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Sample records for enables cleistothecial formation

  1. Laccase localized in hulle cells and cleistothecial primordia of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, T E; Kurtz, M B; Champe, S P

    1983-01-01

    Several species of the genus Aspergillus form sexual spores within minute (approximately 0.2 mm) spherical shells (cleisthothecia) which are woven from specialized hyphae. Aspergillus nidulans cleistothecia are uniquely characterized by their dark red coloration and an envelope of thick-walled globose cells (hulle cells). By use of a new chromogenic substrate, we have shown that the constitutent hyphae of young cleistothecia and the hulle cells which surround the cleistothecia of A. nidulans exhibit a strong phenoloxidase activity which has the substrate specificity of a laccase. This enzyme (laccase II) is distinct from the previously described phenoloxidase (laccase I) that participates in the synthesis of the conidial pigment of A. nidulans: the two enzymes differ electrophoretically, do not cross-react immunologically, appear at different times during colonial development, and are under different genetic control. Examination of seven additional species of Aspergillus showed that the hulle cells of three acleistothecial species were also laccase positive, whereas the pale or unpigmented cleistothecia of four species (which lack hulle cells) were laccase negative. The relevance of these findings to the role of hulle cells in cleistothecial development is discussed. The presence of histologically detectable laccase in cleistothecial primordia provides a valuable tool, previously unavailable, for quantitating the early stages of sexual development in A. nidulans. Images PMID:6341366

  2. Microsatellites enabling multicaptor formation flying ; the Essaim demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alary, D.; Carrin, G.

    2004-11-01

    In the last decade, the microsatellites capabilities have been strongly enhanced. On the same time, costs have been reduced to enable the conception of formation flying systems, sent to orbit with a single lauch. This kind of system is made of several identical satellites, each making an individual measurement ; all the individual measurements can be processed on ground to provide an enriched synthetic measurement, which would have required a big satellite for a less or equal level of performance. The techniques are well known since years, but micro or minisatellites can now turn them into real spaceborne applications. A few years ago, under a French MoD contract, EADS Astrium and THALES Airborne Systems started the development of the Essaim demonstrator. Essaim is designed to demonstrate the electro-magnetic signal interception feasibility from space, and the possibilities of a formation flying (swarm) system to prepare for coming fully operational systems. It is based onseveral microsatellites of 120kg each, flying in a "swarm" configuration, roughly controlled. All the microsatellites are launched simultaneously as piggyback payloads on ARIANE 5, by the end of this year. The microsatellites are built around the Myriade bus developed by CNES in cooperation with EADS Astrium. A three years experimentation phase is scheduled under the contract. This experiment opens the route to other experiments based on the same principle. Several months prior the launch, we already know that it shall be a very promising way.

  3. PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION ENABLED BY WEAK, MISALIGNED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hull, Charles L. H.

    2013-04-10

    The gas from which stars form is magnetized, and strong magnetic fields can efficiently transport angular momentum. Most theoretical models of this phenomenon find that it should prevent formation of large (>100 AU), rotationally supported disks around most protostars, even when non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects that allow the field and gas to decouple are taken into account. Using recent observations of magnetic field strengths and orientations in protostellar cores, we show that this conclusion is incorrect. The distribution of magnetic field strengths is very broad, and alignments between fields and angular momentum vectors within protostellar cores are essentially random. By combining the field strength and misalignment data with MHD simulations showing that disk formation is expected for both weak and misaligned fields, we show that these observations imply that we should expect disk fractions of {approx}10%-50% even when protostars are still deeply embedded in their parent cores, and even if the gas is governed by ideal MHD.

  4. Protostellar disc formation enabled by removal of small dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo; Caselli, Paola; Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that a realistic level of magnetization of dense molecular cloud cores can suppress the formation of a rotationally supported disc (RSD) through catastrophic magnetic braking in the axisymmetric ideal MHD limit. In this study, we present conditions for the formation of RSDs through non-ideal MHD effects computed self-consistently from an equilibrium chemical network. We find that removing from the standard MRN distribution the large population of very small grains (VSGs) of ˜ 10 Å to few 100 Å that dominate the coupling of the bulk neutral matter to the magnetic field increases the ambipolar diffusivity by ˜ 1-2 orders of magnitude at densities below 1010/cm-3. The enhanced ambipolar diffusion (AD) in the envelope reduces the amount of magnetic flux dragged by the collapse into the circumstellar disc-forming region. Therefore, magnetic braking is weakened and more angular momentum can be retained. With continuous high angular momentum inflow, RSDs of tens of au are able to form, survive, and even grow in size, depending on other parameters including cosmic ray ionization rate, magnetic field strength, and rotation speed. Some discs become self-gravitating and evolve into rings in our 2D (axisymmetric) simulations, which have the potential to fragment into (close) multiple systems in 3D. We conclude that disc formation in magnetized cores is highly sensitive to chemistry, especially to grain sizes. A moderate grain coagulation/growth to remove the large population of VSGs, either in the prestellar phase or during free-fall collapse, can greatly promote AD and help formation of tens of au RSDs.

  5. Pyruvate Formate-Lyase Enables Efficient Growth of Escherichia coli on Acetate and Formate.

    PubMed

    Zelcbuch, Lior; Lindner, Steffen N; Zegman, Yonatan; Vainberg Slutskin, Ilya; Antonovsky, Niv; Gleizer, Shmuel; Milo, Ron; Bar-Even, Arren

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) is a ubiquitous enzyme that supports increased ATP yield during sugar fermentation. While the PFL reaction is known to be reversible in vitro, the ability of PFL to support microbial growth by condensing acetyl-CoA and formate in vivo has never been directly tested. Here, we employ Escherichia coli mutant strains that cannot assimilate acetate via the glyoxylate shunt and use carbon labeling experiments to unequivocally demonstrate PFL-dependent co-assimilation of acetate and formate. Moreover, PFL-dependent growth is faster than growth on acetate using the glyoxylate shunt. Hence, growth via the reverse activity of PFL could have substantial ecological and biotechnological significance. PMID:27093333

  6. Enabling Spacecraft Formation Flying in Any Earth Orbit Through Spaceborne GPS and Enhanced Autonomy Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F. H.; Bristow, J. O.; Carpenter, J. R.; Garrison, J. L.; Hartman, K. R.; Lee, T.; Long, A. C.; Kelbel, D.; Lu, V.; How, J. P.; Busse, F.

    2000-01-01

    Formation flying is quickly revolutionizing the way the space community conducts autonomous science missions around the Earth and in space. This technological revolution will provide new, innovative ways for this community to gather scientific information, share this information between space vehicles and the ground, and expedite the human exploration of space. Once fully matured, this technology will result in swarms of space vehicles flying as a virtual platform and gathering significantly more and better science data than is possible today. Formation flying will be enabled through the development and deployment of spaceborne differential Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and through innovative spacecraft autonomy techniques, This paper provides an overview of the current status of NASA/DoD/Industry/University partnership to bring formation flying technology to the forefront as quickly as possible, the hurdles that need to be overcome to achieve the formation flying vision, and the team's approach to transfer this technology to space. It will also describe some of the formation flying testbeds, such as Orion, that are being developed to demonstrate and validate these innovative GPS sensing and formation control technologies.

  7. Histotripsy Lesion Formation using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    When applying histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the formation of a dense bubble cloud only relies on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the “intrinsic threshold” of the medium (absolute value of 26 – 30 MPa in most soft tissue). A previous study conducted by our research group showed that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds (“dual-beam histotripsy”). This paper investigates the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach. More specifically, an ATL L7–4 imaging transducer, pulsed by a Verasonics V-1 Data Acquisition System, was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345 kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red-blood-cell (RBC) tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the RBC phantoms. The results showed that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm while that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two advantages, 1) lesion

  8. Histotripsy Lesion Formation Using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    When histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles are applied, the formation of a dense bubble cloud relies only on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the "intrinsic threshold" of the medium (absolute value of 26-30 MPa in most soft tissues). It has been found that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds ("dual-beam histotripsy"). Here, the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach is investigated. More specifically, an ATL L7-4 imaging transducer (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA, USA), pulsed by a V-1 Data Acquisition System (Verasonics, Redmond, WA, USA), was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345-kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high-voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the red blood cell phantoms. The results indicated that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm, whereas that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two

  9. Covalent small-molecule-RNA complex formation enables cellular profiling of small-molecule-RNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Lirui

    2013-01-01

    Won’t let you go! A strategy is described to design small molecules that react with their cellular RNA targets. This approach not only improves the activity of compounds targeting RNA in cell culture by ≈2500-fold but also enables cell-wide profiling of its RNA targets. PMID:23913698

  10. Covalent small-molecule-RNA complex formation enables cellular profiling of small-molecule-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lirui; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-09-16

    Won't let you go! A strategy is described to design small molecules that react with their cellular RNA targets. This approach not only improves the activity of compounds targeting RNA in cell culture by a factor of about 2500 but also enables cell-wide profiling of its RNA targets. PMID:23913698

  11. Enabling Spacecraft Formation Flying through Position Determination, Control and Enhanced Automation Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, John; Bauer, Frank; Hartman, Kate; How, Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    Formation Flying is revolutionizing the way the space community conducts science missions around the Earth and in deep space. This technological revolution will provide new, innovative ways for the community to gather scientific information, share that information between space vehicles and the ground, and expedite the human exploration of space. Once fully matured, formation flying will result in numerous sciencecraft acting as virtual platforms and sensor webs, gathering significantly more and better science data than call be collected today. To achieve this goal, key technologies must be developed including those that address the following basic questions posed by the spacecraft: Where am I? Where is the rest of the fleet? Where do I need to be? What do I have to do (and what am I able to do) to get there? The answers to these questions and the means to implement those answers will depend oil the specific mission needs and formation configuration. However, certain critical technologies are common to most formations. These technologies include high-precision position and relative-position knowledge including Global Positioning System (GPS) mid celestial navigation; high degrees of spacecraft autonomy inter-spacecraft communication capabilities; targeting and control including distributed control algorithms, and high precision control thrusters and actuators. This paper provides an overview of a selection of the current activities NASA/DoD/Industry/Academia are working to develop Formation Flying technologies as quickly as possible, the hurdles that need to be overcome to achieve our formation flying vision, and the team's approach to transfer this technology to space. It will also describe several of the formation flying testbeds, such as Orion and University Nanosatellites, that are being developed to demonstrate and validate many of these innovative sensing and formation control technologies.

  12. Printing holes by a dewetting solution enables formation of a transparent conductive film.

    PubMed

    Layani, Michael; Berman, Ruth; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-11-12

    We present hereby a general approach for rapid fabrication of large scale, patterned transparent conductive coatings composed of nanoparticles. The approach is based on direct formation of "2D holes" with controllable diameter onto a thin film composed of metal nanoparticles. The holes are formed by inkjet printing a dewetting aqueous liquid, which pushes away the metal nanoparticles, thus forming a transparent array of interconnected conductive rings. PMID:25331032

  13. Exopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Enables Mature Biofilm Formation on Abiotic Surfaces by Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    PubMed Central

    Balsanelli, Eduardo; de Baura, Válter Antonio; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Monteiro, Rose Adele

    2014-01-01

    H. seropedicae associates endophytically and epiphytically with important poaceous crops and is capable of promoting their growth. The molecular mechanisms involved in plant colonization by this microrganism are not fully understood. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are usually necessary for bacterial attachment to solid surfaces, to other bacteria, and to form biofilms. The role of H. seropedicae SmR1 exopolysaccharide in biofilm formation on both inert and plant substrates was assessed by characterization of a mutant in the espB gene which codes for a glucosyltransferase. The mutant strain was severely affected in EPS production and biofilm formation on glass wool. In contrast, the plant colonization capacity of the mutant strain was not altered when compared to the parental strain. The requirement of EPS for biofilm formation on inert surface was reinforced by the induction of eps genes in biofilms grown on glass and polypropylene. On the other hand, a strong repression of eps genes was observed in H. seropedicae cells adhered to maize roots. Our data suggest that H. seropedicae EPS is a structural component of mature biofilms, but this development stage of biofilm is not achieved during plant colonization. PMID:25310013

  14. Regulated Formation of lncRNA-DNA Hybrids Enables Faster Transcriptional Induction and Environmental Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Sara C; Wang, Siwen; Ma, Wai Kit; Al Husini, Nadra; Dhoondia, Zuzer; Ansari, Athar; Pascuzzi, Pete E; Tran, Elizabeth J

    2016-02-01

    Long non-coding (lnc)RNAs, once thought to merely represent noise from imprecise transcription initiation, have now emerged as major regulatory entities in all eukaryotes. In contrast to the rapidly expanding identification of individual lncRNAs, mechanistic characterization has lagged behind. Here we provide evidence that the GAL lncRNAs in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae promote transcriptional induction in trans by formation of lncRNA-DNA hybrids or R-loops. The evolutionarily conserved RNA helicase Dbp2 regulates formation of these R-loops as genomic deletion or nuclear depletion results in accumulation of these structures across the GAL cluster gene promoters and coding regions. Enhanced transcriptional induction is manifested by lncRNA-dependent displacement of the Cyc8 co-repressor and subsequent gene looping, suggesting that these lncRNAs promote induction by altering chromatin architecture. Moreover, the GAL lncRNAs confer a competitive fitness advantage to yeast cells because expression of these non-coding molecules correlates with faster adaptation in response to an environmental switch. PMID:26833086

  15. SPHERES tethered formation flight testbed: advancements in enabling NASA's SPECS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soon-Jo; Adams, Danielle; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Kong, Edmund; Miller, David W.; Leisawitz, David; Lorenzini, Enrico; Sell, Steve

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports on efforts to control a tethered formation flight spacecraft array for NASA's SPECS mission using the SPHERES test-bed developed by the MIT Space Systems Laboratory. Specifically, advances in methodology and experimental results realized since the 2005 SPIE paper are emphasized. These include a new test-bed setup with a reaction wheel assembly, a novel relative attitude measurement system using force torque sensors, and modeling of non-ideal tethers to account for tether vibration modes. The nonlinear equations of motion of multi-vehicle tethered spacecraft with elastic flexible tethers are derived from Lagrange's equations. The controllability analysis indicates that both array resizing and spin-up are fully controllable by the reaction wheels and the tether motor, thereby saving thruster fuel consumption. Based upon this analysis, linear and nonlinear controllers have been successfully implemented on the tethered SPHERES testbed, and tested at the NASA MSFC's flat floor facility using two and three SPHERES configurations.

  16. Stacked modulation formats enabling highest-sensitivity optical free-space links.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Alexandra; Schulz, Marc-Lorenzo; Schindler, Philipp; Wolf, Stefan; Koos, Christian; Freude, Wolfgang; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-08-24

    A new modulation scheme with a sensitivity of 2.3 photons per bit at a bit-error ratio (BER) of 10(-3) is discussed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. We achieve a limiting sensitivity of 2.3 photons per bit (3.7 dB photons per bit) by stacking the modulation formats 64PPM, 4FSK and polarization-switched (PS) QPSK. This modulation stack encodes 11 bit per symbol (PPM: 6 bit, FSK: 2 bit, PS-PQSK: 3 bit). We also replaced 4FSK by 2ODFM (2-channel multiplex) for comparison. With 64PPM-2OFDM-PS-QPSK a total of 12 bit are encoded (PPM: 6 bit, 2 OFDM channels with PS-QPSK: 2 × 3 bit). Both modulation stacks show a similar limiting sensitivity and are probably the highest sensitivities so far reported for a BER of 10(-3), Our theoretical considerations are supported by simulations and experiments. PMID:26368170

  17. Iterative reactions of transient boronic acids enable sequential C-C bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battilocchio, Claudio; Feist, Florian; Hafner, Andreas; Simon, Meike; Tran, Duc N.; Allwood, Daniel M.; Blakemore, David C.; Ley, Steven V.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to form multiple carbon-carbon bonds in a controlled sequence and thus rapidly build molecular complexity in an iterative fashion is an important goal in modern chemical synthesis. In recent times, transition-metal-catalysed coupling reactions have dominated in the development of C-C bond forming processes. A desire to reduce the reliance on precious metals and a need to obtain products with very low levels of metal impurities has brought a renewed focus on metal-free coupling processes. Here, we report the in situ preparation of reactive allylic and benzylic boronic acids, obtained by reacting flow-generated diazo compounds with boronic acids, and their application in controlled iterative C-C bond forming reactions is described. Thus far we have shown the formation of up to three C-C bonds in a sequence including the final trapping of a reactive boronic acid species with an aldehyde to generate a range of new chemical structures.

  18. Synaptic Scaling Enables Dynamically Distinct Short- and Long-Term Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tetzlaff, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Tsodyks, Misha; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Memory storage in the brain relies on mechanisms acting on time scales from minutes, for long-term synaptic potentiation, to days, for memory consolidation. During such processes, neural circuits distinguish synapses relevant for forming a long-term storage, which are consolidated, from synapses of short-term storage, which fade. How time scale integration and synaptic differentiation is simultaneously achieved remains unclear. Here we show that synaptic scaling – a slow process usually associated with the maintenance of activity homeostasis – combined with synaptic plasticity may simultaneously achieve both, thereby providing a natural separation of short- from long-term storage. The interaction between plasticity and scaling provides also an explanation for an established paradox where memory consolidation critically depends on the exact order of learning and recall. These results indicate that scaling may be fundamental for stabilizing memories, providing a dynamic link between early and late memory formation processes. PMID:24204240

  19. New Approach to Develop Optimized Sunscreens that Enable Cutaneous Vitamin D Formation with Minimal Erythema Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kockott, Dieter; Herzog, Bernd; Reichrath, Jörg; Keane, Kevin; Holick, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Sunscreens protect the skin against erythemal radiation (Eer). But at the same time they reduce the effective radiation dose (EVD) responsible for the formation of previtamin D in the skin. The paper describes a calculation method for optimizing the ratio EVD/Eer behind sunscreens e.g. with SPF 5, 15 and 30 respectively. Taking into account that a majority of people in industrialized countries suffer from a shortage in vitamin D even in summer time, the ratio Evd/Eer is a new and important criterion for the quality of sunscreens. Furthermore the exposure time tvd needed per day for forming the equivalent of the recommended amount of 2000 IU of vitamin D per day for skin type 2 is estimated when sunscreens with different filter compositions are used. In vitro experiments show a significant increase of the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) to previtamin D when exposed to artificial solar radiation behind an experimental sunscreen optimized for previtamin D production compared to a commercial sunscreen having the same SPF. PMID:26824688

  20. New Approach to Develop Optimized Sunscreens that Enable Cutaneous Vitamin D Formation with Minimal Erythema Risk.

    PubMed

    Kockott, Dieter; Herzog, Bernd; Reichrath, Jörg; Keane, Kevin; Holick, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Sunscreens protect the skin against erythemal radiation (Eer). But at the same time they reduce the effective radiation dose (EVD) responsible for the formation of previtamin D in the skin. The paper describes a calculation method for optimizing the ratio EVD/Eer behind sunscreens e.g. with SPF 5, 15 and 30 respectively. Taking into account that a majority of people in industrialized countries suffer from a shortage in vitamin D even in summer time, the ratio Evd/Eer is a new and important criterion for the quality of sunscreens. Furthermore the exposure time tvd needed per day for forming the equivalent of the recommended amount of 2000 IU of vitamin D per day for skin type 2 is estimated when sunscreens with different filter compositions are used. In vitro experiments show a significant increase of the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) to previtamin D when exposed to artificial solar radiation behind an experimental sunscreen optimized for previtamin D production compared to a commercial sunscreen having the same SPF. PMID:26824688

  1. A Novel 96well-formatted Micro-gap Plate Enabling Drug Response Profiling on Primary Tumour Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei-Yuan; Hsiung, Lo-Chang; Wang, Chen-Ho; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Ching-Hung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Wo, Andrew M.

    2015-04-01

    Drug-based treatments are the most widely used interventions for cancer management. Personalized drug response profiling remains inherently challenging with low cell count harvested from tumour sample. We present a 96well-formatted microfluidic plate with built-in micro-gap that preserves up to 99.2% of cells during multiple assay/wash operation and only 9,000 cells needed for a single reagent test (i.e. 1,000 cells per test spot x 3 selected concentration x triplication), enabling drug screening and compatibility with conventional automated workstations. Results with MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines showed that no statistical significance was found in dose-response between the device and conventional 96-well plate control. Primary tumour samples from breast cancer patients tested in the device also showed good IC50 prediction. With drug screening of primary cancer cells must consider a wide range of scenarios, e.g. suspended/attached cell types and rare/abundant cell availability, the device enables high throughput screening even for suspended cells with low cell count since the signature microfluidic cell-trapping feature ensures cell preservation in a multiple solution exchange protocol.

  2. Dual-Beam Histotripsy: A Low-Frequency Pump Enabling a High-Frequency Probe for Precise Lesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Duryea, Alexander P.; Kim, Yohan; Hall, Timothy L.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. When using pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the generation of these energetic bubble clouds only depends on where the peak negative pressure (P–) exceeds an intrinsic threshold of a medium (26 – 30 MPa in soft tissue with high water content). This paper investigates a strategic method for precise lesion generation in which a low-frequency pump pulse is applied to enable a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse to exceed the intrinsic threshold. This pump-probe method of controlling a supra-threshold volume can be called “dual-beam histotripsy.” A 20-element dual-frequency (500 kHz and 3 MHz elements confocally aligned) array transducer was used to generate dual-beam histotripsy pulses in RBC phantoms and porcine hepatic tissue specimens. The results showed that, when sub-intrinsic-threshold pump (500 kHz) and probe (3 MHz) pulses were applied together, dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were only generated when their peak negative pressures combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The smallest reproducible lesion varied with the relative amplitude between the pump and probe pulses, and, with a higher proportion of the probe pulse, smaller lesions could be generated. When the propagation direction of the probe pulse relative to the pump pulse was altered, the shape of the produced lesion changed based on the region that exceeded intrinsic threshold. Since the low-frequency pump pulse is more immune to attenuation and aberrations, and the high-frequency probe pulse can provide precision in lesion formation, this dual-beam histotripsy approach would be very useful in situations where precise lesion formation is required through a highly attenuative and aberrative medium, such as transcranial therapy. This is particularly true if a small low-attenuation acoustic window is available for the high

  3. Dynamic formation of a microchannel array enabling kinesin-driven microtubule transport between separate compartments on a chip.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kazuya; Nagai, Moeto; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    2015-05-01

    Microtubules driven by kinesin motors have been utilised as "molecular shuttles" in microfluidic environments with potential applications in autonomous nanoscale manipulations such as capturing, separating, and/or concentrating biomolecules. However, the conventional flow cell-based assay has difficulty in separating bound target molecules from free ones even with buffer flushing because molecular manipulations by molecular shuttles take place on a glass surface and molecular binding occurs stochastically; this makes it difficult to determine whether molecules are carried by molecular shuttles or by diffusion. To address this issue, we developed a microtubule-based transport system between two compartments connected by a single-micrometre-scale channel array that forms dynamically via pneumatic actuation of a polydimethylsiloxane membrane. The device comprises three layers-a control channel layer (top), a microfluidic channel layer (middle), and a channel array layer (bottom)-that enable selective injection of assay solutions into a target compartment and dynamic formation of the microchannel array. The pneumatic channel also serves as a nitrogen supply path to the assay area, which reduces photobleaching of fluorescently labelled microtubules and deactivation of kinesin by oxygen radicals. The channel array suppresses cross-contamination of molecules caused by diffusion or pressure-driven flow between compartments, facilitating unidirectional transport of molecular shuttles from one compartment to another. The method demonstrates, for the first time, efficient and unidirectional microtubule transport by eliminating diffusion of target molecules on a chip and thus may constitute one of the key aspects of motor-driven nanosystems. PMID:25805147

  4. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Fabiana A; Dirk, Brennan S; Tam, Joshua H K; Cavanagh, P Craig; Goiko, Maria; Ferguson, Stephen S G; Pasternak, Stephen H; Dikeakos, Jimmy D; de Bruyn, John R; Heit, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR) software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell. PMID:26657340

  5. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Fabiana A.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Tam, Joshua H. K.; Cavanagh, P. Craig; Goiko, Maria; Ferguson, Stephen S. G.; Pasternak, Stephen H.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; de Bruyn, John R.; Heit, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR) software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell. PMID:26657340

  6. Assessment of factors enabling halite formation in a marsh in a humid temperate climate (Ajó Marsh, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Carol, Eleonora S; Alvarez, María Del Pilar; Borzi, Guido E

    2016-05-15

    The formation of evaporites associated with the final stages of the precipitation sequence, such as the case of halite, is frequent in marshes in arid areas, but it is not to be expected in those humid climates. This work, by means of the study of the hydrological, climatic and land use conditions, identifies the factors that allow the formation of saline precipitations in a marsh located in a humid climate area. The results obtained show that the exclusion of the marsh as a result of the embankment is the main reason for the presence of halite. It is to be expected that in the future the growth of the embanked marsh areas, together with the climatic and tidal condition tendencies recorded, will favour a higher rate of formation of evaporite salts. The identification of these factors makes it possible to set basic sustainable management guidelines to avoid soil salinisation. PMID:27021624

  7. Directional reversals enable Myxococcus xanthus cells to produce collective one-dimensional streams during fruiting-body formation.

