long paper as useful as possible for research purposes, we have the hope that our understanding of emulsion stability is not only based on knowledge of numerous theoretical and experimental works sometimes controversial given in a critical way but that it gives a new approach based on an interpretation of the drop deformation in terms of a characteristic length linked to a deformation number analogous to a Bond number. PMID:18313631

  6. Simple and double emulsions via coaxial jet electrosprays.

    PubMed

    Marín, Alvaro G; Loscertales, Ignacio G; Márquez, M; Barrero, A

    2007-01-01

    We report for the first time the generation of electrified coaxial jets of micrometric diameter in liquid media. Scaling laws to predict the inner and outer diameter of the coaxial jet are given. We show some experiments illustrating the formation process of the coaxial jet, and demonstrate how this process can be used to yield either o/w (oil in water) or o/w/o (oil/water/oil) emulsions of micrometric size. Some interesting analogies with other hydrodynamic focusing processes are also pointed out. PMID:17358479

  7. S-190 exposure verification flight test. [photographic emulsions and film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, L.

    1973-01-01

    A flight test was conducted to determine the optimum exposures for the Skylab S-190A experiment. An aircraft multispectral photographic system (AMPS) which is installed in the NASA Earth Resources aircraft NP3A was used to simulate the S-190A system. The same film emulsions to be used for S-190A were used in the flight test. These rolls were on factory-loaded spools for use in the AMPS camera system. It was found that some variation is to be expected between these rolls and the S-190A flight loads.

  8. Kinetic Release of Alkalinity from Particle-Containing Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are typically employed during remediation to promote biotic reduction of contaminants. Emulsions, however, hold promise for encapsulated delivery of many types of active ingredients required for successful site remediation or long-term site stewardship. Our research is currently focused on using alkalinity-containing particles held within oil-in-water emulsions to sustain control of subsurface pH. Here we describe results from laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling conducted to quantify the kinetics associated with the emulsion delivery and alkalinity release process. Kinetically stable oil-in-water emulsions containing (~60 nmCaCO3 or ~100 nm MgO particles) were previously developed using soybean oil and Gum Arabic as a stabilizing agent. Batch and column experiments were employed to assess the accessibility and release of the alkalinity from the emulsion. Successive additions of HCl were used in batch systems to produce several pH responses (pH rebounds) that were subsequently modeled to elucidate release mechanisms and rates for varying emulsion compositions and particle types. Initial results suggest that a linear-driving-force model is generally able to capture the release behavior in the batch system when the temporally-constant, lumped mass-transfer coefficient is scaled by the fraction of particle mass remaining within the droplets. This result suggests that the rate limiting step in the release process may be the interphase transfer of reactive species at the oil-water interface. 1-d column experiments were also completed in order to quantify the extent and rate of alkalinity release from emulsion droplets retained in a sandy medium. Alkalinity release from the retained droplets treated a pH 4 influent water for 25-60 pore volumes (the duration depended on particle type and mass loading), and the cessation in treatment corresponded to exhaustion of the particle mass held within the oil. Column experiments were simulated using a transport code containing the linear-driving-force expression evaluated in the batch experiments. In these simulations the lumped mass transfer coefficient was fit and compared with values predicted using existing correlations for liquid-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces in porous media.

  9. Tuneable Rheological Properties of Fluorinated Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon Orellana, Laura Andreina; Riechers, Birte; Caen, Ouriel; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    Pickering emulsions are an appealing approach to stabilize liquid-liquid dispersions without surfactants. Recently, amphiphilic silica nanoparticles have been proposed as an alternative to surfactants for droplet microfluidics applications, where aqueous drops are stabilized in fluorinated oils. This system, proved to be effective in preventing the leakage of resorufin, a model dye that was known to leak in surfactant-stabilized drops. The overall capabilities of droplet-based microfluidics technology is highly dependent on the dynamic properties of droplets, interfaces and emulsions. Therefore, fluorinated pickering emulsions dynamic properties need to be characterized, understood and controlled to be used as a substitute of already broadly studied emulsions for droplet microfluidics applications. In this study, fluorinated pickering emulsions have been found to behave as a Herschel Bulkley fluid, representing a challenge for common microfluidic operations as re-injection and sorting of droplets. We found that this behavior is controlled by the interaction between the interfacial properties of the particle-laden interface and the bulk properties of the two phases

  10. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOEpatents

    Ruhe, Thomas C.; Rao, Pilaka P.

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  11. Nuclear Emulsion Scanning in Opera:. Methods and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozza, Cristiano

    2008-06-01

    The design of the OPERA experiment was also motivated and justified by the revival of nuclear emulsion handling and scanning in a modem, automatic fashion, as it took previously place, although at a smaller scale, for the CHORUS experiment. Nuclear emulsions are still the only detector to allow a very detailed topological study of an interaction/decay vertex at the sub-micrometer level. They are most suitable in experiments where topology is a non-ambiguous signature of a certain class of events. This is for instance the case of neutrino oscillation detection and measurement by the study of a tau-appearance signal. The design and performance of the two different scanning systems used in OPERA (ESS and S-UTS) are discussed. Their unique features in terms of speed, precision, background suppression, particle identification, and kinematical reconstruction are shown in close connection with the technical details that make them possible. Unequalled precision, almost vanishing background, and a wealth of information about each single event are the results presented.

  12. Shock Compression and Recovery of Microorganism-Loaded Broths and AN Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazell, P. J.; Beveridge, C.; Groves, K.; Stennett, C.

    2009-12-01

    The microorganisms Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Zygosaccharomyces bailii and an oil-based emulsion, have been subjected to shock compression using the flyer-plate technique to initial pressures of 0.8 GPa (in the suspension). In each experiment, a stainless steel capsule was used to contain the broths and allow for recovery without contamination. Where cavitation was mostly suppressed by virtue of simultaneous shock and dynamic compression, no kill was observed. By introducing an air gap behind the suspension, limited kill was measured in the yeast. Results also suggest that stable emulsification occurs in coarse oil-based emulsions that are subjected to shock.

  13. Development and utilization of ``Plate Changer'' system for neutrino interaction locations in OPERA emulsion target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, J.; Ariga, A.; Ban, T.; Hoshino, K.; Ishiguro, K.; Kazuyama, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kitagawa, N.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Koshiba, S.; Matsuo, T.; Miyanishi, K.; Morishima, K.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Natsume, M.; Narita, K.; Omura, T.; Oya, M.; Sato, O.; Shiraishi, T.; Suzuki, K.; Kose, U.; Yoon, C. S.; Zama, Y.

    2013-02-01

    In the OPERA experiment, so-called Scan Back method is used to locate neutrino interaction vertices in the emulsion target named ECC (Emulsion Cloud Chamber). In Scan Back method, tracks detected in the most downstream emulsion plate in ECCs are followed to upstream plate by plate until it reaches to the interaction points. In order to treat a number of neutrino interactions recorded in OPERA, dedicated systems called Plate Changer has been developed and utilized to neutrino event location in Japan. The details of the system have been described in this report. Until the end of November 2012, 6223 Scan Back trials have been performed using this system, and strongly contributed to the detection of tau neutrino appearance.

  14. Optical transmission measurements for in-line monitoring of turbid oil-water emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Philipp; Dopf, Katja; Aichholz, Markus; Riedel, Boris; Lemmer, Uli; Freudig, Barbara; Zimmermann, Clifton; Gerken, Martina

    2014-05-01

    For absorbing media the concentration may be calculated directly from the optical transmission following the logarithmic dependence given in the Lambert-Beer law. Due to multiple scattering events in oil-water emulsions (e.g. milk, cream, etc.), these exhibit a nonlinear relationship between the attenuation and the oil concentration. We demonstrate that for increasing oil content in oil-water emulsions the attenuation first increases, then levels out, and finally even decreases for a fat content of 60%. Single-wavelength optical transmission measurements are found to be well suited for the in-line monitoring of oil-water emulsions of fat contents below 20%, e.g., for the in-line fat content monitoring of milk. Using experiments and ray-tracing simulations we evaluate system optimization.

  15. Annatto Polymeric Microparticles: Natural Product Encapsulation by the Emulsion-Solvent Evaporation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Zaine; Duran, Nelson; Guterres, Silvia S.

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, the extract from annatto seeds was encapsulated in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) particles by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The particles were washed and centrifuged to remove excess stabilizer and then freeze-dried. The main compound of annatto seeds, bixin, has antioxidant properties as well…

  16. Annatto Polymeric Microparticles: Natural Product Encapsulation by the Emulsion-Solvent Evaporation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, Zaine; Duran, Nelson; Guterres, Silvia S.

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, the extract from annatto seeds was encapsulated in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) particles by the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The particles were washed and centrifuged to remove excess stabilizer and then freeze-dried. The main compound of annatto seeds, bixin, has antioxidant properties as well

  17. Aging mechanism in model Pickering emulsion.

    PubMed

    Fouilloux, Sarah; Malloggi, Florent; Daillant, Jean; Thill, Antoine

    2016-01-21

    We study the stability of a model Pickering emulsion system using fluorinated oil and functionalized silica nanoparticles. A special counter-flow microfluidic set-up was used to prepare monodisperse oil droplets in water. The wettability of the monodisperse silica nanoparticles (NPs) could be tuned by surface grafting and the surface coverage of the droplets was controlled using the microfluidic setup. For surface coverage as low as 23%, we observed a regime of Pickering emulsion stability where the surface coverage of emulsion droplets of constant size increases with time, coexisting with an excess of oil phase. Our results demonstrate that the previously observed limited coalescence regime where surface coverage tends to control the average size of the final droplets must be put in a broader perspective. PMID:26549639

  18. Optical diffusers based on silicone emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jui-Hao; Lien, Shui-Yang; Ho, Jeng-Rong; Shih, Teng-Kai; Chen, Chia-Fu; Chen, Chien-Chung; Whang, Wha-Tzong

    2009-12-01

    The present study provides an experimental approach for fabricating optical diffuser films based on silicone emulsions. The silicone emulsion consisting of silicone polymer (Sylgard 184) and NaCl aq. solution was used as the optical material of diffusers, wherein NaCl aq. solution was severed as surfactant to stabilize the emulsions. After stirring mechanically, microscaled water drop with various sizes distributed randomly in silicone polymer, wherein water drop was used as scattering diffusion particles. To modulate the volume of NaCl aq. solution, the diffusing performance of diffusers could be change by different amount drop particles. Thereafter, an optical examination was carried out to characterize optical properties, transmittance, and light diffusivity of volumetric diffuser films.

  19. Forces acting in quasi 2d emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Carlos; Lowensohn, Janna; Weeks, Eric

    We study the forces in a quasi two dimensional emulsion system. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsions confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the oil droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. By means of microscopy, we measure the droplet positions and their deformation, which we can relate to the contact forces due to surface tension. We improve over prior work in our lab, achieving a better force resolution. We use this result to measure and calibrate the viscous forces acting in our system, which fully determine all the forces on the droplets. Our results can be applied to study static configurations of emulsion, as well as faster flows.

  20. Multi-body coalescence in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tong; Wang, Haitao; Jing, Benxin; Liu, Fang; Burns, Peter C.; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized Pickering emulsions have shown unusual behaviours such as the formation of non-spherical droplets and the sudden halt of coalescence between individual droplets. Here we report another unusual behaviour of Pickering emulsions—the simultaneous coalescence of multiple droplets in a single event. Using latex particles, silica particles and carbon nanotubes as model stabilizers, we show that multi-body coalescence can occur in both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions. The number of droplets involved in the nth coalscence event equals four times the corresponding number of the tetrahedral sequence in close packing. Furthermore, coalescence is promoted by repulsive latex and silica particles but inhibited by attractive carbon nanotubes. The revelation of multi-body coalescence is expected to help better understand Pickering emulsions in natural systems and improve their designs in engineering applications.

  1. Results from CERN experiment WA80

    SciTech Connect

    Gutbrod, H.H.; Plasil, F.; Albrecht, R.; Awes, T.C.; Baktash, C.; Beckmann, P.; Berger, F.; Bock, R.; Claesson, G.; Dragon, L.

    1988-01-01

    As in the case of most of the experiments discussed at this conference, the primary goal of WA80 is a search for evidence that a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) has been formed, or that some similar phase transition has taken place. A number of signatures for QGP formation have been suggested, and most experiments have been designed so as to obtain data that pertain to one or more of these signatures. In the case of WA80, the primary probe for the investigation of the QGP is the measurement of photons that may be emitted from the plasma phase. An understanding of the various QGP signatures, however, requires an understanding of the background created by reaction products that do not relate directly to QGP production and thus requires a thorough understanding of the reaction mechanism governing nucleus-nucleus collisions at these extreme energies. Consequently, another important goal of WA80 is to survey nucleus-nucleus collisions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon and to compare the results to those obtained from proton-nucleus interactions. We have pursued this second goal by measuring forward and transverse energies, by studying the multiplicities of produced charged particles over a large range of pseudorapidity, by investigating transverse momentum spectra of neutral products, and by examining target fragmentation products. In this paper we review all of our results obtained with 60- and 200-GeV/nucleon /sup 16/O projectiles, with the exception of charged-particle multiplicity data, which are discussed in a separate presentation at this conference. We also present the first preliminary calorimeter results from /sup 32/S bombardments at 6.4 TeV. 22 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Electrodynamic treatment of reversed-type emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Skachkov, A.E.; Lavrov, I.S.; Timonov, S.M.

    1985-11-01

    The authors have produced an inhomogeneous electric field in processing reversed emulsions by using the oscillations of conducting spheres in an electric field; this is known as the electrical pendulum effect. The apparatus for the electrodynamic treatment of reversed-type emulsion is shown and the physical characteristics (density, kinematic viscosity, dielectric constant) are shown for the hydrocarbons used: hexane, octane, hexadecane and diesel fuel. It is shown that there is a minimum in the dependence of the residual water content after electrodynamic treatment on the external field strength; the minimum shifts to larger external field strength as the viscosity increases.

  3. Phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Xu, Zhiguang; Cai, Zengxiao; Guo, Qipeng

    2015-06-28

    Herein, we report the phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) induced by salt concentration and pH changes. The ionomers are sulfonated polystyrenes (SPSs) with different sulfonation degrees. The emulsion types were determined by conductivity measurements, confocal microscopy and optical microscopy, and the formation of HIPE organogels was verified by the tube-inversion method and rheological measurements. SPSs with high sulfonation degrees (water-soluble) and low sulfonation degrees (water-insoluble) can stabilize oil-in-water emulsions; these emulsions were transformed into water-in-oil HIPEs by varying salt concentrations and/or changing the pH. SPS, with a sulfonation degree of 11.6%, is the most efficient, and as low as 0.2 (w/v)% of the organic phase is enough to stabilize the HIPEs. Phase inversion of the oil-in-water emulsions occurred to form water-in-oil HIPEs by increasing the salt concentration in the aqueous phase. Two phase inversion points from oil-in-water emulsions to water-in-oil HIPEs were observed at pH 1 and 13. Moreover, synergetic effects between the salt concentration and pH changes occurred upon the inversion of the emulsion type. The organic phase can be a variety of organic solvents, including toluene, xylene, chloroform, dichloroethane, dichloromethane and anisole, as well as monomers such as styrene, butyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. Poly(HIPEs) were successfully prepared by the polymerization of monomers as the continuous phase in the ionomer-stabilized HIPEs. PMID:26028420

  4. Emulsions stabilised by whey protein microgel particles: towards food-grade Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Rouvet, Martine; Gehin-Delval, Cécile; Schmitt, Christophe; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-09-28

    We have investigated a new class of food-grade particles, whey protein microgels, as stabilisers of triglyceride-water emulsions. The sub-micron particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at all pH with and without salt. All emulsions creamed but exhibited exceptional resistance to coalescence. Clear correlations exist between the properties of the microgels in aqueous dispersion and the resulting emulsion characteristics. For conditions in which the particles were uncharged, fluid emulsions with relatively large drops were stabilised, whereas emulsions stabilized by charged particles contained smaller flocculated drops. A combination of optical microscopy of the drops and spectrophotometry of the resolved aqueous phase allowed us to estimate the interfacial adsorption densities of the particles using the phenomenon of limited coalescence. We deduce two classes of particle arrangement. Complete adsorption of the particles was obtained when they were neutral or when their charges were screened by salt resulting in at least one particle monolayer at the interface. By contrast, only around 50% of the particles adsorbed when they were charged with emulsion drops being covered by less than half a monolayer. These findings were supported by direct visualization of drop interfaces using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Uncharged particles were highly aggregated and formed a continuous 2-D network at the interface. Otherwise particles organized as individual aggregates separated by particle-free regions. In this case, we suggest that some particles spread at the interface leading to the formation of a continuous protein membrane. Charged particles displayed the ability to bridge opposing interfaces of neighbouring drops to form dense particle disks protecting drops against coalescence; this is the main reason for the flocculation and stability of emulsions containing sparsely covered drops. PMID:24675994

  5. Microfluidic preparation and self diffusion PFG-NMR analysis of monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Eric; Maan, Abid Aslam; Acquistapace, Simone; Burbidge, Adam; Johns, Michael L; Gunes, Deniz Z; Clausen, Pascal; Syrbe, Axel; Hugo, Julien; Schroen, Karin; Miralles, Vincent; Atkins, Tim; Gray, Richard; Homewood, Philip; Zick, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) double emulsions have been prepared using microfluidic glass devices designed and built primarily from off the shelf components. The systems were easy to assemble and use. They were capable of producing double emulsions with an outer droplet size from 100 to 40 μm. Depending on how the devices were operated, double emulsions containing either single or multiple water droplets could be produced. Pulsed-field gradient self-diffusion NMR experiments have been performed on the monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions to obtain information on the inner water droplet diameter and the distribution of the water in the different phases of the double emulsion. This has been achieved by applying regularization methods to the self-diffusion data. Using these methods the stability of the double emulsions to osmotic pressure imbalance has been followed by observing the change in the size of the inner water droplets over time. PMID:22964093

  6. [Use of perfluorocarbon emulsions for administration of photosensitizing preparations into bone marrow stem cells].

    PubMed

    Temnov, A A; Sklifas, A N; Tereshchenko, A V; Belyĭ, Iu A; Lyskov, N B; Kukushkin, N I

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that, upon incubation of mouse bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) in vitro with the nanoparticles of perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion stabilized by proxanol 268, these nanoparticles penetrate into cells and stay there for a long time (up to 20 days of observation). It has been found that, under in vitro conditions, mouse BMSC loaded with the nanoparticles of both the original emulsion and the emulsion preliminarily incubated with radachlorine do not differ from control stem cells in the rate of division, stretching on a plastic support, and the formation of a monolayer. It has been shown that the exposure to laser radiation of BMSC incubated with the nanoparticles of a PFC emulsion preliminarily incubated with radachlorine under in vitro conditions leads to the death of these cells due to the destruction of the cell membrane. The treatment with laser radiation of BMSC incubated with the nanoparticles of the starting PFC emulsion (without preliminarily incubation with radachlorine) causes no death of these cells. It has been shown in in vivo experiments that, when transplanted to the organism of a recipient mouse, BMSC of a donor mouse incubated with the nanoparticles of a PFC emulsion preliminarily incubated with radachlorine retain their functional activity, in particular the ability to migrate in the animal body. In this case, radachlorine contained in these stem cells retains its major function, to induce the death of stem cells by the action of laser radiation due to the destruction of the cell membrane. The observation period after the transplantation was 5-7 days. PMID:21268351

  7. Probing Interfacial Emulsion Stability Controls using Electrorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuyu; Brandvik, Amy; Alvarado, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    The stability of water-in-oil emulsions is controlled by interfacial mechanisms that include oil film rheology of approaching drops and the strength of drop interfaces. Film drainage is mainly a function of the continuous phase rheology. Temperature is used to regulate the viscosity of the continuous phase and hence determine its effect on emulsion stability through film drainage, in contrast with interfacial strength. In this study, one crude oil is used to formulate water-in-oil emulsions. Oil-water interfacial tension is measured to gauge other interfacial changes with temperature. The critical field value, used as proxy of emulsion stability, approaches a plateau value for each crude oil- aqueous solution pair, at sufficiently high temperature (50 ^oC), which is interpreted to reflect the intrinsic drop-coating film resistance to coalescence. Interfacial tension does vary significantly with either aqueous phase composition or temperature. From comparison with previous results, we speculate that drop coating film is composed of a fraction of asphaltic compunds.

  8. Radiation dosimetry and spectrometry with superheated emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Errico, Francesco

    2001-09-01

    Detectors based on emulsions of overexpanded halocarbon droplets in tissue equivalent aqueous gels or soft polymers, known as "superheated drop detectors" or "bubble (damage) detectors", have been used in radiation detection, dosimetry and spectrometry for over two decades. Recent technological advances have led to the introduction of several instruments for individual and area monitoring: passive integrating meters based on the optical or volumetric registration of the bubbles, and active counters detecting bubble nucleations acoustically. These advances in the instrumentation have been matched by the progress made in the production of stable and well-specified emulsions of superheated droplets. A variety of halocarbons are employed in the formulation of the detectors, and this permits a wide range of applications. In particular, halocarbons with a moderate degree of superheat, i.e. a relatively small difference between their operating temperature and boiling point, can be used in neutron dosimetry and spectrometry since they are only nucleated by energetic heavy ions such as those produced by fast neutrons. More recently, halocarbons with an elevated degree of superheat have been utilised to produce emulsions that nucleate with much smaller energy deposition and detect low linear energy transfer radiations, such as photons and electrons. This paper reviews the detector physics of superheated emulsions and their applications in radiation measurements, particularly in neutron dosimetry and spectrometry.

  9. Particle-Stabilized Powdered Water-in-Oil Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-04-01

    The preparation of powdered water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions by gentle aeration of w/o emulsions stabilized by hydrophobic fumed silica particles in the presence of oleophobic fluorinated clay particles is reported for an alkane and a triglyceride oil. The resultant powders consist of water drops dispersed in oil globules themselves dispersed in air (w/o/a). They contain ∼80 wt % of the precursor w/o emulsion and were stable to phase separation for over 1 year but release oil and water when sheared on a substrate. Above a certain ratio of w/o emulsion:fluorinated clay particles, the powdered emulsions partially invert to an emulsion paste, composed of air bubbles and water droplets dispersed in oil. The tap density and angle of repose of the powdered emulsions were measured and compared with those of the corresponding powdered oils making up the continuous phase of the precursor emulsions. The contact angles of water droplets under oil on glass slides spin coated with silica particles and oil drops and w/o emulsion droplets in air on compressed disks of fluorinated clay particles are consistent with the stabilization of w/o emulsions and powdered emulsions, respectively. PMID:27002604

  10. Na-caseinate/oil/water systems: emulsion morphology diagrams.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui Lin; McGrath, Kathryn M

    2012-09-01

    The concentrated (dispersed phase 50-70 wt%) composition space of Na-caseinate, a family of milk proteins, stabilised emulsions was investigated for three different oils: soybean oil, palm olein and tetradecane with pH 6.8 phosphate buffer continuous phase. The variation of emulsion stability and microstructure were explored using static light scattering, diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance, cryo-scanning electron microscopy, rheology and the time varying macroscopic phase separation of the emulsions. For soybean oil and palm olein a rich diversity of emulsion microstructures and stabilities are realised. Five emulsion domains, each having a different microstructure and macroscopic stability have been identified within the composition space probed. For the lowest concentrations of emulsifier bridging flocculation is evident and emulsions are of low stability. Increasing Na-caseinate concentration leads to an increased stability and the existence of distinct individual oil droplets, visualised using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Further increases in Na-caseinate concentration reduce emulsion stability due to depletion flocculation. Na-caseinate self-assembly is then initiated. At sufficiently high Na-caseinate and/or oil concentrations the continuous phase of the emulsion is a three-dimensional protein network and emulsion stability is again enhanced. At the limits of the emulsion composition space a gel-like paste is formed. The diversity of emulsion microstructure is reduced when tetradecane is the discrete phase. Na-caseinate self-assembly is limited and there is no evidence for formation of a protein network. PMID:22709624

  11. Synthetic Polymers at Interfaces: Monodisperse Emulsions Multiple Emulsions and Liquid Marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guanqing

    The adsorption of polymeric materials at interfaces is an energetically favorable process which is investigated in much diversified fields, such as emulsions, bubbles, foams, liquid marbles. Pickering emulsion, which is emulsion stabilized by solid particles has been investigated for over one century and preparation of Pickering emulsion with narrow size distribution is crucial for both the theoretical study of the stabilization mechanism and practical application, such as templated fabrication of colloidosomes. The precise control over the size and functionality of polymer latices allows the preparation of monodisperse Pickering emulsions with desired sizes through SPG membrane emulsification at rather rapid rate compared to microfludic production. Double or multiple emulsions have long been investigated but its rapid destabilization has always been a major obstacle in applying them into practical applications. The modern living polymerization techniques allow us to prepare polymers with designed structure of block copolymers which makes it possible to prepare ultra-stable multiple emulsions. The precise tuning of the ratio of hydrophobic part over the hydrophilic can unveil the stabilization mechanism. Liquid marble is a new type of materials of which liquid droplets are coated by dry particles. The coating of an outer layer of dry particles renders the liquid droplets non-sticky at solid surface which is useful in transportation of small amount of liquid without leakage at extreme low friction force. The property of liquid marbles relies largely on the stabilizers and the drying condition of polymeric latices is shown to have great influence on the property of liquid marbles. Firstly, an introduction to the interfacial and colloidal science with special attention to topics on emulsions, multiple emulsion and liquid marbles is given in Chapter 1. The unique features of an interface and a discussion on the definition of colloids are introduced prior to the discussion of emulsion stabilization and preparation. A historical review of multiple emulsions is presented subsequently and the stability mechanism is discussed in details with regard to the transportation kinetics of small molecules through the separating membrane of double emulsions. The principle, property and applications of liquid marbles are then summarized. Secondly, the preparation of monodisperse Pickering emulsions stabilized by soft PNIPAM-co-MAA microgels through SPG membrane emulsification is described. The influence of the membrane pore size, pH of the particle dispersion, particle size and the operating parameters of the membrane emulsification device on the size of the emulsion droplets was investigated systematically. The improvement in monodispersity of the emulsion droplets allows us to measure the release profiles of a small molecular dye and a larger nanoparticle through the colloidosomes. It is further demonstrated that the preparation of monodisperse emulsions stabilized by other types of soft particles allows us control the stability of the emulsion with a pH trigger and improved biocompatibility. Thirdly, the preparation of multiple emulsions stabilized by a special designed PEG-b-PS diblock copolymer with desired hydrophobicity by one-step method was presented. The ultra-stability of the as-obtained multiple emulsions was ascribed to the effective steric stabilization of the two interfaces with different polymer configurations at the interfaces. A series of diblock copolymer with increasing PS chain length was then synthesized to investigate the influence of asymmetry ratio on the type of emulsions prepared. It is found that the diblock copolymers with the asymmetry ratio of approximately 1 had the highest power to stabilize multiple emulsions. The multiple emulsions were demonstrated to be a promising platform for controlled release. In the end, particle-stabilized water-in-air liquid marbles were investigated. PSco-MAA nanoparticles synthesized from surfactant-free emulsion polymerization were proved to be effective liquid marble stabilizers. The influence of drying conditions on the properties of liquid marbles was investigated through a macroscopic way. The pH value of the particle dispersion, which influences the protonation states of the particles before freeze-drying, has a profound influence on the property of the stabilized liquid marbles. A brief comment to the future of work of these investigated systems is delivered in the last part.

  12. Ultrasonic energy input influence οn the production of sub-micron o/w emulsions containing whey protein and common stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Kaltsa, O; Michon, C; Yanniotis, S; Mandala, I

    2013-05-01

    Ultrasonication may be a cost-effective emulsion formation technique, but its impact on emulsion final structure and droplet size needs to be further investigated. Olive oil emulsions (20wt%) were formulated (pH∼7) using whey protein (3wt%), three kinds of hydrocolloids (0.1-0.5wt%) and two different emulsification energy inputs (single- and two-stage, methods A and B, respectively). Formula and energy input effects on emulsion performance are discussed. Emulsions stability was evaluated over a 10-day storage period at 5°C recording the turbidity profiles of the emulsions. Optical micrographs, droplet size and viscosity values were also obtained. A differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) multiple cool-heat cyclic method (40 to -40°C) was performed to examine stability via crystallization phenomena of the dispersed phase. Ultrasonication energy input duplication from 11kJ to 25kJ (method B) resulted in stable emulsions production (reduction of back scattering values, dBS∼1% after 10days of storage) at 0.5wt% concentration of any of the stabilizers used. At lower gum amount samples became unstable due to depletion flocculation phenomena, regardless of emulsification energy input used. High energy input during ultrasonic emulsification also resulted in sub-micron oil-droplets emulsions (D(50)=0.615μm compared to D(50)=1.3μm using method A) with narrower particle size distribution and in viscosity reduction. DSC experiments revealed no presence of bulk oil formation, suggesting stability for XG 0.5wt% emulsions prepared by both methods. Reduced enthalpy values found when method B was applied suggesting structural modifications produced by extensive ultrasonication. Change of ultrasonication conditions results in significant changes of oil droplet size and stability of the produced emulsions. PMID:23266492

  13. Partitioning of Laponite Clay Platelets in Pickering Emulsion Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Brunier, Barthélémy; Sheibat-Othman, Nida; Chevalier, Yves; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie

    2016-01-12

    Partitioning of laponite disklike clay platelets between polymer particles and bulk aqueous phase was investigated in Pickering surfactant-free emulsion polymerization of styrene. Adsorption of laponite clay platelets plays an important role in the stabilization of this system, influencing the particle size and the number of particles, and, hence, the reaction rate. Adsorption isotherms show that, while the laponite clay platelets are almost fully exfoliated in water, they form multilayers on the surface of the polymer particles by the end of polymerization, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This observation is supported by quartz crystal microbalance, conductivity, and TEM measurements, which reveal interactions between the clay and polystyrene, as a function of the ionic strength. The strong adsorption of clay platelets leaves a low residual concentration in the aqueous phase that cannot cause further nucleation of polymer particles, as demonstrated during seeded emulsion polymerization experiments in the presence of a high excess of clay. A Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET)-type model for laponite adsorption on polystyrene particles matches the adsorption isotherms. PMID:26653971

  14. Automatic track recognition for large-angle minimum ionizing particles in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, T.; Fukunaga, S.; Ishida, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuo, T.; Mikado, S.; Nishimura, S.; Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H.; Sudou, J.; Ariga, A.; Tufanli, S.

    2014-12-01

    We previously developed an automatic track scanning system which enables the detection of large-angle nuclear fragments in the nuclear emulsion films of the OPERA experiment. As a next step, we have investigated this system's track recognition capability for large-angle minimum ionizing particles (1.0 <= |tan θ| <= 3.5). This paper shows that, for such tracks, the system has a detection efficiency of 95% or higher and reports the achieved angular accuracy of the automatically recognized tracks. This technology is of general purpose and will likely contribute not only to various analyses in the OPERA experiment, but also to future experiments, e.g. on low-energy neutrino and hadron interactions, or to future research on cosmic rays using nuclear emulsions carried by balloons.

  15. Crocin loaded nano-emulsions: Factors affecting emulsion properties in spontaneous emulsification.

    PubMed

    Mehrnia, Mohammad-Amin; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Makhmal-Zadeh, Behzad S; Maghsoudlou, Yahya

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous emulsification may be used for encapsulating bioactive compounds in food and pharmaceutical industry. It has several advantages over high energy and other low energy methods including, protecting sensitive compounds against severe conditions of high energy method and its ability to minimize surfactant, removal of cosurfactant and thermal stability compared with other low energy methods. In this study, we examined possibility of encapsulating highly soluble crocin in W/O micro-emulsions using spontaneous method which further could be used for making double emulsions. Nonionic surfactants of Span 80 and polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) were used for making micro-emulsions that showed the high potential of PGPR for spontaneous method. Surfactant to water ratio (SWR%) was evaluated to find the highest amount of aqueous phase which can be dispersed in organic phase. Droplet size decreased by increasing SWR toward the SWR=100% which had the smallest droplet size and then increased at higher levels of surfactant. By increasing SWR, shear viscosity increased which showed the high effect of PGPR on rheological properties. This study shows in addition to W/O micro-emulsions, spontaneous method could be used for preparing stable O/W micro-emulsions. PMID:26708427

  16. A comparative study of the physicochemical properties of a virgin coconut oil emulsion and commercial food supplement emulsions.

