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Sample records for enables quantitative phosphoproteomics

  1. Sample Collection Method Bias Effects in Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Kanshin, Evgeny; Tyers, Michael; Thibault, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Current advances in selective enrichment, fractionation, and MS detection of phosphorylated peptides allowed identification and quantitation of tens of thousands phosphosites from minute amounts of biological material. One of the major challenges in the field is preserving the in vivo phosphorylation state of the proteins throughout the sample preparation workflow. This is typically achieved by using phosphatase inhibitors and denaturing conditions during cell lysis. Here we determine if the upstream cell collection techniques could introduce changes in protein phosphorylation. To evaluate the effect of sample collection protocols on the global phosphorylation status of the cell, we compared different sample workflows by metabolic labeling and quantitative mass spectrometry on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cultures. We identified highly similar phosphopeptides for cells harvested in ice cold isotonic phosphate buffer, cold ethanol, trichloroacetic acid, and liquid nitrogen. However, quantitative analyses revealed that the commonly used phosphate buffer unexpectedly activated signaling events. Such effects may introduce systematic bias in phosphoproteomics measurements and biochemical analysis. PMID:26040406

  2. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis of ERBB3/ERBB4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kris; Klammer, Martin; Jordan, Nicole; Elschenbroich, Sarah; Parade, Marc; Jacoby, Edgar; Linders, Joannes T. M.; Brehmer, Dirk; Cools, Jan; Daub, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The four members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ERBB) family form homo- and heterodimers which mediate ligand-specific regulation of many key cellular processes in normal and cancer tissues. While signaling through the EGFR has been extensively studied on the molecular level, signal transduction through ERBB3/ERBB4 heterodimers is less well understood. Here, we generated isogenic mouse Ba/F3 cells that express full-length and functional membrane-integrated ERBB3 and ERBB4 or ERBB4 alone, to serve as a defined cellular model for biological and phosphoproteomics analysis of ERBB3/ERBB4 signaling. ERBB3 co-expression significantly enhanced Ba/F3 cell proliferation upon neuregulin-1 (NRG1) treatment. For comprehensive signaling studies we performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) experiments to compare the basal ERBB3/ERBB4 cell phosphoproteome to NRG1 treatment of ERBB3/ERBB4 and ERBB4 cells. We employed a workflow comprising differential isotope labeling with mTRAQ reagents followed by chromatographic peptide separation and final phosphopeptide enrichment prior to MS analysis. Overall, we identified 9686 phosphorylation sites which could be confidently localized to specific residues. Statistical analysis of three replicate experiments revealed 492 phosphorylation sites which were significantly changed in NRG1-treated ERBB3/ERBB4 cells. Bioinformatics data analysis recapitulated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt pathways, but also indicated signaling links to cytoskeletal functions and nuclear biology. Comparative assessment of NRG1-stimulated ERBB4 Ba/F3 cells revealed that ERBB3 did not trigger defined signaling pathways but more broadly enhanced phosphoproteome regulation in cells expressing both receptors. In conclusion, our data provide the first global picture of ERBB3/ERBB4 signaling and provide numerous potential starting points for further mechanistic studies. PMID:26745281

  3. 15N labeled brain enables quantification of proteome and phosphoproteome in cultured primary neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lujian; Sando, Richard C.; Farnum, John B.; Vanderklish, Peter W.; Maximov, Anton; Yates, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Terminally differentiated primary cells represent a valuable in vitro model to study signaling events associated within a specific tissue. Quantitative proteomic methods using metabolic labeling in primary cells encounter labeling efficiency issues hindering the use of these cells. Here we developed a method to quantify the proteome and phosphoproteome of cultured neurons using 15N labeled brain tissue as an internal standard, and applied this method to determine how an inhibitor of an excitatory neural transmitter receptor, phencyclidine (PCP), affects the global phosphoproteome of cortical neurons. We identified over 10,000 phosphopeptides and made accurate quantitative measurements of the neuronal phosphoproteome after neuronal inhibition. We show that short PCP treatments lead to changes in phosphorylation for 7% of neuronal phosphopeptides and that prolonged PCP treatment alters the total levels of several proteins essential for synaptic transmission and plasticity and leads to a massive reduction in the synaptic strength of inhibitory synapses. The results provide valuable insights into the dynamics of molecular networks implicated in PCP-mediated NMDA receptor inhibition and sensorimotor deficits. PMID:22070516

  4. Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics on serial tumor biopsies from a sorafenib-treated HCC patient.

    PubMed

    Dazert, Eva; Colombi, Marco; Boldanova, Tujana; Moes, Suzette; Adametz, David; Quagliata, Luca; Roth, Volker; Terracciano, Luigi; Heim, Markus H; Jenoe, Paul; Hall, Michael N

    2016-02-01

    Compensatory signaling pathways in tumors confer resistance to targeted therapy, but the pathways and their mechanisms of activation remain largely unknown. We describe a procedure for quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics on snap-frozen biopsies of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and matched nontumor liver tissue. We applied this procedure to monitor signaling pathways in serial biopsies taken from an HCC patient before and during treatment with the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. At diagnosis, the patient had an advanced HCC. At the time of the second biopsy, abdominal imaging revealed progressive disease despite sorafenib treatment. Sorafenib was confirmed to inhibit MAPK signaling in the tumor, as measured by reduced ribosomal protein S6 kinase phosphorylation. Hierarchical clustering and enrichment analysis revealed pathways broadly implicated in tumor progression and resistance, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell adhesion pathways. Thus, we describe a protocol for quantitative analysis of oncogenic pathways in HCC biopsies and obtained first insights into the effect of sorafenib in vivo. This protocol will allow elucidation of mechanisms of resistance and enable precision medicine. PMID:26787912

  5. Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics on serial tumor biopsies from a sorafenib-treated HCC patient

    PubMed Central

    Dazert, Eva; Colombi, Marco; Boldanova, Tujana; Moes, Suzette; Adametz, David; Quagliata, Luca; Roth, Volker; Terracciano, Luigi; Heim, Markus H.; Jenoe, Paul; Hall, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Compensatory signaling pathways in tumors confer resistance to targeted therapy, but the pathways and their mechanisms of activation remain largely unknown. We describe a procedure for quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics on snap-frozen biopsies of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and matched nontumor liver tissue. We applied this procedure to monitor signaling pathways in serial biopsies taken from an HCC patient before and during treatment with the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. At diagnosis, the patient had an advanced HCC. At the time of the second biopsy, abdominal imaging revealed progressive disease despite sorafenib treatment. Sorafenib was confirmed to inhibit MAPK signaling in the tumor, as measured by reduced ribosomal protein S6 kinase phosphorylation. Hierarchical clustering and enrichment analysis revealed pathways broadly implicated in tumor progression and resistance, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell adhesion pathways. Thus, we describe a protocol for quantitative analysis of oncogenic pathways in HCC biopsies and obtained first insights into the effect of sorafenib in vivo. This protocol will allow elucidation of mechanisms of resistance and enable precision medicine. PMID:26787912

  6. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Revealed Glucose-Stimulated Responses of Islet Associated with Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaming; Li, Qingrun; Tang, Jiashu; Xia, Fangying; Wu, Jiarui; Zeng, Rong

    2015-11-01

    As central tissue of glucose homeostasis, islet has been an important focus of diabetes research. Phosphorylation plays pivotal roles in islet function, especially in islet glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. A systematic view on how phosphorylation networks were coordinately regulated in this process remains lacking, partially due to the limited amount of islets from an individual for a phosphoproteomic analysis. Here we optimized the in-tip and best-ratio phosphopeptide enrichment strategy and a SILAC-based workflow for processing rat islet samples. With limited islet lysates from each individual rat (20-47 μg), we identified 8539 phosphosites on 2487 proteins. Subsequent quantitative analyses uncovered that short-term (30 min) high glucose stimulation induced coordinate responses of islet phosphoproteome on multiple biological levels, including insulin secretion related pathways, cytoskeleton dynamics, protein processing in ER and Golgi, transcription and translation, and so on. Furthermore, three glucose-responsive phosphosites (Prkar1a pT75pS77 and Tagln2 pS163) from the data set were proved to be correlated with insulin secretion. Overall, we initially gave an in-depth map of islet phosphoproteome regulated by glucose on individual rat level. This was a significant addition to our knowledge about how phosphorylation networks responded in insulin secretion. Also, the list of changed phosphosites was a valuable resource for molecular researchers in diabetes field. PMID:26437020

  7. Quantitative phospho-proteomics to investigate the polo-like kinase 1-dependent phospho-proteome.

    PubMed

    Grosstessner-Hain, Karin; Hegemann, Björn; Novatchkova, Maria; Rameseder, Jonathan; Joughin, Brian A; Hudecz, Otto; Roitinger, Elisabeth; Pichler, Peter; Kraut, Norbert; Yaffe, Michael B; Peters, Jan-Michael; Mechtler, Karl

    2011-11-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a key regulator of mitotic progression and cell division, and small molecule inhibitors of PLK1 are undergoing clinical trials to evaluate their utility in cancer therapy. Despite this importance, current knowledge about the identity of PLK1 substrates is limited. Here we present the results of a proteome-wide analysis of PLK1-regulated phosphorylation sites in mitotic human cells. We compared phosphorylation sites in HeLa cells that were or were not treated with the PLK1-inhibitor BI 4834, by labeling peptides via methyl esterification, fractionation of peptides by strong cation exchange chromatography, and phosphopeptide enrichment via immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Analysis by quantitative mass spectrometry identified 4070 unique mitotic phosphorylation sites on 2069 proteins. Of these, 401 proteins contained one or multiple phosphorylation sites whose abundance was decreased by PLK1 inhibition. These include proteins implicated in PLK1-regulated processes such as DNA damage, mitotic spindle formation, spindle assembly checkpoint signaling, and chromosome segregation, but also numerous proteins that were not suspected to be regulated by PLK1. Analysis of amino acid sequence motifs among phosphorylation sites down-regulated under PLK1 inhibition in this data set identified two potential novel variants of the PLK1 consensus motif. PMID:21857030

  8. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Nitric Oxide–Responsive Phosphoproteins in Cotton Leaf

    PubMed Central

    Song, Meizhen; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Liu, Ji; Zhan, Xianjin; Lan, Jiayang; Feng, Changhui; Zhang, Shengxi; Yu, Shuxun

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of phosphorylation events and their regulation is crucial to understanding the functional biology of plant proteins, but very little is currently known about nitric oxide–responsive phosphorylation in plants. Here, we report the first large-scale, quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) treated with sodium nitroprusside (nitric oxide donor) by utilizing the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) method. A total of 1315 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1528 non-redundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1020 cotton phosphoproteins. Among them, 183 phosphopeptides corresponding to 167 phosphoproteins were found to be differentially phosphorylated in response to sodium nitroprusside. Several of the phosphorylation sites that we identified, including RQxS, DSxE, TxxxxSP and SPxT, have not, to our knowledge, been reported to be protein kinase sites in other species. The phosphoproteins identified are involved in a wide range of cellular processes, including signal transduction, RNA metabolism, intracellular transport and so on. This study reveals unique features of the cotton phosphoproteome and provides new insight into the biochemical pathways that are regulated by nitric oxide. PMID:24714030

  9. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of early seed development in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiehua; Hou, Yuxuan; Tong, Xiaohong; Wang, Yifeng; Lin, Haiyan; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Wen; Li, Zhiyong; Nallamilli, Babi R; Zhang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) seed serves as a major food source for over half of the global population. Though it has been long recognized that phosphorylation plays an essential role in rice seed development, the phosphorylation events and dynamics in this process remain largely unknown so far. Here, we report the first large scale identification of rice seed phosphoproteins and phosphosites by using a quantitative phosphoproteomic approach. Thorough proteomic studies in pistils and seeds at 3, 7 days after pollination resulted in the successful identification of 3885, 4313 and 4135 phosphopeptides respectively. A total of 2487 proteins were differentially phosphorylated among the three stages, including Kip related protein 1, Rice basic leucine zipper factor 1, Rice prolamin box binding factor and numerous other master regulators of rice seed development. Moreover, differentially phosphorylated proteins may be extensively involved in the biosynthesis and signaling pathways of phytohormones such as auxin, gibberellin, abscisic acid and brassinosteroid. Our results strongly indicated that protein phosphorylation is a key mechanism regulating cell proliferation and enlargement, phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling, grain filling and grain quality during rice seed development. Overall, the current study enhanced our understanding of the rice phosphoproteome and shed novel insight into the regulatory mechanism of rice seed development. PMID:26613898

  10. Systems-wide Analysis of a Phosphatase Knock-down by Quantitative Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Hilger, Maximiliane; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Gnad, Florian; Mann, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction in metazoans regulates almost all aspects of biological function, and aberrant signaling is involved in many diseases. Perturbations in phosphorylation-based signaling networks are typically studied in a hypothesis-driven approach, using phospho-specific antibodies. Here we apply quantitative, high-resolution mass spectrometry to determine the systems response to the depletion of one signaling component. Drosophila cells were metabolically labeled using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and the phosphatase Ptp61F, the ortholog of mammalian PTB1B, a drug target for diabetes, was knocked down by RNAi. In total we detected more than 10,000 phosphorylation sites in the phosphoproteome of Drosophila Schneider cells and trained a phosphorylation site predictor with this data. SILAC-based quantitation after phosphatase knock-down showed that apart from the phosphatase, the proteome was minimally affected whereas 288 of 6,478 high-confidence phosphorylation sites changed significantly. Responses at the phosphotyrosine level included the already described Ptp61F substrates Stat92E and Abi. Our analysis highlights a connection of Ptp61F to cytoskeletal regulation through GTPase regulating proteins and focal adhesion components. PMID:19429919

  11. Quantitative Circadian Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis Reveals Extensive Clock Control of Key Components in Physiological, Metabolic, and Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Mani Kant; Nomura, Yuko; Wang, Lei; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Somers, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock provides adaptive advantages to an organism, resulting in increased fitness and survival. The phosphorylation events that regulate circadian-dependent signaling and the processes which post-translationally respond to clock-gated signals are largely unknown. To better elucidate post-translational events tied to the circadian system we carried out a survey of circadian-regulated protein phosphorylation events in Arabidopsis seedlings. A large-scale mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach employing TiO2-based phosphopeptide enrichment techniques identified and quantified 1586 phosphopeptides on 1080 protein groups. A total of 102 phosphopeptides displayed significant changes in abundance, enabling the identification of specific patterns of response to circadian rhythms. Our approach was sensitive enough to quantitate oscillations in the phosphorylation of low abundance clock proteins (EARLY FLOWERING4; ELF4 and PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR3; PRR3) as well as other transcription factors and kinases. During constant light, extensive cyclic changes in phosphorylation status occurred in critical regulators, implicating direct or indirect regulation by the circadian system. These included proteins influencing transcriptional regulation, translation, metabolism, stress and phytohormones-mediated responses. We validated our analysis using the elf4–211 allele, in which an S45L transition removes the phosphorylation herein identified. We show that removal of this phosphorylatable site diminishes interaction with EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3), a key partner in a tripartite evening complex required for circadian cycling. elf4–211 lengthens period, which increases with increasing temperature, relative to the wild type, resulting in a more stable temperature compensation of circadian period over a wider temperature range. PMID:26091701

  12. Research Resource: Identification of Novel Growth Hormone-Regulated Phosphorylation Sites by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Bridgette N.; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Argetsinger, Lawrence S.; Fingar, Diane C.; Andrews, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    GH and GH receptors are expressed throughout life, and GH elicits a diverse range of responses, including growth and altered metabolism. It is therefore important to understand the full spectrum of GH signaling pathways and cellular responses. We applied mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics combined with stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to identify proteins rapidly phosphorylated in response to GH in 3T3-F442A preadipocytes. We identified 132 phosphosites in 95 proteins that exhibited rapid (5 or 15 min) GH-dependent statistically significant increases in phosphorylation by more than or equal to 50% and 96 phosphosites in 46 proteins that were down-regulated by GH by more than or equal to 30%. Several of the GH-stimulated phosphorylation sites were known (e.g. regulatory Thr/Tyr in Erks 1 and 2, Tyr in signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) 5a and 5b, Ser939 in tuberous sclerosis protein (TSC) 2 or tuberin). The remaining 126 GH-stimulated sites were not previously associated with GH. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis of GH-stimulated sites indicated enrichment in proteins associated with the insulin and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and focal adhesions. Akt/protein kinase A consensus sites (RXRXXS/T) were the most commonly phosphorylated consensus sites. Immunoblotting confirmed GH-stimulated phosphorylation of all seven novel GH-dependent sites tested [regulatory sites in proline-rich Akt substrate, 40 kDA (PRAS40), regulatory associated protein of mTOR, ATP-citrate lyase, Na+/H+ exchanger-1, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1, and Shc]). The immunoblot results suggest that many, if not most, of the GH-stimulated phosphosites identified in this large-scale quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis, including sites in multiple proteins in the Akt/ mTOR complex 1 pathway, are phosphorylated in response to GH. Their identification significantly

  13. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Approaches for Deciphering the Signaling Pathway for Tension Wood Formation in Poplar.

    PubMed

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Claverol, Stéphane; Bartholomé, Jérôme; Negroni, Luc; Richet, Nicolas; Lalanne, Céline; Bonneu, Marc; Coutand, Catherine; Plomion, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Trees adjust their growth following forced changes in orientation to re-establish a vertical position. In angiosperms, this adjustment involves the differential regulation of vascular cambial activity between the lower (opposite wood) and upper (tension wood) sides of the leaning stem. We investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to the formation of differential wood types through a quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis on poplar subjected to a gravitropic stimulus. We identified and quantified 675 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 468 phosphoproteins, and 3 763 nonphosphorylated peptides, corresponding to 1 155 proteins, in the differentiating xylem of straight-growing trees (control) and trees subjected to a gravitational stimulus during 8 weeks. About 1% of the peptides were specific to a wood type (straight, opposite, or tension wood). Proteins quantified in more than one type of wood were more numerous: a mixed linear model showed 389 phosphopeptides and 556 proteins to differ in abundance between tension wood and opposite wood. Twenty-one percent of the phosphoproteins identified here were described in their phosphorylated form for the first time. Our analyses revealed remarkable developmental molecular plasticity, with wood type-specific phosphorylation events, and highlighted the involvement of different proteins in the biosynthesis of cell wall components during the formation of the three types of wood. PMID:26112267

  14. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Identifies Filaggrin and other Targets of Ionizing Radiation in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M.; Gristenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2012-04-17

    Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low and high dose ionizing radiation dependent signaling in a complex 3-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labeling strategy using sham and 3 radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1113 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 151 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1 and 2,) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. A phosphorylation site present in multiple copies in the linker regions of human profilaggrin underwent the largest fold change. Increased phosphorylation of these sites coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain skin barrier functions and minimize the damaging consequences of radiation exposure.

  15. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Profiling of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schweppe, Devin K.; Rigas, James R.; Gerber, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Within the molecular scope of NCSLC, a complex landscape of dysregulated cellular signaling has emerged, defined largely by mutations in select mediators of signal transduction, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma (ALK) kinases. Consequently, these mutant kinases become constitutively activated and targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. Encouragingly, small molecule inhibitors of these pathways have shown promise in clinical trials or are approved for clinical use. However, many protein kinases are dysregulated in NSCLC without genetic mutations. To quantify differences in tumor cell signaling that are transparent to genomic methods, we established a super-SILAC internal standard derived from NSCLC cell lines grown in vitro and labeled with heavy lysine and arginine, and deployed them in a phosphoproteomics workflow. We identified 9019 and 8753 phosphorylation sites in two separate tumors. Relative quantification of phosphopeptide abundance between tumor samples allowed for the determination of specific hubs and pathways differing between each tumor. Sites downstream of Ras showed decreased inhibitory phosphorylation (Raf/Mek) and increased activating phosphorylation (Erk1/2) in one tumor versus another. In this way, we were able to quantitatively access oncogenic kinase signaling in primary human tumors. PMID:23911959

  16. Automated, Reproducible, Titania-Based Phosphopeptide Enrichment Strategy for Label-Free Quantitative Phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Brenna McJury; Soderblom, Erik J.; Thompson, J. Will; Moseley, M. Arthur

    2013-01-01

    An automated phosphopeptide enrichment strategy is described using titanium dioxide (TiO2)-packed, fused silica capillaries for use with liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS-based, label-free proteomics workflows. To correlate an optimum peptide:TiO2 loading ratio between different particle types, the ratio of phenyl phosphate-binding capacities was used. The optimum loading for the column was then verified through replicate enrichments of a range of quantities of digested rat brain tissue cell lysate. Fractions were taken during sample loading, multiple wash steps, and the elution steps and analyzed by LC-MS/MS to gauge the efficiency and reproducibility of the enrichment. Greater than 96% of the total phosphopeptides were detected in the elution fractions, indicating efficient trapping of the phosphopeptides on the first pass of enrichment. The quantitative reproducibility of the automated setup was also improved greatly with phosphopeptide intensities from replicate enrichments exhibiting a median coefficient of variation (CV) of 5.8%, and 80% of the identified phosphopeptides had CVs below 11.1%, while maintaining >85% specificity. By providing this high degree of analytical reproducibility, this method allows for label-free phosphoproteomics over large sample sets with complex experimental designs (multiple biological conditions, multiple biological replicates, multiple time-points, etc.), including large-scale clinical cohorts. PMID:23542237

  17. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals the Role of Protein Arginine Phosphorylation in the Bacterial Stress Response*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Andreas; Trentini, Débora Broch; Spiess, Silvia; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Ammerer, Gustav; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Arginine phosphorylation is an emerging protein modification implicated in the general stress response of Gram-positive bacteria. The modification is mediated by the arginine kinase McsB, which phosphorylates and inactivates the heat shock repressor CtsR. In this study, we developed a mass spectrometric approach accounting for the peculiar chemical properties of phosphoarginine. The improved methodology was used to analyze the dynamic changes in the Bacillus subtilis arginine phosphoproteome in response to different stress situations. Quantitative analysis showed that a B. subtilis mutant lacking the YwlE arginine phosphatase accumulated a strikingly large number of arginine phosphorylations (217 sites in 134 proteins), however only a minor fraction of these sites was increasingly modified during heat shock or oxidative stress. The main targets of McsB-mediated arginine phosphorylation comprise central factors of the stress response system including the CtsR and HrcA heat shock repressors, as well as major components of the protein quality control system such as the ClpCP protease and the GroEL chaperonine. These findings highlight the impact of arginine phosphorylation in orchestrating the bacterial stress response. PMID:24263382

  18. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Profiling of Iron-Deficient Arabidopsis Roots1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Ping; Li, Wenfeng; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential mineral nutrient for plants, but often it is not available in sufficient quantities to sustain optimal growth. To gain insights into adaptive processes to low Fe availability at the posttranslational level, we conducted a quantitative analysis of Fe deficiency-induced changes in the phosphoproteome profile of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation-labeled phosphopeptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on an LTQ-Orbitrap with collision-induced dissociation and high-energy collision dissociation capabilities. Using a combination of titanium dioxide and immobilized metal affinity chromatography to enrich phosphopeptides, we extracted 849 uniquely identified phosphopeptides corresponding to 425 proteins and identified several not previously described phosphorylation motifs. A subset of 45 phosphoproteins was defined as being significantly changed in abundance upon Fe deficiency. Kinase motifs in Fe-responsive proteins matched to protein kinase A/calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase II, casein kinase II, and proline-directed kinase, indicating a possible critical function of these kinase classes in Fe homeostasis. To validate our analysis, we conducted site-directed mutagenesis on IAA-CONJUGATE-RESISTANT4 (IAR4), a protein putatively functioning in auxin homeostasis. iar4 mutants showed compromised root hair formation and developed shorter primary roots. Changing serine-296 in IAR4 to alanine resulted in a phenotype intermediate between mutant and wild type, whereas acidic substitution to aspartate to mimic phosphorylation was either lethal or caused an extreme dwarf phenotype, supporting the critical importance of this residue in Fe homeostasis. Our analyses further disclose substantial changes in the abundance of phosphoproteins involved in primary carbohydrate metabolism upon Fe deficiency, complementing the picture derived from previous proteomic and

  19. Identification of Candidate Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) Substrates in Mitosis by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Adam; Adamo, Mark E; Cheng, Chao; Kettenbach, Arminja N

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is an essential regulator of many mitotic processes including the reorganization of the cytoskeleton, chromosome segregation, and formation and separation of daughter cells. Deregulation of Cdk1 activity results in severe defects in these processes. Although the role of Cdk1 in mitosis is well established, only a limited number of Cdk1 substrates have been identified in mammalian cells. To increase our understanding of Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation pathways in mitosis, we conducted a quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis in mitotic HeLa cells using two small molecule inhibitors of Cdk1, Flavopiridol and RO-3306. In these analyses, we identified a total of 24,840 phosphopeptides on 4,273 proteins, of which 1,215 phosphopeptides on 551 proteins were significantly reduced by 2.5-fold or more upon Cdk1 inhibitor addition. Comparison of phosphopeptide quantification upon either inhibitor treatment revealed a high degree of correlation (R(2) value of 0.87) between the different datasets. Motif enrichment analysis of significantly regulated phosphopeptides revealed enrichment of canonical Cdk1 kinase motifs. Interestingly, the majority of proteins identified in this analysis contained two or more Cdk1 inhibitor-sensitive phosphorylation sites, were highly connected with other candidate Cdk1 substrates, were enriched at specific subcellular structures, or were part of protein complexes as identified by the CORUM database. Furthermore, candidate Cdk1 substrates were enriched in G2 and M phase-specific genes. Finally, we validated a subset of candidate Cdk1 substrates by in vitro kinase assays. Our findings provide a valuable resource for the cell signaling and mitosis research communities and greatly increase our knowledge of Cdk1 substrates and Cdk1-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:27134283

  20. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of protein kinase SnRK1 regulated protein phosphorylation in Arabidopsis under submergence.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hsing-Yi; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Ying-Tsui; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-04-01

    SNF1 RELATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 (SnRK1) is proposed to be a central integrator of the plant stress and energy starvation signalling pathways. We observed that the Arabidopsis SnRK1.1 dominant negative mutant (SnRK1.1 (K48M) ) had lower tolerance to submergence than the wild type, suggesting that SnRK1.1-dependent phosphorylation of target proteins is important in signalling pathways triggered by submergence. We conducted quantitative phosphoproteomics and found that the phosphorylation levels of 57 proteins increased and the levels of 27 proteins decreased in Col-0 within 0.5-3h of submergence. Among the 57 proteins with increased phosphorylation in Col-0, 38 did not show increased phosphorylation levels in SnRK1.1 (K48M) under submergence. These proteins are involved mainly in sugar and protein synthesis. In particular, the phosphorylation of MPK6, which is involved in regulating ROS responses under abiotic stresses, was disrupted in the SnRK1.1 (K48M) mutant. In addition, PTP1, a negative regulator of MPK6 activity that directly dephosphorylates MPK6, was also regulated by SnRK1.1. We also showed that energy conservation was disrupted in SnRK1.1 (K48M) , mpk6, and PTP1 (S7AS8A) under submergence. These results reveal insights into the function of SnRK1 and the downstream signalling factors related to submergence. PMID:27029354

  1. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Wee1 Kinase as a Therapeutic Target in a Model of Proneural Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lescarbeau, Rebecca S; Lei, Liang; Bakken, Katrina K; Sims, Peter A; Sarkaria, Jann N; Canoll, Peter; White, Forest M

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain cancer. With a median survival of about a year, new approaches to treating this disease are necessary. To identify signaling molecules regulating GBM progression in a genetically engineered murine model of proneural GBM, we quantified phosphotyrosine-mediated signaling using mass spectrometry. Oncogenic signals, including phosphorylated ERK MAPK, PI3K, and PDGFR, were found to be increased in the murine tumors relative to brain. Phosphorylation of CDK1 pY15, associated with the G2 arrest checkpoint, was identified as the most differentially phosphorylated site, with a 14-fold increase in phosphorylation in the tumors. To assess the role of this checkpoint as a potential therapeutic target, syngeneic primary cell lines derived from these tumors were treated with MK-1775, an inhibitor of Wee1, the kinase responsible for CDK1 Y15 phosphorylation. MK-1775 treatment led to mitotic catastrophe, as defined by increased DNA damage and cell death by apoptosis. To assess the extensibility of targeting Wee1/CDK1 in GBM, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) cell lines were also treated with MK-1775. Although the response was more heterogeneous, on-target Wee1 inhibition led to decreased CDK1 Y15 phosphorylation and increased DNA damage and apoptosis in each line. These results were also validated in vivo, where single-agent MK-1775 demonstrated an antitumor effect on a flank PDX tumor model, increasing mouse survival by 1.74-fold. This study highlights the ability of unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomics to reveal therapeutic targets in tumor models, and the potential for Wee1 inhibition as a treatment approach in preclinical models of GBM. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1332-43. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196784

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of protein kinase SnRK1 regulated protein phosphorylation in Arabidopsis under submergence

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hsing-Yi; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Ying-Tsui; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    SNF1 RELATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 (SnRK1) is proposed to be a central integrator of the plant stress and energy starvation signalling pathways. We observed that the Arabidopsis SnRK1.1 dominant negative mutant (SnRK1.1 K48M) had lower tolerance to submergence than the wild type, suggesting that SnRK1.1-dependent phosphorylation of target proteins is important in signalling pathways triggered by submergence. We conducted quantitative phosphoproteomics and found that the phosphorylation levels of 57 proteins increased and the levels of 27 proteins decreased in Col-0 within 0.5–3h of submergence. Among the 57 proteins with increased phosphorylation in Col-0, 38 did not show increased phosphorylation levels in SnRK1.1 K48M under submergence. These proteins are involved mainly in sugar and protein synthesis. In particular, the phosphorylation of MPK6, which is involved in regulating ROS responses under abiotic stresses, was disrupted in the SnRK1.1 K48M mutant. In addition, PTP1, a negative regulator of MPK6 activity that directly dephosphorylates MPK6, was also regulated by SnRK1.1. We also showed that energy conservation was disrupted in SnRK1.1 K48M, mpk6, and PTP1 S7AS8A under submergence. These results reveal insights into the function of SnRK1 and the downstream signalling factors related to submergence. PMID:27029354

  3. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Crosstalk Between Phosphorylation and O-GlcNAc in the DNA Damage Response Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jun; Martinez, Marissa; Sengupta, Srona; Lee, Albert; Wu, Xinyan; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chatterjee, Aditi; O’Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Zachara, Natasha E.