    PubMed

    Thutupalli, Shashi; Sun, Mingzhai; Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2015-08-01

    The formation of a collectively moving group benefits individuals within a population in a variety of ways. The surface-dwelling bacterium Myxococcus xanthus forms dynamic collective groups both to feed on prey and to aggregate during times of starvation. The latter behaviour, termed fruiting-body formation, involves a complex, coordinated series of density changes that ultimately lead to three-dimensional aggregates comprising hundreds of thousands of cells and spores. How a loose, two-dimensional sheet of motile cells produces a fixed aggregate has remained a mystery as current models of aggregation are either inconsistent with experimental data or ultimately predict unstable structures that do not remain fixed in space. Here, we use high-resolution microscopy and computer vision software to spatio-temporally track the motion of thousands of individuals during the initial stages of fruiting-body formation. We find that cells undergo a phase transition from exploratory flocking, in which unstable cell groups move rapidly and coherently over long distances, to a reversal-mediated localization into one-dimensional growing streams that are inherently stable in space. These observations identify a new phase of active collective behaviour and answer a long-standing open question in Myxococcus development by describing how motile cell groups can remain statistically fixed in a spatial location. PMID:26246416

  8. Directional reversals enable Myxococcus xanthus cells to produce collective one-dimensional streams during fruiting-body formation

    PubMed Central

    Thutupalli, Shashi; Sun, Mingzhai; Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a collectively moving group benefits individuals within a population in a variety of ways. The surface-dwelling bacterium Myxococcus xanthus forms dynamic collective groups both to feed on prey and to aggregate during times of starvation. The latter behaviour, termed fruiting-body formation, involves a complex, coordinated series of density changes that ultimately lead to three-dimensional aggregates comprising hundreds of thousands of cells and spores. How a loose, two-dimensional sheet of motile cells produces a fixed aggregate has remained a mystery as current models of aggregation are either inconsistent with experimental data or ultimately predict unstable structures that do not remain fixed in space. Here, we use high-resolution microscopy and computer vision software to spatio-temporally track the motion of thousands of individuals during the initial stages of fruiting-body formation. We find that cells undergo a phase transition from exploratory flocking, in which unstable cell groups move rapidly and coherently over long distances, to a reversal-mediated localization into one-dimensional growing streams that are inherently stable in space. These observations identify a new phase of active collective behaviour and answer a long-standing open question in Myxococcus development by describing how motile cell groups can remain statistically fixed in a spatial location. PMID:26246416

  9. Label-free detection and dynamic monitoring of drug-induced intracellular vesicle formation enabled using a 2-dimensional matched filter

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Obaid; Fryknäs, Mårten; Zhang, Xiaonan; De Milito, Angelo; Hammerling, Ulf; Linder, Stig; Larsson, Rolf; Gustafsson, Mats G

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of vesicle formation and degradation is a central issue in autophagy research and microscopy imaging is revolutionizing the study of such dynamic events inside living cells. A limiting factor is the need for labeling techniques that are labor intensive, expensive, and not always completely reliable. To enable label-free analyses we introduced a generic computational algorithm, the label-free vesicle detector (LFVD), which relies on a matched filter designed to identify circular vesicles within cells using only phase-contrast microscopy images. First, the usefulness of the LFVD is illustrated by presenting successful detections of autophagy modulating drugs found by analyzing the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116 exposed to each substance among 1266 pharmacologically active compounds. Some top hits were characterized with respect to their activity as autophagy modulators using independent in vitro labeling of acidic organelles, detection of LC3-II protein, and analysis of the autophagic flux. Selected detection results for 2 additional cell lines (DLD1 and RKO) demonstrate the generality of the method. In a second experiment, label-free monitoring of dose-dependent vesicle formation kinetics is demonstrated by recorded detection of vesicles over time at different drug concentrations. In conclusion, label-free detection and dynamic monitoring of vesicle formation during autophagy is enabled using the LFVD approach introduced. PMID:24169509

  10. Oxygen Diffusion Enables Anti-Wear Boundary Film Formation on Titanium Surfaces in Zinc-Dialkyl-Dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-Containing Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a wear reduction by up to six orders of magnitude for Ti-6Al-4V alloy when treated by an oxygen diffusion (OD) process and subsequently tested in a zinc-dialkyl-dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-containing lubricant. In addition to case hardening, it is discovered that OD enables the formation of an anti-wear boundary film on the titanium surface. Transmission electron microscopy and surface chemical analyses revealed that this boundary film has a two-layer structure comprising an amorphous oxide interlayer and a ZDDP-based top film with complex compounds.

  11. The exopolysaccharide Psl–eDNA interaction enables the formation of a biofilm skeleton in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiwei; Liu, Xi; Liu, Hongsheng; Zhang, Li; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Shan; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Ma, Luyan Z.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A hallmark of bacterial biofilms is a self-produced extracellular matrix of exopolysaccharide, extracellular DNA (eDNA) and proteins that hold bacterial cells together in the community. However, interactions among matrix components and how the interactions contribute to the formation of matrix remain unclear. Here, we show the physical interaction between exopolysaccharide Psl and eDNA, the two key biofilm matrix components of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The interaction allows the two components to combine to form a web of eDNA–Psl fibres, which resembles a biofilm skeleton in the centre of pellicles to give bacteria structural support and capability against agents targeted on one matrix component. The web of eDNA–Psl fibres was also found in flow-cell biofilms at microcolonies initiation stage. The colocalization of eDNA or Psl fibres with bacterial cell membrane stain suggests that fibre-like eDNA is likely derived from the lysis of dead bacteria in biofilms. Psl can interact with DNA from diverse sources, suggesting that P. aeruginosa has the ability to use DNA of other organisms (such as human neutrophils and other bacterial species) to form its own communities, which might increase the survival of P. aeruginosa in multispecies biofilms or within a human host. PMID:25472701

  12. Development and evaluation of a Smartphone-enabled, caregiver-supported educational intervention for management of physical disabilities following stroke in India: protocol for a formative research study

    PubMed Central

    Sureshkumar, K; Murthy, G V S; Kinra, Sanjay; Goenka, Shifalika; Kuper, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of stroke in India has reached epidemic proportions. The growing magnitude of disability in patients with stroke in India poses a major public health challenge. Given the nature of the condition, affected individuals often become disabled with profound effects on their quality of life. The availability of rehabilitation services for people with disabilities is inadequate in India. Rehabilitation services are usually offered by private hospitals located in urban areas and many stroke survivors, especially those who are poor or live in rural areas, cannot afford to pay for, or do not have access to, such services. Thus, identification of cost-effective ways to rehabilitate people with stroke-related disability is an important challenge. Educational interventions in stroke rehabilitation can assist stroke survivors to make informed decisions regarding their on-going treatment and to self-manage their condition with support from their caregivers. Although educational interventions have been shown to improve patient knowledge for self-management of stroke, an optimal format for the intervention has not as yet been established, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. This formative research study aims to systematically develop an educational intervention for management of post-stroke disability for stroke survivors in India, and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of delivering the intervention using Smartphones and with caregiver support. The research study will be conducted in Chennai, India, and will be organised in three different phases. Phase 1: Development of the intervention. Phase 2: Field testing and finalising the intervention. Phase 3: Piloting of the intervention and assessment of feasibility and acceptability. A mixed-methods approach will be used to develop and evaluate the intervention. If successful, it will help realise the potential of using Smartphone-enabled, carer-supported educational intervention to

  13. Correlating shaped charge performance with processing conditions and microstructure of an aluminum alloy 1100 liner enabled by a new method to arrest nascent jet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheid, James Eric

    Aluminum-lined shaped charges are used in special applications where jet and / or slug residue in the target is undesired. The three different microstructures of the aluminum liners studied herein resulted from three different manufacturing interpretations of the same design. One interpretation was completely machining the liners from best available annealed round stock. The second was to cold-forge the liners from annealed round-stock in an open-die forge to near-final dimensions, and then machine the liners to the final dimensions. The third variant in this study was to use the above forged liner, but with annealing after the machining. These three manufacturing choices resulted in significant variations in shaped charge performance. The goal of this research was to clarify the relationships between the liner metal microstructure and properties, and the corresponding shaped charge dynamic flow behavior. What began as an investigation into user-reported performance problems associated inherently with liner manufacturing processes and resultant microstructure, resolved into new understandings of the relationships between aluminum liner microstructure and shaped charge collapse kinetics. This understanding was achieved through an extensive literature review and the comprehensive characterization of the material properties of three variants of an 1100 aluminum shaped charge liner with a focus on collapse and nascent jet formation. The machined liner had a microstructure with large millimeter-sized grains and fine particles aligned in bands parallel to the charge axis. The forged liner microstructure consisted of very small one micrometer-sized (1 mum) subgrains and fine particles aligned largely in bands elongated parallel to the liner contour. The annealed liner was characterized by ten micrometer (10 mum) sized equiaxed grains with residual fine particles in the forged alignment. This characterization was enabled by the development, execution and validation of a

  14. Syntheses of [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]benzazoles enabled by the transition-metal-free oxidative N-N bond formation.

    PubMed

    Shang, Erchang; Zhang, Junzhi; Bai, Jinyi; Wang, Zhan; Li, Xiang; Zhu, Bing; Lei, Xiaoguang

    2016-05-19

    A transition-metal-free oxidative N-N bond formation strategy was developed to generate various structurally interesting [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]benzazoles efficiently. The mechanism of the key oxidative N-N bond formation was investigated by using an intramolecular competition reaction. Notably, the first single crystal structure was also obtained to confirm the structure of 2-aryl[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]benzimidazole. PMID:27161847

  15. Online Learning in Divorce: How the Formation of a Community of Practice in a Divorce Support Website Enables and Inhibits Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paechter, Carrie

    2012-01-01

    This article is about the informal learning that took place in an online divorce support and advice forum. In it, the author discusses the formation of a community of practice among the members during the first nine months of the site's operation. The author shows how the key markers of mutual engagement, joint enterprise and shared repertoire…

  16. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed. PMID:25703045

  17. An Intein-based Strategy for the Production of Tag-free Huntingtin Exon 1 Proteins Enables New Insights into the Polyglutamine Dependence of Httex1 Aggregation and Fibril Formation.

    PubMed

    Vieweg, Sophie; Ansaloni, Annalisa; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Warner, John B; Lashuel, Hilal A

    2016-06-01

    The first exon of the Huntingtin protein (Httex1) is one of the most actively studied Htt fragments because its overexpression in R6/2 transgenic mice has been shown to recapitulate several key features of Huntington disease. However, the majority of biophysical studies of Httex1 are based on assessing the structure and aggregation of fusion constructs where Httex1 is fused to large proteins, such as glutathione S-transferase, maltose-binding protein, or thioredoxin, or released in solution upon in situ cleavage of these proteins. Herein, we report an intein-based strategy that allows, for the first time, the rapid and efficient production of native tag-free Httex1 with polyQ repeats ranging from 7Q to 49Q. Aggregation studies on these proteins enabled us to identify interesting polyQ-length-dependent effects on Httex1 oligomer and fibril formation that were previously not observed using Httex1 fusion proteins or Httex1 proteins produced by in situ cleavage of fusion proteins. Our studies revealed the inability of Httex1-7Q/15Q to undergo amyloid fibril formation and an inverse correlation between fibril length and polyQ repeat length, suggesting possible polyQ length-dependent differences in the structural properties of the Httex1 aggregates. Altogether, our findings underscore the importance of working with tag-free Httex1 proteins and indicate that model systems based on non-native Httex1 sequences may not accurately reproduce the effect of polyQ repeat length and solution conditions on Httex1 aggregation kinetics and structural properties. PMID:27002149

  18. Technology Enabled Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on technology-enabled learning and human resource development. Among results found in "Current State of Technology-enabled Learning Programs in Select Federal Government Organizations: a Case Study of Ten Organizations" (Letitia A. Combs) are the following: the dominant delivery method is traditional…

  19. Dust control for Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Kevin; Karl, Chad; Litherland, Mark; Ritchie, David; Sun, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    The dust control group designed a system to restrict dust that is disturbed by the Enabler during its operation from interfering with astronaut or camera visibility. This design also considers the many different wheel positions made possible through the use of artinuation joints that provide the steering and wheel pitching for the Enabler. The system uses a combination of brushes and fenders to restrict the dust when the vehicle is moving in either direction and in a turn. This design also allows for each of maintenance as well as accessibility of the remainder of the vehicle.

  20. Dust control for Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Kevin; Karl, Chad; Litherland, Mark; Ritchie, David; Sun, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    The dust control group designed a system to restrict dust that is disturbed by the Enabler during its operation from interfering with astronaut or camera visibility. This design also considers the many different wheel positions made possible through the use of artinuation joints that provide the steering and wheel pitching for the Enabler. The system uses a combination of brushes and fenders to restrict the dust when the vehicle is moving in either direction and in a turn. This design also allows for ease of maintenance as well as accessibility of the remainder of the vehicle.

  1. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2014-06-23

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  2. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2012-07-02

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  3. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  4. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, Zayas; Michael, Derby; Patrick, Gilman; Ananthan, Shreyas; Lantz, Eric; Cotrell, Jason; Beck, Fredic; Tusing, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Leveraging this experience, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office has evaluated the potential for wind power to generate electricity in all 50 states. This report analyzes and quantifies the geographic expansion that could be enabled by accessing higher above ground heights for wind turbines and considers the means by which this new potential could be responsibly developed.

  5. Bedrails: restraints or enablers?

    PubMed

    Mullette, Betty; Zulkowski, Karen

    2004-08-01

    Bedrails presently are used as both mobility restraints and enablers in long-term care facilities. As enablers, bedrails facilitate movement and may reduce the risk of pressure ulcer development. As restraints, they impede movement and may increase risk of ulcer development. Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act regulations on restraint use have led to confusion for state Medicare surveyors and facilities regarding the definition of appropriate bedrail use and need for supportive documentation. Consequently, some facilities receive deficiency citations for inappropriate use or documentation while others do not. The purpose of this survey was to compare responses of Directors of Nursing in long-term care facilities and Medicare state surveyors to determine how each interprets the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act bedrail language for use and documentation. Questionnaires on bedrail use and documentation were sent to state surveyors and Directors of Nursing. One hundred, three (103) Directors of Nursing in 45 states and 65 surveyors from 39 states participated in the survey (response rate 61%). Study results demonstrated general acceptance of bedrail use as an enabler but not as a restraint by both Directors of Nursing and state surveyors. Four percent (4%) of Directors of Nursing reported receiving a citation for bedrail use and 59% of surveyors reported issuing citations for bedrail use. Significant differences were noted between the two groups regarding appropriate bedrail use and necessary documentation. The intent of Medicare guidelines and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is to standardize care for nursing home residents in the United States; yet, current regulations are open to individual interpretation by state surveyors and confusion exists between the intent of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act and the daily operations of nursing homes. Educating clinicians about the risks and benefits of bedrail use, either as restraint or enabler, and

  6. Enable, mediate, advocate.

    PubMed

    Saan, Hans; Wise, Marilyn

    2011-12-01

    The authors of the Ottawa Charter selected the words enable, mediate and advocate to describe the core activities in what was, in 1986, the new Public Health. This article considers these concepts and the values and ideas upon which they were based. We discuss their relevance in the current context within which health promotion is being conducted, and discuss the implications of changes in the health agenda, media and globalization for practice. We consider developments within health promotion since 1986: its central role in policy rhetoric, the increasing understanding of complexities and the interlinkage with many other societal processes. So the three core activities are reviewed: they still fit well with the main health promotion challenges, but should be refreshed by new ideas and values. As the role of health promotion in the political arena has grown we have become part of the policy establishment and that is a mixed blessing. Making way for community advocates is now our challenge. Enabling requires greater sensitivity to power relations involved and an understanding of the role of health literacy. Mediating keeps its central role as it bridges vital interests of parties. We conclude that these core concepts in the Ottawa Charter need no serious revision. There are, however, lessons from the last 25 years that point to ways to address present and future challenges with greater sensitivity and effectiveness. We invite the next generation to avoid canonizing this text: as is true of every heritage, the heirs must decide on its use. PMID:22080073

  7. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-10-15

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  8. Enabling graphene nanoelectronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Ohta, Taisuke; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Gutierrez, Carlos; Nolen, C. M.; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; McCarty, Kevin F.; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has shown that graphene, a 2D electronic material amenable to the planar semiconductor fabrication processing, possesses tunable electronic material properties potentially far superior to metals and other standard semiconductors. Despite its phenomenal electronic properties, focused research is still required to develop techniques for depositing and synthesizing graphene over large areas, thereby enabling the reproducible mass-fabrication of graphene-based devices. To address these issues, we combined an array of growth approaches and characterization resources to investigate several innovative and synergistic approaches for the synthesis of high quality graphene films on technologically relevant substrate (SiC and metals). Our work focused on developing the fundamental scientific understanding necessary to generate large-area graphene films that exhibit highly uniform electronic properties and record carrier mobility, as well as developing techniques to transfer graphene onto other substrates.

  9. Enabling distributed petascale science.

    SciTech Connect

    Baranovski, A.; Bharathi, S.; Bresnahan, J.; chervenak, A.; Foster, I.; Fraser, D.; Freeman, T.; Gunter, D.; Jackson, K.; Keahey, K.; Kesselman, C.; Konerding, D. E.; Leroy, N.; Link, M.; Livny, M.; Miller, N.; Miller, R.; Oleynik, G.; Pearlman, L.; Schopf, J. M.; Schuler, R.; Tierney, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; FNL; Univ. of Southern California; Univ. of Chicago; LBNL; Univ. of Wisconsin

    2007-01-01

    Petascale science is an end-to-end endeavour, involving not only the creation of massive datasets at supercomputers or experimental facilities, but the subsequent analysis of that data by a user community that may be distributed across many laboratories and universities. The new SciDAC Center for Enabling Distributed Petascale Science (CEDPS) is developing tools to support this end-to-end process. These tools include data placement services for the reliable, high-performance, secure, and policy-driven placement of data within a distributed science environment; tools and techniques for the construction, operation, and provisioning of scalable science services; and tools for the detection and diagnosis of failures in end-to-end data placement and distributed application hosting configurations. In each area, we build on a strong base of existing technology and have made useful progress in the first year of the project. For example, we have recently achieved order-of-magnitude improvements in transfer times (for lots of small files) and implemented asynchronous data staging capabilities; demonstrated dynamic deployment of complex application stacks for the STAR experiment; and designed and deployed end-to-end troubleshooting services. We look forward to working with SciDAC application and technology projects to realize the promise of petascale science.

  10. Enabling immersive simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Josh; Mateas, Michael; Hart, Derek H.; Whetzel, Jonathan; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Glickman, Matthew R.; Abbott, Robert G.

    2009-02-01

    The object of the 'Enabling Immersive Simulation for Complex Systems Analysis and Training' LDRD has been to research, design, and engineer a capability to develop simulations which (1) provide a rich, immersive interface for participation by real humans (exploiting existing high-performance game-engine technology wherever possible), and (2) can leverage Sandia's substantial investment in high-fidelity physical and cognitive models implemented in the Umbra simulation framework. We report here on these efforts. First, we describe the integration of Sandia's Umbra modular simulation framework with the open-source Delta3D game engine. Next, we report on Umbra's integration with Sandia's Cognitive Foundry, specifically to provide for learning behaviors for 'virtual teammates' directly from observed human behavior. Finally, we describe the integration of Delta3D with the ABL behavior engine, and report on research into establishing the theoretical framework that will be required to make use of tools like ABL to scale up to increasingly rich and realistic virtual characters.

  11. Grid-Enabled Measures

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Richard P.; Hesse, Bradford W.; Shaikh, Abdul R.; Courtney, Paul; Morgan, Glen; Augustson, Erik; Kobrin, Sarah; Levin, Kerry; Helba, Cynthia; Garner, David; Dunn, Marsha; Coa, Kisha

    2011-01-01

    Scientists are taking advantage of the Internet and collaborative web technology to accelerate discovery in a massively connected, participative environment —a phenomenon referred to by some as Science 2.0. As a new way of doing science, this phenomenon has the potential to push science forward in a more efficient manner than was previously possible. The Grid-Enabled Measures (GEM) database has been conceptualized as an instantiation of Science 2.0 principles by the National Cancer Institute with two overarching goals: (1) Promote the use of standardized measures, which are tied to theoretically based constructs; and (2) Facilitate the ability to share harmonized data resulting from the use of standardized measures. This is done by creating an online venue connected to the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) where a virtual community of researchers can collaborate together and come to consensus on measures by rating, commenting and viewing meta-data about the measures and associated constructs. This paper will describe the web 2.0 principles on which the GEM database is based, describe its functionality, and discuss some of the important issues involved with creating the GEM database, such as the role of mutually agreed-on ontologies (i.e., knowledge categories and the relationships among these categories— for data sharing). PMID:21521586

  12. Nanowires enabling strained photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, J.; Bertagnolli, E.; Lugstein, A.; Birner, S.

    2014-04-21

    Photovoltaic nano-devices have largely been relying on charge separation in conventional p-n junctions. Junction formation via doping, however, imposes major challenges in process control. Here, we report on a concept for photovoltaic energy conversion at the nano scale without the need for intentional doping. Our approach relies on charge carrier separation in inhomogeneously strained germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). This concept utilizes the strain-induced gradient in bandgap along tapered NWs. Experimental data confirms the feasibility of strain-induced charge separation in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Ge NW devices with an internal quantum efficiency of ∼5%. The charge separation mechanism, though, is not inherently limited to a distinct material. Our work establishes a class of photovoltaic nano-devices with its opto-electronic properties engineered by size, shape, and applied strain.

  13. Enabling cleanup technology transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmars, J. D.

    2002-08-12

    Technology transfer in the environmental restoration, or cleanup, area has been challenging. While there is little doubt that innovative technologies are needed to reduce the times, risks, and costs associated with the cleanup of federal sites, particularly those of the Departments of Energy (DOE) and Defense, the use of such technologies in actual cleanups has been relatively limited. There are, of course, many reasons why technologies do not reach the implementation phase or do not get transferred from developing entities to the user community. For example, many past cleanup contracts provided few incentives for performance that would compel a contractor to seek improvement via technology applications. While performance-based contracts are becoming more common, they alone will not drive increased technology applications. This paper focuses on some applications of cleanup methodologies and technologies that have been successful and are illustrative of a more general principle. The principle is at once obvious and not widely practiced. It is that, with few exceptions, innovative cleanup technologies are rarely implemented successfully alone but rather are implemented in the context of enabling processes and methodologies. And, since cleanup is conducted in a regulatory environment, the stage is better set for technology transfer when the context includes substantive interactions with the relevant stakeholders. Examples of this principle are drawn from Argonne National Laboratory's experiences in Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Programs (ASAPs), Precise Excavation, and the DOE Technology Connection (TechCon) Program. The lessons learned may be applicable to the continuing challenges posed by the cleanup and long-term stewardship of radioactive contaminants and unexploded ordnance (UXO) at federal sites.

  14. FOILFEST :community enabled security.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Whitley, John B.; Drayer, Darryl Donald; Cummings, John C., Jr.

    2005-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Group of Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop, ''FOILFest: Community Enabled Security'', on July 18-21, 2005, in Albuquerque, NM. This was a far-reaching look into the future of physical protection consisting of a series of structured brainstorming sessions focused on preventing and foiling attacks on public places and soft targets such as airports, shopping malls, hotels, and public events. These facilities are difficult to protect using traditional security devices since they could easily be pushed out of business through the addition of arduous and expensive security measures. The idea behind this Fest was to explore how the public, which is vital to the function of these institutions, can be leveraged as part of a physical protection system. The workshop considered procedures, space design, and approaches for building community through technology. The workshop explored ways to make the ''good guys'' in public places feel safe and be vigilant while making potential perpetrators of harm feel exposed and convinced that they will not succeed. Participants in the Fest included operators of public places, social scientists, technology experts, representatives of government agencies including DHS and the intelligence community, writers and media experts. Many innovative ideas were explored during the fest with most of the time spent on airports, including consideration of the local airport, the Albuquerque Sunport. Some provocative ideas included: (1) sniffers installed in passage areas like revolving door, escalators, (2) a ''jumbotron'' showing current camera shots in the public space, (3) transparent portal screeners allowing viewing of the screening, (4) a layered open/funnel/open/funnel design where open spaces are used to encourage a sense of ''communitas'' and take advantage of citizen ''sensing'' and funnels are technological tunnels of sensors (the tunnels of truth), (5) curved benches with blast proof walls or backs, (6

  15. Toward genome-enabled mycology.

    PubMed

    Hibbett, David S; Stajich, Jason E; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    Genome-enabled mycology is a rapidly expanding field that is characterized by the pervasive use of genome-scale data and associated computational tools in all aspects of fungal biology. Genome-enabled mycology is integrative and often requires teams of researchers with diverse skills in organismal mycology, bioinformatics and molecular biology. This issue of Mycologia presents the first complete fungal genomes in the history of the journal, reflecting the ongoing transformation of mycology into a genome-enabled science. Here, we consider the prospects for genome-enabled mycology and the technical and social challenges that will need to be overcome to grow the database of complete fungal genomes and enable all fungal biologists to make use of the new data. PMID:23928422

  16. Computer Security Systems Enable Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggen, Gary

    1989-01-01

    A good security system enables access and protects information from damage or tampering, but the most important aspects of a security system aren't technical. A security procedures manual addresses the human element of computer security. (MLW)

  17. Enabling Space Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, William J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation on enabling space science and exploration covers the following topics: 1) Today s Deep Space Network; 2) Next Generation Deep Space Network; 3) Needed technologies; 4) Mission IT and networking; and 5) Multi-mission operations.

  18. Enable: Developing Instructional Language Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Beth

    The program presented in this manual provides a structure and activities for systematic development of effective listening comprehension in typical and atypical children. The complete ENABLE kit comes with pictures, cut-outs, and puppets to illustrate the directives, questions, and narrative activities. The manual includes an organizational and…

  19. Exogenous Attention Enables Perceptual Learning

    PubMed Central

    Szpiro, Sarit F. A.; Carrasco, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Practice can improve visual perception, and these improvements are considered to be a form of brain plasticity. Training-induced learning is time-consuming and requires hundreds of trials across multiple days. The process of learning acquisition is understudied. Can learning acquisition be potentiated by manipulating visual attentional cues? We developed a protocol in which we used task-irrelevant cues for between-groups manipulation of attention during training. We found that training with exogenous attention can enable the acquisition of learning. Remarkably, this learning was maintained even when observers were subsequently tested under neutral conditions, which indicates that a change in perception was involved. Our study is the first to isolate the effects of exogenous attention and to demonstrate its efficacy to enable learning. We propose that exogenous attention boosts perceptual learning by enhancing stimulus encoding. PMID:26502745

  20. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    A recently proposed concept of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two laser modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation in a relativistic beam. This seeding technique holds promise of a one-stage soft x-ray FEL that radiates not only transversely but also longitudinally coherent pulses. Currently, an experimental verification of the concept is being conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory aimed at the demonstration of the EEHG.

  1. Nanofluidics: enabling processes for biotech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmanella, Umberto; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2001-10-01

    The advance of micro and nanodevice manufacturing technology enables us to carry out biological and chemical processes in a more efficient manner. In fact, fluidic processes connect the macro and the micro/nano worlds. For devices approaching the size of the fluid molecules, many physical phenomena occur that are not observed in macro flows. In this brief review, we discuss a few selected topics which of are interest for basic research and are important for applications in biotechnology.

  2. Technologies for Networked Enabled Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B.; Levine, J.

    2005-01-01

    Current point-to-point data links will not scale to support future integration of surveillance, security, and globally-distributed air traffic data, and already hinders efficiency and capacity. While the FAA and industry focus on a transition to initial system-wide information management (SWIM) capabilities, this paper describes a set of initial studies of NAS network-enabled operations technology gaps targeted for maturity in later SWIM spirals (201 5-2020 timeframe).