    PubMed

    Khor, Yih Phing; Koh, Soo Peng; Long, Kamariah; Long, Shariah; Ahmad, Sharifah Zarah Syed; Tan, Chin Ping

    2014-01-01

    Food manufacturers are interested in developing emulsion-based products into nutritional foods by using beneficial oils, such as fish oil and virgin coconut oil (VCO). In this study, the physicochemical properties of a VCO oil-in-water emulsion was investigated and compared to other commercial oil-in-water emulsion products (C1, C2, C3, and C4). C3 exhibited the smallest droplet size of 3.25 µm. The pH for the emulsion samples ranged from 2.52 to 4.38 and thus were categorised as acidic. In a texture analysis, C2 was described as the most firm, very adhesive and cohesive, as well as having high compressibility properties. From a rheological viewpoint, all the emulsion samples exhibited non-Newtonian behaviour, which manifested as a shear-thinning property. The G'G'' crossover illustrated by the VCO emulsion in the amplitude sweep graph but not the other commercial samples illustrated that the VCO emulsion had a better mouthfeel. In this context, the VCO emulsion yielded the highest zeta potential (64.86 mV), which was attributed to its strong repulsive forces, leading to a good dispersion system. C2 comprised the highest percentage of fat among all emulsion samples, followed by the VCO emulsion, with 18.44% and 6.59%, respectively. PMID:24988188

  17. Emulsion characteristics, chemical and textural properties of meat systems produced with double emulsions as beef fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Serdaroğlu, Meltem; Öztürk, Burcu; Urgu, Müge

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, double emulsions are stated to have a promising potential in low-fat food production, however, there are very few studies on their possible applications in meat matrices. We aimed to investigate the quality of beef emulsion systems in which beef fat was totally replaced by double emulsions (W1/O/W2) prepared with olive oil and sodium caseinate (SC) by two-step emulsification procedure. Incorporation of W1/O/W2 emulsion resulted in reduced lipid, increased protein content, and modified fatty acid composition. W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments had lower jelly and fat separation, higher water-holding capacity and higher emulsion stability than control samples with beef fat. Increased concentrations of W1/O/W2 emulsions resulted in significant changes in texture parameters. TBA values were lower in W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments than control treatment after 60days of storage. In conclusion, our study confirms that double emulsions had promising impacts on modifying fatty acid composition and developing both technologically and oxidatively stable beef emulsion systems. PMID:26995773

  18. Effect of fibrous filter properties on the oil-in-water-emulsion separation and filtration performance.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Swarna; von Arnim, Volkmar; Stegmaier, Thomas; Planck, Heinrich

    2011-06-15

    Separation of secondary emulsions of dispersed droplet size less than 10 μm, by means of fibrous medium is a very complex but important process. The study investigates the influence of thin fibrous filter properties, i.e. surface energy, pore size and porosity on the separation performance of an isooctane in water emulsion (0.2%, mean drop size 2 μm). Experiments were carried out on five different filter media with a wide variation in their pore size (2-51 μm), surface energy (14-46 mN/m) and porosity (0.46-0.87) at similar process conditions. Filter media with different wettability are obtained by applying various hydrophobic and hydrophilic coatings. All the used coatings contain nanoparticles (25 nm) to impart nanoscale surface roughness at the single fiber surface. Besides emulsion properties and operating conditions, the phase separation mechanism and performance highly depends on pore size, surface energy and porosity of the filter media. More complete coalescence takes place at reduced pore size and at a surface preferentially wetted by the dispersed phase. Whereas when the pore size equals to the influent droplet size, then the surface wettability of filter is less effective and the separation mechanism is governed by inflow velocity. The emulsion inflow velocity and pressure drop are significantly affected by the filter media air permeability but do not depend on filter surface energy. PMID:21459510

  19. Double emulsions based on silicone-fluorocarbon-water and their skin penetration.

    PubMed

    Mahrhauser, Denise-Silvia; Fischer, Claudia; Valenta, Claudia

    2016-02-10

    Double emulsions have significant potential in pharmacy and cosmetics due to the feasibility of combining incompatible substances in one product and the protection of sensitive compounds by incorporating them into their innermost phase. However, a major drawback of double emulsions is their thermodynamic instability and their strong tendency to coalesce. In the present study, the physicochemical stability, the skin permeation and the skin penetration potential of modified semi-solid double emulsions was investigated. The double emulsions were prepared of the cosmetically applied perfluoropolyethers Fomblin(®) HC/04 or Fomblin(®) HC-OH, silicone, carbomer and water. Measurement of the droplet size and examination of the microscopic images confirmed their physicochemical stability over the observation period of eight weeks. Franz-type diffusion cell experiments revealed no increase in curcumin permeation due to the employed perfluoropolyethers compared to the respective control formulations. The formulations used as control were O/W macroemulsions with or without a Polysorbate 80/Sorbitane monooleate 80 surfactant combination. Likewise, tape stripping studies showed no penetration enhancing effect of the employed perfluoropolyethers which is desirable as both perfluoropolyethers are commonly applied components in human personal-care products. PMID:26688033

  20. Emergent Hyperuniformity in Periodically Driven Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis

    I will discuss the self-organization of microfluidic emulsions into anomalously homogeneous structures. Upon periodic driving confined emulsions undergo a first-order transition from a reversible to an irreversible dynamics. We evidence that this dynamical transition is accompanied by structural changes at all scales yielding macroscopic yet finite hyperuniform structures. Numerical simulations are performed to single out the very ingredients responsible for the suppression of density fluctuations. We show that, as opposed to equilibrium systems, the long-range nature of the hydrodynamic interactions are not required for the formation of hyperuniform patterns, thereby suggesting a robust relation between reversibility and hyperuniformity which should hold in a broad class of periodically driven materials.

  1. Continuous phases in emulsions of three liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman ); Johnson, G.K. ); Dadyburjor, D.B. )

    1993-08-01

    For three-phase (macro)emulsions formed by the top (T), middle (M), and bottom (B) phases of amphiphile/oil/water systems, it has been variously stated in the literature either (1) that the continuous phase is always M or (2) that the continuous phase is B below the phase inversion temperature (PIT) and T above the PIT. We show by means of isothermal electrical conductivity measurements at various temperatures on emulsions of known phase volume fractions that neither hypothesis is generally correct. For our experimental conditions the [open quotes]choice[close quotes] of continuous phase depends on the phase volume fractions, and at all temperatures - by appropriate choice of phase volume fractions - any of T, M, or B may be made the continuous phase. 21 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Droplet Dynamics of a Flowing Emulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cypull, Olivia; Feitosa, Klebert

    The inner workings of glassy systems have long been a topic of interest for soft material scientists. Similarities between the jamming behavior of emulsions and the glass transition of glassy systems have prompted the conjecture that they might share the same underlying mechanism. Here we study a dense oil-in-water emulsion system forced to flow through a narrow microchannel. By matching the index of refraction of the two phases, we image the internal dynamics of the droplets in a confocal microscope. At low velocity speeds, we find that the velocity along the edge of the microchannel was not significantly different than then the average droplet velocity in the bulk suggesting a near plug flow. By contrast the droplets near the edge experienced more movement perpendicular to the flow indicating the fluidization effect of the confining walls.

  3. Thermoresponsive macroporous scaffolds prepared by emulsion templating.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengzhong; Bismarck, Alexander; Steinke, Joachim H G

    2012-11-14

    A versatile method to prepare non-covalently crosslinked polyHIPEs hydrogels from oil-in-water high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) whose aqueous phase contained thermo-responsive linear polymers is described. The interconnected pore structure of the polyHIPEs is maintained by reversible physical aggregation of thermo-responsive polymer chains in an aqueous environment. This method to prepare interconnected porous hydrogels using a thermal trigger in the guise of thermo-responsive polymers by emulsion templating requires no chemical reaction during solidification of the template. This particular feature could provide a safer route to injectable scaffolds as issues of polymerisation/crosslinking chemistry and residual initiator fragments or monomers do not arise. PMID:22927192

  4. Intelligent gels and cryogels with entrapped emulsions.

    PubMed

    Komarova, Galina A; Starodubtsev, Sergey G; Lozinsky, Vladimir I; Kalinina, Elena V; Landfester, Katharina; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2008-05-01

    Smart thermoresponsive gels and cryogels with incorporated emulsions have been synthesized and studied. The gels were obtained by three-dimensional copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide or N,N'-bis(acryloyl)cystamine in the presence of dispersion of tetradecane stabilized with sodium dodecylsulfate. Polymerization was performed at room temperature and below the water crystallization temperature. Both composite gels and cryogels were capable of heat-induced collapse. The extent of the collapse of the composite gel prepared at room temperature was much smaller and without squeezing of the lipophilic phase out of the shrunk composite gel. In contrast, shrinking of the composite cryogel was accompanied by release of tetradecane emulsion. PMID:18386880

  5. The Rheology of a Three Component System: COAL/WATER/#4 Oil Emulsions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmartin, Barbara Jean

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the rheology of a three component system, coal/water/#4 oil emulsions (COW), in which the third component, water, was present in a significant concentration, and to determine the applicability of existing theories from suspension rheology to the three component system studied. In a coal/water/oil emulsion, free coal particles adhere to the surface of the water droplets, preventing their coagulation, while the larger coal particles reside in the matrix of stabilized water droplets. The use of liquid fuels containing coal is a means of utilizing our nation's coal reserves while conserving oil. These fuels can be burned in conventional oil-fired furnaces. In this investigation, a high sulfur, high ash, bituminous coal was used, along with a heavy #4 oil to prepare the emulsions. The coal was ground to a log-normal distribution with an average particle size of 62 microns. A Haake RV3 concentric cylinder viscometer, with a ribbed measuring system, was used to determine the viscosity of the emulsions. A physical pendulum settling device measured the shift in center of mass of the COW as a function of time. The flow behavior of the fuel in pipes was also tested. In interpreting the data from the viscometer and the pipe flow experiments, a power law analysis was used in the region from 30 s('-1) to 200 s('-1). Extrapolation methods were used to obtain the low and high shear behavior of the emulsions. In the shear rate region found in boiler feed systems, COW are shear thinning with a flow behavior index of 0.7. The temperature dependent characteristic of the emulsions studied were similar and followed an Arrhenius type relationship. The viscosity of the COW decreases with increasing coal average particle size and is also a function of the width of the size distribution used. The type of coal used strongly influences the rheology of the fuel. The volatile content and the atomic oxygen to nitrogen ratio of the coal are the most predictive factors in terms of the variation in viscosity of the emulsion with coal type. The viscosity of the oil used is linearly related to the viscosity of the COW. The relative viscosity - concentration relationship for the emulsions was evaluated by an equation developed by Quemada for use in blood rheology: (eta)(,r) = (1 - (phi)/(phi)(,max))('-2). The best fit of the data to the equation was found when the coal plus water concentration was used for (phi). The maximum packing fraction increased with increasing shear rate, reflecting a breaking up of the agglomerates in the system. By using the relative packing fraction of the coal plus oil concentration, the relative viscosity of the emulsions tested at the three shear rates evaluted can be fit to the Quemada relative viscosity equation. In the pipe flow tests, the emulsions showed little time-dependent behavior, however they did exhibit a well effect. A fair correlation was obtained between pipe flow behavior and the results obtained in the viscometer. Coal/water/#4 oil emulsions behave as coal and water in oil systems and can be successfully modeled using theories from suspension rheology.

  6. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  7. Imaging techniques applied to characterize bitumen and bituminous emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Ramón-Torregrosa, P; Páez-Dueñas, A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this article is to present some important advances in the imaging techniques currently used in the characterization of bitumen and bituminous emulsions. Bitumen exhibits some properties, such as a black colour and a reflecting surface at rest, which permit the use of optical techniques to study the macroscopic behaviour of asphalt mixes in the cold mix technology based on emulsion use. Imaging techniques allow monitoring in situ the bitumen thermal sensitivity as well as the complex phenomenon of emulsion breaking. Evaporation-driven breaking was evaluated from the shape of evaporating emulsion drops deposited onto non-porous and hydrophobic substrates. To describe the breaking kinetics, top-view images of a drying emulsion drop placed on an aggregate sheet were acquired and processed properly. We can conclude that computer-aided image analysis in road pavement engineering can elucidate the mechanism of breaking and curing of bituminous emulsion. PMID:17825782

  8. Automatic readout for nuclear emulsions in muon radiography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A.; Bozza, C.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Kose, U.; Lauria, A.; Medinaceli, E.; Miyamoto, S.; Montesi, C.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Russo, A.; Sirignano, C.; Stellacci, S. M.; Strolin, P.; Tioukov, V.

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear emulsions are an effective choice in many scenarios of volcano radiography by cosmic-ray muons. They are cheap and emulsion-based detectors require no on-site power supply. Nuclear emulsion films provide sub-micrometric tracking precision and intrinsic angular accuracy better than 1 mrad. Imaging the inner structure of a volcano requires that the cosmic-ray absorption map be measured on wide angular range. High-absorption directions can be probed by allowing for large statistics, which implies a large overall flux, i.e. wide surface for the detector. A total area of the order of a few m2 is nowadays typical, thanks to the automatic readout tools originally developed for high-energy physics experiments such as CHORUS, PEANUT, OPERA. The European Scanning System is now being used to read out nuclear emulsion films exposed to cosmic rays on the side of volcanoes. The structure of the system is described in detail with respect to both hardware and software. Its present scanning speed of 20 cm2/h/side/microscope is suitable to fulfil the needs of the current exposures of nuclear emulsion films for muon radiograph, but it is worth to notice that applications in volcano imaging are among the driving forces pushing to increase the performances of the system. Preliminary results for the Unzen volcano of a joint effort by research groups in Italy and Japan show that the current system is already able to provide signal/background ratio in the range 100÷10000:1, depending on the quality cuts set in the off-line data analysis. The size of the smallest detectable structures in that experimental setup is constrained by the available statistics in the region of highest absorption to about 50 mrad, or 22 m under the top of the mountain. Another exposure is currently taking data at the Stromboli volcano. Readout of the exposed films is expected to begin in March 2012, and preliminary results will be available soon after. An effort by several universities and INFN has already started to increase the scanning speed, to exceed 100 cm2/h and approach the order of magnitude of 1000 cm2/h. Muon radiography also demands high signal/background ratio to probe high absorption regions in volcanoes. A new camera, a new image acquisition device, an improved motion control board and extensive use of GPU-based processing are the keys to make a new leap in speed while even improving data quality. With most of the new hardware already finalised, software development is quickly progressing, and a stable, user-friendly and cheap prototype is expected to be ready to take data already this summer. The amount of raw data collected is typically of the order of 10 TB/m2. The operation of automatic microscopes is thus complemented with an automatic data management and processing system based on a distributed computing model. The processing power can be scaled up linearly by just increasing the number of available computers. An evolution is underway on this side too, and algorithms designed for GPU-based processing will soon help increase the available power while decreasing the overall cost of typical installations.

  9. Clinical applications of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy.

    PubMed

    Muller, Sam H; Diaz, James H; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-12-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE; Intralipid) therapy, a standard treatment in local anesthetic toxicity, has demonstrated therapeutic efficacies for a number of different drug class-mediated toxicities. Some of these varied drug groups include antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiarrhythmics, and calcium channel blockers. To meet the objective of describing the growing number of indications for Intralipid therapy and any diverse effects and/or failures of Intralipid therapy in reversing multiple drug toxicities, we queried several Internet search engines with the key words "intravenous lipid emulsion therapy," "Intralipid," "lipid emulsion," and "local anesthetic systemic toxicity," resulting in the identification of 31 case reports for descriptive analysis. These case reports included 49 separate drug overdose cases involving ten separate drug classes which were successfully reversed with Intralipid. The education of clinicians regarding the beneficial and varied roles of Intralipid therapy in different clinical settings is warranted, particularly in terms of the potential for Intralipid therapy to reverse the toxicities of non-local anesthetic drugs. PMID:26049929

  10. Simple and double emulsions via electrospray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrero, Antonio; Loscertales, Ignacio G.

    2005-11-01

    Generation of nanoemulsions is of great interest in medical and pharmaceutical applications; drug delivery or antiviral emulsions are typical examples. The use of electrosprays for dispersing liquids inside liquid insulator baths have been recently reported, (Barrero et al. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 272, 104, 2004). Capsules, nanotubes and coaxial nanofibers have been obtained from electrified coaxial jets (Loscertales et al. Science 295, n. 5560, 1695, 2002; J. American Chem. Soc. 126, 5376, 2004). Here we present a method for making double emulsions (both water-oil-water and o/w/o) based on the generation of compound electrosprays inside insulator liquid baths. Basically, a conducting liquid injected throughout a capillary needle is electroatomized in cone-jet mode inside a dielectric liquid bath. A third insulating liquid is injected inside the Taylor cone to form a second meniscus. Then, a steady coaxial jet, in which the insulating liquid is coated by the conducting one, develops. A double emulsion forms as a result of the jet breaking up into compound droplets electrically charged. Experimental results carried out with glycerine and different oils in a bath of heptane are reported.

  11. Lipid Emulsion for Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanowicz, Sarah; Patil, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    The accidental overdose of local anesthetics may prove fatal. The commonly used amide local anesthetics have varying adverse effects on the myocardium, and beyond a certain dose all are capable of causing death. Local anesthetics are the most frequently used drugs amongst anesthetists and although uncommon, local anaesthetic systemic toxicity accounts for a high proportion of mortality, with local anaesthetic-induced cardiac arrest particularly resistant to standard resuscitation methods. Over the last decade, there has been convincing evidence of intravenous lipid emulsions as a rescue in local anesthetic-cardiotoxicity, and anesthetic organisations, over the globe have developed guidelines on the use of this drug. Despite this, awareness amongst practitioners appears to be lacking. All who use local anesthetics in their practice should have an appreciation of patients at high risk of toxicity, early symptoms and signs of toxicity, preventative measures when using local anesthetics, and the initial management of systemic toxicity with intravenous lipid emulsion. In this paper we intend to discuss the pharmacology and pathophysiology of local anesthetics and toxicity, and the rationale for lipid emulsion therapy. PMID:21969824

  12. Drops and emulsions with complex interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erni, Philipp; Windhab, Erich J.; Fischer, Peter

    2007-11-01

    We study the behavior of emulsion drops in external flow fields, focusing on recent experimental work involving liquid interfaces covered with surface-active species, in particular adsorbed proteins and particles. Three different length scales are considered: (i) the rheology of complex interfaces is discussed for adsorbed polyelectrolyte surfactants with different molecular structure (compact and globular vs. random coil); (ii) the flow of single drops with macromolecular adsorption layers is studied in optical flow cells; (iii) dilute emulsions of drops are investigated using rheo-small angle light scattering (rheo-SALS). We discuss the results in the context of emulsion and drop models accounting for interfacial viscoelasticity, as well as with capsule suspension models for the case of rigid interfacial layers. Drops stabilized by adsorbed particles or globular proteins can be understood as capsules surrounded by a soft shell; their behavior on the single drop level is in many ways reminiscent of phenomena observed with red blood cells or vesicles, including non-linear drop shape fluctuations under creeping flow conditions. References: [1] Fischer P, Erni P. Curr Opin Colloid Interface Sci (2007, accepted) [2] Erni P et al., Appl Phys Lett 87, 244104 (2007)

  13. Method for demulsification of bitumen emulsions using polyalkylene polyamine salts

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, D.R.

    1984-03-06

    A process for recovering bitumen from oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions is disclosed wherein water soluble demulsifiers are used. These demulsifiers are polyamine salts prepared by contacting poly(ethyleneimines) with organic or inorganic acids. The polyamines have a molecular weight of at least 1,000. To resolve the bituminous petroleum emulsions, the process is carried out between 25/sup 0/ and 160/sup 0/ C. wherein the demulsifier of the invention is contacted with the bituminous emulsion.

  14. PEGylated Nanoparticles Obtained through Emulsion Polymerization as Paclitaxel Carriers.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Claudio; Morosi, Lavinia; Bello, Ezia; Ferrari, Raffaele; Licandro, Simonetta Andrea; Lupi, Monica; Ubezio, Paolo; Morbidelli, Massimo; Zucchetti, Massimo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Moscatelli, Davide; Frapolli, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Polymer nanoparticles (NPs) represent a promising way to deliver poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs without the use of unwanted excipients, whose presence can be the cause of severe side effects. In this work, a Cremophor-free formulation for paclitaxel (PTX) has been developed by employing PEGylated polymer nanoparticles (NPs) as drug delivery carriers based on modified poly(ε-caprolactone) macromonomers and synthesized through free radical emulsion polymerization. Paclitaxel was loaded in the NPs in a postsynthesis process which allowed to obtain a drug concentration suitable for in vivo use. In vivo experiments on drug biodistribution and therapeutic efficacy show comparable behavior between the NPs and the Cremophor formulation, also showing good tolerability of the new formulation proposed. PMID:26623665

  15. Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Fibrotic Profile of Fish Oil Emulsions Used in Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Clerigues, Alfonso; Marti-Bonmati, Ezequiel; Milara, Javier; Almudever, Patricia; Cortijo, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (PN) is associated with many complications including severe hepatobiliary dysfunction. Commercial ω-6 fatty acid-soybean based-lipid emulsions in PN may mediate long term PN associate liver disease (PNALD) whereas ω-3-fish oil parenteral emulsions have shown to reverse PNALD in children. However, its clinical effectiveness in adults has been scarcely reported. In this work, we study the role of soybean and fish oil lipid commercial emulsions on inflammatory and profibrotic liver markers in adults with long term PNALD and in in vitro cellular models. Inflammatory and profibrotic markers were measured in serum of ten adults with long term PNALD and in culture supernatants of monocytes. Liver epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) was induced by transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) to evaluate in vitro liver fibrosis. Omegaven®, a 100% fish oil commercial emulsion, was infused during four months in two patients with severe long term PNALD reversing, at the first month, the inflammatory, profibrotic and clinical parameters of PNALD. The effect was maintained during the treatment course but impaired when conventional lipid emulsions were reintroduced. The other patients under chronic soybean oil-based PN showed elevated inflammatory and profibrotic parameters. In vitro human monocytes stimulated with lipopolysaccharide induced a strong inflammatory response that was suppressed by Omegaven®, but increased by soybean emulsions. In other experiments, TGFβ1 induced EMT that was suppressed by Omegaven® and enhanced by soybean oil lipid emulsions. Omegaven® improves clinical, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic parameters in adults with long-term home PNALD. PMID:25502575

  16. Effect of primary emulsions on microsphere size and protein-loading in the double emulsion process.

    PubMed

    Maa, Y F; Hsu, C C

    1997-01-01

    Incorporation of a protein drug in microspheres made of a hydrophobic polymer is commonly achieved via double liquid-liquid emulsification (w/o/w) or by dispersing a powdered protein in a polymer solution followed by liquid-liquid emulsification (s/o/w). This study focused on the effect of the first operating step in both processes on the size and protein-loading of the microspheres. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the model protein and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was used as the model polymer. The w/o emulsion was characterized based on the degree of emulsion fineness which was controlled using rotor/stator homogenization. The s/o emulsion was characterized based on protein powder size and shape. Protein powders of different sizes and shapes were produced using different powder preparation methods. In both emulsification processes, the second operating step which produced the microspheres was conducted in either a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) or a static mixer. The size of the microspheres thus prepared was found to increase with increasing size of the protein powder in the s/o/w system but increase with decreasing size of the liquid emulsion droplets in the w/o/w system. Empirical correlations can accurately predict the size of the microspheres if the size of w/o emulsion droplets and protein powder is 10 x less than the microsphere size. Protein loading in the microspheres decreased with respect to increases in w/o emulsion droplet size or in protein powder size. We propose that these phenomena are attributed to two mechanisms, fragmentation along the weak routes in the w/o/w system and particle redistribution as the result of terminal velocity in the s/o/w system. The role of protein powder shape was not significant until the protein powder size exceeded 5 microns. Irregular-shaped protein powders resulted in lower encapsulation efficiency than spherical-shaped protein powders. PMID:9132473

  17. Squalene emulsions for parenteral vaccine and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher B

    2009-01-01

    Squalene is a linear triterpene that is extensively utilized as a principal component of parenteral emulsions for drug and vaccine delivery. In this review, the chemical structure and sources of squalene are presented. Moreover, the physicochemical and biological properties of squalene-containing emulsions are evaluated in the context of parenteral formulations. Historical and current parenteral emulsion products containing squalene or squalane are discussed. The safety of squalene-based products is also addressed. Finally, analytical techniques for characterization of squalene emulsions are examined. PMID:19783926

  18. Development of Nuclear Emulsion for Fast Neutron Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machii, Shogo; Kuwabara, Kenichi; Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. Energy resolution of nuclear emulsion is 21% (12%) FWHM against neutron energy of 2.8 MeV (4.9 MeV). Nuclear emulsion has high gamma ray rejection power. For now, at least 2×104 gamma rays/cm2, no increase of as a background for neutron measurement when scan using automatic nuclear emulsion read out system HTS. This value suggests that it is applicable even under high gamma ray environment, such as nuclear fusion reactor.

  19. Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

    1981-09-01

    Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

  20. Emulsions with unique properties from proteins as emulsifiers.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, H; Reger, M

    2014-03-01

    Many proteins are surface active molecules and form stable emulsions. In these emulsions, the protein covered oil droplets behave as sticky droplets even when they are ionically charged. As a result of the stickiness of the droplets the emulsions have gel-like properties. The stickiness is due to the multipolar nature of the proteins in contrast to the bipolar nature of surfactants or other amphiphilic compounds that form emulsions with repulsive droplets. Stable emulsions are also formed from particles like clays to which proteins are adsorbed. These hybrid compounds form even more stable emulsions with stronger elastic properties than clays and proteins on their own. These so called pickering emulsions have paste-like properties and do not flow. The scaffolding network of the crosslinked protein bilayers on the droplets is so strong that both the water and the oil can be removed from the emulsions by freeze drying without collapse of the scaffold. The resulting sponge can be used again for the uptake of both water and oil. Emulsions which are prepared from different proteins differ mainly in their elastic properties. PMID:24161225

  1. Chemistry and formation of water-in-oil emulsions and tar balls

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, J.R.; Phillips, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Significant research of the last four years includes sitings, investigations at spills-of-opportunity, recent studies, as well as new research form Arctic and sub-Arctic oil weathering experiments and observations on behavior of crude oil in the presence of ice. This book also contains research and practical information of interest to petroleum companies, scientists, engineers, environmentalists, chemical and biological oceanographers, and oil spill response coordinators. When crude oil or refined products are released at sea, they are subjected immediately to a wide variety of weathering processes. These processes cause significant changes in the rheological properties of the oil, several orders of magnitude increases in viscosity, factor of two changes in interfacial surface tensions, and appreciable (5-10/sup 6/) changes in oil density. All these alterations have important implications for the subsequent spill cleanup or contaminant strategy. The increase in volume due to incorporation of water in emulsions can cause further problems for storing the collected product. Specific laboratory studies on water-in-oil emulsions with a variety of crude and refined petroleum products are discussed in detail along with data on the component concentrations of wax, asphaltene, and other surface-active materials. This information facilitates reliable predictions on whether or not a particular crude or refined product will form a stable emulsion. The information covers case histories of real spill events with discussion of specific studies of water in oil emulsions and the chemistry of emulsion formation and behavior. The chemical composition of tar balls, their sources, fate, and global distribution are discussed. Conclusions and critical citation review for easy reference is presented in addition to details on particular topics.

  2. Linear and nonlinear rheology of dense emulsions across the glass and the jamming regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffold, Frank; Zhang, Chi; Mason, Thomas G.

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the linear and nonlinear rheology of concentrated silicone oil-in-water emulsions, amorphous disordered solids composed of repulsive and deformable soft colloidal spheres. Based on recent results from simulation and theory, we derive quantitative predictions for the dependences of the elastic shear modulus and the yield stress on the effective droplet volume fraction. The remarkable agreement with experiments we observe supports the scenario that the repulsive glass and the jammed state can be clearly identified in the rheology of soft spheres at finite temperature while crossing continuously from a liquid to a highly compressed yet disordered solid. We show that the onset of elasticity due to entropic contribution can be described by a quasi-equilibrium analytical model of linear elasticity hat includes energetic contributions from entropy and soft interfacial deformation. In a second set of experiments we use confocal microscopy to monitor the structure and dynamics of emulsion droplets while crossing the glass and the jamming transition..

  3. Overview of the hypernuclear production in heavy-ion collision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappold, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, heavy-ion collision experiments have brought new insight to the study of hypernucleus. Experiments using ion induced reactions for hypernuclear research focus on two distinct aspects: the spectroscopy and probing the nuclear reaction. In the case of the experimental spectroscopy, the internal structure of hypernuclei is investigated in order to determine the baryon-baryon interaction in the strangeness sector for the hyper-matter equation of state. The dynamical aspect of the nucleus-nucleus reaction can also be explored by studying the production of hypernuclei. The experimental observations of the production mechanisms responsible for the formation of the hypernuclei in ion collisions will be presented. Depending of the center-of-mass energy and the type of experiment, fixed target or collider, hypernuclei can be produced in the mid-rapidity and/or in the spectator regions. The experimental results from both cases will be presented and discussed.

  4. A multivariate screening analysis of W/O emulsions in high external electric fields as studied by means of dielectric time domain spectroscopy. 2: Model emulsions stabilized by interfacially active fractions from crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Foerdedal, H.; Midttun, O.; Sjoeblom, J.; Kvalheim, O.M.; Schildberg, Y.; Volle, J.L.

    1996-09-01

    The electrically induced coalescence of water-in-oil emulsions stabilized by interfacially active fractions from crude oils has been studied by means of time domain dielectric spectroscopy at high electric fields. The experiments were designed with a 2{sup 7-3} reduced factorial design. Regression analysis clearly shows that the choice of organic solvent and the amount of asphaltenes, as well as the interplay between these variables, are the most significant parameters for determining the stability of these emulsions. It should be pointed out that the asphaltenes were the only surface active fraction tested. No interplay between, for instance, asphaltenes and resins was investigated. The nonlinearity found in the regression analysis is explained by different aggregation states of asphaltenes in aliphatic and aromatic solvents. The influence of the variables upon the emulsion stability is discussed.

  5. Crude oil emulsions containing a compatible fluorochemical surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Karydas, A.; Rodgers, J.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a crude oil in water emulsion, which is stable to both breakdown and phase inversion up to at least about 50{degrees} C., the emulsion containing an effective, compatible, emulsion stabilizing amount of a fluorochemical surfactant of the formula (R{sub {ital f}}){sub {ital n}}A{sub {ital m}}Q wherein R{sub {ital f}} is an inert, stable, oleophobic and hydrophobic fluoroaliphatic group having up to about 20 carbon atoms; n is an integer from 1 to 3; A is a direct bond or an organic linking group and is covalently bonded to both R{sub {ital f}} and Q; Q is an anionic, nonionic or amphoteric group; and m is an integer from 1 to 3; wherein the amount of weight of the fluorochemical surfactant present in the emulsion being between about 0.001 and 1% by weight of the emulsion, in the presence of absence of up to about 2% by weight of a crude oil emulsion promoting hydrocarbon surfactant, with the proviso that at least about 0.005% by weight total fluorochemical and hydrocarbon surfactant is present, based upon the weight of emulsion, and wherein the emulsion contains bout 15 to about 90 percent by weight water, based upon the weight of emulsion, such that the viscosity of the emulsion is less than about 50% of the viscosity of the crude oil, and wherein the emulsion spontaneously breaks down into an aqueous and crude oil phase at a temperature between about 55{degrees} and 75{degrees} C.

  6. A novel approach to dark matter search based on nanometric emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Asada, T.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Furuya, S.; Gentile, V.; Hakamata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Katsuragawa, T.; Kuwabara, K.; Machii, S.; Naka, T.; Pupilli, F.; Sirignano, C.; Tawara, Y.; Tioukov, V.; Umemoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2014-12-01

    The most convincing candidate as main constituent of the dark matter in the Universe consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP). WIMPs must be electrically neutral and interact with a very low cross-section (σ < 10-40 cm2) which makes them detectable in direct searches only through the observation of nuclear recoils induced by the WIMP rare scatterings. In the experiments carried out so far, recoiled nuclei are searched for as a signal over a background produced by Compton electrons and neutron scatterings. Signal found by some experiments have not been confirmed by other techniques. None of these experiments is able to detect the track, typically less than one micron long, of the recoiled nucleus and therefore none is able to directly detect the incoming direction of WIMPs. We propose an R&D program for a new experimental method able to observe the track of the scattered nucleus based on new developments in the nuclear emulsion technique: films with nanometric silver grains, expansion of emulsions and very fast completely automated scanning systems. Nuclear emulsions would act both as the WIMP target and as the tracking detector able to reconstruct the direction of the recoiled nucleus. This unique characteristic would provide a new and unambiguous signature of the presence of the dark matter in our galaxy.