    2015-01-01

    The modification of intracellular proteins by monosaccharides of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is an essential and dynamic post-translational modification of metazoans. The addition and removal of O-GlcNAc is catalyzed by the O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase, respectively. One mechanism by which O-GlcNAc is thought to mediate proteins is by regulating phosphorylation. To provide insight into the pathways regulated by O-GlcNAc, we have utilized stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to carry out comparisons of site-specific phosphorylation in OGT wild-type (WT) and Null cells. Quantitation of the phosphoproteome demonstrated that out of 5,529 phosphoserine, phosphothreonine and phosphotyrosine sites, 232 phosphosites were upregulated and 133 downregulated in the absence of O-GlcNAc. Collectively, these data suggest that deletion of OGT has a profound effect on the phosphorylation of cell cycle and DNA damage response proteins. Key events were confirmed by biochemical analyses and demonstrate a increase in the activating autophosphorylation event on ATM (Ser1987) and on ATM’s downstream targets p53, H2AX and Chk2. Together, these data support widespread changes in the phosphoproteome upon removal of O-GlcNAc, suggesting that O-GlcNAc regulates processes such as the cell cycle, genomic stability, and lysosomal biogenesis. PMID:25263469

  4. Label-free quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis reveals differentially regulated proteins and pathway in PRRSV-infected pulmonary alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Fang, Liurong; Jin, Hui; Wang, Dang; An, Kang; Xu, Ningzhi; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an important pathogen of swine worldwide and causes significant economic losses. Through regulating the host proteins phosphorylation, PRRSV was found to manipulate the activities of several signaling molecules to regulate innate immune responses. However, the role of protein phosphorylation during PRRSV infection and the signal pathways responsible for it are relatively unknown. Here liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to systematically investigate the global phosphorylation events in PRRSV-infected pulmonary alveolar macrophages. In total, we identified 2125 unique phosphosites, of which the phosphorylation level of 292 phosphosites on 242 proteins and 373 phosphosites on 249 proteins was significantly altered at 12 and 36 h pi, respectively. The phosphoproteomics data were analyzed using ingenuity pathways analysis to identify defined canonical pathways and functional networks. Pathway analysis revealed that PRRSV-induced inflammatory cytokines production was probably due to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB signal pathway, which were regulated by several protein kinases during virus infection. Interacting network analysis indicated that altered phosphoproteins were involved in cellular assembly and organization, protein synthesis, molecular transport, and signal transduction in PRRSV infected cells. These pathways and functional networks analysis could provide direct insights into the biological significance of phosphorylation events modulated by PRRSV and may help us elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of PRRSV infection. PMID:24533505

  5. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran H.; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Yang, Feng; Yao, Qiuming; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T.; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-11

    Root hairs are single hair-forming cells on roots that function to increase root surface area, enhancing water and nutrient uptake. In leguminous plants, root hairs also play a critical role as the site of infection by symbiotic nitrogen fixing rhizobia, leading to the formation of a novel organ, the nodule. The initial steps in the rhizobia-root hair infection process are known to involve specific receptor kinases and subsequent kinase cascades. Here, we characterize the phosphoproteome of the root hairs and the corresponding stripped roots (i.e., roots from which root hairs were removed) during rhizobial colonization and infection to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of root hair cell biology. We chose soybean (Glycine max L.), one of the most important crop plants in the legume family, for this study because of its larger root size, which permits isolation of sufficient root hair material for phosphoproteomic analysis. Phosphopeptides derived from root hairs and stripped roots, mock inoculated or inoculated with the soybean-specific rhizobium Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were labeled with the isobaric tag 8-plex ITRAQ, enriched using Ni-NTA magnetic beads and subjected to nRPLC-MS/MS analysis using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD strategy. A total of 1,625 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1,659 non-redundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1,126 soybean phosphoproteins. Among them, 273 phosphopeptides corresponding to 240 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly regulated (>1.5 fold abundance change) in response to inoculation with B. japonicum. The data reveal unique features of the soybean root hair phosphoproteome, including root hair and stripped root-specific phosphorylation suggesting a complex network of kinase-substrate and phosphatase-substrate interactions in response to rhizobial inoculation.

  6. Identification of novel protein functions and signaling mechanisms by genetics and quantitative phosphoproteomics in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fredens, Julius; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Færgeman, Nils J

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids combined with mass spectrometry is a widely used methodology for measuring relative changes in protein and phosphorylation levels at a global level. We have applied this method to the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans in combination with RNAi-mediated gene knockdown by feeding the nematode on pre-labeled lysine auxotroph Escherichia coli. In this chapter, we describe in details the generation of the E. coli strain, incorporation of heavy isotope-labeled lysine in C. elegans, and the procedure for a comprehensive global phosphoproteomic experiment. PMID:25059608

  7. Discovery of Mouse Spleen Signaling Responses to Anthrax using Label-Free Quantitative Phosphoproteomics via Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Nathan P.; Dong, Li; Zhou, Weidong; Du, Xiuxia; Reghu, Nikitha; Kool, Arjan C.; Choi, Dahan; Bailey, Charles L.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Popov, Serguei G.

    2011-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by spores of the bacterium Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis), and is an extremely dangerous disease that can kill unvaccinated victims within 2 weeks. Modern antibiotic-based therapy can increase the survival rate to ∼50%, but only if administered presymptomatically (within 24–48 h of exposure). To discover host signaling responses to presymptomatic anthrax, label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics via liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to compare spleens from uninfected and spore-challenged mice over a 72 h time-course. Spleen proteins were denatured using urea, reduced using dithiothreitol, alkylated using iodoacetamide, and digested into peptides using trypsin, and the resulting phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide solid-phase extraction and analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography-Linear Trap Quadrupole-Orbitrap-MS(/MS). The fragment ion spectra were processed using DeconMSn and searched using both Mascot and SEQUEST resulting in 252,626 confident identifications of 6248 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 5782 phosphorylation sites). The precursor ion spectra were deisotoped using Decon2LS and aligned using MultiAlign resulting in the confident quantitation of 3265 of the identified phosphopeptides. ANOVAs were used to produce a q-value ranked list of host signaling responses. Late-stage (48–72 h postchallenge) Sterne strain (lethal) infections resulted in global alterations to the spleen phosphoproteome. In contrast, ΔSterne strain (asymptomatic; missing the anthrax toxin) infections resulted in 188 (5.8%) significantly altered (q<0.05) phosphopeptides. Twenty-six highly tentative phosphorylation responses to early-stage (24 h postchallenge) anthrax were discovered (q<0.5), and ten of these originated from eight proteins that have known roles in the host immune response. These tentative early-anthrax host response signaling events within mouse spleens may translate into presymptomatic

  8. Quantitative analysis of changes in the phosphoproteome of maize induced by the plant hormone salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liuji; Hu, Xiuli; Wang, Shunxi; Tian, Lei; Pang, Yanjie; Han, Zanping; Wu, Liancheng; Chen, Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in regulating various physiological and biochemical processes. Our previous study identified several protein kinases responsive to SA, suggesting that phosphorylation events play an important role in the plant response to SA. In this study, we characterized the phosphoproteome of maize in response to SA using isotope tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology and TiO2 enrichment method. Based on LC-MS/MS analysis, we found a total of 858 phosphoproteins among 1495 phosphopeptides. Among them, 291 phosphopeptides corresponding to 244 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly changed after SA treatment. The phosphoproteins identified are involved in a wide range of biological processes, which indicate that the response to SA encompasses a reformatting of major cellular processes. Furthermore, some of the phosphoproteins which were not previously known to be involved with SA were found to have significantly changed phosphorylation levels. Many of these changes are phosphorylation decreases, indicating that other currently unknown SA signaling pathways that result in decreased phosphorylation of downstream targets must be involved. Our study represents the first attempt at global phosphoproteome profiling in response to SA, and provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulated by SA. PMID:26659305

  9. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Signaling Mechanisms Associated with Rapid Cold Hardening in a Chill-Tolerant Fly.

    PubMed

    Teets, Nicholas M; Denlinger, David L

    2016-08-01

    Rapid cold hardening (RCH) is a physiological adaptation in which brief chilling (minutes to hours) significantly enhances the cold tolerance of insects. RCH allows insects to cope with sudden cold snaps and diurnal variation in temperature, but the mechanistic basis of this rapid stress response is poorly understood. Here, we used phosphoproteomics to identify phosphorylation-mediated signaling events that are regulated by chilling that induces RCH. Phosphoproteomic changes were measured in both brain and fat bodies, two tissues that are essential for sensing cold and coordinating RCH at the organismal level. Tissues were chilled ex vivo, and changes in phosphoprotein abundance were measured using 2D electrophoresis coupled with Pro-Q diamond labeling of phosphoproteins followed by protein identification via LC-MS/MS. In both tissues, we observed an abundance of protein phosphorylation events in response to chilling. Some of the proteins regulated by RCH-inducing chilling include proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in the degradation of damaged cellular components via the proteasome and autophagosome. Our results suggest that phosphorylation-mediated signaling cascades are major drivers of RCH and enhance our mechanistic understanding of this complex phenotype. PMID:27362561

  10. Identification of Putative Mek1 Substrates during Meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using Quantitative Phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Suhandynata, Raymond T.; Wan, Lihong; Zhou, Huilin; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination plays a key role in sexual reproduction as it generates crossovers that, in combination with sister chromatid cohesion, physically connect homologous chromosomes, thereby promoting their proper segregation at the first meiotic division. Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved, topoisomerase-like protein Spo11. Repair of these DSBs is highly regulated to create crossovers between homologs that are distributed throughout the genome. This repair requires the presence of the mitotic recombinase, Rad51, as well as the strand exchange activity of the meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1. A key regulator of meiotic DSB repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1, which promotes interhomolog strand invasion and is required for the meiotic recombination checkpoint and the crossover/noncrossover decision. Understanding how Mek1 regulates meiotic recombination requires the identification of its substrates. Towards that end, an unbiased phosphoproteomic approach utilizing Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cells (SILAC) was utilized to generate a list of potential Mek1 substrates, as well as proteins containing consensus phosphorylation sites for cyclin-dependent kinase, the checkpoint kinases, Mec1/Tel1, and the polo-like kinase, Cdc5. These experiments represent the first global phosphoproteomic dataset for proteins in meiotic budding yeast. PMID:27214570

  11. Identification of Putative Mek1 Substrates during Meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Suhandynata, Raymond T; Wan, Lihong; Zhou, Huilin; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination plays a key role in sexual reproduction as it generates crossovers that, in combination with sister chromatid cohesion, physically connect homologous chromosomes, thereby promoting their proper segregation at the first meiotic division. Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved, topoisomerase-like protein Spo11. Repair of these DSBs is highly regulated to create crossovers between homologs that are distributed throughout the genome. This repair requires the presence of the mitotic recombinase, Rad51, as well as the strand exchange activity of the meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1. A key regulator of meiotic DSB repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1, which promotes interhomolog strand invasion and is required for the meiotic recombination checkpoint and the crossover/noncrossover decision. Understanding how Mek1 regulates meiotic recombination requires the identification of its substrates. Towards that end, an unbiased phosphoproteomic approach utilizing Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cells (SILAC) was utilized to generate a list of potential Mek1 substrates, as well as proteins containing consensus phosphorylation sites for cyclin-dependent kinase, the checkpoint kinases, Mec1/Tel1, and the polo-like kinase, Cdc5. These experiments represent the first global phosphoproteomic dataset for proteins in meiotic budding yeast. PMID:27214570

  12. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of the PI3K-regulated signaling network.

    PubMed

    Gnad, Florian; Wallin, Jeffrey; Edgar, Kyle; Doll, Sophia; Arnott, David; Robillard, Liliane; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Stokes, Matthew P; Vijapurkar, Ulka; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Friedman, Lori S; Belvin, Marcia

    2016-07-01

    The PI3K pathway is commonly activated in cancer. Only a few studies have attempted to explore the spectrum of phosphorylation signaling downstream of the PI3K cascade. Such insight, however, is imperative to understand the mechanisms responsible for oncogenic phenotypes. By applying MS-based phosphoproteomics, we mapped 2509 phosphorylation sites on 1096 proteins, and quantified their responses to activation or inhibition of PIK3CA using isogenic knock-in derivatives and a series of targeted inhibitors. We uncovered phosphorylation changes in a wide variety of proteins involved in cell growth and proliferation, many of which have not been previously associated with PI3K signaling. A significant update of the posttranslational modification database PHOSIDA (http://www.phosida.com) allows efficient use of the data. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003899 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD003899). PMID:27282143

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics in nuclei of vasopressin-sensitive renal collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, Steven J.; Hurtado, Patricia A. Gonzales; Hoffert, Jason D.; Saeed, Fahad; Pisitkun, Trairak

    2012-01-01

    Vasopressin regulates transport across the collecting duct epithelium in part via effects on gene transcription. Transcriptional regulation occurs partially via changes in phosphorylation of transcription factors, transcriptional coactivators, and protein kinases in the nucleus. To test whether vasopressin alters the nuclear phosphoproteome of vasopressin-sensitive cultured mouse mpkCCD cells, we used stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry to quantify thousands of phosphorylation sites in nuclear extracts and nuclear pellet fractions. Measurements were made in the presence and absence of the vasopressin analog dDAVP. Of the 1,251 sites quantified, 39 changed significantly in response to dDAVP. Network analysis of the regulated proteins revealed two major clusters (“cell-cell adhesion” and “transcriptional regulation”) that were connected to known elements of the vasopressin signaling pathway. The hub proteins for these two clusters were the transcriptional coactivator β-catenin and the transcription factor c-Jun. Phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser552 was increased by dDAVP [log2(dDAVP/vehicle) = 1.79], and phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser73 was decreased [log2(dDAVP/vehicle) = −0.53]. The β-catenin site is known to be targeted by either protein kinase A or Akt, both of which are activated in response to vasopressin. The c-Jun site is a canonical target for the MAP kinase Jnk2, which is downregulated in response to vasopressin in the collecting duct. The data support the idea that vasopressin-mediated control of transcription in collecting duct cells involves selective changes in the nuclear phosphoproteome. All data are available to users at http://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/mNPPD/. PMID:22992673

  14. Analysis of T4SS-induced signaling by H. pylori using quantitative phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Glowinski, Frithjof; Holland, Carsten; Thiede, Bernd; Jungblut, Peter R.; Meyer, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen colonizing the human stomach. Infection with H. pylori causes chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa and may lead to peptic ulceration and/or gastric cancer. A major virulence determinant of H. pylori is the type IV secretion system (T4SS), which is used to inject the virulence factor CagA into the host cell, triggering a wide range of cellular signaling events. Here, we used a phosphoproteomic approach to investigate tyrosine signaling in response to host-pathogen interaction, using stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC) of AGS cells to obtain a differential picture between multiple infection conditions. Cells were infected with wild type H. pylori P12, a P12Δ CagA deletion mutant, and a P12Δ PAI deletion mutant to compare signaling changes over time and in the absence of CagA or the T4SS. Tryptic peptides were enriched for tyrosine (Tyr) phosphopeptides and analyzed by nano-LC-Orbitrap MS. In total, 85 different phosphosites were found to be regulated following infection. The majority of phosphosites identified were kinases of the MAPK family. CagA and the T4SS were found to be key regulators of Tyr phosphosites. Our findings indicate that CagA primarily induces activation of ERK1 and integrin-linked factors, whereas the T4SS primarily modulates JNK and p38 activation. PMID:25101063

  15. Quantitative phospho-proteomics reveals the Plasmodium merozoite triggers pre-invasion host kinase modification of the red cell cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Zuccala, Elizabeth S; Satchwell, Timothy J; Angrisano, Fiona; Tan, Yan Hong; Wilson, Marieangela C; Heesom, Kate J; Baum, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The invasive blood-stage malaria parasite - the merozoite - induces rapid morphological changes to the target erythrocyte during entry. However, evidence for active molecular changes in the host cell that accompany merozoite invasion is lacking. Here, we use invasion inhibition assays, erythrocyte resealing and high-definition imaging to explore red cell responses during invasion. We show that although merozoite entry does not involve erythrocyte actin reorganisation, it does require ATP to complete the process. Towards dissecting the ATP requirement, we present an in depth quantitative phospho-proteomic analysis of the erythrocyte during each stage of invasion. Specifically, we demonstrate extensive increased phosphorylation of erythrocyte proteins on merozoite attachment, including modification of the cytoskeletal proteins beta-spectrin and PIEZO1. The association with merozoite contact but not active entry demonstrates that parasite-dependent phosphorylation is mediated by host-cell kinase activity. This provides the first evidence that the erythrocyte is stimulated to respond to early invasion events through molecular changes in its membrane architecture. PMID:26830761

  16. Wide-scale quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis reveals that cold treatment of T cells closely mimics soluble antibody stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Qinqin; Salomon, Arthur R.

    2015-01-01

    The activation of T-lymphocytes through antigen-mediated T-cell receptor (TCR) clustering is vital in regulating the adaptive-immune response. Although T cell receptor signaling has been extensively studied, the fundamental mechanisms for signal initiation are not fully understood. Reduced temperature initiated some of the hallmarks of TCR signaling such as increased phosphorylation and activation on ERK and calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum as well as coalesce T-cell membrane microdomains. The precise mechanism of TCR signaling initiation due to temperature change remains obscure. One critical question is whether signaling initiated by cold treatment of T cells differs from signaling initiated by crosslinking of the T cell receptor. To address this uncertainty, a wide-scale, quantitative mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis was performed on T cells stimulated either by temperature shift or through crosslinking of the TCR. Careful statistical comparison between the two stimulations revealed a striking level of identity between the subset of 339 sites that changed significantly with both stimulations. This study demonstrates for the first time, at unprecedented detail, that T cell cold treatment was sufficient to initiate signaling patterns nearly identical to soluble antibody stimulation, shedding new light on the mechanism of activation of these critically important immune cells. PMID:25839225

  17. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of murine Fmr1-KO cell lines provides new insights into FMRP-dependent signal transduction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Matic, Katarina; Eninger, Timo; Bardoni, Barbara; Davidovic, Laetitia; Macek, Boris

    2014-10-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that has a major effect on neuronal protein synthesis. Transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to loss of FMRP and development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known hereditary cause of intellectual impairment and autism. Here we utilize SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to analyze murine FMR1(-) and FMR1(+) fibroblastic cell lines derived from FMR1-KO embryos to identify proteins and phosphorylation sites dysregulated as a consequence of FMRP loss. We quantify FMRP-related changes in the levels of 5,023 proteins and 6,133 phosphorylation events and map them onto major signal transduction pathways. Our study confirms global downregulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway and decrease in phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the absence of FMRP, which is connected to attenuation of long-term potentiation. We detect differential expression of several key proteins from the p53 pathway, pointing to the involvement of p53 signaling in dysregulated cell cycle control in FXS. Finally, we detect differential expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing and nuclear transport, as well as Wnt and calcium signaling, such as PLC, PKC, NFAT, and cPLA2. We postulate that calcium homeostasis is likely affected in molecular pathogenesis of FXS. PMID:25168779

  18. Effects of MEK inhibitors GSK1120212 and PD0325901 in vivo using 10-plex quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; McAllister, Fiona E.; Everley, Robert A.; Beausoleil, Sean A.; Banks, Alexander S.; Gygi, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed isobaric tag-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics strategies can comprehensively analyze drug treatments effects on biological systems. Given the role of MEK signaling in cancer and MAPK-dependent diseases, we sought to determine if this pathway could be inhibited safely by examining the downstream molecular consequences. We used a series of TMT10-plex experiments to analyze the effect of two MEK inhibitors (GSK1120212 and PD0325901) on three tissues (kidney, liver, and pancreas) from nine mice. We quantified ~6000 proteins in each tissue, but significant protein level alterations were minimal with inhibitor treatment. Of particular interest was kidney tissue, as edema is an adverse effect of these inhibitors. From kidney tissue, we enriched phosphopeptides using titanium dioxide (TiO2) and quantified 10,562 phosphorylation events. Further analysis by phosphotyrosine (pY) peptide immunoprecipitation quantified an additional 592 phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation motif analysis revealed that the inhibitors decreased phosphorylation levels of PxSP and SP sites, consistent with ERK inhibition. The MEK inhibitors had the greatest decrease on the phosphorylation of two proteins, Barttin and Slc12a3, which have roles in ion transport and fluid balance. Further studies will provide insight into the effect of these MEK inhibitors with respect to edema and other adverse events in mouse models and human patients. PMID:25195567

  19. Quantitative phosphoproteomics revealed interplay between Syk and Lyn in the resistance to nilotinib in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Romain; Leroy, Cédric; Drullion, Claire; Lagarde, Valérie; Etienne, Gabriel; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Lippert, Eric; Roche, Serge; Mahon, François-Xavier; Pasquet, Jean-Max

    2011-08-25

    In this study, we have addressed how Lyn kinase signaling mediates nilotinib-resistance by quantitative phospho-proteomics using Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acid in Cell culture. We have found an increased tyrosine phosphorylation of 2 additional tyrosine kinases in nilotinib-resistant cells: the spleen tyrosine kinase Syk and the UFO family receptor tyrosine kinase Axl. This increased tyrosine phosphorylation involved an interaction of these tyrosine kinases with Lyn. Inhibition of Syk by the inhibitors R406 or BAY 61-3606 or by RNA interference restored the capacity of nilotinib to inhibit cell proliferation. Conversely, coexpression of Lyn and Syk were required to fully induce resistance to nilotinib in drug-sensitive cells. Surprisingly, the knockdown of Syk also strongly decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of Lyn and Axl, thus uncovering interplay between Syk and Lyn. We have shown the involvement of the adaptor protein CDCP-1 in resistance to nilotinib. Interestingly, the expression of Axl and CDCP1 were found increased both in a nilotinib-resistant cell line and in nilotinib-resistant CML patients. We conclude that an oncogenic signaling mediated by Lyn and Syk can bypass the need of Bcr-Abl in CML cells. Thus, targeting these kinases may be of therapeutic value to override imatinib or nilotinib resistance in CML. PMID:21730355

  20. Quantitative phospho-proteomics reveals the Plasmodium merozoite triggers pre-invasion host kinase modification of the red cell cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Zuccala, Elizabeth S.; Satchwell, Timothy J.; Angrisano, Fiona; Tan, Yan Hong; Wilson, Marieangela C.; Heesom, Kate J.; Baum, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The invasive blood-stage malaria parasite – the merozoite – induces rapid morphological changes to the target erythrocyte during entry. However, evidence for active molecular changes in the host cell that accompany merozoite invasion is lacking. Here, we use invasion inhibition assays, erythrocyte resealing and high-definition imaging to explore red cell responses during invasion. We show that although merozoite entry does not involve erythrocyte actin reorganisation, it does require ATP to complete the process. Towards dissecting the ATP requirement, we present an in depth quantitative phospho-proteomic analysis of the erythrocyte during each stage of invasion. Specifically, we demonstrate extensive increased phosphorylation of erythrocyte proteins on merozoite attachment, including modification of the cytoskeletal proteins beta-spectrin and PIEZO1. The association with merozoite contact but not active entry demonstrates that parasite-dependent phosphorylation is mediated by host-cell kinase activity. This provides the first evidence that the erythrocyte is stimulated to respond to early invasion events through molecular changes in its membrane architecture. PMID:26830761

  1. Quantitative analysis of the TNF-α-induced phosphoproteome reveals AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC as an IKKβ substrate

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ramesh K.; Nolte, Hendrik; Sun, Tianliang; Kaur, Harmandeep; Sreenivasan, Krishnamoorthy; Looso, Mario; Offermanns, Stefan; Krüger, Marcus; Swiercz, Jakub M.

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitor of the nuclear factor-κB (IκB) kinase (IKK) complex is a key regulator of the canonical NF-κB signalling cascade and is crucial for fundamental cellular functions, including stress and immune responses. The majority of IKK complex functions are attributed to NF-κB activation; however, there is increasing evidence for NF-κB pathway-independent signalling. Here we combine quantitative mass spectrometry with random forest bioinformatics to dissect the TNF-α-IKKβ-induced phosphoproteome in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In total, we identify over 20,000 phosphorylation sites, of which ∼1% are regulated up on TNF-α stimulation. We identify various potential novel IKKβ substrates including kinases and regulators of cellular trafficking. Moreover, we show that one of the candidates, AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC, is directly phosphorylated by IKKβ on serine 298. We provide evidence that IKKβ-mediated AEG-1 phosphorylation is essential for IκBα degradation as well as NF-κB-dependent gene expression and cell proliferation, which correlate with cancer patient survival in vivo. PMID:25849741

  2. Integrative Network Analysis Combined with Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Transforming Growth Factor-beta Receptor type-2 (TGFBR2) as a Novel Regulator of Glioblastoma Stem Cell Properties.