  3. New Generation Sensor Web Enablement

    PubMed Central

    Bröring, Arne; Echterhoff, Johannes; Jirka, Simon; Simonis, Ingo; Everding, Thomas; Stasch, Christoph; Liang, Steve; Lemmens, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Many sensor networks have been deployed to monitor Earth’s environment, and more will follow in the future. Environmental sensors have improved continuously by becoming smaller, cheaper, and more intelligent. Due to the large number of sensor manufacturers and differing accompanying protocols, integrating diverse sensors into observation systems is not straightforward. A coherent infrastructure is needed to treat sensors in an interoperable, platform-independent and uniform way. The concept of the Sensor Web reflects such a kind of infrastructure for sharing, finding, and accessing sensors and their data across different applications. It hides the heterogeneous sensor hardware and communication protocols from the applications built on top of it. The Sensor Web Enablement initiative of the Open Geospatial Consortium standardizes web service interfaces and data encodings which can be used as building blocks for a Sensor Web. This article illustrates and analyzes the recent developments of the new generation of the Sensor Web Enablement specification framework. Further, we relate the Sensor Web to other emerging concepts such as the Web of Things and point out challenges and resulting future work topics for research on Sensor Web Enablement. PMID:22163760

  4. 'Ethos' Enabling Organisational Knowledge Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsudaira, Yoshito

    This paper examines knowledge creation in relation to improvements on the production line in the manufacturing department of Nissan Motor Company and aims to clarify embodied knowledge observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation will be clarified. For that purpose, this study adopts an approach that adds a first, second, and third-person's viewpoint to the theory of knowledge creation. Embodied knowledge, observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation, is the continued practice of 'ethos' (in Greek) founded in Nissan Production Way as an ethical basis. Ethos is knowledge (intangible) assets for knowledge creating companies. Substantiated analysis classifies ethos into three categories: the individual, team and organisation. This indicates the precise actions of the organisational members in each category during the knowledge creation process. This research will be successful in its role of showing the indispensability of ethos - the new concept of knowledge assets, which enables knowledge creation -for future knowledge-based management in the knowledge society.

  5. Optimized microsystems-enabled photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nielson, Gregory N.; Young, Ralph W.; Resnick, Paul J.; Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-22

    Technologies pertaining to designing microsystems-enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) cells are described herein. A first restriction for a first parameter of an MEPV cell is received. Subsequently, a selection of a second parameter of the MEPV cell is received. Values for a plurality of parameters of the MEPV cell are computed such that the MEPV cell is optimized with respect to the second parameter, wherein the values for the plurality of parameters are computed based at least in part upon the restriction for the first parameter.

  6. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed. PMID:27013938

  7. Directory Enabled Policy Based Networking

    SciTech Connect

    KELIIAA, CURTIS M.

    2001-10-01

    This report presents a discussion of directory-enabled policy-based networking with an emphasis on its role as the foundation for securely scalable enterprise networks. A directory service provides the object-oriented logical environment for interactive cyber-policy implementation. Cyber-policy implementation includes security, network management, operational process and quality of service policies. The leading network-technology vendors have invested in these technologies for secure universal connectivity that transverses Internet, extranet and intranet boundaries. Industry standards are established that provide the fundamental guidelines for directory deployment scalable to global networks. The integration of policy-based networking with directory-service technologies provides for intelligent management of the enterprise network environment as an end-to-end system of related clients, services and resources. This architecture allows logical policies to protect data, manage security and provision critical network services permitting a proactive defense-in-depth cyber-security posture. Enterprise networking imposes the consideration of supporting multiple computing platforms, sites and business-operation models. An industry-standards based approach combined with principled systems engineering in the deployment of these technologies allows these issues to be successfully addressed. This discussion is focused on a directory-based policy architecture for the heterogeneous enterprise network-computing environment and does not propose specific vendor solutions. This document is written to present practical design methodology and provide an understanding of the risks, complexities and most important, the benefits of directory-enabled policy-based networking.

  8. Enabling Exploration Through Docking Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Caris A.

    2012-01-01

    Human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit will likely require international cooperation in order to leverage limited resources. International standards can help enable cooperative missions by providing well understood, predefined interfaces allowing compatibility between unique spacecraft and systems. The International Space Station (ISS) partnership has developed a publicly available International Docking System Standard (IDSS) that provides a solution to one of these key interfaces by defining a common docking interface. The docking interface provides a way for even dissimilar spacecraft to dock for exchange of crew and cargo, as well as enabling the assembly of large space systems. This paper provides an overview of the key attributes of the IDSS, an overview of the NASA Docking System (NDS), and the plans for updating the ISS with IDSS compatible interfaces. The NDS provides a state of the art, low impact docking system that will initially be made available to commercial crew and cargo providers. The ISS will be used to demonstrate the operational utility of the IDSS interface as a foundational technology for cooperative exploration.

  9. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed. PMID:27013938

  10. Context-Enabled Business Intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2012-04-01

    To truly understand context and apply it in business intelligence, it is vital to understand what context is and how it can be applied in addressing organizational needs. Context describes the facets of the environment that impact the way that end users interact with the system. Context includes aspects of location, chronology, access method, demographics, social influence/ relationships, end-user attitude/ emotional state, behavior/ past behavior, and presence. To be successful in making Business Intelligence content enabled, it is important to be able to capture the context of use user. With advances in technology, there are a number of ways in which this user based information can be gathered and exposed to enhance the overall end user experience.

  11. Rotational propulsion enabled by inertia.

    PubMed

    Nadal, François; Pak, On Shun; Zhu, LaiLai; Brandt, Luca; Lauga, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The fluid mechanics of small-scale locomotion has recently attracted considerable attention, due to its importance in cell motility and the design of artificial micro-swimmers for biomedical applications. Most studies on the topic consider the ideal limit of zero Reynolds number. In this paper, we investigate a simple propulsion mechanism --an up-down asymmetric dumbbell rotating about its axis of symmetry-- unable to propel in the absence of inertia in a Newtonian fluid. Inertial forces lead to continuous propulsion for all finite values of the Reynolds number. We study computationally its propulsive characteristics as well as analytically in the small-Reynolds-number limit. We also derive the optimal dumbbell geometry. The direction of propulsion enabled by inertia is opposite to that induced by viscoelasticity. PMID:25034393

  12. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bean; Trond Bjornard; Thomas Larson

    2007-09-01

    It is expected that nuclear energy will be a significant component of future supplies. New facilities, operating under a strengthened international nonproliferation regime will be needed. There is good reason to believe virtual engineering applied to the facility design, as well as to the safeguards system design will reduce total project cost and improve efficiency in the design cycle. Simulation Enabled Safeguards Assessment MEthodology (SESAME) has been developed as a software package to provide this capability for nuclear reprocessing facilities. The software architecture is specifically designed for distributed computing, collaborative design efforts, and modular construction to allow step improvements in functionality. Drag and drop wireframe construction allows the user to select the desired components from a component warehouse, render the system for 3D visualization, and, linked to a set of physics libraries and/or computational codes, conduct process evaluations of the system they have designed.

  13. Policy enabled information sharing system

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Craig R.; Nelson, Brian D.; Ratheal, Steve W.

    2014-09-02

    A technique for dynamically sharing information includes executing a sharing policy indicating when to share a data object responsive to the occurrence of an event. The data object is created by formatting a data file to be shared with a receiving entity. The data object includes a file data portion and a sharing metadata portion. The data object is encrypted and then automatically transmitted to the receiving entity upon occurrence of the event. The sharing metadata portion includes metadata characterizing the data file and referenced in connection with the sharing policy to determine when to automatically transmit the data object to the receiving entity.

  14. Enabling technology for human collaboration.

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Tim Andrew; Jones, Wendell Bruce; Warner, David Jay; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Merkle, Peter Benedict

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of a five-month LDRD late start project which explored the potential of enabling technology to improve the performance of small groups. The purpose was to investigate and develop new methods to assist groups working in high consequence, high stress, ambiguous and time critical situations, especially those for which it is impractical to adequately train or prepare. A testbed was constructed for exploratory analysis of a small group engaged in tasks with high cognitive and communication performance requirements. The system consisted of five computer stations, four with special devices equipped to collect physiologic, somatic, audio and video data. Test subjects were recruited and engaged in a cooperative video game. Each team member was provided with a sensor array for physiologic and somatic data collection while playing the video game. We explored the potential for real-time signal analysis to provide information that enables emergent and desirable group behavior and improved task performance. The data collected in this study included audio, video, game scores, physiological, somatic, keystroke, and mouse movement data. The use of self-organizing maps (SOMs) was explored to search for emergent trends in the physiological data as it correlated with the video, audio and game scores. This exploration resulted in the development of two approaches for analysis, to be used concurrently, an individual SOM and a group SOM. The individual SOM was trained using the unique data of each person, and was used to monitor the effectiveness and stress level of each member of the group. The group SOM was trained using the data of the entire group, and was used to monitor the group effectiveness and dynamics. Results suggested that both types of SOMs were required to adequately track evolutions and shifts in group effectiveness. Four subjects were used in the data collection and development of these tools. This report documents a proof of concept

  15. Enabling Participation In Exoplanet Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart F.

    2015-08-01

    Determining the distribution of exoplanets has required the contributions of a community of astronomers, who all require the support of colleagues to finish their projects in a manner to enable them to enter new collaborations to continue to contribute to understanding exoplanet science.The contributions of each member of the astronomy community are to be encouraged and must never be intentionally obstructed.We present a member’s long pursuit to be a contributing part of the exoplanet community through doing transit photometry as a means of commissioning the telescopes for a new observatory, followed by pursuit of interpreting the distributions in exoplanet parameter data.We present how the photometry projects have been presented as successful by the others who have claimed to have completed them, but how by requiring its employees to present results while omitting one member has been obstructive against members working together and has prevented the results from being published in what can genuinely be called a peer-reviewed fashion.We present how by tolerating one group to obstruct one member from finishing participation and then falsely denying credit is counterproductive to doing science.We show how expecting one member to attempt to go around an ostracizing group by starting something different is destructive to the entire profession. We repeat previously published appeals to help ostracized members to “go around the observatory” by calling for discussion on how the community must act to reverse cases of shunning, bullying, and other abuses. Without better recourse and support from the community, actions that do not meet standard good collegial behavior end up forcing good members from the community. The most important actions are to enable an ostracized member to have recourse to participating in group papers by either working through other authors or through the journal. All journals and authors must expect that no co-author is keeping out a major

  16. DMD-enabled confocal microendoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre M.; Dlugan, Andrew L. P.; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2001-05-01

    Conventional endoscopy is limited to imaging macroscopic views of tissue. The British Columbia Cancer Research Center, in collaboration with Digital Optical Imaging Corp., is developing a fiber-bundle based microendoscopy system to enable in vivo confocal imaging of cells and tissue structure through the biopsy channel of an endoscope, hypodermic needle, or catheter. The feasibility of imaging individual cells and tissue architecture will be presented using both reflectance and tissue auto-fluorescence modes of imaging. The system consists of a coherent fiber bundle, low-magnification high-NA objective lens, Digital Micromirror DeviceTM(DMD), light source, and CCD camera. The novel approach is the precise control and manipulation of light flow into and out of individual optical fibers. This control is achieved by employing a DMD to illuminate and detect light from selected fibers such that only the core of each fiber is illuminated or detected. The objective of the research is to develop a low-cost, clinically viable microendoscopy system for a range of detection, diagnostic, localization and differentiation uses associated with cancer and pre-cancerous conditions. Currently, multi-wavelength reflectance confocal images with 1 micrometers lateral resolution and 1.6 micrometers axial resolution have been achieved using a 0.95 mm bundle with 30,000 fibers.

  17. Enabling individualized therapy through nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Jason H.; van de Ven, Anne L.; Godin, Biana; Blanco, Elvin; Serda, Rita E.; Grattoni, Alessandro; Ziemys, Arturas; Bouamrani, Ali; Hu, Tony; Ranganathan, Shivakumar I.; De Rosa, Enrica; Martinez, Jonathan O.; Smid, Christine A.; Buchanan, Rachel M.; Lee, Sei-Young; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Landry, Matthew; Meyn, Anne; Tasciotti, Ennio; Liu, Xuewu; Decuzzi, Paolo; Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Individualized medicine is the healthcare strategy that rebukes the idiomatic dogma of ‘losing sight of the forest for the trees’. We are entering a new era of healthcare where it is no longer acceptable to develop and market a drug that is effective for only 80% of the patient population. The emergence of “-omic” technologies (e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) and advances in systems biology are magnifying the deficiencies of standardized therapy, which often provide little treatment latitude for accommodating patient physiologic idiosyncrasies. A personalized approach to medicine is not a novel concept. Ever since the scientific community began unraveling the mysteries of the genome, the promise of discarding generic treatment regimens in favor of patient-specific therapies became more feasible and realistic. One of the major scientific impediments of this movement towards personalized medicine has been the need for technological enablement. Nanotechnology is projected to play a critical role in patient-specific therapy; however, this transition will depend heavily upon the evolutionary development of a systems biology approach to clinical medicine based upon “-omic” technology analysis and integration. This manuscript provides a forward looking assessment of the promise of nanomedicine as it pertains to individualized medicine and establishes a technology “snapshot” of the current state of nano-based products over a vast array of clinical indications and range of patient specificity. Other issues such as market driven hurdles and regulatory compliance reform are anticipated to “self-correct” in accordance to scientific advancement and healthcare demand. These peripheral, non-scientific concerns are not addressed at length in this manuscript; however they do exist, and their impact to the paradigm shifting healthcare transformation towards individualized medicine will be critical for its success. PMID:20045055

  18. Solar Glitter -- Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Gregory N.

    2012-02-01

    Many products have significantly benefitted from, or been enabled by, the ability to manufacture structures at an ever decreasing length scale. Obvious examples of this include integrated circuits, flat panel displays, micro-scale sensors, and LED lighting. These industries have benefited from length scale effects in terms of improved performance, reduced cost, or new functionality (or a combination of these). In a similar manner, we are working to take advantage of length scale effects that exist within solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. While this is a significant step away from traditional approaches to solar power systems, the benefits in terms of new functionality, improved performance, and reduced cost for solar power are compelling. We are exploring scale effects that result from the size of the solar cells within the system. We have developed unique cells of both crystalline silicon and III-V materials that are very thin (5-20 microns thick) and have very small lateral dimensions (on the order of hundreds of microns across). These cells minimize the amount of expensive semiconductor material required for the system, allow improved cell performance, and provide an expanded design space for both module and system concepts allowing optimized power output and reduced module and balance of system costs. Furthermore, the small size of the cells allows for unique high-efficiency, high-flexibility PV panels and new building-integrated PV options that are currently unavailable. These benefits provide a pathway for PV power to become cost competitive with grid power and allow unique power solutions independent of grid power.

  19. Nanomaterial-enabled membranes for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogensues, Adam Roy

    Incorporating engineered nanomaterials as components of synthetic membranes can improve their separation performance and endow membranes with additional functions. This work explores two approaches to the design of membranes modified with nanomaterials. In the first chapter, exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) decorated with gold nanoparticles were embedded in a polysulfone matrix to fabricate phase inversion nanocomposite membranes. The cast membranes were evaluated as flow-through membrane reactors in experiments on the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The nanocomposite membranes were not as catalytically efficient as those fabricated by modifying anodized alumina membranes polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) containing gold nanoparticles. However, because of the facility of membrane casting by phase inversion and new opportunities enabled by the demonstrated hierarchy-based approach to nanocomposite membrane design, such membrane may hold commercial promise. In the second part of the study, the practicability of PEM-based nanofiltration was evaluated under conditions of precipitative fouling (i.e. scaling) by calcium sulfate. Polyelectrolytes were deposited onto 50 kDa polyethersulfone membranes to create PEM-based nanofiltration membranes. The prepared membranes were compared with the commercial NF270 membrane in terms of flux and rejection performance, as well as the morphology of gypsum crystals formed on the membrane surface. None of the PEM coatings tested inhibited scale formation.

  20. Enabling Community Through Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Haythornthwaite, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Background Social network analysis provides a perspective and method for inquiring into the structures that comprise online groups and communities. Traces from interaction via social media provide the opportunity for understanding how a community is formed and maintained online. Objective The paper aims to demonstrate how social network analysis provides a vocabulary and set of techniques for examining interaction patterns via social media. Using the case of the #hcsmca online discussion forum, this paper highlights what has been and can be gained by approaching online community from a social network perspective, as well as providing an inside look at the structure of the #hcsmca community. Methods Social network analysis was used to examine structures in a 1-month sample of Twitter messages with the hashtag #hcsmca (3871 tweets, 486 unique posters), which is the tag associated with the social media–supported group Health Care Social Media Canada. Network connections were considered present if the individual was mentioned, replied to, or had a post retweeted. Results Network analyses revealed patterns of interaction that characterized the community as comprising one component, with a set of core participants prominent in the network due to their connections with others. Analysis showed the social media health content providers were the most influential group based on in-degree centrality. However, there was no preferential attachment among people in the same professional group, indicating that the formation of connections among community members was not constrained by professional status. Conclusions Network analysis and visualizations provide techniques and a vocabulary for understanding online interaction, as well as insights that can help in understanding what, and who, comprises and sustains a network, and whether community emerges from a network of online interactions. PMID:24176835

  1. Two Types of Bureaucracy: Enabling and Coercive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Paul S.; Borys, Bryan

    1996-01-01

    Proposes a conceptualization of workflow formalization that helps reconcile contrasting assessments of bureaucracy as alienating or enabling to employees. Uses research on equipment technology design to identify enabling and coercive types of formalization. Identifies some forces tending to discourage an enabling orientation and some persistent…

  2. Data format translation routines

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base.

  3. An Internet enabled impact limiter material database

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, S.; Kanipe, F.; McMurtry, W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents a detailed explanation of the construction of an interest enabled database, also known as a database driven web site. The data contained in the internet enabled database are impact limiter material and seal properties. The technique used in constructing the internet enabled database presented in this paper are applicable when information that is changing in content needs to be disseminated to a wide audience.

  4. The Xenopus ORFeome: A resource that enables functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Ian M.; Balcha, Dawit; Hao, Tong; Shen, Yun; Trivedi, Prasad; Patrushev, Ilya; Fortriede, Joshua D.; Karpinka, John B.; Liu, Limin; Zorn, Aaron M.; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Hill, David E.; Gilchrist, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Functional characterisation of proteins and large-scale, systems-level studies are enabled by extensive sets of cloned open reading frames (ORFs) in an easily-accessible format that enables many different applications. Here we report the release of the first stage of the Xenopus ORFeome, which contains 8673 ORFs from the Xenopus Gene Collection (XGC) for Xenopus laevis, cloned into a Gateway® donor vector enabling rapid in-frame transfer of the ORFs to expression vectors. This resource represents an estimated 7871 unique genes, approximately 40% of the non-redundant X. laevis gene complement, and includes 2724 genes where the human ortholog has an association with disease. Transfer into the Gateway system was validated by 5′ and 3′ end sequencing of the entire collection and protein expression of a set of test clones. In a parallel process, the underlying ORF predictions from the original XGC collection were re-analysed to verify quality and full-length status, identifying those proteins likely to exhibit truncations when translated. These data are integrated into Xenbase, the Xenopus community database, which associates genomic, expression, function and human disease model metadata to each ORF, enabling end-users to search for ORFeome clones with links to commercial distributors of the collection. When coupled with the experimental advantages of Xenopus eggs and embryos, the ORFeome collection represents a valuable resource for functional genomics and disease modelling. PMID:26391338

  5. A Semantic Image Annotation Model to Enable Integrative Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Daniel L.; Mongkolwat, Pattanasak; Channin, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Integrating and relating images with clinical and molecular data is a crucial activity in translational research, but challenging because the information in images is not explicit in standard computer-accessible formats. We have developed an ontology-based representation of the semantic contents of radiology images called AIM (Annotation and Image Markup). AIM specifies the quantitative and qualitative content that researchers extract from images. The AIM ontology enables semantic image annotation and markup, specifying the entities and relations necessary to describe images. AIM annotations, represented as instances in the ontology, enable key use cases for images in translational research such as disease status assessment, query, and inter-observer variation analysis. AIM will enable ontology-based query and mining of images, and integration of images with data in other ontology-annotated bioinformatics databases. Our ultimate goal is to enable researchers to link images with related scientific data so they can learn the biological and physiological significance of the image content. PMID:21347180

  6. The Xenopus ORFeome: A resource that enables functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Grant, Ian M; Balcha, Dawit; Hao, Tong; Shen, Yun; Trivedi, Prasad; Patrushev, Ilya; Fortriede, Joshua D; Karpinka, John B; Liu, Limin; Zorn, Aaron M; Stukenberg, P Todd; Hill, David E; Gilchrist, Michael J

    2015-12-15

    Functional characterisation of proteins and large-scale, systems-level studies are enabled by extensive sets of cloned open reading frames (ORFs) in an easily-accessible format that enables many different applications. Here we report the release of the first stage of the Xenopus ORFeome, which contains 8673 ORFs from the Xenopus Gene Collection (XGC) for Xenopus laevis, cloned into a Gateway® donor vector enabling rapid in-frame transfer of the ORFs to expression vectors. This resource represents an estimated 7871 unique genes, approximately 40% of the non-redundant X. laevis gene complement, and includes 2724 genes where the human ortholog has an association with disease. Transfer into the Gateway system was validated by 5' and 3' end sequencing of the entire collection and protein expression of a set of test clones. In a parallel process, the underlying ORF predictions from the original XGC collection were re-analysed to verify quality and full-length status, identifying those proteins likely to exhibit truncations when translated. These data are integrated into Xenbase, the Xenopus community database, which associates genomic, expression, function and human disease model metadata to each ORF, enabling end-users to search for ORFeome clones with links to commercial distributors of the collection. When coupled with the experimental advantages of Xenopus eggs and embryos, the ORFeome collection represents a valuable resource for functional genomics and disease modelling. PMID:26391338

  7. Electronic Health Record Application Support Service Enablers.

    PubMed

    Neofytou, M S; Neokleous, K; Aristodemou, A; Constantinou, I; Antoniou, Z; Schiza, E C; Pattichis, C S; Schizas, C N

    2015-08-01

    There is a huge need for open source software solutions in the healthcare domain, given the flexibility, interoperability and resource savings characteristics they offer. In this context, this paper presents the development of three open source libraries - Specific Enablers (SEs) for eHealth applications that were developed under the European project titled "Future Internet Social and Technological Alignment Research" (FI-STAR) funded under the "Future Internet Public Private Partnership" (FI-PPP) program. The three SEs developed under the Electronic Health Record Application Support Service Enablers (EHR-EN) correspond to: a) an Electronic Health Record enabler (EHR SE), b) a patient summary enabler based on the EU project "European patient Summary Open Source services" (epSOS SE) supporting patient mobility and the offering of interoperable services, and c) a Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) enabler (PACS SE) based on the dcm4che open source system for the support of medical imaging functionality. The EHR SE follows the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) V2.0 and supports the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) profiles (recently awarded in Connectathon 2015). These three FI-STAR platform enablers are designed to facilitate the deployment of innovative applications and value added services in the health care sector. They can be downloaded from the FI-STAR cataloque website. Work in progress focuses in the validation and evaluation scenarios for the proving and demonstration of the usability, applicability and adaptability of the proposed enablers. PMID:26736531

  8. The OGC Sensor Web Enablement framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J.; Botts, M.

    2006-12-01

    Sensor observations are at the core of natural sciences. Improvements in data-sharing technologies offer the promise of much greater utilisation of observational data. A key to this is interoperable data standards. The Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement initiative (SWE) is developing open standards for web interfaces for the discovery, exchange and processing of sensor observations, and tasking of sensor systems. The goal is to support the construction of complex sensor applications through real-time composition of service chains from standard components. The framework is based around a suite of standard interfaces, and standard encodings for the message transferred between services. The SWE interfaces include: Sensor Observation Service (SOS)-parameterized observation requests (by observation time, feature of interest, property, sensor); Sensor Planning Service (SPS)-tasking a sensor- system to undertake future observations; Sensor Alert Service (SAS)-subscription to an alert, usually triggered by a sensor result exceeding some value. The interface design generally follows the pattern established in the OGC Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS) interfaces, where the interaction between a client and service follows a standard sequence of requests and responses. The first obtains a general description of the service capabilities, followed by obtaining detail required to formulate a data request, and finally a request for a data instance or stream. These may be implemented in a stateless "REST" idiom, or using conventional "web-services" (SOAP) messaging. In a deployed system, the SWE interfaces are supplemented by Catalogue, data (WFS) and portrayal (WMS) services, as well as authentication and rights management. The standard SWE data formats are Observations and Measurements (O&M) which encodes observation metadata and results, Sensor Model Language (SensorML) which describes sensor-systems, Transducer Model Language (TML) which

  9. Revolutionary Deep Space Science Missions Enabled by Onboard Autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Debban, Theresa; Yen, Chen wan; Sherwood, Robert; Castano, Rebecca; Cichy, Benjamin; Davies, Ashley; Brul, Michael; Fukunaga, Alex; Fukunaga, Alex; Doggett, Thomas; Williams, Kevin; Dohm, James

    2003-01-01

    Breakthrough autonomy technologies enable a new range of spire missions that acquire vast amounts of data and return only the most scientifically important data to Earth. These missions would monitor science phenomena in great detail (either with frequent observations or at extremely high spatial resolution) and onboard analyze the data to detect specific science events of interest. These missions would monitor volcanic eruptions, formation and movement of aeolian features. and atmospheric phenomena. The autonomous spacecraft would respond to science events by planning its future operations to revisit or perform complementary observations. In this paradigm, the spacecraft represents the scientists agent enabling optimization of the downlink data volume resource. This paper describes preliminary efforts to define and design such missions.

  10. Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents provides materials that clarify the authority for Federal agencies to enter into utility energy services contracts (UESCs), as well as sample documents and resources to ease utility partnership contracting.

  11. ISS - Enabling Exploration Through Docking Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Caris A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA and the ISS partnership are jointly developing a key standard to enable future collaborative exploration. The IDSS is based on flight proven design while incorporating new low impact technology. Low impact technology accommodates a wide range of vehicle contact and capture conditions. This standard will get early demonstration on the ISS. Experience gained here will enable operational experience and the opportunity to refine the standard.

  12. An Architecture to Enable Future Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Caffrey, Robert; Frye, Stu; Grosvenor, Sandra; Hess, Melissa; Chien, Steve; Sherwood, Rob; Davies, Ashley; Hayden, Sandra; Sweet, Adam

    2004-01-01

    A sensor web is a coherent set of distributed 'nodes', interconnected by a communications fabric, that collectively behave as a single dynamic observing system. A 'plug and play' mission architecture enables progressive mission autonomy and rapid assembly and thereby enables sensor webs. This viewgraph presentation addresses: Target mission messaging architecture; Strategy to establish architecture; Progressive autonomy with onboard sensor web; EO-1; Adaptive array antennas (smart antennas) for satellite ground stations.