  7. Induction of Infection in Sesbania exaltata by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene Formulated in an Invert Emulsion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In greenhouse experiments, an experimental invert emulsion (MSG 8.25) was tested as an adjuvant with spores of the mycoherbicidal fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene, a highly virulent pathogen of the leguminous weed Aeschynomene virginica (northern jointvetch), but non-pathoge...

  8. Towards predicting the stability of protein-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Delahaije, Roy J B M; Gruppen, Harry; Giuseppin, Marco L F; Wierenga, Peter A

    2015-05-01

    The protein concentration is known to determine the stability against coalescence during formation of emulsions. Recently, it was observed that the protein concentration also influences the stability of formed emulsions against flocculation as a result of changes in the ionic strength. In both cases, the stability was postulated to be the result of a complete (i.e. saturated) coverage of the interface. By combining the current views on emulsion stability against coalescence and flocculation with new experimental data, an empiric model is established to predict emulsion stability based on protein molecular properties such as exposed hydrophobicity and charge. It was shown that besides protein concentration, the adsorbed layer (i.e. maximum adsorbed amount and interfacial area) dominates emulsion stability against coalescence and flocculation. Surprisingly, the emulsion stability was also affected by the adsorption rate. From these observations, it was concluded that a completely covered interface indeed ensures the stability of an emulsion against coalescence and flocculation. The contribution of adsorption rate and adsorbed amount on the stability of emulsions was combined in a surface coverage model. For this model, the adsorbed amount was predicted from the protein radius, surface charge and ionic strength. Moreover, the adsorption rate, which depends on the protein charge and exposed hydrophobicity, was approximated by the relative exposed hydrophobicity (QH). The model in the current state already showed good correspondence with the experimental data, and was furthermore shown to be applicable to describe data obtained from literature. PMID:25704489

  9. Synthesis of metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Haorong; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2011-12-13

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  10. Mannans as stabilizers of oil-in-water beverage emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant polysaccharides and gums such as gum arabic (GA) are commonly used as stabilizers of oil-in-water emulsions. O-acetyl-galactoglucomannan (GGM), a by-product from mechanical pulping of spruce wood, is able to stabilize colloidal wood resin emulsions (Hannuksela and Holmbom, 2004), but its use a...

  11. Water-in-diesel emulsions and related systems.

    PubMed

    Lif, Anna; Holmberg, Krister

    2006-11-16

    Water-in-diesel emulsions are fuels for regular diesel engines. The advantages of an emulsion fuel are reductions in the emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matters, which are both health hazardous, and reduction in fuel consumption due to better burning efficiency. An important aspect is that diesel emulsions can be used without engine modifications. This review presents the influence of water on the emissions and on the combustion efficiency. Whereas there is a decrease in emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matters, there is an increase in the emissions of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide with increasing water content of the emulsion. The combustion efficiency is improved when water is emulsified with diesel. This is a consequence of the microexplosions, which facilitate atomization of the fuel. The review also covers related fuels, such as diesel-in-water-in-diesel emulsions, i.e., double emulsions, water-in-diesel microemulsions, and water-in-vegetable oil emulsions, i.e., biodiesel emulsions. A brief overview of other types of alternative fuels is also included. PMID:16806033

  12. Rheological properties of heavy oils and heavy oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M.R.

    1996-06-01

    In this study, the author investigated the effects of a number of process variables such as shear rate, measurement temperature, pressure, the influence of pretreatment, and the role of various amounts of added water on the rheology of the resulting heavy oil or the emulsion. Rheological properties of heavy oils and the corresponding emulsions are important from transportation and processing standpoints.

  13. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Gelger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water, The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles.

  14. Nanoscale and Microscale Iron Emulsions for Treating DNAPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Cherie L.

    2002-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using emulsified nanoscale and microscale iron particles to enhance dehalogenation of (Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid) DNAPL free-phase. The emulsified system consisted of a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable oil-in-water emulsion with nanoscale or microscale iron particles contained within the emulsion droplets. It was demonstrated that DNAPLs, such as trichloroethene (TCE), diffuse through the oil membrane of the emulsion particle whereupon they reach an aqueous interior and the surface of an iron particle where dehalogenation takes place. The hydrocarbon reaction by-products of the dehalogenation reaction, primarily ethene (no chlorinated products detected), diffuse out of the emulsion droplet. This study also demonstrated that an iron-emulsion system could be delivered in-situ to the DNAPL pool in a soil matrix by using a simulated push well technique. Iron emulsions degraded pure TCE at a rate comparable to the degradation of dissolved phase TCE by iron particles, while pure iron had a very low degradation rate for free-phase TCE. The iron-emulsion systems can be injected into a sand matrix where they become immobilized and are not moved by flowing water. It has been documented that surfactant micelles possess the ability to pull pooled TCE into emulsion droplets where degradation of TCE takes place.

  15. Emulsion design to improve the delivery of functional lipophilic components.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian

    2010-01-01

    The food industry has used emulsion science and technology for many years to create a diverse range of food products, such as milk, cream, soft drinks, nutritional beverages, dressings, mayonnaise, sauces, dips, deserts, ice cream, margarine, and butter. The majority of these food products are conventional oil-in-water (O/W) or water-in-oil (W/O) type emulsions. Recently, there has been increasing interest within the food industry in either improving or extending the functional performance of foods using novel structured emulsions. This article reviews recent developments in the creation of structured emulsions that could be used by the food and other industries, including nanoemulsions, multiple emulsions, multilayer emulsions, solid lipid particles, and filled hydrogel particles. These structured emulsions can be produced from food-grade [generally recognized as safe (GRAS)] ingredients (e.g., lipids, proteins, polysaccharides, surfactants, and minerals), using simple processing operations (e.g., mixing, homogenizing, and thermal processing). The structure, production, performance, and potential applications of each type of structured emulsion system are discussed. PMID:22129337

  16. Maximizing the stability of pyrolysis oil/diesel fuel emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several emulsions consisting of biomass pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) in diesel fuel were produced and analyzed for stability over time. An ultrasonic probe was used to generate microscopic droplets of bio-oil suspended in diesel fuel, and this emulsion was stabilized using surfactant chemicals. The most...

  17. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water. The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles

  18. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains 5 milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000859 in §...

  19. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains 5 milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000859 in §...

  20. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains 5 milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000859 in §...

  1. 21 CFR 524.802 - Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. 524... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.802 Enrofloxacin, silver sulfadiazine emulsion. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains 5 milligrams (mg) enrofloxacin and 10 mg silver sulfadiazine. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000859 in §...

  2. Splenic lipidosis after administration of intravenous fat emulsions.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, G B

    1978-01-01

    Spleens showing fatty infiltration and necrosis of the pulp were found at necropsy on several patients who had received intravenous fat emulsions during their terminal illnesses. The postmortem findings are described and the clinicopathological correlation is discussed with special reference to the phenomenon of creaming of the emulsion. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:690241

  3. Field-Induced Structures in Ferrofluid Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Lawrence, E. M.; Wu, A.; Ivey, M. L.; Flores, G. A.; Javier, K.; Bibette, J.; Richard, J.

    1995-04-01

    The field-induced structure in a monodisperse ferrofluid emulsion is studied. An applied magnetic field induces a magnetic dipole moment in each droplet. When the dipole-dipole interaction energy exceeds the thermal energy, a phase transition occurs as the fluid of randomly dispersed droplets changes to a solid of nearly equally sized and spaced columns. Our results show that the column spacing follows a relation d = 1.33L0.37 for cell thickness 3<=L<=800 μm. A new theory, which treats the column shape more realistically, is developed to account for the results.

  4. Measurement of Stress Redistribution in Flowing Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmond, Kenneth W.; Weeks, Eric R.

    2015-08-01

    We study how local rearrangements alter droplet stresses within flowing dense quasi-two-dimensional emulsions at area fractions ϕ ≥0.88 . Using microscopy, we measure droplet positions while simultaneously using their deformed shape to measure droplet stresses. We find that rearrangements alter nearby stresses in a quadrupolar pattern: stresses on neighboring droplets tend to either decrease or increase depending on location. The stress redistribution is more anisotropic with increasing ϕ . The spatial character of the stress redistribution influences where subsequent rearrangements occur. Our results provide direct quantitative support for rheological theories of dense amorphous materials that connect local rearrangements to changes in nearby stress.

  5. Domain and droplet sizes in emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijters, Stefan; Günther, Florian; Harting, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Particle-stabilized emulsions are commonly used in various industrial applications. These emulsions can present in different forms, such as Pickering emulsions or bijels, which can be distinguished by their different topologies and rheology. We numerically investigate the effect of the volume fraction and the uniform wettability of the stabilizing spherical particles in mixtures of two fluids. For this, we use the well-established three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method, extended to allow for the added colloidal particles with non-neutral wetting properties. We obtain data on the domain sizes in the emulsions by using both structure functions and the Hoshen-Kopelman (HK) algorithm, and we demonstrate that both methods have their own (dis)advantages. We confirm an inverse dependence between the concentration of particles and the average radius of the stabilized droplets. Furthermore, we demonstrate the effect of particles detaching from interfaces on the emulsion properties and domain-size measurements.

  6. Development of an Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Ultrasound Drug Delivery Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Sebastian, Ian E.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-03-01

    Many therapeutic applications of ultrasound (US) include the use of pefluorocarbon (PFC) microbubbles or emulsions. These colloidal systems can be activated in the presence of US, which in the case of emulsions, results in the production of bubblesa process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). ADV can be used as a drug delivery mechanism, thereby yielding the localized release of toxic agents such a chemotherapeutics. In this work, emulsions that contain PFC and chlorambucil, a chemotherapy drug, are formulated using albumin or lipid shells. For albumin droplets, the oil phasewhich contained CHLclearly enveloped the PFC phase. The albumin emulsion also displayed better retention of CHL in the absence of US, which was evaluated by incubating Chinese hamster ovary cells with the various formulations. Thus, the developed emulsions are suitable for further testing in ADV-induced release of CHL.

  7. Temperature dependence of emulsion morphologies and the dispersion morphology diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H. ); Covatch, G.C.; Lim, Kyunghee )

    1991-02-07

    The recently constructed dispersion morphology diagram predicts that for amphiphile/oil/water systems there exists a range of concentrations within which only OL/AQ (oil-in-water) emulsions form and another range of concentrations for which the emulsion morphology is always AQ/OL (water-in-soil), regardless of whether the temperature is below the lower critical end-point temperature, above the upper critical end point, or between these two temperatures. These predictions contradict the PIT (phase inversion temperature) idea, that below the PIT amphiphile/oil/water systems for only oil-in-water emulsions and above the PIT they form only water-in-oil emulsions. By using electrical conductivity measurements to determine the emulsion morphologies at different temperatures for systems of constant composition, the authors show for the system studied that the previous predictions of the dispersion morphology diagram are correct.

  8. Solid water-in-oil emulsion explosives compositions and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cechanski, M.

    1985-06-25

    Solid water-in-oil emulsion explosive compositions comprising a discontinuous emulsion phase formed of an aqueous solution of an oxidizer salt and a continuous emulsion phase formed of a solid carbonaceous fuel derived from an oleaginous liquid. The continuous phase provides a self-sustaining matrix. A solid non-hygroscopic oxidizer salt, such as ammonium perchlorate, is dispersed in the emulsion in a solid granular form. Void cells are also dispersed within the emulsion to provide a void volume of at least 5%. The explosive compositions may ve formulated to be sensitive to No. 8 blasting caps. Processes for forming the explosive compositions include the use of an oleaginous liquid of a polyester and styrene monomer mixture, which is emulsified with an aqueous solution of oxidizer salt without the addition of an emulsifying agent. The explosive composition may be formed as a unitary product or transformed into granular particulate form.

  9. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, was used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improve the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study were: (1) Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems. (2) Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system. (3) Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit. (4) Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system. and (5) Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts (not completed due to lack of funds)

  10. Simulation of Non-Newtonian Emulsion Flows in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanichev, I. V.; Akhmadiev, F. G.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation of emulsion flows in differently shaped microchannels to reproduce the choking of such flows as a result of the effect of dynamic blocking has been made. A model of a highly concentrated emulsion as a structure of tightly packed deformed droplets surrounded by elastic shells is considered. The motion of liquid was determined by the method of the lattice Boltzmann equations together with the immersed boundary method. The influence of the non-Newtonian properties and of elastic turbulence of the indicated emulsion, as well as of the elasticity of the shells of its droplets and of the interaction of these shells on the emulsion motion in a microchannel, has been investigated. It is shown that the flow of this emulsion can be slowed down substantially only due to the mutual attraction of the shells of its droplets.

  11. Novel sample preparation method of polymer emulsion for SEM observation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Hou, Zhaosheng; Li, Tianduo

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to design a simple and reliable method for obtaining the detailed information about the average size, size distribution, and the surface morphology of particles with variation of the sample preparation of a polymer emulsion. In this work, the characteristic features of the particles of rosin size with high viscosity were first described by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphologies of polymer emulsion of solid lipid nanoparticles and of the microspheres were observed. The advantage of the method is that not only the true size and shape of emulsion particles can be shown, but the problem of high-viscosity emulsion that prevents there study with SEM is solved. Using this new method, the micromorphology and size distribution of the emulsion particles with different viscosities have been clearly observed. PMID:17576124

  12. Mechanistic study on demulsification of water-in-diluted bitumen emulsions by ethylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xianhua; Mussone, Paolo; Gao, Song; Wang, Shengqun; Wu, Shiau-Yin; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe

    2010-03-01

    In our previous study, ethylcellulose (EC), an effective, nontoxic, and biodegradable natural polymer, was found effective in dewatering water-in-diluted bitumen emulsions. In this study, the demulsification mechanism of water-in-diluted bitumen emulsions by EC is investigated. In situ experiments using a micropipet apparatus provided direct evidence on both flocculation and coalescence of water droplets in diluted bitumen by EC. The addition of EC was found to decrease naphtha-diluted bitumen-water interfacial tension significantly. At the molecular level, AFM imaging revealed disruption of the continuous interfacial films formed from surface-active components of bitumen by EC. Our study clearly indicates that the demulsification by EC is through both flocculation and coalescence of water droplets, attained by competitive adsorption of EC at the oil-water interface and disruption of the original protective interfacial films formed from the surface-active components of bitumen. PMID:20175568

  13. Experimental data in support of continuous microwave effect on emulsion polymerization of styrene

    PubMed Central

    Ergan, Başak Temur; Bayramoğlu, Mahmut; Özcan, Seval

    2015-01-01

    This article contains original experimental data, figures and methods to the study of Microwave-assisted emulsion polymerization of styrene under the frame of “Enhanced Microwave Synthesis” (EMS), has been examined to investigate the advantages of Microwave (MW) power use in emulsion polymerization (Ergan et al., Eur. Polym. J. 69, 2015, 374–384). For comparative purpose, MW and conventional heating (CH) method experiments were conducted under similar conditions. By externally cooling the reaction vessel with 1,4-dioxane, constant and continuous MW power was successfully applied at isothermal condition during the polymerization. Here we give the MW power calibration data of MW-experimental system, the complete set of the experimental polymerization data and the analysis data obtained from different polymer characterization test devices (GPC, DSC and Viscometer). PMID:26306319

  14. A halo event observed with an emulsion chamber and air shower array at Mt Chacaltaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Honda, K.; Inoue, N.; Kawasumi, N.; Martinic, N.; Navia O, C.; Ochi, N.; Ohmori, N.; Ohsawa, A.; Oliveira, L. C.; Shinozaki, K.; Tamada, M.; Ticona, R.; Tsushima, I.

    2004-02-01

    A hybrid experiment to operate simultaneously an air shower array, a hadron calorimeter and an emulsion chamber is under way at Mt Chacaltaya (5200 m, Bolivia). An event with a halo, a blackened area of ~1 cm on x-ray film of the emulsion chamber, was observed with the experiment. Information about the halo (Ehalo = 850 TeV) and on high energy particles of electromagnetic and hadronic components outside the halo (sumEggr = 632.5 TeV and sumE(ggr)h = 278.8 TeV with a detection threshold of 2 TeV) was obtained from emulsion chamber data. Details about low energy hadrons were determined from the hadron calorimeter data, and characteristics of the accompanying air shower (Ne = 7.0 × 107, s = 0.59) were determined by the air shower array. We reconstruct the event, based on the observed data. The event is compared with simulated events, which supports the conclusion that nuclear interactions change their characteristics in the high energy region so as to result in stronger energy subdivision.

  15. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber... manufacture of emulsion crumb rubber, other than acrylonitrilebutadiene rubber....

  16. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber... manufacture of emulsion crumb rubber, other than acrylonitrilebutadiene rubber....

  17. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber... manufacture of emulsion crumb rubber, other than acrylonitrilebutadiene rubber....

  18. Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions: Its Stabilization and Demulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nour, Abdurahman H.; Mohd. Yunus, R.; Anwaruddin, H.

    Traditional ways of breaking emulsions using heat and chemicals are disadvantageous from both economic and environmental perspectives. In this research, the potentials of microwave technology in demulsification of water-in-crude oil emulsions are investigated. The study began with some characterization studies to provide understandings of fundamental issues such as formation, formulation and breaking of emulsions by both chemical and microwave approaches. The aim was to obtain optimized operating conditions as well as fundamental understanding of water-in-oil emulsion stability upon which further developments on demulsification processes could be developed. It was found that emulsion stability was related to some parameters such as, the surfactant concentration, water content, temperature and agitation speed. Experimental results found that microwave radiation method can enhance the demulsification of water-in-oil emulsions in a very short time compared to the conventional heating methods. The results obtained in this study have exposed the capability of microwave technology in demulsification of water-in-oil emulsion. Further works are nevertheless required to provide deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved to facilitate the development of an optimum system applicable to the industry.

  19. Integrated microfluidic system with simultaneous emulsion generation and concentration.

    PubMed

    Koppula, Karuna S; Fan, Rong; Veerapalli, Kartik R; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-03-15

    Because the size, size distribution, and concentration of emulsions play an important role in most of the applications, controlled emulsion generation and effective concentration are of great interest in fundamental and applied studies. While microfluidics has been demonstrated to be able to produce emulsion drops with controlled size, size distribution, and hierarchical structures, progress of controlled generation of concentrated emulsions is limited. Here, we present an effective microfluidic emulsion generation system integrated with an orifice structure to separate aqueous droplets from the continuous oil phase, resulting in concentrated emulsion drops in situ. Both experimental and simulation results show that the efficiency of separation is determined by a balance between pressure drop and droplet accumulation near the orifice. By manipulating this balance via changing flow rates and microfluidic geometry, we can achieve monodisperse droplets on chip that have a concentration as high as 80,000 drops per microliter (volume fraction of 66%). The present approach thus provides insights to the design of microfluidic device that can be used to concentrate emulsions (drops and bubbles), colloidal particles (drug delivery polymer particles), and biological particles (cells and bacteria) when volume fractions as high as 66% are necessary. PMID:26722797

  20. Temperature dependence of emulsion morphologies and the dispersion morphology diagram. 2. Three-phase emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Johnson, G.K.

    1995-07-06

    Using several different compositions of the (pseudo)ternary amphiphile/oil/`water` system C{sub 6}H{sub 13}(OC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}-OH/n-tetradecane/aqueous 10 mM NaCl, we show by means of electrical conductivity measurements that the temperature dependencies of the emulsion morphologies were consistent with predictions from isothermal dispersion morphology diagrams, thus contradicting phase inversion temperature ideas. 26 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Removal kinetic model of oil droplet from o/w emulsion by adding methylated milk casein in flotation.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hideo; Seki, Hideshi; Satoh, Yuuki

    2012-06-01

    In this study, o/w emulsion flotation experiments were conducted by adding methylated milk casein (MeSC). Emulsion used in this study was prepared by ultrasonic emulsification of heavy oil (bunker-A) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution. A simple kinetic model was proposed to estimate the removal rate of the oil droplets within the column. The model was based on main assumption that adsorption of single droplet adsorbed MeCS or floc onto bubble surface within flotation column. Removal rate constant, K, was defined by k(a)X(s) (S(b)τ/V), where k(a) and X(s) are overall adsorption rate and saturated adsorption density of oil droplet or floc, S(b), τ and V are bubble surface production rate, retention time of bubble swarms and emulsion volume within the column, respectively. The experiments were conducted with varying operating conditions; superficial gas velocity, column dimension and emulsion volume. K was evaluated from slope value of obtained straight line by plotting time versus ln (T/T(0)), where T/T(0) is relative turbidity. K was mostly proportional to (S(b)τ/V), which corresponds to specific surface area of bubble swarms per unit volume within the column, in the present experimental region. This result suggested that efficiency of this removal process was mainly controlled by the specific surface area of bubble swarms, and proposed model was fundamentally verified. PMID:22483713

  2. Temperature dependence of emulsion morphologies and the dispersion morphology diagram for three-phase emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Johnson, G.K.

    1995-12-31

    Using several different compositions of the (pseudo)ternary amphiphile/oil/{open_quotes}water{close_quotes} system C{sub 6}H{sub 13}(OC{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}OH/n-tetradecane/aqueous 10 mM NaCl that form oil-rich top phases (J), water-rich bottom phases ({Beta}), and middle-phase microemulsions (m), we showed by means of electrical conductivity measurements that the temperature dependencies of the three-phase emulsion morphologies were consistent with predictions from isothermal dispersion morphology diagrams, thus contradicting ideas derived from the PIT (phase inversion temperature) model for two-phase emulsions. In particular, we formed three-phase emulsions in which either (1) the continuous phase was an oil-rich phase (actually, m) below the PIT and the water-rich phase ({Beta}) above that temperature; (2) the water-rich phase was continuous both below and above the PIT; or (3) oil-rich phase was the continuous phase both below and above the PIT.

  3. Automated method of tracing proton tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Jin-lu; Li, Hong-yun; Song, Ji-wen; Zhang, Jian-fu; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Zhong-bing; Liu, Jin-liang; Liu, Lin-yue

    2015-07-01

    The low performance of the manual recognition of proton-recoil tracks in nuclear emulsions has limited its application to energy spectrum measurement of a pulsed neutron source. We developed an automated microscope system to trace proton-recoil tracks in nuclear emulsions. Given a start point on the proton track of interest, the microscope system can automatically trace and record the entire track using an image processing algorithm. Tests indicate that no interaction of the operator is needed in tracing the entire track. This automated microscope greatly reduces the labor of the operator and increases the efficiency of track data collection in nuclear emulsion.

  4. Protein Formulations for Emulsions and Solid-in-Oil Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Madalena; Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Silva, Carla; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-06-01

    Needs from medical and cosmetic areas have led to the design of novel nanosized emulsions and solid-in-oil dispersions of proteins. Here, we describe the production of those emulsions and dispersions using high-energy methodologies such as high-pressure homogenization or ultrasound. Recent work has resulted in new mechanistic insights related to the formation of protein emulsions and dispersions. The production method and composition of these formulations can determine major parameters such as size, stability, and functionality, and therefore their final application. Aqueous nanoemulsions of proteins can be used for drug delivery, while solid-in-oil dispersions are often used in transdermal applications. PMID:26996614

  5. Biofilm Formation in Microscopic Double Emulsion Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Connie; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    In natural, medical, and industrial settings, there exist surface-associated communities of bacteria known as biofilms. These highly structured films are composed of bacterial cells embedded within self-produced extracellular matrix, usually composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids; this matrix serves to protect the bacterial community from antibiotics and environmental stressors. Here, we form biofilms encapsulated within monodisperse, microscopically-sized double emulsion droplets using microfluidics. The bacteria self-organize at the inner liquid-liquid droplet interfaces, multiply, and differentiate into extracellular matrix-producing cells, forming manifold three-dimensional shell-within-a-shell structures of biofilms, templated upon the inner core of spherical liquid droplets. By using microfluidics to encapsulate bacterial cells, we have the ability to view individual cells multiplying in microscopically-sized droplets, which allows for high-throughput analysis in studying the genetic program leading to biofilm development, or cell signaling that induces differentiation.

  6. Bacterial imprinting at Pickering emulsion interfaces.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiantao; Svensson Bonde, Johan; Kamra, Tripta; Bülow, Leif; Leo, Jack C; Linke, Dirk; Ye, Lei

    2014-09-26

    The tendency of bacteria to assemble at oil-water interfaces can be utilized to create microbial recognition sites on the surface of polymer beads. In this work, two different groups of bacteria were first treated with acryloyl-functionalized chitosan and then used to stabilize an oil-in-water emulsion composed of cross-linking monomers that were dispersed in aqueous buffer. Polymerization of the oil phase followed by removal of the bacterial template resulted in well-defined polymer beads bearing bacterial imprints. Chemical passivation of chitosan and cell displacement assays indicate that the bacterial recognition on the polymer beads was dependent on the nature of the pre-polymer and the target bacteria. The functional materials for microbial recognition show great potential for constructing cell-cell communication networks, biosensors, and new platforms for testing antibiotic drugs. PMID:25111359

  7. Further progress for a fast scanning of nuclear emulsions with Large Angle Scanning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2014-02-01

    The LASSO (Large Angle Scanning System for OPERA) is a scanning system designed in the framework of the OPERA experiment as a result of several R&Ds aimed to improve the performance of the European Scanning System (ESS) by increasing the scanning speed, the angular acceptance and the efficiency in microtrack reconstruction. The novel Continuous Motion (CM) scanning approach allows to double the ESS nominal speed without any changes in the hardware set-up. The LASSO modular design makes the system easily adaptable to new hardware. The novel microtrack reconstruction algorithm has been developed to be efficient in both standard Stop&Go (SG) and CM modes, performing a number of corrections during the processing like corrections for vibrations, optical distortions, field of view curvature. As an intermediate step it reconstructs silver grains positions inside emulsion layer to make a transition from 2D images to real 3D traces of a charged particle. This allows the algorithm to have no internal limits on the slope of microtracks being equally efficient on all angles. The LASSO has been used for about one year for mass production scanning of emulsion films of OPERA, Muon Radiography and also of films employed to study nuclear fragmentation of ion beams used in medical physics. More than 50000 cm2 of the emulsion surface have been analyzed during this period.

  8. Anti-fouling effect of bentonite suspension in ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsion.

    PubMed

    Panpanit, S; Visvanathan, C; Muttamara, S

    2002-03-01

    The effect on membrane fouling resistance during ultrafilration of oil/water emulsion with the presence of bentonite suspension is experimentally evaluated. The fouling resistance was analyzed as a function of different membrane types and bentonite concentration. The total membrane fouling was categorized into reversible and irreversible, by adopting an appropriate chemical cleaning technique. The results revealed a 40% flux augmentation with the increase of bentonite concentration up to an optimum value of 300 mg l(-1) for cellulose acetate membrane. Further increase of bentonite concentration led to particle deposition on the membrane surface and reduced the flux. The polysulfone membrane did not show a similar flux improvement. This could be due to its high hydrophobicity. The absorption of oil/water emulsion on bentonite increased TOC removal rate from 65% to 80%, and this effect was the major cause of reduction in gel layer formation on the membrane surface. The extent of irreversible fouling of the hydrophilic cellulose acetate membrane was much smaller than that of the polysulfone membrane. These experiments demonstrated that, presence of bentonite could induce transformation of irreversible fouling caused by oil emulsion to reversible fouling, which could be periodically chemically cleaned. PMID:11999987

  9. Excipient effects on humanized monoclonal antibody interactions with silicone oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Britt, Keith A; Schwartz, Daniel K; Wurth, Christine; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2012-12-01

    The interfacial adsorption of three humanized monoclonal antibodies to emulsions of microdroplets of silicone oil was examined using indirect measurement via integrated peak areas in size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatograms. The level of silicone oil far exceeded the typical levels used in prefillable syringes. The three antibodies rapidly adsorbed to silicone oil-water interfaces in various buffer formulations. Addition of 140 mM NaCl to solutions buffered with 10 mM l-histidine, pH 6.0, increased the amount of protein adsorbed. Conversely, the extent of adsorption was significantly decreased by the addition of 0.03% (w/v) Tween® 20. Stern-Volmer constants determined from intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence quenching by acrylamide suggested that the tertiary structure of the adsorbed antibodies was significantly perturbed. However, no aggregation or precipitation of the antibodies was detected. Flow cytometric analysis of emulsions of fluorescently stained silicone oil in solutions containing fluorescently labeled antibodies and light microscopy experiments suggested that agglomeration of silicone oil droplets in the emulsions occurred. Zeta potentials measured for silicone oil microdroplets with adsorbed antibodies suggested that droplet agglomeration was probably the result of reduced electrostatic energy barriers to droplet collisions. PMID:22987313

  10. Active Emulsions: Synchronization of Chemical Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraden, Seth

    2012-02-01

    We explore the dynamical behavior of emulsions consisting of nanoliter volume droplets of the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction separated by a continuous oil phase. Some of the aqueous BZ reactants partition into the oil leading to chemical coupling of the drops. We use microfluidics to vary the size, composition and topology of the drops in 1D and 2D. Addition of a light sensitive catalyst to the drops and illumination with a computer projector allows each drop to be individually perturbed. A variety of synchronous regimes are found that systematically vary with the coupling strength and whether coupling is dominated by activatory or inhibitory species. In 1D we observe in- and anti-phase oscillations, stationary Turing patterns in which drops stop oscillating, but form spatially periodic patterns of drops in the oxidized and reduced states, and more complex combinations of stationary and oscillatory drops. In 2D, the attractors are more complex and vary with network topology and coupling strength. For hexagonal lattices as a function of increasing coupling strength we observe right and left handed rotating oscillations, mixed oscillatory and Turing states and finally full Turing states. Reaction -- diffusion models based on a simplified description of the BZ chemistry and diffusion of messenger species reproduce a number of the experimental results. For a range of parameters, a simplified phase oscillator model provides an intuitive understanding of the complex synchronization patterns. [4pt] ``Coupled oscillations in a 1D emulsion of Belousov--Zhabotinsky droplets,'' Jorge Delgado, Ning Li, Marcin Leda, Hector O. Gonzalez-Ochoa, Seth Fraden and Irving R. Epstein, Soft Matter, 7, 3155 (2011).

  11. Nuclear Emulsion Film Detectors for Proton Radiography:. Design and Test of the First Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Moser, U.; Pistillo, C.; Studer, S.; Scampoli, P.

    2010-04-01

    Proton therapy is nowadays becoming a wide spread clinical practice in cancer therapy and sophisticated treatment planning systems are routinely used to exploit at best the ballistic properties of charged particles. The information on the quality of the beams and the range of the protons is a key issue for the optimization of the treatment. For this purpose, proton radiography can be used in proton therapy to obtain direct information on the range of the protons, on the average density of the tissues for treatment planning optimization and to perform imaging with negligible dose to the patient. We propose an innovative method based on nuclear emulsion film detectors for proton radiography, a technique in which images are obtained by measuring the position and the residual range of protons passing through the patient's body. Nuclear emulsion films interleaved with tissue equivalent absorbers can be fruitfully used to reconstruct proton tracks with very high precision. The first prototype of a nuclear emulsion based detector has been conceived, constructed and tested with a therapeutic proton beam at PSI. The scanning of the emulsions has been performed at LHEP in Bern, where a fully automated microscopic scanning technology has been developed for the OPERA experiment on neutrino oscillations. After track reconstruction, the first promising experimental results have been obtained by imaging a simple phantom made of PMMA with a step of 1 cm. A second phantom with five 5 × 5 mm2 section aluminum rods located at different distances and embedded in a PMMA structure has been also imaged. Further investigations are in progress to improve the resolution and to image more sophisticated phantoms.