    PubMed

    Narushima, Yuta; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Oyama, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant brain tumors with poor prognosis and their development and progression are known to be driven by glioblastoma stem cells. Although glioblastoma stem cells lose their cancer stem cell properties during cultivation in serum-containing medium, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating signaling alteration in relation to reduction of stem cell-like characteristics. To elucidate the global phosphorylation-related signaling events, we performed a SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of serum-induced dynamics in glioblastoma stem cells established from the tumor tissues of the patient. Among a total of 2876 phosphorylation sites on 1584 proteins identified in our analysis, 732 phosphorylation sites on 419 proteins were regulated through the alteration of stem cell-like characteristics. The integrative computational analyses based on the quantified phosphoproteome data revealed the relevant changes of phosphorylation levels regarding the proteins associated with cytoskeleton reorganization such as Rho family GTPase and Intermediate filament signaling, in addition to transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 (TGFBR2) as a prominent upstream regulator involved in the serum-induced phosphoproteome regulation. The functional association of transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 with stem cell-like properties was experimentally validated through signaling perturbation using the corresponding inhibitors, which indicated that transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 could play an important role as a novel cell fate determinant in glioblastoma stem cell regulation. PMID:26670566

  3. Phosphoproteomics of the Dopamine Pathway Enables Discovery of Rap1 Activation as a Reward Signal In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Kuroda, Keisuke; Nakauchi, Sakura; Nishioka, Tomoki; Takano, Tetsuya; Zhang, Xinjian; Tsuboi, Daisuke; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Kobayashi, Kenta; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Miura, Masami; Nishi, Akinori; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Amano, Mutsuki; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2016-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) type 1 receptor (D1R) signaling in the striatum presumably regulates neuronal excitability and reward-related behaviors through PKA. However, whether and how D1Rs and PKA regulate neuronal excitability and behavior remain largely unknown. Here, we developed a phosphoproteomic analysis method to identify known and novel PKA substrates downstream of the D1R and obtained more than 100 candidate substrates, including Rap1 GEF (Rasgrp2). We found that PKA phosphorylation of Rasgrp2 activated its guanine nucleotide-exchange activity on Rap1. Cocaine exposure activated Rap1 in the nucleus accumbens in mice. The expression of constitutively active PKA or Rap1 in accumbal D1R-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1R-MSNs) enhanced neuronal firing rates and behavioral responses to cocaine exposure through MAPK. Knockout of Rap1 in the accumbal D1R-MSNs was sufficient to decrease these phenotypes. These findings demonstrate a novel DA-PKA-Rap1-MAPK intracellular signaling mechanism in D1R-MSNs that increases neuronal excitability to enhance reward-related behaviors. PMID:26804993

  4. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unravels biased phosphorylation of serotonin 2A receptor at Ser280 by hallucinogenic versus nonhallucinogenic agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-05-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT(2A) receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT(2A) receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser(280)) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT(2A) receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser(280) by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT(2A) receptors at Ser(280) in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser(280) to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased

  5. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Unravels Biased Phosphorylation of Serotonin 2A Receptor at Ser280 by Hallucinogenic versus Nonhallucinogenic Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J.; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT2A receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT2A receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT2A agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser280) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser280 by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT2A receptors at Ser280 in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser280 to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of

  6. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Analysis of Lysophosphatidic Acid Induced Chemotaxis applying Dual-step ¹⁸O Labeling Coupled with Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Yingchun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Qian, Weijun; Yang, Feng; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Du, Xiuxia; Wang, Wei; Moore, Ronald J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Waters, Katrina M.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Camp, David G.; Klemke, Richard L.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central cellular regulatory mechanism in modulating protein activity and propagating signals within cellular pathways and networks. Development of more effective methods for the simultaneous identification of phosphorylation sites and quantification of temporal changes in protein phosphorylation could provide important insights into molecular signaling mechanisms in a variety of different cellular processes. Here we present an integrated quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its applications for comparative analysis of Cos-7 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient stimulation. The approach combines trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling plus 16O/18O-methanol esterification labeling for quantitation, a macro- Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography trap for phosphopeptide enrichment, and a monolithic capillary column with integrated electrospray emitter. LC separation and MS/MS is followed by neutral loss-dependent MS/MS/MS for phosphopeptide identification using a linear ion trap (LTQ)-FT mass spectrometer and complementary searching algorithms for interpreting MS/MS spectra. Protein phosphorylation involved in various signaling pathways of cell migration were identified and quantified, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase 1, dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2, and dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1b, and a number of Rho GTPase-activating proteins. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its application for rapid discovery of phosphorylation events associated with gradient sensing and cell chemotaxis.

  7. Phosphoproteomics in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harsha, H. C.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2010-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation serves as a basis for regulating a number of cellular processes. Aberrant activation of kinase signaling pathways is commonly associated with several cancers. Recent developments in phosphoprotein/phosphopeptide enrichment strategies and quantitative mass spectrometry have resulted in robust pipelines for high-throughput characterization of phosphorylation in a global fashion. Today, it is possible to profile site-specific phosphorylation events on thousands of proteins in a single experiment. The potential of this approach is already being realized to characterize signaling pathways that govern oncogenesis. In addition, chemical proteomic strategies have been used to unravel targets of kinase inhibitors, which are otherwise difficult to characterize. This review summarizes various approaches used for analysis of the phosphoproteome in general, and protein kinases in particular, highlighting key cancer phosphoproteomic studies. PMID:20937571

  8. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals a Role for Serine and Threonine Kinases in the Cytoskeletal Reorganization in Early T Cell Receptor Activation in Human Primary T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ruperez, Patricia; Gago-Martinez, Ana; Burlingame, A. L.; Oses-Prieto, Juan A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation events play a primary role in regulation of almost all aspects of cell function including signal transduction, cell cycle, or apoptosis. Thus far, T cell phosphoproteomics have focused on analysis of phosphotyrosine residues, and little is known about the role of serine/threonine phosphorylation in early activation of the T cell receptor (TCR). Therefore, we performed a quantitative mass spectrometry-based analysis of the global phosphoproteome of human primary T cells in response to 5 min of TCR activation with anti-CD3 antibody. Combining immunoprecipitation with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody, titanium dioxide phosphopeptide enrichment, isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation methodology, and strong cation exchange separation, we were able to identify 2814 phosphopeptides. These unique sites were employed to investigate the site-specific phosphorylation dynamics. Five hundred and seventeen phosphorylation sites showed TCR-responsive changes. We found that upon 5 min of stimulation of the TCR, specific serine and threonine kinase motifs are overrepresented in the set of responsive phosphorylation sites. These phosphorylation events targeted proteins with many different activities and are present in different subcellular locations. Many of these proteins are involved in intracellular signaling cascades related mainly to cytoskeletal reorganization and regulation of small GTPase-mediated signal transduction, probably involved in the formation of the immune synapse. PMID:22499768

  9. Identification of Mediator Kinase Substrates in Human Cells using Cortistatin A and Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Poss, Zachary C; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Odell, Aaron T; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Lee, Thomas; Pelish, Henry E; Shair, Matthew D; Dowell, Robin D; Old, William M; Taatjes, Dylan J

    2016-04-12

    Cortistatin A (CA) is a highly selective inhibitor of the Mediator kinases CDK8 and CDK19. Using CA, we now report a large-scale identification of Mediator kinase substrates in human cells (HCT116). We identified over 16,000 quantified phosphosites including 78 high-confidence Mediator kinase targets within 64 proteins, including DNA-binding transcription factors and proteins associated with chromatin, DNA repair, and RNA polymerase II. Although RNA-seq data correlated with Mediator kinase targets, the effects of CA on gene expression were limited and distinct from CDK8 or CDK19 knockdown. Quantitative proteome analyses, tracking around 7,000 proteins across six time points (0-24 hr), revealed that CA selectively affected pathways implicated in inflammation, growth, and metabolic regulation. Contrary to expectations, increased turnover of Mediator kinase targets was not generally observed. Collectively, these data support Mediator kinases as regulators of chromatin and RNA polymerase II activity and suggest their roles extend beyond transcription to metabolism and DNA repair. PMID:27050516

  10. Quantitative Site-Specific Phosphoproteomics of Trichoderma reesei Signaling Pathways upon Induction of Hydrolytic Enzyme Production.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Yadav, Avinash; Saloheimo, Markku; Corthals, Garry L; Pakula, Tiina M

    2016-02-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is used for industrial production of secreted enzymes including carbohydrate active enzymes, such as cellulases and hemicellulases. The production of many of these enzymes by T. reesei is influenced by the carbon source it grows on, where the regulation system controlling hydrolase genes involves various signaling pathways. T. reesei was cultivated in the presence of sorbitol, a carbon source that does not induce the production of cellulases and hemicellulases, and then exposed to either sophorose or spent-grain extract, which are efficient inducers of the enzyme production. Specific changes at phosphorylation sites were investigated in relation to the production of cellulases and hemicellulases using an MS-based framework. Proteome-wide phosphorylation following carbon source exchange was investigated in the early stages of induction: 0, 2, 5, and 10 min. The workflow involved sequential trypsin digestion, TiO2 enrichment, and MS analysis using a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. We report on the identification and quantitation of 1721 phosphorylation sites. Investigation of the data revealed a complex signaling network activated upon induction involving components related to light-mediated cellulase induction, osmoregulation, and carbon sensing. Changes in protein phosphorylation were detected in the glycolytic pathway, suggesting an inhibition of glucose catabolism at 10 min after the addition of sophorose and as early as 2 min after the addition of spent-grain extract. Differential phosphorylation of factors related to carbon storage, intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton, and cellulase gene regulation were also observed. PMID:26689635

  11. Global Effects of Kinase Inhibitors on Signaling Networks Revealed by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cuiping; Olsen, Jesper V.; Daub, Henrik; Mann, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant signaling causes many diseases, and manipulating signaling pathways with kinase inhibitors has emerged as a promising area of drug research. Most kinase inhibitors target the conserved ATP-binding pocket; therefore specificity is a major concern. Proteomics has previously been used to identify the direct targets of kinase inhibitors upon affinity purification from cellular extracts. Here we introduce a complementary approach to evaluate the effects of kinase inhibitors on the entire cell signaling network. We used triple labeling SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) to compare cellular phosphorylation levels for control, epidermal growth factor stimulus, and growth factor combined with kinase inhibitors. Of thousands of phosphopeptides, less than 10% had a response pattern indicative of targets of U0126 and SB202190, two widely used MAPK inhibitors. Interestingly, 83% of the growth factor-induced phosphorylation events were affected by either or both inhibitors, showing quantitatively that early signaling processes are predominantly transmitted through the MAPK cascades. In contrast to MAPK inhibitors, dasatinib, a clinical drug directed against BCR-ABL, which is the cause of chronic myelogenous leukemia, affected nearly 1,000 phosphopeptides. In addition to the proximal effects on ABL and its immediate targets, dasatinib broadly affected the downstream MAPK pathways. Pathway mapping of regulated sites implicated a variety of cellular functions, such as chromosome remodeling, RNA splicing, and cytoskeletal organization, some of which have been described in the literature before. Our assay is streamlined and generic and could become a useful tool in kinase drug development. PMID:19651622

  12. Informatics Methods to Enable Sharing of Quantitative Imaging Research Data

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Mia A.; Freymann, John B.; Kirby, Justin S.; Fedorov, Andriy; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Berglund, Anders E.; Fenstermacher, David A.; Tan, Yongqiang; Guo, Xiaotao; Casavant, Thomas L.; Brown, Bartley J.; Braun, Terry A.; Dekker, Andre; Roelofs, Erik; Mountz, James M.; Boada, Fernando; Laymon, Charles; Oborski, Matt; Rubin, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Quantitative Research Network (QIN) is a collaborative research network whose goal is to share data, algorithms and research tools to accelerate quantitative imaging research. A challenge is the variability in tools and analysis platforms used in quantitative imaging. Our goal was to understand the extent of this variation and to develop an approach to enable sharing data and to promote reuse of quantitative imaging data in the community. Methods We performed a survey of the current tools in use by the QIN member sites for representation and storage of their QIN research data including images, image meta-data and clinical data. We identified existing systems and standards for data sharing and their gaps for the QIN use case. We then proposed a system architecture to enable data sharing and collaborative experimentation within the QIN. Results There area variety of tools currently used by each QIN institution. We developed a general information system architecture to support the QIN goals. We also describe the remaining architecture gaps we are developing to enable members to share research images and image meta-data across the network. Conclusions As a research network, the QIN will stimulate quantitative imaging research by pooling data, algorithms and research tools. However, there are gaps in current functional requirements that will need to be met by future informatics development. Special attention must be given to the technical requirements needed to translate these methods into the clinical research workflow to enable validation and qualification of these novel imaging biomarkers. PMID:22770688

  13. Label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics with novel pairwise abundance normalization reveals synergistic RAS and CIP2A signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kauko, Otto; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Jumppanen, Mikael; Hintsanen, Petteri; Suni, Veronika; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Corthals, Garry; Aittokallio, Tero; Westermarck, Jukka; Imanishi, Susumu Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivated RAS drives progression of many human malignancies. However, oncogenic activity of RAS is dependent on simultaneous inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity. Although PP2A is known to regulate some of the RAS effector pathways, it has not been systematically assessed how these proteins functionally interact. Here we have analyzed phosphoproteomes regulated by either RAS or PP2A, by phosphopeptide enrichment followed by mass-spectrometry-based label-free quantification. To allow data normalization in situations where depletion of RAS or PP2A inhibitor CIP2A causes a large uni-directional change in the phosphopeptide abundance, we developed a novel normalization strategy, named pairwise normalization. This normalization is based on adjusting phosphopeptide abundances measured before and after the enrichment. The superior performance of the pairwise normalization was verified by various independent methods. Additionally, we demonstrate how the selected normalization method influences the downstream analyses and interpretation of pathway activities. Consequently, bioinformatics analysis of RAS and CIP2A regulated phosphoproteomes revealed a significant overlap in their functional pathways. This is most likely biologically meaningful as we observed a synergistic survival effect between CIP2A and RAS expression as well as KRAS activating mutations in TCGA pan-cancer data set, and synergistic relationship between CIP2A and KRAS depletion in colony growth assays. PMID:26278961

  14. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics of the Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATM) and Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) Dependent DNA Damage Response in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hofer, Manuel; Köcher, Thomas; Pichler, Peter; Novatchkova, Maria; Yang, Jianhua; Schlögelhofer, Peter; Mechtler, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is an important biological regulatory mechanism. In the context of genome integrity, signaling cascades driven by phosphorylation are crucial for the coordination and regulation of DNA repair. The two serine/threonine protein kinases ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) are key factors in this process, each specific for different kinds of DNA lesions. They are conserved across eukaryotes, mediating the activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, chromatin modifications, and regulation of DNA repair proteins. We designed a novel mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics approach to study DNA damage repair in Arabidopsis thaliana. The protocol combines filter aided sample preparation, immobilized metal affinity chromatography, metal oxide affinity chromatography, and strong cation exchange chromatography for phosphopeptide generation, enrichment, and separation. Isobaric labeling employing iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) was used for profiling the phosphoproteome of atm atr double mutants and wild type plants under either regular growth conditions or challenged by irradiation. A total of 10,831 proteins were identified and 15,445 unique phosphopeptides were quantified, containing 134 up- and 38 down-regulated ATM/ATR dependent phosphopeptides. We identified known and novel ATM/ATR targets such as LIG4 and MRE11 (needed for resistance against ionizing radiation), PIE1 and SDG26 (implicated in chromatin remodeling), PCNA1, WAPL, and PDS5 (implicated in DNA replication), and ASK1 and HTA10 (involved in meiosis). PMID:25561503

  15. Label-free quantitative analysis of the casein kinase 2-responsive phosphoproteome of the marine minimal model species Ostreococcus tauri.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Thierry; Hindle, Matthew; Martin, Sarah F; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E; Krahmer, Johanna; Kis, Katalin; Millar, Andrew J; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2015-12-01

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a protein kinase that phosphorylates a plethora of cellular target proteins involved in processes including DNA repair, cell cycle control, and circadian timekeeping. CK2 is functionally conserved across eukaryotes, although the substrate proteins identified in a range of complex tissues are often different. The marine alga Ostreococcus tauri is a unicellular eukaryotic model organism ideally suited to efficiently study generic roles of CK2 in the cellular circadian clock. Overexpression of CK2 leads to a slow circadian rhythm, verifying functional conservation of CK2 in timekeeping. The proteome was analysed in wild-type and CK2-overexpressing algae at dawn and dusk, revealing that differential abundance of the global proteome across the day is largely unaffected by overexpression. However, CK2 activity contributed more strongly to timekeeping at dusk than at dawn. The phosphoproteome of a CK2 overexpression line and cells treated with CK2 inhibitor was therefore analysed and compared to control cells at dusk. We report an extensive catalogue of 447 unique CK2-responsive differential phosphopeptide motifs to inform future studies into CK2 activity in the circadian clock of more complex tissues. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000975 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000975). PMID:25930153

  16. Enrichment Strategies in Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive study of the phosphoproteome is heavily dependent on appropriate enrichment strategies that are most often, but not exclusively, carried out on the peptide level. In this chapter, I give an overview of the most widely used techniques. In addition to dedicated antibodies, phosphopeptides are enriched by their selective interaction with metals in the form of chelated metal ions or metal oxides. The negative charge of the phosphate group is also exploited in a variety of chromatographic fractionation methods that include different types of ion exchange chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), and electrostatic repulsion HILIC (ERLIC) chromatography. Selected examples from the literature will demonstrate how a combination of these techniques with current high-performance mass spectrometry enables the identification of thousands of phosphorylation sites from various sample types. PMID:26584921

  17. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals genistein as a modulator of cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways in triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FANG, YI; ZHANG, QIAN; WANG, XIN; YANG, XUE; WANG, XIANGYU; HUANG, ZHEN; JIAO, YUCHEN; WANG, JING

    2016-01-01

    Around one sixth of breast cancer cases are classified as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), named after the absence of the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2); however, patients with TNBC suffer from poor clinical outcome and shortage of targeted therapy. Genistein, an estrogenic soy isoflavone, shows anticancer effects in TNBC cells such as inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects is poorly understood and its elucidation can help the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TNBC. In this study, by combining isobaric tag-based TMT labeling with titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment, we quantitated 5,445 phosphorylation sites on 2,008 phosphoproteins in the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231, upon genistein treatment. Our analysis revealed 332 genistein-regulated phosphorylation sites on 226 proteins. Our data show that genistein can regulate several biological processes during the cell cycle, including DNA replication, cohesin complex cleavage, and kinetochore formation. Furthermore, genistein can also activate DNA damage response, including activation of ATR and BRCA1 complex. Overall, our study presents evidence at a phosphoproteomic level that genistein is able to inhibit TNBC cell growth by regulating the cell cycle and DNA damage response in a more complex manner. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms through which genistein exerts its anticancer effects in TNBC cells. PMID:26783066

  18. Regulation of Platelet Derived Growth Factor Signaling by Leukocyte Common Antigen-related (LAR) Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase: A Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Study.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Adil R; Patel, Trushar R; Creese, Andrew J; Tomlinson, Michael G; Hellberg, Carina; Heath, John K; Hotchin, Neil A; Cunningham, Debbie L

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways are reliant on protein phosphorylation events that are controlled by a balance of kinase and phosphatase activity. Although kinases have been extensively studied, the role of phosphatases in controlling specific cell signaling pathways has been less so. Leukocyte common antigen-related protein (LAR) is a member of the LAR subfamily of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs). LAR is known to regulate the activity of a number of receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR). To gain insight into the signaling pathways regulated by LAR, including those that are PDGF-dependent, we have carried out the first systematic analysis of LAR-regulated signal transduction using SILAC-based quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic techniques. We haveanalyzed differential phosphorylation between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) and MEFs in which the LAR cytoplasmic phosphatase domains had been deleted (LARΔP), and found a significant change in abundance of phosphorylation on 270 phosphosites from 205 proteins because of the absence of the phosphatase domains of LAR. Further investigation of specific LAR-dependent phosphorylation sites and enriched biological processes reveal that LAR phosphatase activity impacts on a variety of cellular processes, most notably regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Analysis of putative upstream kinases that may play an intermediary role between LAR and the identified LAR-dependent phosphorylation events has revealed a role for LAR in regulating mTOR and JNK signaling. PMID:27074791

  19. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals genistein as a modulator of cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Xin; Yang, Xue; Wang, Xiangyu; Huang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuchen; Wang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Around one sixth of breast cancer cases are classified as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), named after the absence of the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2); however, patients with TNBC suffer from poor clinical outcome and shortage of targeted therapy. Genistein, an estrogenic soy isoflavone, shows anticancer effects in TNBC cells such as inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects is poorly understood and its elucidation can help the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TNBC. In this study, by combining isobaric tag-based TMT labeling with titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment, we quantitated 5,445 phosphorylation sites on 2,008 phosphoproteins in the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231, upon genistein treatment. Our analysis revealed 332 genistein-regulated phosphorylation sites on 226 proteins. Our data show that genistein can regulate several biological processes during the cell cycle, including DNA replication, cohesin complex cleavage, and kinetochore formation. Furthermore, genistein can also activate DNA damage response, including activation of ATR and BRCA1 complex. Overall, our study presents evidence at a phosphoproteomic level that genistein is able to inhibit TNBC cell growth by regulating the cell cycle and DNA damage response in a more complex manner. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms through which genistein exerts its anticancer effects in TNBC cells. PMID:26783066

  20. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of signaling downstream of the prostaglandin e2/g-protein coupled receptor in human synovial fibroblasts: potential antifibrotic networks.

    PubMed

    Gerarduzzi, Casimiro; He, QingWen; Antoniou, John; Di Battista, John A

    2014-11-01

    The Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling mechanism within fibroblasts is of growing interest as it has been shown to prevent numerous fibrotic features of fibroblast activation with limited evidence of downstream pathways. To understand the mechanisms of fibroblasts producing tremendous amounts of PGE2 with autocrine effects, we apply a strategy of combining a wide-screening of PGE2-induced kinases with quantitative phosphoproteomics. Our large-scale proteomic approach identified a PKA signal transmitted through phosphorylation of its substrates harboring the R(R/X)X(S*/T*) motif. We documented 115 substrates, of which 72 had 89 sites with a 2.5-fold phosphorylation difference in PGE2-treated cells than in untreated cells, where approximately half of such sites were defined as being novel. They were compiled by networking software to focus on highlighted activities and to associate them with a functional readout of fibroblasts. The substrates were associated with a variety of cellular functions including cytoskeletal structures (migration/motility), regulators of G-protein coupled receptor function, protein kinases, and transcriptional/translational regulators. For the first time, we extended the PGE2 pathway into an elaborate network of interconnecting phosphoproteins, providing vital information to a once restricted signalosome. These data provide new insights into eicosanoid-initiated cell signaling with regards to the regulation of fibroblast activation and the identification of new targets for evidenced-based pharmacotherapy against fibrosis. PMID:25223752

  1. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals a Key Role of Insulin Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Tyrosine Kinase in Human Sperm Capacitation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men. PMID:25693802

  2. Targeted Phosphoproteome Analysis Using Selected/Multiple Reaction Monitoring (SRM/MRM).

    PubMed

    Adachi, Jun; Narumi, Ryohei; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics has been rapidly spread based on the advancement of mass spectrometry and development of efficient enrichment techniques for phosphorylated proteins or peptides. Non-targeted approach has been employed in most of the studies for phosphoproteome analysis. However, targeted approach using selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) is an indispensible technique used for the quantitation of known targets especially when we have many samples to quantitate phosphorylation events on proteins in biological or clinical samples. We herein describe the application of a large-scale phosphoproteome analysis and SRM-based quantitation for the systematic discovery and validation of biomarkers. PMID:26700043

  3. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis reveals γ-bisabolene inducing p53-mediated apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma via HDAC2 inhibition and ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Jou, Yu-Jen; Chen, Chao-Jung; Liu, Yu-Ching; Way, Tzong-Der; Lai, Chih-Ho; Hua, Chun-Hung; Wang, Ching-Ying; Huang, Su-Hua; Kao, Jung-Yie; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2015-10-01

    γ-Bisabolene, one of main components in cardamom, showed potent in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative activities against human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). γ-Bisabolene activated caspases-3/9 and decreased mitochondrial memebrane potential, leading to apoptosis of OSCC cell lines (Ca9-22 and SAS), but not normal oral fibroblast cells. Phosphoproteome profiling of OSCC cells treated with γ-bisabolene was identified using TiO2-PDMS plate and LC-MS/MS, then confirmed using Western blotting and real-time RT-PCR assays. Phosphoproteome profiling revealed that γ-bisabolene increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, protein phosphatases 1 (PP1), and p53, as well as decreased the phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the process of apoptosis induction. Protein-protein interaction network analysis proposed the involvement of PP1-HDAC2-p53 and ERK1/2-p53 pathways in γ-bisabolene-induced apoptosis. Subsequent assays indicated γ-bisabolene eliciting p53 acetylation that enhanced the expression of p53-regulated apoptotic genes. PP1 inhibitor-2 restored the status of HDAC2 phosphorylation, reducing p53 acetylation and PUMA mRNA expression in γ-bisabolene-treated Ca9-22 and SAS cells. Meanwhile, MEK and ERK inhibitors significantly decreased γ-bisabolene-induced PUMA expression in both cancer cell lines. Notably, the results ascertained the involvement of PP1-HDAC2-p53 and ERK1/2-p53 pathways in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of γ-bisabolene-treated cells. This study demonstrated γ-bisabolene displaying potent anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities against OSCC in vitro and in vivo, elucidating molecular mechanisms of γ-bisabolene-induced apoptosis. The novel insight could be useful for developing anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26194454

  4. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Study Reveals that Protein Kinase A Regulates Neural Stem Cell Differentiation Through Phosphorylation of Catenin Beta-1 and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuxin; Li, Zheyi; Shen, Hongyan; Zhang, Zhong; Yin, Yuxin; Wang, Qingsong; Zhao, Xuyang; Ji, Jianguo

    2016-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is central to the understanding of multiple cellular signaling pathways responsible for regulating the self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs). Here we performed a large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis of rat fetal NSCs using strong cation exchange chromatography prefractionation and citric acid-assisted two-step enrichment with TiO2 strategy followed by nanoLC-MS/MS analysis. Totally we identified 32,546 phosphosites on 5,091 phosphoproteins, among which 23,945 were class I phosphosites, and quantified 16,000 sites during NSC differentiation. More than 65% of class I phosphosites were novel when compared with PhosphoSitePlus database. Quantification results showed that the early and late stage of NSC differentiation differ greatly. We mapped 69 changed phosphosites on 20 proteins involved in Wnt signaling pathway, including S552 on catenin beta-1 (Ctnnb1) and S9 on glycogen synthase kinase 3β (Gsk3β). Western blotting and real-time PCR results proved that Wnt signaling pathway plays critical roles in NSC fate determination. Furthermore, inhibition and activation of PKA dramatically affected the phosphorylation state of Ctnnb1 and Gsk3β, which regulates the differentiation of NSCs. Our data provides a valuable resource for studying the self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Stem Cells 2016;34:2090-2101. PMID:27097102

  5. Stable Isotope Metabolic Labeling-based Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Reveals Ethylene-regulated Time-dependent Phosphoproteins and Putative Substrates of Constitutive Triple Response 1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhu; Guo, Guangyu; Zhang, Manyu; Liu, Claire Y.; Hu, Qin; Lam, Henry; Cheng, Han; Xue, Yu; Li, Jiayang; Li, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene is an important plant hormone that regulates numerous cellular processes and stress responses. The mode of action of ethylene is both dose- and time-dependent. Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in ethylene signaling, which is mediated by the activities of ethylene receptors, constitutive triple response 1 (CTR1) kinase, and phosphatase. To address how ethylene alters the cellular protein phosphorylation profile in a time-dependent manner, differential and quantitative phosphoproteomics based on 15N stable isotope labeling in Arabidopsis was performed on both one-minute ethylene-treated Arabidopsis ethylene-overly-sensitive loss-of-function mutant rcn1-1, deficient in PP2A phosphatase activity, and a pair of long-term ethylene-treated wild-type and loss-of-function ethylene signaling ctr1-1 mutants, deficient in mitogen-activated kinase kinase kinase activity. In total, 1079 phosphopeptides were identified, among which 44 were novel. Several one-minute ethylene-regulated phosphoproteins were found from the rcn1-1. Bioinformatic analysis of the rcn1-1 phosphoproteome predicted nine phosphoproteins as the putative substrates for PP2A phosphatase. In addition, from CTR1 kinase-enhanced phosphosites, we also found putative CTR1 kinase substrates including plastid transcriptionally active protein and calcium-sensing receptor. These regulatory proteins are phosphorylated in the presence of ethylene. Analysis of ethylene-regulated phosphosites using the group-based prediction system with a protein–protein interaction filter revealed a total of 14 kinase–substrate relationships that may function in both CTR1 kinase- and PP2A phosphatase-mediated phosphor-relay pathways. Finally, several ethylene-regulated post-translational modification network models have been built using molecular systems biology tools. It is proposed that ethylene regulates the phosphorylation of arginine/serine-rich splicing factor 41, plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2A, light

  6. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals the role of the AMPK plant ortholog SnRK1 as a metabolic master regulator under energy deprivation.