  13. Enabling Self-Monitoring Data Exchange in Participatory Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Campos, Guillermo; Ofoghi, Bahadorreza; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The development of new methods, devices and apps for self-monitoring have enabled the extension of the application of these approaches for consumer health and research purposes. The increase in the number and variety of devices has generated a complex scenario where reporting guidelines and data exchange formats will be needed to ensure the quality of the information and the reproducibility of results of the experiments. Based on the Minimal Information for Self Monitoring Experiments (MISME) reporting guideline we have developed an XML format (MISME-ML) to facilitate data exchange for self monitoring experiments. We have also developed a sample instance to illustrate the concept and a Java MISME-ML validation tool. The implementation and adoption of these tools should contribute to the consolidation of a set of methods that ensure the reproducibility of self monitoring experiments for research purposes. PMID:26262401

  14. New Labour and the enabling state.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ian

    2000-11-01

    The notion of the 'enabling state' gained currency in the UK during the 1990s as an alternative to the 'providing' or the welfare state. It reflected the process of contracting out in the NHS and compulsory competitive tendering (CCT) in local government during the 1980s, but was also associated with developments during the 1990s in health, social care and education in particular. The creation of an internal market in the NHS and the associated purchaser-provider split appeared to transfer 'ownership' of services increasingly to the providers - hospitals, General Practitioners (GPs) and schools. The mixed economy of care that was stimulated by the 1990 NHS and Community Care Act appeared to offer local authorities the opportunity to enable non state providers to offer care services in the community. The new service charters were part of the enablement process because they offered users more opportunity to influence provision. This article examines how far service providers were enabled and assesses the extent to which new Labour's policies enhance or reject the 'enabling state' in favour of more direct provision. PMID:11560707

  15. Upgraded NERVA systems: Enabler nuclear system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, Gerry

    1991-01-01

    The NERVA/Rover Enabler technology enables to go on a low risk, short-term program to meet the requirements of the Mars mission and maybe some lunar missions. The following subject areas are covered: NERVA technology - the foundation for tomorrow's space missions; NERVA/Rover reactor system test sequence; NERVA engine development program; nuclear thermal reactor capability based on many related Westinghouse technology programs; investment in Rover/Nerva technology; synergistic applications of NERVA technology; flow schematic of the NDR engine; the NERVA nuclear subsystem; and technology evolution.

  16. Enabling human HUMS with data modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Jaenisch, Kristina K.; Hicklen, Michael L.

    2006-05-01

    We simulate a notional Navy SEAL rebreather diver on an extended mission using Model Predictive Control (MPC) theory. A mathematical framework for enabling physiological HUMS (Health Usage Management Systems) is shown. A rebreather simulation is used to derive MPC baseline Data Models of diver status by converting the simulation first into differential equations and then into lookup tables (LUT). When abnormal readings are indicated, sensor data from the diver is published to the ad hoc network, enabling intermittent upload. Mission success confidence is updated and determined during the mission. A novel method of converting MPC Data Models into lookup tables worn by the diver is given.

  17. Origami-enabled deformable silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Hai; Liang, Hanshuang; Liang, Mengbing; Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong; Song, Zeming; Jiang, Hanqing; Yu, Hongyu

    2014-02-24

    Deformable electronics have found various applications and elastomeric materials have been widely used to reach flexibility and stretchability. In this Letter, we report an alternative approach to enable deformability through origami. In this approach, the deformability is achieved through folding and unfolding at the creases while the functional devices do not experience strain. We have demonstrated an example of origami-enabled silicon solar cells and showed that this solar cell can reach up to 644% areal compactness while maintaining reasonable good performance upon cyclic folding/unfolding. This approach opens an alternative direction of producing flexible, stretchable, and deformable electronics.

  18. Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ENABLE Program

    SciTech Connect

    2012-06-01

    The Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ENABLE program, a new project funding approach, allows small Federal facilities to realize energy and water savings in six months or less. ESPC ENABLE provides a standardized and streamlined process to install targeted energy conservation measures (ECMs) such as lighting, water, and controls with measurement and verification (M&V) appropriate for the size and scope of the project. This allows Federal facilities smaller than 200,000 square feet to make progress towards important energy efficiency and water conservation requirements.

  19. Networking Technologies Enable Advances in Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory; Freeman, Kenneth; Gilstrap, Raymond; Beck, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment to prototype a new way of conducting science by applying networking and distributed computing technologies to an Earth Science application. A combination of satellite, wireless, and terrestrial networking provided geologists at a remote field site with interactive access to supercomputer facilities at two NASA centers, thus enabling them to validate and calibrate remotely sensed geological data in near-real time. This represents a fundamental shift in the way that Earth scientists analyze remotely sensed data. In this paper we describe the experiment and the network infrastructure that enabled it, analyze the data flow during the experiment, and discuss the scientific impact of the results.

  20. Role of Nitric Oxide and Flavohemoglobin Homolog Genes in Aspergillus nidulans Sexual Development and Mycotoxin Production ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Sachin; Cary, Jeffrey W.; Grayburn, W. Scott; Calvo, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Flavohemoglobins are widely distributed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These proteins are involved in reducing nitric oxide levels. Deletion of the Aspergillus nidulans flavohemoglobin gene fhbA induced sexual development and decreased sterigmatocystin production. Supplementation with a nitric oxide-releasing compound promoted cleistothecial formation and increased nsdD and steA expression, indicating that nitric oxide induces sexual development. This is the first study on the effect of nitric oxide on morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in fungi. PMID:21642398

  1. Nanotechnologv Enabled Biological and Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an enabling technology that will impact almost all economic sectors: one of the most important and with great potential is the health/medical sector. - Nanomaterials for drug delivery - Early warning sensors - Implantable devices - Artificial parts with improved characteristics Carbon nanotubes and nanofibers show promise for use in sensor development, electrodes and other biomedical applications.

  2. Technology-Enabled Crime, Policing and Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuade, Sam

    2006-01-01

    Crime, policing and security are enabled by and co-evolve with technologies that make them possible. As criminals compete with security and policing officials for technological advantage perpetually complex crime, policing and security results in relatively confusing and therefore unmanageable threats to society. New, adaptive and ordinary crimes…

  3. Action Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Action learning is based on the premise that action and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable action, which has contributed to the growth of action learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in action learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…

  4. Enabling Family-Friendly Cultural Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Kate; Yen, Joyce W.; Riskin, Eve A.; Lange, Sheila Edwards

    2007-01-01

    Strategies to address the problem of work and family balance have begun emerging in recent years. Many American college and universities have begun to adopt this "family-friendly policies," such as tenure-clock extensions. Each of the policies to enable work and family balance, however, is situated within the broader academic culture. Departmental…

  5. Safely Enabling Low-Altitude Airspace Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Near-term Goal: Enable initial low-altitude airspace and UAS operations with demonstrated safety as early as possible, within 5 years. Long-term Goal: Accommodate increased UAS operations with highest safety, efficiency, and capacity as much autonomously as possible (10-15 years).

  6. Safely Enabling Low-Altitude Airspace Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Near-term Goal - Enable initial low-altitude airspace and UAS operations with demonstrated safety as early as possible, within 5 years. Long-term Goal - Accommodate increased UAS operations with highest safety, efficiency, and capacity as much autonomously as possible (10-15 years).

  7. Fluorescent particles enable visualization of gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. J.

    1968-01-01

    Fluorescent particles enable visualization of the flow patterns of gases at slow velocities. Through a transparent section in the gas line, a camera views the visible light emitted by the particles carried by the gas stream. Fine definition of the particle tracks are obtained at slow camera shutter speeds.

  8. Enabling a Comprehensive Teaching Strategy: Video Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecht, H. David; Ogilby, Suzanne M.

    2008-01-01

    This study empirically tests the feasibility and effectiveness of video lectures as a form of video instruction that enables a comprehensive teaching strategy used throughout a traditional classroom course. It examines student use patterns and the videos' effects on student learning, using qualitative and nonparametric statistical analyses of…

  9. 75 FR 13235 - IP-Enabled Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... 47 CFR 63.60(a) and (f), published on August 7, 2009 (74 FR 39551), were approved by the Office of... published a document in the Federal Register, 74 FR 39551, August 7, 2009, that sets forth an effective date... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 63 IP-Enabled Services AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission ACTION: Final...

  10. Femtosecond laser enabled keratoplasty for advanced keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Yathish; Nagaraja, Harsha; Kugar, Thungappa; Shetty, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and advantages of femtosecond laser enabled keratoplasty (FLEK) over conventional penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) in advanced keratoconus. Materials and Methods: Detailed review of literature of published randomized controlled trials of operative techniques in PKP and FLEK. Results: Fifteen studies were identified, analyzed, and compared with our outcome. FLEK was found to have better outcome in view of better and earlier stabilization uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and better refractive outcomes with low astigmatism as compared with conventional PKP. Wound healing also was noticed to be earlier, enabling early suture removal in FLEK. Conclusions: Studies relating to FLEK have shown better results than conventional PKP, however further studies are needed to assess the safety and intraoperative complications of the procedure. PMID:23925340

  11. Enabling Semantic Interoperability for Earth System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, R.

    2004-12-01

    Data interoperability across heterogeneous systems can be hampered by differences in terminology, particularly when multiple scientific communities are involved. To reconcile differences in semantics, a common semantic framework was created as a collection of ontologies. Such a shared understanding of concepts enables ontology-aware software tools to understand the meaning of terms in documents and web pages. The ontologies were created as part of the Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) prototype. The ontologies provide a representation of Earth system science knowledge and associated data, organized in a scalable structure, bulding on the keywords developed by the NASA Global Change Master Directory (GCMD). An integrated search tool consults the ontologies to enable searches without an exact term match. The ontologies can be used within other applications (such as Earth Science Markup Language descriptors) and future semantic web services in Earth system science.

  12. NASP - Enabling new space launch options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froning, David; Gaubatz, William; Mathews, George

    1990-01-01

    Successful NASP developments in the United States are bringing about the possibility of effective, fully reusable vehicles for transport of people and cargo between earth and space. These developments include: extension of airbreathing propulsion to a much higher speed; densification of propellants for greater energy per unit volume of mass; structures with much greater strength-to-weight at high temperatures; computational advancements that enable more optimal design and integration of airframes, engines and controls; and advances in avionics, robotics, artificial intelligence and automation that enable accomplishment of earth-to-orbit (ETO) operations with much less manpower support and cost. This paper describes the relative magnitude of improvement that these developments may provide.

  13. Enabling Technologies for Petascale Electromagnetic Accelerator Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Li-Xin; Prudencio, Ernesto; Schussman, Greg; Uplenchwar, Ravi; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok; Luo, Xiaojun; Shephard, Mark; /Rensselaer Poly.

    2007-11-09

    The SciDAC2 accelerator project at SLAC aims to simulate an entire three-cryomodule radio frequency (RF) unit of the International Linear Collider (ILC) main Linac. Petascale computing resources supported by advances in Applied Mathematics (AM) and Computer Science (CS) and INCITE Program are essential to enable such very large-scale electromagnetic accelerator simulations required by the ILC Global Design Effort. This poster presents the recent advances and achievements in the areas of CS/AM through collaborations.

  14. A novel guide catheter enabling intracranial placement.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael C; Sherma, Arun K; Surdell, Daniel; Shaibani, Ali; Bendok, Bernard R

    2009-11-15

    We describe use of a novel guide, catheter with a soft and pliable, 6-cm or 12-cm distal segment that enables distal, including intracranial, placement--the Neuron guide catheter (Penumbra, San Leandro, CA)--in the treatment of 11 cases with a range of neuroendovascular lesions. We were able to advance the Neuron guide catheter to the intended level in each case and suffered no complications related to catheter spasm, dissection, thrombosis or thromboembolism. PMID:19670314

  15. Enabling international adoption of LOINC through translation

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, Daniel J.; Chiaravalloti, Maria Teresa; Hook, John; McDonald, Clement J.

    2012-01-01

    Interoperable health information exchange depends on adoption of terminology standards, but international use of such standards can be challenging because of language differences between local concept names and the standard terminology. To address this important barrier, we describe the evolution of an efficient process for constructing translations of LOINC terms names, the foreign language functions in RELMA, and the current state of translations in LOINC. We also present the development of the Italian translation to illustrate how translation is enabling adoption in international contexts. We built a tool that finds the unique list of LOINC Parts that make up a given set of LOINC terms. This list enables translation of smaller pieces like the core component “hepatitis c virus” separately from all the suffixes that could appear with it, such “Ab.IgG”, “DNA”, and “RNA”. We built another tool that generates a translation of a full LOINC name from all of these atomic pieces. As of version 2.36 (June 2011), LOINC terms have been translated into 9 languages from 15 linguistic variants other than its native English. The five largest linguistic variants have all used the Part-based translation mechanism. However, even with efficient tools and processes, translation of standard terminology is a complex undertaking. Two of the prominent linguistic challenges that translators have faced include: the approach to handling acronyms and abbreviations, and the differences in linguistic syntax (e.g. word order) between languages. LOINC’s open and customizable approach has enabled many different groups to create translations that met their needs and matched their resources. Distributing the standard and its many language translations at no cost worldwide accelerates LOINC adoption globally, and is an important enabler of interoperable health information exchange PMID:22285984

  16. NASA Missions Enabled by Space Nuclear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.; Schmidt, George R.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Space Missions that are enabled by Space Nuclear Systems. The topics include: 1) Space Nuclear System Applications; 2) Trade Space for Electric Power Systems; 3) Power Generation Specific Energy Trade Space; 4) Radioisotope Power Generation; 5) Radioisotope Missions; 6) Fission Power Generation; 7) Solar Powered Lunar Outpost; 8) Fission Powered Lunar Outpost; 9) Fission Electric Power Generation; and 10) Fission Nuclear Thermal Propulsion.

  17. Delivering compassionate care: the enablers and barriers.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Angela; O'Brien, Mary R; Kirton, Jennifer A; Zubairu, Kate; Bray, Lucy

    The importance of providing compassionate care to patients is well established. While compassionate care can be understood as an individual response to others' vulnerability, it is acknowledged that healthcare environments can impact significantly on this aspect of practice. This study sought to explore how health professionals and pre-qualifying healthcare students (HCS) understand compassionate care and factors that hinder or enable them to practice compassionately. The perceptions of health professionals (n=146) and HCS (n=166) registered at a university in Northwest England were explored using mixed methods. This article reports on the data gained from the qualitative interviews and responses to open-text questions from the mainly quantitative questionnaire. The findings are discussed under the following themes: individual and relationship factors that impact on compassionate care practice; organisational factors that impact on the clinical environment and team; and leadership factors that hinder or enable a compassionate care culture. This article argues that there are a number of enabling factors that enhance a culture conducive to providing compassionate care. These include leaders who act as positive role models, good relationships between team members and a focus on staff wellbeing. PMID:26355360

  18. Design and Simulation of MEMS Enabled Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Mark

    2001-03-01

    Over the past two decades considerable progress in microsystems (MEMS) fabrication technologies has been made resulting in a variety of commercially successful devices. Most of these devices have required application specific fabrication steps, which must be developed, and the lack of proper design tools often resulted in repeated prototyping that was expensive and time consuming. Further development of MEMS enabled commercial products and reduction of the time to market requires implementation of a concurrent design methodology through better design tools and standardization of the fabrication processes. The cross-disciplinary nature of MEMS-Enabled Systems necessitates designers with different backgrounds to work together in understanding the effects of one sub-system on another and this requires a top-down approach to integrated system design. Design tools that can facilitate this communication and reduce the need for excessive prototype fabrication and test iterations and significantly reduce cost and time-to-market are vitally important. The main focus of this article is to describe the top-down design methodology and and ongoing research on tools that facilitate concurrent design of MEMS enabled systems.

  19. Technology Enabling the First 100 Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The discoveries of the first 100 exoplanets by precise radial velocities in the late 1990's at Lick Observatory and Observatoire de Haute-Provence were enabled by several technological advances and a cultural one. A key ingredient was a cross-dispersed echelle spectrometer at a stable, coude focus, with a CCD detector, offering high spectral resolution, large wavelength coverage, and a linear response to photons. A second ingredient was a computer capable of storing the megabyte images from such spectrometers and analyzing them for Doppler shifts. Both Lick and OHP depended on these advents. A third ingredient was a stable wavelength calibration. Here, two technologies emerged independently, with iodine gas employed by Marcy's group (used first by solar physicists doing helioseismology) and simultaneous thorium-argon spectra (enabled by fiber optics) used by Mayor's group. A final ingredient was a new culture emerging in the 1990's of forward-modeling of spectra on computers, enabled by the well-behaved photon noise of CCDs, giving Poisson errors amenable to rigorous statistical algorithms for measuring millipixel Doppler shifts. The prospect of detecting the 12 meter/sec reflex velocity (1/100 pixel) of a Jupiter-like planet was considered impossible, except to a few who asked, "What actually limits Doppler precision?". Inspired insights were provided by Robert Howard, Paul Schechter, Bruce Campbell, and Gordon Walker, leading to the first 100 exoplanets.

  20. Web-enabling technologies for the factory floor: a web-enabling strategy for emanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velez, Ricardo; Lastra, Jose L. M.; Tuokko, Reijo O.

    2001-10-01

    This paper is intended to address the different technologies available for Web-enabling of the factory floor. It will give an overview of the importance of Web-enabling of the factory floor, in the application of the concepts of flexible and intelligent manufacturing, in conjunction with e-commerce. As a last section, it will try to define a Web-enabling strategy for the application in eManufacturing. This is made under the scope of the electronics manufacturing industry, so every application, technology or related matter is presented under such scope.

  1. Concept Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidya, Narendera

    This document, published in India by the Regional College of Education, deals with 13 subjects: the tough context (thinking), definitions of concept, functions of concept, the process of concept formation, discriminant learning, mediation process, second signalling system, factors affecting concept formation, studies in concept formation, the…

  2. Sensor Web Enablement for Coastal Buoy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Y.; Durbha, S. S.; King, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    Coastal buoys and stations provide frequent, high-quality marine observations for weather service, public safety, atmospheric, and oceanographic study. However, sharing of the generated datasets, information, and results, between geographically distributed organizations often proves to be challenging. This is due to the complicated steps involved in data discovery and conversion of the data into usable information due to problems of syntactic, structural, and semantic heterogeneity in the datasets. Therefore, a standardized modeling framework is desired for the coastal buoys to provide enhanced capabilities for interoperability and to better disseminate the information. This study is developing an interoperable framework for coastal buoys using Sensor Model Language (SensorML) and other components (e.g., Observations & Measurements Schema (O&M), Transducer Markup Language (TransducerML), Sensor Observation Service (SOS), etc) of the OpenGeospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE). SensorML is a standard for the description of measurement devices and more complex measurement systems, in order to enable automatic processing of sensor data by generic software. In this study, buoys operated by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) with different payloads (e.g., ARES, DACT, DART, GSBP, MARS, and VEEP) were described using SensorML. Each of these payloads has a variety of sensors used to measure the marine parameters (e.g., sea surface temperature, wind direction, wind speed, water level). Our framework of the proposed Coastal Sensor Web Enablement (CSWE) middleware for buoy systems is built upon the existing OGC web services. The Web service specifications such as Sensor Planning Service (SPS), Sensor Observation Service (SOS), and Sensor Alert Service (SAS) define how data collection requests are expressed, observations retrieved, and alert or alarm conditions defined. The integration of these components in the proposed architecture provides access to

  3. Astronomy Enabled by Ares V -- A Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Daniel F.; Langhoff, S.; Worden, S. P.; Thronson, H.; Correll, R.

    2009-01-01

    On April 26th and 27th, 2008, NASA Ames Research Center hosted a two-day weekend workshop entitled "Astronomy Enabled by Ares V.” The primary goal of the workshop was to begin the process of bringing the Ares V designers together with senior representatives of the astronomical community to discuss the feasibility of using the Ares V heavy-lift launch vehicle to enable both new astronomical telescope architectures and new science. When developed in the latter part of the upcoming decade Ares V will be by far the most capable launch vehicle, with mass and volume launch capability many times that now available. The vehicle is understood to be the main workhorse in carrying humans and cargo to the Moon and beyond and, as such, is a key lynchpin for NASA's new space transportation architecture. Participants included experts from academia, industry, and NASA, including representatives of the Constellation architecture. Participants considered, in the context of identified astronomy needs: (1) Are there telescope concepts or missions capable of breakthrough science that are either enabled or significantly enhanced by the capabilities of an Ares V? (2) What demands do large telescopes place on the payload environment of the Ares V, such as mass, volume, fairing shape, cleanliness, acoustics, etc.? (3) What technology and environmental issues need to be addressed to facilitate launching observatories on an Ares V? (4) Is there a trade-off between mass and complexity that could reduce launch risk and, thereby, the cost of building large telescopes? We report on the results of this workshop, which included discussion on the operations model for such large-investment astronomical facilities. Such an operations model might well involve human and or robotic maintenance and servicing, in order to fully capitalize on the science potential of such facilities.

  4. A wireless sensor enabled by wireless power.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Hong; Lin, Chii-Ruey

    2012-01-01

    Through harvesting energy by wireless charging and delivering data by wireless communication, this study proposes the concept of a wireless sensor enabled by wireless power (WPWS) and reports the fabrication of a prototype for functional tests. One WPWS node consists of wireless power module and sensor module with different chip-type sensors. Its main feature is the dual antenna structure. Following RFID system architecture, a power harvesting antenna was designed to gather power from a standard reader working in the 915 MHz band. Referring to the Modbus protocol, the other wireless communication antenna was integrated on a node to send sensor data in parallel. The dual antenna structure integrates both the advantages of an RFID system and a wireless sensor. Using a standard UHF RFID reader, WPWS can be enabled in a distributed area with a diameter up to 4 m. Working status is similar to that of a passive tag, except that a tag can only be queried statically, while the WPWS can send dynamic data from the sensors. The function is the same as a wireless sensor node. Different WPWSs equipped with temperature and humidity, optical and airflow velocity sensors are tested in this study. All sensors can send back detection data within 8 s. The accuracy is within 8% deviation compared with laboratory equipment. A wireless sensor network enabled by wireless power should be a totally wireless sensor network using WPWS. However, distributed WPWSs only can form a star topology, the simplest topology for constructing a sensor network. Because of shielding effects, it is difficult to apply other complex topologies. Despite this limitation, WPWS still can be used to extend sensor network applications in hazardous environments. Further research is needed to improve WPWS to realize a totally wireless sensor network. PMID:23443370

  5. Small-RPS Enabled Mars Rover Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.

    2004-01-01

    Both the MER and the Mars Pathfinder rovers operated on Mars in an energy-limited mode, since the solar panels generated power during daylight hours only. At other times the rovers relied on power stored in batteries. In comparison, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) offer a power-enabled paradigm, where power can be generated for long mission durations (measured in years), independently from the Sun, and on a continuous basis. A study was performed at PL to assess the feasibility of a small-RPS enabled MER-class rover concept and any associated advantages of its mission on Mars. The rover concept relied on design heritage from MER with two significant changes. First, the solar panels were replaced with two single GPHS module based small-RPSs. Second, the Mossbauer spectroscope was substituted with a laser Raman spectroscope, in order to move towards MEPAG defined astrobiology driven science goals. The highest power requirements were contributed to mobility and telecommunication type operating modes, hence influencing power system sizing. The resulting hybrid power system included two small-RPSs and two batteries. Each small-RPS was assumed to generate 50We of power or 62OWh/sol of energy (BOL), comparable to that of MER. The two 8Ah batteries were considered available during peak power usage. Mission architecture, power trades, science instruments, data, communication, thermal and radiation environments, mobility, mass issues were also addressed. The study demonstrated that a new set of RPS-enabled rover missions could be envisioned for Mars exploration within the next decade, targeting astrobiology oriented science objectives, while powered by 2 to 4 GPHS modules.

  6. A Wireless Sensor Enabled by Wireless Power

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Da-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Hong; Lin, Chii-Ruey

    2012-01-01

    Through harvesting energy by wireless charging and delivering data by wireless communication, this study proposes the concept of a wireless sensor enabled by wireless power (WPWS) and reports the fabrication of a prototype for functional tests. One WPWS node consists of wireless power module and sensor module with different chip-type sensors. Its main feature is the dual antenna structure. Following RFID system architecture, a power harvesting antenna was designed to gather power from a standard reader working in the 915 MHz band. Referring to the Modbus protocol, the other wireless communication antenna was integrated on a node to send sensor data in parallel. The dual antenna structure integrates both the advantages of an RFID system and a wireless sensor. Using a standard UHF RFID reader, WPWS can be enabled in a distributed area with a diameter up to 4 m. Working status is similar to that of a passive tag, except that a tag can only be queried statically, while the WPWS can send dynamic data from the sensors. The function is the same as a wireless sensor node. Different WPWSs equipped with temperature and humidity, optical and airflow velocity sensors are tested in this study. All sensors can send back detection data within 8 s. The accuracy is within 8% deviation compared with laboratory equipment. A wireless sensor network enabled by wireless power should be a totally wireless sensor network using WPWS. However, distributed WPWSs only can form a star topology, the simplest topology for constructing a sensor network. Because of shielding effects, it is difficult to apply other complex topologies. Despite this limitation, WPWS still can be used to extend sensor network applications in hazardous environments. Further research is needed to improve WPWS to realize a totally wireless sensor network. PMID:23443370

  7. Essays on Technology-Enabled Platforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Tat Koon

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three studies that examine dynamics on Business-to-Business (B2B) exchanges and crowd-based design contest platforms. In the first study, we examine trust formation and development in global buyer-supplier relationships. Trust affects all business relationships, especially global B2B transactions due to the distances…

  8. Enabling Large Focal Plane Arrays Through Mosaic Hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Leong, Edward; Costen, Nick P.; Sharp, Elmer; Adachi, Tomoko; Benford, Dominic J.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated advances in mosaic hybridization that will enable very large format far-infrared detectors. Specifically we have produced electrical detector models via mosaic hybridization yielding superconducting circuit patbs by hybridizing separately fabricated sub-units onto a single detector unit. The detector model was made on a 100mm diameter wafer while four model readout quadrant chips were made from a separate 100mm wafer. The individually fabric.ted parts were hybridized using a Suss FCI50 flip chip bonder to assemble the detector-readout stack. Once all of the hybridized readouts were in place, a single, large and thick silicon substrate was placed on the stack and attached with permanent epoxy to provide strength and a Coefficient of Thermal Expansion match to the silicon components underneath. Wirebond pads on the readout chips connect circuits to warm readout electronics; and were used to validate the successful superconducting electrical interconnection of the model mosaic-hybrid detector. This demonstration is directly scalable to 150 mm diameter wafers, enabling pixel areas over ten times the area currently available.