  12. Stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions with regenerated chitin nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Zhigang; Bian, Wenyang; Feng, Li; Wu, Zongwei; Wang, Peng; Zeng, Xiaoxiong; Wu, Tao

    2015-09-15

    Natural chitin is a highly crystalline biopolymer with poor aqueous solubility. Thus direct application of chitin is rather limited unless chemical modifications are made to improve its solubility in aqueous media. Through a simple dissolution and regeneration process, we have successfully prepared chitin nanofibers with diameters around 50nm, which form a stable suspension at concentrations higher than 0.50% and a self-supporting gel at concentrations higher than 1.00%. Additionally, these nanofibers can stabilize oil-in-water emulsions with oil fraction more than 0.50 at chitin usage level of 0.01g/g oil. The droplet sizes of the resulting emulsions decrease with increasing chitin concentrations and decreasing oil fraction. Confocal laser scanning micrographs demonstrate the adsorption of chitin nanofibers on the emulsion droplet surface, which indicates the emulsion stabilization is through a Pickering mechanism. Our findings allow the direct application of chitin in the food industry without chemical modifications. PMID:25863618

  13. Reduced Fat Food Emulsions: Physicochemical, Sensory, and Biological Aspects.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheryl; Smith, Gordon; Degner, Brian; McClements, David Julian

    2016-03-11

    Fat plays multiple important roles in imparting desirable sensory attributes to emulsion-based food products, such as sauces, dressings, soups, beverages, and desserts. However, there is concern that over consumption of fats leads to increased incidences of chronic diseases, such as obesity, coronary heart disease, and diabetes. Consequently, there is a need to develop reduced fat products with desirable sensory profiles that match those of their full-fat counterparts. The successful design of high quality reduced-fat products requires an understanding of the many roles that fat plays in determining the sensory attributes of food emulsions, and of appropriate strategies to replace some or all of these attributes. This paper reviews our current understanding of the influence of fat on the physicochemical and physiological attributes of food emulsions, and highlights some of the main approaches that can be used to create high quality emulsion-based food products with reduced fat contents. PMID:25748819

  14. Double emulsion templated monodisperse phospholipid liposomes incorporating Doxorubicin hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Mingtan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel approach for fabricating monodisperse phospholipid liposomes incorporating water soluble anticancer drug Doxorubicin hydrochloride using controlled w/o/w double emulsions as templates. Glass-capillary microfluidics is used to generate monodisperse w/o/w double emulsion templates and double emulsion droplet size is from 20 to 100 um according to different flow rates. We show that the high uniformity in size and shape of the templates are maintained in the final phospholipid liposomes after a solvent removal step by Nikon eclipse microscopy. The lipid bilayers encapsulating anticancer drug inside is retained after the emulsion drops are converted to vesicles. The liposomes vesicles are promising water soluble anticancer drug delivery vehicles.

  15. The choice of homogenisation equipment affects lipid oxidation in emulsions.

    PubMed

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Søgaard; Horsewell, Andy; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2012-09-15

    Milk proteins are often used by the food industry because of their good emulsifying properties. In addition, they can also provide oxidative stability to foods. However, different milk proteins or protein components have been shown to differ in their antioxidative properties, and their localisation in emulsions has been shown to be affected by the emulsification conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of homogenisation equipment (microfluidizer vs. two-stage valve homogeniser) on lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared with two different milk proteins. Emulsions were prepared at pH 7 with similar droplet sizes. Results showed that the oxidative stability of emulsions prepared with sodium caseinate was not influenced by the type of homogeniser used. In contrast, the type of homogenisation equipment significantly influenced lipid oxidation when whey protein was used as emulsifier, with the microfluidizer resulting in lower levels of oxidation. PMID:23107694

  16. Emulsion Polymerization of Butyl Acrylate: Spin Trapping and EPR Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.; Westmoreland, D.

    1994-01-01

    The propagating radical in the emulsion polymerization reaction of butyl acrylate was detected by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy using two spin trapping agents, 2-methyl-2nitrosopropane and alpha -N-tert-butylnitrone.

  17. Static quasi-2D emulsion as a granular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rui; Orellana, Carlos; Hong, Xia; Desmond, Kenneth; Weeks, Eric

    2014-03-01

    We study the forces between emulsion droplets and the properties of force chains in a static oil-in-water emulsion system near jamming. The emulsion is confined between two parallel glass plates in order to construct a quasi-2D system. Quasi-2D emulsion systems are somewhat analogous to 2D granular disks, except for the absence of static friction between the droplets. We focus on samples at an area fraction ϕ that is higher than the jamming point, ϕc, and test the robustness of the power law dependence of pressure and the contact numbers on ϕ -ϕc . Specifically, we vary the surface tension by adding surfactants in the water, and examine the power law relationship under such variations. We also compare our result to simulations as well as established experimental results of true granular systems.

  18. On mini-cluster observed by Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tati, T.

    1985-01-01

    Bundles of electromagnetic showers with very small tranverse momenta (approx. 10 MeV) accompanied by decay products of Chiron-type fireballs, have been observed. These bundles are called Miniclusters. This phenomenon supports the picture of fireballs made up of hadronic matter and based on the theory of the finite degree of freedom.

  19. Tunable Pickering emulsions with polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles (PGLNs).

    PubMed

    Silmore, Kevin S; Gupta, Chetali; Washburn, Newell R

    2016-03-15

    Lignin is an abundant biopolymer that has native interfacial functions but aggregates strongly in aqueous media. Polyacrylamide was grafted onto kraft lignin nanoparticles using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) chemistry to form polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles (PGLNs) that tune aggregation strength while retaining interfacial activities in forming Pickering emulsions. Polymer graft density on the particle surface, ionic strength, and initial water and cyclohexane volume fractions were varied and found to have profound effects on emulsion characteristics, including emulsion volume fraction, droplet size, and particle interfacial concentration that were attributed to changes in lignin aggregation and hydrophobic interactions. In particular, salt concentration was found to have a significant effect on aggregation, zeta potential, and interfacial tension, which was attributed to changes in solubility of both the kraft lignin and the polyacrylamide grafts. Dynamic light scattering, UV-vis spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and tensiometry were used to quantify emulsion properties and nanoparticle behavior. Under all conditions, the emulsions exhibited relatively fast creaming but were stable against coalescence and Ostwald ripening for a period of months. All emulsions were also oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions, as predicted by the Bancroft rule, and no catastrophic phase inversions were observed for any nanoparticle compositions. We conclude that lower grafting density of polyacrylamide on a lignin core resulted in high levels of interfacial activity, as characterized by higher concentration at the water-cyclohexane interface with a corresponding decrease in interfacial tension. These results indicate that the interfacial properties of polymer-grafted lignin nanoparticles are primarily due to the native hydrophobic interactions of the lignin core. These results suggest that the forces that drive aggregation are also correlated with interfacial activities, and polymer-nanoparticle interactions are critical for optimizing interfacial activities. Controlled radical polymerization is a powerful tool for polymer grafting that can leverage the intrinsic interfacial functions of lignin for the formation of Pickering emulsions. PMID:26707776

  20. Enhanced reductive dechlorination in columns treated with edible oil emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Cameron M.; Borden, Robert C.

    2006-09-01

    The effect of edible oil emulsion treatment on enhanced reductive dechlorination was evaluated in a 14 month laboratory column study. Experimental treatments included: (1) emulsified soybean oil and dilute HCl to inhibit biological activity; (2) emulsified oil only; (3) emulsified oil and anaerobic digester sludge; and (4) continuously feeding soluble substrate. A single application of emulsified oil was effective in generating strongly reducing, anaerobic conditions for over 14 months. PCE was rapidly reduced to cis-DCE in all three live columns. Bioaugmentation with a halorespiring enrichment culture resulted in complete dechlorination of PCE to ethene in the soluble substrate column (yeast extract and lactate). However, an additional treatment with a pulse of yeast extract and bioaugmentation culture was required to stimulate complete dechlorination in the emulsion treated columns. Once the dechlorinating population was established, the emulsion only column degraded PCE from 90-120 μM to below detection with concurrent ethene production in a 33 day contact time. The lower biodegradation rates in the emulsion treated columns compared to the soluble substrate column suggest that emulsified oil barriers may require a somewhat longer contact time for effective treatment. In the HCl inhibited column, partitioning of PCE to the retained oil substantially delayed PCE breakthrough. However, reduction of PCE to more soluble degradation products ( cis-DCE, VC and ethene) greatly reduced the impact of oil-water partitioning in live columns. There was only a small decline in the hydraulic conductivity ( K) of column #1 (low pH + emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.57) and column #2 (live + emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.73) indicating emulsion injection did not result in appreciable clogging of the clayey sand. However, K loss was greater in column #3 (sludge +emulsion, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.12) and column #4 (soluble substrate, Kfinal/ Kinitial = 0.03) indicating clogging due to biomass and/or gas production can be significant.

  1. Generation of colloidal granules and capsules from double emulsion drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kathryn S.

    Assemblies of colloidal particles are extensively used in ceramic processing, pharmaceuticals, inks and coatings. In this project, the aim was to develop a new technique to fabricate monodispersed colloidal assemblies. The use of microfluidic devices and emulsion processing allows for the fabrication of complex materials that can be used in a variety of applications. A microfluidic device is used to create monodispersed water/oil/water (w/o/w) double emulsions with interior droplets of colloidal silica suspension ranging in size from tens to hundreds of microns. By tailoring the osmotic pressure using glycerol as a solute in the continuous and inner phases of the emulsion, we can control the final volume size of the monodispersed silica colloidal crystals that form in the inner droplets of the double emulsion. Modifying the ionic strength in the colloidal dispersion can be used to affect the particle-particle interactions and crystal formation of the final colloidal particle. This w/o/w technique has been used with other systems of metal oxide colloids and cellulose nanocrystals. Encapsulation of the colloidal suspension in a polymer shell for the generation of ceramic-polymer core-shell particles has also been developed. These core-shell particles have spawned new research in the field of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. Systems and chemistries for creating cellulose hydrogels within the double emulsions have also been researched. Water in oil single emulsions and double emulsions have been used to create cellulose hydrogel spheres in the sub-100 micron diameter range. Oil/water/oil double emulsions allow us to create stable cellulose capsules. The addition of a second hydrogel polymer, such as acrylate or alginate, further strengthens the cellulose gel network and can also be processed into capsules and particles using the microfluidic device. This work could have promising applications in acoustic metamaterials, personal care products, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural applications, among others.

  2. Stabilization/solidification of munition destruction waste by asphalt emulsion.

    PubMed

    Cervinkova, Marketa; Vondruska, Milan; Bednarik, Vratislav; Pazdera, Antonin

    2007-04-01

    Destruction of discarded military munitions in an explosion chamber produces two fractions of hazardous solid waste. The first one is scrap waste that remains in the chamber after explosion; the second one is fine dust waste, which is trapped on filters of gas products that are exhausted from the chamber after explosion. The technique of stabilization/solidification of the scrap waste by asphalt emulsion is described in this paper. The technique consists of simple mixing of the waste with anionic asphalt emulsion, or two-step mixing of the waste with cationic asphalt emulsion. These techniques are easy to use and the stabilized scrap waste proves low leachability of contained heavy metals assessed by TCLP test. Hence, it is possible to landfill the scrap waste stabilized by asphalt emulsion. If the dust waste, which has large specific surface, is stabilized by asphalt emulsion, it is not fully encapsulated; the results of the leaching tests do not meet the regulatory levels. However, the dust waste solidified by asphalt emulsion can be deposited into an asphalted disposal site of the landfill. The asphalt walls of the disposal site represent an efficient secondary barrier against pollutant release. PMID:16979816

  3. Stabilization Mechanisms of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nour, Abdurahman H.; Suliman, A.; Hadow, Mahmmoud M.

    During the lifting and production of crude oil, water/oil emulsions are created. They are stabilized by asphaltenes and resins which are colloidally dispersed in the crude oil. Asphaltenes consist mainly of polar heterocompounds. It is known that they decrease the interfacial tension between oil and water and form stable interfacial films. Both effects favour the formation and stabilization of emulsions. Resins are complex high-molecular-weight compounds that are not soluble in ethylacetate, but are soluble in n-heptane. Their interfacial activity is less than that of asphaltenes. The role of resins in stabilizing emulsions has also been debated in literature. This study reports the results of experimental investigation of various factors affecting the stability of emulsions which are considered to be undesirable for a number of reasons, including both up-stream and down-stream operation in the petroleum industry. It was found that, the (R/A) ratio affects the emulsion and dispersion stabilities. High resin/asphaltene ratios decrease the emulsion stability.

  4. Evaluation on oxidative stability of walnut beverage emulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Liu, Fuguo; Xue, Yanhui; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-07-15

    Walnut beverage emulsions were prepared with walnut kernels, mixed nonionic emulsifiers and xanthan gum. The effects of food antioxidants on the physical stability and lipid oxidation of walnut beverage emulsions were investigated. The results showed that tea polyphenols could not only increase the droplet size of the emulsions, but also enhance physical stability during the thermal storage at 62±1°C. However, water-dispersed oil-soluble vitamin E and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin obviously decreased the physical stability of the emulsion system during the thermal storage. BHT and natural antioxidant extract had scarcely influenced on the physical stability of walnut beverage emulsions. Tea polyphenols and BHT could significantly retard lipid oxidation in walnut beverage emulsions against thermal and UV light exposure during the storage. Vitamin E exhibited the prooxidant effect during the thermal storage and the antioxidant attribute during UV light exposure. Other food antioxidants had no significant effect on retarding lipid oxidation during thermal or light storage. PMID:26948632

  5. Formulation, stability and degradation kinetics of intravenous cinnarizine lipid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Cui, Yue; Tang, Xing

    2009-05-21

    Cinnarizine was loaded in the lipid emulsion to develop an intravenous formulation with good physical and chemical stability. High-pressure homogenization was used to prepare the lipid emulsion. The factors influencing the stability of cinnarizine lipid emulsion, such as different drug loading methods, pH, temperature, sterilization methods and sterilization time were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatograph. The degradation of cinnarizine in aqueous solution and lipid emulsion both followed apparent first-order kinetics. A possible degradation mechanism was postulated by the bell-shaped pH-rate profile of cinnarizine. Localization of the drug in the interfacial lecithin layer significantly improved the chemical stability of cinnarizine and its stabilizing mechanism was thoroughly discussed and proved. The activation energy of cinnarizine in lipid emulsion was calculated to be 51.27 kJ/mol which was similar to that in aqueous solution. This indicates that the stabilizing effect of the drug carrier on cinnarizine was not an alteration of the degradation reaction. In addition, shelf-life of cinnarizine in lipid emulsion was estimated to be 1471.6 days at 4 degrees C, which is much longer compared with 19.8 days in aqueous solution. The final products were stable enough to resist a 121 degrees C rotating steam sterilization for 15 min. PMID:19429300

  6. Nanoparticle coated emulsions as novel dermal delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Eskandar, Nasrin Ghouchi; Simovic, Spomenka; Prestidge, Clive A

    2009-08-01

    The dermal delivery characteristics of hydrophilic silica nanoparticle coated medium chain triglyceride oil-in-water emulsions are reported and correlated with the physicochemical and interfacial properties of the emulsion based drug carriers. The synergistic drug/stabiliser/nanoparticle interactions are demonstrated to be a function of the charge and concentration of the initial emulsion stabiliser; charge and initial loading phase of nanoparticles and physicochemical properties of the drug molecule. The improved physical stability of the emulsions and the chemical stability of two model lipophilic agents (all-trans-retinol and acridine orange 10-nonyl bromide) confirm that engineered nanoparticle layers can enhance the shelf-life of liable lipophilic agents. Nanoparticle coatings are shown to control the in-vitro release of active agents from emulsions and significantly promote skin retention. The lipophilic agents distributed into the deeper viable skin layers without permeation through full-thickness skin and hence systemic exposure. Nanoparticle-coated submicron oil-in-water emulsions can serve as novel dermal carriers with controlled release kinetics and targeted drug delivery. PMID:19534710

  7. Droplet-based microfluidics and the dynamics of emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baret, Jean-Christophe; Brosseau, Quentin; Semin, Benoit; Qu, Xiaopeng

    2012-02-01

    Emulsions are complex fluids already involved for a long time in a wide-range of industrial processes, such as, for example, food, cosmetics or materials synthesis [1]. More recently, applications of emulsions have been extended to new fields like biotechnology or biochemistry where the compartmentalization of compounds in emulsion droplets is used to parallelise (bio-) chemical reactions [2]. Interestingly, these applications pinpoint to fundamental questions dealing with surfactant dynamics, dynamic surface tension, hydrodynamic interactions and electrohydrodynamics. Droplet-based microfluidics is a very powerful tool to quantitatively study the dynamics of emulsions at the single droplet level or even at the single interface level: well-controlled emulsions are produced and manipulated using hydrodynamics, electrical forces, optical actuation and combination of these effects. We will describe here how droplet-based microfluidics is used to extract quantitative informations on the physical-chemistry of emulsions for a better understanding and control of the dynamics of these systems [3].[4pt] [1] J. Bibette et al. Rep. Prog. Phys., 62, 969-1033 (1999)[0pt] [2] A. Theberge et al., Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed. 49, 5846 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.-C. Baret et al., Langmuir, 25, 6088 (2009)

  8. Analyzing Benzene and Cyclohexane Emulsion Droplet Collisions on Ultramicroelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Deng, Haiqiang; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2015-11-01

    We report the collisions of single emulsion oil droplets with extremely low dielectric constants (e.g., benzene, ε of 2.27, or cyclohexane, ε of 2.02) as studied via emulsion droplet reactor (EDR) on an ultramicroelectrode (UME). By applying appropriate potentials to the UME, we observed the electrochemical effects of single-collision signals from the bulk electrolysis of single emulsion droplets. Different hydrophobic redox species (ferrocene, decamethyl-ferrocene, or metalloporphyrin) were trapped in a mixed benzene (or cyclohexane) oil-in-water emulsion using an ionic liquid as the supporting electrolyte and emulsifier. The emulsions were prepared using ultrasonic processing. Spike-like responses were observed in each i-t response due to the complete electrolysis of all of the above-mentioned redox species within the droplet. On the basis of these single-particle collision results, the collision frequency, size distribution, i-t decay behavior of the emulsion droplets, and possible mechanisms are analyzed and discussed. This work demonstrated that bulk electrolysis can be achieved in a few seconds in these attoliter reactors, suggesting many applications, such as analysis and electrosynthesis in low dielectric constant solvents, which have a much broader potential window. PMID:26461801

  9. Effects of alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, and soy isoflavones on lipid oxidation of structured lipid-based emulsions.

    PubMed

    Osborn-Barnes, Hannah T; Akoh, Casimir C

    2003-11-01

    Structured lipids (SLs) are triacylglycerols that have been modified to change the fatty acid composition and/or positional distribution in the glycerol backbone by chemically and/or enzymatically catalyzed reactions and/or genetic engineering. Ten percent oil-in-water emulsions were formulated with a canola oil/caprylic acid SL and stabilized with 0.5% whey protein isolate (WPI) or sucrose fatty acid ester (SFE). The effects of alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, genistein, and daidzein (added at 0.02 wt % of oil) on lipid oxidation were evaluated over a 15-day period in emulsion samples. Significantly (p < 0.05) less total oxidation (calculated from peroxide value and anisidine value measurements) occurred in the WPI emulsions compared to their SFE counterparts. In this study, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, and both soy isoflavones exhibited prooxidant activities in SFE emulsions. Because of their ability to exhibit prooxidant activity under certain conditions, manufacturers must experiment with these compounds before adding them to SL-based products as functional ingredients. PMID:14582986

  10. Sculpting Pickering Emulsion Droplets by Arrest and Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher; Wei, Zengyi; Caggioni, Marco; Spicer, Patrick; Atherton, Tim

    Pickering emulsion droplets can be arrested into non-spherical shapes--useful for applications such as active delivery--through a general mechanism of deformation followed by absorption of additional colloidal particles onto the interface, relaxation of the droplet caused by surface tension and arrest at some point due to crowding of the particles. We perform simulations of the arrest process to clarify the relative importance of diffusive rearrangement of particles and collective forcing due to surface evolution. Experiment and theory are compared, giving insight into the stability of the resulting capsules and the robustness of the production process for higher-throughput production in, for example, microfluidic systems. We adapt theoretical tools from the jamming literature to better understand the arrested configurations and long timescale evolution of the system: using linear programming and a penalty function approach, we identify unjamming motions in kinetically arrested states. We propose a paradigm of ``metric jamming'' to describe the limiting behavior of this class of system: a structure is metric-jammed if it is stable with respect to collective motion of the particles as well as evolution of the hypersurface on which the packing is embedded. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  11. A Halo Event Observed by Hybrid Experiment at Mt. Chacaltaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasumi, N.; Aoki, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Honda, K.; Inoue, N.; Kawasumi, N.; Martinic, N.; Navia O., C.; Ochi, N.; Ohmori, N.; Ohsawa, A.; Oliveira, L.; Shinozaki, K.; Tamada, M.; Ticona, R.; Tsushima, I.

    2003-07-01

    An experiment of an air shower array, hadron calorimeter and an emulsion chamb er is under way at Mt. Chacaltaya. One high energy event, having a halo in the center of the family by the emulsion chamb er, is analyzed in detail.

  12. Superparamagnetic polymer emulsion particles from a soap-free seeded emulsion polymerization and their application for lipase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanjun; Chen, Xia; Li, Yanfeng; Liu, Xiao; Lei, Lin; Zhang, Yakui; Qian, Jiayu

    2014-01-01

    Using emulsion copolymer of styrene (St), glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) as seed latexes, the superparamagnetic polymer emulsion particles were prepared by seeded emulsion copolymerization of butyl methacrylate (BMA), vinyl acetate (VAc) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of the seed latexes and superparamagnetic Fe3O4/SiOx nanoparticles (or Fe3O4-APTS nanoparticles) through a two-step process, without addition of any emulsifier. The magnetic emulsion particles named P(St-GMA-HEMA)/P(BMA-VAc) were characterized by transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results showed that the magnetic emulsion particles held a structure with a thinner shell (around 100 nm) and a bigger cavity (around 200 nm), and possessed a certain level of magnetic response. The resulting magnetic emulsion particles were employed in the immobilization of lipase by two strategies to immobilized lipase onto the resulting magnetic composites directly (S-1) or using glutaraldehyde as a coupling agent (S-2), thus, experimental data showed that the thermal stability and reusability of immobilized lipase based on S-2 were higher than that of S-1. PMID:24114322

  13. Development of Large Area Emulsion Chamber Methods with a Super Conducting Magnet for Observation of Cosmic Ray Nuclei from 1 GeV to 1,000 TeV (Emulsion Techniques)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Gregory, John C.; Tominaga, Taka; Dong, Bei Lei

    1997-01-01

    The research developed the fundamental techniques of the emulsion chamber methods that permit measurements of the composition and energy spectra of cosmic rays at energies ranging from 1 GeV/n to over 1,000 TeV/n. The research program consisted of exploring new principles and techniques in measuring very high energy cosmic nuclei with large-area emulsion chambers for high statistics experiments. These tasks have been accomplished and their use was essential in successful analysis of the balloon-borne emulsion chamber experiments up to 10(exp 14) eV. It also provided the fundamental technologies for designing large-area detectors that are aimed at measuring the composition at above 1015 eV region. The latter is now partially succeeded by a NASA Mission Concept, Advanced Cosmic Composition Experiments on the Space Station (ACCESS). The cosmic ray group at the University of Alabama in Huntsville has performed technological R & D as well as contributing to the Japanese-American-Emulsion-Chamber-Experiments (JACEE) Collaboration with the regular data analysis. While primary research support for other institutions' efforts in the JACEE experiments came from NSF and DOE, primary support for the University of Alabama in Huntsville was this contract. Supplemental tasks to standardize the data base and hardware upgrades (automatized microscope) had this institutions cooperation. Investigation of new techniques in this program consisted of development of a fast calorimetry, magnetic/scattering selection of high momentum tracks for a pairmeter, and high statistics momentum measurements for low energy nuclei (E < 1 TeV/n). The highest energy calorimetry and a pairmeter have been considered as strawman instruments by the GOAL (Galactic Origin and Acceleration Limit) proposal of the NASA Cosmic Ray Working Group for long- duration balloon flights. We accomplished the objectives of the GOAL program with three circumpolar, Antarctic JACEE balloon flights during 1992 - 1994.

  14. Asphaltene and solids-stabilized water-in-oil emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztukowski, Danuta M.

    Water-in-crude oil emulsions are a problem in crude oil production, transportation, and processing. Many of these emulsions are stabilized by asphaltenes and native oilfield solids adsorbed at the oil-water interface. Design of effective emulsion treatments is hampered because there is a lack of understanding of the role asphaltenes and solids play in stabilizing these emulsions. In this work, the structural, compositional and rheological properties of water/hydrocarbon interfaces were determined for model emulsions consisting of water, toluene, heptane, asphaltenes and native oilfield solids. The characteristics of the interface were related to the properties of asphaltenes and native solids. Emulsion stability was correlated to interfacial rheology. A combination of vapour pressure osmometry, interfacial tension and emulsion gravimetric studies indicated that asphaltenes initially adsorb at the interface as a monolayer of self-associated molecular aggregates. It was demonstrated why it is necessary to account for asphaltene self-association when interpreting interfacial measurements. The interfacial area of Athabasca asphaltenes was found to be approximately 1.5 nm2 and did not vary with concentration or asphaltene self-association. Hence, more self-associated asphaltenes simply formed a thicker monolayer. The interfacial monolayer observed in this work varied from 2 to 9 nm in thickness. The asphaltene monolayer was shown to adsorb reversibly only at short interface aging times. The film gradually reorganizes at the interface to form a rigid, irreversibly adsorbed network. The elastic and viscous moduli can be modeled using the Lucassen-van den Tempel (LVDT) model when the aging time is less than 10 minutes. An increase in film rigidity can be detected with an increase in the total elastic modulus. Increased film rigidity was shown to reduce the rate of coalescence in an emulsion and increase overall emulsion stability (reduce free water resolution). The rate of coalescence and the free water resolution of emulsions decreased when the interface aging time increased, the heptane fraction in heptol increased, and the asphaltene concentration decreased. For systems in which asphaltenes do not leave the interface during coalescence, the rate of coalescence correlated to the measured total modulus over a range of asphaltene concentrations, solvent qualities, and interface aging times. For systems in which asphaltenes leave the interface during coalescence, the correlation under-predicted the coalescence rate because the total modulus increases as material leaves the interface. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  15. Dynamics of oppositely charged emulsion droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhou; Wyss, Hans M.; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of two pinned droplets under the influence of an applied electric stress. We find that at a sufficiently strong field, this stress is sufficient to induce contact of the droplets. Interestingly, upon such contact, the dynamic behavior sensitively depends on the separation distance between the droplets. Besides the classical "coalescence" regime, we identify two other dynamic regimes: "fuse-and-split" and "periodic non-coalescence." In the "fuse-and-split" regime, the droplets first fuse to form a jet, which subsequently breaks up into two droplets. In the "periodic non-coalescence" regime, the droplets contact and bounce away periodically without coalescence. Further analysis indicates that while the electric stress stretches the droplets into shapes that depend on the initial droplet separation, the surface tension stress dominates over the electric stress as soon as the droplets touch. We show that the shapes of the contacting droplets determine their subsequent dynamics. Our work provides a rationale for understanding the interplay between surface tension and electric stresses that govern the behavior of charged droplets and could inspire new methods for characterizing emulsion stability and surfactant performance.

  16. Dynamic behaviors of oppositely charged emulsion droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhou; Wyss, Hans M.; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamic behaviors of two oppositely charged emulsion droplets. Using an electrocapillary number and separation distance between droplets, we have characterized three types of droplet behaviors in electric field. Besides the common seen coalescence, two qualitatively different dynamic behaviors are identified: fuse-and-split and periodic non-coalescence. In fuse-and-split regime, the droplets fuse into a jet, which subsequently breaks up into two droplets. In periodic non-coalescence regime, the droplets contact and bounce away periodically without coalescence. Further analysis indicates that the applied voltage always decreases dramatically upon droplets' contact due to spikes of discharging current. Thus, the electric field strength drops and surface tension quickly dominates over electric stress upon droplet's contact. By analyzing capillary instability, all the observed dynamic states can be attributed to the different initial shapes of dumbbell-like jet formed upon droplets' contact. By controlling the initial separation distance between droplets, the shapes of the jet and thus the resultant dynamics can be precisely manipulated.

  17. Radiation polymerization in the emulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundardi, F.; Zubir, A.; Marliyanti, I.

    Kinetics aspects of radiation polymerization of methyl-methacrylate, styrene and vinyl acetate monomers in the emulsion systems have been studied. A panoramic gamma source with an activity of about 70,000 Ci was employed as a variable dose rate irradiator. Influence of the emulsifier content and irradiation dose rate on the rate of polymerization and the molecular weight of the products have been studied. In this study, Smith-Ewart rate theory was used to explain the experimental results. Tween 20 was used as the emulsifier. In the case of vinyl acetate monomer, it was found that the irradiation dose needed for obtaining a certain degree of conversion increased with the increase of the emulsifier content. However, in the case of styrene and methylmethacrylate monomers it was found that the irradiation dose needed for obtaining a certain degree of conversion decreased with the increase of the emulsifier content. The molecular weight of polymers, were found to be much influenced by the irradiation dose rate, emulsifier content and the degree of conversion. It was found that the three monomers showed different characteristics. Several deviation from Smith-Ewart rate theory have been detected.

  18. Metal separation using emulsion liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, R.M.; Dearden, D.V.; McBride, D.W. Jr.; Oscarson, J.L.; Lamb, J.D.; Christensen, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    Emulsion membrane systems consisting of an aqueous metal salt source phase, a toluene membrane containing the macrocyclic ligand dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC18C6) (0.02 M) and the surfactant sorbitan monooleate (3% v/v), and an aqueous 0.05 M Li/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/ receiving phase were studied with respect to the disappearance of metal from the source phase as a function of time. The salts Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/, Sr(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/, TlNO/sub 3/, and LiNO/sub 3/ were studied both singly and in mixtures of Pb(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ with each of the other salts. In all mixtures studied, Pb/sup 2 +/ was transported first, followed by the second cation (except Li/sup +/ which was not transported). An excess of a second salt with a common anion enhanced the transport of Pb/sup 2 +/. Modeling of these systems was discussed. Source phases containing basic (pH 11) K(Al(OH)/sub 4/) solutions were studied using the same membrane and a 0.15 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ receiving phase. K/sup +/ and Al(III) (as aluminate anion) were both found to transport in this system, but no transport of Al(III) and little transport of K/sup +/ were detected when DC18C6 was absent.

  19. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-02-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets (that is, droplets with faces of differing chemistries) and multiple emulsions, are of increasing importance in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules for food, in chemical separations, in cosmetics, and in dynamic optics. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets' physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have great utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with controllably reconfigurable morphologies and the potential to create a wide range of responsive materials.

  20. Breaking oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by yeast.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Guilherme F; Picone, Carolina S F; Cuellar, Maria C; Cunha, Rosiane L

    2015-04-01

    Several biotechnological processes can show an undesirable formation of emulsions making difficult phase separation and product recovery. The breakup of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by yeast was studied using different physical and chemical methods. These emulsions were composed by deionized water, hexadecane and commercial yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The stability of the emulsions was evaluated varying the yeast concentration from 7.47 to 22.11% (w/w) and the phases obtained after gravity separation were evaluated on chemical composition, droplet size distribution, rheological behavior and optical microscopy. The cream phase showed kinetic stability attributed to mechanisms as electrostatic repulsion between the droplets, a possible Pickering-type stabilization and the viscoelastic properties of the concentrated emulsion. Oil recovery from cream phase was performed using gravity separation, centrifugation, heating and addition of demulsifier agents (alcohols and magnetic nanoparticles). Long centrifugation time and high centrifugal forces (2 h/150,000×g) were necessary to obtain a complete oil recovery. The heat treatment (60°C) was not enough to promote a satisfactory oil separation. Addition of alcohols followed by centrifugation enhanced oil recovery: butanol addition allowed almost complete phase separation of the emulsion while ethanol addition resulted in 84% of oil recovery. Implementation of this method, however, would require additional steps for solvent separation. Addition of charged magnetic nanoparticles was effective by interacting electrostatically with the interface, resulting in emulsion destabilization under a magnetic field. This method reached almost 96% of oil recovery and it was potentially advantageous since no additional steps might be necessary for further purifying the recovered oil. PMID:25791419

  1. Phytosterol colloidal particles as Pickering stabilizers for emulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu; Tang, Chuan-He

    2014-06-01

    Water-insoluble phytosterols were developed into a kind of colloidal particle as Pickering stabilizers for emulsions by a classic anti-solvent method using 100% ethanol as the organic phase to solubilize the phytosterols and whey protein concentrate (WPC) as the emulsifier. The colloidal particles in the dispersion, with morphology of stacked platelet-like sheets, had a mean diameter of 44.7 and 24.7 μm for the volume- and surface-averaged sizes, respectively. The properties and stability of the emulsions stabilized by these colloidal particles were highly dependent upon the applied total solid concentration (c; in the dispersion) and oil fraction (ø). The results indicated that (1) at a low c value (<1.0%, w/v) the emulsions were susceptible to phase separation, even at a low ø of 0.2, (2) at low ø values (e.g., 0.2 or 0.3) and a relatively high c value (1.0%, w/v, or above), a severe droplet flocculation occurred for the emulsions, and (3) when both c and ø were appropriately high, a kind of self-supporting gel-like emulsions could be formed. More interestingly, a phase inversion of the emulsions from the oil-in-water to water-in-oil type was observed, upon the ø increasing from 0.2 to 0.6 (especially at high c values, e.g., 3.0%, w/v). The elaborated Pickering emulsions stabilized by the phytosterol colloidal particles with a gel-like behavior would provide a candidate to act as a novel delivery system for active ingredients. PMID:24848560

  2. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    PubMed Central

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including multiple emulsions and Janus droplets which contain hemispheres of differing material, are of increasing importance1 in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics2, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules3–5 for food6, in chemical separations7, in cosmetics8, and in dynamic optics9. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets’ physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes10, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods11,12. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have greatly increased utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with controllably reconfigurable morphologies and the potential to create a wide range of responsive materials. PMID:25719669

  3. To Model Chemical Reactivity in Heterogeneous Emulsions, Think Homogeneous Microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Daz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence Stuart; Liu, Changyao; Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Pastoriza-Gallego, Maria Jos; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Qing; Krishnan, Gunaseelan; Snchez-Paz, Vernica; Zhang, Yongliang; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2015-08-25

    Two important and unsolved problems in the food industry and also fundamental questions in colloid chemistry are how to measure molecular distributions, especially antioxidants (AOs), and how to model chemical reactivity, including AO efficiency in opaque emulsions. The key to understanding reactivity in organized surfactant media is that reaction mechanisms are consistent with a discrete structures-separate continuous regions duality. Aggregate structures in emulsions are determined by highly cooperative but weak organizing forces that allow reactants to diffuse at rates approaching their diffusion-controlled limit. Reactant distributions for slow thermal bimolecular reactions are in dynamic equilibrium, and their distributions are proportional to their relative solubilities in the oil, interfacial, and aqueous regions. Our chemical kinetic method is grounded in thermodynamics and combines a pseudophase model with methods for monitoring the reactions of AOs with a hydrophobic arenediazonium ion probe in opaque emulsions. We introduce (a) the logic and basic assumptions of the pseudophase model used to define the distributions of AOs among the oil, interfacial, and aqueous regions in microemulsions and emulsions and (b) the dye derivatization and linear sweep voltammetry methods for monitoring the rates of reaction in opaque emulsions. Our results show that this approach provides a unique, versatile, and robust method for obtaining quantitative estimates of AO partition coefficients or partition constants and distributions and interfacial rate constants in emulsions. The examples provided illustrate the effects of various emulsion properties on AO distributions such as oil hydrophobicity, emulsifier structure and HLB, temperature, droplet size, surfactant charge, and acidity on reactant distributions. Finally, we show that the chemical kinetic method provides a natural explanation for the cut-off effect, a maximum followed by a sharp reduction in AO efficiency with increasing alkyl chain length of a particular AO. We conclude with perspectives and prospects. PMID:25805058

  4. Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray iron nucleus observed with emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Y.; Shimada, E.; Ohta, I.; Tasaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Sugimoto, H.; Taira, K.; Tateyama, N.