    PubMed

    Nukarinen, Ella; Nägele, Thomas; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Mair, Andrea; Landgraf, Ramona; Börnke, Frederik; Hanson, Johannes; Teige, Markus; Baena-Gonzalez, Elena; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Since years, research on SnRK1, the major cellular energy sensor in plants, has tried to define its role in energy signalling. However, these attempts were notoriously hampered by the lethality of a complete knockout of SnRK1. Therefore, we generated an inducible amiRNA::SnRK1α2 in a snrk1α1 knock out background (snrk1α1/α2) to abolish SnRK1 activity to understand major systemic functions of SnRK1 signalling under energy deprivation triggered by extended night treatment. We analysed the in vivo phosphoproteome, proteome and metabolome and found that activation of SnRK1 is essential for repression of high energy demanding cell processes such as protein synthesis. The most abundant effect was the constitutively high phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) in the snrk1α1/α2 mutant. RPS6 is a major target of TOR signalling and its phosphorylation correlates with translation. Further evidence for an antagonistic SnRK1 and TOR crosstalk comparable to the animal system was demonstrated by the in vivo interaction of SnRK1α1 and RAPTOR1B in the cytosol and by phosphorylation of RAPTOR1B by SnRK1α1 in kinase assays. Moreover, changed levels of phosphorylation states of several chloroplastic proteins in the snrk1α1/α2 mutant indicated an unexpected link to regulation of photosynthesis, the main energy source in plants. PMID:27545962

  7. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals the role of the AMPK plant ortholog SnRK1 as a metabolic master regulator under energy deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Nukarinen, Ella; Nägele, Thomas; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Mair, Andrea; Landgraf, Ramona; Börnke, Frederik; Hanson, Johannes; Teige, Markus; Baena-Gonzalez, Elena; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Since years, research on SnRK1, the major cellular energy sensor in plants, has tried to define its role in energy signalling. However, these attempts were notoriously hampered by the lethality of a complete knockout of SnRK1. Therefore, we generated an inducible amiRNA::SnRK1α2 in a snrk1α1 knock out background (snrk1α1/α2) to abolish SnRK1 activity to understand major systemic functions of SnRK1 signalling under energy deprivation triggered by extended night treatment. We analysed the in vivo phosphoproteome, proteome and metabolome and found that activation of SnRK1 is essential for repression of high energy demanding cell processes such as protein synthesis. The most abundant effect was the constitutively high phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) in the snrk1α1/α2 mutant. RPS6 is a major target of TOR signalling and its phosphorylation correlates with translation. Further evidence for an antagonistic SnRK1 and TOR crosstalk comparable to the animal system was demonstrated by the in vivo interaction of SnRK1α1 and RAPTOR1B in the cytosol and by phosphorylation of RAPTOR1B by SnRK1α1 in kinase assays. Moreover, changed levels of phosphorylation states of several chloroplastic proteins in the snrk1α1/α2 mutant indicated an unexpected link to regulation of photosynthesis, the main energy source in plants. PMID:27545962

  8. Novel Host Proteins and Signaling Pathways in Enteropathogenic E. coli Pathogenesis Identified by Global Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Scott, Nichollas E; Trimble, William S; Foster, Leonard J; Finlay, B Brett

    2015-07-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to directly translocate effector proteins into host cells where they play a pivotal role in subverting host cell signaling needed for disease. However, our knowledge of how EPEC affects host protein phosphorylation is limited to a few individual protein studies. We employed a quantitative proteomics approach to globally map alterations in the host phosphoproteome during EPEC infection. By characterizing host phosphorylation events at various time points throughout infection, we examined how EPEC dynamically impacts the host phosphoproteome over time. This experimental setup also enabled identification of T3SS-dependent and -independent changes in host phosphorylation. Specifically, T3SS-regulated events affected various cellular processes that are known EPEC targets, including cytoskeletal organization, immune signaling, and intracellular trafficking. However, the involvement of phosphorylation in these events has thus far been poorly studied. We confirmed the MAPK family as an established key host player, showed its central role in signal transduction during EPEC infection, and extended the repertoire of known signaling hubs with previously unrecognized proteins, including TPD52, CIN85, EPHA2, and HSP27. We identified altered phosphorylation of known EPEC targets, such as cofilin, where the involvement of phosphorylation has so far been undefined, thus providing novel mechanistic insights into the roles of these proteins in EPEC infection. An overlap of regulated proteins, especially those that are cytoskeleton-associated, was observed when compared with the phosphoproteome of Shigella-infected cells. We determined the biological relevance of the phosphorylation of a novel protein in EPEC pathogenesis, septin-9 (SEPT9). Both siRNA knockdown and a phosphorylation-impaired SEPT9 mutant decreased bacterial adherence and EPEC-mediated cell death. In contrast, a phosphorylation

  9. Predicting Outbreak Detection in Public Health Surveillance: Quantitative Analysis to Enable Evidence-Based Method Selection

    PubMed Central

    Buckeridge, David L.; Okhmatovskaia, Anna; Tu, Samson; O’Connor, Martin; Nyulas, Csongor; Musen, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Public health surveillance is critical for accurate and timely outbreak detection and effective epidemic control. A wide range of statistical algorithms is used for surveillance, and important differences have been noted in the ability of these algorithms to detect outbreaks. The evidence about the relative performance of these algorithms, however, remains limited and mainly qualitative. Using simulated outbreak data, we developed and validated quantitative models for predicting the ability of commonly used surveillance algorithms to detect different types of outbreaks. The developed models accurately predict the ability of different algorithms to detect different types of outbreaks. These models enable evidence-based algorithm selection and can guide research into algorithm development. PMID:18999264

  10. Predicting outbreak detection in public health surveillance: quantitative analysis to enable evidence-based method selection.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, David L; Okhmatovskaia, Anna; Tu, Samson; O'Connor, Martin; Nyulas, Csongor; Musen, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    Public health surveillance is critical for accurate and timely outbreak detection and effective epidemic control. A wide range of statistical algorithms is used for surveillance, and important differences have been noted in the ability of these algorithms to detect outbreaks. The evidence about the relative performance of these algorithms, however, remains limited and mainly qualitative. Using simulated outbreak data, we developed and validated quantitative models for predicting the ability of commonly used surveillance algorithms to detect different types of outbreaks. The developed models accurately predict the ability of different algorithms to detect different types of outbreaks. These models enable evidence-based algorithm selection and can guide research into algorithm development. PMID:18999264

  11. Portable SERS-enabled micropipettes for microarea sampling and reliably quantitative detection of surface organic residues.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Zhang, Xinwei; Chen, Yong; Wan, Liang; Huang, Weihua; Shen, Aiguo; Hu, Jiming

    2015-09-15

    We report the first microsampling device for reliably quantitative, label-free and separation-free detection of multicomponents of surface organic residues (SORs) by means of a quality controllable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-enabled micropipette. The micropipette is comprised of a drawn glass capillary with a tiny orifice (∼50 μm) at the distal tip, where the specially designed nanorattles (NRs) are compactly coated on the inner wall surface. SERS signals of 4-mercapto benzoic acid (MBA) anchored inside the internal gap of NRs could be used to evaluate and control the quality of micropipettes and, therefore, allow us to overcome the limitations of a reliably quantitative SERS assay using traditional substrates without an internal standard. By dropping a trace extraction agent on targeting SORs located on a narrow surface, the capillary and SERS functionalities of these micropipettes allow on-site microsampling via capillary action and subsequent multiplex distinction/detection due to their molecularly narrow Raman peaks. For example, 8 nM thiram (TMTD), 8 nM malachite green (MG), and 1.5 μM (400 ppb) methyl parathion (MPT) on pepper and cucumber peels have been simultaneously detected in a wide detection range. The portable SERS-enabled device could potentially be facilely incorporated with liquid-liquid or solid phase micro-extracting devices for a broader range of applications in rapid and field analysis of food/public/environment security related SORs. PMID:26274894

  12. Improvement of phosphoproteome analyses using FAIMS and decision tree fragmentation. application to the insulin signaling pathway in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Bridon, Gaëlle; Bonneil, Eric; Muratore-Schroeder, Tara; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Thibault, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    This report examines the analytical benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) coupled to liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for phosphoproteomics analyses. The ability of FAIMS to separate multiply charged peptide ions from chemical interferences confers a unique advantage in phosphoproteomics by enhancing the detection of low abundance phosphopeptides. LC-FAIMS-MS experiments performed on TiO(2)-enriched tryptic digests from Drosophila melanogaster provided a 50% increase in phosphopeptide identification compared to conventional LC-MS analysis. Also, FAIMS can be used to select different population of multiply charged phosphopeptide ions prior to their activation with either collision activated dissociation (CAD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Importantly, FAIMS enabled the resolution of coeluting phosphoisomers of different abundances to facilitate their unambiguous identification using conventional database search engines. The benefits of FAIMS in large-scale phosphoproteomics of D. melanogaster are further investigated using label-free quantitation to identify differentially regulated phosphoproteins in response to insulin stimulation. PMID:22059388

  13. Challenges in plasma membrane phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Orsburn, Benjamin C; Stockwin, Luke H; Newton, Dianne L

    2011-01-01

    The response to extracellular stimuli often alters the phosphorylation state of plasma membrane-associated proteins. In this regard, generation of a comprehensive membrane phosphoproteome can significantly enhance signal transduction and drug mechanism studies. However, analysis of this subproteome is regarded as technically challenging, given the low abundance and insolubility of integral membrane proteins, combined with difficulties in isolating, ionizing and fragmenting phosphopeptides. In this article, we highlight recent advances in membrane and phosphoprotein enrichment techniques resulting in improved identification of these elusive peptides. We also describe the use of alternative fragmentation techniques, and assess their current and future value to the field of membrane phosphoproteomics. PMID:21819303

  14. Phosphoproteomics and Lung Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    López, Elena; Cho, William C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Massive evidence suggests that genetic abnormalities contribute to the development of lung cancer. These molecular abnormalities may serve as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers for this deadly disease. It is imperative to search these biomarkers in different tumorigenesis pathways so as to provide the most appropriate therapy for each individual patient with lung malignancy. Phosphoproteomics is a promising technology for the identification of biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for cancer. Thousands of proteins interact via physical and chemical association. Moreover, some proteins can covalently modify other proteins post-translationally. These post-translational modifications ultimately give rise to the emergent functions of cells in sequence, space and time. Phosphoproteomics clinical researches imply the comprehensive analysis of the proteins that are expressed in cells or tissues and can be employed at different stages. In addition, understanding the functions of phosphorylated proteins requires the study of proteomes as linked systems rather than collections of individual protein molecules. In fact, proteomics approaches coupled with affinity chromatography strategies followed by mass spectrometry have been used to elucidate relevant biological questions. This article will discuss the relevant clues of post-translational modifications, phosphorylated proteins, and useful proteomics approaches to identify molecular cancer signatures. The recent progress in phosphoproteomics research in lung cancer will be also discussed. PMID:23202899

  15. Reduced-representation Phosphosignatures Measured by Quantitative Targeted MS Capture Cellular States and Enable Large-scale Comparison of Drug-induced Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Abelin, Jennifer G; Patel, Jinal; Lu, Xiaodong; Feeney, Caitlin M; Fagbami, Lola; Creech, Amanda L; Hu, Roger; Lam, Daniel; Davison, Desiree; Pino, Lindsay; Qiao, Jana W; Kuhn, Eric; Officer, Adam; Li, Jianxue; Abbatiello, Susan; Subramanian, Aravind; Sidman, Richard; Snyder, Evan; Carr, Steven A; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2016-05-01

    Profiling post-translational modifications represents an alternative dimension to gene expression data in characterizing cellular processes. Many cellular responses to drugs are mediated by changes in cellular phosphosignaling. We sought to develop a common platform on which phosphosignaling responses could be profiled across thousands of samples, and created a targeted MS assay that profiles a reduced-representation set of phosphopeptides that we show to be strong indicators of responses to chemical perturbagens.To develop the assay, we investigated the coordinate regulation of phosphosites in samples derived from three cell lines treated with 26 different bioactive small molecules. Phosphopeptide analytes were selected from these discovery studies by clustering and picking 1 to 2 proxy members from each cluster. A quantitative, targeted parallel reaction monitoring assay was developed to directly measure 96 reduced-representation probes. Sample processing for proteolytic digestion, protein quantification, peptide desalting, and phosphopeptide enrichment have been fully automated, making possible the simultaneous processing of 96 samples in only 3 days, with a plate phosphopeptide enrichment variance of 12%. This highly reproducible process allowed ∼95% of the reduced-representation phosphopeptide probes to be detected in ∼200 samples.The performance of the assay was evaluated by measuring the probes in new samples generated under treatment conditions from discovery experiments, recapitulating the observations of deeper experiments using a fraction of the analytical effort. We measured these probes in new experiments varying the treatments, cell types, and timepoints to demonstrate generalizability. We demonstrated that the assay is sensitive to disruptions in common signaling pathways (e.g. MAPK, PI3K/mTOR, and CDK). The high-throughput, reduced-representation phosphoproteomics assay provides a platform for the comparison of perturbations across a range of

  16. Recent advances in enrichment and separation strategies for mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chenxi; Zhong, Xuefei; Li, Lingjun

    2016-01-01

    Due to the significance of protein phosphorylation in various biological processes and signaling events, new analytical techniques for enhanced phosphoproteomics have been rapidly introduced in recent years. The combinatorial use of the phospho-specific enrichment techniques and prefractionation methods prior to MS analysis enables comprehensive profiling of the phosphoproteome and facilitates deciphering the critical roles that phosphorylation plays in signaling pathways in various biological systems. This review places special emphasis on the recent five-year (2009–2013) advances for enrichment and separation techniques that have been utilized for phosphopeptides prior to MS analysis. PMID:24687451

  17. Optical digital coherent detection technology enabled flexible and ultra-fast quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan-Hua; Lu, Xing; Song, Lu; Guo, Xiaojie; Wang, Yawei; Zhu, Linyan; Sui, Qi; Li, Jianping; Shi, Kebin; Li, Zhaohui

    2016-07-25

    Quantitative phase imaging has been an important labeling-free microscopy modality for many biomedical and material science applications. In which, ultra-fast quantitative phase imaging is indispensable for dynamic or transient characteristics analysis. Conventional wide field optical interferometry is a common scheme for quantitative phase imaging, while its data acquisition rate is usually hindered by the frame rate of arrayed detector. By utilizing novel balanced-photo-detector based digital optics coherent detection techniques, we report on a method of constructing ultra-fast quantitative phase microscopy at the line-scan rate of 100 MHz with ~2 μm spatial resolution. PMID:27464166

  18. Sperm phosphoproteomics: historical perspectives and current methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Porambo, James R; Salicioni, Ana M; Visconti, Pablo E; Platt, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian sperm are differentiated germ cells that transfer genetic material from the male to the female. Owing to this essential role in the reproductive process, an understanding of the complex mechanisms that underlie sperm function has implications ranging from the development of novel contraceptives to the treatment of male infertility. While the importance of phosphorylation in sperm differentiation, maturation and fertilization has been well established, the ability to directly determine the sites of phosphorylation within sperm proteins and to quantitate the extent of phosphorylation at these sites is a recent development that has relied almost exclusively on advances in the field of proteomics. This review will summarize the work that has been carried out to date on sperm phosphoproteomics and discuss how the resulting qualitative and quantitative information has been used to provide insight into the manner in which protein phosphorylation events modulate sperm function. The authors also present the proteomics process as it is most often utilized for the elucidation of protein expression, with a particular emphasis on the way in which the process has been modified for the analysis of protein phosphorylation in sperm. PMID:23194270

  19. Phosphoproteomics for the masses.

    PubMed

    Grimsrud, Paul A; Swaney, Danielle L; Wenger, Craig D; Beauchene, Nicole A; Coon, Joshua J

    2010-01-15

    Protein phosphorylation serves as a primary mechanism of signal transduction in the cells of biological organisms. Technical advancements over the last several years in mass spectrometry now allow for the large-scale identification and quantitation of in vivo phosphorylation at unprecedented levels. These developments have occurred in the areas of sample preparation, instrumentation, quantitative methodology, and informatics so that today, 10 000-20 000 phosphorylation sites can be identified and quantified within a few weeks. With the rapid development and widespread availability of such data, its translation into biological insight and knowledge is a current obstacle. Here we present an overview of how this technology came to be and is currently applied, as well as future challenges for the field. PMID:20047291

  20. Phosphoproteomics for the masses

    PubMed Central

    Grimsrud, Paul A.; Swaney, Danielle L.; Wenger, Craig D.; Beauchene, Nicole A.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation serves as a primary mechanism of signal transduction in the cells of biological organisms. Technical advancements over the last several years in mass spectrometry now allow for the large-scale identification and quantitation of in vivo phosphorylation at unprecedented levels. These developments have occurred in the areas of sample preparation, instrumentation, quantitative methodology, and informatics so that today, ten to twenty thousand phosphorylation sites can be identified and quantified within a few weeks. With the rapid development and widespread availability of such data, its translation into biological insight and knowledge is a current obstacle. Here we present an overview of how this technology came to be and is currently applied, as well as future challenges for the field. PMID:20047291

  1. Nanotag-enabled photonic crystal fiber as quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering optofluidic platform

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkhasova, Polina; Chen, Hui; Du, Henry; Kanka, Jiri; Mergo, Pawel

    2015-02-16

    Core-shell nanotags that are active in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and entrapped with thiocyanate (SCN) label molecules were immobilized in the air channels of suspended-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to impart quantitative capacity to SERS-based PCF optofluidic sensing platform. The Raman intensity of Rhodamine 6G increases with concentration, whereas the intensity of SCN remains constant when measured using this platform. The signal from the SCN label can be used as an internal reference to establish calibration for quantitative measurements of analytes of unknown concentrations. The long optical path-length PCF optofluidic platform integrated with SERS-active core-shell nanotags holds significant promise for sensitive quantitative chem/bio measurements with the added benefit of small sampling volume. The dependence of SERS intensity on the nanotag coverage density and PCF length was interpreted based on numerical-analytical simulations.

  2. Nanotag-enabled photonic crystal fiber as quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering optofluidic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkhasova, Polina; Chen, Hui; Kanka, Jiri; Mergo, Pawel; Du, Henry

    2015-02-01

    Core-shell nanotags that are active in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and entrapped with thiocyanate (SCN) label molecules were immobilized in the air channels of suspended-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) to impart quantitative capacity to SERS-based PCF optofluidic sensing platform. The Raman intensity of Rhodamine 6G increases with concentration, whereas the intensity of SCN remains constant when measured using this platform. The signal from the SCN label can be used as an internal reference to establish calibration for quantitative measurements of analytes of unknown concentrations. The long optical path-length PCF optofluidic platform integrated with SERS-active core-shell nanotags holds significant promise for sensitive quantitative chem/bio measurements with the added benefit of small sampling volume. The dependence of SERS intensity on the nanotag coverage density and PCF length was interpreted based on numerical-analytical simulations.

  3. Nanoparticle-mediated photothermal effect enables a new method for quantitative biochemical analysis using a thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guanglei; Sanjay, Sharma T.; Dou, Maowei; Li, Xiujun

    2016-03-01

    A new biomolecular quantitation method, nanoparticle-mediated photothermal bioassay, using a common thermometer as the signal reader was developed. Using an immunoassay as a proof of concept, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) captured in the sandwich-type assay system were transformed into a near-infrared (NIR) laser-driven photothermal agent, Prussian blue (PB) NPs, which acted as a photothermal probe to convert the assay signal into heat through the photothermal effect, thus allowing sensitive biomolecular quantitation using a thermometer. This is the first report of biomolecular quantitation using a thermometer and also serves as the first attempt to introduce the nanoparticle-mediated photothermal effect for bioassays.A new biomolecular quantitation method, nanoparticle-mediated photothermal bioassay, using a common thermometer as the signal reader was developed. Using an immunoassay as a proof of concept, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) captured in the sandwich-type assay system were transformed into a near-infrared (NIR) laser-driven photothermal agent, Prussian blue (PB) NPs, which acted as a photothermal probe to convert the assay signal into heat through the photothermal effect, thus allowing sensitive biomolecular quantitation using a thermometer. This is the first report of biomolecular quantitation using a thermometer and also serves as the first attempt to introduce the nanoparticle-mediated photothermal effect for bioassays. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information on FTIR characterization (Fig. S1), photothermal immunoassay of PSA in human serum samples (Table S1), and the Experimental section, including preparation of antibody-conjugated iron oxide NPs, sandwich-type immunoassay, characterization, and photothermal detection protocol. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09051b

  4. High-Resolution Enabled 12-Plex DiLeu Isobaric Tags for Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex isobaric tags (e.g., tandem mass tags (TMT) and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)) are a valuable tool for high-throughput mass spectrometry based quantitative proteomics. We have developed our own multiplex isobaric tags, DiLeu, that feature quantitative performance on par with commercial offerings but can be readily synthesized in-house as a cost-effective alternative. In this work, we achieve a 3-fold increase in the multiplexing capacity of the DiLeu reagent without increasing structural complexity by exploiting mass defects that arise from selective incorporation of 13C, 15N, and 2H stable isotopes in the reporter group. The inclusion of eight new reporter isotopologues that differ in mass from the existing four reporters by intervals of 6 mDa yields a 12-plex isobaric set that preserves the synthetic simplicity and quantitative performance of the original implementation. We show that the new reporter variants can be baseline-resolved in high-resolution higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD) spectra, and we demonstrate accurate 12-plex quantitation of a DiLeu-labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae lysate digest via high-resolution nano liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC–MS2) analysis on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. PMID:25405479

  5. Advances in surface plasmon resonance imaging enable quantitative tracking of nanoscale changes in thickness and roughness.

    PubMed

    Raegen, Adam N; Reiter, Kyle; Dion, Alexander; Clarke, Anthony J; Lipkowski, Jacek; Dutcher, John R

    2014-04-01

    To date, detailed studies of the thickness of coatings using surface plasmon resonance have been limited to samples that are very uniform in thickness, and this technique has not been applied quantitatively to samples that are inherently rough or undergo instabilities with time. Our manuscript describes a significant improvement to surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) that allows this sensitive technique to be used for quantitative tracking of the thickness and roughness of surface coatings that are rough on the scale of tens of nanometers. We tested this approach by studying samples with an idealized, one-dimensional roughness: patterned channels in a thin polymer film. We find that a novel analysis of the SPRi data collected with the plane of incidence parallel to the patterned channels allows the determination of the thickness profile of the channels in the polymer film, which is in agreement with that measured using atomic force microscopy. We have further validated our approach by performing SPRi measurements perpendicular to the patterned channels, for which the measured SPR curve agrees well with the single SPR curve calculated using the average thickness determined from the thickness profile as determined using AFM. We applied this analysis technique to track the average thickness and RMS roughness of cellulose microfibrils upon exposure to cellulolytic enzymes, providing quantitative determinations of the times of action of the enzymes that are of direct interest to the cellulosic ethanol industry. PMID:24605881

  6. Phosphoproteome Dynamics Upon Changes in Plant Water Status Reveal Early Events Associated With Rapid Growth Adjustment in Maize Leaves*

    PubMed Central

    Bonhomme, Ludovic; Valot, Benoît; Tardieu, François; Zivy, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Plant growth adjustment during water deficit is a crucial adaptive response. The rapid fine-tuned control achieved at the post-translational level is believed to be of considerable importance for regulating early changes in plant growth reprogramming. Aiming at a better understanding of early responses to contrasting plant water statuses, we carried out a survey of the protein phosphorylation events in the growing zone of maize leaves upon a range of water regimes. In this study, the impact of mild and severe water deficits were evaluated in comparison with constant optimal watering and with recovery periods lasting 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 min. Using four biological replicates per treatment and a robust quantitative phosphoproteomic methodology based on stable-isotope labeling, we identified 3664 unique phosphorylation sites on 2496 proteins. The abundance of nearly 1250 phosphorylated peptides was reproducibly quantified and profiled with high confidence among treatments. A total of 138 phosphopeptides displayed highly significant changes according to water regimes and enabled to identify specific patterns of response to changing plant water statuses. Further quantification of protein amounts emphasized that most phosphorylation changes did not reflect protein abundance variation. During water deficit and recovery, extensive changes in phosphorylation status occurred in critical regulators directly or indirectly involved in plant growth and development. These included proteins influencing epigenetic control, gene expression, cell cycle-dependent processes and phytohormone-mediated responses. Some of the changes depended on stress intensity whereas others depended on rehydration duration, including rapid recoveries that occurred as early as 5 or 10 mins after rewatering. By combining a physiological approach and a quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis, this work provides new insights into the in vivo early phosphorylation events triggered by rapid changes in

  7. Phosphoproteomic Analyses Reveal Signaling Pathways That Facilitate Lytic Gammaherpesvirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, James A.; Chavan, Shweta S.; Sifford, Jeffrey M.; MacLeod, Veronica; Voth, Daniel E.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Forrest, J. Craig

    2013-01-01

    Lytic gammaherpesvirus (GHV) replication facilitates the establishment of lifelong latent infection, which places the infected host at risk for numerous cancers. As obligate intracellular parasites, GHVs must control and usurp cellular signaling pathways in order to successfully replicate, disseminate to stable latency reservoirs in the host, and prevent immune-mediated clearance. To facilitate a systems-level understanding of phosphorylation-dependent signaling events directed by GHVs during lytic replication, we utilized label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to interrogate the lytic replication cycle of murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV68). Compared to controls, MHV68 infection regulated by 2-fold or greater ca. 86% of identified phosphopeptides – a regulatory scale not previously observed in phosphoproteomic evaluations of discrete signal-inducing stimuli. Network analyses demonstrated that the infection-associated induction or repression of specific cellular proteins globally altered the flow of information through the host phosphoprotein network, yielding major changes to functional protein clusters and ontologically associated proteins. A series of orthogonal bioinformatics analyses revealed that MAPK and CDK-related signaling events were overrepresented in the infection-associated phosphoproteome and identified 155 host proteins, such as the transcription factor c-Jun, as putative downstream targets. Importantly, functional tests of bioinformatics-based predictions confirmed ERK1/2 and CDK1/2 as kinases that facilitate MHV68 replication and also demonstrated the importance of c-Jun. Finally, a transposon-mutant virus screen identified the MHV68 cyclin D ortholog as a viral protein that contributes to the prominent MAPK/CDK signature of the infection-associated phosphoproteome. Together, these analyses enhance an understanding of how GHVs reorganize and usurp intracellular signaling networks to facilitate infection and replication. PMID:24068923

  8. Deep Proteomics of Mouse Skeletal Muscle Enables Quantitation of Protein Isoforms, Metabolic Pathways, and Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T.; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. PMID:25616865

  9. Quantitative Analyses of Core Promoters Enable Precise Engineering of Regulated Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Ede, Christopher; Chen, Ximin; Lin, Meng-Yin; Chen, Yvonne Y

    2016-05-20

    Inducible transcription systems play a crucial role in a wide array of synthetic biology circuits. However, the majority of inducible promoters are constructed from a limited set of tried-and-true promoter parts, which are susceptible to common shortcomings such as high basal expression levels (i.e., leakiness). To expand the toolbox for regulated mammalian gene expression and facilitate the construction of mammalian genetic circuits with precise functionality, we quantitatively characterized a panel of eight core promoters, including sequences with mammalian, viral, and synthetic origins. We demonstrate that this selection of core promoters can provide a wide range of basal gene expression levels and achieve a gradient of fold-inductions spanning 2 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, commonly used parts such as minimal CMV and minimal SV40 promoters were shown to achieve robust gene expression upon induction, but also suffer from high levels of leakiness. In contrast, a synthetic promoter, YB_TATA, was shown to combine low basal expression with high transcription rate in the induced state to achieve significantly higher fold-induction ratios compared to all other promoters tested. These behaviors remain consistent when the promoters are coupled to different genetic outputs and different response elements, as well as across different host-cell types and DNA copy numbers. We apply this quantitative understanding of core promoter properties to the successful engineering of human T cells that respond to antigen stimulation via chimeric antigen receptor signaling specifically under hypoxic environments. Results presented in this study can facilitate the design and calibration of future mammalian synthetic biology systems capable of precisely programmed functionality. PMID:26883397

  10. KinasePA: Phosphoproteomics data annotation using hypothesis driven kinase perturbation analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengyi; Patrick, Ellis; Humphrey, Sean J; Ghazanfar, Shila; James, David E; Jothi, Raja; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa

    2016-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative phosphoproteomics has become a key approach for proteome-wide profiling of phosphorylation in tissues and cells. Traditional experimental design often compares a single treatment with a control, whereas increasingly more experiments are designed to compare multiple treatments with respect to a control. To this end, the development of bioinformatic tools that can integrate multiple treatments and visualise kinases and substrates under combinatorial perturbations is vital for dissecting concordant and/or independent effects of each treatment. Here, we propose a hypothesis driven kinase perturbation analysis (KinasePA) to annotate and visualise kinases and their substrates that are perturbed by various combinatorial effects of treatments in phosphoproteomics experiments. We demonstrate the utility of KinasePA through its application to two large-scale phosphoproteomics datasets and show its effectiveness in dissecting kinases and substrates within signalling pathways driven by unique combinations of cellular stimuli and inhibitors. We implemented and incorporated KinasePA as part of the "directPA" R package available from the comprehensive R archive network (CRAN). Furthermore, KinasePA also has an interactive web interface that can be readily applied to annotate user provided phosphoproteomics data (http://kinasepa.pengyiyang.org). PMID:27145998