  9. Enabling Large Focal Plane Arrays Through Mosaic Hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Leong, Edward; Costen, Nicholas P.; Sharp, Elmer; Adachi, Tomoko; Benford, Dominic J.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated advances in mosaic hybridization that will enable very large format far-infrared detectors. Specifically we have produced electrical detector models via mosaic hybridization yielding superconducting circuit paths by hybridizing separately fabricated sub-units onto a single detector unit. The detector model was made on a 100mm diameter wafer while four model readout quadrant chips were made from a separate 100mm wafer. The individually fabricated parts were hybridized using a flip-chip bonder to assemble the detector-readout stack. Once all of the hybridized readouts were in place, a single, large and thick silicon substrate was placed on the stack and attached with permanent epoxy to provide strength and a Coefficient of Thermal Expansion match to the silicon components underneath. Wirebond pads on the readout chips connect circuits to warm readout electronics; and were used to validate the successful superconducting electrical interconnection of the model mosaic-hybrid detector. This demonstration is directly scalable to 150 mm diameter wafers, enabling pixel areas over ten times the area currently available.

  10. Experiments Enabled by a New High-Resolution Positron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natisin, Mike; Danielson, James; Surko, Cliff

    2016-05-01

    The ability to make state-resolved measurements of positron interactions with atoms and molecules is limited by difficulties encountered in creating beams with narrow energy spreads. Recent experiments and simulations of buffer gas positron cooling and trap-based beam formation have enabled the design and construction of a cryogenic buffer-gas trap with total beam energy spreads as low as 7 meV FWHM and temporal spreads of sub-microsecond duration. The potential effect of this narrow energy spread on the ability to probe new physics in positron scattering and annihilation experiments will be discussed. For example, beams with such energy spreads are expected to enable the first measurements of state-resolved excitation of molecular rotations by positron impact (i.e., H2). Further, these narrow spreads and resulting enhanced resolving power are expected to permit the study of new features in annihilation energy spectra, such as possible overtone, combination, and IR-inactive vibrational modes in Feshbach-resonant positron annihilation. Work supported by NSF Grant PHY-1401794.

  11. Solar vapor generation enabled by nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Oara; Urban, Alexander S; Day, Jared; Lal, Surbhi; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2013-01-22

    Solar illumination of broadly absorbing metal or carbon nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid produces vapor without the requirement of heating the fluid volume. When particles are dispersed in water at ambient temperature, energy is directed primarily to vaporization of water into steam, with a much smaller fraction resulting in heating of the fluid. Sunlight-illuminated particles can also drive H(2)O-ethanol distillation, yielding fractions significantly richer in ethanol content than simple thermal distillation. These phenomena can also enable important compact solar applications such as sterilization of waste and surgical instruments in resource-poor locations. PMID:23157159

  12. Camera-enabled techniques for organic synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Richard J; O’Brien, Matthew; Browne, Duncan L

    2013-01-01

    Summary A great deal of time is spent within synthetic chemistry laboratories on non-value-adding activities such as sample preparation and work-up operations, and labour intensive activities such as extended periods of continued data collection. Using digital cameras connected to computer vision algorithms, camera-enabled apparatus can perform some of these processes in an automated fashion, allowing skilled chemists to spend their time more productively. In this review we describe recent advances in this field of chemical synthesis and discuss how they will lead to advanced synthesis laboratories of the future. PMID:23766820

  13. The role of CORBA in enabling telemedicine

    SciTech Connect

    Forslund, D.W.

    1997-07-01

    One of the most powerful tools available for telemedicine is a multimedia medical record accessible over a wide area and simultaneously editable by multiple physicians. The ability to do this through an intuitive interface linking multiple distributed data repositories while maintaining full data integrity is a fundamental enabling technology in healthcare. The author discusses the role of distributed object technology using CORBA in providing this capability including an example of such a system (TeleMed) which can be accessed through the World Wide Web. Issues of security, scalability, data integrity, and useability are emphasized.

  14. Transparent displays enabled by resonant nanoparticle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Qiu, Wenjun; Shapira, Ofer; Delacy, Brendan G.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2014-01-01

    The ability to display graphics and texts on a transparent screen can enable many useful applications. Here we create a transparent display by projecting monochromatic images onto a transparent medium embedded with nanoparticles that selectively scatter light at the projected wavelength. We describe the optimal design of such nanoparticles, and experimentally demonstrate this concept with a blue-color transparent display made of silver nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. This approach has attractive features including simplicity, wide viewing angle, scalability to large sizes and low cost.

  15. WSKE: Web Server Key Enabled Cookies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masone, Chris; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Smith, Sean

    In this paper, we present the design and prototype of a new approach to cookie management: if a server deposits a cookie only after authenticating itself via the SSL handshake, the browser will return the cookie only to a server that can authenticate itself, via SSL, to the same keypair. This approach can enable usable but secure client authentication. This approach can improve the usability of server authentication by clients. This approach is superior to the prior work on Active Cookies in that it defends against both DNS spoofing and IP spoofing—and does not require binding a user's interaction with a server to individual IP addresses.

  16. ENABLER Nuclear Propulsion System Conceptual Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauley, Keith A.; Woodham, Kurt; Ohi, Don; Haga, Heath; Henderson, Bo

    2004-02-01

    The Titan Corporation conducted a systems engineering study to develop an overall architecture that meets both the articulated and unarticulated requirements on the Prometheus Program with the least development effort. Key elements of the Titan-designed ENABLER system include a thermal fission reactor, thermionic power converters, sodium heat pipes, ion thruster engines, and a radiation shield and deployable truss to protect the payload. The overall design is scaleable over a wide range of power requirements from 10s of kilowatts to 10s of megawatts.

  17. Enabling Rapid Naval Architecture Design Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Michael A.; Dufresne, Stephane; Balestrini-Robinson, Santiago; Mavris, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Well accepted conceptual ship design tools can be used to explore a design space, but more precise results can be found using detailed models in full-feature computer aided design programs. However, defining a detailed model can be a time intensive task and hence there is an incentive for time sensitive projects to use conceptual design tools to explore the design space. In this project, the combination of advanced aerospace systems design methods and an accepted conceptual design tool facilitates the creation of a tool that enables the user to not only visualize ship geometry but also determine design feasibility and estimate the performance of a design.

  18. Agility enabled by the SEMATECH CIM framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawker, Scott; Waskiewicz, Fred

    1997-01-01

    The survivor in today's market environment is agile: able to survive and thrive in a market place marked by rapid, continuous change. For manufacturers, this includes an ability to rapidly develop, deploy and reconfigure manufacturing information and control systems. The SEMATECH CIM framework defines an application integration architecture and standard application components that enable agile manufacturing information and control systems. Further, the CIM framework and its evolution process foster virtual organizations of suppliers and manufacturers, combining their products and capabilities into an agile manufacturing information and control system.

  19. Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  20. Interaction-enabled topological crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapa, Matthew F.; Teo, Jeffrey C. Y.; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2016-03-01

    In this article we provide a general mechanism for generating interaction-enabled fermionic topological phases. We illustrate the mechanism with crystalline symmetry-protected topological phases in one, two, and three spatial dimensions. These nontrivial phases require interactions for their existence, and in the cases we consider, the free-fermion classification yields only a trivial phase. For the one- and two-dimensional phases we consider, we provide explicit exactly solvable models which realize the interaction-enabled phases. Similar to the interpretation of the Kitaev Majorana wire as a mean-field p -wave superconductor Hamiltonian arising from an interacting model with quartic interactions, we show that our systems can be interpreted as "mean-field" charge-4 e superconductors arising, e.g., from an interacting model with eight-body interactions or through another physical mechanism. The quartet superconducting nature allows for the teleportation of full Cooper pairs and, in two dimensions, for interesting semiclassical crystalline defects with non-Abelian anyon bound states.

  1. MENTOR: an enabler for interoperable intelligent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarraipa, João; Jardim-Goncalves, Ricardo; Steiger-Garcao, Adolfo

    2010-07-01

    A community with knowledge organisation based on ontologies will enable an increase in the computational intelligence of its information systems. However, due to the worldwide diversity of communities, a high number of knowledge representation elements, which are not semantically coincident, have appeared representing the same segment of reality, becoming a barrier to business communications. Even if a domain community uses the same kind of technologies in its information systems, such as ontologies, it doesn't solve its semantics differences. In order to solve this interoperability problem, a solution is to use a reference ontology as an intermediary in the communications between the community enterprises and the outside, while allowing the enterprises to keep their own ontology and semantics unchanged internally. This work proposes MENTOR, a methodology to support the development of a common reference ontology for a group of organisations sharing the same business domain. This methodology is based on the mediator ontology (MO) concept, which assists the semantic transformations among each enterprise's ontology and the referential one. The MO enables each organisation to keep its own terminology, glossary and ontological structures, while providing seamless communication and interaction with the others.

  2. High-performance microlasers enable display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eric B.; Hargis, David E.; Bergstedt, Robert; Dion, Al; Hurtado, Randy; Solone, Paul J.

    1999-08-01

    Recent advances in compact, air-cooled, diode-pumped solid- state visible microlasers have enabled the development of portable laser display systems. In addition to the added benefits of large color gamut, invariant color accuracy, image uniformity, high contrast, and large depth of focus inherent in the microlaser design, the reliability of these all-solid state red-green-blue (RGB) sources make them attractive for display applications. Compact, multi-watt laser modules have been demonstrated for use as a high brightness 'laser light engine' for replacing arc lamps in LCD/DMD type display configurations. Using this 'backlit' approach, a microlaser- based projector has been demonstrated, providing greater than 500 lumens at 1280 X 1024 resolution using reflective AMLCD light valves. Also being developed is an airborne tactical HMD system wherein the laser module is remotely coupled to a subtractive color LCD assembly through an optical fiber to provide a more than 24,000,000 (twenty-four million) cd/m2 luminance for illuminating the LCD assembly. This technology could be applied to a variety of cockpit displays providing sunlight readable illumination for both head-down and head-up backlit display configurations. The advantages of the microlaser technology will enable further applications in other military platforms such as command and control centers, simulators and HMDs. Longer term potential includes high end CAD workstations, entertainment systems, and electronic cinema.

  3. Blue space geographies: Enabling health in place.

    PubMed

    Foley, Ronan; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Drawing from research on therapeutic landscapes and relationships between environment, health and wellbeing, we propose the idea of 'healthy blue space' as an important new development Complementing research on healthy green space, blue space is defined as; 'health-enabling places and spaces, where water is at the centre of a range of environments with identifiable potential for the promotion of human wellbeing'. Using theoretical ideas from emotional and relational geographies and critical understandings of salutogenesis, the value of blue space to health and wellbeing is recognised and evaluated. Six individual papers from five different countries consider how health can be enabled in mixed blue space settings. Four sub-themes; embodiment, inter-subjectivity, activity and meaning, document multiple experiences within a range of healthy blue spaces. Finally, we suggest a considerable research agenda - theoretical, methodological and applied - for future work within different forms of blue space. All are suggested as having public health policy relevance in social and public space. PMID:26238330

  4. The Master Enabler: In Orbit Servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Benjamin B.; Kienlen, Michael; Naasz, Bo; Roberts, Brian; Deweese, Keith; Cassidy, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most noteworthy missions in space exploration have occurred in the last two decades and owe their success to on-orbit servicing. The tremendously successful Hubble Space Telescope repair and upgrade missions, as well as the completed assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) and its full utilization, lead us to the next chapter and set of challenges. These include fully exploiting the many space systems already launched, assembling large structures in situ thereby enabling new scientific discoveries, and providing systems that reliably and cost-effectively support the next steps in space exploration. In-orbit servicing is a tool--a tool that can serve as the master enabler to create space architectures that would otherwise be unattainable. This paper will survey how NASA's satellite-servicing technology development efforts are being applied to the planning and execution of two such ambitious missions, specifically asteroid capture and the in-space assembly of a very large life-finding telescope.

  5. In-Orbit Servicing: The Master Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Benjamin B.; Kienlen, Michael; Naasz, Bo; Roberts, Brian; Deweese, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most noteworthy missions in space exploration have occurred in the last two decades and owe their success to on-orbit servicing. The tremendously successful Hubble Space Telescope repair and upgrade missions, as well as the completed assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) and its full utilization, lead us to the next chapter and set of challenges. These include fully exploiting the many space systems already launched, assembling large structures in situ thereby enabling new scientific discoveries, and providing systems that reliably and cost-effectively support the next steps in space exploration. In-orbit servicing is a tool--a tool that can serve as the master enabler to create space architectures that would otherwise be unattainable. This paper will survey how NASA's satellite-servicing technology development efforts are being applied to the planning and execution of two such ambitious missions, specifically asteroid capture and the in-space assembly of a very large life-finding telescope.

  6. The "Master Enabler" - In-Orbit Servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Benjamin; Kienlen, Michael; Naasz, Bo; Roberts, Brian; Deweese, Keith; Cassidy, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most noteworthy missions in space exploration have occurred in the last two decades and owe their success to on-orbit servicing. The tremendously successful Hubble Space Telescope repair and upgrade missions, as well as the completed assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) and its full utilization, lead us to the next chapter and set of challenges. These include fully exploiting the many space systems already launched, assembling large structures in situ thereby enabling new scientific discoveries, and providing systems that reliably and cost-effectively support the next steps in space exploration. In-orbit servicing is a tool-a tool that can serve as the master enabler to create space architectures that would otherwise be unattainable. This paper will survey how NASA's satellite-servicing technology development efforts are being applied to the planning and execution of two such ambitious missions, specifically asteroid capture and the in-space assembly of a very large life-finding telescope.

  7. Ultra-precision: enabling our future.

    PubMed

    Shore, Paul; Morantz, Paul

    2012-08-28

    This paper provides a perspective on the development of ultra-precision technologies: What drove their evolution and what do they now promise for the future as we face the consequences of consumption of the Earth's finite resources? Improved application of measurement is introduced as a major enabler of mass production, and its resultant impact on wealth generation is considered. This paper identifies the ambitions of the defence, automotive and microelectronics sectors as important drivers of improved manufacturing accuracy capability and ever smaller feature creation. It then describes how science fields such as astronomy have presented significant precision engineering challenges, illustrating how these fields of science have achieved unprecedented levels of accuracy, sensitivity and sheer scale. Notwithstanding their importance to science understanding, many science-driven ultra-precision technologies became key enablers for wealth generation and other well-being issues. Specific ultra-precision machine tools important to major astronomy programmes are discussed, as well as the way in which subsequently evolved machine tools made at the beginning of the twenty-first century, now provide much wider benefits. PMID:22802499

  8. Nano-Enabled SERS Reporting Photosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Arash; Roxin, Áron; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    To impart effective cellular damage via photodynamic therapy (PDT), it is vital to deliver the appropriate light dose and photosensitizer concentration, and to monitor the PDT dose delivered at the site of interest. In vivo monitoring of photosensitizers has in large part relied on their fluorescence emission. Palladium-containing photosensitizers have shown promising clinical results by demonstrating near full conversion of light to PDT activity at the cost of having undetectable fluorescence. We demonstrate that, through the coupling of plasmonic nanoparticles with palladium-photosensitizers, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) provides both reporting and monitoring capability to otherwise quiescent molecules. Nano-enabled SERS reporting of photosensitizers allows for the decoupling of the therapeutic and imaging mechanisms so that both phenomena can be optimized independently. Most importantly, the design enables the use of the same laser wavelength to stimulate both the PDT and imaging features, opening the potential for real-time dosimetry of photosensitizer concentration and PDT dose delivery by SERS monitoring. PMID:25767614

  9. Enabling techniques for asynchronous coherent OCDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Wada, Naoya; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2005-11-01

    The coherent OCDMA system could suffer from severe multiple access interference (MAI) and beat noise, which limit the maximum number of active users that can be supported in a network. One effective method to reduce the beat noise as well as the MAI noise is to lower the interference level by adopting ultra-long optical code. Applying optical thresholding technique is also crucial to enable data-rate detection for achieving a practical OCDMA system. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the key enabling techniques for asynchronous coherent OCDMA: the novel encoder/decoders including spatial lightwave phase modulator, micro-ring resonator for spectral phase coding and superstructured FBG (SSFBG) and AWG type encode/decoder for time-spreading coding; optical thresholding techniques with PPLN and nonlinearity in fiber. The FEC has also been applied in OCDMA system recently. With 511-chip SSFBG and SC-based optical thresholder, 10-user, truly-asynchronous gigabit OCDMA transmission has been successfully achieved. Most recently, a record throughput 12×10.71 Gbps truly-asynchronous OCDMA has been demonstrated by using the 16×16 ports AWG-type encoder/decoder and FEC transmit ITU-T G.709 OTN frames.

  10. Enabling collaboration across communities through blogs and mashups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blower, Jon; Frey, Jeremy; Haines, Keith; Gemmell, Alastair; Milsted, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The use of Web technologies to visualize and explore geoscientific data is now well-established (e.g. [1]). Many systems are now available, based upon standard approaches, to provide interactive online capabilities for publishing data, hiding much of the complexities of the underlying data and infrastructure. Recently, progress has been made in moving beyond simple visualization to enabling intercomparison of diverse datasets (e.g. [2]), supporting scientific work in model validation, data assimilation and other areas. These systems typically lack an important feature, namely the ability of the user to contribute to the information on these sites, rather than simply acting as a consumer. We present early results from two recent projects that apply Web 2.0 and social networking techniques to enable collaborative geoscientific work on the Web in which user-contributed material is just as important as that provided by the central data providers. "BlogMyData" combines an interactive online visualization system (Godiva2) with a sophisticated blogging engine, which was originally designed for laboratory chemists. Scientists use the blog to make comments on the visualizations they see, for example to hold discussions on particular features of interest, such as a potential problem with a numerical forecast model. The blog entries are geospatially tagged, meaning that comments can be discovered by location and time, enabling scientists to find new collaborators in similar areas of interest. A use case in climate reanalysis will be discussed. "MashMyData" builds on previous work in online intercomparison systems by allowing users to upload their own data for automated intercomparison with other datasets. This brings complex datasets within the reach of new communities; for example, we shall demonstrate a particular use case in which an ocean geochemist employs the system to compare her own temperature proxy data (derived from coccolithophore studies) with physical

  11. Proximity-enabled protein crosslinking through genetically encoding haloalkane unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zheng; Lacey, Vanessa K; Ren, Haiyan; Xu, Jing; Burban, David J; Jennings, Patricia A; Wang, Lei

    2014-02-17

    The selective generation of covalent bonds between and within proteins would provide new avenues for studying protein function and engineering proteins with new properties. New covalent bonds were genetically introduced into proteins by enabling an unnatural amino acid (Uaa) to selectively react with a proximal natural residue. This proximity-enabled bioreactivity was expanded to a series of haloalkane Uaas. Orthogonal tRNA/synthetase pairs were evolved to incorporate these Uaas, which only form a covalent thioether bond with cysteine when positioned in close proximity. By using the Uaa and cysteine, spontaneous covalent bond formation was demonstrated between an affibody and its substrate Z protein, thereby leading to irreversible binding, and within the affibody to increase its thermostability. This strategy of proximity-enabled protein crosslinking (PEPC) may be generally expanded to target different natural amino acids, thus providing diversity and flexibility in covalent bond formation for protein research and protein engineering. PMID:24449339

  12. Reck enables cerebrovascular development by promoting canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Florian; Carretero-Ortega, Jorge; Menéndez, Javier; Narvaez, Carlos; Sun, Belinda; Lancaster, Eva; Pershad, Valerie; Trzaska, Sean; Véliz, Evelyn; Kamei, Makoto; Prendergast, Andrew; Kidd, Kameha R; Shaw, Kenna M; Castranova, Daniel A; Pham, Van N; Lo, Brigid D; Martin, Benjamin L; Raible, David W; Weinstein, Brant M; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral vasculature provides the massive blood supply that the brain needs to grow and survive. By acquiring distinctive cellular and molecular characteristics it becomes the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a selectively permeable and protective interface between the brain and the peripheral circulation that maintains the extracellular milieu permissive for neuronal activity. Accordingly, there is great interest in uncovering the mechanisms that modulate the formation and differentiation of the brain vasculature. By performing a forward genetic screen in zebrafish we isolated no food for thought (nft (y72)), a recessive late-lethal mutant that lacks most of the intracerebral central arteries (CtAs), but not other brain blood vessels. We found that the cerebral vascularization deficit of nft (y72) mutants is caused by an inactivating lesion in reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs [reck; also known as suppressor of tumorigenicity 15 protein (ST15)], which encodes a membrane-anchored tumor suppressor glycoprotein. Our findings highlight Reck as a novel and pivotal modulator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway that acts in endothelial cells to enable intracerebral vascularization and proper expression of molecular markers associated with BBB formation. Additional studies with cultured endothelial cells suggest that, in other contexts, Reck impacts vascular biology via the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) cascade. Together, our findings have broad implications for both vascular and cancer biology. PMID:26657775

  13. Enabling technologies to advance microbial isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Microbial production of isoprenoids provides an attractive alternative to biomass extraction and chemical synthesis. Although widespread research aims for isoprenoid biosynthesis, it is still in its infancy in terms of delivering commercial products. Large barriers remain in realizing a cost-competitive process, for example, developing an optimal microbial cell factory. Here, we summarize the many tools and methods that have been developed in the metabolic engineering of isoprenoid production, with the advent of systems biology and synthetic biology, and discuss how these technologies advance to accelerate the design-build-test engineering cycle to obtain optimum microbial systems. It is anticipated that innovative combinations of new and existing technologies will continue to emerge, which will enable further development of microbial cell factories for commercial isoprenoid production. PMID:25549781

  14. Nanoplasmon-enabled macroscopic thermal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Gustav Edman; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2014-05-01

    In numerous applications of energy harvesting via transformation of light into heat the focus recently shifted towards highly absorptive nanoplasmonic materials. It is currently established that noble metals-based absorptive plasmonic platforms deliver significant light-capturing capability and can be viewed as super-absorbers of optical radiation. Naturally, approaches to the direct experimental probing of macroscopic temperature increase resulting from these absorbers are welcomed. Here we derive a general quantitative method of characterizing heat-generating properties of optically absorptive layers via macroscopic thermal imaging. We further monitor macroscopic areas that are homogeneously heated by several degrees with nanostructures that occupy a mere 8% of the surface, leaving it essentially transparent and evidencing significant heat generation capability of nanoplasmon-enabled light capture. This has a direct bearing to a large number of applications where thermal management is crucial.

  15. Microsystem enabled photovoltaic modules and systems

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sweatt, William C; Okandan, Murat

    2015-05-12

    A microsystem enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) module including: an absorber layer; a fixed optic layer coupled to the absorber layer; a translatable optic layer; a translation stage coupled between the fixed and translatable optic layers; and a motion processor electrically coupled to the translation stage to controls motion of the translatable optic layer relative to the fixed optic layer. The absorber layer includes an array of photovoltaic (PV) elements. The fixed optic layer includes an array of quasi-collimating (QC) micro-optical elements designed and arranged to couple incident radiation from an intermediate image formed by the translatable optic layer into one of the PV elements such that it is quasi-collimated. The translatable optic layer includes an array of focusing micro-optical elements corresponding to the QC micro-optical element array. Each focusing micro-optical element is designed to produce a quasi-telecentric intermediate image from substantially collimated radiation incident within a predetermined field of view.

  16. Corrigendum: Exogenous Attention Enables Perceptual Learning.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Szpiro, S. F. A., & Carrasco, M. (2015). Exogenous attention enables perceptual learning.Psychological Science, 26, 1854-1862. (Original DOI:10.1177/0956797615598976)In the second paragraph of the Testing Sessions section of this article, thetvalue for the between-group difference in spatial-frequency differences was incorrectly reported as 9.49,p> .1, rather than 0.95,p> .1. The sentence should read as follows:There was no significant difference between groups for the orientation differences,t(12) = 1.51,p> .1, or for the spatial-frequency differences,t(12) = 0.95,p> .1.Thus, the conclusion regarding the lack of significance remains the same. PMID:26935483

  17. Telexistence: Enabling Humans to Be Virtually Ubiquitous.

    PubMed

    Tachi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Telecommunication and remote-controlled operations are becoming increasingly common in our daily lives. While performing these operations, ideally users would feel as if they were actually present at the remote sites. However, the present commercially available telecommunication and telepresence systems do not provide the sensation of self-presence or self-existence, and hence, users do not get the feeling of being spatially present or that they are directly performing spatial tasks, rather than simply controlling them remotely. This article describes the TELESAR V telexistence master-slave system that enables a human user to feel present in a remote environment. TELESAR V can transmit not only visual and auditory sensations, but also haptic sensations, which are conveyed using the principle of haptic primary colors. PMID:26780759

  18. Enabling Computational Technologies for Terascale Scientific Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.

    2000-08-24

    We develop scalable algorithms and object-oriented code frameworks for terascale scientific simulations on massively parallel processors (MPPs). Our research in multigrid-based linear solvers and adaptive mesh refinement enables Laboratory programs to use MPPs to explore important physical phenomena. For example, our research aids stockpile stewardship by making practical detailed 3D simulations of radiation transport. The need to solve large linear systems arises in many applications, including radiation transport, structural dynamics, combustion, and flow in porous media. These systems result from discretizations of partial differential equations on computational meshes. Our first research objective is to develop multigrid preconditioned iterative methods for such problems and to demonstrate their scalability on MPPs. Scalability describes how total computational work grows with problem size; it measures how effectively additional resources can help solve increasingly larger problems. Many factors contribute to scalability: computer architecture, parallel implementation, and choice of algorithm. Scalable algorithms have been shown to decrease simulation times by several orders of magnitude.

  19. Enabling Communication in Emergency Response Environments

    PubMed Central

    Aldunate, Roberto G.; Schmidt, Klaus Nicholas; Herrera, Oriel

    2012-01-01

    Effective communication among first responders during response to natural and human-made large-scale catastrophes has increased tremendously during the last decade. However, most efforts to achieve a higher degree of effectiveness in communication lack synergy between the environment and the technology involved to support first responders operations. This article presents a natural and intuitive interface to support Stigmergy; or communication through the environment, based on intuitively marking and retrieving information from the environment with a pointer. A prototype of the system was built and tested in the field, however the pointing activity revealed challenges regarding accuracy due to limitations of the sensors used. The results obtained from these field tests were the basis for this research effort and will have the potential to enable communication through the environment for first responders operating in highly dynamical and inhospitable disaster relief environments. PMID:22778647

  20. Photonically-enabled RF spectrum analyzer demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkee, Elizabeth T.; Tsai, Ken; Smith, Andrew D.; Jung, T.; Lembo, Larry; Davis, Richard; Babbitt, W. Randall; Krishna-Mohan, R.; Cole, Zachary; Merkel, Kristian D.; Wagner, Kelvin H.