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray Fe-nucleus has been measured from 4 GeV per nucleon to beyond 100 GeV per nucleon. The data were obtained using emulsion chambers on a balloon from Sanriku, Japan. The energies were estimated by the opening angle method after calibrated using 1.88 GeV per nucleon Fe collisions. The spectrum of Fe is approximately E-2.5 in the range from 10 to 200 GeV per nucleon. This result is in good agreement with those of other experiments.

  5. Initial state interactions and J/ ψ production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglin, C.; Baldisseri, A.; Bussière, A.; Guillaud, J. P.; Kossakowski, R.; Liaud, P.; Staley, F.; Baldit, A.; Barrière, C.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Fredj, L.; Landaud, G.; Vazeille, F.; Sonderegger, P.; Abreu, M. C.; Bordalo, P.; Ferreira, R.; Gago, J. M.; Lourenço, C.; Peralta, L.; Ramos, S.; Silva, S.; Varela, J.; Gerschel, C.; Jouan, D.; Papillon, S.; Tarrago, X.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Chaurand, B.; Kluberg, L.; Romana, A.; Gorodetzky, P.; Grosdidier, B.; Racca, C.; Bedjidian, M.; Contardo, D.; Descroix, E.; Drapier, O.; Grossiord, J. Y.; Guichard, A.; Haroutunian, R.; Pizzi, J. R.; NA38 Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    The mean squared transverse momentum of J/ψ's measured in pCu, pU, OCu, OU and SU collisions at 200 GeV/ nucleon is analyzed in terms of initial state interactions. Taking this effect into account, the mechanism which suppresses the J/ ψ production in ion-induced collisions would only have a weak PT dependence.

  6. On the photon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Y. A.; Antonenko, V. G.

    1995-03-01

    A modified Landau hydrodynamical model is applied to study hard thermal photon production in central heavy-ion collisions at LHC, RHIC and SPS energies. It is shown that the phase transition from quark-gluon plasma into hadrons in consequence of the thermodynamical expansion is close to the second order phase transition if a resonance production is taken into account. Hard direct photon emission is also investigated with consideration of nuclear shadowing effect on structure function of quarks and gluons. Also ?? photon background is investigated. It is demonstrated that at the LHC energy photon yield from the quark-gluon plasma in the photon transversal momentum k ? range from 5 to 25 GeV/c exceeds both the background and the direct photon yield. This conclusion may be important for the quark-gluon plasma diagnostic aims. It is also shown that for the LHC energy the thermal photon yield in the present model essentially exceeds this yield obtained in the Bjorken scaling model.

  7. Systematics of the release of residual nuclei from relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Garrard, T. L.; Kertzmann, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    Relativistic nuclei of krypton, xenon, holmium, and gold, accelerated in a partially stripped state to a maximum rigidity of about 5.6 GeV, interacting with targets of aluminum, carbon, and polyethylene are examined. For each projectile and target combination, determinations are made for the total and partial charge changing cross sections for the production of lighter fragments. From these measurements, a new representation of the dependence of the total charge changing cross sections on beam and target charge is developed. Simple representations of the variation of the partial cross sections were identified with the charge of the produced fragments and shown to be dependent on the charge and energy of the beam. The fission of gold nuclei at high energies in these various targets has also been studied.

  8. Systematics of the release of residual nuclei from relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Binns, W.R.; Garrard, T.L.; Israel, M.H.; Kertzmann, M.P.; Klarmann, J.; Stone, E.C.; Waddington, C.J.

    1987-11-01

    We have examined relativistic nuclei of krypton, xenon, holmium, and gold, accelerated in a partially stripped state to a maximum rigidity of about 5.6 GeV, interacting with targets of aluminum, carbon, and polyethylene. For each projectile and target combination we determined the total and partial charge changing cross sections for the production of lighter fragments. From these measurements we have developed a new representation of the dependence of the total charge changing cross sections on beam and target charge. We have also identified simple representations of the variation of the partial cross sections with the charge of the produced fragments and shown that they are dependent on the charge and energy of the beam. The fission of gold nuclei at high energies in these various targets has also been studied.

  9. Strong color field baryonic remnants in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 200A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pop, V. Topor; Barrette, J.; Gale, C.; Gyulassy, M.

    2005-11-01

    The effects of strong-color electric fields on the baryon production at RHIC are studied in the framework of the HIJING/BB (v2.0) model. The particle species dependence of nuclear modification factors are analyzed for Au+Au collisions at 200A GeV. A doubling of the string tension leading to a modification of the strangeness suppression according to the Schwinger mechanism is shown to provide an alternative explanation to coalescence models for the interpretation of the observed baryon and meson production at moderate p{sub T} and results in a predicted enhancement in the (multi)strange (anti)hyperon production.

  10. Examinations of the early degrees of freedom in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, P.; Linnyk, O.; Cassing, W.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2016-04-01

    The parton-hadron string dynamics (PHSD) transport model is used to study the impact of the choice of initial degrees of freedom on the final hadronic and electromagnetic observables in Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV. We find that a nonperturbative system of massive gluons (scenario I) and a system dominated by quarks and antiquarks (scenario II) lead to different hadronic observables when imposing the same initial energy-momentum tensor Tμ ν(x ) just after the passage of the impinging nuclei. In case of the gluonic initial condition the formation of s ,s ¯ pairs in the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) proceeds rather slowly, such that the antistrange quarks and accordingly the K+ mesons do not achieve chemical equilibrium even in central Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV. Accordingly, the K+ rapidity distribution is suppressed in the gluonic scenario, and is in conflict with the data from the BRAHMS Collaboration. The proton and antiproton rapidity distributions also disfavor scenario I. Furthermore, a clear suppression of direct photon and dilepton production is found for the pure gluonic initial conditions, which is not so clearly seen in the present photon and dilepton spectra from Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV due to a large contribution from other channels. It is argued that dilepton spectra in the invariant mass range 1.2

  11. Multi-particle correlation observables in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, R.

    1981-01-01

    Global features of exclusively measured events, including number correlations and vector correlations, and hybrid analysis of measurements of one or two specific fragments like spectator nuclei, high transverse momentum particles, polarization of one particle, etc., are considered. (GHT)

  12. Production of cumulative protons in high-energy hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olimov, K.; Bazarov, E. Kh.; Bekmirzaev, R. N.; Lutpullaev, S. L.; Olimov, A. K.; Petrov, V. I.; Sattarov, A. R.; Khamidov, Kh. Sh.; Yuldashev, B. S.

    2007-04-01

    Under conditions of 4π coverage, the production of cumulative protons in π -C, pC, 4HeC, and CC collisions at high energies is studied on the basis of a large statistical sample. The behavior of inclusive cross sections for cumulative-proton production versus the cumulative number β is found to be universal in the sense that it is independent of the type projectile and primary energy. It is established that the mean number of cumulative protons is also independent of the projectile type and primary energy.

  13. Multiple pion and kaon production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions: measurements versus specific models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guptaroy, P.; de, Bh.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bhattacharyya, D. P.

    The pion and kaon rapidity densities and the nature of kaon-pion ratios offer two very prominent and crucial physical observables on which modestly sufficient data for heavy nucleus collisions are available to date. In the light of two sets of models - one purely phenomenological and the other with a modest degree of a dynamical basis - we try to examine the state of agreement between calculations and experimental results obtainable from the past and the latest measurements. Impact and implications of all these would also finally be spelt out.

  14. Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2009-04-01

    Heavy baryon/meson ratios Λc/D0 and Λb/ Bmacr 0 in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the quark coalescence model. For heavy baryons, we include production from coalescence of heavy quarks with free light quarks as well as with bounded light diquarks that might exist in the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma produced in these collisions. Including the contribution from decays of heavy hadron resonances and also that due to fragmentation of heavy quarks that are left in the system after coalescence, the resulting Λc/D0 and Λb/ Bmacr 0 ratios in midrapidity (|y|⩽0.5) from central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV are about a factor of five and ten, respectively, larger than those given by the thermal model, and about a factor of ten and twelve, respectively, larger than corresponding ratios in the PYTHIA model for pp collisions. These ratios are reduced by a factor of about 1.6 if there are no diquarks in the quark-gluon plasma. The transverse momentum dependence of the heavy baryon/meson ratios is found to be sensitive to the heavy quark mass, with the Λb/ Bmacr 0 ratio being much flatter than the Λc/D0 ratio. The latter peaks at the transverse momentum pT≃0.8 GeV but the peak shifts to pT≃2 GeV in the absence of diquarks.

  15. Ratios of heavy baryons to heavy mesons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yongseok; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2009-04-15

    Heavy baryon/meson ratios {lambda}{sub c}/D{sup 0} and {lambda}{sub b}/B{sup 0} in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the quark coalescence model. For heavy baryons, we include production from coalescence of heavy quarks with free light quarks as well as with bounded light diquarks that might exist in the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma produced in these collisions. Including the contribution from decays of heavy hadron resonances and also that due to fragmentation of heavy quarks that are left in the system after coalescence, the resulting {lambda}{sub c}/D{sup 0} and {lambda}{sub b}/B{sup 0} ratios in midrapidity (|y|{<=}0.5) from central Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV are about a factor of five and ten, respectively, larger than those given by the thermal model, and about a factor of ten and twelve, respectively, larger than corresponding ratios in the PYTHIA model for pp collisions. These ratios are reduced by a factor of about 1.6 if there are no diquarks in the quark-gluon plasma. The transverse momentum dependence of the heavy baryon/meson ratios is found to be sensitive to the heavy quark mass, with the {lambda}{sub b}/B{sup 0} ratio being much flatter than the {lambda}{sub c}/D{sup 0} ratio. The latter peaks at the transverse momentum p{sub T}{approx_equal}0.8 GeV but the peak shifts to p{sub T}{approx_equal}2 GeV in the absence of diquarks.

  16. Systematic failure of static nucleus-nucleus potential to explore sub-barrier fusion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Gautam, Manjeet

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses the validity of the static Woods-Saxon potential and the energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential (EDWSP) for description of sub-barrier fusion dynamics. The low lying surface vibrations of colliding nuclei and neutron transfer channels are found to be major factors responsible for fusion enhancement at sub-barrier energies. Theoretical calculations based upon the static Woods-Saxon potential obtained using the one-dimensional Wong formula fail to explain the energy dependence of the sub-barrier fusion cross-section of {}2040C{}{}a+{}2246,48,50T{}{}i systems. The role of inelastic surface vibrations is properly entertained within the context of coupled channel calculations performed using the CCFULL code. However, the EDWSP model, in conjunction with the one-dimensional Wong formula, accurately explains the sub-barrier fusion enhancement of {}2040C{}{}a+{}2246,48,50T{}{}i systems and simulates the influence of nuclear structure degrees of freedom, such as the inelastic surface vibrational states of colliding pairs. In EDWSP model calculations, a wide range of diffuseness parameters, ranging from a=0.96 fm to a=0.85 fm, which is much larger than a value ≤ft( a=0.65 fm \\right) extracted from the elastic scattering data, is required to bring the observed fusion enhancement.

  17. Exclusive glueball production in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, M. V. T.; Silva, M. L. L. da

    2011-01-15

    The cross sections for the glueball candidates in quasireal photon-photon collisions and on central diffraction processes (i.e., double Pomeron exchange) in heavy-ion interactions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are computed. The rates for these distinct production channels are compared, and they may be a fruitful approach to the investigation of glueballs.

  18. Strange particle production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in the RHIC BES energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong-Cong, Zhang; Xian-Bao, Yuan; Sheng-Qin, Feng; Zhong-Bao, Yin

    2016-03-01

    The parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE is used to investigate strange particle production in Au + Au collisions at in different centralities and at , 11.5 and 7.7 GeV in the most central collision, respectively. It is shown that the transverse momentum distributions of strange particles by the PACIAE model fit the RHIC Beam Energy Scan experimental results well. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475068, 11247021), Excellent Youth Foundation of Hubei Scientific Committee (2006ABB036) and Key Laboratory foundation of Quark and Lepton Physics (Hua-Zhong Normal University)(QLPL2014P01)

  19. Forward Physics in Proton-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nemchik, J.; Potashnikova, I. K.

    2008-10-13

    We present an universal treatment for a substantial nuclear suppression representing a common feature of all known reactions on nuclear targets (forward production of high-p{sub T} hadrons, production of direct photons, the Drell-Yan process, heavy flavor production, etc.). Such a suppression at large Feynman x{sub F}, corresponding to region of minimal light-cone momentum fraction variable x{sub 2} in nuclei, is tempting to interpret as a manifestation of coherence or the Color Glass Condensate. We demonstrate, however, that it is actually a simple consequence of energy conservation and takes place even at low energies, where no effects of coherence are possible. We analyze this common suppression mechanism for several processes performing model predictions in the light-cone dipole approach. Our calculations agree with the data.

  20. Heavy-quark Langevin dynamics and single-electron spectra in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraudo, A.; Alberico, W. M.; De Pace, A.; Molinari, A.; Monteno, M.; Nardi, M.; Prino, F.

    2011-01-01

    The stochastic dynamics of heavy quarks in the fireball produced in heavy-ion collisions is followed through numerical simulations based on the Langevin equation. The modification of the final pT spectra (RAA) of c and b quarks, hadrons and single-electrons with respect to pp collisions is studied. The transport coefficients are evaluated treating separately the contribution of soft and hard collisions. The initial heavy-quark spectra are generated according to NLO-pQCD, accounting for nuclear effects through recent nPDFs. The evolution of the medium is obtained from the output of two hydro-codes (ideal and viscous). The heavy-quark fragmentation into hadrons and their final semileptonic decays are implemented according to up-to-date experimental data. A comparison with RHIC data for non-photonic electron spectra is given.

  1. Principles of emulsion stabilization with special reference to polymeric surfactants.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Tharwat

    2006-01-01

    This overview summarizes the basic principles of emulsion stabilization with particular reference to polymeric surfactants. The main breakdown processes in emulsions are briefly described. A section is devoted to the structure of polymeric surfactants and their conformation at the interface. Particular attention is given to two polymeric surfactants that are suitable for oil-in-water (O/W) and water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions. For O/W emulsions, a hydrophobically modified inulin (HMI), obtained by grafting several alkyl groups on the backbone of the inulin (polyfructose) chain, is the most suitable. For W/O emulsions, an A-B-A block copolymer of polydroxystearic acid (PHS), the A chains, and polyethylene oxide (PEO), the B chain, is the most suitable. The conformation of both polymeric surfactants at the O/W and W/O interfaces is described. A section is devoted to the interaction between emulsion droplets containing adsorbed polymer surfactant molecules. This interaction is referred to as steric stabilization, and it is a combination of two main effects, namely, unfavorable mixing of the A chains, referred to as the mixing interaction, Gmix, and loss of configurational entropy on significant overlap of the stabilizing chains, referred to as elastic interaction, Gel. The criteria for effective steric stabilization are summarized. O/W emulsions based on HMI are described, and their stability in water and in aqueous electrolyte solutions is investigated using optical microscopy. Very stable emulsions can be produced both at room temperature and at 50 degrees C. The reason for this high stability is described in terms of the multipoint anchoring of the polymeric surfactant (by several alkyl groups), the strong hydration of the inulin (polyfructose) chains, and the high concentration of inulin in the adsorbed layer. W/O emulsions using PHS-PEO-PHS block copolymer can be prepared at a high volume fraction of water, varphi, and these emulsions remain fluid up to high varphi values (> 0.6). These emulsions also remain stable for several months at room temperature and at 50 degrees C. The last two sections are concerned with the problems of creaming or sedimentation and phase inversion. Creaming or sedimentation can be prevented by the use of "thickeners" in the continuous phase. These molecules produce non-Newtonian systems that will have a high residual or zero shear viscosity. The latter, which may exceed 1000 Pas, can also be prevented by control of the bulk (or elastic) modulus of the system. Phase inversion in O/W emulsions can also be prevented using HMI, since this polymeric surfactant is not soluble in the oil phase. As long as coalescence and Ostwald ripening are prevented, the emulsions can remain stable for very long times both at room temperature and at 50 degrees C. PMID:16688378

  2. Evaluation of percutaneous permeation of repellent DEET and sunscreen oxybenzone from emulsion-based formulations in artificial membrane and human skin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Miller, Donald; Burczynski, Frank; Gu, Xiaochen

    2014-01-01

    Insect repellent DEET and sunscreen ingredient oxybenzone play an essential role in minimizing vector-borne diseases and skin cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of emulsion type, addition of thickening agent and droplet size in three emulsion-based lotions on percutaneous permeation of DEET and oxybenzone using in vitro diffusion experiments, in order to minimize overall systemic permeation of the substances. Formulation C (water-in-oil emulsion) significantly increased overall permeation of DEET through human skin (56%) compared to Formulation A (oil-in-water emulsion). Formulation B (oil-in-water emulsion with thickening agent xanthan gum) significantly decreased the size of oil droplet containing DEET (16%), but no effect on oil droplets containing oxybenzone. Adding xanthan gum also increased overall permeation of DEET and oxybenzone (21% and 150%) when compared to Formulation A; presence of both ingredients in Formulation B further increased their permeation (36% and 23%) in comparison to its single counterparts. Overall permeation of oxybenzone through LDPE was significantly higher by 26%–628% than that through human skin; overall permeation of DEET through human skin was significantly higher by 64%–338% than that through LDPE. PMID:26579363

  3. Induced phase transitions of nanoparticle-stabilized emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frijters, Stefan; Günther, Florian; Harting, Jens

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticles can stabilize fluid-fluid interfaces over long timescales and are nowadays commonly used, e.g. in emulsions. However, their fundamental properties are as of yet poorly understood. Nanoparticle-stabilized emulsions can exhibit different phases, such as Pickering emulsions or bijels, which can be characterized by their different topologies and rheology. We investigate the effect of various initial conditions on random mixtures of two fluids and nanoparticles - in particular, the final state these systems will reach. For this, we use the well-established 3D lattice Boltzmann method, extended to allow for the added nanoparticles. After the evolution of the emulsions has stopped, we induce transitions from one state to another by gradually changing the wettability of the nanoparticles over time. This changes the preferential local curvature of the interfaces, which strongly affects the global state. We observe strong hysteresis effects because of the energy barrier presented by the necessary massive reordering of the particles. Being able to change emulsion states in situ has potential application possibilities in filtering technology, or creating particle scaffolds.

  4. Thermodynamically Stable Pickering Emulsions Stabilized by Janus Dumbbells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Fuquan; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Daeyeon

    2013-03-01

    Janus particles have two sides with different, often opposite, surface properties. Janus dumbbell is one type of Janus particles that consists of two partially fused spherical lobes. It is possible to independently control the geometry and surface wettability of Janus dumbbells. Janus dumbbells can also be produced in a large quantity, making them useful for practical applications such as emulsion stabilization. In this work, we calculate the free energy of emulsion formation using amphiphilic Janus dumbbells as solid surfactants. In contrast to kinetically stable emulsions stabilized by homogeneous particles, emulsion stabilized by Janus dumbbells can be thermodynamically stable. There also exists an optimal radius of droplets that can be stabilized by infinite or limited number of amphiphilic dumbbells in the continuous phase. We demonstrate that the optimal radius of dumbbell-stabilized droplets can be predicted based on the volume of the dispersed phase and the volume fraction of dumbbells in the continuous phase. We believe our calculation will provide guidelines for using Janus dumbbells as colloid surfactants to generate stable emulsions.

  5. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes at the Interface of Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Nicholas M; Weston, Javen S; Li, Brian; Venkataramani, Deepika; Aichele, Clint P; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Crossley, Steven P

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit very unique properties in biphasic systems. Their interparticle attraction leads to reduced droplet coalescence rates and corresponding improvements in emulsion stability. Here we use covalent and noncovalent techniques to modify the hydrophilicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and study their resulting behavior at an oil-water interface. By using both paraffin wax/water and dodecane/water systems, the thickness of the layer of MWNTs at the interface and resulting emulsion stability are shown to vary significantly with the approach used to modify the MWNTs. Increased hydrophilicity of the MWNTs shifts the emulsions from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. The stability of the emulsion is found to correlate with the thickness of nanotubes populating the oil-water interface and relative strength of the carbon nanotube network. The addition of a surfactant decreases the thickness of nanotubes at the interface and enhances the overall interfacial area stabilized at the expense of increased droplet coalescence rates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the interfacial thickness of modified carbon nanotubes has been quantified and correlated to emulsion stability. PMID:26549532

  6. Rejuvenation of Spent Media via Supported Emulsion Liquid Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiencek, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to maximize the reuseability of spent fermentation media. Supported emulsion liquid membrane separation, a highly efficient extraction technique, is used to remove inhibitory byproducts during fermentation; thus, improving the yield while reducing the need for fresh water. The key objectives of this study are: Develop an emulsion liquid membrane system targeting low molecular weight organic acids which has minimal toxicity on a variety of microbial systems; Conduct mass transfer studies to allow proper modeling and design of a supported emulsion liquid membrane system; Investigate the effect of gravity on emulsion coalescence within the membrane unit; Access the effect of water re-use on fermentation yields in a model microbial system; Develop a perfusion-type fermentor utilizing a supported emulsion liquid membrane system to control inhibitory fermentation byproducts; Work for the coming year will focus on the determination of toxicity of various solvents, selection of the emulsifying agents, as well as characterizing the mass transfer of hollow-fiber contactors.

  7. Delivery of Chlorambucil Using an Acoustically-Triggered, Perfluoropentane Emulsion

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Sebastian, Ian E.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound-mediated delivery systems have mainly focused on microbubble contrast agents as carriers of drugs or genetic material. This study utilizes micron-sized, perfluoropentane (PFP) emulsions as carriers for chlorambucil (CHL), a lipophilic chemotherapeutic. The release of CHL is achieved via acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), whereby the superheated emulsion is converted into gas bubbles using ultrasound. Emulsions were made using an albumin shell and soybean oil as the CHL carrier. The ratio of the PFP to soybean oil phases in the droplets, as well as the fraction of droplets that vaporize per ultrasound exposure were shown to correlate with droplet diameter. A 60-minute incubation with the CHL-loaded emulsion caused a 46.7% cellular growth inhibition, whereas incubation with the CHL-loaded emulsion that was exposed to ultrasound at 6.3 MHz caused an 84.3% growth inhibition. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01), signifying that ADV can be used as a method to substantially enhance drug delivery. PMID:20691925

  8. Influence of processing parameters on morphology of polymethoxyflavone in emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ting, Yuwen; Li, Colin C; Wang, Yin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Huang, Qingrong

    2015-01-21

    Polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) are groups of compounds isolated from citrus peels that have been documented with wide arrays of health-promoting bioactivities. Because of their hydrophobic structure and high melting point, crystallized PMFs usually have poor systemic bioavailability when consumed orally. To improve the oral efficiency of PMFs, a viscoelastic emulsion system was formulated. Because of the crystalline nature, the inclusion of PMFs into the emulsion system faces great challenges in having sufficient loading capacity and stabilities. In this study, the process of optimizing the quality of emulsion-based formulation intended for PMF oral delivery was systematically studied. With alteration of the PMF loading concentration, processing temperature, and pressure, the emulsion with the desired droplet and crystal size can be effectively fabricated. Moreover, storage temperatures significantly influenced the stability of the crystal-containing emulsion system. The results from this study are a good illustration of system optimization and serve as a great reference for future formulation design of other hydrophobic crystalline compounds. PMID:25537008

  9. Formation of pickering emulsions using ion-specific responsive colloids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Khooi Y; Gautrot, Julien E; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2011-02-15

    The ability to control the dispersion, aggregation, and assembly of colloidal systems is important for a number of applications, for instance, Pickering emulsions, drug and gene delivery, control of fluid rheology, and the formation of colloidal crystal arrays. We generated a responsive colloidal system based on polymer-brush-grafted silica nanoparticles and demonstrated that such a colloidal system can be used to produce stable oil-in-water Pickering emulsions. Cationic poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl-trimethyl-ammonium chloride) (PMETAC) brushes were grown from silica nanoparticles (diameter ∼320 nm) through surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). PMETAC brushes are attractive coatings for controlling the behavior of colloidal systems, owing to their ion-specific collapse resulting in the switching of surface hydrophilicity. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta-potential measurements indicated the successful grafting of PMETAC brushes on nanoparticles. The resulting colloidal dispersion was shown to be responsive to perchlorate ions (ClO(4)(-)), which triggered particle aggregation and enabled the generation of Pickering emulsions. The onset of aggregation depended on the polymer chain length. Aggregation was not affected by the initiator density and brush conformational changes. Further studies suggested that particle aggregation and the formation of stable Pickering emulsions were not simply due to brush collapse but also were due to a gradual shielding of electrostatic repulsion. Finally, the stability and homogeneity of the resulting Pickering emulsions were studied. PMID:20839829

  10. Structure and rheology of highly concentrated emulsions: a modern look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, A. Ya; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2015-08-01

    The review concerns modern physicochemical, chemical and physical approaches to research into structural features that determine the rheological properties of highly concentrated emulsions. The structures and properties of various systems (suspensions, emulsions as well as transient forms including micellar colloidal solutions) are considered. The formation of highly concentrated emulsions is treated as the concentration glass transition leading to suppression of the molecular and supermolecular mobility and, subsequently, to the existence of a solid-like state of the systems in question. The emphasis is placed on analysis of visco-plasticity which manifests itself in the possibility for emulsions (unlike suspensions) to undergo irreversible deformation (to flow) at stresses exceeding some threshold (critical value) called the yield stress. The thixotropic nature of the transition through the yield stress, governed by the kinetics of the breakup/recovery of the inherent structure is considered in detail. It has been shown that structure formation in highly concentrated emulsions can extend to a macroscopic level and result in the onset of heterogeneity of a flow in the form of shear bands. The bibliography includes 202 references.

  11. Double emulsion formation through hierarchical flow-focusing microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarmanesh, Milad; Farhadi, Mousa; Azizian, Pooya

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic device is presented for creating double emulsions, controlling their sizes and also manipulating encapsulation processes. As a result of three immiscible liquids' interaction using dripping instability, double emulsions can be produced elegantly. Effects of dimensionless numbers are investigated which are Weber number of the inner phase (Wein), Capillary number of the inner droplet (Cain), and Capillary number of the outer droplet (Caout). They affect the formation process, inner and outer droplet size, and separation frequency. Direct numerical simulation of governing equations was done using volume of fluid method and adaptive mesh refinement technique. Two kinds of double emulsion formation, the two-step and the one-step, were simulated in which the thickness of the sheath of double emulsions can be adjusted. Altering each dimensionless number will change detachment location, outer droplet size and droplet formation period. Moreover, the decussate regime of the double-emulsion/empty-droplet is observed in low Wein. This phenomenon can be obtained by adjusting the Wein in which the maximum size of the sheath is discovered. Also, the results show that Cain has significant influence on the outer droplet size in the two-step process, while Caout affects the sheath in the one-step formation considerably.

  12. Freeze-thaw stability of water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Rousseau, D

    2009-11-01

    Factors influencing water-in-oil emulsion stability during freeze/thaw-cycling, namely interfacial crystallization vs. network crystallization and the sequence of crystallization events (i.e., dispersed vs. continuous phase or vice versa), are assessed. We show that destabilization is most apparent with a liquid-state emulsifier and a continuous oil phase that solidifies prior to the dispersed phase. Emulsions stable to F/T-cycling are obtained when the emulsifier crystallizes at the oil-water interface or in emulsions where the continuous phase crystallizes after the dispersed aqueous phase. The materials used are two food-grade oil-soluble emulsifiers - polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) and glycerol monostearin (GMS) and two continuous oil phases with differing crystallization temperatures - canola oil and coconut oil. Emulsion stability is assessed with pulsed field gradient NMR droplet size analysis, sedimentation, microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. This study demonstrates the sequence of crystallization events and the physical state of the surfactant at the oil-water interface strongly impact the freeze-thaw stability of water-in-oil emulsions. PMID:19683718

  13. Size analysis of nanoparticles extracted from W/O emulsions.

    PubMed

    Nagelreiter, C; Kotisch, H; Heuser, T; Valenta, C

    2015-07-01

    Nanosized particles are frequently used in many different applications, especially TiO2 nanoparticles as physical filters in sunscreens to protect the skin from UV radiation. However, concerns have arisen about possible health issues caused by nanoparticles and therefore, the assessment of the occurrence of nanoparticles is important in pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations. In a previous work of our group, a method was presented to extract nanoparticles from O/W emulsions. But to respond to the needs of dry and sensitive skin, sunscreens of the water-in-oil emulsion type are available. In these, assessment of present nanoparticles is also an important issue, so the present study offers a method for extracting nanoparticles from W/O emulsions. Both methods emanate from the same starting point, which minimizes both effort and cost before the beginning of the assessment. By addition of NaOH pellets and centrifugation, particles were extracted from W/O emulsions and measured for their size and surface area by laser diffraction. With the simple equation Q=A/S a distinction between nanoparticles and microparticles was achieved in W/O emulsions, even in commercially available samples. The present method is quick and easy to implement, which makes it cost-effective. PMID:25907509

  14. Treatment methods for breaking certain oil and water emulsions

    DOEpatents

    Sealock, Jr., L. John; Baker, Eddie G.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed are treatment methods for breaking emulsions of petroleum oil and salt water, fatty oil and water, and those resulting from liquefication of organic material. The emulsions are broken by heating to a predetermined temperature at or above about 200.degree. C. and pressurizing to a predetermined pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the predetermined temperature to produce a heated and pressurized fluid. The heated and pressurized fluid is contained in a single vessel at the predetermined temperature and pressure for a predetermined period of time to effectively separate the emulsion into substantially distinct first and second phases, the first phase comprising primarily the petroleum oil, the second phase comprising primarily the water. The first and second phases are separately withdrawn from the vessel at a withdraw temperature between about 200.degree. C. and 374.degree. C. and a withdraw pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the withdraw temperature. Where solids are present in the certain emulsions, the above described treatment may also effectively separate the certain emulsion into a substantially distinct third phase comprising primarily the solids.