  11. Phosphoproteomics in translational research: a sarcoma perspective.

    PubMed

    Noujaim, J; Payne, L S; Judson, I; Jones, R L; Huang, P H

    2016-05-01

    Phosphoproteomics has been extensively used as a preclinical research tool to characterize the phosphorylated components of the cancer proteome. Advances in the field have yielded insights into new drug targets, mechanisms of disease progression and drug resistance, and biomarker discovery. However, application of this technology to clinical research has been challenging because of practical issues relating to specimen integrity and tumour heterogeneity. Beyond these limitations, phosphoproteomics has the potential to play a pivotal role in translational studies and contribute to advances in different tumour groups, including rare disease sites like sarcoma. In this review, we propose that deploying phosphoproteomic technologies in translational research may facilitate the identification of better defined predictive biomarkers for patient stratification, inform drug selection in umbrella trials and identify new combinations to overcome drug resistance. We provide an overview of current phosphoproteomic technologies, such as affinity-based assays and mass spectrometry-based approaches, and discuss their advantages and limitations. We use sarcoma as an example to illustrate the current challenges in evaluating targeted kinase therapies in clinical trials. We then highlight useful lessons from preclinical studies in sarcoma biology to demonstrate how phosphoproteomics may address some of these challenges. Finally, we conclude by offering a perspective and list the key measures required to translate and benchmark a largely preclinical technology into a useful tool for translational research. PMID:26802162

  12. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays. PMID:25717323

  13. Quantitative hopanoid analysis enables robust pattern detection and comparison between laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C-H; Kong, L; Bialecka-Fornal, M; Park, S; Thompson, A L; Kulkarni, G; Conway, S J; Newman, D K

    2015-01-01

    external diplopterol standards. These new quantitative approaches permit meaningful comparisons between studies, allowing more accurate hopanoid pattern detection in both laboratory and environmental samples. PMID:25865768

  14. Quantitative hopanoid analysis enables robust pattern detection and comparison between laboratories.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-H; Kong, L; Bialecka-Fornal, M; Park, S; Thompson, A L; Kulkarni, G; Conway, S J; Newman, D K

    2015-07-01

    external diplopterol standards. These new quantitative approaches permit meaningful comparisons between studies, allowing more accurate hopanoid pattern detection in both laboratory and environmental samples. PMID:25865768

  15. Technical phosphoproteomic and bioinformatic tools useful in cancer research.

    PubMed

    López, Elena; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; López, Isabel; Mendieta, Jesús; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Muñoz, Sarbelio Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is one of the most important forms of cellular regulation. Thus, phosphoproteomic analysis of protein phosphorylation in cells is a powerful tool to evaluate cell functional status. The importance of protein kinase-regulated signal transduction pathways in human cancer has led to the development of drugs that inhibit protein kinases at the apex or intermediary levels of these pathways. Phosphoproteomic analysis of these signalling pathways will provide important insights for operation and connectivity of these pathways to facilitate identification of the best targets for cancer therapies. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins or peptides from tissue or bodily fluid samples is required. The application of technologies such as phosphoenrichments, mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to bioinformatics tools is crucial for the identification and quantification of protein phosphorylation sites for advancing in such relevant clinical research. A combination of different phosphopeptide enrichments, quantitative techniques and bioinformatic tools is necessary to achieve good phospho-regulation data and good structural analysis of protein studies. The current and most useful proteomics and bioinformatics techniques will be explained with research examples. Our aim in this article is to be helpful for cancer research via detailing proteomics and bioinformatic tools. PMID:21967744

  16. Technical phosphoproteomic and bioinformatic tools useful in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is one of the most important forms of cellular regulation. Thus, phosphoproteomic analysis of protein phosphorylation in cells is a powerful tool to evaluate cell functional status. The importance of protein kinase-regulated signal transduction pathways in human cancer has led to the development of drugs that inhibit protein kinases at the apex or intermediary levels of these pathways. Phosphoproteomic analysis of these signalling pathways will provide important insights for operation and connectivity of these pathways to facilitate identification of the best targets for cancer therapies. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins or peptides from tissue or bodily fluid samples is required. The application of technologies such as phosphoenrichments, mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to bioinformatics tools is crucial for the identification and quantification of protein phosphorylation sites for advancing in such relevant clinical research. A combination of different phosphopeptide enrichments, quantitative techniques and bioinformatic tools is necessary to achieve good phospho-regulation data and good structural analysis of protein studies. The current and most useful proteomics and bioinformatics techniques will be explained with research examples. Our aim in this article is to be helpful for cancer research via detailing proteomics and bioinformatic tools. PMID:21967744

  17. Pump-free gradient-based micro-device enables quantitative and high-throughput bacterial growth inhibition analysis.

    PubMed

    Ran, Min; Wang, Ying; Wang, Sida; Luo, Chunxiong

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility testing is very important in antibiotic therapy. Traditional methods to determine antibiotic susceptibility include disk diffusion and broth dilution. However, these tests are always labor intensive, time-consuming, and need large amounts of reagents. In this paper, we demonstrated a novel pump-free micro-device that enables quantitative and high-throughput bacterial growth inhibition analysis. This device consists of a series of wells and diffusion-based antibiotic gradient channels. The wells serve as antibiotic sources and buffer sinks, and we could easily observe the bacterial growth in the gradient channels .The design of the multi-wells is adapted to the commercialized multi-channel pipette, which makes it very convenient for loading reagents into the wells. For each assay, only about 20 μL antibiotic solution is needed. As a demonstration, we used both fluorescence images and dark-field images to quantify the bacterial growth inhibition effect under different antibiotics. The quantitative data of bacterial growth inhibition under different antibiotics can be obtained within 3 to 4 h. Considering the simple operation process and the high-throughput and quantitative result this device can offer, it has great potential to be widely used in clinics and may be useful for the study of the kinetics of bacterial growth. PMID:26044203

  18. Characterization of the Phosphoproteome in SLE Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianrong; Dai, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a complex regulatory event that is involved in the signaling networks that affect virtually every cellular process. The protein phosphorylation may be a novel source for discovering biomarkers and drug targets. However, a systematic analysis of the phosphoproteome in patients with SLE has not been performed. To clarify the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we compared phosphoprotein expression in PBMCs from SLE patients and normal subjects using proteomics analyses. Phosphopeptides were enriched using TiO2 from PBMCs isolated from 15 SLE patients and 15 healthy subjects and then analyzed by automated LC-MS/MS analysis. Phosphorylation sites were identified and quantitated by MASCOT and MaxQuant. A total of 1035 phosphorylation sites corresponding to 618 NCBI-annotated genes were identified in SLE patients compared with normal subjects. Differentially expressed proteins, peptides and phosphorylation sites were then subjected to bioinformatics analyses. Gene ontology(GO) and pathway analyses showed that nucleic acid metabolism, cellular component organization, transport and multicellular organismal development pathways made up the largest proportions of the differentially expressed genes. Pathway analyses showed that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and actin cytoskeleton regulators made up the largest proportions of the metabolic pathways. Network analysis showed that rous sarcoma oncogene (SRC), v-rel reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), histone deacetylase (HDA1C) and protein kinase C, delta (PRKCD) play important roles in the stability of the network. These data suggest that aberrant protein phosphorylation may contribute to SLE pathogenesis. PMID:23285258

  19. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Cell-Based Resistance to BRAF Inhibitor Therapy in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert; Vella, Laura J.; Xavier, Dylan; Amirkhani, Ardeshir; Parker, Jimmy; Cebon, Jonathan; Molloy, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of melanoma by targeted inhibition of the mutated kinase BRAF with small molecules only temporarily suppresses metastatic disease. In the face of chemical inhibition tumor plasticity, both innate and adaptive, promotes survival through the biochemical and genetic reconfiguration of cellular pathways that can engage proliferative and migratory systems. To investigate this process, high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to characterize the phosphoproteome of this transition in vitro. A simple and accurate, label-free quantitative method was used to localize and quantitate thousands of phosphorylation events. We also correlated changes in the phosphoproteome with the proteome to more accurately determine changes in the activity of regulatory kinases determined by kinase landscape profiling. The abundance of phosphopeptides with sites that function in cytoskeletal regulation, GTP/GDP exchange, protein kinase C, IGF signaling, and melanosome maturation were highly divergent after transition to a drug resistant phenotype. PMID:26029660

  20. Phosphoproteomics analysis of a clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing isolate: expanding the mycobacterial phosphoproteome catalog

    PubMed Central

    Fortuin, Suereta; Tomazella, Gisele G.; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Sampson, Samantha L.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Soares, Nelson C.; Wiker, Harald G.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Warren, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases, mediates a switch between protein activity and cellular pathways that contribute to a large number of cellular processes. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 Serine/Threonine kinases (STPKs) which show close homology to eukaryotic kinases. This study aimed to elucidate the phosphoproteomic landscape of a clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis. We performed a high throughput mass spectrometric analysis of proteins extracted from an early-logarithmic phase culture. Whole cell lysate proteins were processed using the filter-aided sample preparation method, followed by phosphopeptide enrichment of tryptic peptides by strong cation exchange (SCX) and Titanium dioxide (TiO2) chromatography. The MaxQuant quantitative proteomics software package was used for protein identification. Our analysis identified 414 serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylated sites, with a distribution of S/T/Y sites; 38% on serine, 59% on threonine and 3% on tyrosine; present on 303 unique peptides mapping to 214 M. tuberculosis proteins. Only 45 of the S/T/Y phosphorylated proteins identified in our study had been previously described in the laboratory strain H37Rv, confirming previous reports. The remaining 169 phosphorylated proteins were newly identified in this clinical M. tuberculosis Beijing strain. We identified 5 novel tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. These findings not only expand upon our current understanding of the protein phosphorylation network in clinical M. tuberculosis but the data set also further extends and complements previous knowledge regarding phosphorylated peptides and phosphorylation sites in M. tuberculosis. PMID:25713560

  1. Laboratory reflectance spectra of clay minerals mixed with Mars analog materials: Toward enabling quantitative clay abundances from Mars spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Bishop, Janice L.; Brown, Adrian J.; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas F.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative estimates of clay minerals on the martian surface, via remote sensing observations, provide constraints on activity, timing, duration, and extent of aqueous processes and the geochemical environment in martian history. We describe an analytical study to begin enabling quantitative estimates of phyllosilicates when mixed with martian analog materials. We characterize the chemistry, mineralogy, particle size distribution, and reflectance spectra of the end-member materials: saponite, montmorillonite, pyroxene, and palagonitic soil. Reflectance spectra were obtained for physical mixtures of saponite and montmorillonite with pyroxene, and saponite with palagonitic soil. We analyzed the diagnostic phyllosilicate spectral signatures in the 2.2-2.4 μm wavelength region in detail for the mixtures. This involved fitting the observed ∼2.3 or ∼2.2 μm band depth, associated with the presence of saponite and montmorillonite, respectively, as a function of the abundance of these materials in the mixtures. Based upon the band depth of the spectral features we find that 3-5 wt.% of the clay minerals in the mixture with pyroxene can be recognized and at 25 wt.% their presence is indisputable in the mixtures. When the saponite is mixed with the lower albedo palagonitic soil, its presence is clearly distinguishable via the 1.4 and 2.3 μm features at 25 wt.% abundance. These relationships, between abundance and band depth, provide an ability to quantitatively address the amount of these materials in mixtures. The trends described here provide guidance for estimating the presence of phyllosilicates in matrices on the martian surface.

  2. Improved Selection of Internal Transcribed Spacer-Specific Primers Enables Quantitative, Ultra-High-Throughput Profiling of Fungal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bokulich, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of fungal communities has been restricted by short read lengths and primer amplification bias, slowing the adoption of newer sequencing technologies to fungal community profiling. To address these issues, we evaluated the performance of several common internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers and designed a novel primer set and work flow for simultaneous quantification and species-level interrogation of fungal consortia. Primer comparison and validation were predicted in silico and by sequencing a “mock community” of mixed yeast species to explore the challenges of amplicon length and amplification bias for reconstructing defined yeast community structures. The amplicon size and distribution of this primer set are smaller than for all preexisting ITS primer sets, maximizing sequencing coverage of hypervariable ITS domains by very-short-amplicon, high-throughput sequencing platforms. This feature also enables the optional integration of quantitative PCR (qPCR) directly into the HTS preparatory work flow by substituting qPCR with these primers for standard PCR, yielding quantification of individual community members. The complete work flow described here, utilizing any of the qualified primer sets evaluated, can rapidly profile mixed fungal communities and capably reconstructed well-characterized beer and wine fermentation fungal communities. PMID:23377949

  3. Computational phosphoproteomics: From identification to localization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dave C H; Jones, Andrew R; Hubbard, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the phosphoproteome by MS has become a key technology for the characterization of dynamic regulatory processes in the cell, since kinase and phosphatase action underlie many major biological functions. However, the addition of a phosphate group to a suitable side chain often confounds informatic analysis by generating product ion spectra that are more difficult to interpret (and consequently identify) relative to unmodified peptides. Collectively, these challenges have motivated bioinformaticians to create novel software tools and pipelines to assist in the identification of phosphopeptides in proteomic mixtures, and help pinpoint or “localize” the most likely site of modification in cases where there is ambiguity. Here we review the challenges to be met and the informatics solutions available to address them for phosphoproteomic analysis, as well as highlighting the difficulties associated with using them and the implications for data standards. PMID:25475148

  4. Phosphoproteomics data classify hematological cancer cell lines according to tumor type and sensitivity to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor classification based on their predicted responses to kinase inhibitors is a major goal for advancing targeted personalized therapies. Here, we used a phosphoproteomic approach to investigate biological heterogeneity across hematological cancer cell lines including acute myeloid leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Results Mass spectrometry was used to quantify 2,000 phosphorylation sites across three acute myeloid leukemia, three lymphoma, and three multiple myeloma cell lines in six biological replicates. The intensities of the phosphorylation sites grouped these cancer cell lines according to their tumor type. In addition, a phosphoproteomic analysis of seven acute myeloid leukemia cell lines revealed a battery of phosphorylation sites whose combined intensities correlated with the growth-inhibitory responses to three kinase inhibitors with remarkable correlation coefficients and fold changes (> 100 between the most resistant and sensitive cells). Modeling based on regression analysis indicated that a subset of phosphorylation sites could be used to predict response to the tested drugs. Quantitative analysis of phosphorylation motifs indicated that resistant and sensitive cells differed in their patterns of kinase activities, but, interestingly, phosphorylations correlating with responses were not on members of the pathway being targeted; instead, these mainly were on parallel kinase pathways. Conclusion This study reveals that the information on kinase activation encoded in phosphoproteomics data correlates remarkably well with the phenotypic responses of cancer cells to compounds that target kinase signaling and could be useful for the identification of novel markers of resistance or sensitivity to drugs that target the signaling network. PMID:23628362

  5. Sample Preparation for Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Circadian Time Series in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Krahmer, Johanna; Hindle, Matthew M.; Martin, Sarah F.; Le Bihan, Thierry; Millar, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Systems biological approaches to study the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock have mainly focused on transcriptomics while little is known about the proteome, and even less about posttranslational modifications. Evidence has emerged that posttranslational protein modifications, in particular phosphorylation, play an important role for the clock and its output. Phosphoproteomics is the method of choice for a large-scale approach to gain more knowledge about rhythmic protein phosphorylation. Recent plant phosphoproteomics publications have identified several thousand phosphopeptides. However, the methods used in these studies are very labor-intensive and therefore not suitable to apply to a well-replicated circadian time series. To address this issue, we present and compare different strategies for sample preparation for phosphoproteomics that are compatible with large numbers of samples. Methods are compared regarding number of identifications, variability of quantitation, and functional categorization. We focus on the type of detergent used for protein extraction as well as methods for its removal. We also test a simple two-fraction separation of the protein extract. PMID:25662467

  6. Validation of reference genes in Penicillium echinulatum to enable gene expression study using real-time quantitative RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Denise; Nora, Luísa C; Basso, Vanessa; Camassola, Marli; Dillon, Aldo J P

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a methodology that facilitates the quantification of mRNA expression in a given sample. Analysis of relative gene expression by qRT-PCR requires normalization of the data using a reference gene that is expressed at a similar level in all evaluated conditions. Determining an internal control gene is essential for gene expression studies. Gene expression studies in filamentous fungi frequently use the β-actin gene (actb), β-tubulin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as reference genes because they are known to have consistent expression levels. Until now, no study has been performed to select an internal control gene for the filamentous fungal species Penicillium echinulatum. The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate internal control genes to enable the study of gene expression in P. echinulatum using qRT-PCR. P. echinulatum strain S1M29 was grown in conditions to either induce (cellulose and sugar cane bagasse) or repress (glucose) gene expression to analyze 23 candidate normalization genes for stable expression. Two software programs, BestKeeper and geNorm, were used to assess the expression of the candidate normalization genes. The results indicate that the actb reference gene is more stably expressed in P. echinulatum. This is the first report in the literature that determines a normalization gene for this fungus. From the results obtained, we recommend the use of the P. echinulatum actb gene as an endogenous control for gene expression studies of cellulases and hemicellulases by qRT-PCR. PMID:24509829

  7. DNA Replication Stress Phosphoproteome Profiles Reveal Novel Functional Phosphorylation Sites on Xrs2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongqing; Piening, Brian D; Kennedy, Jacob J; Lin, Chenwei; Jones-Weinert, Corey W; Yan, Ping; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-05-01

    In response to replication stress, a phospho-signaling cascade is activated and required for coordination of DNA repair and replication of damaged templates (intra-S-phase checkpoint) . How phospho-signaling coordinates the DNA replication stress response is largely unknown. We employed state-of-the-art liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approaches to generate high-coverage and quantitative proteomic and phospho-proteomic profiles during replication stress in yeast, induced by continuous exposure to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) . We identified 32,057 unique peptides representing the products of 4296 genes and 22,061 unique phosphopeptides representing the products of 3183 genes. A total of 542 phosphopeptides (mapping to 339 genes) demonstrated an abundance change of greater than or equal to twofold in response to MMS. The screen enabled detection of nearly all of the proteins known to be involved in the DNA damage response, as well as many novel MMS-induced phosphorylations. We assessed the functional importance of a subset of key phosphosites by engineering a panel of phosphosite mutants in which an amino acid substitution prevents phosphorylation. In total, we successfully mutated 15 MMS-responsive phosphorylation sites in seven representative genes including APN1 (base excision repair); CTF4 and TOF1 (checkpoint and sister-chromatid cohesion); MPH1 (resolution of homologous recombination intermediates); RAD50 and XRS2 (MRX complex); and RAD18 (PRR). All of these phosphorylation site mutants exhibited MMS sensitivity, indicating an important role in protecting cells from DNA damage. In particular, we identified MMS-induced phosphorylation sites on Xrs2 that are required for MMS resistance in the absence of the MRX activator, Sae2, and that affect telomere maintenance. PMID:27017623

  8. Assessment of beating parameters in human induced pluripotent stem cells enables quantitative in vitro screening for cardiotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sirenko, Oksana; Cromwell, Evan F.; Crittenden, Carole; Wignall, Jessica A.; Wright, Fred A.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-12-15

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes show promise for screening during early drug development. Here, we tested a hypothesis that in vitro assessment of multiple cardiomyocyte physiological parameters enables predictive and mechanistically-interpretable evaluation of cardiotoxicity in a high-throughput format. Human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes were exposed for 30 min or 24 h to 131 drugs, positive (107) and negative (24) for in vivo cardiotoxicity, in up to 6 concentrations (3 nM to 30 uM) in 384-well plates. Fast kinetic imaging was used to monitor changes in cardiomyocyte function using intracellular Ca{sup 2+} flux readouts synchronous with beating, and cell viability. A number of physiological parameters of cardiomyocyte beating, such as beat rate, peak shape (amplitude, width, raise, decay, etc.) and regularity were collected using automated data analysis. Concentration–response profiles were evaluated using logistic modeling to derive a benchmark concentration (BMC) point-of-departure value, based on one standard deviation departure from the estimated baseline in vehicle (0.3% dimethyl sulfoxide)-treated cells. BMC values were used for cardiotoxicity classification and ranking of compounds. Beat rate and several peak shape parameters were found to be good predictors, while cell viability had poor classification accuracy. In addition, we applied the Toxicological Prioritization Index (ToxPi) approach to integrate and display data across many collected parameters, to derive “cardiosafety” ranking of tested compounds. Multi-parameter screening of beating profiles allows for cardiotoxicity risk assessment and identification of specific patterns defining mechanism-specific effects. These data and analysis methods may be used widely for compound screening and early safety evaluation in drug development. - Highlights: • Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are promising in vitro models. • We tested if evaluation

  9. Phosphoproteomics technologies and applications in plant biology research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinna; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Li, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation has long been recognized as an essential mechanism to regulate many important processes of plant life. However, studies on phosphorylation mediated signaling events in plants are challenged with low stoichiometry and dynamic nature of phosphorylated proteins. Significant advances in mass spectrometry based phosphoproteomics have taken place in recent decade, including phosphoprotein/phosphopeptide enrichment, detection and quantification, and phosphorylation site localization. This review describes a variety of separation and enrichment methods for phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides, the applications of technological innovations in plant phosphoproteomics, and highlights significant achievement of phosphoproteomics in the areas of plant signal transduction, growth and development. PMID:26136758

  10. Large-Scale Multiplexed Quantitative Discovery Proteomics Enabled by the Use of an O-18-Labeled “Universal” Reference Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jescheke, Marc G.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Hemdon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative comparison of protein abundances across a relatively large number of patient samples is an important challenge for clinical proteomic applications. Herein we describe a dual-quantitation strategy that allows the simultaneous integration of complementary label-free and stable isotope labeling based approaches without increasing the number of LC-MS analyses. The approach utilizes a stable isotope 18O-labeled “universal” reference sample as a comprehensive set of internal standards spiked into each individually processed unlabeled patient sample. The quantitative data are based on both the direct 16O-MS intensities for label-free quantitation and the 16O/18O isotopic peptide pair ratios that compare each patient sample to the identical labeled reference. The effectiveness of this dual-quantitation approach for large scale quantitative proteomics is demonstrated by the application to a set of 38 clinical plasma samples from surviving and non-surviving severe burn patients. With the coupling of immunoaffinity depletion, cysteinyl-peptide enrichment based fractionation, high resolution LC-MS measurements, and the dual-quantitation approach, a total of 318 proteins were confidently quantified with at least two peptides and 263 proteins were quantified by both approaches. The strategy also enabled a direct comparison between the two approaches with the labeling approach showing significantly better precision in quantitation while the label-free approach resulted in more protein identifications. The relative abundance differences determined by the two approaches also show strong correlation. Finally, the dual-quantitation strategy allowed us to identify more candidate protein biomarkers, illustrating the complementary nature of the two quantitative methods.

  11. Toward defining the phosphoproteome of Xenopus laevis embryos

    PubMed Central

    McGivern, Jered V.; Swaney, Danielle L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Sheets, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation is universally used for controlling protein function, but knowledge of the phosphoproteome in vertebrate embryos has been limited. However, recent technical advances make it possible to define an organism's phosphoproteome at a more comprehensive level. Xenopus laevis offers established advantages for analyzing the regulation of protein function by phosphorylation. Functionally unbiased, comprehensive information about the Xenopus phosphoproteome would provide a powerful guide for future studies of phosphorylation in a developmental context. To this end, we performed a phosphoproteomic analysis of Xenopus oocytes, eggs, and embryos using recently developed mass spectrometry methods. We identified 1,441 phosphorylation sites present on 654 different Xenopus proteins, including hundreds of previously unknown phosphorylation sites. This approach identified several phosphorylation sites described in the literature and/or evolutionarily conserved in other organisms, validating the data's quality. These data will serve as a powerful resource for the exploration of phosphorylation and protein function within a developmental context. PMID:19384857

  12. Integrating Phosphoproteome and Transcriptome Reveals New Determinants of Macrophage Multinucleation*

    PubMed Central

    Rotival, Maxime; Ko, Jeong-Hun; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Kerloc'h, Audrey; Montoya, Alex; Mauro, Claudio; Faull, Peter; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Petretto, Enrico; Behmoaras, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage multinucleation (MM) is essential for various biological processes such as osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and multinucleated giant cell-associated inflammatory reactions. Here we study the molecular pathways underlying multinucleation in the rat through an integrative approach combining MS-based quantitative phosphoproteomics (LC-MS/MS) and transcriptome (high-throughput RNA-sequencing) to identify new regulators of MM. We show that a strong metabolic shift toward HIF1-mediated glycolysis occurs at transcriptomic level during MM, together with modifications in phosphorylation of over 50 proteins including several ARF GTPase activators and polyphosphate inositol phosphatases. We use shortest-path analysis to link differential phosphorylation with the transcriptomic reprogramming of macrophages and identify LRRFIP1, SMARCA4, and DNMT1 as novel regulators of MM. We experimentally validate these predictions by showing that knock-down of these latter reduce macrophage multinucleation. These results provide a new framework for the combined analysis of transcriptional and post-translational changes during macrophage multinucleation, prioritizing essential genes, and revealing the sequential events leading to the multinucleation of macrophages. PMID:25532521

  13. Virtual-'light-sheet' single-molecule localisation microscopy enables quantitative optical sectioning for super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Palayret, Matthieu; Armes, Helen; Basu, Srinjan; Watson, Adam T; Herbert, Alex; Lando, David; Etheridge, Thomas J; Endesfelder, Ulrike; Heilemann, Mike; Laue, Ernest; Carr, Antony M; Klenerman, David; Lee, Steven F

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule super-resolution microscopy allows imaging of fluorescently-tagged proteins in live cells with a precision well below that of the diffraction limit. Here, we demonstrate 3D sectioning with single-molecule super-resolution microscopy by making use of the fitting information that is usually discarded to reject fluorophores that emit from above or below a virtual-'light-sheet', a thin volume centred on the focal plane of the microscope. We describe an easy-to-use routine (implemented as an open-source ImageJ plug-in) to quickly analyse a calibration sample to define and use such a virtual light-sheet. In addition, the plug-in is easily usable on almost any existing 2D super-resolution instrumentation. This optical sectioning of super-resolution images is achieved by applying well-characterised width and amplitude thresholds to diffraction-limited spots that can be used to tune the thickness of the virtual light-sheet. This allows qualitative and quantitative imaging improvements: by rejecting out-of-focus fluorophores, the super-resolution image gains contrast and local features may be revealed; by retaining only fluorophores close to the focal plane, virtual-'light-sheet' single-molecule localisation microscopy improves the probability that all emitting fluorophores will be detected, fitted and quantitatively evaluated. PMID:25884495

  14. Virtual-'Light-Sheet' Single-Molecule Localisation Microscopy Enables Quantitative Optical Sectioning for Super-Resolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Palayret, Matthieu; Armes, Helen; Basu, Srinjan; Watson, Adam T.; Herbert, Alex; Lando, David; Etheridge, Thomas J.; Endesfelder, Ulrike; Heilemann, Mike; Laue, Ernest; Carr, Antony M.; Klenerman, David; Lee, Steven F.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule super-resolution microscopy allows imaging of fluorescently-tagged proteins in live cells with a precision well below that of the diffraction limit. Here, we demonstrate 3D sectioning with single-molecule super-resolution microscopy by making use of the fitting information that is usually discarded to reject fluorophores that emit from above or below a virtual-'light-sheet', a thin volume centred on the focal plane of the microscope. We describe an easy-to-use routine (implemented as an open-source ImageJ plug-in) to quickly analyse a calibration sample to define and use such a virtual light-sheet. In addition, the plug-in is easily usable on almost any existing 2D super-resolution instrumentation. This optical sectioning of super-resolution images is achieved by applying well-characterised width and amplitude thresholds to diffraction-limited spots that can be used to tune the thickness of the virtual light-sheet. This allows qualitative and quantitative imaging improvements: by rejecting out-of-focus fluorophores, the super-resolution image gains contrast and local features may be revealed; by retaining only fluorophores close to the focal plane, virtual-'light-sheet' single-molecule localisation microscopy improves the probability that all emitting fluorophores will be detected, fitted and quantitatively evaluated. PMID:25884495

  15. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the response of maize leaves to drought, heat and their combination stress