    2008-04-01

    A RF spectrum analyzer with high performance and unique capabilities that traditional all-electronic spectrum analyzers do not exhibit is demonstrated. The system is based on photonic signal processing techniques that have enabled us to demonstrate the spectral analysis of a 1.5 GHz bandwidth with a 1.4 ms update time and a resolution bandwidth of 31 kHz. We observed a 100% probability of intercept for all signals, including short pulses, during the measurement window. The spectrum analyzer operated over the 0.5 to 2.0 GHz range and exhibited a spur-free dynamic range of 42 dB. The potential applications of such a system are extensive and include: detection and location of transient electromagnetic signals, spectrum monitoring for adaptive communications such as spectrum-sensing cognitive radio, and battlefield spectrum management.

  1. Enabling a New Planning and Scheduling Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Davis, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    The Flight Projects Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is developing a new planning and scheduling environment and a new scheduling algorithm to enable a paradigm shift in planning and scheduling concepts. Over the past 33 years Marshall has developed and evolved a paradigm for generating payload timelines for Skylab, Spacelab, various other Shuttle payloads, and the International Space Station. The current paradigm starts by collecting the requirements, called "tasks models," from the scientists and technologists for the tasks that they want to be done. Because of shortcomings in the current modeling schema, some requirements are entered as notes. Next a cadre with knowledge of vehicle and hardware modifies these models to encompass and be compatible with the hardware model; again, notes are added when the modeling schema does not provide a better way to represent the requirements. Finally, another cadre further modifies the models to be compatible with the scheduling engine. This last cadre also submits the models to the scheduling engine or builds the timeline manually to accommodate requirements that are expressed in notes. A future paradigm would provide a scheduling engine that accepts separate science models and hardware models. The modeling schema would have the capability to represent all the requirements without resorting to notes. Furthermore, the scheduling engine would not require that the models be modified to account for the capabilities (limitations) of the scheduling engine. The enabling technology under development at Marshall has three major components. (1) A new modeling schema allows expressing all the requirements of the tasks without resorting to notes or awkward contrivances. The chosen modeling schema is both maximally expressive and easy to use. It utilizes graphics methods to show hierarchies of task constraints and networks of temporal relationships. (2) A new scheduling algorithm automatically schedules the models

  2. Enabling compassionate healthcare: perils, prospects and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, Russell

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging consensus that caring and compassion are under threat in the frenetic environment of modern healthcare. Enabling and sustaining compassionate care requires not only a focus on the needs of the patient, but also on those of the care giver. As such, threats and exhortations to health professionals are likely to have limited and perverse effects and it is to the organisational and system arrangements which support staff that attention should shift. Any approach to supporting compassionate care may work for some services, for some patients and staff, some of the time. No single approach is likely to be a panacea. Unravelling the contexts within which different approaches are effectual will allow for more selective development of support systems and interventions. PMID:24757687

  3. Health-Enabled Smart Sensor Fusion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ray

    2012-01-01

    A process was designed to fuse data from multiple sensors in order to make a more accurate estimation of the environment and overall health in an intelligent rocket test facility (IRTF), to provide reliable, high-confidence measurements for a variety of propulsion test articles. The object of the technology is to provide sensor fusion based on a distributed architecture. Specifically, the fusion technology is intended to succeed in providing health condition monitoring capability at the intelligent transceiver, such as RF signal strength, battery reading, computing resource monitoring, and sensor data reading. The technology also provides analytic and diagnostic intelligence at the intelligent transceiver, enhancing the IEEE 1451.x-based standard for sensor data management and distributions, as well as providing appropriate communications protocols to enable complex interactions to support timely and high-quality flow of information among the system elements.

  4. Enabling communication concurrency through flexible MPI endpoints

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dinan, James; Grant, Ryan E.; Balaji, Pavan; Goodell, David; Miller, Douglas; Snir, Marc; Thakur, Rajeev

    2014-09-23

    MPI defines a one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. This model captures many use cases effectively; however, it also limits communication concurrency and interoperability between MPI and programming models that utilize threads. Our paper describes the MPI endpoints extension, which relaxes the longstanding one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. Using endpoints, an MPI implementation can map separate communication contexts to threads, allowing them to drive communication independently. Also, endpoints enable threads to be addressable in MPI operations, enhancing interoperability between MPI and other programming models. Furthermore, these characteristics are illustrated through several examples and an empirical study thatmore » contrasts current multithreaded communication performance with the need for high degrees of communication concurrency to achieve peak communication performance.« less

  5. Laboratory Astrophysics: Enabling Scientific Discovery and Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, K.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Science Strategic Roadmap for Universe Exploration lays out a series of science objectives on a grand scale and discusses the various missions, over a wide range of wavelengths, which will enable discovery. Astronomical spectroscopy is arguably the most powerful tool we have for exploring the Universe. Experimental and theoretical studies in Laboratory Astrophysics convert "hard-won data into scientific understanding". However, the development of instruments with increasingly high spectroscopic resolution demands atomic and molecular data of unprecedented accuracy and completeness. How to meet these needs, in a time of severe budgetary constraints, poses a significant challenge both to NASA, the astronomical observers and model-builders, and the laboratory astrophysics community. I will discuss these issues, together with some recent examples of productive astronomy/lab astro collaborations.

  6. Nanoplasmon-enabled macroscopic thermal management

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Gustav Edman; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    In numerous applications of energy harvesting via transformation of light into heat the focus recently shifted towards highly absorptive nanoplasmonic materials. It is currently established that noble metals-based absorptive plasmonic platforms deliver significant light-capturing capability and can be viewed as super-absorbers of optical radiation. Naturally, approaches to the direct experimental probing of macroscopic temperature increase resulting from these absorbers are welcomed. Here we derive a general quantitative method of characterizing heat-generating properties of optically absorptive layers via macroscopic thermal imaging. We further monitor macroscopic areas that are homogeneously heated by several degrees with nanostructures that occupy a mere 8% of the surface, leaving it essentially transparent and evidencing significant heat generation capability of nanoplasmon-enabled light capture. This has a direct bearing to a large number of applications where thermal management is crucial. PMID:24870613

  7. Science Missions Enabled by the Ares V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, Simon Peter; Weiler, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's planned heavy-lift Ares V rocket is a centerpiece of U.S. Space Exploration Policy. With approximately 30% more capacity to Trans-Lunar Injection (TLI) than the Saturn V, Ares V could also enable additional science and exploration missions currently unachievable or extremely unworkable under current launch vehicle architectures. During the spring and summer of 2008, NASA held two workshops dedicated to the discussion of these new mission concepts for the Ares V rocket. The first workshop dealt with astronomy and astrophysics, and the second dealt primarily with planetary science and exploration, but did touch on Earth science and heliophysics. We present here the summary results and outcomes of these meetings, including a discussion of specific mission concepts and ideas, as well as suggestions on design for the Ares V fairing and flight configurations that improve science return.

  8. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, D.; CMS Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize opportunistic resources resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enable access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Here we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.

  9. Metasurface-Enabled Remote Quantum Interference.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pankaj K; Ni, Xingjie; Wu, Chihhui; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-10

    An anisotropic quantum vacuum (AQV) opens novel pathways for controlling light-matter interaction in quantum optics, condensed matter physics, etc. Here, we theoretically demonstrate a strong AQV over macroscopic distances enabled by a judiciously designed array of subwavelength-scale nanoantennas-a metasurface. We harness the phase-control ability and the polarization-dependent response of the metasurface to achieve strong anisotropy in the decay rate of a quantum emitter located over distances of hundreds of wavelengths. Such an AQV induces quantum interference among radiative decay channels in an atom with orthogonal transitions. Quantum vacuum engineering with metasurfaces holds promise for exploring new paradigms of long-range light-matter interaction for atom optics, solid-state quantum optics, quantum information processing, etc. PMID:26207477

  10. The network-enabled optimization system server

    SciTech Connect

    Mesnier, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    Mathematical optimization is a technology under constant change and advancement, drawing upon the most efficient and accurate numerical methods to date. Further, these methods can be tailored for a specific application or generalized to accommodate a wider range of problems. This perpetual change creates an ever growing field, one that is often difficult to stay abreast of. Hence, the impetus behind the Network-Enabled Optimization System (NEOS) server, which aims to provide users, both novice and expert, with a guided tour through the expanding world of optimization. The NEOS server is responsible for bridging the gap between users and the optimization software they seek. More specifically, the NEOS server will accept optimization problems over the Internet and return a solution to the user either interactively or by e-mail. This paper discusses the current implementation of the server.

  11. Enabling communication concurrency through flexible MPI endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Dinan, James; Grant, Ryan E.; Balaji, Pavan; Goodell, David; Miller, Douglas; Snir, Marc; Thakur, Rajeev

    2014-09-23

    MPI defines a one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. This model captures many use cases effectively; however, it also limits communication concurrency and interoperability between MPI and programming models that utilize threads. Our paper describes the MPI endpoints extension, which relaxes the longstanding one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. Using endpoints, an MPI implementation can map separate communication contexts to threads, allowing them to drive communication independently. Also, endpoints enable threads to be addressable in MPI operations, enhancing interoperability between MPI and other programming models. Furthermore, these characteristics are illustrated through several examples and an empirical study that contrasts current multithreaded communication performance with the need for high degrees of communication concurrency to achieve peak communication performance.

  12. Grid Enabled Geospatial Catalogue Web Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ai-Jun; Di, Li-Ping; Wei, Ya-Xing; Liu, Yang; Bui, Yu-Qi; Hu, Chau-Min; Mehrotra, Piyush

    2004-01-01

    Geospatial Catalogue Web Service is a vital service for sharing and interoperating volumes of distributed heterogeneous geospatial resources, such as data, services, applications, and their replicas over the web. Based on the Grid technology and the Open Geospatial Consortium (0GC) s Catalogue Service - Web Information Model, this paper proposes a new information model for Geospatial Catalogue Web Service, named as GCWS which can securely provides Grid-based publishing, managing and querying geospatial data and services, and the transparent access to the replica data and related services under the Grid environment. This information model integrates the information model of the Grid Replica Location Service (RLS)/Monitoring & Discovery Service (MDS) with the information model of OGC Catalogue Service (CSW), and refers to the geospatial data metadata standards from IS0 19115, FGDC and NASA EOS Core System and service metadata standards from IS0 191 19 to extend itself for expressing geospatial resources. Using GCWS, any valid geospatial user, who belongs to an authorized Virtual Organization (VO), can securely publish and manage geospatial resources, especially query on-demand data in the virtual community and get back it through the data-related services which provide functions such as subsetting, reformatting, reprojection etc. This work facilitates the geospatial resources sharing and interoperating under the Grid environment, and implements geospatial resources Grid enabled and Grid technologies geospatial enabled. It 2!so makes researcher to focus on science, 2nd not cn issues with computing ability, data locztic, processir,g and management. GCWS also is a key component for workflow-based virtual geospatial data producing.

  13. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section

  14. Realising the Uncertainty Enabled Model Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornford, D.; Bastin, L.; Pebesma, E. J.; Williams, M.; Stasch, C.; Jones, R.; Gerharz, L.

    2012-12-01

    The FP7 funded UncertWeb project aims to create the "uncertainty enabled model web". The central concept here is that geospatial models and data resources are exposed via standard web service interfaces, such as the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) suite of encodings and interface standards, allowing the creation of complex workflows combining both data and models. The focus of UncertWeb is on the issue of managing uncertainty in such workflows, and providing the standards, architecture, tools and software support necessary to realise the "uncertainty enabled model web". In this paper we summarise the developments in the first two years of UncertWeb, illustrating several key points with examples taken from the use case requirements that motivate the project. Firstly we address the issue of encoding specifications. We explain the usage of UncertML 2.0, a flexible encoding for representing uncertainty based on a probabilistic approach. This is designed to be used within existing standards such as Observations and Measurements (O&M) and data quality elements of ISO19115 / 19139 (geographic information metadata and encoding specifications) as well as more broadly outside the OGC domain. We show profiles of O&M that have been developed within UncertWeb and how UncertML 2.0 is used within these. We also show encodings based on NetCDF and discuss possible future directions for encodings in JSON. We then discuss the issues of workflow construction, considering discovery of resources (both data and models). We discuss why a brokering approach to service composition is necessary in a world where the web service interfaces remain relatively heterogeneous, including many non-OGC approaches, in particular the more mainstream SOAP and WSDL approaches. We discuss the trade-offs between delegating uncertainty management functions to the service interfaces themselves and integrating the functions in the workflow management system. We describe two utility services to address

  15. Technology-enabled Airborne Spacing and Merging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, James; Barmore, Bryan; Abbott, Tetence

    2005-01-01

    Over the last several decades, advances in airborne and groundside technologies have allowed the Air Traffic Service Provider (ATSP) to give safer and more efficient service, reduce workload and frequency congestion, and help accommodate a critically escalating traffic volume. These new technologies have included advanced radar displays, and data and communication automation to name a few. In step with such advances, NASA Langley is developing a precision spacing concept designed to increase runway throughput by enabling the flight crews to manage their inter-arrival spacing from TRACON entry to the runway threshold. This concept is being developed as part of NASA s Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) project under the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies Program. Precision spacing is enabled by Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), which provides air-to-air data exchange including position and velocity reports; real-time wind information and other necessary data. On the flight deck, a research prototype system called Airborne Merging and Spacing for Terminal Arrivals (AMSTAR) processes this information and provides speed guidance to the flight crew to achieve the desired inter-arrival spacing. AMSTAR is designed to support current ATC operations, provide operationally acceptable system-wide increases in approach spacing performance and increase runway throughput through system stability, predictability and precision spacing. This paper describes problems and costs associated with an imprecise arrival flow. It also discusses methods by which Air Traffic Controllers achieve and maintain an optimum interarrival interval, and explores means by which AMSTAR can assist in this pursuit. AMSTAR is an extension of NASA s previous work on in-trail spacing that was successfully demonstrated in a flight evaluation at Chicago O Hare International Airport in September 2002. In addition to providing for precision inter-arrival spacing, AMSTAR

  16. Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In today's climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, educators are challenged to continuously monitor student progress to ensure achievement. This article details how formative assessment helps educators meet this challenge and to ensure achievement. Formative assessment can influence learning and support achievement, allowing teachers…

  17. Willing and Enabled: The Academic Outcomes of a Tertiary Enabling Program in Regional Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrewartha, Lisa; Harvey, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the achievement levels of students undertaking the Tertiary Enabling Program (TEP) at La Trobe University. The TEP is an alternative pathway program that traverses multiple institutions, campuses, and disciplinary areas, and is designed to prepare a diverse student cohort for tertiary study. The Program integrates several…

  18. Imaging enabled platforms for development of therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan; Rizvi, Imran; Blanden, Adam R.; Evans, Conor L.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Spring, Bryan Q.; Muzikansky, Alona; Pogue, Brian W.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2011-03-01

    Advances in imaging and spectroscopic technologies have enabled the optimization of many therapeutic modalities in cancer and noncancer pathologies either by earlier disease detection or by allowing therapy monitoring. Amongst the therapeutic options benefiting from developments in imaging technologies, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is exceptional. PDT is a photochemistry-based therapeutic approach where a light-sensitive molecule (photosensitizer) is activated with light of appropriate energy (wavelength) to produce reactive molecular species such as free radicals and singlet oxygen. These molecular entities then react with biological targets such as DNA, membranes and other cellular components to impair their function and lead to eventual cell and tissue death. Development of PDT-based imaging also provides a platform for rapid screening of new therapeutics in novel in vitro models prior to expensive and labor-intensive animal studies. In this study we demonstrate how an imaging platform can be used for strategizing a novel combination treatment strategy for multifocal ovarian cancer. Using an in vitro 3D model for micrometastatic ovarian cancer in conjunction with quantitative imaging we examine dose and scheduling strategies for PDT in combination with carboplatin, a chemotherapeutic agent presently in clinical use for management of this deadly form of cancer.

  19. Nanocrystal-enabled solid state bonding.

    SciTech Connect

    San Diego State University, San Diego, CA; Puskar, Joseph David; Tikare, Veena; Garcia Cardona, Cristina; Reece, Mark; Brewer, Luke N.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann

    2010-10-01

    In this project, we performed a preliminary set of sintering experiments to examine nanocrystal-enabled diffusion bonding (NEDB) in Ag-on-Ag and Cu-on-Cu using Ag nanoparticles. The experimental test matrix included the effects of material system, temperature, pressure, and particle size. The nanoparticle compacts were bonded between plates using a customized hot press, tested in shear, and examined post mortem using microscopy techniques. NEDB was found to be a feasible mechanism for low-temperature, low-pressure, solid-state bonding of like materials, creating bonded interfaces that were able to support substantial loads. The maximum supported shear strength varied substantially within sample cohorts due to variation in bonded area; however, systematic variation with fabrication conditions was also observed. Mesoscale sintering simulations were performed in order to understand whether sintering models can aid in understanding the NEDB process. A pressure-assisted sintering model was incorporated into the SPPARKS kinetic Monte Carlo sintering code. Results reproduce most of the qualitative behavior observed in experiments, indicating that simulation can augment experiments during the development of the NEDB process. Because NEDB offers a promising route to low-temperature, low-pressure, solid-state bonding, we recommend further research and development with a goal of devising new NEDB bonding processes to support Sandia's customers.

  20. Glass ceramic ZERODUR enabling nanometer precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Nieder, Johannes; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The IC Lithography roadmap foresees manufacturing of devices with critical dimension of < 20 nm. Overlay specification of single digit nanometer asking for nanometer positioning accuracy requiring sub nanometer position measurement accuracy. The glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in critical components of microlithography wafer stepper and offered with an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), the tightest tolerance available on market. SCHOTT is continuously improving manufacturing processes and it's method to measure and characterize the CTE behavior of ZERODUR® to full fill the ever tighter CTE specification for wafer stepper components. In this paper we present the ZERODUR® Lithography Roadmap on the CTE metrology and tolerance. Additionally, simulation calculations based on a physical model are presented predicting the long term CTE behavior of ZERODUR® components to optimize dimensional stability of precision positioning devices. CTE data of several low thermal expansion materials are compared regarding their temperature dependence between - 50°C and + 100°C. ZERODUR® TAILORED 22°C is full filling the tight CTE tolerance of +/- 10 ppb / K within the broadest temperature interval compared to all other materials of this investigation. The data presented in this paper explicitly demonstrates the capability of ZERODUR® to enable the nanometer precision required for future generation of lithography equipment and processes.

  1. Water: A Critical Material Enabling Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Karen D.

    2014-01-01

    Water is one of the most critical materials in human spaceflight. The availability of water defines the duration of a space mission; the volume of water required for a long-duration space mission becomes too large, heavy, and expensive for launch vehicles to carry. Since the mission duration is limited by the amount of water a space vehicle can carry, the capability to recycle water enables space exploration. In addition, water management in microgravity impacts spaceflight in other respects, such as the recent emergency termination of a spacewalk caused by free water in an astronaut's spacesuit helmet. A variety of separation technologies are used onboard spacecraft to ensure that water is always available for use, and meets the stringent water quality required for human space exploration. These separation technologies are often adapted for use in a microgravity environment, where water behaves in unique ways. The use of distillation, membrane processes, ion exchange and granular activated carbon will be reviewed. Examples of microgravity effects on operations will also be presented. A roadmap for future technologies, needed to supply water resources for the exploration of Mars, will also be reviewed.

  2. Enabling electroweak baryogenesis through dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Marek; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Wells, James D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the impact on electroweak baryogenesis from a swifter cosmological expansion induced by dark matter. We detail the experimental bounds that one can place on models that realize it, and we investigate the modifications of these bounds that result from a non-standard cosmological history. The modifications can be sizeable if the expansion rate of the Universe increases by several orders of magnitude. We illustrate the impact through the example of scalar field dark matter, which can alter the cosmological history enough to enable a strong-enough first-order phase transition in the Standard Model when it is supplemented by a dimension six operator directly modifying the Higgs boson potential. We show that due to the modified cosmological history, electroweak baryogenesis can be realized, while keeping deviations of the triple Higgs coupling below HL-LHC sensitivies. The required scale of new physics to effectuate a strong-enough first order phase transition can change by as much as twenty percent as the expansion rate increases by six orders of magnitude.

  3. Individualized grid-enabled mammographic training system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, M. H.; Gale, A. G.

    2009-02-01

    The PERFORMS self-assessment scheme measures individuals skills in identifying key mammographic features on sets of known cases. One aspect of this is that it allows radiologists' skills to be trained, based on their data from this scheme. Consequently, a new strategy is introduced to provide revision training based on mammographic features that the radiologist has had difficulty with in these sets. To do this requires a lot of random cases to provide dynamic, unique, and up-to-date training modules for each individual. We propose GIMI (Generic Infrastructure in Medical Informatics) middleware as the solution to harvest cases from distributed grid servers. The GIMI middleware enables existing and legacy data to support healthcare delivery, research, and training. It is technology-agnostic, data-agnostic, and has a security policy. The trainee examines each case, indicating the location of regions of interest, and completes an evaluation form, to determine mammographic feature labelling, diagnosis, and decisions. For feedback, the trainee can choose to have immediate feedback after examining each case or batch feedback after examining a number of cases. All the trainees' result are recorded in a database which also contains their trainee profile. A full report can be prepared for the trainee after they have completed their training. This project demonstrates the practicality of a grid-based individualised training strategy and the efficacy in generating dynamic training modules within the coverage/outreach of the GIMI middleware. The advantages and limitations of the approach are discussed together with future plans.

  4. Smart Sensors Enable Smart Air Conditioning Control

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants' information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans' intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It's also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection. PMID:24961213

  5. Smart sensors enable smart air conditioning control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants' information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans' intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It's also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection. PMID:24961213

  6. Enabling scientific workflows in virtual reality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreylos, O.; Bawden, G.; Bernardin, T.; Billen, M.I.; Cowgill, E.S.; Gold, R.D.; Hamann, B.; Jadamec, M.; Kellogg, L.H.; Staadt, O.G.; Sumner, D.Y.

    2006-01-01

    To advance research and improve the scientific return on data collection and interpretation efforts in the geosciences, we have developed methods of interactive visualization, with a special focus on immersive virtual reality (VR) environments. Earth sciences employ a strongly visual approach to the measurement and analysis of geologic data due to the spatial and temporal scales over which such data ranges, As observations and simulations increase in size and complexity, the Earth sciences are challenged to manage and interpret increasing amounts of data. Reaping the full intellectual benefits of immersive VR requires us to tailor exploratory approaches to scientific problems. These applications build on the visualization method's strengths, using both 3D perception and interaction with data and models, to take advantage of the skills and training of the geological scientists exploring their data in the VR environment. This interactive approach has enabled us to develop a suite of tools that are adaptable to a range of problems in the geosciences and beyond. Copyright ?? 2008 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.

  7. Survey of Enabling Technologies for CAPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffrey; Mazanek, Daniel D.; Koons, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    The enabling technologies required for the development of a viable Comet/Asteroid Protection System (CAPS) can be divided into two principal areas: detection and deflection/orbit modification. With the proper funding levels, many of the technologies needed to support a CAPS architecture could be achievable within the next 15 to 20 years. In fact, many advanced detection technologies are currently in development for future in-space telescope systems such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), formerly known as the Next Generation Space Telescope. It is anticipated that many of the JWST technologies would be available for application for CAPS detection concepts. Deflection/orbit modification technologies are also currently being studied as part of advanced power and propulsion research. However, many of these technologies, such as extremely high-output power systems, advanced propulsion, heat rejection, and directed energy systems, would likely be farther term in availability than many of the detection technologies. Discussed subsequently is a preliminary examination of the main technologies that have been identified as being essential to providing the element functionality defined during the CAPS conceptual study. The detailed requirements for many of the technology areas are still unknown, and many additional technologies will be identified as future in-depth studies are conducted in this area.

  8. Powered wheelchairs: are we enabling or disabling?

    PubMed

    Beaumont-White, S; Ham, R O

    1997-04-01

    Following the unsuccessful issue of three powered indoor National Health Service (NHS) wheelchairs, a survey was carried out of 40 users in a London wheelchair service to identify the problems with issue and possible areas for improvement to practice. The survey identified improvements that were necessary both from the service and the manufacturers' booklets. The improvements include the issue of written instructions and information to complement verbal instruction given at handover. Such information should be as interesting to read as possible, make use of appropriate language and diagrams (especially in area where English is often not the first language), colour, text and print size to maximise comprehension to these severely disabled users and often their elderly relatives or carers. The importance of the role of the rehabilitation engineer in training the user, giving instruction at handover and annual review are highlighted to ensure that the equipment remains working, suitable and up to date for the individual's needs. Training in interpersonal and communication skills and the importance of recall should also be emphasised. The implementation of the findings should lead to increasing contact with the service by the user, reduction in repair and replacement costs, regular review, correct supply and will therefore enable users to increase their independence with appropriate equipment. PMID:9141127

  9. Bandwidth Enabled Flight Operations: Examining the Possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanich, Greg; Renema, Fritz; Clancy, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Bandwidth Enabled Flight Operations project is a research effort at the NASA Ames Research Center to investigate the use of satellite communications to improve aviation safety and capacity. This project is a follow on to the AeroSAPIENT Project, which demonstrated methods for transmitting high bandwidth data in various configurations. For this research, we set a goal to nominally use only 10 percent of the available bandwidth demonstrated by AeroSAPIENT or projected by near-term technology advances. This paper describes the results of our research, including available satellite bandwidth, commercial and research efforts to provide these services, and some of the limiting factors inherent with this communications medium. It also describes our investigation into the needs of the stakeholders (Airlines, Pilots, Cabin Crews, ATC, Maintenance, etc). The paper also describes our development of low-cost networked flight deck and airline operations center simulations that were used to demonstrate two application areas: Providing real time weather information to the commercial flight deck, and enhanced crew monitoring and control for airline operations centers.