  15. Cellulose Nanocrystals as Water in Water Emulsion Stabilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddireddy, Karthik Reddy; Capron, Isabelle; Nicolai, Taco; Benyahia, Lazhar

    Cellulose is the most abundant polymer on the earth. Thus, it is very much desirable to find as many practical applications as possible for it. Cellulose, in its original form, contains both amorphous and crystalline parts. It is possible to separate both parts by dissolving the amorphous part in concentrated sulfuric acid. The remaining crystalline cellulose part exist in the form of rod-like particles. The dimensions of the particles depend on the source. We produce the particles from the acid hydrolysis of cotton cellulose fibers. It results in cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with dimensions of ~150 nm x 6 nm x 6 nm. It is well known that CNCs could very efficiently stabilize oil in water (O/W) emulsions by forming very dense monolayers of CNCs at O-W interfaces. However, it is not yet known whether they could also stabilize water in water (W/W) emulsions. The W/W emulsions can be produced by any two incompatible polymers. It is challenging to find effective stabilizers for W/W emulsions due to ultralow interfacial tension and large interfacial thickness. In this talk, I will show the efficiency and effectiveness of these one-dimensional rods as W/W emulsion stabilizers.

  16. Stability determination of crude oil emulsions by electrorheological measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Vladimir; Wang, Xiuyu; Plancher, Henry

    2008-11-01

    Emulsion stability is paramount to the success of many industrial applications and the remediation of naturally undesirable occurring fluid-fluid dispersions. Bottle tests and critical electric field (Ec) measurements are two commonly used techniques to interpret emulsion stability. In the former, the amount of water resolved after gravitational settling test or centrifugation as a function of time is used as an indicator of stability. Generally, the lower the total water fraction resolved, the higher the emulsion stability. In the second method, the value of Ec leading to drop coalescence is used as an indicator of stability. A larger value of Ec is a reflection of a more stable dispersion. The value of Ec is usually determined by measuring a sudden increase in electrical conductivity in water-crude oil emulsions as the field value is increased. In this work, an electrorheological test is used to establish the value of Ec and hence the stability criterion. Results of electrorheological measurements are compared to results of bottle tests for water-crude oil emulsions with or without stabilizing solid micro-particles. Results will show the consistency among the different measuring techniques, for a wide range of ionic strength and composition of the water phase and two crude oils.

  17. Study on Formation of High Performance Ice Slurry by Emulsion in Ice Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Oikawa, Ken; Okada, Masashi; Teraoka, Yoshikazu; Kawagoe, Tetsuo

    This study is focused on an emulsion as a new thermal storage material for ice storage. Two types of emulsions are made of oil-water mixture with a little additive. Oils used are silicone, light and lump oils. Water contents of emulsions are 70,80 and 90 %. The additive is amino group modified silicone oil, and there is no depression of freezing point for the emulsions because of its hydrophobic property. In order to know structures of emulsions, those electric resistances were measured. And components of liquids separating from emulsions were investigated. From above results, it was found that one was W/O type and the other was O/W type. And then, adaptability of two emulsions to the ice storage was discussed, and then, it was found that a high performance ice slurry could be formed by the W/O type emulsion.

  18. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed. PMID:24892245

  19. Hemp Sesbania (Sesbania exaltata) control in rice (Oryza sativa) with the bioherbicidal fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene formulated in an invert emulsion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In greenhouse and field experiments, an invert emulsion (MSG 8.25) was tested with dried, formulated spores of the bioherbicidal fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene, a highly virulent pathogen of the leguminous weed Aeschynomene virginica (northern jointvetch), but considered “...

  20. Phase and emulsion morphology diagrams of nonionic- amphiphile/oil/water systems and their interrelationships

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Kyunghee Lim

    1992-09-01

    For two-phase, non-multiple emulsions, the emulsion morphology diagram shows, as a function of temperature and phase or component concentration, which phase is dispersed and which is the continuous one, as well as the temperatures and compositions at which inversions occur. The emulsion morphology diagram plays for emulsions a role that is similar to the role played by phase diagrams for phases.

  1. Phase and emulsion morphology diagrams of nonionic- amphiphile/oil/water systems and their interrelationships

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H. ); Kyunghee Lim . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    For two-phase, non-multiple emulsions, the emulsion morphology diagram shows, as a function of temperature and phase or component concentration, which phase is dispersed and which is the continuous one, as well as the temperatures and compositions at which inversions occur. The emulsion morphology diagram plays for emulsions a role that is similar to the role played by phase diagrams for phases.

  2. Stabilization/solidification of galvanic sludges by asphalt emulsions.

    PubMed

    Bednarik, Vratislav; Vondruska, Milan; Koutny, Marek

    2005-06-30

    A combination of two-aqueous asphalt emulsions was proposed for stabilization/solidification treatment of galvanic sludges prior to landfilling. The presented procedure comprises mixing the galvanic sludge with a slow setting nonionic asphalt emulsion and subsequently forming a secondary asphalt barrier by means of a rapid setting anionic asphalt emulsion. The method was tested on four samples of galvanic sludge from various galvanizing plants, with various water and pollutant contents. Stabilization efficiency was assessed by water-leaching test, TCLP test and by determining ecotoxicity of leachates. Leachate parameters exhibited very low values and favorable results of ecotoxicological tests indicate high efficiency of the developed procedure for galvanic sludge disposal. PMID:15943936

  3. Destabilising Pickering emulsions by drop flocculation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Catherine P; Khairul Anwar, Hunainah; Hughes, James

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated how emulsions of water drops coated by organoclay particles destabilise in organic solvents. The drops destabilise and the emulsions undergo a fluid-solid transition if the particles are poorly wetted by the solvent. We show that the drops adhere together and form three-dimensional networks as the fraction of the poor-quality solvent in the mixture increases. Microscopic observations revealed that the drops coalesce into buckled, non-spherical shapes in mixtures rich in poor-quality solvent. A key finding is that destabilisation is favoured under conditions where the energy of adhesion between the particle layers coating drops is comparable to the energy required to detach the particles from the drops. Rupture of the interfacial layer produces particle flocs and uncoated, unstable water drops that settle out of the emulsion. PMID:26674231

  4. Synthesis of Fluorosurfactants for Emulsion-Based Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microemulsion represents an attractive platform for fundamental and applied biomedical research because the emulsified droplets can serve as millions of compartmentalized micrometer-sized reactors amenable to high-throughput screening or online monitoring. However, establishing stable emulsions with surfactants that are compatible with biological applications remains a significant challenge. Motivated by the lack of commercially available surfactants suitable for microemulsion-based biological assays, this study describes the facile synthesis of a biocompatible fluorosurfactant with nonionic tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl (Tris) polar head groups. We have further demonstrated compatibility of the developed surfactant with diverse emulsion-based applications, including DNA polymeric nanoparticle synthesis, enzymatic activity assay, and bacterial or mammalian cell culture, in the setup of both double- and multiphases of emulsions. PMID:24646088

  5. Automated Track Recognition and Event Reconstruction in Nuclear Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deines-Jones, P.; Cherry, M. L.; Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Jones, W. V.; Kolganova, E. D.; Kudzia, D.; Nilsen, B. S.; Olszewski, A.; Pozharova, E. A.; Sengupta, K.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Waddington, C, J.; Wefel, J. P.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.

    1998-01-01

    The major advantages of nuclear emulsion for detecting charged particles are its submicron position resolution and sensitivity to minimum ionizing particles. These must be balanced, however, against the difficult manual microscope measurement by skilled observers required for the analysis. We have developed an automated system to acquire and analyze the microscope images from emulsion chambers. Each emulsion plate is analyzed independently, allowing coincidence techniques to be used in order to reject back- ground and estimate error rates. The system has been used to analyze a sample of high-multiplicity Pb-Pb interactions (charged particle multiplicities approx. 1100) produced by the 158 GeV/c per nucleon Pb-208 beam at CERN. Automatically reconstructed track lists agree with our best manual measurements to 3%. We describe the image analysis and track reconstruction techniques, and discuss the measurement and reconstruction uncertainties.

  6. Behavior of Malondialdehyde in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Vandemoortele, Angelique; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2015-06-17

    The impact of temperature, emulsifier, and protein type on the reactivity of malondialdehyde in oil-in-water emulsions was elucidated. Malondialdehyde recoveries in aqueous buffer, protein solutions, saturated oil, and fully hydrogenated coconut oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by whey proteins or Tween 20 at 4 or 40 °C were compared. At both temperatures, the reactivity of malondialdehyde in aqueous buffer was the same. In protein solutions, malondialdehyde concentrations were reduced further and its decrease was protein-dependent. Similar trends were found for emulsions. Surprisingly, malondialdehyde was very reactive in saturated oil because only 15% was recovered at 40 °C. However, the degradation in oil proved to be strongly temperature-dependent; at 4 °C, losses amounted to only 8%. This study revealed that malondialdehyde is a very reactive molecule, both in the presence and absence of proteins. Its use as a general oxidation marker should therefore be considered with care. PMID:26016781

  7. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana; Petrina Jáuregui, Estrella; Elizondo Armendáriz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a particularly important problem in patients who need this type of nutritional support for a long time. Prevalence of the condition is highly variable depending on the series, and its clinical presentation is different in adults and children. The etiology of PNALD is not well defined, and participation of several factors at the same time has been suggested. When a bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is detected for a long time, other causes of liver disease should be ruled out and risk factors should be minimized. The composition of lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition is one of the factors related to PNALD. This article reviews the different types of lipid emulsions and the potential benefits of emulsions enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:25982234

  8. Development of a frozen yogurt fortified with a nano-emulsion containing purple rice bran oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate a frozen yogurt (FY) fortified with a nano-emulsion containing purple rice bran oil (NPRBO). A nano-emulsion with a droplet size range of 150-300 nm was produced by sonication followed by ultra-shear homogenization. The nano-emulsion was mi...

  9. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the...

  10. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of the...

  11. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber...

  12. 40 CFR 428.20 - Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emulsion crumb rubber subcategory. 428.20 Section 428.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS RUBBER MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Emulsion Crumb Rubber Subcategory § 428.20 Applicability; description of the emulsion crumb rubber...

  13. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  14. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory. This subpart applies to dischargers of pollutants to waters of the United States...

  15. Study of nuclear multifragmentation induced by ultrarelativistic μ-mesons in nuclear track emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenkov, D. A.; Bradnova, V.; Firu, E.; Kornegrutsa, N. K.; Haiduc, M.; Mamatkulov, K. Z.; Kattabekov, R. R.; Neagu, A.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Rusakova, V. V.; Stanoeva, R.; Zaitsev, A. A.; Zarubin, P. I.; Zarubina, I. G.

    2016-02-01

    Exposures of test samples of nuclear track emulsion were analyzed. The formation of high-multiplicity nuclear stars was observed upon irradiating nuclear track emulsions with ultrarelativistic muons. Kinematical features studied in this exposure of nuclear track emulsions for events of the muon-induced splitting of carbon nuclei to three α-particles are indicative of the nuclear-diffraction interaction mechanism.

  16. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  17. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory. This subpart applies to dischargers of pollutants to waters of the United States...

  18. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  19. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  20. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ROOFING MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  1. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  2. 40 CFR 443.10 - Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... asphalt emulsion subcategory. 443.10 Section 443.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS (TARS AND ASPHALT) POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Asphalt Emulsion Subcategory § 443.10 Applicability; description of the asphalt emulsion subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  3. 40 CFR 467.20 - Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rolling with emulsions subcategory. 467.20 Section 467.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Rolling With Emulsions Subcategory § 467.20 Applicability; description of the rolling with emulsions subcategory. This subpart applies to dischargers of pollutants to waters of the United States...

  4. 40 CFR 467.60 - Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. 467.60 Section 467.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Drawing With Emulsions or Soaps Subcategory § 467.60 Applicability; description of the drawing with emulsions or soaps subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  5. Properties and oxidative stability of emulsions prepared with myofibrillar protein and lard diacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xiaoqin; Guan, Haining; Zhao, Xinxin; Chen, Qian; Kong, Baohua

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the emulsifying properties and oxidative stability of emulsions prepared with porcine myofibrillar proteins (MPs) and different lipids, including lard, glycerolized lard (GL) and purified glycerolized lard (PGL). The GL and PGL emulsions had significantly higher emulsifying activity indices and emulsion stability indices than the lard emulsion (P<0.05). The PGL emulsion presented smaller droplet sizes, thus decreasing particle aggregation and improving emulsion stability. The static and dynamic rheological observations of the emulsions showed that the emulsions had pseudo-plastic behavior, and the PGL emulsion presented a larger viscosity and a higher storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G'') compared with the other two emulsions (P<0.05). The formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, carbonyl contents and total sulfhydryl contents was not significantly different between the emulsions with PGL, GL and lard (P<0.05). In general, lard diacylglycerols enhanced emulsifying abilities and had no adverse effects on the oxidation stability of the emulsions prepared with MPs. PMID:26775153

  6. Photoinduced demulsification of emulsions using a photoresponsive gemini surfactant.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Fukuyasu, Kengo; Horiuchi, Tatsuya; Kondo, Yukishige; Stroeve, Pieter

    2014-01-14

    This Article reports on the influence of light irradiation on the stability of emulsions prepared using a photoresponsive gemini surfactant (C7-azo-C7) having an azobenzene skeleton as a spacer. When mixtures of trans C7-azo-C7 aqueous solution and n-octane are homogenized, stable emulsions are obtained in a specific region of weight fraction and surfactant concentration. Fluorescence microscopy observations using a small amount of fluorescent probes show that the stable emulsions are oil-in-water (O/W)-type. UV irradiation of stable O/W emulsions promotes the cis isomerization of trans C7-azo-C7 and leads to the coalescence of the oil (octane) droplets in the emulsions, that is, demulsification. While the equilibrated interfacial tension (IFT) between aqueous trans C7-azo-C7 solution and octane is almost the same as that between aqueous cis C7-azo-C7 and octane, the occupied area per molecule for C7-azo-C7 at octane/water interface decreases with the cis photoisomerization of trans isomer. Dynamic IFT measurement shows that UV irradiation to the interface between aqueous trans C7-azo-C7 solution and octane brings about an increase in the interfacial tension, indicating that the Gibbs free energy at the interface increases. From these results, the cis isomerization of trans C7-azo-C7 molecules at the O/W interface due to UV irradiation leads to direct contact between the water and octane phases, because of the reduction of molecular area at the interface, and subsequently makes the emulsions demulsified. PMID:24354334

  7. Viscoelastic properties of sterically stabilised emulsions and their stability.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Tharwat

    2015-08-01

    The interaction forces between emulsion droplets containing adsorbed polymeric surfactants and the theory of steric stabilisation are briefly described. The results for the viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions that are stabilised with partially hydrolysed poly(vinyl acetate) that is commonly referred to as poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with 4% vinyl acetate are given. The effect of the oil volume fraction, addition of electrolytes and increasing temperature is described. This allows one to obtain various parameters such as the adsorbed layer thickness, the critical flocculation concentration of electrolyte (CFC) and critical flocculation temperature (CFT) at constant electrolyte concentration. The viscoelastic properties of O/W emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyethylene oxide (A) and polypropylene oxide (B) are described. These emulsions behave as viscoelastic liquids showing a cross-over-point between G' (the elastic component of the complex modulus) and G″ (the viscous component of the complex modulus) at a characteristic frequency. Plots of G' and G″ versus oil volume fraction ϕ show the transition from predominantly viscous to predominantly elastic response at a critical volume fraction ϕ(c). The latter can be used to estimate the adsorbed layer thickness of the polymeric surfactants. Results are also shown for W/O emulsions stabilised with an A-B-A block copolymer of polyhydroxystearic acid (PHS, A) and polyethylene oxide (PEO, B). The viscosity volume fraction curves could be fitted to the Dougherty-Krieger equation for hard-spheres. The results could be applied to give an estimate of the adsorbed layer thickness Δ which shows a decrease with increase of the water volume fraction. This is due to the interpenetration and/or compression of the PHS layers on close approach of the water droplets on increasing the water volume fraction. The last section of the review gives an example of O/W emulsion stability using an AB(n) graft copolymer of polyfructose (A) to which several C12 alkyl chains are grafted. The emulsions are stable both at high temperature and in the presence of high electrolyte concentrations (2 mol dm(-3) NaCl). This high stability is due to the strong adsorption ("anchoring") of the graft copolymer with several C12 alkyl chains and the strong hydration of the polyfructose chains both in water and in the presence of high electrolyte concentrations and temperature. Evidence for this high stability is obtained using disjoining pressure measurements which show a highly stable film between the emulsion droplets and absence of its rupture up to high pressures. PMID:25900262

  8. Impact of polydispersity on multipolar resonant scattering in emulsions.

    PubMed

    Mascaro, Benoit; Brunet, Thomas; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Raffy, Simon; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Leng, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    The influence of size polydispersity on the resonant acoustic properties of dilute emulsions, made of fluorinated-oil droplets, is quantitatively investigated. Ultrasound attenuation and dispersion measurements on various samples with controlled size polydispersities, ranging from 1% to 13%, are found to be in excellent agreement with predictions based on the independent scattering approximation. By relating the particle-size distribution of the synthesized emulsions to the quality factor of the predicted multipolar resonances, the number of observable acoustic resonances is shown to be imposed by the sample polydispersity. These results are briefly discussed into the context of metamaterials for which scattering resonances are central to their effective properties. PMID:23556570

  9. Numerical analysis of electromagnetic cascades in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plyasheshnikov, A. V.; Vorobyev, K. V.

    1985-01-01

    A new calculational scheme of the Monte Carlo method assigned for the investigation of the development of high and extremely high energy electromagnetic cascades (EMC) in the matter was elaborated. The scheme was applied to the analysis of angular and radial distributions of EMC electrons in the atmosphere. By means of this scheme the EMC development in dense medium is investigated and some preliminary data are presented on the behavior of EMC in emulsion chambers. The results of more detailed theoretical analysis of the EMC development in emulsion chambers are discussed.

  10. Statistical physics of topological emulsions and expanding populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Kirill Sergeevich

    This thesis studies how microscopic interactions lead to large scale phenomena in two very different systems: two-dimensional liquid crystals and expanding populations. First, we explore the interactions among circular droplets embedded in a two-dimensional liquid crystal. The interactions arise due to anchoring boundary conditions on the surface of the inclusions and the elastic deformations of the orientational order parameter in the continuous phase. We analytically compute the texture around a single droplet and the far-field droplet-droplet pair potential. The near-field pair potential is computed numerically. We find that droplets attract at long separations and repel at short separations, which results in a well-defined preferred distance between the droplets and stabilization of the emulsion. Self-organization, barriers to coalescence, and the effects of thermal fluctuations are also discussed. Second, we study the role of randomness in the number of offspring on the evolutionary dynamics of expanding populations. Several equally fit genetic variants (alleles) are considered. We find that spatial expansion combined with demographic fluctuations leads to a substantial loss of genetic diversity and spatial segregation of the alleles. The effects of these processes on recurring mutations and selective sweeps are studied as well. Third, the competition between two alleles of different fitness is investigated. We find that the essential features of this competition can be captured by a non-linear reaction-diffusion equation. During a range expansion the fitter allele forms growing sectors that eventually engulf the less fit allele. The applications to measuring relative fitness in microbiological experiments are discussed. Finally, we analyze how a combination of strong stochasticity and weak competition affects the spreading of beneficial mutations in stationary, non-expanding, populations.

  11. Preparation of hybrid thiol-acrylate emulsion-templated porous polymers by interfacial copolymerization of high internal phase emulsions.

    PubMed

    Langford, Caitlin R; Johnson, David W; Cameron, Neil R

    2015-05-01

    Emulsion-templated highly porous polymers (polyHIPEs), containing distinct regions differing in composition, morphology, and/or properties, are prepared by the simultaneous polymerization of two high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) contained within the same mould. The HIPEs are placed together in the mould and subjected to thiol-acrylate photopolymerization. The resulting polyHIPE material is found to contain two distinct semicircular regions, reflecting the composition of each HIPE. The original interface between the two emulsions becomes a copolymerized band between 100 and 300 μm wide, which is found to be mechanically robust. The separate polyHIPE layers are distinguished from one another by their differing average void diameter, chemical composition, and extent of contraction upon drying. PMID:25732898

  12. The coalescence stability of protein-stabilized emulsions estimated by analytical photo-centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Cheetangdee, Nopparat; Oki, Mariko; Fukada, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Various protein solutions were studied in order to quantify the emulsifying activity of proteins, and to explore oil-water interfacial tension, oil particle size analysis, and oil phase separation behaviors in protein-stabilized oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions. Three proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA), β-lactoglobulin (β-lg), and β-casein (β-ca), were employed to disperse hexadecane in various pH and ionic strength solutions in a wide range of oil-water ratios. It was confirmed that the volume mean oil droplet diameter, d(43), changed depending on the oil content, the pH, the ionic strength, and the used protein. In a dilute protein solution (0.01 %) at pH 7, droplet size increased with oil content in so-called surfactant-poor regimes (e.g., above 5%, 10%, and 20% oil content for BSA, β-lg, and β-ca emulsion, respectively) but remained constant at ca. 10 mm, 6 mm, and 20 mm, respectively, in lower oil content surfactant-rich regimes. In surfactant-poor regimes, the most important factor determining the oil drop size was the threshold amount of protein adsorption onto the oil-water interface. In surfactant-rich regimes, on the other hand, it is suggested that drop size may be governed mainly by the mechanical strength of protein films covering the oil drops during emulsification, and this was quantified by the critical osmotic pressure, P(CR). In this study, the P(CR) was measured conveniently in the oil phase separation experiments for protein-stabilized emulsions using analytical photo-centrifugal apparatus. The correlation between the P(CR) and oil droplet size prepared by emulsification at different pH and ionic strength media is discussed. PMID:21768743

  13. Determination of mean droplet sizes of water-in-oil emulsions using an Earth's field NMR instrument.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, Einar O; Flux, Louise S; Johns, Michael L

    2012-08-01

    The use of the Earth's magnetic field (EF) to conduct nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments has a long history with a growing list of applications (e.g. ground water detection, diffusion measurements of Antarctic sea ice). In this paper we explore whether EFNMR can be used to accurately and practically measure the mean droplet size () of water-in-oil emulsions (paraffin and crude oil). We use both pulsed field gradient (PFG) measurements of restricted self-diffusion and T₂ relaxometry, as appropriate. T₂ relaxometry allows the extension of droplet sizing ability below the limits set by the available magnetic field gradient strength of the EFNMR apparatus. A commercially available bench-top NMR spectrometer is used to verify the results obtained using the EFNMR instrument, with good agreement within experimental error, seen between the two instruments. These results open the potential for further investigation of the application of EFNMR for emulsion droplet sizing. PMID:22750255

  14. DIMENSION STABILIZED FIXED PHOTOGRAPHIC TYPE EMULSION AND A METHOD FOR PRODUCING SAME

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, F.C.

    1962-03-13

    A process is given for stabilizing the dimensions of fixed gelatin-base photographic type emulsions containing silver halide, and particularly to such emulsions containing large amounts of silver chloride for use as nuclear track emulsions, so that the dimensions of the final product are the same as or in a predetermined fixed ratio to the dimensions of the emulsions prior to exposure. The process comprises contacting an exposed, fixed emulsion with a solution of wood rosin dissolved in ethyl alcohol for times corresponding to the dimensions desired, and thereafter permitting the alcohol to evaporate. (AEC)

  15. Highlights from the OPERA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, N.

    2014-04-01

    The OPERA neutrino experiment is designed to detect νμ → ντ oscillations in direct appearance mode. The hybrid apparatus consists of an emulsion/lead target complemented by electronic detectors. It is placed in the long-baseline CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam (CNGS) 730 km away from the source. The running of the experiment and the extraction of data recorded in the emulsion will be described, together with the special procedures used to locate interaction vertices and detect short decay topologies. New oscillation search results with increased statistics will be presented. Up-to-date results of the neutrino velocity measurements will also be reported.

  16. Spectra, composition, and interactions of nuclei with magnet interaction chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parneil, T. A.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Roberts, F. E.; Tabuki, T.; Watts, J. W.; Burnett, T. H.; Cherry, M. C.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.

    1990-01-01

    Emulsion chambers will be flown in the Astromag Facility to measure the cosmic ray composition and spectra to 10 exp 15 eV total energy and to definitively study the characteristics of nucleus-nucleus interactions above 10 exp 12 eV/n. Two configurations of emulsion chambers will be flown in the SCIN/MAGIC experiment. One chamber has an emulsion target and a calorimeter similar to those recently flown on balloons for composition and spectra measurements. The other has an identical calorimeter and a low-density target section optimized for performing rigidity measurements on charged particles produced in interactions. The transverse momenta of charged and neutral mesons, direct hadronic pairs from resonance decays and interference effects, and possible charge clustering in high-density states of matter will be studied.

  17. Enhancing the antibacterial efficacy of isoeugenol by emulsion encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Krogsgård Nielsen, Christina; Kjems, Jørgen; Mygind, Tina; Snabe, Torben; Schwarz, Karin; Serfert, Yvonne; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2016-07-16

    Food spoilage and foodborne illnesses are two global challenges for food manufacturers. Essential oils are natural antibacterials that could have a potential for use in food preservation. Unfortunately high concentrations are needed to obtain the desired antibacterial effect, and this limits their use in food due to their adverse organoleptic properties. Encapsulation could make essential oils more effective by concentrating them in the aqueous phase of the food matrix where the bacteria are present. Here we tested encapsulation of the essential oil isoeugenol in spray-dried emulsions as a means of making isoeugenol a more effective antibacterial for use in food preservation. We used β-lactoglobulin and n-OSA starch as emulsifiers, and some emulsions were coated with positively charged chitosan to promote the contact with bacteria through electrostatic interactions. The antibacterial efficacy was quantified as the minimal bactericidal concentration in growth media, milk and carrot juice. The emulsion encapsulation system developed in this study provided high loading capacities, and encapsulation enhanced the efficacy of isoeugenol against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria in media and carrot juice but not in milk. Chitosan-coating did not enhance the efficacy further, possibly due to the aggregation of the chitosan-coated emulsions. The encapsulation system is easy to upscale and should be applicable for encapsulation of similar essential oils. Therefore, we believe it has potential to be used for natural food preservation. PMID:27089032

  18. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae-ik; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung; Jeong, Chiyoung; Cho, Sungkoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jung Sook; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil; Incerti, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the 'NETSCAN' method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  19. Drug encapsulation using supercritical fluid extraction of emulsions.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, P; Huff, R; Shekunov, B Y

    2006-03-01

    The current work was aimed at evaluating a new method, supercritical fluid extraction of emulsions (SFEE), for the production of composite (e.g., polymer-drug) micro- and nanoparticles, intended for application in sustained-release drug delivery formulations. Using the proposed method, composite particles were obtained, both in a continuous or batch manner by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions. Model drugs indomethacin and ketoprofen and biodegradable polymers poly(lactic/glycolic) acid and Eudragit RS were used in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the SFEE process for producing these particles. Stable aqueous suspensions of composite micro and nanoparticles, having sizes ranging between 0.1 and 2 microm were consistently obtained. Emulsion droplet diameter was found to be the major size control parameter. Other parameters investigated included polymer and drug concentrations in solvent and emulsion solvent fraction. The residual solvent content in the particle suspension obtained was consistently below 50 ppm. Standard dissolution tests were used to observe the sustained release phenomenon of the composite particles. The dissolution profile was characterized in terms of the intrinsic dissolution kinetic coefficients taking into account the specific surface area and solubility of the particles. It was observed that the kinetic coefficient parameter for encapsulated drugs was reduced by 2-4 orders of magnitude when compared to the unprocessed drug particles. PMID:16447174

  20. Modular 'click-in-emulsion' bone-targeted nanogels.

    PubMed

    Heller, Daniel A; Levi, Yair; Pelet, Jeisa M; Doloff, Joshua C; Wallas, Jasmine; Pratt, George W; Jiang, Shan; Sahay, Gaurav; Schroeder, Avi; Schroeder, Josh E; Chyan, Yieu; Zurenko, Christopher; Querbes, William; Manzano, Miguel; Kohane, Daniel S; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-03-13

    A new class of nanogel demonstrates modular biodistribution and affinity for bone. Nanogels, ∼70 nm in diameter and synthesized via an astoichiometric click-chemistry in-emulsion method, controllably display residual, free clickable functional groups. Functionalization with a bisphosphonate ligand results in significant binding to bone on the inner walls of marrow cavities, liver avoidance, and anti-osteoporotic effects. PMID:23280931

  1. Mannan-stabilized oil-in-water beverage emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stabilizing effect of spruce galactoglucomannan (GGM) on a model beverage emulsion system was studied and compared to that of guar gum and locust bean gum galactomannans, konjac glucomannan, and corn arabinoxylan. In addition, enzymatic modification was applied on guar gum to examine the effect ...

  2. Water-oil Janus emulsions: microfluidic synthesis and morphology design.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xue-Hui; Huang, Jin-Pei; Xu, Jian-Hong; Chen, Jian; Luo, Guang-Sheng

    2016-04-14

    In this work we developed a facile method to prepare water-oil Janus emulsions in situ with tunable morphologies by using a double-bore capillary microfluidic device. In addition, by combining the theory model and our liquids' properties, we propose a method to design the morphology of water-oil Janus emulsions. To systematically research Janus morphologies we combined the theory model and the fluids' properties. Under the model guidance, we carefully selected the liquids system where only the interfacial tension between the water phase and the continuous phase changed while keeping the other two interfacial tensions unchanged. Thus we could adjust the Janus morphology by changing the surfactant mass fraction in the continuous phase. In addition, with the double-bore capillary, we prepared water-oil Janus emulsions with a large flow ratio range. By adjusting the flow ratio and the surfactant mass fraction, we successfully prepared Janus emulsions with gradual morphology changes, which would be meaningful in fields that have a high demand for morphology designing of amphiphilic Janus particles. PMID:26947622

  3. Hydrophobin coated boehmite nanoparticles stabilizing oil in water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Reger, Martin; Hoffmann, Heinz

    2012-02-15

    Hydrophobin coated boehmite nanoparticles have been used to establish tooth-paste like, homogenous emulsions. The surface-modified nanoparticles were simply obtained by mixing aqueous solutions of cationic boehmite particles with the anionic hydrophobin H Star Protein B® (HPB). Surface tension measurements clearly show that 1 wt.% boehmite binds up to 1 wt.% HPB. The strong interaction and aggregation of hydrophobin coated boehmite nanoparticles was proven by Cryo-TEM measurements, too. Interestingly, the combined use of 0.5 wt.% HPB and 0.5 wt.% boehmite as emulsifying agents resulted in very stable, homogenous, high internal phase emulsions (65 wt.% oil) that are stable over months. The established emulsions have also been characterized by rheological measurements. Storage moduli of more than 1000 Pa are characteristic for their high gel-like properties. Furthermore, light microscopy showed an average droplet size close to 1 μm with low polydispersity. Cryo-SEM confirmed that the hydrophobin coated nanoparticles are located at the interface of the oil droplets and therefore stabilize the emulsion systems. PMID:22129628

  4. Intravenous lipid emulsion for treating permethrin toxicosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    DeGroot, Whitney D

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old cat was presented with acute onset seizures, tremors, and hypersalivation. Permethrin toxicity was diagnosed based on a history of recent flea treatment. Measures were taken to minimize further absorption of permethrin, and methocarbamol and intravenous lipid emulsion were used to control tremors. The cat recovered and was discharged within 42 h. PMID:24381347

  5. Intravenous lipid emulsion for treating permethrin toxicosis in a cat

    PubMed Central

    DeGroot, Whitney D.