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiuli; Wu, Liuji; Zhao, Feiyun; Zhang, Dayong; Li, Nana; Zhu, Guohui; Li, Chaohao; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Drought and heat stress, especially their combination, greatly affect crop production. Many studies have described transcriptome, proteome and phosphoproteome changes in response of plants to drought or heat stress. However, the study about the phosphoproteomic changes in response of crops to the combination stress is scare. To understand the mechanism of maize responses to the drought and heat combination stress, phosphoproteomic analysis was performed on maize leaves by using multiplex iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic and LC-MS/MS methods. Five-leaf-stage maize was subjected to drought, heat or their combination, and the leaves were collected. Globally, heat, drought and the combined stress significantly changed the phosphorylation levels of 172, 149, and 144 phosphopeptides, respectively. These phosphopeptides corresponded to 282 proteins. Among them, 23 only responded to the combined stress and could not be predicted from their responses to single stressors; 30 and 75 only responded to drought and heat, respectively. Notably, 19 proteins were phosphorylated on different sites in response to the single and combination stresses. Of the seven significantly enriched phosphorylation motifs identified, two were common for all stresses, two were common for heat and the combined stress, and one was specific to the combined stress. The signaling pathways in which the phosphoproteins were involved clearly differed among the three stresses. Functional characterization of the phosphoproteins and the pathways identified here could lead to new targets for the enhancement of crop stress tolerance, which will be particularly important in the face of climate change and the increasing prevalence of abiotic stressors. PMID:25999967

  16. Noninvasive device readouts validated by immunohistochemical analysis enable objective quantitative assessment of acute wound healing in human skin.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Greaves, Nicholas S; Sebastian, Anil; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Objective evaluation of cutaneous wounds through use of noninvasive devices has important implications for diagnosis, monitoring treatment efficacy, progression and may lead to development of improved theranostic treatment strategies. However, there is a lack of validation in the use of certain devices in wound repair, where objective measurements taken by noninvasive devices have been corroborated by immunohistochemical analysis. Thus, data from three acute wound-healing studies in healthy volunteers using three noninvasive objective devices were further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. One hundred ten participants had 5-mm diameter skin biopsies to their arms. Spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis (SIAscopy), full-field laser perfusion imaging, and three-dimensional imaging provided quantitative measurements of melanin, hemoglobin, collagen, blood flow, and wound size; all of which were validated by immunohistochemistry. Full-field laser perfusion imaging showed blood flow increased to D7 and decreased by 40% to D14. SIAscopy showed that hemoglobin increased to D7 and reduced to D14. CD31 analysis corroborated this by showing a 76% increase in blood vessel density to D7 and a reduction by 14% to D14. Three-dimensional imaging showed that wound surface area reduced by 50% from day 7 to day 14. Alpha-smooth muscle Actin (Alpha-SMA) staining supported these trends by showing increased levels by 72% from D0 to D14 (corresponding to wound contraction). Collagen, measured by SIAscopy, decreased to D7 and increased to D14, which was validated by collagen III analysis. Additionally, collagen I increased by 14% from D0 to D14. SIAscopy measurements for melanin showed an increase at D7 and a slight reduction to D14, while melanogenesis increased by 46.7% from D0 to D14. These findings show the utility of noninvasive objective devices in the quantitative evaluation of wound-healing parameters in human skin as corroborated by immunohistochemistry. This may contribute

  17. Quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation toward blood

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Williamson, Andrew; Lee, Chia-Fang; Pearson, Stella; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate in vitro into three germ layers (endodermic, mesodermic, ectodermic). Studies on the differentiation of these cells to specific early differentiation stages has been aided by an ES cell line carrying the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) targeted to the Brachyury (Bry) locus which marks mesoderm commitment. Furthermore, expression of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (Flk1) along with Bry defines hemangioblast commitment. Isobaric-tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQTM) and phosphopeptide enrichment coupled to liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry allow the study of phosphorylation changes occurring at different stages of ES cell development using Bry and Flk1 expression respectively. We identified and relatively quantified 37 phosphoentities which are modulated during mesoderm-induced ES cells differentiation, comparing epiblast-like, early mesoderm and hemangioblast-enriched cells. Among the proteins differentially phosphorylated toward mesoderm differentiation were: the epigenetic regulator Dnmt3b, the protein kinase GSK3b, the chromatin remodeling factor Smarcc1, the transcription factor Utf1; as well as protein specifically related to stem cell differentiation, as Eomes, Hmga2, Ints1 and Rif1. As most key factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding the post-translational modifications driving their regulation during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. PMID:25890499

  18. In vivo Monitoring of Transcriptional Dynamics After Lower-Limb Muscle Injury Enables Quantitative Classification of Healing

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Carlos A.; Shcherbina, Anna; Ricke, Darrell O.; Pop, Ramona; Carrigan, Christopher T.; Gifford, Casey A.; Urso, Maria L.; Kottke, Melissa A.; Meissner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic lower-limb musculoskeletal injuries are pervasive amongst athletes and the military and typically an individual returns to activity prior to fully healing, increasing a predisposition for additional injuries and chronic pain. Monitoring healing progression after a musculoskeletal injury typically involves different types of imaging but these approaches suffer from several disadvantages. Isolating and profiling transcripts from the injured site would abrogate these shortcomings and provide enumerative insights into the regenerative potential of an individual’s muscle after injury. In this study, a traumatic injury was administered to a mouse model and healing progression was examined from 3 hours to 1 month using high-throughput RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq). Comprehensive dissection of the genome-wide datasets revealed the injured site to be a dynamic, heterogeneous environment composed of multiple cell types and thousands of genes undergoing significant expression changes in highly regulated networks. Four independent approaches were used to determine the set of genes, isoforms, and genetic pathways most characteristic of different time points post-injury and two novel approaches were developed to classify injured tissues at different time points. These results highlight the possibility to quantitatively track healing progression in situ via transcript profiling using high- throughput sequencing. PMID:26381351

  19. A Novel Image-Analysis Toolbox Enabling Quantitative Analysis of Root System Architecture1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lobet, Guillaume; Pagès, Loïc; Draye, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    We present in this paper a novel, semiautomated image-analysis software to streamline the quantitative analysis of root growth and architecture of complex root systems. The software combines a vectorial representation of root objects with a powerful tracing algorithm that accommodates a wide range of image sources and quality. The root system is treated as a collection of roots (possibly connected) that are individually represented as parsimonious sets of connected segments. Pixel coordinates and gray level are therefore turned into intuitive biological attributes such as segment diameter and orientation as well as distance to any other segment or topological position. As a consequence, user interaction and data analysis directly operate on biological entities (roots) and are not hampered by the spatially discrete, pixel-based nature of the original image. The software supports a sampling-based analysis of root system images, in which detailed information is collected on a limited number of roots selected by the user according to specific research requirements. The use of the software is illustrated with a time-lapse analysis of cluster root formation in lupin (Lupinus albus) and an architectural analysis of the maize (Zea mays) root system. The software, SmartRoot, is an operating system-independent freeware based on ImageJ and relies on cross-platform standards for communication with data-analysis software. PMID:21771915

  20. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals That Hsp90 Inhibition Preferentially Targets Kinases and the DNA Damage Response*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kirti; Vabulas, R. Martin; Macek, Boris; Pinkert, Stefan; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias; Hartl, F. Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors as chemotherapeutic agents in diseases such as cancer, their global effects on the proteome remain largely unknown. Here we use high resolution, quantitative mass spectrometry to map protein expression changes associated with the application of the Hsp90 inhibitor, 17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG). In depth data obtained from five replicate SILAC experiments enabled accurate quantification of about 6,000 proteins in HeLa cells. As expected, we observed activation of a heat shock response with induced expression of molecular chaperones, which refold misfolded proteins, and proteases, which degrade irreparably damaged polypeptides. Despite the broad range of known Hsp90 substrates, bioinformatics analysis revealed that particular protein classes were preferentially affected. These prominently included proteins involved in the DNA damage response, as well as protein kinases and especially tyrosine kinases. We followed up on this observation with a quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of about 4,000 sites, which revealed that Hsp90 inhibition leads to much more down- than up-regulation of the phosphoproteome (34% down versus 6% up). This study defines the cellular response to Hsp90 inhibition at the proteome level and sheds light on the mechanisms by which it can be used to target cancer cells. PMID:22167270

  1. Dynamic Adipocyte Phosphoproteome Reveals that Akt Directly Regulates mTORC2

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Sean J.; Yang, Guang; Yang, Pengyi; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Stöckli, Jacqueline; Yang, Jean Y.; James, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A major challenge of the post-genomics era is to define the connectivity of protein phosphorylation networks. Here, we quantitatively delineate the insulin signaling network in adipocytes by high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These data reveal the complexity of intracellular protein phosphorylation. We identified 37,248 phosphorylation sites on 5,705 proteins in this single-cell type, with approximately 15% responding to insulin. We integrated these large-scale phosphoproteomics data using a machine learning approach to predict physiological substrates of several diverse insulin-regulated kinases. This led to the identification of an Akt substrate, SIN1, a core component of the mTORC2 complex. The phosphorylation of SIN1 by Akt was found to regulate mTORC2 activity in response to growth factors, revealing topological insights into the Akt/mTOR signaling network. The dynamic phosphoproteome described here contains numerous phosphorylation sites on proteins involved in diverse molecular functions and should serve as a useful functional resource for cell biologists. PMID:23684622

  2. Quantitative radiography enabled by slot collimation and a novel scatter correction technique on a large-area flat panel x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Meghan L.; Boden, Adam E.; Sabol, John M.

    2009-02-01

    In addition to causing loss of contrast and blurring in an image, scatter also makes quantitative measurements of xray attenuation impossible. Many devices, methods, and models have been developed to eliminate, estimate, and correct for the effects of scatter. Although these techniques can reduce the impact of scatter in a large-area image, no methods have proven to be practical and sufficient to enable quantitative analysis of image data in a routine clinical setting. This paper describes a method of scatter correction which uses moderate x-ray collimation in combination with a correction algorithm operating on data obtained from large-area flat panel detector images. The method involves acquiring slot collimated images of the object, and utilizing information from outside of the collimated region, in addition to a priori data, to estimate the scatter within the collimated region. This method requires no increase dose to the patient while providing high image quality and accurate estimates of the primary x-ray data. This scatter correction technique was validated through beam stop experiments and comparison of theoretically calculated and measured contrast of thin aluminum and polymethylmethacrelate objects. Measurements taken with various background material thicknesses, both with and without a grid, showed that the slot-scatter corrected contrast and the theoretical contrast were not significantly different given a 99% confidence interval. However, the uncorrected contrast was found to be significantly different from the corrected and theoretical contrasts. These findings indicate that this method of scatter correction can eliminate the effect of scatter on contrast and potentially enable quantitative x-ray imaging.

  3. Comprehensive Analysis of the Membrane Phosphoproteome Regulated by Oligogalacturonides in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Benedetta; Spinelli, Francesco; Pontiggia, Daniela; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Early changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana membrane phosphoproteome in response to oligogalacturonides (OGs), a class of plant damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), were analyzed by two complementary proteomic approaches. Differentially phosphorylated sites were determined through phosphopeptide enrichment followed by LC-MS/MS using label-free quantification; differentially phosphorylated proteins were identified by 2D-DIGE combined with phospho-specific fluorescent staining (phospho-DIGE). This large-scale phosphoproteome analysis of early OG-signaling enabled us to determine 100 regulated phosphosites using LC-MS/MS and 46 differential spots corresponding to 34 pdhosphoproteins using phospho-DIGE. Functional classification showed that the OG-responsive phosphoproteins include kinases, phosphatases and receptor-like kinases, heat shock proteins (HSPs), reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes, proteins related to cellular trafficking, transport, defense and signaling as well as novel candidates for a role in immunity, for which elicitor-induced phosphorylation changes have not been shown before. A comparison with previously identified elicitor-regulated phosphosites shows only a very limited overlap, uncovering the immune-related regulation of 70 phosphorylation sites and revealing novel potential players in the regulation of elicitor-dependent immunity. PMID:27532006

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of the Membrane Phosphoproteome Regulated by Oligogalacturonides in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Benedetta; Spinelli, Francesco; Pontiggia, Daniela; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Early changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana membrane phosphoproteome in response to oligogalacturonides (OGs), a class of plant damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), were analyzed by two complementary proteomic approaches. Differentially phosphorylated sites were determined through phosphopeptide enrichment followed by LC-MS/MS using label-free quantification; differentially phosphorylated proteins were identified by 2D-DIGE combined with phospho-specific fluorescent staining (phospho-DIGE). This large-scale phosphoproteome analysis of early OG-signaling enabled us to determine 100 regulated phosphosites using LC-MS/MS and 46 differential spots corresponding to 34 pdhosphoproteins using phospho-DIGE. Functional classification showed that the OG-responsive phosphoproteins include kinases, phosphatases and receptor-like kinases, heat shock proteins (HSPs), reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes, proteins related to cellular trafficking, transport, defense and signaling as well as novel candidates for a role in immunity, for which elicitor-induced phosphorylation changes have not been shown before. A comparison with previously identified elicitor-regulated phosphosites shows only a very limited overlap, uncovering the immune-related regulation of 70 phosphorylation sites and revealing novel potential players in the regulation of elicitor-dependent immunity. PMID:27532006

  5. The use of elemental mass spectrometry in phosphoproteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Maes, Evelyne; Tirez, Kristof; Baggerman, Geert; Valkenborg, Dirk; Schoofs, Liliane; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Mertens, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications in mammalian cells. Because this molecular switch is an important mechanism that diversifies and regulates proteins in cellular processes, knowledge about the extent and quantity of phosphorylation is very important to understand the complex cellular interplay. Although phosphoproteomics strategies are applied worldwide, they mainly include only molecular mass spectrometry (like MALDI or ESI)-based experiments. Although identification and relative quantification of phosphopeptides is straightforward with these techniques, absolute quantification is more complex and usually requires for specific isotopically phosphopeptide standards. However, the use of elemental mass spectrometry, and in particular inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), in phosphoproteomics-based experiments, allow one to absolutely quantify phosphopeptides. Here, these phosphoproteomic applications with ICP-MS as elemental detector are reviewed. Pioneering work and recent developments in the field are both described. Additionally, the advantage of the parallel use of molecular and elemental mass spectrometry is stressed. PMID:25139451

  6. An Initial Characterization of the Serum Phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weidong; Ross, Mark M.; Tessitore, Alessandra; Ornstein, David; VanMeter, Amy; Liotta, Lance A.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a dynamic post-translational protein modification that is the basis of a general mechanism for maintaining and regulating protein structure and function, and of course underpins key cellular processes through signal transduction. In the last several years, many studies of large-scale profiling of phosphoproteins and mapping phosphorylation sites from cultured human cells or tissues by mass spectrometry technique have been published; however, there is little information on general (or global) phosphoproteomic characterization and description of the content of phosphoprotein analytes within the circulation. Circulating phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides could represent important disease biomarkers because of their well-known importance in cellular function, and these analytes frequently are mutated and activated in human diseases such as cancer. Here we report an initial attempt to characterize the phosphoprotein content of serum. To accomplish this, we developed a method in which phosphopeptides are enriched from digested serum proteins and analyzed by LC-MS/MS using LTQ-Orbitrap (CID) and LTQ-ETD mass spectrometers. Using this approach we identified ~100 unique phosphopeptides with stringent filtering criteria and a lower than 1% false discovery rate. PMID:19824718

  7. A Novel Quantitative Hemolytic Assay Coupled with Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms Analysis Enabled Early Diagnosis of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Identified Unique Predisposing Mutations in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoko; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Masanori; Shirotani-Ikejima, Hiroko; Uchida, Yumiko; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    For thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs), the diagnosis of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is made by ruling out Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)-associated HUS and ADAMTS13 activity-deficient thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), often using the exclusion criteria for secondary TMAs. Nowadays, assays for ADAMTS13 activity and evaluation for STEC infection can be performed within a few hours. However, a confident diagnosis of aHUS often requires comprehensive gene analysis of the alternative complement activation pathway, which usually takes at least several weeks. However, predisposing genetic abnormalities are only identified in approximately 70% of aHUS. To facilitate the diagnosis of complement-mediated aHUS, we describe a quantitative hemolytic assay using sheep red blood cells (RBCs) and human citrated plasma, spiked with or without a novel inhibitory anti-complement factor H (CFH) monoclonal antibody. Among 45 aHUS patients in Japan, 24% (11/45) had moderate-to-severe (≥50%) hemolysis, whereas the remaining 76% (34/45) patients had mild or no hemolysis (<50%). The former group is largely attributed to CFH-related abnormalities, and the latter group has C3-p.I1157T mutations (16/34), which were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Thus, a quantitative hemolytic assay coupled with RFLP analysis enabled the early diagnosis of complement-mediated aHUS in 60% (27/45) of patients in Japan within a week of presentation. We hypothesize that this novel quantitative hemolytic assay would be more useful in a Caucasian population, who may have a higher proportion of CFH mutations than Japanese patients. PMID:25951460

  8. Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Endometrium in Women with or without Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-Mei; Deng, Hai-Teng; Liu, Chong-Dong; Chen, Yu-Ling; Zhang, Zhen-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The molecular mechanisms underlying the endometriosis are still not completely understood. In order to test the hypothesis that the approaches in phosphoproteomics might contribute to the identification of key biomarkers to assess disease pathogenesis and drug targets, we carried out a phosphoproteomics analysis of human endometrium. Methods: A large-scale differential phosphoproteome analysis, using peptide enrichment of titanium dioxide purify and sequential elution from immobilized metal affinity chromatography with linear trap quadrupole-tandem mass spectrometry, was performed in endometrium tissues from 8 women with or without endometriosis. Results: The phosphorylation profiling of endometrium from endometriosis patients had been obtained, and found that identified 516 proteins were modified at phosphorylation level during endometriosis. Gene ontology annotation analysis showed that these proteins were enriched in cellular processes of binding and catalytic activity. Further pathway analysis showed that ribosome pathway and focal adhesion pathway were the top two pathways, which might be deregulated during the development of endometriosis. Conclusions: That large-scale phosphoproteome quantification has been successfully identified in endometrium tissues of women with or without endometriosis will provide new insights to understand the molecular mechanisms of the development of endometriosis. PMID:26415800

  9. Hippocampal phosphoproteomics of F344 rats exposed to 1-bromopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Hu, Shijie; Huang, Hanlin; Ichihara, Gaku

    2015-01-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and human. To identify phosphorylated modification on the unrecognized post-translational modifications of proteins and investigate their role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity, changes in hippocampal phosphoprotein expression levels were analyzed quantitatively in male F344 rats exposed to 1-BP inhalation at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 or 4 weeks. Hippocampal protein extracts were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by Pro-Q Diamond gel staining and SYPRO Ruby staining coupled with two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), respectively, as well as by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) to identify phosphoproteins. Changes in selected proteins were further confirmed by Manganese II (Mn{sup 2+})-Phos-tag SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Bax and cytochrome c protein levels were determined by western blotting. Pro-Q Diamond gel staining combined with 2D-DIGE identified 26 phosphoprotein spots (p < 0.05), and MALDI-TOF/MS identified 18 up-regulated proteins and 8 down-regulated proteins. These proteins are involved in the biological process of response to stimuli, metabolic processes, and apoptosis signaling. Changes in the expression of phosphorylated 14-3-3 θ were further confirmed by Mn{sup 2+}-Phos-tag SDS-PAGE. Western blotting showed overexpression of Bax protein in the mitochondria with down-regulation in the cytoplasm, whereas cytochrome c expression was high in the cytoplasm but low in the mitochondria after 1-BP exposure. Our results suggest that the pathogenesis of 1-BP-induced hippocampal damage involves inhibition of antiapoptosis process. Phosphoproteins identified in this study can potentially serve as biomarkers for 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • 1-BP modified hippocampal phosphoproteome in rat and 23 altered proteins were identified. • 1-BP changed phosphorylation

  10. Spatial proteomic and phospho-proteomic organization in three prototypical cell migration modes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tight spatio-temporal signaling of cytoskeletal and adhesion dynamics is required for localized membrane protrusion that drives directed cell migration. Different ensembles of proteins are therefore likely to get recruited and phosphorylated in membrane protrusions in response to specific cues. Results Here, we use an assay that allows to biochemically purify extending protrusions of cells migrating in response to three prototypical receptors: integrins, recepor tyrosine kinases and G-coupled protein receptors. Using quantitative proteomics and phospho-proteomics approaches, we provide evidence for the existence of cue-specific, spatially distinct protein networks in the different cell migration modes. Conclusions The integrated analysis of the large-scale experimental data with protein information from databases allows us to understand some emergent properties of spatial regulation of signaling during cell migration. This provides the cell migration community with a large-scale view of the distribution of proteins and phospho-proteins regulating directed cell migration. PMID:24987309

  11. Systematic profiling of the bacterial phosphoproteome reveals bacterium-specific features of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Miao-Hsia; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2015-09-15

    Protein phosphorylation is a crucial posttranslational modification for regulating cellular processes in bacteria; however, it has not been extensively studied because of technical difficulties in the enrichment of phosphopeptides. We devised an enrichment protocol that enabled the identification of >1000 phosphopeptides from a single bacterial sample. We discovered three high-confidence serine and threonine phosphorylation motifs, as well as 29 other motifs at various levels of confidence, from three distinct bacterial phosphoproteomes. We found that the proline-directed and basophilic phosphorylation motifs that are commonly enriched in eukaryotes were not observed in bacteria. Unlike eukaryotes, bacteria had a low occurrence of both phosphorylation and acetylation in N-terminal phosphopeptides. Because infection of host cells by bacterial pathogens is often accompanied by kinase-mediated phosphorylation events, the differences in phosphorylation preferences between bacteria and eukaryotes revealed by this study could be useful in identifying bacterial-specific targets for future therapies. PMID:26373674

  12. Brief Isoflurane Anesthesia Produces Prominent Phosphoproteomic Changes in the Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kohtala, Samuel; Theilmann, Wiebke; Suomi, Tomi; Wigren, Henna-Kaisa; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Elo, Laura L; Rokka, Anne; Rantamäki, Tomi

    2016-06-15

    Anesthetics are widely used in medical practice and experimental research, yet the neurobiological basis governing their effects remains obscure. We have here used quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the protein phosphorylation changes produced by a 30 min isoflurane anesthesia in the adult mouse hippocampus. Altogether 318 phosphorylation alterations in total of 237 proteins between sham and isoflurane anesthesia were identified. Many of the hit proteins represent primary pharmacological targets of anesthetics. However, findings also enlighten the role of several other proteins-implicated in various biological processes including neuronal excitability, brain energy homeostasis, synaptic plasticity and transmission, and microtubule function-as putative (secondary) targets of anesthetics. In particular, isoflurane increases glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylation at the inhibitory Ser(9) residue and regulates the phosphorylation of multiple proteins downstream and upstream of this promiscuous kinase that regulate diverse biological functions. Along with confirmatory Western blot data for GSK3β and p44/42-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase; reduced phosphorylation of the activation loop), we observed increased phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) on residues (Thr(1620,1623)) that have been shown to render its dissociation from microtubules and alterations in microtubule stability. We further demonstrate that diverse anesthetics (sevoflurane, urethane, ketamine) produce essentially similar phosphorylation changes on GSK3β, p44/p42-MAPK, and MAP2 as observed with isoflurane. Altogether our study demonstrates the potential of quantitative phosphoproteomics to study the mechanisms of anesthetics (and other drugs) in the mammalian brain and reveals how already a relatively brief anesthesia produces pronounced phosphorylation changes in multiple proteins in the central nervous system. PMID:27074656

  13. Data set from a comprehensive phosphoproteomic analysis of rice variety IRBB5 in response to bacterial blight

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yuxuan; Tong, Xiaohong; Wang, Yifeng; Qiu, Jiehua; Li, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Shiwen; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial blight (BB) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) has become one of the most devastating diseases for rice, a major food source for over half of the world populations. To investigate the roles of protein phosphorylation in rice bacterial blight resistance, a quantitative phosphoproteomic study was conducted in rice variety IRBB5 at 0 h and 24 h after Xoo infection. 2367 and 2223 phosphosites on 1334 and 1297 representative proteins were identified in 0 h and 24 h after Xoo infection, respectively, out of which 762 proteins were found to be differentially phosphorylated. In associated with the published article “A comprehensive quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of rice in response to bacterial blight” in BMC Plant Biology (Hou et al., 2015) [1], this dataset article provided the detailed information of experimental designing, methods, features as well as the raw data of mass spectrometry (MS) identification. The MS proteomics data could be fully accessed from the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD002222. PMID:26862573

  14. Phosphoproteomic Analyses Reveal Early Signaling Events in the Osmotic Stress Response1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    E. Stecker, Kelly; Minkoff, Benjamin B.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating how plants sense and respond to water loss is important for identifying genetic and chemical interventions that may help sustain crop yields in water-limiting environments. Currently, the molecular mechanisms involved in the initial perception and response to dehydration are not well understood. Modern mass spectrometric methods for quantifying changes in the phosphoproteome provide an opportunity to identify key phosphorylation events involved in this process. Here, we have used both untargeted and targeted isotope-assisted mass spectrometric methods of phosphopeptide quantitation to characterize proteins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) whose degree of phosphorylation is rapidly altered by hyperosmotic treatment. Thus, protein phosphorylation events responsive to 5 min of 0.3 m mannitol treatment were first identified using 15N metabolic labeling and untargeted mass spectrometry with a high-resolution ion-trap instrument. The results from these discovery experiments were then validated using targeted Selected Reaction Monitoring mass spectrometry with a triple quadrupole. Targeted Selected Reaction Monitoring experiments were conducted with plants treated under nine different environmental perturbations to determine whether the phosphorylation changes were specific for osmosignaling or involved cross talk with other signaling pathways. The results indicate that regulatory proteins such as members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family are specifically phosphorylated in response to osmotic stress. Proteins involved in 5′ messenger RNA decapping and phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate synthesis were also identified as targets of dehydration-induced phosphoregulation. The results of these experiments demonstrate the utility of targeted phosphoproteomic analysis in understanding protein regulation networks and provide new insight into cellular processes involved in the osmotic stress response. PMID:24808101

  15. Phosphoproteome Integration Reveals Patient-Specific Networks in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Drake, Justin M; Paull, Evan O; Graham, Nicholas A; Lee, John K; Smith, Bryan A; Titz, Bjoern; Stoyanova, Tanya; Faltermeier, Claire M; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Carlin, Daniel E; Fleming, Daniel Teo; Wong, Christopher K; Newton, Yulia; Sudha, Sud; Vashisht, Ajay A; Huang, Jiaoti; Wohlschlegel, James A; Graeber, Thomas G; Witte, Owen N; Stuart, Joshua M

    2016-08-11

    We used clinical tissue from lethal metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients obtained at rapid autopsy to evaluate diverse genomic, transcriptomic, and phosphoproteomic datasets for pathway analysis. Using Tied Diffusion through Interacting Events (TieDIE), we integrated differentially expressed master transcriptional regulators, functionally mutated genes, and differentially activated kinases in CRPC tissues to synthesize a robust signaling network consisting of druggable kinase pathways. Using MSigDB hallmark gene sets, six major signaling pathways with phosphorylation of several key residues were significantly enriched in CRPC tumors after incorporation of phosphoproteomic data. Individual autopsy profiles developed using these hallmarks revealed clinically relevant pathway information potentially suitable for patient stratification and targeted therapies in late stage prostate cancer. Here, we describe phosphorylation-based cancer hallmarks using integrated personalized signatures (pCHIPS) that shed light on the diversity of activated signaling pathways in metastatic CRPC while providing an integrative, pathway-based reference for drug prioritization in individual patients. PMID:27499020

  16. The Quantitative Criteria Based on the Fractal Dimensions, Entropy, and Lacunarity for the Spatial Distribution of Cancer Cell Nuclei Enable Identification of Low or High Aggressive Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    relevant information. Two novel quantitative criteria based on the complexity and the diversity measures enabled the identification of low or high aggressive prostate carcinomas and should be verified in the future multicenter, randomized studies. PMID:26903883

  17. Understanding the Mechanisms Enabling an Ultra-high Efficiency Moving Wire Interface for Real-time Carbon 14 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Quantitation of Samples Suspended in Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Avraham Thaler

    Carbon 14 (14C) quantitation by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a powerfully sensitive and uniquely quantitative tool for tracking labeled carbonaceous molecules in biological systems. This is due to 14C's low natural abundance of 1 ppt, the nominal difference in biological activity between an unlabeled and a 14C-labeled molecule, and the ability of AMS to measure isotopic ratios independently of a sample's other characteristics. To make AMS more broadly accessible, a moving wire interface for real-time coupling of high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) to AMS and high throughput AMS quantitation of minute single samples has been developed. Prior to this work, samples needed to be converted to solid carbon before measurement. This conversion process has many steps and requires that the sample size be large enough to allow precise handling of the resulting graphite. These factors make the process susceptible to error and time consuming, as well as requiring 0.5 ug of carbon. Samples which do not contain enough carbon, such as HPLC fractions, must be bulked up. This adds background and increases effort. The moving wire interface overcomes these limitations by automating sample processing. Samples placed on the wire are transported through a solvent removal stage followed by a combustion stage after which the combustion products are directed to a gas accepting ion source. The ion source converts the carbon from the CO2 combustion product into C ions, from which an isotopic ratio can be determined by AMS. Although moving wire interfaces have been implemented for various tasks since 1964, the efficiency of these systems at transferring fluid from an HPLC to the wire was only 3%, the efficiency of transferring combustion products from the combustion oven to ion source was only 30%, the flow and composition of the carrier gas from the combustion oven to the ion source needed to be optimized for coupling to an AMS gas accepting ion source and the drying ovens

  18. Phosphoproteomic analysis of induced resistance reveals activation of signal transduction processes by beneficial and pathogenic interaction in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Perazzolli, Michele; Palmieri, Maria Cristina; Matafora, Vittoria; Bachi, Angela; Pertot, Ilaria

    2016-05-20

    Protein phosphorylation regulates several key processes of the plant immune system. Protein kinases and phosphatases are pivotal regulators of defense mechanisms elicited by resistance inducers. However, the phosphorylation cascades that trigger the induced resistance mechanisms in plants have not yet been deeply investigated. The beneficial fungus Trichoderma harzianum T39 (T39) induces resistance against grapevine downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola), but its efficacy could be further improved by a better understanding of the cellular regulations involved. We investigated quantitative changes in the grapevine phosphoproteome during T39-induced resistance to get an overview of regulatory mechanisms of downy mildew resistance. Immunodetection experiments revealed activation of the 45 and 49kDa kinases by T39 treatment both before and after pathogen inoculation, and the phosphoproteomic analysis identified 103 phosphopeptides that were significantly affected by the phosphorylation cascades during T39-induced resistance. Peptides affected by T39 treatment showed comparable phosphorylation levels after P. viticola inoculation, indicating activation of the microbial recognition machinery before pathogen infection. Phosphorylation profiles of proteins related to photosynthetic processes and protein ubiquitination indicated a partial overlap of cellular responses in T39-treated and control plants. However, phosphorylation changes of proteins involved in response to stimuli, signal transduction, hormone signaling, gene expression regulation, and RNA metabolism were exclusively elicited by P. viticola inoculation in T39-treated plants. These results highlighted the relevance of phosphorylation changes during T39-induced resistance and identified key regulator candidates of the grapevine defense against downy mildew. PMID:27010348

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Tissue Samples by Combining iTRAQ Isobaric Labeling with Selected/Multiple Reaction Monitoring (SRM/MRM).