  10. BEST: Barcode Enabled Sequencing of Tetrads

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Adrian C.; Ludlow, Catherine L.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2014-01-01

    Tetrad analysis is a valuable tool for yeast genetics, but the laborious manual nature of the process has hindered its application on large scales. Barcode Enabled Sequencing of Tetrads (BEST)1 replaces the manual processes of isolating, disrupting and spacing tetrads. BEST isolates tetrads by virtue of a sporulation-specific GFP fusion protein that permits fluorescence-activated cell sorting of tetrads directly onto agar plates, where the ascus is enzymatically digested and the spores are disrupted and randomly arrayed by glass bead plating. The haploid colonies are then assigned sister spore relationships, i.e. information about which spores originated from the same tetrad, using molecular barcodes read during genotyping. By removing the bottleneck of manual dissection, hundreds or even thousands of tetrads can be isolated in minutes. Here we present a detailed description of the experimental procedures required to perform BEST in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, starting with a heterozygous diploid strain through the isolation of colonies derived from the haploid meiotic progeny. PMID:24836713

  11. Enabler for the agile virtual enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Karl; Schmidt, Thomas; Wippel, Gerald

    2001-10-01

    In this presentation, a new approach for a flexible low-cost Internet extended enterprise (project FLoCI-EE) will be presented. FLoCI-EE is a project in the fifth framework program of the European commission with 8 partners from 4 countries, which started in January 2001 and will be finished in December 2003. The main objective of FLoCI-EE is the development of a software prototype, which enables flexible enterprise cooperation with the aim to design, manufacture and sell products commonly, independent of enterprise borderlines. The needed IT-support includes functions of product data management (PDM), enterprise resource planning (ERP), supply chain management (SCM) and customer relationship management (CRM). Especially for small and medium sized enterprises, existing solutions are too expensive and inflexible to be of use under current turbulent market conditions. The second part of this paper covers the item Web Services, because in the role-specific support approach of FLoCI-EE, there are user- interface-components, which are tailored for specific roles in an enterprise. These components integrate automatically the services of the so-called basic-components, and the externally offered Web Services like UDDI.

  12. MetaShare: Enabling Knowledge-Based Data Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D. D.; Salayandia, L.; Gates, A.; Osuna, F.

    2013-12-01

    MetaShare is a free and open source knowledge-based system for supporting data management planning, now required by some agencies and publishers. MetaShare supports users as they describe the types of data they will collect, expected standards, and expected policies for sharing. MetaShare's semantic model captures relationships between disciplines, tools, data types, data formats, and metadata standards. As the user plans their data management activities, MetaShare recommends choices based on practices and decisions from a community that has used the system for similar purposes, and extends the knowledge base to capture new relationships. The MetaShare knowledge base is being seeded with information for geoscience and environmental science domains, and is currently undergoing testing on at the University of Texas at El Paso. Through time and usage, it is expected to grow to support a variety of research domains, enabling community-based learning of data management practices. Knowledge of a user's choices during the planning phase can be used to support other tasks in the data life cycle, e.g., collecting, disseminating, and archiving data. A key barrier to scientific data sharing is the lack of sufficient metadata that provides context under which data were collected. The next phase of MetaShare development will automatically generate data collection instruments with embedded metadata and semantic annotations based on the information provided during the planning phase. While not comprehensive, this metadata will be sufficient for discovery and will enable user's to focus on more detailed descriptions of their data. Details are available at: Salayandia, L., Pennington, D., Gates, A., and Osuna, F. (accepted). MetaShare: From data management plans to knowledge base systems. AAAI Fall Symposium Series Workshop on Discovery Informatics, November 15-17, 2013, Arlington, VA.

  13. Enabling a Scientific Cloud Marketplace: VGL (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, R.; Woodcock, R.; Wyborn, L. A.; Vote, J.; Rankine, T.; Cox, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Virtual Geophysics Laboratory (VGL) provides a flexible, web based environment where researchers can browse data and use a variety of scientific software packaged into tool kits that run in the Cloud. Both data and tool kits are published by multiple researchers and registered with the VGL infrastructure forming a data and application marketplace. The VGL provides the basic work flow of Discovery and Access to the disparate data sources and a Library for tool kits and scripting to drive the scientific codes. Computation is then performed on the Research or Commercial Clouds. Provenance information is collected throughout the work flow and can be published alongside the results allowing for experiment comparison and sharing with other researchers. VGL's "mix and match" approach to data, computational resources and scientific codes, enables a dynamic approach to scientific collaboration. VGL allows scientists to publish their specific contribution, be it data, code, compute or work flow, knowing the VGL framework will provide other components needed for a complete application. Other scientists can choose the pieces that suit them best to assemble an experiment. The coarse grain workflow of the VGL framework combined with the flexibility of the scripting library and computational toolkits allows for significant customisation and sharing amongst the community. The VGL utilises the cloud computational and storage resources from the Australian academic research cloud provided by the NeCTAR initiative and a large variety of data accessible from national and state agencies via the Spatial Information Services Stack (SISS - http://siss.auscope.org). VGL v1.2 screenshot - http://vgl.auscope.org

  14. Web enabled data management with DPM & LFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Ayllon, Alejandro; Beche, Alexandre; Furano, Fabrizio; Hellmich, Martin; Keeble and, Oliver; Brito Da Rocha, Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    The Disk Pool Manager (DPM) and LCG File Catalog (LFC) are two grid data management components currently used in production with more than 240 endpoints. Together with a set of grid client tools they give the users a unified view of their data, hiding most details concerning data location and access. Recently we've put a lot of effort in developing a reliable and high performance HTTP/WebDAV frontend to both our grid catalog and storage components, exposing the existing functionality to users accessing the services via standard clients - e.g. web browsers, curl - present in all operating systems, giving users a simple and straight-forward way of interaction. In addition, as other relevant grid storage components (like dCache) expose their data using the same protocol, for the first time we had the opportunity of attempting a unified view of all grid storage using HTTP. We describe the HTTP redirection mechanism used to integrate the grid catalog(s) with the multiple storage components, including details on some assumptions made to allow integration with other implementations. We describe the way we hide the details regarding site availability or catalog inconsistencies by switching the standard HTTP client automatically between multiple replicas. We also present measurements of access performance, and the relevant factors regarding replica selection - current throughput and load, geographic proximity, etc. Finally, we report on some additional work done to have this system as a viable alternative to GridFTP, providing multi-stream transfers and exploiting some additional features of WebDAV to enable third party copies - essential for managing data movements between storage systems - with equivalent performance.

  15. "Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

    2008-06-12

    ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids” Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

  16. New Catalog of Resources Enables Paleogeosciences Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingo, R. C.; Horlick, K. A.; Anderson, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The 21st century promises a new era for scientists of all disciplines, the age where cyber infrastructure enables research and education and fuels discovery. EarthCube is a working community of over 2,500 scientists and students of many Earth Science disciplines who are looking to build bridges between disciplines. The EarthCube initiative will create a digital infrastructure that connects databases, software, and repositories. A catalog of resources (databases, software, repositories) has been produced by the Research Coordination Network for Paleogeosciences to improve the discoverability of resources. The Catalog is currently made available within the larger-scope CINERGI geosciences portal (http://hydro10.sdsc.edu/geoportal/catalog/main/home.page). Other distribution points and web services are planned, using linked data, content services for the web, and XML descriptions that can be harvested using metadata protocols. The databases provide searchable interfaces to find data sets that would otherwise remain dark data, hidden in drawers and on personal computers. The software will be described in catalog entries so just one click will lead users to methods and analytical tools that many geoscientists were unaware of. The repositories listed in the Paleogeosciences Catalog contain physical samples found all across the globe, from natural history museums to the basements of university buildings. EarthCube has over 250 databases, 300 software systems, and 200 repositories which will grow in the coming year. When completed, geoscientists across the world will be connected into a productive workflow for managing, sharing, and exploring geoscience data and information that expedites collaboration and innovation within the paleogeosciences, potentially bringing about new interdisciplinary discoveries.

  17. Enabling laser applications in microelectronics manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Brune, Jan; Fechner, Burkhard; Senczuk, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    In this experimental study, we report on high-pulse-energy excimer laser drilling into high-performance build-up films which are pivotal in microelectronics manufacturing. Build-up materials ABF-GX13 from Ajinomoto as well as ZS-100 from Zeon Corporation are evaluated with respect to their viability for economic excimer laser-based micro-via formation. Excimer laser mask imaging projection at laser wavelengths of 193, 248 and 308 nm is employed to generate matrices of smaller micro-vias with different diameters and via pitches. High drilling quality is achievable for all excimer laser wavelengths with the fastest ablation rates measured in the case of 248 and 308 nm wavelengths. The presence of glass fillers in build-up films as in the ABF-GX13 material poses some limitations to the minimum achievable via diameter. However, surprisingly good drilling results are obtainable as long as the filler dimensions are well below the diameter of the micro-vias. Sidewall angles of vias are controllable by adjusting the laser energy density and pulse number. In this work, the structuring capabilities of excimer lasers in build-up films as to taper angle variations, attainable via diameters, edge-stop behavior and ablation rates will be elucidated.

  18. Ionic liquid nanostructure enables alcohol self assembly.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas; Hayes, Robert; Imberti, Silvia; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2016-05-14

    Weakly structured solutions are formed from mixtures of one or more amphiphiles and a polar solvent (usually water), and often contain additional organic components. They contain solvophobic aggregates or association structures with incomplete segregation of components, which leads to a poorly defined interfacial region and significant contact between the solvent and aggregated hydrocarbon groups. The length scales, polydispersity, complexity and ill-defined structures in weakly structured solutions makes them difficult to probe experimentally, and obscures understanding of their formation and stability. In this work we probe the nanostructure of homogenous binary mixtures of the ionic liquid (IL) propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and octanol as a function of composition using neutron diffraction and atomistic empirical potential structure refinement (EPSR) fits. These experiments reveal why octanol forms weakly structured aggregates in PAN but not in water, the mechanism by which PAN stabilises the octanol assemblies, and how the aggregate morphologies evolve with octanol concentration. This new understanding provides insight into the general stabilisation mechanisms and structural features of weakly structured mixtures, and reveals new pathways for identifying molecular or ionic liquids that are likely to facilitate aggregation of non-traditional amphiphiles. PMID:27102801

  19. Hydrologic Prediction Through Earthcube Enabled Hydrogeophysical Cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Johnson, D.

    2012-12-01

    to "develop a framework to understand and predict responses of the Earth as a system— from the space-atmosphere boundary to the core, including the influences of humans and ecosystems." Effective development of hydrologic prediction tools will require the hydrogeophysical community to engage in and become conversant with the cyberinfrastructure community. In my presentation I will provide several examples of how such tools could look like, and what some of the opportunities are for getting this engagement going and develop cyberinfrastructure enabled hydrologic prediction tools.

  20. Initiator-integrated 3D printing enables the formation of complex metallic architectures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Guo, Qiuquan; Cai, Xiaobing; Zhou, Shaolin; Kobe, Brad; Yang, Jun

    2014-02-26

    Three-dimensional printing was used to fabricate various metallic structures by directly integrating a Br-containing vinyl-terminated initiator into the 3D resin followed by surface-initiated atomic-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and subsequent electroless plating. Cu- and Ni-coated complex structures, such as microlattices, hollow balls, and even Eiffel towers, were prepared. Moreover, the method is also capable of fabricating ultralight cellular metals with desired structures by simply etching the polymer template away. By combining the merits of 3D printing in structure design with those of ATRP in surface modification and polymer-assisted ELP of metals, this universal, robust, and cost-effective approach has largely extended the capability of 3D printing and will make 3D printing technology more practical in areas of electronics, acoustic absorption, thermal insulation, catalyst supports, and others. PMID:24328276

  1. Enabling and Integrating Online Formative Assessment in a Flipped Calculus Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Larissa Bucchi; Dorn, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of videos in mathematics courses means that direct instruction, traditionally part of class lectures, now often occurs outside of the classroom. Although students come to class with some baseline level of understanding, instructors lose opportunities to assess students' understanding of content as it is seen for the first time.…

  2. GTP/GDP exchange by Sec12p enables COPII vesicle bud formation on synthetic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Futai, Eugene; Hamamoto, Susan; Orci, Lelio; Schekman, Randy

    2004-01-01

    The generation of COPII vesicles from synthetic liposome membranes requires the minimum coat components Sar1p, Sec23/24p, Sec13/31p, and a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog such as GMP-PNP. However, in the presence of GTP and the full complement of coat subunits, nucleotide hydrolysis by Sar1p renders the coat insufficiently stable to sustain vesicle budding. In order to recapitulate a more authentic, GTP-dependent budding event, we introduced the Sar1p nucleotide exchange catalyst, Sec12p, and evaluated the dynamics of coat assembly and disassembly by light scattering and tryptophan fluorescence measurements. The catalytic, cytoplasmic domain of Sec12p (Sec12ΔCp) activated Sar1p with a turnover 10-fold higher than the GAP activity of Sec23p stimulated by the full coat. COPII assembly was stabilized on liposomes incubated with Sec12ΔCp and GTP. Numerous COPII budding profiles were visualized on membranes, whereas a parallel reaction conducted in the absence of Sec12ΔCp produced no such profiles. We suggest that Sec12p participates actively in the growth of COPII vesicles by charging new Sar1p-GTP molecules that insert at the boundary between a bud and the surrounding endoplasmic reticulum membrane. PMID:15457212

  3. Synthetic cascades are enabled by combining biocatalysts with artificial metalloenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, V.; Wilson, Y. M.; Dürrenberger, M.; Ghislieri, D.; Churakova, E.; Quinto, T.; Knörr, L.; Häussinger, D.; Hollmann, F.; Turner, N. J.; Ward, T. R.

    2013-02-01

    Enzymatic catalysis and homogeneous catalysis offer complementary means to address synthetic challenges, both in chemistry and in biology. Despite its attractiveness, the implementation of concurrent cascade reactions that combine an organometallic catalyst with an enzyme has proven challenging because of the mutual inactivation of both catalysts. To address this, we show that incorporation of a d6-piano stool complex within a host protein affords an artificial transfer hydrogenase (ATHase) that is fully compatible with and complementary to natural enzymes, thus enabling efficient concurrent tandem catalysis. To illustrate the generality of the approach, the ATHase was combined with various NADH-, FAD- and haem-dependent enzymes, resulting in orthogonal redox cascades. Up to three enzymes were integrated in the cascade and combined with the ATHase with a view to achieving (i) a double stereoselective amine deracemization, (ii) a horseradish peroxidase-coupled readout of the transfer hydrogenase activity towards its genetic optimization, (iii) the formation of L-pipecolic acid from L-lysine and (iv) regeneration of NADH to promote a monooxygenase-catalysed oxyfunctionalization reaction.

  4. Enabling performance skills: Assessment in engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrone, Jenny Kristina

    Current reform in engineering education is part of a national trend emphasizing student learning as well as accountability in instruction. Assessing student performance to demonstrate accountability has become a necessity in academia. In newly adopted criterion proposed by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), undergraduates are expected to demonstrate proficiency in outcomes considered essential for graduating engineers. The case study was designed as a formative evaluation of freshman engineering students to assess the perceived effectiveness of performance skills in a design laboratory environment. The mixed methodology used both quantitative and qualitative approaches to assess students' performance skills and congruency among the respondents, based on individual, team, and faculty perceptions of team effectiveness in three ABET areas: Communications Skills. Design Skills, and Teamwork. The findings of the research were used to address future use of the assessment tool and process. The results of the study found statistically significant differences in perceptions of Teamwork Skills (p < .05). When groups composed of students and professors were compared, professors were less likely to perceive student's teaming skills as effective. The study indicated the need to: (1) improve non-technical performance skills, such as teamwork, among freshman engineering students; (2) incorporate feedback into the learning process; (3) strengthen the assessment process with a follow-up plan that specifically targets performance skill deficiencies, and (4) integrate the assessment instrument and practice with ongoing curriculum development. The findings generated by this study provides engineering departments engaged in assessment activity, opportunity to reflect, refine, and develop their programs as it continues. It also extends research on ABET competencies of engineering students in an under-investigated topic of factors correlated with team

  5. Science Enabling Roles and Services of SPDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, R. E.; Bilitza, D.; Candey, R. M.; Chimiak, R. A.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Harris, B. T.; Johnson, R. C.; King, J. H.; Kovalick, T. J.; Lal, N.; Leckner, H. A.; Liu, M. H.; Papitashvili, N. E.; Roberts, D.

    2011-12-01

    The current Heliophysics Science Data Management Policy defines the roles of the Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project as a heliophysics active Final Archive, a focus for critical data infrastructure services and a center of excellence for data and ancillary information services. This presentation will highlight some of our current activities and our understanding of why and how our services are useful to researchers, as well as SPDF's programmatic emphasis in the coming year. We will discuss how, in cooperation with the Heliophysics Virtual discipline Observatories (VxOs), we are working closely with the RBSP and MMS mission teams to support their decisions to use CDF as a primary format for their public data products, to leverage the ongoing data flows and capabilities of CDAWeb (directly and through external clients such as Autoplot) to serve their data in a multi-mission context and to use SSCWeb to assist community science planning and analysis. Among other current activities, we will also discuss and demonstrate our continuing effort to make the Virtual Space Physics Observatory (VSPO) service comprehensive in all significant and NASA relevant heliophysics data. The OMNI and OMNI High Resolution datasets remain current and heavily cited in publications. We are expanding our FTP file services to include online archived non-CDF data from all active missions, which is a re-hosting of this function from NSSDC's FTP site. We have extended the definitions of time in CDF to unambiguously and consistently handle leap seconds. We are improving SSCWeb for much faster performance, more capabilities and a web services interface to Query functionality. We will also review how CDAWeb data can be easily accessed within IDL and new features in CDAWeb.

  6. Science Enabling Roles and Services of SPDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Robert E.; Bilitza, Dieter; Candey, Robert M.; Chimiak, Reine A.; Cooper, John F.; Garcia, Leonard N.; Harris, Bernard T.; Johnson, Rita C.; King, Joseph H.; Kovalick, Tamara J.; Lal, Nand; Leckner, Howard A.; Liu, Michael H.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.; Roberts, D. Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The current Heliophysics Science Data Management Policy defines the roles of the Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project as a heliophysics active Final Archive, a focus for critical data infrastructure services and a center of excellence for data and ancillary information services. This presentation will highlight some of our current activities and our understanding of why and how our services are useful to researchers, as well as SPDF's programmatic emphasis in the coming year. We will discuss how. in cooperation with the Heliophysics Virtual discipline Observatories (VxOs), we are working closely with the RBSP and MMS mission teams to support their decisions to use CDF as a primary format for their public data products, to leverage the ongoing data flows and capabilities of CDAWeb (directly and through external clients such as Autoplot) to serve their data in a multi-mission context and to use SSCWeb to assist community science planning and analysis. Among other current activities, we will also discuss and demonstrate our continuing effort to make the Virtual Space Physics Observatory (VSPO) service comprehensive in all significant and NASA relevant heliophysics data. The OMNI and OMNI High Resolution datasets remain current and heavily cited in publications. We are expanding our FTP file services to include online archived non-CDF data from all active missions, which is a re-hosting of this function from NSSDC's FTP site. We have extended the definitions of time in CDF to unambiguously and consistently handle leap seconds. We are improving SSCWeb for much faster per1ormance, more capabilities and a web services inter1ace to Query functionality. We will also review how CDAWeb data can be easily accessed within IDL and new features in CDAWeb.

  7. 78 FR 76603 - Enable Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Enable Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on November 26, 2013, Enable Gas Transmission, LLC (Enable) 1111 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed... Gas Transmission, LLC, P.O. Box 21734 Shreveport, LA 71151 at (318) 429- 3708. Specifically,...

  8. An Investigation of Relations among Academic Enablers and Reading Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Lyndsay N.; Demaray, Michelle Kilpatrick

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the link between academic enablers and different types of reading achievement measures. Academic enablers are skills and behaviors that support, or enable, students to perform well academically, such as engagement, interpersonal skills, motivation, and study skills. The sample in this study consisted of 61 third-,…

  9. FINESSE: Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, Jennifer; Lim, Darlene; Colaprete, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for the human and robotic exploration of the Moon, near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and Phobos and Deimos. We follow the philosophy that "science enables exploration and exploration enables science." 1) FINESSE Science: Understand the effects of volcanism and impacts as dominant planetary processes on the Moon, NEAs, and Phobos & Deimos. 2) FINESSE Exploration: Understand which exploration concepts of operations (ConOps) and capabilities enable and enhance scientific return. To accomplish these objectives, we are conducting an integrated research program focused on scientifically-driven field exploration at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve in Idaho and at the West Clearwater Lake Impact Structure in northern Canada. Field deployments aimed at reconnaissance geology and data acquisition were conducted in 2014 at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve. Targets for data acquisition included selected sites at Kings Bowl eruptive fissure, lava field and blowout crater, Inferno Chasm vent and outflow channel, North Crater lava flow and Highway lava flow. Field investigation included (1) differential GPS (dGPS) measurements of lava flows, channels (and ejecta block at Kings Bowl); (2) LiDAR imaging of lava flow margins, surfaces and other selected features; (3) digital photographic documentation; (4) sampling for geochemical and petrographic analysis; (5) UAV aerial imagery of Kings Bowl and Inferno Chasm features; and (6) geologic assessment of targets and potential new targets. Over the course of the 5-week field FINESSE campaign to the West Clearwater Impact Structure (WCIS) in 2014, the team focused on several WCIS research topics, including impactites, central uplift formation, the impact-generated hydrothermal system, multichronometer

  10. The MMI Device Ontology: Enabling Sensor Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, C.; Galbraith, N.; Morris, R. A.; Bermudez, L. E.; Graybeal, J.; Arko, R. A.; Mmi Device Ontology Working Group

    2010-12-01

    .g., SensorML, NetCDF). These identifiers can be resolved through a web browser, or other client applications via HTTP against the MMI Ontology Registry and Repository (ORR), where the ontology is maintained. SPARQL-based query capabilities, which are enhanced with reasoning, along with several supported output formats, allow the effective interaction of diverse client applications with the semantic information associated with the device ontology. In this presentation we describe the process for the development of the MMI Device Ontology and illustrate extensions and applications that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this semantic approach, including example queries involving inference. We also highlight the issues encountered and future work.

  11. Galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, J.

    1984-11-01

    Implications of the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background on large and small angular scales for galaxy formation are reviewed. In primeval adiabatic fluctuations, a universe dominated by cold, weakly interacting nonbaryonic matter, e.g., the massive photino is postulated. A possible signature of photino annihilation in our galactic halo involves production of cosmic ray antiprotons. If the density is near its closure value, it is necessary to invoke a biasing mechanism for suppressing galaxy formation throughout most of the universe in order to reconcile the dark matter density with the lower astronomical determinations of the mean cosmological density. A mechanism utilizing the onset of primordial massive star formation to strip gaseous protogalaxies is described. Only the densest, early collapsing systems form luminous galaxies. (ESA)

  12. Comet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  13. Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    de Supinski, B R

    2010-02-14

    The Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies (PCET) project addressed challenges arising from current trends in computer architecture that will lead to large-scale systems with many more nodes, each of which uses multicore chips. These factors will soon lead to systems that have over one million processors. Also, the use of multicore chips will lead to less memory and less memory bandwidth per core. We need fundamentally new algorithmic approaches to cope with these memory constraints and the huge number of processors. Further, correct, efficient code development is difficult even with the number of processors in current systems; more processors will only make it harder. The goal of PCET was to overcome these challenges by developing the computer science and mathematical underpinnings needed to realize the full potential of our future large-scale systems. Our research results will significantly increase the scientific output obtained from LLNL large-scale computing resources by improving application scientist productivity and system utilization. Our successes include scalable mathematical algorithms that adapt to these emerging architecture trends and through code correctness and performance methodologies that automate critical aspects of application development as well as the foundations for application-level fault tolerance techniques. PCET's scope encompassed several research thrusts in computer science and mathematics: code correctness and performance methodologies, scalable mathematics algorithms appropriate for multicore systems, and application-level fault tolerance techniques. Due to funding limitations, we focused primarily on the first three thrusts although our work also lays the foundation for the needed advances in fault tolerance. In the area of scalable mathematics algorithms, our preliminary work established that OpenMP performance of the AMG linear solver benchmark and important individual kernels on Atlas did not match the predictions of our

  14. Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Vouk, Mladen A.

    2013-01-15

    Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Fortunately, the data management problems encountered by most scientific domains are common enough to be addressed through shared technology solutions. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation, analysis, or visualization engine. These processes are complicated by the fact that scientific data are structured differently for specific application domains, and are stored in specialized file formats. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Specialized feature discovery and statistical analysis techniques are needed before the data can be understood or visualized. Furthermore, interactive analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Finally, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration. The SDM center was established under the SciDAC program to address these issues. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced

  15. Strategic Research to Enable NASA's Exploration Missions Conference and Workshop: Poster Session. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    Reports are presented from volume 2 of the conference titled Strategic Research to Enable NASA's Exploration Missions, poster session. Topics included spacecraft fire suppression and fire extinguishing agents,materials flammability, various topics on the effects of microgravity including crystal growth, fluid mechanics, electric particulate suspension, melting and solidification, bubble formation, the sloshing of liquid fuels, biological studies, separation of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide for Mars ISRU.

  16. Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahr, Hubert; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    1. Historical notes on planet formation Bodenheimer; 2. The formation and evolution of planetary systems Bouwman et al.; 3. Destruction of protoplanetary disks by photoevaporation Richling, Hollenbach and Yorke; 4. Turbulence in protoplanetary accretion disks Klahr, Rozyczka, Dziourkevitch, Wunsch and Johansen; 5. The origin of solids in the early solar system Trieloff and Palme; 6. Experiments on planetesimal formation Wurm and Blum; 7. Dust coagulation in protoplanetary disks Henning, Dullemond, Wolf and Dominik; 8. The accretion of giant planet cores Thommes and Duncan; 9. Planetary transits: direct vision of extrasolar planets Lecavelier des Etangs and Vidal-Madjar; 10. The core accretion - gas capture model Hubickyj; 11. Properties of exoplanets Marcy, Fischer, Butler and Vogt; 12. Giant planet formation: theories meet observations Boss; 13. From hot Jupiters to hot Neptures … and below Lovis, Mayor and Udry; 14. Disk-planet interaction and migration Masset and Kley; 15. The Brown Dwarf - planet relation Bate; 16. From astronomy to astrobiology Brandner; 17. Overview and prospective Lin.

  17. Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wette, Matthew; Sohl, Garett; Scharf, Daniel; Benowitz, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Formation flying for spacecraft is a rapidly developing field that will enable a new era of space science. For one of its missions, the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) project has selected a formation flying interferometer design to detect earth-like planets orbiting distant stars. In order to advance technology needed for the TPF formation flying interferometer, the TPF project has been developing a distributed real-time testbed to demonstrate end-to-end operation of formation flying with TPF-like functionality and precision. This is the Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed (FAST) . This FAST was conceived to bring out issues in timing, data fusion, inter-spacecraft communication, inter-spacecraft sensing and system-wide formation robustness. In this paper we describe the FAST and show results from a two-spacecraft formation scenario. The two-spacecraft simulation is the first time that precision end-to-end formation flying operation has been demonstrated in a distributed real-time simulation environment.