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old cat was presented with acute onset seizures, tremors, and hypersalivation. Permethrin toxicity was diagnosed based on a history of recent flea treatment. Measures were taken to minimize further absorption of permethrin, and methocarbamol and intravenous lipid emulsion were used to control tremors. The cat recovered and was discharged within 42 h. PMID:24381347

  6. Immunomodulatory and Physical Effects of Oil Composition in Vaccine Adjuvant Emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Christopher B.; Baldwin, Susan L.; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Reed, Steven G.; Vedvick, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Squalene-based oil-in-water emulsions have been used for years in some seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. However, concerns have been expressed regarding squalene source and potential biological activities. Little information is available regarding the immunomodulatory activity of squalene in comparison with other metabolizable oils in the context of oil-in-water emulsions formulated with vaccines. The present work describes the manufacture and physical characterization of emulsions composed of different classes of oils, including squalene, long chain triglycerides, a medium chain triglyceride, and a perfluorocarbon, all emulsified with egg phosphatidylcholine. Some differences were apparent among the non-squalene oils in terms of emulsion stability, including higher size polydispersity in the perfluorocarbon emulsion, more rapid visual instability at 60 °C for the long-chain triglyceride and perfluorocarbon emulsions, and an increased creaming rate in the medium-chain triglyceride emulsion at 60 °C as detected by laser scattering optical profiling. The biological activity of each of these emulsions was compared when formulated with either a recombinant malaria antigen or a split-virus inactivated influenza vaccine. Overall, vaccines containing the squalene emulsion elicited higher antibody titers and more abundant long-lived plasma cells than vaccines containing emulsions based on other oils. Since squalene-based emulsions show higher adjuvant potency compared to the other oils tested, non-squalene oils may be more suitable as carriers of amphiphilic or hydrophobic immunostimulatory molecules (such as TLR agonists) rather than as stand-alone adjuvants. PMID:21906648

  7. Enhanced stabilization of cloudy emulsions with gum Arabic and whey protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Klein, Miri; Aserin, Abraham; Svitov, Inna; Garti, Nissim

    2010-05-01

    Cloudy emulsions are oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions normally prepared as concentrates, further diluted, per request, into the final beverage. The cloudy emulsion provides flavor, color, and cloud (turbidity) to the soft drink. These systems are stabilized by emulsifiers and/or amphiphilic polysaccharides. Cloudy emulsions based on naturally occurring food grade emulsifiers were studied in the present work. Two charged natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum Arabic (GA), are interacted in aqueous solution to form charge-charge interactions improving the emulsion stability. The emulsions were high sheared (Microfluidizer) and characterized by particle size distribution analysis (DLS), optical centrifugation (LUMiFuge), optical microscopy observations, and turbidity measurements. Emulsions obtained from 10wt% of 3:1wt. ratio WPI:GA, at pH 7 (10wt% canola oil) show better stability than emulsions stabilized by GA or WPI alone. The droplet sizes were smaller than 1microm and did not grow significantly during 1 month of incubation at 25 degrees C. The D-limonene-based emulsion droplets were larger (> 2microm) than those made with vegetable oils immediately after preparation and underwent significant droplet size increase (coalescence) within 1 month (>8 microm). The emulsion with turbidity suitable as a cloudy emulsion was composed of 3wt% WPI:GA (3:1) and 20wt% canola oil. PMID:20149604

  8. The influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction of ghee.

    PubMed

    Newton, Angela E; Fairbanks, Antony J; Golding, Matt; Andrewes, Paul; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2015-04-15

    Food systems, such as cream and butter, have an emulsion or emulsion-like structure. When these food emulsions are heated to high temperatures to make products such as ghee, the Maillard reaction forms a range of volatile flavour compounds. The objective of this paper was to unravel the specific influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction pathways that occur during the cooking of ghee using model systems. Switching the dispersed phase from oil to water provided a means of altering the ratios of volatile compounds produced in the cooked samples. The oil-in-water emulsion generated a volatile compound profile similar to that of the fat containing two phase model matrix, whereas the water-in-oil emulsion produced a different ratio of these compounds. The ability to generate different volatile compound profiles through the use of inverted emulsion structures could point to a new avenue for control of the Maillard reaction in high temperature food systems. PMID:25466150

  9. Stabilization of emulsions using polymeric surfactants based on inulin.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Th F; Vandamme, A; Levecke, B; Booten, K; Stevens, C V

    2004-05-20

    The use of polymeric surfactants for stabilization of emulsions is described. A brief account of general classification and description of polymeric surfactants is given. This is followed by a description of the adsorption and conformation of polymeric surfactants at interfaces. The theoretical approaches for studying polymer adsorption are briefly described. This is followed by a section on the experimental techniques that can be applied to study adsorption and conformation of polymers at the interface. Examples are given to illustrate the experimental techniques. A section is devoted to the interaction between droplets containing adsorbed polymer layers (steric stabilization). The last section gives results on oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions stabilised with a novel graft copolymeric surfactant based on inulin that has been modified by introducing alkyl groups. Two oils were used, namely Isopar M (isoparaffinic oil) and cyclomethicone. Emulsions prepared using the inulin-based surfactant have large droplets, but this could be significantly reduced by addition of a cosurfactant in the oil phase, namely Span 20. The stability of the emulsions was investigated in water, in 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 mol dm(-3) NaCl and in 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 mol dm(-3) MgSO(4). These emulsions were stable for more than 1 year up to 50 degrees C in NaCl concentrations up to 2 mol dm(-3) and 1 mol dm(-3) MgSO(4). This high stability in high electrolyte concentrations could be attributed to the nature of the hydrophilic (stabilizing) polyfructose chain. This was confirmed using cloud point measurements, which showed high hydration of the polyfructose chain in such high electrolyte concentrations. This ensured the long-term physical stability resulting from the strong steric repulsion between the polyfructose chains. PMID:15072943

  10. Thiolated alkyl-modified carbomers: Novel excipients for mucoadhesive emulsions.

    PubMed

    Bonengel, Sonja; Hauptstein, Sabine; Leonaviciute, Gintare; Griessinger, Julia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-07-30

    The aim of this study was the design and evaluation of mucoadhesive emulsifying polymeric excipients. Three thiol bearing ligands with increasing pKa values of their sulfhydryl group, namely 4-aminothiophenol (pKa=6.86), l-cysteine (pKa=8.4) and d/l-homocysteine (pKa=10.0) were coupled to the polymeric backbone of alkyl-modified carbomer (PA1030). Resulting conjugates displayed 818.5μmol 4-aminothiophenol, 698.5μmol cysteine and 651.5μmol homocysteine per gram polymer and were evaluated regarding the reactivity of thiol groups, emulsifying and mucoadhesive properties. In general, the synthesized conjugates showed a pH dependent reactivity, whereby the fastest oxidation occurred in PA1030-cysteine, as almost no free thiol groups could be detected after 120min. Emulsification of medium chain triglycerides was feasible with all synthesized conjugates leading to oil-in-water-emulsions. Emulsions with PA1030-cysteine displayed the highest stability and the smallest droplet size among the tested formulations. Oxidation and consequently cross-linking of the thiomers prior to the emulsification process led to an overall decreased emulsion stability. Evaluating mucosal residence time of thiomer emulsions on porcine buccal mucosa, a 9.2-fold higher amount of formulation based on PA1030-cysteine remained on the mucosal tissue within 3h compared to the unmodified polymer. According to these results, the highest reactive ligand l-cysteine seems to be most promising in order to obtain thiolated polymers for the preparation of mucoadhesive o/w-emulsions. PMID:25857707

  11. A Simple Experiment Illustrating the Structure of Association Colloids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friberg, Stig. E.; Bendiksen, Beverly

    1979-01-01

    The experiment described is intended to illustrate the intermolecular phenomena involved in association colloids. These are normal and inverse micelles and lyotropic liquid crystals. Solubilization, microemulsion and emulsion are discussed. (Author/SA)

  12. Oil components modulate physical characteristics and function of the natural oil emulsions as drug or gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Chung, H; Kim, T W; Kwon, M; Kwon, I C; Jeong, S Y

    2001-04-28

    Oil-in-water (o/w) type lipid emulsions were formulated by using 18 different natural oils and egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) to investigate how emulsion particle size and stability change with different oils. Cottonseed, linseed and evening primrose oils formed emulsions with very large and unstable particles. Squalene, light mineral oil and jojoba bean oil formed stable emulsions with small particles. The remaining natural oils formed moderately stable emulsions. Emulsions with smaller initial particle size were more stable than those with larger particles. The correlation between emulsion size made with different oils and two physical properties of the oils was also investigated. The o/w interfacial tension and particle size of the emulsion were inversely proportional. The effect of viscosity was less pronounced. To study how the oil component in the emulsion modulates the in vitro release characteristics of lipophilic drugs, three different emulsions loaded with two different drugs were prepared. Squalene, soybean oil and linseed oil emulsions represented the most, medium and the least stable systems, respectively. For the lipophilic drugs, release was the slowest from the most stable squalene emulsion, followed by soybean oil and then by linseed oil emulsions. Cationic emulsions were also prepared with the above three different oils as gene carriers. In vitro transfection activity was the highest for the most stable squalene emulsion followed by soybean oil and then by linseed oil emulsions. Even though the in vitro transfection activity of emulsions were lower than the liposome in the absence of serum, the activity of squalene emulsion, for instance, was ca. 30 times higher than that of liposome in the presence of 80% (v/v) serum. In conclusion, the choice of oil component in o/w emulsion is important in formulating emulsion-based drug or gene delivery systems. PMID:11295226

  13. Comparative studies of salinomycin-loaded nanoparticles prepared by nanoprecipitation and single emulsion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Wu, Puyuan; Ren, Wei; Xin, Kai; Yang, Yang; Xie, Chen; Yang, Chenchen; Liu, Qin; Yu, Lixia; Jiang, Xiqun; Liu, Baorui; Li, Rutain; Wang, Lifeng

    2014-07-01

    To establish a satisfactory delivery system for the delivery of salinomycin (Sal), a novel, selective cancer stem cell inhibitor with prominent toxicity, gelatinase-responsive core-shell nanoparticles (NPs), were prepared by nanoprecipitation method (NR-NPs) and single emulsion method (SE-NPs). The gelatinase-responsive copolymer was prepared by carboxylation and double amination method. We studied the stability of NPs prepared by nanoprecipitation method with different proportions of F68 in aqueous phase to determine the best proportion used in our study. Then, the NPs were prepared by nanoprecipitation method with the best proportion of F68 and single emulsion method, and their physiochemical traits including morphology, particle size, zeta potential, drug loading content, stability, and in vitro release profiles were studied. The SE-NPs showed significant differences in particle size, drug loading content, stability, and in vitro release profiles compared to NR-NPs. The SE-NPs presented higher drug entrapment efficiency and superior stability than the NR-NPs. The drug release rate of SE-NPs was more sustainable than that of the NR-NPs, and in vivo experiment indicated that NPs could prominently reduce the toxicity of Sal. Our study demonstrates that the SE-NPs could be a satisfactory method for the preparation of gelatinase-responsive NPs for intelligent delivery of Sal.

  14. Comparative studies of salinomycin-loaded nanoparticles prepared by nanoprecipitation and single emulsion method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To establish a satisfactory delivery system for the delivery of salinomycin (Sal), a novel, selective cancer stem cell inhibitor with prominent toxicity, gelatinase-responsive core-shell nanoparticles (NPs), were prepared by nanoprecipitation method (NR-NPs) and single emulsion method (SE-NPs). The gelatinase-responsive copolymer was prepared by carboxylation and double amination method. We studied the stability of NPs prepared by nanoprecipitation method with different proportions of F68 in aqueous phase to determine the best proportion used in our study. Then, the NPs were prepared by nanoprecipitation method with the best proportion of F68 and single emulsion method, and their physiochemical traits including morphology, particle size, zeta potential, drug loading content, stability, and in vitro release profiles were studied. The SE-NPs showed significant differences in particle size, drug loading content, stability, and in vitro release profiles compared to NR-NPs. The SE-NPs presented higher drug entrapment efficiency and superior stability than the NR-NPs. The drug release rate of SE-NPs was more sustainable than that of the NR-NPs, and in vivo experiment indicated that NPs could prominently reduce the toxicity of Sal. Our study demonstrates that the SE-NPs could be a satisfactory method for the preparation of gelatinase-responsive NPs for intelligent delivery of Sal. PMID:25147486

  15. Local Rearrangements of Droplets in a Dense Emulsion Under Shear Rearrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Vishwas; Dutta, Sudeep; Del Gado, Emanuela; Blair, Daniel

    Jammed suspensions can flow when subjected to shear deformation. The flow properties are complex, depend on shear rates and can be inhomogeneous through the material. The microscopic origin of such flow properties is still a subject of intense research. In this work, we present a study of jammed emulsions under shear deformation, using a combination of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. In the steady state regime, we investigate the local rearrangement of jammed emulsion droplets at a wide range of shear rates and shear strains and characterise the local rearrangement of droplets in terms of mean square displacement (MSD), displacement maps and displacement correlation function. At small shear strains and high shear rates, we find localised flow events and super diffusive motion of droplets. But at low shear rates, we observe emerging shear localisation from plastic events in an elastic background and avalanches. The characterisation of local rearrangements is also done in the stress over-shoot regime as well in the regime approaching the steady state stress. We observe a transient shear banding that progressively disappears as the pressure reaches a steady state value.

  16. Ethyl ferulate, a component with anti-inflammatory properties for emulsion-based creams.

    PubMed

    Nazaré, Ana C; de Faria, Carolina M Q G; Chiari, Bruna G; Petrônio, Maicon S; Regasini, Luis O; Silva, Dulce H S; Corrêa, Marcos A; Isaac, Vera L B; da Fonseca, Luiz M; Ximenes, Valdecir F

    2014-01-01

    Ethyl ferulate (FAEE) has been widely studied due to its beneficial heath properties and, when incorporated in creams, shows a high sun protection capacity. Here we aimed to compare FAEE and its precursor, ferulic acid (FA), as free radical scavengers, inhibitors of oxidants produced by leukocytes and the alterations in rheological properties when incorporated in emulsion based creams. The cell-free antiradical capacity of FAEE was decreased compared to FA. However, FAEE was more effective regarding the scavenging of reactive oxygen species produced by activated leukocytes. Stress and frequency sweep tests showed that the formulations are more elastic than viscous. The viscoelastic features of the formulations were confirmed in the creep and recovery assay and showed that the FAEE formulation was less susceptive to deformation. Liberation experiments showed that the rate of FAEE release from the emulsion was slower compared to FA. In conclusion, FAEE is more effective than FA as a potential inhibitor of oxidative damage produced by oxidants generated by leukocytes. The rheological alterations caused by the addition of FAEE are indicative of lower spreadability, which could be useful for formulations used in restricted areas of the skin. PMID:24941338

  17. Experimental study of forces between quasi-two-dimensional emulsion droplets near jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmond, Kenneth W.; Young, Pearl J.; Chen, Dandan; Weeks, Eric R.

    We experimentally study the jamming of quasi-two-dimensional emulsions. Our experiments consist of oil-in-water emulsion droplets confined between two parallel plates. From the droplet outlines, we can determine the forces between every droplet pair to within 8% over a wide range of area fractions $\\phi$. We study three bidisperse samples that jam at area fractions $\\phi_c \\approx 0.86$. Our data show that for $\\phi > \\phi_c$, the contact numbers and pressure have power-law dependence on $\\phi-\\phi_c$ in agreement with the critical scaling found in numerical simulations. Furthermore, we see a link between the interparticle force law and the exponent for the pressure scaling, supporting prior computational observations. We also observe linear-like force chains (chains of large inter-droplet forces) that extend over 10 particle lengths, and examine the origin of their linearity. We find that the relative orientation of large force segments are random and that the tendency for force chains to be linear is not due to correlations in the direction of neighboring large forces, but instead occurs because the directions are biased towards being linear to balance the forces on each droplet.

  18. Nuclear research emulsion neutron spectrometry at the Little-Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C.

    1985-10-01

    Nuclear research emulsions (NRE) have been used to characterize the neutron spectrum emitted by the Little-Boy replica. NRE were irradiated at the Little-Boy surface as well as approximately 2 m from the center of the Little-Boy replica using polar angles of 0/sup 0/, 30/sup 0/, 60/sup 0/ and 90/sup 0/. For the NRE exposed at 2 m, neutron background was determined using shadow shields of borated polyethylene. Emulsion scanning to date has concentrated exclusively on the 2-m, 0/sup 0/ and 2-m, 90/sup 0/ locations. Approximately 5000 proton-recoil tracks have been measured in NRE irradiated at each of these locations. Neutron spectra obtained from these NRE proton-recoil spectra are compared with both liquid scintillator neutron spectrometry and Monte Carlo calculations. NRE and liquid scintillator neutron spectra generally agree within experimental uncertainties at the 2-m, 90/sup 0/ location. However, at the 2-m, 0/sup 0/ location, the neutron spectra derived from these two independent experimental methods differ significantly. NRE spectra and Monte Carlo calculations exhibit general agreement with regard to both intensity as well as energy dependence. Better agreement is attained between theory and experiment at the 2-m, 90/sup 0/ location, where the neutron intensity is considerably higher. 14 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Selective removal of erythromycin by magnetic imprinted polymers synthesized from chitosan-stabilized Pickering emulsion.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hongxiang; Chen, Qunhui; Pan, Jianming; Zhang, Yunlei; Huang, Yong; Qi, Xueyong

    2015-05-30

    Magnetic imprinted polymers (MIPs) were synthesized by Pickering emulsion polymerization and used to adsorb erythromycin (ERY) from aqueous solution. The oil-in-water Pickering emulsion was stabilized by chitosan nanoparticles with hydrophobic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as magnetic carrier. The imprinting system was fabricated by radical polymerization with functional and crosslinked monomer in the oil phase. Batches of static and dynamic adsorption experiments were conducted to analyze the adsorption performance on ERY. Isotherm data of MIPs well fitted the Freundlich model (from 15 °C to 35 °C), which indicated heterogeneous adsorption for ERY. The ERY adsorption capacity of MIPs was about 52.32 μmol/g at 15 °C. The adsorption kinetics was well described by the pseudo-first-order model, which suggested that physical interactions were primarily responsible for ERY adsorption. The Thomas model used in the fixed-bed adsorption design provided a better fit to the experimental data. Meanwhile, ERY exhibited higher affinity during adsorption on the MIPs compared with the adsorption capacity of azithromycin and chloramphenicol. The MIPs also exhibited excellent regeneration capacity with only about 5.04% adsorption efficiency loss in at least three repeated adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:25704432

  20. Albedo in the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolskaya, N. V.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Case, G.; Christl, M.; Chang, J.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    ATIC(Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon borne experiment designed to measure the cosmic ray composition for elements from hydrogen to iron and their energy spectra from approx.50 GeV to near 100 TeV. It consists of a Si-matrix detector to determine the charge of a CR particle, a scintillator hodoscope for tracking, carbon interaction targets and a fully active BGO calorimeter. ATIC had its first 16-day flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 28/12/2000 to 13/01/2000. The ATIC flight collected approximately 25 million events. To measure charge of primary particle in presence of radiation scattered back from the interaction and subsequent shower development in the calorimeter a charge detector must be a mosaic of small detector pads so that the pad containing the signal from the incident particle has no additional signal from albedo particles. Therefore the silicon matrix was built of 4480 individual silicon pads each 2 cm x 1.5 cm. The matrix consists of four planes of detectors and the active detector area, in these planes are partially overlapped to completely cover the aperture. The lateral and amplitude distributions of albedo signals in Si-matrix are analyzed for different primary nuclei and different energy deposits in BGO calorimeter. The greater part of albedo signals has Q near 1, where Q = square root of Amplitude(MIP). The albedo distribution exponentially decreases up to Q near 8. These high values are produced by slow protons and plans. There are also a small number of signals of Q > 8, mainly for heavy nucleus primaries. These signals are apparently generated by neutrons. The comparison of the experimental data and simulations with GEANT 3-21 code using QGSM generator for nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented.

  1. Dose and timing requirements for immunogenicity of viral poultry vaccine antigen: investigations of emulsion-based depot function.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Theo; Hofmans, Marij P M; Theelen, Marc J G; Manders, Frans G A; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2007-10-01

    The release requirements for vaccine antigens delivered by adjuvants with presumed depot function are poorly understood. Water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions are routinely used in many poultry vaccines. They strongly activate antibody production, and are regarded as a depot from which antigens are slowly released, resulting in prolonged antigen residence. However, from earlier studies we concluded that W/O adjuvant activity is partly based on the immunostimulatory activity of the oil phase. Here we assess the dose and regimen requirements for viral antigen in immunization experiments in chickens. Three-week-old to 4-week-old White Leghorn chickens were repeatedly injected with inactivated infectious bursal disease virus antigen over 48 days. Our aim was to compare the antibody responses in repeatedly injected animals, receiving fractioned doses of antigen, with the responses in animals receiving only one injection of the full dose of antigen formulated in either a W/O emulsion or in saline. We observed that repeated administration of small amounts of antigen results in a gradual increase of specific humoral immune responses during the immunization regimen. Immunization with a higher first dose evoked an early higher antibody response, which, however, reached a similar plateau level at the end of the regimen. When compared with lower first-dose regimens, a slow decline of serum antibody titre 2 weeks after the end of antigen injections indicated that repeated injection of small doses of antigen indeed mimics the efficacy of depot-forming adjuvants. All regimens of fractioned antigen in saline, however, proved less effective, when compared with a single-dose vaccination of the cumulative amount of antigen formulated in a W/O emulsion. From our data we confirm that W/O emulsions are very effective vaccine vehicles for improving antigen-specific humoral responses in chickens, owing to a combination of antigen residence-prolonging activity and direct immune stimulation. PMID:17899459

  2. Target and projectile fragmentations in {sup 208}Pb-emulsion collisions at 160{ital A} GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, G.; Jain, P.L.

    1996-12-01

    We present the results of a study performed on the {sup 208}Pb-emulsion interactions at 160{ital A} GeV. In a minimum-bias sample of 1034 nuclear collisions, charges are assigned to all of the emitted 3431 helium and 1820 heavier projectile fragments during the breakup of the {sup 208}Pb beam in emulsion. Multiplicity distributions of the target-associated slow-moving particles and of the fast-moving projectile fragments are investigated. The polar angles of a subsample of 337 interactions having at least four projectile fragments of charge {ital Z}{ge}2 are accurately measured and their pseudorapidity distributions are obtained. Multiplicity distributions, two- and three-body asymmetries, and conditional moments of the fast-moving projectile particles are investigated in terms of the total charge remaining in bound in the multiply charged projectile fragments. The results are compared with our existing 10.6{ital A} GeV {sup 197}Au-emulsion data obtained in experiment No. 875 conducted at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Multiplicity distributions of slow particles emitted from the {sup 208}Pb- and {sup 197}Au-induced emulsion reactions are found to be independent of the beam masses and their energies. An insignificant number of fission events is observed in this work. Some differences in the average yields of helium nuclei and heavier fragments are observed, which may be attributed to an energy effect or to the limited statistics. However, two- and three-body asymmetries and conditional moments indicate that the breakup mechanism of the projectiles over a wide span of energies seems to be energy independent. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Hierarchical polymerized high internal phase emulsions synthesized from surfactant-stabilized emulsion templates.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ling L C; Villafranca, Pedro M Baiz; Menner, Angelika; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-05-21

    In building construction, structural elements, such as lattice girders, are positioned specifically to support the mainframe of a building. This arrangement provides additional structural hierarchy, facilitating the transfer of load to its foundation while keeping the building weight down. We applied the same concept when synthesizing hierarchical open-celled macroporous polymers from high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) templates stabilized by varying concentrations of a polymeric non-ionic surfactant from 0.75 to 20 w/vol %. These hierarchical poly(merized)HIPEs have multimodally distributed pores, which are efficiently arranged to enhance the load transfer mechanism in the polymer foam. As a result, hierarchical polyHIPEs produced from HIPEs stabilized by 5 vol % surfactant showed a 93% improvement in Young's moduli compared to conventional polyHIPEs produced from HIPEs stabilized by 20 vol % of surfactant with the same porosity of 84%. The finite element method (FEM) was used to determine the effect of pore hierarchy on the mechanical performance of porous polymers under small periodic compressions. Results from the FEM showed a clear improvement in Young's moduli for simulated hierarchical porous geometries. This methodology could be further adapted as a predictive tool to determine the influence of hierarchy on the mechanical properties of a range of porous materials. PMID:23617331

  4. Effect of the degree of substitution of octenyl succinic anhydride-banana starch on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, Luis A; Bello-Flores, Christopher A; Nuñez-Santiago, María del Carmen; Coronel-Aguilera, Claudia P; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2015-11-01

    Banana starch was esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) at different degree substitution (DS) and used to stabilize emulsions. Morphology, emulsion stability, emulsification index, rheological properties and particle size distribution of the emulsions were tested. Emulsions dyed with Solvent Red 26 showed affinity for the oil phase. Backscattering light showed three regions in the emulsion where the emulsified region was present. Starch concentration had higher effect in the emulsification index (EI) than the DS used in the study because similar values were found with OSA-banana and native starches. However, OSA-banana presented greater stability of the emulsified region. Rheological tests in emulsions with OSA-banana showed G'>G" values and low dependence of G' with the frequency, indicating a dominant elastic response to shear. When emulsions were prepared under high-pressure conditions, the emulsions with OSA-banana starch with different DS showed a bimodal distribution of particle size. The emulsion with OSA-banana starch and the low DS showed similar mean droplet diameter than its native counterpart. In contrast, the highest DS led to the highest mean droplet diameter. It is concluded that OSA-banana starch with DS can be used to stabilize specific emulsion types. PMID:26256319

  5. Stabilization mechanism of oil-in-water emulsions by β-lactoglobulin and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Eléonore; Mekhloufi, Ghozlene; Le Potier, Isabelle; de Kerdaniel, Typhaine du Fou; Grossiord, Jean-Louis; Rosilio, Véronique; Agnely, Florence

    2011-02-15

    Natural biopolymer stabilized oil-in-water emulsions were formulated using β-lactoglobulin (β-lg), gum arabic (GA), and β-lg:GA solutions as an alternative to synthetic surfactants. Emulsions using these biopolymers and their complexes were formulated varying the biopolymer total concentration, the protein-to-polysaccharide ratio, and the emulsification protocol. This work showed that whereas β-lg enabled the formulation of emulsions at concentration as low as 0.5 (w/w)%, GA allowed to obtain emulsions at concentrations equal to or higher than 2.5 (w/w)%. In order to improve emulsion stability, β-lg and GA were complexed through strong attractive electrostatic interactions. GA solution had to be added to previously prepared β-lg emulsions in order to obtain stable emulsions. Interfacial tension and interfacial rheological measurements allowed a better understanding of the possible stabilizing mechanism. β-lg and GA both induced a very effective decrease in interfacial tension and showed interfacial elastic behaviour. In the mixed system, β-lg adsorbed at the interface and GA electrostatically bound to it, leading to the formation of a bi-layer stabilized emulsion. However, emulsion stability was not improved compared to β-lg stabilized emulsion, probably due to depletion or bridging flocculation. PMID:21145063

  6. The FASES instrument development and experiment preparation for the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picker, Gerold; Gollinger, Klaus; Greger, Ralf; Dettmann, Jan; Winter, Josef; Dewandre, Thierry; Castiglione, Luigi; Vincent-Bonnieu, Sebastien; Liggieri, Libero; Clausse, Daniele; Antoni, Mickael

    The FASES experiments target the investigation of the stability of emulsions. The main objec-tives are the study of the surfactant adsorption at the liquid / liquid interfaces, the interaction of the droplets as well as the behaviour of the liquid film between nearby drops. Particular focus is given to the dynamic droplet evolution during emulsion destabilisation. The results of the experiments shall support development of methods for the modelling of droplet size distri-butions, which are important to many industries using stable emulsions like food production, cosmetics and pharmaceutics or unstable emulsions as required for applications in waste water treatment or crude oil recovery. The development of the experimental instrumentation was initiated in 2002. The flight instru-ment hardware development was started in 2004 and finally the flight unit was completed in 2009. Currently the final flight preparation is proceeding targeting a launch to the International Space Station (ISS) with Progress 39P in September 2010. The experiment setup of the instrument is accommodated in a box type insert called Experiment Container (EC), which will be installed in the Fluid Science Laboratory part of the European Columbus module of the ISS. The EC is composed of two diagnostics instruments for the investigation of transparent and opaque liquid emulsion. The transparent emulsions will be subject to the experiment called "Investigations on drop/drop interactions in Transparent Emulsions" (ITEM). The opaque emulsion samples will be studied in the experiment called "Investigations on concentrated or opaque Emulsions and on Phase Inversions" (EMPI). The thermal conditioning unit (TCU) allows performing homogeneous thermalization, tem-perature sweeps, emulsion preparation by stirrer, and optical diagnostics with a scanning mi-croscope. The objective of the instrument is the 3D reconstruction of the emulsion droplet distribution in the liquid matrix in terms of the droplet sizes, location and their time depen-dent evolution. The TCU will be used for the stability experiment ITEM-S and the droplet freezing experiment ITEM-F. The Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) will give an information about the evolution of the emulsion through the droplet size distribution and the dispersion state of the droplets within the emulsion during a controlled temperature sweep by measuring the latent heat of droplet freezing and melting during the EMPI experiments. For this purpose the calorimeter is equipped with a reference sample filled with a pure liquid matrix and a similar measurement sample filled with the specific emulsion under investigation. The differential heat flux between measurement sample and reference sample is measured with a sensitive heat flux sensor. Each instrument is serviced by a robotic sample stowage system, which accommodates in total 44 different ITEM and EMPI emulsion samples each filled with a specific composition of the emulsion. Currently the flight preparation is ongoing with particular focus on the preparation of the emulsion flight sample set and the instrument's operating parameters. The FASES flight instrument was developed by ASTRIUM Space Transportation Germany with support of RUAG Aerospace Wallisellen under ESA / ESTEC contract. The science team of FASES is supported by ESA/ESTEC (Microgravity Application Programme, AO99-052).

  7. Fast parallelized kalman filter based reconstruction of charged particle trajectories for the compressed baryonic matter experiment on a many-core server at the laboratory of information technologies, JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablyazimov, T. O.; Zyzak, M. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Kisel, P. I.

    2014-07-01

    The charged particle trajectory online reconstruction in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment (GSI, Germany) is an extremely difficult task. It is conditioned by a high rate of the ion beam-tar-get collisions (up to 107/s), high track multiplicity in each nucleus-nucleus collision (up to 1000 particles), and charged-particle trajectory registration with the coordinate detectors located in a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field. Such a problem could be solved only by using modern high-performance computers. This work scrutinizes a Kalman filter based track reconstruction algorithm implemented using different parallelization approaches. To perform the analysis, a many-core hybrid server with two Intel Xeon X5660 CPUs and a NVidia GTX 480 GPU (JINR LIT) was used.

  8. Upgrade of the ALICE Experiment: Letter Of Intent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; ALICE Collaboration; et al.

    2014-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-2019. These plans are presented in the ALICE Upgrade Letter of Intent, submitted to the LHCC (LHC experiments Committee) in September 2012. In order to fully exploit the physics reach of the LHC in this field, high-precision measurements of the heavy-flavour production, quarkonia, direct real and virtual photons, and jets are necessary. This will be achieved by an increase of the LHC Pb-Pb instant luminosity up to 6×1027 cm-2s-1 and running the ALICE detector with the continuous readout at the 50 kHz event rate. The physics performance accessible with the upgraded detector, together with the main detector modifications, are presented.

  9. Effect of emulsifiers and their liquid crystalline structures in emulsions on dermal and transdermal delivery of hydroquinone, salicylic acid and octadecenedioic acid.

    PubMed

    Otto, A; Wiechers, J W; Kelly, C L; Dederen, J C; Hadgraft, J; du Plessis, J

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of emulsifiers and their liquid crystalline structures on the dermal and transdermal delivery of hydroquinone (HQ), salicylic acid (SA) and octadecenedioic acid (DIOIC). Emulsions containing liquid crystalline phases were compared with an emulsion without liquid crystals. Skin permeation experiments were performed using Franz-type diffusion cells and human abdominal skin dermatomed to a thickness of 400 mum. The results indicate that emulsifiers arranging in liquid crystalline structures in the water phase of the emulsion enhanced the skin penetration of the active ingredients with the exception of SA. SA showed a different pattern of percutaneous absorption, and no difference in dermal and transdermal delivery was observed between the emulsions with and without liquid crystalline phases. The increase in skin penetration of HQ and DIOIC could be attributed to an increased partitioning of the actives into the skin. It was hypothesized that the interaction between the different emulsifiers and active ingredients in the formulations varied and, therefore, the solubilization capacities of the various emulsifiers and their association structures. PMID:20484969

  10. A Novel Submicron Emulsion System Loaded with Doxorubicin Overcome Multi-Drug Resistance in MCF-7/ADR Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W. P.; Hua, H. Y.; Sun, P. C.; Zhao, Y. X.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop the Solutol HS15-based doxorubicin submicron emulsion with good stability and overcoming multi-drug resistance. In this study, we prepared doxorubicin submicron emulsion, and examined the stability after autoclaving, the in vitro cytotoxic activity, the intracellular accumulation and apoptpsis of doxorubicin submicron emulsion in MCF-7/ADR cells. The physicochemical properties of doxorubicin submicron emulsion were not significantly affected after autoclaving. The doxorubicin submicron emulsion significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin submicron emulsion and enhanced cytotoxic activity and apoptotic effects of doxorubicin. These results may be correlated to doxorubicin submicron emulsion inhibitory effects on efflux pumps through the progressive release of intracellular free Solutol HS15 from doxorubicin submicron emulsion. Furthermore, these in vitro results suggest that the Solutol HS15-based submicron emulsion may be a potentially useful drug delivery system to circumvent multi-drug resistance of tumor cells. PMID:26664069

  11. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-06-01

    Uranium mill tailings are a source of low-level radiation and radioactive materials that may be released into the environment. Stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is necessary to minimize radon exhalation and other radioactive releases. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing uranium tailings is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory: the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other potentially hazardous materials in uranium tailings. Results of these studies indicate that radon flux from uranium tailings can be reduced by greater than 99% by covering the tailings with an asphalt emulsion that is poured on or sprayed on (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick), or mixed with some of the tailings and compacted to form an admixture seal (2.5 to 15.2 cm) containing 18 wt % residual asphalt.