    PubMed

    Narumi, Ryohei; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics is an indispensible technique used in the discovery and quantification of phosphorylation events on proteins in biological samples. The application of this technique to tissue samples is especially useful for the discovery of biomarkers as well as biological studies. We herein describe the application of a large-scale phosphoproteome analysis and SRM/MRM-based quantitation to develop a strategy for the systematic discovery and validation of biomarkers using tissue samples. PMID:26584920

  20. Preparation of Polypropylene Spin Tips Filled with Immobilized Titanium(IV) Ion Monolithic Adsorbent for Robust Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangjie; Wan, Hao; Liu, Zhongshan; Wang, Hongwei; Mao, Jiawei; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-05-17

    In this study, we developed a Ti(IV) monolithic spin tip for phosphoproteome analysis of a minute amount of biological sample for the first time. The surface of polypropylene pipet tip was activated by the photoinitiator benzophenone under UV light radiation followed by polymerization of ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate and bis-acrylamide in the tip to form a porous monolith with reactive phosphate groups. The as-prepared tips grafted with monolithic adsorbent were then chelated with titanium(IV) ion for phosphopeptide enrichment. It was found that the tips enabled fast and efficient capture of phosphopeptides from microscale complex samples. The monolithic tip was demonstrated to have a detection limit as low as 5 fmol β-casein tryptic digest, along with an exceptionally high specificity to capture phosphopeptides from complex tryptic digest mixed with an unphosphorylated protein and a phosphorylated protein at a molar ratio up to 1000:1. When the tip was applied to enrich phosphopeptides from 5 μg of tryptic digest of complex HeLa cell proteins, 1185 high confidence of phosphorylated sites were successfully identified with the specificity as high as 92.5%. So far, this is the most sensitive phosphoproteomics analysis using a standard liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system for proteome-wide phosphorylation analysis in mammalian cells. PMID:27101427

  1. In vivo phosphoproteomics analysis reveals the cardiac targets of β-adrenergic receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Alicia; Andersen, Martin N; Steffensen, Annette B; Horn, Heiko; Kelstrup, Christian D; Francavilla, Chiara; Jensen, Lars J; Schmitt, Nicole; Thomsen, Morten B; Olsen, Jesper V

    2013-06-01

    β-Blockers are widely used to prevent cardiac arrhythmias and to treat hypertension by inhibiting β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) and thus decreasing contractility and heart rate. βARs initiate phosphorylation-dependent signaling cascades, but only a small number of the target proteins are known. We used quantitative in vivo phosphoproteomics to identify 670 site-specific phosphorylation changes in murine hearts in response to acute treatment with specific βAR agonists. The residues adjacent to the regulated phosphorylation sites exhibited a sequence-specific preference (R-X-X-pS/T), and integrative analysis of sequence motifs and interaction networks suggested that the kinases AMPK (adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase), Akt, and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) mediate βAR signaling, in addition to the well-established pathways mediated by PKA (cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase) and CaMKII (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II). We found specific regulation of phosphorylation sites on six ion channels and transporters that mediate increased ion fluxes at higher heart rates, and we showed that phosphorylation of one of these, Ser(92) of the potassium channel KV7.1, increased current amplitude. Our data set represents a quantitative analysis of phosphorylated proteins regulated in vivo upon stimulation of seven-transmembrane receptors, and our findings reveal previously unknown phosphorylation sites that regulate myocardial contractility, suggesting new potential targets for the treatment of heart disease and hypertension. PMID:23737553

  2. Systematic Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation Networks From Phosphoproteomic Data*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chunxia; Ye, Mingliang; Liu, Zexian; Cheng, Han; Jiang, Xinning; Han, Guanghui; Songyang, Zhou; Tan, Yexiong; Wang, Hongyang; Ren, Jian; Xue, Yu; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, hundreds of protein kinases (PKs) specifically and precisely modify thousands of substrates at specific amino acid residues to faithfully orchestrate numerous biological processes, and reversibly determine the cellular dynamics and plasticity. Although over 100,000 phosphorylation sites (p-sites) have been experimentally identified from phosphoproteomic studies, the regulatory PKs for most of these sites still remain to be characterized. Here, we present a novel software package of iGPS for the prediction of in vivo site-specific kinase-substrate relations mainly from the phosphoproteomic data. By critical evaluations and comparisons, the performance of iGPS is satisfying and better than other existed tools. Based on the prediction results, we modeled protein phosphorylation networks and observed that the eukaryotic phospho-regulation is poorly conserved at the site and substrate levels. With an integrative procedure, we conducted a large-scale phosphorylation analysis of human liver and experimentally identified 9719 p-sites in 2998 proteins. Using iGPS, we predicted a human liver protein phosphorylation networks containing 12,819 potential site-specific kinase-substrate relations among 350 PKs and 962 substrates for 2633 p-sites. Further statistical analysis and comparison revealed that 127 PKs significantly modify more or fewer p-sites in the liver protein phosphorylation networks against the whole human protein phosphorylation network. The largest data set of the human liver phosphoproteome together with computational analyses can be useful for further experimental consideration. This work contributes to the understanding of phosphorylation mechanisms at the systemic level, and provides a powerful methodology for the general analysis of in vivo post-translational modifications regulating sub-proteomes. PMID:22798277

  3. Large-Scale Multiplexed Quantitative Discovery Proteomics Enabled by the Use of an 18O-Labeled “Universal” Reference Sample

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative comparison of protein abundances across a large number of biological or patient samples represents an important proteomics challenge that needs to be addressed for proteomics discovery applications. Herein, we describe a strategy that incorporates a stable isotope 18O-labeled ″universal″ reference sample as a comprehensive set of internal standards for analyzing large sample sets quantitatively. As a pooled sample, the 18O-labeled ″universal″ reference sample is spiked into each individually processed unlabeled biological sample and the peptide/protein abundances are quantified based on 16O/18O isotopic peptide pair abundance ratios that compare each unlabeled sample to the identical reference sample. This approach also allows for the direct application of label-free quantitation across the sample set simultaneously along with the labeling-approach (i.e., dual-quantitation) since each biological sample is unlabeled except for the labeled reference sample that is used as internal standards. The effectiveness of this approach for large-scale quantitative proteomics is demonstrated by its application to a set of 18 plasma samples from severe burn patients. When immunoaffinity depletion and cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation with high resolution LC-MS measurements were combined, a total of 312 plasma proteins were confidently identified and quantified with a minimum of two unique peptides per protein. The isotope labeling data was directly compared with the label-free 16O-MS intensity data extracted from the same data sets. The results showed that the 18O reference-based labeling approach had significantly better quantitative precision compared to the label-free approach. The relative abundance differences determined by the two approaches also displayed strong correlation, illustrating the complementary nature of the two quantitative methods. The simplicity of including the 18O-reference for accurate quantitation makes this

  4. A shotgun phosphoproteomics analysis of embryos in germinated maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tian-Cong; Meng, Ling-Bo; Yang, Chuan-Ping; Liu, Gui-Feng; Liu, Guan-Jun; Ma, Wei; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2008-11-01

    To better understand the role that reversible protein phosphorylation plays in seed germination, we initiated a phosphoproteomic investigation of embryos of germinated maize seeds. A total of 776 proteins including 39 kinases, 16 phosphatases, and 33 phosphoproteins containing 36 precise in vivo phosphorylation sites were identified. All the phosphorylation sites identified, with the exception of the phosphorylation site on HSP22, have not been reported previously (Lund et al. in J Biol Chem, 276, 29924-29929, 2001). Assayed with QRT-PCR, the transcripts of ten kinase genes were found to be dramatically up-regulated during seed germination and those of four phosphatase genes were up-regulated after germination, which indicated that reversible protein phosphorylation occurred and complex regulating networks were activated during this period. At least one-third of these phosphoproteins are key components involved in biological processes which relate to seed germination, such as DNA repair, gene transcription, RNA splicing and protein translation, suggesting that protein phosphorylation plays an important role in seed germination. As far as we know, this is the first phosphoproteomic study on a monocot and it will lay a solid foundation for further study of the molecular mechanisms of seed germination and seedling development. PMID:18726113

  5. Phosphopeptide enrichment using offline titanium dioxide columns for phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Rong; Veenstra, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Identification of phosphoproteins or phosphopeptides as cancer biomarkers is an emerging field in phosphoproteomics. Owing to the low stoichiometric nature of protein phosphorylation, phosphoproteins or phosphopeptides must be enriched prior to downstream mass spectrometry analysis. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been prevalently used to enrich phosphopeptides from complex proteome samples due to its high affinity for phosphopeptides, and the method is straightforward. In this protocol, an offline phosphopeptide enrichment procedure using TiO2 columns is described. Peptides from a proteome lysate are loaded onto a TiO2 column in an acidic environment, followed by column washing with aqueous, organic, and ammonium glutamate (NH4Glu) buffers at acidic conditions. Phosphopeptides are eluted using an ammonia solution at high pH. Use of NH4Glu significantly reduces nonspecific bindings while a high recovery rate (84 %) of phosphopeptides is retained. The method is optimized for large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis and phosphoprotein biomarker discovery starting from sub-milligram or milligrams of proteome samples. PMID:23625397

  6. Breast Cancer Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  7. Plug-and-play analysis of the human phosphoproteome by targeted high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Robert T; Searle, Brian C; Llovet, Ariadna; Villén, Judit

    2016-05-01

    Systematic approaches to studying cellular signaling require phosphoproteomic techniques that reproducibly measure the same phosphopeptides across multiple replicates, conditions, and time points. Here we present a method to mine information from large-scale, heterogeneous phosphoproteomics data sets to rapidly generate robust targeted mass spectrometry (MS) assays. We demonstrate the performance of our method by interrogating the IGF-1/AKT signaling pathway, showing that even rarely observed phosphorylation events can be consistently detected and precisely quantified. PMID:27018578

  8. Mechanisms of Soybean Roots' Tolerances to Salinity Revealed by Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Comparisons Between Two Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Pi, Erxu; Qu, Liqun; Hu, Jianwen; Huang, Yingying; Qiu, Lijuan; Lu, Hongfei; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Cong; Peng, Tingting; Zhao, Ying; Wang, Huizhong; Tsai, Sau-Na; Ngai, Saiming; Du, Liqun

    2016-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms underlying plant salinity tolerance provides valuable knowledgebase for effective crop improvement through genetic engineering. Current proteomic technologies, which support reliable and high-throughput analyses, have been broadly used for exploring sophisticated molecular networks in plants. In the current study, we compared phosphoproteomic and proteomic changes in roots of different soybean seedlings of a salt-tolerant cultivar (Wenfeng07) and a salt-sensitive cultivar (Union85140) induced by salt stress. The root samples of Wenfeng07 and Union85140 at three-trifoliate stage were collected at 0 h, 0.5 h, 1 h, 4 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h after been treated with 150 mm NaCl. LC-MS/MS based phosphoproteomic analysis of these samples identified a total of 2692 phosphoproteins and 5509 phosphorylation sites. Of these, 2344 phosphoproteins containing 3744 phosphorylation sites were quantitatively analyzed. Our results showed that 1163 phosphorylation sites were differentially phosphorylated in the two compared cultivars. Among them, 10 MYB/MYB transcription factor like proteins were identified with fluctuating phosphorylation modifications at different time points, indicating that their crucial roles in regulating flavonol accumulation might be mediated by phosphorylated modifications. In addition, the protein expression profiles of these two cultivars were compared using LC MS/MS based shotgun proteomic analysis, and expression pattern of all the 89 differentially expressed proteins were independently confirmed by qRT-PCR. Interestingly, the enzymes involved in chalcone metabolic pathway exhibited positive correlations with salt tolerance. We confirmed the functional relevance of chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes using soybean composites and Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, and found that their salt tolerance were positively regulated by chalcone synthase, but was negatively regulated by

  9. Phosphoproteomics reveals malaria parasite Protein Kinase G as a signalling hub regulating egress and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mahmood M.; Solyakov, Lev; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Flueck, Christian; Siddiqui, Faiza A.; Singh, Shailja; Mistry, Sharad; Viskaduraki, Maria; Lee, Kate; Hopp, Christine S.; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Doerig, Christian; Moon, Robert W.; Green, Judith L.; Holder, Anthony A.; Baker, David A.; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the key phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways in the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, remains rudimentary. Here we address this issue for the essential cGMP-dependent protein kinase, PfPKG. By employing chemical and genetic tools in combination with quantitative global phosphoproteomics, we identify the phosphorylation sites on 69 proteins that are direct or indirect cellular targets for PfPKG. These PfPKG targets include proteins involved in cell signalling, proteolysis, gene regulation, protein export and ion and protein transport, indicating that cGMP/PfPKG acts as a signalling hub that plays a central role in a number of core parasite processes. We also show that PfPKG activity is required for parasite invasion. This correlates with the finding that the calcium-dependent protein kinase, PfCDPK1, is phosphorylated by PfPKG, as are components of the actomyosin complex, providing mechanistic insight into the essential role of PfPKG in parasite egress and invasion. PMID:26149123

  10. Phosphoproteomics reveals malaria parasite Protein Kinase G as a signalling hub regulating egress and invasion.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mahmood M; Solyakov, Lev; Bottrill, Andrew R; Flueck, Christian; Siddiqui, Faiza A; Singh, Shailja; Mistry, Sharad; Viskaduraki, Maria; Lee, Kate; Hopp, Christine S; Chitnis, Chetan E; Doerig, Christian; Moon, Robert W; Green, Judith L; Holder, Anthony A; Baker, David A; Tobin, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the key phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways in the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, remains rudimentary. Here we address this issue for the essential cGMP-dependent protein kinase, PfPKG. By employing chemical and genetic tools in combination with quantitative global phosphoproteomics, we identify the phosphorylation sites on 69 proteins that are direct or indirect cellular targets for PfPKG. These PfPKG targets include proteins involved in cell signalling, proteolysis, gene regulation, protein export and ion and protein transport, indicating that cGMP/PfPKG acts as a signalling hub that plays a central role in a number of core parasite processes. We also show that PfPKG activity is required for parasite invasion. This correlates with the finding that the calcium-dependent protein kinase, PfCDPK1, is phosphorylated by PfPKG, as are components of the actomyosin complex, providing mechanistic insight into the essential role of PfPKG in parasite egress and invasion. PMID:26149123

  11. Phosphoproteomics Profiling of Tobacco Mature Pollen and Pollen Activated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fíla, Jan; Radau, Sonja; Matros, Andrea; Hartmann, Anja; Scholz, Uwe; Feciková, Jana; Mock, Hans-Peter; Čapková, Věra; Zahedi, René Peiman; Honys, David

    2016-04-01

    Tobacco mature pollen has extremely desiccated cytoplasm, and is metabolically quiescent. Upon re-hydration it becomes metabolically active and that results in later emergence of rapidly growing pollen tube. These changes in cytoplasm hydration and metabolic activity are accompanied by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we subjected mature pollen, 5-min-activated pollen, and 30-min-activated pollen to TCA/acetone protein extraction, trypsin digestion and phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide. The enriched fraction was subjected to nLC-MS/MS. We identified 471 phosphopeptides that carried 432 phosphorylation sites, position of which was exactly matched by mass spectrometry. These 471 phosphopeptides were assigned to 301 phosphoproteins, because some proteins carried more phosphorylation sites. Of the 13 functional groups, the majority of proteins were put into these categories: transcription, protein synthesis, protein destination and storage, and signal transduction. Many proteins were of unknown function, reflecting the fact that male gametophyte contains many specific proteins that have not been fully functionally annotated. The quantitative data highlighted the dynamics of protein phosphorylation during pollen activation; the identified phosphopeptides were divided into seven groups based on the regulatory trends. The major group comprised mature pollen-specific phosphopeptides that were dephosphorylated during pollen activation. Several phosphopeptides representing the same phosphoprotein had different regulation, which pinpointed the complexity of protein phosphorylation and its clear functional context. Collectively, we showed the first phosphoproteomics data on activated pollen where the position of phosphorylation sites was clearly demonstrated and regulatory kinetics was resolved. PMID:26792808

  12. Integrative Phosphoproteomics Links IL-23R Signaling with Metabolic Adaptation in Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lochmatter, Corinne; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D; Yu, Zhanru; Powrie, Fiona; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-23 mediated signal transduction represents a major molecular mechanism underlying the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition, emerging evidence supports the role of IL-23-driven Th17 cells in inflammation. Components of the IL-23 signaling pathway, such as IL-23R, JAK2 and STAT3, have been characterized, but elements unique to this network as compared to other interleukins have not been readily explored. In this study, we have undertaken an integrative phosphoproteomics approach to better characterise downstream signaling events. To this end, we performed and compared phosphopeptide and phosphoprotein enrichment methodologies after activation of T lymphocytes by IL-23. We demonstrate the complementary nature of the two phosphoenrichment approaches by maximizing the capture of phosphorylation events. A total of 8202 unique phosphopeptides, and 4317 unique proteins were identified, amongst which STAT3, PKM2, CDK6 and LASP-1 showed induction of specific phosphorylation not readily observed after IL-2 stimulation. Interestingly, quantitative analysis revealed predominant phosphorylation of pre-existing STAT3 nuclear subsets in addition to translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 within 30 min after IL-23 stimulation. After IL-23R activation, a small subset of PKM2 also translocates to the nucleus and may contribute to STAT3 phosphorylation, suggesting multiple cellular responses including metabolic adaptation. PMID:27080861

  13. Phosphoproteomic network analysis in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus reveals new candidates in egg activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongbo; Garcia-Vedrenne, Ana Elisa; Isserlin, Ruth; Lugowski, Andrew; Morada, Anthony; Sun, Alex; Miao, Yishen; Kuzmanov, Uros; Wan, Cuihong; Ma, Hongyue; Foltz, Kathy; Emili, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Fertilization triggers a dynamic symphony of molecular transformations induced by a rapid rise in intracellular calcium. Most prominent are surface alterations, metabolic activation, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell-cycle reentry. While the activation process appears to be broadly evolutionarily conserved, and protein phosphorylation is known to play a key role, the signaling networks mediating the response to fertilization are not well described. To address this gap, we performed a time course phosphoproteomic analysis of egg activation in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a system that offers biochemical tractability coupled with exquisite synchronicity. By coupling large-scale phosphopeptide enrichment with unbiased quantitative MS, we identified striking changes in global phosphoprotein patterns at 2- and 5-min postfertilization as compared to unfertilized eggs. Overall, we mapped 8796 distinct phosphosite modifications on 2833 phosphoproteins, of which 15% were differentially regulated in early egg activation. Activated kinases were identified by phosphosite mapping, while enrichment analyses revealed conserved signaling cascades not previously associated with egg activation. This work represents the most comprehensive study of signaling associated with egg activation to date, suggesting novel mechanisms that can be experimentally tested and providing a valuable resource for the broader research community. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002239 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002239). PMID:26227301

  14. Phosphoproteome dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under heat shock and cold stress

    PubMed Central

    Kanshin, Evgeny; Kubiniok, Peter; Thattikota, Yogitha; D'Amours, Damien; Thibault, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells and organisms to survive and function through changes in temperature evolved from their specific adaptations to nonoptimal growth conditions. Responses to elevated temperatures have been studied in yeast and other model organisms using transcriptome profiling and provided valuable biological insights on molecular mechanisms involved in stress tolerance and adaptation to adverse environment. In contrast, little is known about rapid signaling events associated with changes in temperature. To gain a better understanding of global changes in protein phosphorylation in response to heat and cold, we developed a high temporal resolution phosphoproteomics protocol to study cell signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The method allowed for quantitative analysis of phosphodynamics on 2,777 phosphosites from 1,228 proteins. The correlation of kinetic profiles between kinases and their substrates provided a predictive tool to identify new putative substrates for kinases such as Cdc28 and PKA. Cell cycle analyses revealed that the increased phosphorylation of Cdc28 at its inhibitory site Y19 during heat shock is an adaptive response that delays cell cycle progression under stress conditions. The cellular responses to heat and cold were associated with extensive changes in phosphorylation on proteins implicated in transcription, protein folding and degradation, cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis. PMID:26040289

  15. Integrative Phosphoproteomics Links IL-23R Signaling with Metabolic Adaptation in Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lochmatter, Corinne; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D.; Yu, Zhanru; Powrie, Fiona; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-23 mediated signal transduction represents a major molecular mechanism underlying the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition, emerging evidence supports the role of IL-23-driven Th17 cells in inflammation. Components of the IL-23 signaling pathway, such as IL-23R, JAK2 and STAT3, have been characterized, but elements unique to this network as compared to other interleukins have not been readily explored. In this study, we have undertaken an integrative phosphoproteomics approach to better characterise downstream signaling events. To this end, we performed and compared phosphopeptide and phosphoprotein enrichment methodologies after activation of T lymphocytes by IL-23. We demonstrate the complementary nature of the two phosphoenrichment approaches by maximizing the capture of phosphorylation events. A total of 8202 unique phosphopeptides, and 4317 unique proteins were identified, amongst which STAT3, PKM2, CDK6 and LASP-1 showed induction of specific phosphorylation not readily observed after IL-2 stimulation. Interestingly, quantitative analysis revealed predominant phosphorylation of pre-existing STAT3 nuclear subsets in addition to translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 within 30 min after IL-23 stimulation. After IL-23R activation, a small subset of PKM2 also translocates to the nucleus and may contribute to STAT3 phosphorylation, suggesting multiple cellular responses including metabolic adaptation. PMID:27080861

  16. Human cytomegalovirus pUL97 kinase induces global changes in the infected cell phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Oberstein, Adam; Perlman, David H.; Shenk, Thomas; Terry, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Replication of human cytomegalovirus is regulated in part by cellular kinases and the single viral Ser/Thr kinase, pUL97. The virus-coded kinase augments the replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) by enabling nuclear egress and altering cell cycle progression. These roles are accomplished through direct phosphorylation of nuclear lamins and the retinoblastoma protein, respectively. In an effort to identify additional pUL97 substrates, we analyzed the phosphoproteome of SILAC-labeled human fibroblasts during infection with either wild-type HCMV or a pUL97 kinase-dead mutant virus. Phosphopeptides were enriched over a titanium dioxide matrix and analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometry. We identified 157 unambiguous phosphosites from 106 cellular and 17 viral proteins whose phosphorylation required UL97. Analysis of peptides containing these sites allowed the identification of several candidate pUL97 phosphorylation motifs, including a completely novel phosphorylation motif, LxSP. Substrates harboring the LxSP motif were enriched in nucleocytoplasmic transport functions, including a number of components of the nuclear pore complex. These results extend the known functions of pUL97 and suggest that modulation of nuclear pore function may be important during HCMV replication. PMID:25867546

  17. Semi-quantitative analysis of solid waste flows from nano-enabled consumer products in Europe, Denmark and the United Kingdom - Abundance, distribution and management.