  18. Formation testers

    SciTech Connect

    Brieger, E.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a method for use in obtaining multiple pressure tests of an earth formation traversed by a well bore by use of a sidewall fluid sampler well tool which has a fluid pressure sampling chamber in the well tool in open fluid communication with a pad sealing means, comprising the steps of: for one selected level in a well bore, moving a pad sealing means on the well tool into engagement with the wall of a well bore and isolating a wall segment of the earth formation; after the pad sealing means engges the wall segment of the earth formation, generating a hydraulic pressure in the well tool and applying said hydraulic pressure to said fluid pressure sampling chamber for increasing the volume of said fluid pressure sampling chamber thereby to dray a fluid sample from the earth formation engaged by the pad sealing means into the fluid pressure sampling chamber, sensing the pressure of said fluid sample as it is drawn into the fluid pressure sampling chamber while the volume of the sampling chamber is being increased, relieving the hydraulic pressure in the well tool with respect to said fluid pressur sampling chamber for decreasing the volume of said fluid pressure sampling chamber thereby to contact the sampling chamber to dischrge the fluid sample through the pad sealing means; retracting the sealing pad means and, after retrction of sealing pad means from engagement from the wall of the well bore, moving the well tool to a second location at another level in the well bore and, at the second location, repeating the steps of the method performed at the one selected level for obtaining another fluid sample and pressure sensing at said second location.

  19. Enabling Linked Science in Global Climate Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsethagen, T.; Stephan, E.; Lin, G.; Williams, D.; Banks, E.

    2012-12-01

    This paper shares a real-world global climate UQ science use case and illustrates how a linked science application called Provenance Environment (ProvEn), currently being developed, enables and facilitates scientific teams to publish, share, link, and discover new links over their UQ research results. UQ results include terascale datasets that are published to an Earth Systems Grid Federation (ESGF) repository. ProvEn demonstrates how a scientific team conducting UQ studies can discover dataset links using its domain knowledgebase, allowing them to better understand the UQ study research objectives, the experimental protocol used, the resulting dataset lineage, related analytical findings, ancillary literature citations, along with the social network of scientists associated with the study. This research claims that scientists using this linked science approach will not only allow them to greatly benefit from understanding a particular dataset within a knowledge context, a benefit can also be seen by the cross reference of knowledge among the numerous UQ studies being stored in ESGF. ProvEn collects native forms of data provenance resources as the UQ study is carried out. The native data provenance resources can be collected from a variety of sources such as scripts, a workflow engine log, simulation log files, scientific team members etc. Schema alignment is used to translate the native forms of provenance into a set of W3C PROV-O semantic statements used as a common interchange format which will also contain URI references back to resources in the UQ study dataset for querying and cross referencing. ProvEn leverages Fedora Commons' digital object model in a Resource Oriented Architecture (ROA) (i.e. a RESTful framework) to logically organize and partition native and translated provenance resources by UQ study. The ROA also provides scientists the means to both search native and translated forms of provenance.

  20. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  1. AFC-Enabled Vertical Tail System Integration Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, Helen P.; Brandt, John B.; Lacy, Douglas S.; Whalen, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    This document serves as the final report for the SMAAART AFC-Enabled Vertical Tail System Integration Study. Included are the ground rule assumptions which have gone into the study, layouts of the baseline and AFC-enabled configurations, critical sizing information, system requirements and architectures, and assumed system properties that result in an NPV assessment of the two candidate AFC technologies.

  2. Group-enabled DEVS model construction methodology for distributed organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarjoughian, Hessam S.; Vahie, Sankait; Lee, James D.

    1997-06-01

    A USAF project has been initiated to enable groupware that currently supports IDEF activity model capture to be extended to support DEVS model construction. The methodology developed for this purpose enables team participants to enter activity data and then be queried for additional data that support DEVS system decomposition, assigning the activities to components and adding in relevant dynamics.

  3. Commitment in Structurally Enabled and Induced Exchange Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Edward J.; Thye, Shane R.; Yoon, Jeongkoo

    2006-01-01

    Network structures both enable and constrain the development of social relations. This research investigates these features by comparing the development of commitments in structurally enabled and structurally induced exchange relations. We integrate ideas from the theory of relational cohesion and the choice process theory of commitment. In an…

  4. Habit formation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle S; Graybiel, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  5. Habit formation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle S.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  6. ASIC-enabled High Resolution Optical Time Domain Reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skendzic, Sandra

    Fiber optics has become the preferred technology in communication systems because of what it has to offer: high data transmission rates, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and lightweight, flexible cables. An optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) provides a convenient method of locating and diagnosing faults (e.g. break in a fiber) along a fiber that can obstruct crucial optical pathways. Both the ability to resolve the precise location of the fault and distinguish between two discrete, closely spaced faults are figures of merit. This thesis presents an implementation of a high resolution OTDR through the use of a compact and programmable ASIC (application specific integrated circuit). The integration of many essential OTDR functions on a single chip is advantageous over existing commercial instruments because it enables small, lightweight packaging, and offers low power and cost efficiency. Furthermore, its compactness presents the option of placing multiple ASICs in parallel, which can conceivably ease the characterization of densely populated fiber optic networks. The OTDR ASIC consists of a tunable clock, pattern generator, precise timer, electrical receiver, and signal sampling circuit. During OTDR operation, the chip generates narrow electrical pulse, which can then be converted to optical format when coupled with an external laser diode driver. The ASIC also works with an external photodetector to measure the timing and amplitude of optical reflections in a fiber. It has a 1 cm sampling resolution, which allows for a 2 cm spatial resolution. While this OTDR ASIC has been previously demonstrated for multimode fiber fault diagnostics, this thesis focuses on extending its functionality to single mode fiber. To validate this novel approach to OTDR, this thesis is divided into five chapters: (1) introduction, (2) implementation, (3), performance of ASIC-based OTDR, (4) exploration in optical pre-amplification with a semiconductor optical amplifier, and

  7. A Semantically Enabled Metadata Repository for Solar Irradiance Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Cox, M.; Lindholm, D. M.; Nadiadi, I.; Traver, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, has been conducting research in Atmospheric and Space science for over 60 years, and providing the associated data products to the public. LASP has a long history, in particular, of making space-based measurements of the solar irradiance, which serves as crucial input to several areas of scientific research, including solar-terrestrial interactions, atmospheric, and climate. LISIRD, the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center, serves these datasets to the public, including solar spectral irradiance (SSI) and total solar irradiance (TSI) data. The LASP extended metadata repository, LEMR, is a database of information about the datasets served by LASP, such as parameters, uncertainties, temporal and spectral ranges, current version, alerts, etc. It serves as the definitive, single source of truth for that information. The database is populated with information garnered via web forms and automated processes. Dataset owners keep the information current and verified for datasets under their purview. This information can be pulled dynamically for many purposes. Web sites such as LISIRD can include this information in web page content as it is rendered, ensuring users get current, accurate information. It can also be pulled to create metadata records in various metadata formats, such as SPASE (for heliophysics) and ISO 19115. Once these records are be made available to the appropriate registries, our data will be discoverable by users coming in via those organizations. The database is implemented as a RDF triplestore, a collection of instances of subject-object-predicate data entities identifiable with a URI. This capability coupled with SPARQL over HTTP read access enables semantic queries over the repository contents. To create the repository we leveraged VIVO, an open source semantic web application, to manage and create new ontologies and populate repository content. A variety of ontologies were used in

  8. Creating an enabling environment for diasporas' participation in homeland development.

    PubMed

    Brinkerhoff, Jennifer M

    2012-01-01

    Diasporas contribute to their homeland’s development through remittances, philanthropy, skills transfer, business investment, and advocacy. This paper focuses on actions that homeland governments can take to create an enabling environment for diasporas’ contributions. Part I addresses the diaspora phenomenon and the homeland government-diaspora relationship. Part II develops a framework for characterizing government’s role in an enabling environment specific to diasporas’ development contributions. Part III considers how to put the framework into practice, identifying important caveats and discussing several implementation issues, including the potential role of donors. The framework is also a tool for diasporans to strategically advocate for improved enabling environments. PMID:22400149

  9. Advanced Coatings Enabling High Performance Instruments for Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh

    We propose a three-year effort to develop techniques for far-ultraviolet (FUV) and ultraviolet coatings both as reflective optics coatings and as out-of-band-rejection (solar-blind) filters that will have a dramatic effect on the throughput and efficiency of instruments. This is an ideal time to address this problem. On the one hand, exciting new science questions posed in UV and optical realm place exacting demands on instrument capabilities far beyond HST-COS, FUSE, and GALEX with large focal plane arrays and high efficiency requirements. And on the other hand, the development of techniques and process such as atomic layer deposition with its atomically precise capability and nano-engineered materials approach enables us to address the challenging materials issues in the UV where interaction of photons and matter happen in the first few nanometers of the material surface. Aluminum substrates with protective overlayers (typically XFy, where X = Li, Mg, or Ca) have been the workhorse of reflective coatings for ultraviolet and visible instruments; however, they have demonstrated severe limitations. The formation of oxide at the Al-XFy interface and thick protective layers both affect the overall optical performance, leading to diminished reflection at shorter wavelengths. To address these long-standing shortcomings of coatings, we will use our newly developed processes and equipment to produce high-quality single- and multi-layer films of a variety of dielectrics and metals deposited with nano-scale control. JPL s new ALD system affords high uniformity, low oxygen background, good plasma processes, and precise temperature control, which are vital to achieving the large scale, uniform, and ultrathin films that are free of oxygen at interfaces. For example, ALD-grown aluminum can be protected using our newly developed chemistry for ALD magnesium fluoride. Our work will verify that the ALD technique reliably prevents the oxidation of aluminum, and will subsequently be

  10. XNsim: Internet-Enabled Collaborative Distributed Simulation via an Extensible Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novotny, John; Karpov, Igor; Zhang, Chendi; Bedrossian, Nazareth S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the XNsim approach to achieve Internet-enabled, dynamically scalable collaborative distributed simulation capabilities is presented. With this approach, a complete simulation can be assembled from shared component subsystems written in different formats, that run on different computing platforms, with different sampling rates, in different geographic locations, and over singlelmultiple networks. The subsystems interact securely with each other via the Internet. Furthermore, the simulation topology can be dynamically modified. The distributed simulation uses a combination of hub-and-spoke and peer-topeer network topology. A proof-of-concept demonstrator is also presented. The XNsim demonstrator can be accessed at http://www.jsc.draver.corn/xn that hosts various examples of Internet enabled simulations.

  11. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  12. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  13. An IT-enabled supply chain model: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannella, Salvatore; Framinan, Jose M.; Barbosa-Póvoa, Ana

    2014-11-01

    During the last decades, supply chain collaboration practices and the underlying enabling technologies have evolved from the classical electronic data interchange (EDI) approach to a web-based and radio frequency identification (RFID)-enabled collaboration. In this field, most of the literature has focused on the study of optimal parameters for reducing the total cost of suppliers, by adopting operational research (OR) techniques. Herein we are interested in showing that the considered information technology (IT)-enabled structure is resilient, that is, it works well across a reasonably broad range of parameter settings. By adopting a methodological approach based on system dynamics, we study a multi-tier collaborative supply chain. Results show that the IT-enabled supply chain improves operational performance and customer service level. Nonetheless, benefits for geographically dispersed networks are of minor entity.

  14. Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents, May 2009 (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-05-01

    Enabling Documents, delivered by the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to provide materials that clarify the authority for federal agencies to enter into utility energy services contracts (UESCs).

  15. 78 FR 69405 - Enable Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... to abandon in place the Leedey Purification Facility, also located in the state of Oklahoma, all as... . Specifically, Enable proposes to abandon in place the Leedey Purification Facility and to abandon by sale...

  16. Physical Activity Beliefs, Barriers, and Enablers among Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Aytur, Semra A.; Borodulin, Katja

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background and Methods Physical activity during postpartum is both a recommended and an essential contributor to maternal health. Understanding the beliefs, barriers, and enablers regarding physical activity during the postpartum period can more effectively tailor physical activity interventions. The objective of this study was to document self-reported beliefs, barriers, and enablers to physical activity among a cohort of women queried at 3 and 12 months postpartum. Five questions about beliefs and two open-ended questions about their main barriers and enablers regarding physical activity and exercise were asked of 667 women at 3 months postpartum. Among the sample, 530 women answered the same questions about barriers and enablers to physical activity at 12 months postpartum. Results Agreement on all five beliefs statements was high (≥89%), indicating that women thought that exercise and physical activity were appropriate at 3 months postpartum, even if they continued to breastfeed. For the cohort, the most common barriers to physical activity at both 3 and 12 months postpartum were lack of time (47% and 51%, respectively) and issues with child care (26% and 22%, respectively). No barrier changed by more than 5% from 3 to 12 months postpartum. For the cohort, the most common enablers at 3 months postpartum were partner support (16%) and desire to feel better (14%). From 3 to 12 months postpartum, only one enabler changed by >5%; women reported baby reasons (e.g., baby older, healthier, not breastfeeding, more active) more often at 12 months than at 3 months postpartum (32% vs. 10%). Environmental/policy and organizational barriers and enablers were reported less often than intrapersonal or interpersonal barriers at both time points. Conclusions A number of barriers and enablers were identified for physical activity, most of which were consistent at 3 and 12 months postpartum. This study provides information to create more successful interventions to

  17. Mechanical Engineering Design Project report: Enabler control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, Christian; Delvecchio, Dave; Scarborough, Alan; Havics, Andrew A.

    1992-01-01

    The Controls Group was assigned the responsibility for designing the Enabler's control system. The requirement for the design was that the control system must provide a simple user interface to control the boom articulation joints, chassis articulation joints, and the wheel drive. The system required controlling hydraulic motors on the Enabler by implementing 8-bit microprocessor boards. In addition, feedback to evaluate positions and velocities must be interfaced to provide the operator with confirmation as well as control.

  18. Dense WDM transmission at 2  μm enabled by an arrayed waveguide grating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Gleeson, M; Ye, N; Pavarelli, N; Ouyang, X; Zhao, J; Kavanagh, N; Robert, C; Yang, H; Morrissey, P E; Thomas, K; Gocalinska, A; Chen, Y; Bradley, T; Wooler, J P; Hayes, J R; Numkam Fokoua, E; Li, Z; Alam, S U; Poletti, F; Petrovich, M N; Richardson, D J; Kelly, B; O'Carroll, J; Phelan, R; Pelucchi, E; O'Brien, P; Peters, F; Corbett, B; Gunning, F

    2015-07-15

    We show, for the first time, dense WDM (8×20  Gbit/s) transmission at 2 μm enabled by advanced modulation formats (4-ASK Fast-OFDM) and the development of key components, including a new arrayed waveguide grating (AWGr) at 2 μm. The AWGr shows -12.8±1.78  dB of excess loss with an 18-dB extinction ratio and a thermal tunability of 0.108 nm/°C. PMID:26176456

  19. Catalytic Carbocation Generation Enabled by the Mesolytic Cleavage of Alkoxyamine Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qilei; Gentry, Emily C; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-08-16

    A new catalytic method is described to access carbocation intermediates via the mesolytic cleavage of alkoxyamine radical cations. In this process, electron transfer between an excited state oxidant and a TEMPO-derived alkoxyamine substrate gives rise to a radical cation with a remarkably weak C-O bond. Spontaneous scission results in the formation of the stable nitroxyl radical TEMPO(.) as well as a reactive carbocation intermediate that can be intercepted by a wide range of nucleophiles. Notably, this process occurs under neutral conditions and at comparatively mild potentials, enabling catalytic cation generation in the presence of both acid sensitive and easily oxidized nucleophilic partners. PMID:27403637

  20. Language Technologies to Support Formative Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlanga, Adriana J.; Kalz, Marco; Stoyanov, Slavi; van Rosmalen, Peter; Smithies, Alisdair; Braidman, Isobel

    2011-01-01

    Formative feedback enables comparison to be made between a learner's current understanding and a desired learning goal. Obtaining this information is a time consuming task that most tutors cannot afford. We therefore wished to develop a support software tool, which provides tutors and learners with information that identifies a learner's progress,…

  1. Computational protein design enables a novel one-carbon assimilation pathway.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Justin B; Smith, Amanda Lee; Poust, Sean; Wargacki, Adam J; Bar-Even, Arren; Louw, Catherine; Shen, Betty W; Eiben, Christopher B; Tran, Huu M; Noor, Elad; Gallaher, Jasmine L; Bale, Jacob; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Gelb, Michael H; Keasling, Jay D; Stoddard, Barry L; Lidstrom, Mary E; Baker, David

    2015-03-24

    We describe a computationally designed enzyme, formolase (FLS), which catalyzes the carboligation of three one-carbon formaldehyde molecules into one three-carbon dihydroxyacetone molecule. The existence of FLS enables the design of a new carbon fixation pathway, the formolase pathway, consisting of a small number of thermodynamically favorable chemical transformations that convert formate into a three-carbon sugar in central metabolism. The formolase pathway is predicted to use carbon more efficiently and with less backward flux than any naturally occurring one-carbon assimilation pathway. When supplemented with enzymes carrying out the other steps in the pathway, FLS converts formate into dihydroxyacetone phosphate and other central metabolites in vitro. These results demonstrate how modern protein engineering and design tools can facilitate the construction of a completely new biosynthetic pathway. PMID:25775555

  2. Computational protein design enables a novel one-carbon assimilation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Justin B.; Smith, Amanda Lee; Poust, Sean; Wargacki, Adam J.; Bar-Even, Arren; Louw, Catherine; Shen, Betty W.; Eiben, Christopher B.; Tran, Huu M.; Noor, Elad; Gallaher, Jasmine L.; Bale, Jacob; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Gelb, Michael H.; Keasling, Jay D.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    We describe a computationally designed enzyme, formolase (FLS), which catalyzes the carboligation of three one-carbon formaldehyde molecules into one three-carbon dihydroxyacetone molecule. The existence of FLS enables the design of a new carbon fixation pathway, the formolase pathway, consisting of a small number of thermodynamically favorable chemical transformations that convert formate into a three-carbon sugar in central metabolism. The formolase pathway is predicted to use carbon more efficiently and with less backward flux than any naturally occurring one-carbon assimilation pathway. When supplemented with enzymes carrying out the other steps in the pathway, FLS converts formate into dihydroxyacetone phosphate and other central metabolites in vitro. These results demonstrate how modern protein engineering and design tools can facilitate the construction of a completely new biosynthetic pathway. PMID:25775555

  3. Computational protein design enables a novel one-carbon assimilation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, JB; Smith, AL; Poust, S; Wargacki, AJ; Bar-Even, A; Louw, C; Shen, BW; Eiben, CB; Tran, HM; Noor, E; Gallaher, JL; Bale, J; Yoshikuni, Y; Gelb, MH; Keasling, JD; Stoddard, BL; Lidstrom, ME; Baker, D

    2015-03-09

    We describe a computationally designed enzyme, formolase (FLS), which catalyzes the carboligation of three one-carbon formaldehyde molecules into one three-carbon dihydroxyacetone molecule. The existence of FLS enables the design of a new carbon fixation pathway, the formolase pathway, consisting of a small number of thermodynamically favorable chemical transformations that convert formate into a three-carbon sugar in central metabolism. The formolase pathway is predicted to use carbon more efficiently and with less backward flux than any naturally occurring one-carbon assimilation pathway. When supplemented with enzymes carrying out the other steps in the pathway, FLS converts formate into dihydroxyacetone phosphate and other central metabolites in vitro. These results demonstrate how modern protein engineering and design tools can facilitate the construction of a completely new biosynthetic pathway.

  4. Family physician enabling attitudes: a qualitative study of patient perceptions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Family physicians frequently interact with people affected by chronic diseases, placing them in a privileged position to enable patients to gain control over and improve their health. Soliciting patients’ perceptions about how their family physician can help them in this process is an essential step to promoting enabling attitudes among these health professionals. In this study, we aimed to identify family physician enabling attitudes and behaviours from the perspective of patients with chronic diseases. Methods We conducted a descriptive qualitative study with 30 patients, 35 to 75 years of age presenting at least one common chronic disease, recruited in primary care clinics in two regions of Quebec, Canada. Data were collected through in-depth interviews and were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Family physician involvement in a partnership was perceived by participants as the main attribute of enablement. Promoting patient interests in the health care system was also important. Participants considered that having their situation taken into account maximized the impact of their physician’s interventions and allowed the legitimization of their feelings. They found their family physician to be in a good position to acknowledge and promote their expertise, and to help them maintain hope. Conclusions From the patient’s perspective, their partnership with their family physician is the most important aspect of enablement. PMID:23305144

  5. Enabling conformity to international standards within SeaDataNet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.; Boldrini, Enrico; de Korte, Arjen; Santoro, Mattia; Manzella, Giuseppe; Nativi, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    SeaDataNet objective is to construct a standardized system for managing the large and diverse data sets collected by the oceanographic fleets and the new automatic observation systems. The aim is to network and enhance the currently existing infrastructures, which are the national oceanographic data centres and satellite data centres of 36 countries, active in data collection. The networking of these professional data centres, in a unique virtual data management system will provide integrated data sets of standardized quality on-line. The Common Data Index (CDI) is the middleware service adopted by SeaDataNet for discovery and access of the available data. In order to develop an interoperable and effective system, the use of international de facto and de jure standards is required. In particular the new goal object of this presentation is to introduce and discuss the solutions for making SeaDataNet compliant with the European Union (EU) INSPIRE directive and in particular with its Implementing Rules (IR). The European INSPIRE directive aims to rule the creation of an European Spatial Data Infrastructure (ESDI). This will enable the sharing of environmental spatial information among public sector organisations and better facilitate public access to spatial information across Europe. To ensure that the spatial data infrastructures of the European Member States are compatible and usable in a community and transboundary context, the directive requires that common IRs are adopted in a number of specific areas (Metadata, Data Specifications, Network Services, Data and Service Sharing and Monitoring and Reporting). Often the use of already approved digital geographic information standards is mandated, drawing from international organizations like the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the latter by means of its Technical Committee 211 (ISO/TC 211). In the context of geographic data discovery a set of mandatory

  6. Enabling Desktop Nanofabrication with the Targeted Use of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel James

    This thesis focuses on the application of soft materials to scanning probe-based molecular printing techniques, such as dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The selective incorporation of soft materials in place of hard materials in traditional cantilever-based scanning probe lithography (SPL) systems not only enables the deposition of a broader range of materials, but also dramatically lowers the cost while simultaneously increasing the throughput of SPL. Chapter 1 introduces SPL and DPN, and highlights a few recent advances in using DPN to control surface chemical functionality at the nanoscale. In addition to introducing the material deposition capabilities of DPN, Chapter 1 introduces the development of the cantilever-free architecture, a relatively recent paradigm shift in high-throughput SPL. Furthermore, an in-depth synthetic methodology for making the most widely used cantilever-free tip arrays, consisting of elastomeric nanoscale pens adhered to an elastomeric backing layer on a glass slide, is included as an appendix. Chapter 2 discusses the synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles at specified locations by using DPN to deposit the precursors dispersed in a polymer matrix; after deposition, the precursors are annealed to form single nanoparticles. This work builds on previous soft material-based advances in DPN by utilizing the polymer as a "nanoreactor" to synthesize the desired nanoparticles, where the precursors can diffuse and coalesce into a single nanoparticle within each spot. The process of precursor aggregation and single nanoparticle formation is studied, and it is found that metal precursors follow one of three pathways based upon their reduction potential. Chapter 3 is the first of three chapters that highlights the power of soft materials in the cantilever-free architecture. In particular, Chapter 3 examines the role of the elastomeric backing layer as a compliant spring whose stiffness (as measured by the spring constant, k) can be tuned

  7. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  8. Vulnerabilities in First-Generation RFID-enabled Credit Cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydt-Benjamin, Thomas S.; Bailey, Daniel V.; Fu, Kevin; Juels, Ari; O'Hare, Tom

    RFID-enabled credit cards are widely deployed in the United States and other countries, but no public study has thoroughly analyzed the mechanisms that provide both security and privacy. Using samples from a variety of RFID-enabled credit cards, our study observes that (1) the cardholder's name and often credit card number and expiration are leaked in plaintext to unauthenticated readers, (2) our homemade device costing around 150 effectively clones one type of skimmed cards thus providing a proof-of-concept implementation for the RF replay attack, (3) information revealed by the RFID transmission cross contaminates the security of RFID and non-RFID payment contexts, and (4) RFID-enabled credit cards are susceptible in various degrees to a range of other traditional RFID attacks such as skimming and relaying.

  9. Solar Sail Propulsion: Enabling New Capabilities for Heliophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Young, R.; Alhorn, D.; Heaton, A.; Vansant, T.; Campbell, B.; Pappa, R.; Keats, W.; Liewer, P. C.; Alexander, D.; Wawrzyniak, G.; Ayon, J.; Burton, R.; Carroll, D.; Matloff, G.; Kezerashvili, R. Ya.

    2010-01-01

    Solar sails can play a critical role in enabling solar and heliophysics missions. Solar sail technology within NASA is currently at 80% of TRL-6, suitable for an in-flight technology demonstration. It is conceivable that an initial demonstration could carry scientific payloads that, depending on the type of mission, are commensurate with the goals of the three study panels of the 2010 Heliophysics Survey. Follow-on solar sail missions, leveraging advances in solar sail technology to support Heliophysics Survey goals, would then be feasible. This white paper reports on a sampling of missions enabled by solar sails, the current state of the technology, and what funding is required to advance the current state of technology such that solar sails can enable these missions

  10. Porous scaffold architecture guides tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Cipitria, Amaia; Lange, Claudia; Schell, Hanna; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Reichert, Johannes C; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Fratzl, Peter; Duda, Georg N

    2012-06-01

    Critical-sized bone defect regeneration is a remaining clinical concern. Numerous scaffold-based strategies are currently being investigated to enable in vivo bone defect healing. However, a deeper understanding of how a scaffold influences the tissue formation process and how this compares to endogenous bone formation or to regular fracture healing is missing. It is hypothesized that the porous scaffold architecture can serve as a guiding substrate to enable the formation of a structured fibrous network as a prerequirement for later bone formation. An ovine, tibial, 30-mm critical-sized defect is used as a model system to better understand the effect of the scaffold architecture on cell organization, fibrous tissue, and mineralized tissue formation mechanisms in vivo. Tissue regeneration patterns within two geometrically distinct macroscopic regions of a specific scaffold design, the scaffold wall and the endosteal cavity, are compared with tissue formation in an empty defect (negative control) and with cortical bone (positive control). Histology, backscattered electron imaging, scanning small-angle X-ray scattering, and nanoindentation are used to assess the morphology of fibrous and mineralized tissue, to measure the average mineral particle thickness and the degree of alignment, and to map the local elastic indentation modulus. The scaffold proves to function as a guiding substrate to the tissue formation process. It enables the arrangement of a structured fibrous tissue across the entire defect, which acts as a secondary supporting network for cells. Mineralization can then initiate along the fibrous network, resulting in bone ingrowth into a critical-sized defect, although not in complete bridging of the defect. The fibrous network morphology, which in turn is guided by the scaffold architecture, influences the microstructure of the newly formed bone. These results allow a deeper understanding of the mode of mineral tissue formation and the way this is