  12. Bioreactor droplets from liposome-stabilized all-aqueous emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, Daniel C.; Strulson, Christopher A.; Cacace, David N.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Keating, Christine D.

    2014-08-01

    Artificial bioreactors are desirable for in vitro biochemical studies and as protocells. A key challenge is maintaining a favourable internal environment while allowing substrate entry and product departure. We show that semipermeable, size-controlled bioreactors with aqueous, macromolecularly crowded interiors can be assembled by liposome stabilization of an all-aqueous emulsion. Dextran-rich aqueous droplets are dispersed in a continuous polyethylene glycol (PEG)-rich aqueous phase, with coalescence inhibited by adsorbed ~130-nm diameter liposomes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and dynamic light scattering data indicate that the liposomes, which are PEGylated and negatively charged, remain intact at the interface for extended time. Inter-droplet repulsion provides electrostatic stabilization of the emulsion, with droplet coalescence prevented even for submonolayer interfacial coatings. RNA and DNA can enter and exit aqueous droplets by diffusion, with final concentrations dictated by partitioning. The capacity to serve as microscale bioreactors is established by demonstrating a ribozyme cleavage reaction within the liposome-coated droplets.

  13. Amphoteric water-in-oil self-inverting polymer emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Lipowski, S. A.

    1985-11-12

    An amphoteric water-in-oil self-inverting polymer emulsion is prepared which contains a copolymer of a nonionic vinyl monomer and an amphoteric vinyl monomer or a terpolymer of a nonionic vinyl monomer, an anionic vinyl monomer and a cationic vinyl monomer in the aqueous phase, a hydrocarbon oil for the oil phase, a water-in-oil emulsifying agent and an inverting surfactant. An example of a copolymer is a copolymer of a nonionic vinyl monomer such as acrylamide or methacrylamide and an amphoteric vinyl monomer such as a reaction product of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and monochloracetic acid. An example of a terpolymer is a terpolymer of a nonionic vinyl monomer such as acrylamide or methacrylamide, an anionic vinyl monomer such as sodium acrylate and a cationic vinyl monomer such as triethyl ammonium ethyl methacrylate methosulfate salt. The emulsion is useful in papermaking, treatment of sewage and industrial wastes, drilling muds and secondary and tertiary recovery of petroleum by water flooding.

  14. High energy primary electron spectrum observed by the emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Aizu, H.; Hiraiwa, N.; Taira, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Niu, K.; Koss, T. A.; Lord, J. J.; Golden, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A detector of the emulsion chamber type is used to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons. Two large emulsion chambers, each having an area of 40 by 50 sq cm, are exposed for about 25.5 hr at an average pressure altitude of 3.9 mbar. About 500 high-energy cascades (no less than about 600 GeV) are detected by searching for dark spots on the X-ray films. A power-law energy dependence formula is derived for the spectrum of primary cosmic-ray electrons in the energy region over 100 GeV. The results are in good agreement with the transition curves obtained previously by theoretical and Monte Carlo calculations.

  15. Main properties of sands hydrophobized by alkoxysilane emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, Marek; Baryła, Patrycja; Lefik, Marek

    2014-10-01

    The results of laboratory tests and geotechnical view on sands hydrophobized by alkoxysilane emulsions are presented. For the soils subjected to this process, very low permeability and no capillary elevation was observed. Laboratory tests also indicate that other physical and mechanical properties of hydrophobized sands remain nearly untouched, i.e., the considered hydrophobisation process does not reduce the strength of soils. Properly composed alkoxysilane emulsions can also solidify in pores to produce a stabilizing silicate binder. The filtration barriers in ground and soil stabilization are thus considered as possible applications of the hydrophobized soils. The process of treatment of granular soils with alkoxysilanes is neutral for the environment and the cost of implementation of the method is relatively low.

  16. Anthocyanin antioxidant activity and partition behavior in whey protein emulsion.

    PubMed

    Viljanen, Kaarina; Kylli, Petri; Hubbermann, Eva-Maria; Schwarz, Karin; Heinonen, Marina

    2005-03-23

    The antioxidant activities of anthocyanins and anthocyanin fractions isolated from blackcurrants, raspberries, and lingonberries were investigated in whey protein-stabilized emulsion. The extent of protein oxidation was measured by determining the loss of tryptophan fluorescence and formation of protein carbonyl compounds and that of lipid oxidation by conjugated diene hydroperoxides and hexanal analyses. The antioxidant activity of berry anthocyanins increased with an increase in concentration. Blackcurrant anthocyanins were the most potent antioxidants toward both protein and lipid oxidation at all concentrations due to the beneficial combination of delphinidin and cyanidin glycosides. Most berry anthocyanins (69.4-72.8%) partitioned into the aqueous phase of the emulsion, thus being located favorably for antioxidant action toward protein oxidation. The presence of the lipid decreased the share of anthocyanin in the aqueous phase. Thus, the structure of food affects the antioxidant activity by influencing the partitioning of the antioxidant. PMID:15769130

  17. Shape Transformation of Fluctuating Vesicles Filled with a Ferrofluid Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhang; Yafei, Wang; Gang, Hu

    2005-03-01

    By transferring inverse double emulsion (O/W/O) droplets from an oil phase into a water phase we have assembled asymmetric vesicles containing monodisperse submicron-sized emulsion droplets, which are made of an oil-based ferrofluid. Under a magnetic field the submicron-sized ferrofluid droplets trapped inside flexible vesicles form chain structures, which depend on the size and the shape of vesicles. The formation of chains of trapped ferrofluid droplets can also induce shape changes in fluctuating vesicles. We examine the metastable shapes of lipid vesicles manipulated by an external magnetic field. The responsive vesicles provide a model system to study the topological and rheological properties of biological membranes. The equilibrium shapes and stability of the vesicles under various ionic strengths are also studied.

  18. Programmable Sequential Assembly in a DNA Functionalized Emulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yin; Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Haase, Martin; Feng, Lang; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian; Brujic, Jasna; Chaikin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Assembling a complex structure requires not only the appropriate association of specific units, but putting the pieces together sequentially in the right order. We present the sequential self-assembly of a system of micron-sized emulsion droplets functionalized by pre-programmed DNA molecules. Each droplet is initially inert with the DNA protected by a partially complementary strand with a toehold. A Yurke process [1] utilizes the toehold to free the protected strand which can then act in a similar way to bind to the toehold on the next droplet in the sequence and deprotect a strand which continues the reaction to subsequent droplets. Since the DNA attached to a lipid on an emulsion is mobile this design enables the cyclic strand displacement on the nanoscale to produce sequence-specific interactions on the microscale. We demonstrate such programmed assembly in a system of three types of droplets with different cyclically complementary protected strands.

  19. On the transport of emulsions in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Cortis, Andrea; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2007-06-27

    Emulsions appear in many subsurface applications includingbioremediation, surfactant-enhanced remediation, and enhancedoil-recovery. Modeling emulsion transport in porous media is particularlychallenging because the rheological and physical properties of emulsionsare different from averages of the components. Current modelingapproaches are based on filtration theories, which are not suited toadequately address the pore-scale permeability fluctuations and reductionof absolute permeability that are often encountered during emulsiontransport. In this communication, we introduce a continuous time randomwalk based alternative approach that captures these unique features ofemulsion transport. Calculations based on the proposed approach resultedin excellent match with experimental observations of emulsionbreakthrough from the literature. Specifically, the new approach explainsthe slow late-time tailing behavior that could not be fitted using thestandard approach. The theory presented in this paper also provides animportant stepping stone toward a generalizedself-consistent modeling ofmultiphase flow.

  20. Lateral distortions of electromagnetic cascades in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, L. G.; Levit, L. B.; Jones, W. V.; Huggett, R. W.; Barrowes, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    Electromagnetic cascades in a lead-emulsion chamber have been studied to determine the effect of air gaps on the upstream sides of the emulsions. Such air gaps cause a change in the form of the radial distribution of electron tracks, making cascades appear older and giving incorrect energy estimates. The number of tracks remaining within a radius r was found to vary as exp(-g/G), where g is the gap thickness. The characteristic gap thickness in mm is G = 3.04 + 1.30 ln (Err per GeV per sq mm) where E is the energy of the initiating gamma ray. Use of this relation provides a significant correction to cascade-energy estimates and allows one to calculate the effect of different gap thicknesses on the energy threshold for visual detection of cascades.

  1. The Response of a 2D Emulsion to Local Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xia; Orellana, Carlos; Weeks, Eric

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally perturb a quasi-two-dimensional emulsion packing by inflating an oil droplet into the system in a controlled way. Our samples are oil-in-water emulsion confined between two close-spaced parallel plates, so that the droplets are deformed into pancake shapes. In this system, there is only viscous friction and no static friction between droplets. By imaging the droplets with a video microscopy, we observe rearrangement events induced by the local perturbation. Simultaneously, we measure droplet-droplet contact forces by analyzing the outlines of each droplet in our movies. These allow us to study how the packings with varying degrees of spatial order have different responses to the local perturbation.

  2. Enzymatically activated emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanofibre networks.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ins P; Sasselli, Ivan Ramos; Cannon, Daniel A; Hughes, Meghan; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Tuttle, Tell; Ulijn, Rein V

    2016-03-01

    We report on-demand formation of emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanoscale networks. These are formed through biocatalytic dephosphorylation and self-assembly of Fmoc(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)dipeptide amphiphiles in aqueous/organic mixtures. This is achieved by using alkaline phosphatase which transforms surfactant-like phosphorylated precursors into self-assembling aromatic peptide amphiphiles (Fmoc-tyrosine-leucine, Fmoc-YL) that form nanofibrous networks. In biphasic organic/aqueous systems, these networks form preferentially at the interface thus providing a means of emulsion stabilisation. We demonstrate on-demand emulsification by enzyme addition, even after storage of the biphasic mixture for several weeks. Experimental (Fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) and computational techniques (atomistic molecular dynamics) are used to characterise the interfacial self-assembly process. PMID:26905042

  3. Effect of irradiated pork on physicochemical properties of meat emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Sung, Jung-Min; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Ham, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2016-02-01

    The effect of pork irradiated with doses up to 10 kGy on meat emulsions formulated with carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) was investigated. Raw pork was vacuums packaged at a thickness of 2.0 cm and irradiated by X-ray linear accelerator (15 kW, 5 MeV). The emulsion had higher lightness, myofibrillar protein solubility, total protein solubility, and apparent viscosity with increasing doses, whereas cooking loss, total expressible fluid separation, and hardness decreased. There were no significant differences in fat separation, sarcoplasmic protein solubility, springiness, and cohesiveness. Our results indicated that it is treatment by ionizing radiation which causes the effects the physicochemical properties of the final raw meat product.

  4. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Fine Particles for Ocean and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan

    2006-07-08

    This semi-annual progress report includes our latest research on deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) emulsions stabilized by pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}). We describe a practical system that could be employed for the release of a dense C/W emulsion. The heart of the system is a Kenics-type static mixer. The testing and evaluation of a static mixer in the NETL High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility was described in the previous semi-annual report. The release system could be deployed from a floating platform over the open ocean, or at the end of an off-shore pipe laying on the continental slope. Because the emulsion is much denser than ambient seawater, modeling shows that upon release the plume will sink much deeper from the injection point, increasing the sequestration time for CO{sub 2}. When released in the open ocean, a plume containing the output of a 500 MW{sub el} coal-fired power plant will typically sink hundreds of meters below the injection point. When released from a pipe on the continental shelf, the plume will sink about twice as much because of the limited entrainment of ambient seawater when the plume flows along the sloping seabed. Furthermore, the plume is slightly alkaline, not acidic. The disadvantage is that the creation of the emulsion requires significant amounts of pulverized limestone, on the order of 0.5-0.75 weight ratio of limestone to CO{sub 2}. While pulverized limestone with particle size appropriate for creating C/W emulsions can be purchased for $38 per ton, it is shown in this report that it may be more economic to purchase raw limestone from quarries and pulverize it in situ using grinding mills. In this case the major cost elements are the capital and operating costs of the grinding mills, resulting in a total cost of about $11 per ton of pulverized limestone, including the cost of raw material and shipping. Because we need approximately 0.75 ton of pulverized limestone per ton of liquid CO2 to create a stable C/W emulsion, the total cost of preparing the emulsion on site is about $8.5 per ton of liquid CO{sub 2}, not including the cost of the emulsion mixer. Currently, the cost estimates of capturing and liquefying CO{sub 2} at a coal-fired power plant range from $15 to 75/t CO{sub 2}. Thus, the preparation of C/W emulsions stabilized by pulverized limestone particles would add about 10 to 50% to the capture cost of CO{sub 2}. At this juncture the primary research objectives of this Co-operative Agreement are shifting toward geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. Experiments are underway to create micro-emulsions of CO{sub 2}-in-Water (C/W) and Water-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) stabilized by ultrafine particles ranging from sub-micrometer to a few micrometer in size. Such microemulsions are expected to readily penetrate deep geologic formations, such as porous sedimentary layers, including saline aquifers and semi-depleted oil and gas fields. Injections of (C/W) and (W/C) type micro-emulsions may prove to be less prone to leakage from the formations compared to injections of neat liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2}.

  5. Compositional ripening of particle- and surfactant-stabilised emulsions: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Benjamin L; Kuc, Olivia; Beaussoubre, Pascal; Wong, Kenneth

    2010-03-01

    When beta-ionone-in-water emulsions are mixed with squalane-in-water emulsions, the slightly water-soluble, mobile beta-ionone undergoes mass transfer to the drops of highly water-insoluble, immobile oil squalane. We have investigated this compositional ripening process for emulsions stabilised either by particles or by surfactant molecules. For particle-stabilised emulsions, the swelling of the squalane-containing drops triggers droplet coalescence which causes the final swollen droplet radius to be proportional to the swelling ratio to the power of 1. Surfactant-stabilised emulsions swell without coalescence which causes the final droplet radius to be proportional to the swelling ratio to the power 1/3. Addition of excess, non-adsorbed particles to the particle-stabilised emulsions suppresses the swelling-triggered coalescence and causes a switchover from particle to surfactant behaviour. PMID:20165771

  6. A simple and low-cost 3d-printed emulsion generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. M.; Aguirre-Pablo, A. A.; Li, E. Q.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2015-11-01

    The technique traditionally utilized to fabricate microfluidic emulsion generators, i.e. soft-lithography, is complex and expensive for producing three-dimensional (3D) structures. Here we apply 3D printing technology to fabricate a simple and low-cost 3D printed microfluidic device for emulsion generation without the need for surface treatment on the channel walls. This 3D-printed emulsion generator has been successfully tested over a range of conditions. We also formulate and demonstrate uniform scaling laws for emulsion droplets generated in different regimes for the first time, by incorporating the dynamic contact angle effects during the drop formation. Magnetically responsive microspheres are also produced with our emulsion templates, demonstrating the potential applications of this 3D emulsion generator in material and chemical engineering.

  7. Oil-in-alcohol highly concentrated emulsions as templates for the preparation of macroporous materials.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, Susana; Pérez-Carrillo, Lourdes A; Miras, Jonathan; Solans, Conxita; Esquena, Jordi

    2012-05-22

    New oil-in-alcohol highly concentrated emulsions were formulated and were used as a templates to obtain macroporous poly(furfuryl alcohol) monoliths by a one-step method. The oil-in-alcohol highly concentrated emulsions were prepared by stepwise addition of the oil phase to the surfactant-alcohol solution and were characterized by optical microscopy and by laser diffraction. The typical structure of highly concentrated emulsions, with close-packed polyhedral droplets, has been observed. Poly(furfuryl alcohol) monoliths were obtained by polymerizing in the external phase of these emulsions. These materials are mainly macroporous and retain the size distribution and morphology from the highly concentrated emulsions. The internal structure of the monoliths was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The images showed an interconnected network with pore size similar to the droplet size of the highly concentrated emulsions used as templates. PMID:22489569

  8. Pickering emulsions based on cyclodextrins: A smart solution for antifungal azole derivatives topical delivery.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Loïc; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique

    2016-01-20

    Surfactants are usually used for the preparation of emulsions. Potential drawbacks on the human body or on the environment can be observed for some of them(e.g. skin irritation, hemolysis, protein denaturation, etc.). However, it is possible to use biocompatible emulsifiers such as native cyclodextrins (CDs). The mixture of oil (paraffin oil or isopropyl myristate), water and native CDs results in the formation of Pickering emulsions. The emulsion properties were investigated by ternary phase diagrams elaboration, multiple light scattering, optical and transmission microscopies. The results prove that these Pickering emulsions were very stable against coalescence due to the dense film format the oil/water interface. The rheological behavior has shown that these emulsions remain compatible for topical applications. This kind of emulsions (biocompatibility, stability and surfactant free) has been used to obtain sustainable formulations for antifungal econazole derivatives delivery. Our results prove that these new formulations are at least as active as commercially available formulations. PMID:26616822

  9. Functional properties of ultrasonically generated flaxseed oil-dairy emulsions.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Akalya; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2014-09-01

    This study reports on the functional properties of 7% flaxseed oil/milk emulsion obtained by sonication (OM) using 20 kHz ultrasound (US) at 176 W for 1-8 min in two different delivery formulae, viz., ready-to-drink (RTD) and lactic acid gel. The RTD emulsions showed no change in viscosity after sonication for up to 8 min followed by storage up to a minimum of 9 days at 4±2 °C. Similarly, the oxidative stability of the RTD emulsion was studied by measuring the conjugated diene hydroperoxides (CD). The CD was unaffected after 8 min of ultrasonic processing. The safety aspect of US processing was evaluated by measuring the formation of CD at different power levels. The functional properties of OM gels were evaluated by small and large scale deformation studies. The sonication process improved the gelation characteristics, viz., decreased gelation time, increased elastic nature, decreased syneresis and increased gel strength. The presence of finer sono-emulsified oil globules, stabilized by partially denatured whey proteins, contributed to the improvements in the gel structure in comparison to sonicated and unsonicated pasteurized homogenized skim milk (PHSM) gels. A sono-emulsification process of 5 min followed by gelation for about 11 min can produce gels of highest textural attibutes. PMID:24713146

  10. Preparation and evaluation of minoxidil foamable emu oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Shatalebi, M A; Rafiei, Y

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a minoxidil foamable emu oil emulsion with the purpose of improving minoxidil permeation into the skin, increasing hair growth, reducing skin irritation, and increasing consumer compliance. Minoxidil was dissolved in a solvent system comprising ethanol: glycerin: lactic acid: water (10:20:5:65). The foamable emulsion was prepared by mixing the oil phase with minoxidil solution using different amount of various emulsifiers. Seventeen formulations were prepared and the most stable foamable emulsion was selected and evaluated for various pharmaceutical parameters such as homogeneity, pH, stability to centrifugal stress, freeze-thaw and foamability. The adopted formulation showed good pharmaceutical characteristics. In vitro release rate of the formulations were evaluated using Franz diffusion cell using phosphate buffer pH 7.4 and ethanol as the receiver medium at sink condition. The release rate of formulations was found to obey Higuchi kinetic model. Experimental animal study was performed to evaluate hair growth potential of the formulation. Different cyclic phases of hair follicles, like anagen, and telogen phases, were determined at one month period. Histological study after treatment with adopted formulation exhibited greater number of hair follicles in anagenic phase (96%) which were higher as compared to marketed 5% minoxidil solution (Pakdaru® 70%) and the control group (42%). From animal study it was concluded that the selected formulation exhibited a significant potency in promoting hair growth in comparison with marketed 5% minoxidil solution Pakdaru®. PMID:25657781

  11. Neurotrophic effects of perfluorocarbon emulsion gel: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Positive neurotrophic effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment may be more easily achieved by applying a Perflourocarbon (PFC) emulsion gel to the repair site. PFCs are halogen substituted carbon oils with unique oxygen transport potentials that are capable of increasing oxygen availability in local tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine if the application of a PFC emulsion to a repaired nerve would improve recovery. Materials and methods The left tibial nerve of 21 immature female Sprague-Dawley rats was transected, immediately repaired, and then circumferentially coated with PFC gel (Group A, n = 7), PFC-less gel (Group B, n = 7), or nothing (suture only, Group C, n = 7). At eight weeks post surgery, electrophysiological testing and histological and morphological analysis was performed. Results No statistically significant differences between experimental groups were found for muscle size and weight, axon counts, or nerve conduction velocity. Group A had a significantly smaller G-ratio than Groups B and C (p < .0001). Conclusion Overall results do not indicate a functional benefit associated with application of a PFC emulsion gel to rodent tibial nerve repairs. A positive effect on myelination was seen. PMID:22112536

  12. Asphaltene self-association and water-in-hydrocarbon emulsions.

    PubMed

    Sztukowski, Danuta M; Jafari, Maryam; Alboudwarej, Hussein; Yarranton, Harvey W

    2003-09-01

    The configuration of asphaltenes on the water-oil interface was evaluated from a combination of molar mass, interfacial tension, drop size distribution, and gravimetric measurements of model emulsions consisting of asphaltenes, toluene, heptane, and water. Molar mass measurements were required because asphaltenes self-associate and the level of self-association varies with asphaltene concentration, the resin content, solvent type, and temperature. Plots of interfacial tension versus the log of asphaltene molar concentration were employed to determine the average interfacial area of asphaltene molecules on the interface. The moles of asphaltenes per area of emulsion interface were determined from the molar mass data as well as drop size distributions and gravimetric measurements of the model emulsions. The results indicate that asphaltenes form monolayers on the interface even at concentrations as high as 40 kg/m(3). As well, large aggregates with molar masses exceeding approximately 10,000 g/mol did not appear to adsorb at the interface. The area occupied by the asphaltenes on the interface was constant indicating that self-associated asphaltenes simply extend further into the continuous phase than nonassociated asphaltenes. The thickness of the monolayer ranged from 2 to 9 nm. PMID:12927181

  13. An emulsion polymerization process for soluble and electrically conductive polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Kinlen, P.J.; Ding, Y.; Graham, C.R.; Liu, J.; Remsen, E.E.

    1998-07-01

    A new emulsion process has been developed for the direct synthesis of the emeraldine salt of polyaniline (PANI) that is soluble in organic solvents. The process entails forming an emulsion composed of water, a water soluble organic solvent (e.g., 2-butoxyethanol), a water insoluble organic acid (e.g., dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid) and aniline. Aniline is protonated by the organic acid to form a salt which partitions into the organic phase. As oxidant (ammonium peroxydisulfate) is added, PANI salt forms in the organic phase and remains soluble. As the reaction proceeds, the reaction mixture changes from an emulsion to a two phase system, the soluble PANI remaining in the organic phase. With dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (DNNSA) as the organic acid, the resulting product is truly soluble in organic solvents such as xylene and toluene (not a dispersion), of high molecular weight (M{sub w} > 22,000), film forming and miscible with many polymers such as polyurethanes, epoxies and phenoxy resins. As cast, the polyaniline film is only moderately conductive, (10{sup {minus}5} S/cm), however treatment of the film with surfactants such as benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BTEAC) or low molecular weight alcohols and ketones such as methanol and acetone increases the conductivity 2--3 orders of magnitude.

  14. Physics of puffing and microexplosion of emulsion fuel droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinjo, J.; Xia, J.; Ganippa, L. C.; Megaritis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The physics of water-in-oil emulsion droplet microexplosion/puffing has been investigated using high-fidelity interface-capturing simulation. Varying the dispersed-phase (water) sub-droplet size/location and the initiation location of explosive boiling (bubble formation), the droplet breakup processes have been well revealed. The bubble growth leads to local and partial breakup of the parent oil droplet, i.e., puffing. The water sub-droplet size and location determine the after-puffing dynamics. The boiling surface of the water sub-droplet is unstable and evolves further. Finally, the sub-droplet is wrapped by boiled water vapor and detaches itself from the parent oil droplet. When the water sub-droplet is small, the detachment is quick, and the oil droplet breakup is limited. When it is large and initially located toward the parent droplet center, the droplet breakup is more extensive. For microexplosion triggered by the simultaneous growth of multiple separate bubbles, each explosion is local and independent initially, but their mutual interactions occur at a later stage. The degree of breakup can be larger due to interactions among multiple explosions. These findings suggest that controlling microexplosion/puffing is possible in a fuel spray, if the emulsion-fuel blend and the ambient flow conditions such as heating are properly designed. The current study also gives us an insight into modeling the puffing and microexplosion of emulsion droplets and sprays.

  15. Microemulsion versus emulsion as effective carrier of hydroxytyrosol.

    PubMed

    Chatzidaki, Maria D; Arik, Nehir; Monteil, Julien; Papadimitriou, Vassiliki; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Xenakis, Aristotelis

    2016-01-01

    Two edible Water-in-Oil (W/O) dispersions, an emulsion that remains kinetically stable and a microemulsion which is spontaneously formed, transparent and thermodynamically stable, were developed for potential use as functional foods, due to their ability to be considered as matrices to encapsulate biologically active hydrophilic molecules. Both systems contained Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT) as the continuous phase and were used as carriers of Hydroxytyrosol (HT), a hydrophilic antioxidant of olive oil. A low energy input fabrication process of the emulsion was implemented. The obtained emulsion contained 1.3% (w/w) of surfactants and 5% (w/w) aqueous phase. The spontaneously formed microemulsion contained 4.9% (w/w) of surfactants and 2% (w/w) aqueous phase. A comparative study in terms of structural characterization of the systems in the absence and presence of HT was carried out. Particle size distribution obtained by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) technique and interfacial properties of the surfactants' layer, examined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy indicated the involvement of HT in the surfactant membrane. Finally, the proposed systems were studied for the scavenging activity of the encapsulated antioxidant toward galvinoxyl stable free radical showing a high scavenging activity of HT in both systems. PMID:25999235

  16. Emulsion-templated fully reversible protein-in-oil gels.

    PubMed

    Romoscanu, Alexandre I; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2006-08-29

    We have developed a new method allowing us to transform low-viscous apolar fluids into elastic solids with a shear elastic modulus of the order of 10(3)-10(5) Pa. The elasticity of the elastic solid is provided by a percolating 3D network of proteins, which are originally adsorbed at the interface of an oil-in-water emulsion template. By cross-linking the protein films at the interface and upon removal of water, the template is driven into a structure resembling a dry foam where the protein interfaces constitute the walls of the foam and the air is replaced by oil confined within polyhedral, closely packed droplets. Depending on the density of the protein network, the final material consists of chemically unmodified oil in a proportion of 95 to 99.9%. The physical properties of the elastic solid obtained can be tuned by changing either the average diameter size of the emulsion template or the cross-linking process of the protein film. However, the original low-viscosity emulsion can be restored by simply rehydrating the solidified fluid. Therefore, the present procedure offers an appealing strategy to build up solid properties for hydrophobic liquids while preserving the low viscosity and ease of manufacturing. PMID:16922568

  17. Feasibility of Surfactant-Free Supported Emulsion Liquid Membrane Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shih-Yao B.; Li, Jin; Wiencek, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Supported emulsion liquid membrane (SELM) is an effective means to conduct liquid-liquid extraction. SELM extraction is particularly attractive for separation tasks in the microgravity environment where density difference between the solvent and the internal phase of the emulsion is inconsequential and a stable dispersion can be maintained without surfactant. In this research, dispersed two-phase flow in SELM extraction is modeled using the Lagrangian method. The results show that SELM extraction process in the microgravity environment can be simulated on earth by matching the density of the solvent and the stripping phase. Feasibility of surfactant-free SELM (SFSELM) extraction is assessed by studying the coalescence behavior of the internal phase in the absence of the surfactant. Although the contacting area between the solvent and the internal phase in SFSELM extraction is significantly less than the area provided by regular emulsion due to drop coalescence, it is comparable to the area provided by a typical hollow-fiber membrane. Thus, the stripping process is highly unlikely to become the rate-limiting step in SFSELM extraction. SFSELM remains an effective way to achieve simultaneous extraction and stripping and is able to eliminate the equilibrium limitation in the typical solvent extraction processes. The SFSELM design is similar to the supported liquid membrane design in some aspects.

  18. Olive Oil Based Emulsions in Frozen Puff Pastry Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, D.; Migliori, M.; Lupi, F. R.; de Cindio, B.

    2008-07-01

    Puff pastry is an interesting food product having different industrial applications. It is obtained by laminating layers of dough and fats, mainly shortenings or margarine, having specific properties which provides required spreading characteristic and able to retain moisture into dough. To obtain these characteristics, pastry shortenings are usually saturated fats, however the current trend in food industry is mainly oriented towards unsatured fats such as olive oil, which are thought to be safer for human health. In the present work, a new product, based on olive oil, was studied as shortening replacer in puff pastry production. To ensure the desired consistency, for the rheological matching between fat and dough, a water-in-oil emulsion was produced based on olive oil, emulsifier and a hydrophilic thickener agent able to increase material structure. Obtained materials were characterized by rheological dynamic tests in linear viscoelastic conditions, aiming to setup process and material consistency, and rheological data were analyzed by using the weak gel model. Results obtained for tested emulsions were compared to theological properties of a commercial margarine, adopted as reference value for texture and stability. Obtained emulsions are characterized by interesting rheological properties strongly dependent on emulsifier characteristics and water phase composition. However a change in process temperature during fat extrusion and dough lamination seems to be necessary to match properly typical dough rheological properties.

  19. Cation selectivity in a toluene emulsion membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, R.M.; Dearden, D.V.; Witt, E.R.; McBride, D.W. Jr.; Christensen, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Metal separations from various mixtures of alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, Cu/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Ag/sup +/, Tl/sup +/, and Pb/sup 2 +/ nitrates were studied using an emulsion membrane system. The membrane consisted of a water-in-oil emulsion composed of 0.050 M Li/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/ in H/sub 2/O and 0.020 M dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC18C6) in toluene with sorbitan monooleate serving as surfactant. The emulsion was placed into an aqueous source phase solution of the metal nitrates of interest. Of the cations studied, Pb/sup 2 +/ was transported most rapidly and selectively. The selectivity of the system for particular cations is governed by the relative M/sup n+/-DC18C6 and M/sup n+/-P/sub 2/O/sub 7//sup 4 -/ complex stabilities. Formation of a sufficiently stable M/sup n+/-DC18C6 complex is necessary to partition cations into the toluene membrane, and formation of a more stable M/sup n+/-P/sub 2/O/sub 7//sup 4 -/ complex is necessary to strip cations from the membrane into the receiving phase. 17 references, 2 figures, 6 tables.

  20. Metal-Silicate Differentiation from a Metal Pond Emulsion during Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, J.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    The terrestrial planets demonstrate a heavy bombardment of impacts in their early formation history. Impacts are violent, energetic collisions that may melt the surface and/or cause segregation of impactor material including silicates and liquid metal iron. Although theoretical studies have been done with conceptual models for metal diapir descent to form terrestrial planetary cores, physical or computer modeling studies are scarce due to the strong variations in physical properties between liquid metals and solid silicates. We use laboratory fluid experiments to study core formation processes using liquid metal gallium and high viscosity glucose syrup which provide the buoyancy ratios expected for planetary interiors and low Reynolds number flow dynamics. Preliminary results indicate that the physical process of sinking metal diapirs form trailing conduits that may drag low density surface magmatic material to the base of the mantle. The low density material collects, grows at the base of the box, and rises back to the surface. We compare two cases of a pond made of 1) liquid metal emulsion and 2) a smooth coalesced metal pond. We find that emulsion experiments entrain greater amounts of low density fluid to the base of the box. Once the metal diapir reaches the base, conduit material exhibits flow reversal to return buoyantly to the surface. In the case of coalesced liquid metal diapirs, low density conduit material returns to the surface through the pre-established conduit. In the emulsion diapir case, we observe the formation of a new thermo-chemical buoyant plume that grows, exits the conduit, and travels along a new pathway to the surface. Metal plume descent and chemical plume rise velocities are consistent with Stokes velocity. Estimates of metal-silicate plume sinking time and thermo-chemical plume rise time for terrestrial planetary interiors are provided. We suggest the observation of a thermo-chemical plume as a source for orogeny at the surface of terrestrial planets that may have produced the first mantle plumes and early volcanoes during core forming events.