    PubMed

    Heggelund, Laura; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Boldrin, Alessio

    2016-10-01

    Many nano-enabled consumer products are known to be in the global market. At the same, little is known about the quantity, type, location etc. of the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) inside the products. This limits the scientific investigations of potential environmental effects of these materials, and especially the knowledge of ENM behaviour and potential effects at the end-of-life stage of the products is scarce. To gain a better understanding of the end-of-life waste treatment of nano-enabled consumer product, we provide an overview of the ENMs flowing into and throughout waste systems in Europe, Denmark and the United Kingdom. Using a nanoproduct inventory (nanodb.dk), we performed a four-step analysis to estimate the most abundant ENMs and in which waste fractions they are present. We found that in terms of number of products: (i) nano silver is the most used ENM in consumer products, and (ii) plastic from used product containers is the largest waste fraction also comprising a large variety of ENMs, though possibly in very small masses. Also, we showed that the local waste management system can influence the distribution of ENMs. It is recommended that future research focus on recycling and landfilling of nano-enabled products since these compartments represent hot spots for end-of-life nanoproducts. PMID:27311351

  18. Rapid Phosphoproteomic Effects of Abscisic Acid (ABA) on Wild-Type and ABA Receptor-Deficient A. thaliana Mutants*

    PubMed Central

    Minkoff, Benjamin B.; Stecker, Kelly E.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)1 is a plant hormone that controls many aspects of plant growth, including seed germination, stomatal aperture size, and cellular drought response. ABA interacts with a unique family of 14 receptor proteins. This interaction leads to the activation of a family of protein kinases, SnRK2s, which in turn phosphorylate substrates involved in many cellular processes. The family of receptors appears functionally redundant. To observe a measurable phenotype, four of the fourteen receptors have to be mutated to create a multilocus loss-of-function quadruple receptor (QR) mutant, which is much less sensitive to ABA than wild-type (WT) plants. Given these phenotypes, we asked whether or not a difference in ABA response between the WT and QR backgrounds would manifest on a phosphorylation level as well. We tested WT and QR mutant ABA response using isotope-assisted quantitative phosphoproteomics to determine what ABA-induced phosphorylation changes occur in WT plants within 5 min of ABA treatment and how that phosphorylation pattern is altered in the QR mutant. We found multiple ABA-induced phosphorylation changes that occur within 5 min of treatment, including three SnRK2 autophosphorylation events and phosphorylation on SnRK2 substrates. The majority of robust ABA-dependent phosphorylation changes observed were partially diminished in the QR mutant, whereas many smaller ABA-dependent phosphorylation changes observed in the WT were not responsive to ABA in the mutant. A single phosphorylation event was increased in response to ABA treatment in both the WT and QR mutant. A portion of the discovery data was validated using selected reaction monitoring-based targeted measurements on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. These data suggest that different subsets of phosphorylation events depend upon different subsets of the ABA receptor family to occur. Altogether, these data expand our understanding of the model by which the family of ABA receptors directs

  19. Radiosensitization of Human Leukemic HL-60 Cells by ATR Kinase Inhibitor (VE-821): Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Šalovská, Barbora; Fabrik, Ivo; Ďurišová, Kamila; Link, Marek; Vávrová, Jiřina; Řezáčová, Martina; Tichý, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapy are frequently used in oncology. DNA damage response (DDR)—triggered by radiation-induced double strand breaks—is orchestrated mainly by three Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs): Ataxia teleangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ATM and Rad3-related kinase (ATR). Their activation promotes cell-cycle arrest and facilitates DNA damage repair, resulting in radioresistance. Recently developed specific ATR inhibitor, VE-821 (3-amino-6-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-N-phenylpyrazine-2-carboxamide), has been reported to have a significant radio- and chemo-sensitizing effect delimited to cancer cells (largely p53-deficient) without affecting normal cells. In this study, we employed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to describe the mechanism of the radiosensitizing effect of VE-821 in human promyelocytic leukemic cells HL-60 (p53-negative). Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC)-prefractionation with TiO2-enrichment and nano-liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed 9834 phosphorylation sites. Proteins with differentially up-/down-regulated phosphorylation were mostly localized in the nucleus and were involved in cellular processes such as DDR, all phases of the cell cycle, and cell division. Moreover, sequence motif analysis revealed significant changes in the activities of kinases involved in these processes. Taken together, our data indicates that ATR kinase has multiple roles in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle and that its inhibitor VE-821 is a potent radiosensitizing agent for p53-negative HL-60 cells. PMID:25003641

  20. A pipeline for 15N metabolic labeling and phosphoproteome analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, Benjamin B; Burch, Heather L; Sussman, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Within the past two decades, the biological application of mass spectrometric technology has seen great advances in terms of innovations in hardware, software, and reagents. Concurrently, the burgeoning field of proteomics has followed closely (Yates et al., Annu Rev Biomed Eng 11:49-79, 2009)-and with it, importantly, the ability to globally assay altered levels of posttranslational modifications in response to a variety of stimuli. Though many posttranslational modifications have been described, a major focus of these efforts has been protein-level phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues (Schreiber et al., Proteomics 8:4416-4432, 2008). The desire to examine changes across signal transduction cascades and networks in their entirety using a single mass spectrometric analysis accounts for this push-namely, preservation and enrichment of the transient yet informative phosphoryl side group. Analyzing global changes in phosphorylation allows inferences surrounding cascades/networks as a whole to be made. Towards this same end, much work has explored ways to permit quantitation and combine experimental samples such that more than one replicate or experimental condition can be identically processed and analyzed, cutting down on experimental and instrument variability, in addition to instrument run time. One such technique that has emerged is metabolic labeling (Gouw et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 9:11-24, 2010), wherein biological samples are labeled in living cells with nonradioactive heavy isotopes such as (15)N or (13)C. Since metabolic labeling in living organisms allows one to combine the material to be processed at the earliest possible step, before the tissue is homogenized, it provides a unique and excellent method for comparing experimental samples in a high-throughput, reproducible fashion with minimal technical variability. This chapter describes a pipeline used for labeling living Arabidopsis thaliana plants with nitrogen-15 ((15)N) and how

  1. Discovery of O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate Modified Proteins in Large-scale Phosphoproteomics Data*

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylated O-GlcNAc is a novel post-translational modification that has so far only been found on the neuronal protein AP180 from the rat (Graham et al., J. Proteome Res. 2011, 10, 2725–2733). Upon collision induced dissociation, the modification generates a highly mass deficient fragment ion (m/z 284.0530) that can be used as a reporter for the identification of phosphorylated O-GlcNAc. Using a publically available mouse brain phosphoproteome data set, we employed our recently developed Oscore software to re-evaluate high resolution/high accuracy tandem mass spectra and discovered the modification on 23 peptides corresponding to 11 mouse proteins. The systematic analysis of 220 candidate phosphoGlcNAc tandem mass spectra as well as a synthetic standard enabled the dissection of the major phosphoGlcNAc fragmentation pathways, suggesting that the modification is O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate. We find that the classical O-GlcNAc modification often exists on the same peptides indicating that O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate may biosynthetically arise in two steps involving the O-GlcNAc transferase and a currently unknown kinase. Many of the identified proteins are involved in synaptic transmission and for Ca2+/calmodulin kinase IV, the O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate modification was found in the vicinity of two autophosphorylation sites required for full activation of the kinase suggesting a potential regulatory role for O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate. By re-analyzing mass spectrometric data from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, our study also identified Zinc finger protein 462 (ZNF462) as the first human O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate modified protein. Collectively, the data suggests that O-GlcNAc-6-phosphate is a general post-translation modification of mammalian proteins with a variety of possible cellular functions. PMID:22826440

  2. Identification of targets of c-Src tyrosine kinase by chemical complementation and phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Isabel Martinez; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Zhong, Jun; Molina, Henrik; Jacob, Harrys K C; Herbst-Robinson, Katie; Dancy, Beverley M; Katju, Vikram; Bose, Ron; Zhang, Jin; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cole, Philip A

    2012-08-01

    The cellular proto-oncogene c-Src is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase involved in cell growth and cytoskeletal regulation. Despite being dysregulated in a variety of human cancers, its precise functions are not fully understood. Identification of the substrates of c-Src remains a major challenge, because there is no simple way to directly stimulate its activity. Here we combine the chemical rescue of mutant c-Src and global quantitative phosphoproteomics to obtain the first high resolution snapshot of the range of tyrosine phosphorylation events that occur in the cell immediately after specific c-Src stimulation. After enrichment by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, we identified 29 potential novel c-Src substrate proteins. Tyrosine phosphopeptide mapping allowed the identification of 382 nonredundant tyrosine phosphopeptides on 213 phosphoproteins. Stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture-based quantitation allowed the detection of 97 nonredundant tyrosine phosphopeptides whose level of phosphorylation is increased by c-Src. A large number of previously uncharacterized c-Src putative protein targets and phosphorylation sites are presented here, a majority of which play key roles in signaling and cytoskeletal networks, particularly in cell adhesion. Integrin signaling and focal adhesion kinase signaling pathway are two of the most altered pathways upon c-Src activation through chemical rescue. In this context, our study revealed the temporal connection between c-Src activation and the GTPase Rap1, known to stimulate integrin-dependent adhesion. Chemical rescue of c-Src provided a tool to dissect the spatiotemporal mechanism of activation of the Rap1 guanine exchange factor, C3G, one of the identified potential c-Src substrates that plays a role in focal adhesion signaling. In addition to unveiling the role of c-Src in the cell and, specifically, in the Crk-C3G-Rap1 pathway, these results exemplify a strategy for obtaining a comprehensive understanding of

  3. Wrangling Phosphoproteomic Data to Elucidate Cancer Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Mark L.; Lee, Wan-Jui; van der Maaten, Laurens; Shannon, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The interpretation of biological data sets is essential for generating hypotheses that guide research, yet modern methods of global analysis challenge our ability to discern meaningful patterns and then convey results in a way that can be easily appreciated. Proteomic data is especially challenging because mass spectrometry detectors often miss peptides in complex samples, resulting in sparsely populated data sets. Using the R programming language and techniques from the field of pattern recognition, we have devised methods to resolve and evaluate clusters of proteins related by their pattern of expression in different samples in proteomic data sets. We examined tyrosine phosphoproteomic data from lung cancer samples. We calculated dissimilarities between the proteins based on Pearson or Spearman correlations and on Euclidean distances, whilst dealing with large amounts of missing data. The dissimilarities were then used as feature vectors in clustering and visualization algorithms. The quality of the clusterings and visualizations were evaluated internally based on the primary data and externally based on gene ontology and protein interaction networks. The results show that t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) followed by minimum spanning tree methods groups sparse proteomic data into meaningful clusters more effectively than other methods such as k-means and classical multidimensional scaling. Furthermore, our results show that using a combination of Spearman correlation and Euclidean distance as a dissimilarity representation increases the resolution of clusters. Our analyses show that many clusters contain one or more tyrosine kinases and include known effectors as well as proteins with no known interactions. Visualizing these clusters as networks elucidated previously unknown tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathways that drive cancer. Our approach can be applied to other data types, and can be easily adopted because open source software

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of in Vivo Phosphoproteome of Mouse Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kwang; Sim, JuHee; Kim, Sun Ju; Sung, Eunji; Kim, Jin Young; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Sangkyu

    2015-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues are some of the most widespread reversible post-translational modifications. Microsomes are vesicle-like bodies, not ordinarily present within living cells, which form from pieces of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), plasma membrane, mitochondria, or Golgi apparatus of broken eukaryotic cells. Here we investigated the total phosphoproteome of mouse liver microsomes (MLMs) using TiO2 enrichment of phosphopeptides coupled to on-line 2D-LC-MS/MS. In total, 699 phosphorylation sites in 527 proteins were identified in MLMs. When compared with the current phosphoSitePlus database, 155 novel phosphoproteins were identified in MLM. The distributions of phosphosites were 89.4, 8.0, and 2.6% for phosphoserine, phosphotheronine, and phosphotyrosine, respectively. By Motif-X analysis, eight Ser motifs and one Thr motif were found, and five acidic, two basophilic-, and two proline-directed motifs were assigned. The potential functions of phosphoproteins in MLM were assigned by Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. In GO annotation, phosphorylated microsomal proteins were involved in mRNA processing, mRNA metabolic processes, and RNA splicing. In the KEGG pathway analysis, phosphorylated microsomal proteins were highly enriched in ribosome protein processing in ER and ribosomes and in RNA transport. Furthermore, we determined that 52 and 23 phosphoproteins were potential substrates of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and casein kinase II, respectively, many of which are 40S/60S ribosomal proteins. Overall, our results provide an overview of features of protein phosphorylation in MLMs that should be a valuable resource for the future understanding of protein synthesis or translation involving phosphorylation. PMID:26487105

  5. Enabling comparative gene expression studies of thyroid hormone action through the development of a flexible real-time quantitative PCR assay for use across multiple anuran indicator and sentinel species.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Propper, Catherine R; Helbing, Caren C

    2014-03-01

    Studies performed across diverse frog species have made substantial contributions to our understanding of basic vertebrate development and the natural or anthropogenic environmental factors impacting sensitive life stages. Because, anurans are developmental models, provide ecosystems services, and act as sentinels for the identification of environmental chemical contaminants that interfere with thyroid hormone (TH) action during postembryonic development, there is demand for flexible assessment techniques that can be applied to multiple species. As part of the "thyroid assays across indicator and sentinel species" (TAXISS) initiative, we have designed and validated a series of cross-species real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) primer sets that provide information on transcriptome components in evolutionarily distant anurans. Validation for fifteen gene transcripts involved a rigorous three-tiered quality control within tissue/development-specific contexts. Assay performance was confirmed on multiple tissues (tail fin, liver, brain, and intestine) of Rana catesbeiana and Xenopus laevis tadpoles enabling comparisons between tissues and generation of response profiles to exogenous TH. This revealed notable differences in TH-responsive gene transcripts including thra, thrb, thibz, klf9, col1a2, fn1, plp1, mmp2, timm50, otc, and dio2, suggesting differential regulation and susceptibility to contaminant effects. Evidence for the applicability of the TAXISS anuran qPCR assay across seven other species is also provided with five frog families represented and its utility in defining genome structure was demonstrated. This novel validated approach will enable meaningful comparative studies between frog species and aid in extending knowledge of developmental regulatory pathways and the impact of environmental factors on TH signaling in frog species for which little or no genetic information is currently available. PMID:24503578

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Activated ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of Cytoplasmic Substrates Identified by Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Screen.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Arthur, Jonathan W; Graham, Mark E; Lavin, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signaling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle checkpoints, initiating DNA repair, and regulating gene expression. ATM kinase can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including oxidative stress. Here, we confirmed activation of cytoplasmic ATM by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. Then we employed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites, including 6,686 high-confidence sites mapping to 2,536 unique proteins. A total of 62 differentially phosphorylated peptides were identified; of these, 43 were phosphorylated in control but not in A-T cells, and 19 varied in their level of phosphorylation. Motif enrichment analysis of phosphopeptides revealed that consensus ATM serine glutamine sites were overrepresented. When considering phosphorylation events, only observed in control cells (not observed in A-T cells), with predicted ATM sites phosphoSerine/phosphoThreonine glutamine, we narrowed this list to 11 candidate ATM-dependent cytoplasmic proteins. Two of these 11 were previously described as ATM substrates (HMGA1 and UIMCI/RAP80), another five were identified in a whole cell extract phosphoproteomic screens, and the remaining four proteins had not been identified previously in DNA damage response screens. We validated the phosphorylation of three of these proteins (oxidative stress responsive 1 (OSR1), HDGF, and ccdc82) as ATM dependent after H2O2 exposure, and another protein (S100A11) demonstrated ATM

  7. A Phosphoproteomic Comparison of B-RAFV600E and MKK1/2 Inhibitors in Melanoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Scott A.; Houel, Stephane; Lee, Thomas; Wang, Nan; Old, William M.; Ahn, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of oncogenic B-RAFV600E and MKK1/2 have yielded remarkable responses in B-RAFV600E-positive melanoma patients. However, the efficacy of these inhibitors is limited by the inevitable onset of resistance. Despite the fact that these inhibitors target the same pathway, combination treatment with B-RAFV600E and MKK1/2 inhibitors has been shown to improve both response rates and progression-free survival in B-RAFV600E melanoma patients. To provide insight into the molecular nature of the combinatorial response, we used quantitative mass spectrometry to characterize the inhibitor-dependent phosphoproteome of human melanoma cells treated with the B-RAFV600E inhibitor PLX4032 (vemurafenib) or the MKK1/2 inhibitor AZD6244 (selumetinib). In three replicate experiments, we quantified changes at a total of 23,986 phosphosites on 4784 proteins. This included 1317 phosphosites that reproducibly decreased in response to at least one inhibitor. Phosphosites that responded to both inhibitors grouped into networks that included the nuclear pore complex, growth factor signaling, and transcriptional regulators. Although the majority of phosphosites were responsive to both inhibitors, we identified 16 sites that decreased only in response to PLX4032, suggesting rare instances where oncogenic B-RAF signaling occurs in an MKK1/2-independent manner. Only two phosphosites were identified that appeared to be uniquely responsive to AZD6244. When cells were treated with the combination of AZD6244 and PLX4032 at subsaturating concentrations (30 nm), responses at nearly all phosphosites were additive. We conclude that AZD6244 does not substantially widen the range of phosphosites inhibited by PLX4032 and that the benefit of the drug combination is best explained by their additive effects on suppressing ERK1/2 signaling. Comparison of our results to another recent ERK1/2 phosphoproteomics study revealed a surprising degree of variability in the sensitivity of phosphosites to MKK1

  8. Phosphoproteomic analysis identifies the tumor suppressor PDCD4 as a RSK substrate negatively regulated by 14-3-3

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Jacob A.; Geraghty, Kathryn M.; Lavoie, Geneviève; Kanshin, Evgeny; Tcherkezian, Joseph; Calabrese, Viviane; Jeschke, Grace R.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Blenis, John; Thibault, Pierre; Roux, Philippe P.

    2014-01-01

    The Ras/MAPK signaling cascade regulates various biological functions, including cell growth and proliferation. As such, this pathway is frequently deregulated in several types of cancer, including most cases of melanoma. RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) is a MAPK-activated protein kinase required for melanoma growth and proliferation, but relatively little is known about its exact function and the nature of its substrates. Herein, we used a quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to define the signaling networks regulated by RSK in melanoma. To more accurately predict direct phosphorylation substrates, we defined the RSK consensus phosphorylation motif and found significant overlap with the binding consensus of 14-3-3 proteins. We thus characterized the phospho-dependent 14-3-3 interactome in melanoma cells and found that a large proportion of 14-3-3 binding proteins are also potential RSK substrates. Our results show that RSK phosphorylates the tumor suppressor PDCD4 (programmed cell death protein 4) on two serine residues (Ser76 and Ser457) that regulate its subcellular localization and interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. We found that 14-3-3 binding promotes PDCD4 degradation, suggesting an important role for RSK in the inactivation of PDCD4 in melanoma. In addition to this tumor suppressor, our results suggest the involvement of RSK in a vast array of unexplored biological functions with relevance in oncogenesis. PMID:25002506

  9. Phosphoproteomic profiling identifies focal adhesion kinase as a mediator of docetaxel resistance in castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian Y; Hochgräfe, Falko; Lin, Hui-Ming; Castillo, Lesley; Wu, Jianmin; Raftery, Mark J; Martin Shreeve, S; Horvath, Lisa G; Daly, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Docetaxel remains the standard-of-care for men diagnosed with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, only approximately 50% of patients benefit from treatment and all develop docetaxel-resistant disease. Here, we characterize global perturbations in tyrosine kinase signaling associated with docetaxel resistance and thereby develop a potential therapeutic strategy to reverse this phenotype. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified that metastatic docetaxel-resistant prostate cancer cell lines (DU145-Rx and PC3-Rx) exhibit increased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on Y397 and Y576, in comparison with parental controls (DU145 and PC3, respectively). Bioinformatic analyses identified perturbations in pathways regulating focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton and in protein-protein interaction networks related to these pathways in docetaxel-resistant cells. Treatment with the FAK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) PF-00562271 reduced FAK phosphorylation in the resistant cells, but did not affect cell viability or Akt phosphorylation. Docetaxel administration reduced FAK and Akt phosphorylation, whereas cotreatment with PF-00562271 and docetaxel resulted in an additive attenuation of FAK and Akt phosphorylation and overcame the chemoresistant phenotype. The enhanced efficacy of cotreatment was due to increased autophagic cell death, rather than apoptosis. These data strongly support that enhanced FAK activation mediates chemoresistance in CRPC, and identify a potential clinical niche for FAK TKIs, where coadministration with docetaxel may be used in patients with CRPC to overcome chemoresistance. PMID:24194567

  10. Phosphoproteomic profiling of tumor tissues identifies HSP27 Ser82 phosphorylation as a robust marker of early ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zahari, Muhammad Saddiq; Wu, Xinyan; Pinto, Sneha M.; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Kim, Min-Sik; Fetics, Barry; Philip, Mathew; Barnes, Sheri R.; Godfrey, Beverly; Gabrielson, Edward; Nevo, Erez; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Delays between tissue collection and tissue fixation result in ischemia and ischemia-associated changes in protein phosphorylation levels, which can misguide the examination of signaling pathway status. To identify a biomarker that serves as a reliable indicator of ischemic changes that tumor tissues undergo, we subjected harvested xenograft tumors to room temperature for 0, 2, 10 and 30 minutes before freezing in liquid nitrogen. Multiplex TMT-labeling was conducted to achieve precise quantitation, followed by TiO2 phosphopeptide enrichment and high resolution mass spectrometry profiling. LC-MS/MS analyses revealed phosphorylation level changes of a number of phosphosites in the ischemic samples. The phosphorylation of one of these sites, S82 of the heat shock protein 27 kDa (HSP27), was especially abundant and consistently upregulated in tissues with delays in freezing as short as 2 minutes. In order to eliminate effects of ischemia, we employed a novel cryogenic biopsy device which begins freezing tissues in situ before they are excised. Using this device, we showed that the upregulation of phosphorylation of S82 on HSP27 was abrogated. We thus demonstrate that our cryogenic biopsy device can eliminate ischemia-induced phosphoproteome alterations, and measurements of S82 on HSP27 can be used as a robust marker of ischemia in tissues. PMID:26329039

  11. Phosphoproteome analysis demonstrates the potential role of THRAP3 phosphorylation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Ino, Yoko; Arakawa, Noriaki; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Hisashi; Toda, Tosifusa

    2016-04-01

    Elucidating the androgen-independent growth mechanism is critical for developing effective treatment strategies to combat androgen-independent prostate cancer. We performed a comparative phosphoproteome analysis using a prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, and an LNCaP-derived androgen-independent cell line, LNCaP-AI, to identify phosphoproteins involved in this mechanism. We performed quantitative comparisons of the phosphopeptide levels in tryptic digests of protein extracts from these cell lines using MS. We found that the levels of 69 phosphopeptides in 66 proteins significantly differed between LNCaP and LNCaP-AI. In particular, we focused on thyroid hormone receptor associated protein 3 (THRAP3), which is a known transcriptional coactivator of the androgen receptor. The phosphorylation level of THRAP3 was significantly lower at S248 and S253 in LNCaP-AI cells. Furthermore, pull-down assays showed that 32 proteins uniquely bound to the nonphosphorylatable mutant form of THRAP3, whereas 31 other proteins uniquely bound to the phosphorylation-mimic form. Many of the differentially interacting proteins were identified as being involved with RNA splicing and processing. These results suggest that the phosphorylation state of THRAP3 at S248 and S253 might be involved in the mechanism of androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth by changing the interaction partners. PMID:26841317

  12. Phosphoproteomic screening identifies Rab GTPases as novel downstream targets of PINK1.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Chiang; Kondapalli, Chandana; Lehneck, Ronny; Procter, James B; Dill, Brian D; Woodroof, Helen I; Gourlay, Robert; Peggie, Mark; Macartney, Thomas J; Corti, Olga; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Campbell, David G; Itzen, Aymelt; Trost, Matthias; Muqit, Miratul Mk

    2015-11-12

    Mutations in the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) are causative of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). We have previously reported that PINK1 is activated by mitochondrial depolarisation and phosphorylates serine 65 (Ser(65)) of the ubiquitin ligase Parkin and ubiquitin to stimulate Parkin E3 ligase activity. Here, we have employed quantitative phosphoproteomics to search for novel PINK1-dependent phosphorylation targets in HEK (human embryonic kidney) 293 cells stimulated by mitochondrial depolarisation. This led to the identification of 14,213 phosphosites from 4,499 gene products. Whilst most phosphosites were unaffected, we strikingly observed three members of a sub-family of Rab GTPases namely Rab8A, 8B and 13 that are all phosphorylated at the highly conserved residue of serine 111 (Ser(111)) in response to PINK1 activation. Using phospho-specific antibodies raised against Ser(111) of each of the Rabs, we demonstrate that Rab Ser(111) phosphorylation occurs specifically in response to PINK1 activation and is abolished in HeLa PINK1 knockout cells and mutant PINK1 PD patient-derived fibroblasts stimulated by mitochondrial depolarisation. We provide evidence that Rab8A GTPase Ser(111) phosphorylation is not directly regulated by PINK1 in vitro and demonstrate in cells the time course of Ser(111) phosphorylation of Rab8A, 8B and 13 is markedly delayed compared to phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser(65). We further show mechanistically that phosphorylation at Ser(111) significantly impairs Rab8A activation by its cognate guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), Rabin8 (by using the Ser111Glu phosphorylation mimic). These findings provide the first evidence that PINK1 is able to regulate the phosphorylation of Rab GTPases and indicate that monitoring phosphorylation of Rab8A/8B/13 at Ser(111) may represent novel biomarkers of PINK1 activity in vivo. Our findings also suggest that disruption of Rab GTPase-mediated signalling may represent a major mechanism

  13. Searching for novel Cdk5 substrates in brain by comparative phosphoproteomics of wild type and Cdk5-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vallejos, Erick; Utreras, Elías; Bórquez, Daniel A; Prochazkova, Michaela; Terse, Anita; Jaffe, Howard; Toledo, Andrea; Arruti, Cristina; Pant, Harish C; Kulkarni, Ashok B; González-Billault, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is the most common post-translational modification that regulates several pivotal functions in cells. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase which is mostly active in the nervous system. It regulates several biological processes such as neuronal migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity among others. In search for novel substrates of Cdk5 in the brain we performed quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis, isolating phosphoproteins from whole brain derived from E18.5 Cdk5+/+ and Cdk5-/- embryos, using an Immobilized Metal-Ion Affinity Chromatography (IMAC), which specifically binds to phosphorylated proteins. The isolated phosphoproteins were eluted and isotopically labeled for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry identification. We found 40 proteins that showed decreased phosphorylation at Cdk5-/- brains. In addition, out of these 40 hypophosphorylated proteins we characterized two proteins, :MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich protein Kinase C substrate) and Grin1 (G protein regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1). MARCKS is known to be phosphorylated by Cdk5 in chick neural cells while Grin1 has not been reported to be phosphorylated by Cdk5. When these proteins were overexpressed in N2A neuroblastoma cell line along with p35, serine phosphorylation in their Cdk5 motifs was found to be increased. In contrast, treatments with roscovitine, the Cdk5 inhibitor, resulted in an opposite effect on serine phosphorylation in N2A cells and primary hippocampal neurons transfected with MARCKS. In summary, the results presented here identify Grin 1 as novel Cdk5 substrate and confirm previously identified MARCKS as a a bona fide Cdk5 substrate. PMID:24658276

  14. Phosphoproteome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and its dynamics during nitrogen starvation

    PubMed Central

    Spät, Philipp; Maček, Boris; Forchhammer, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have shaped the earth's biosphere as the first oxygenic photoautotrophs and still play an important role in many ecosystems. The ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions is an essential characteristic in order to ensure survival. To this end, numerous studies have shown that bacteria use protein post-translational modifications such as Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in cell signaling, adaptation, and regulation. Nevertheless, our knowledge of cyanobacterial phosphoproteomes and their dynamic response to environmental stimuli is relatively limited. In this study, we applied gel-free methods and high accuracy mass spectrometry toward the detection of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation events in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We could identify over 300 phosphorylation events in cultures grown on nitrate as exclusive nitrogen source. Chemical dimethylation labeling was applied to investigate proteome and phosphoproteome dynamics during nitrogen starvation. Our dataset describes the most comprehensive (phospho)proteome of Synechocystis to date, identifying 2382 proteins and 183 phosphorylation events and quantifying 2111 proteins and 148 phosphorylation events during nitrogen starvation. Global protein phosphorylation levels were increased in response to nitrogen depletion after 24 h. Among the proteins with increased phosphorylation, the PII signaling protein showed the highest fold-change, serving as positive control. Other proteins with increased phosphorylation levels comprised functions in photosynthesis and in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. This study reveals dynamics of Synechocystis phosphoproteome in response to environmental stimuli and suggests an important role of protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in fundamental mechanisms of homeostatic control in cyanobacteria. PMID:25873915

  15. Phosphoproteome of Human Glioblastoma Initiating Cells Reveals Novel Signaling Regulators Encoded by the Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Ao-Kondo, Hiroko; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Akiyama, Tetsu; Oyama, Masaaki

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive tumors with poor prognosis. Although various studies have been performed so far, there are not effective treatments for patients with glioblastoma. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to systematically elucidate the aberrant signaling machinery activated in this malignant brain tumor, we investigated phosphoproteome dynamics of glioblastoma initiating cells using high-resolution nanoflow LC-MS/MS system in combination with SILAC technology. Through phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide beads, a total of 6,073 phosphopeptides from 2,282 phosphorylated proteins were identified based on the two peptide fragmentation methodologies of collision induced dissociation and higher-energy C-trap dissociation. The SILAC-based quantification described 516 up-regulated and 275 down-regulated phosphorylation sites upon epidermal growth factor stimulation, including the comprehensive status of the phosphorylation sites on stem cell markers such as nestin. Very intriguingly, our in-depth phosphoproteome analysis led to identification of novel phosphorylated molecules encoded by the undefined sequence regions of the human transcripts, one of which was regulated upon external stimulation in human glioblastoma initiating cells. Conclusions/Significance Our result unveils an expanded diversity of the regulatory phosphoproteome defined by the human transcriptome. PMID:22912867

  16. Sensitive kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics for identifying direct kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Wen-Horng; Iliuk, Anton; Hu, Lianghai; Galan, Jacob A; Yu, Shuai; Hans, Michael; Geahlen, Robert L; Tao, W Andy

    2012-04-10

    Our understanding of the molecular control of many disease pathologies requires the identification of direct substrates targeted by specific protein kinases. Here we describe an integrated proteomic strategy, termed kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics, which combines a sensitive kinase reaction with endogenous kinase-dependent phosphoproteomics to identify direct substrates of protein kinases. The unique in vitro kinase reaction is carried out in a highly efficient manner using a pool of peptides derived directly from cellular kinase substrates and then dephosphorylated as substrate candidates. The resulting newly phosphorylated peptides are then isolated and identified by mass spectrometry. A further comparison of these in vitro phosphorylated peptides with phosphopeptides derived from endogenous proteins isolated from cells in which the kinase is either active or inhibited reveals new candidate protein substrates. The kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics strategy was applied to identify unique substrates of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a protein-tyrosine kinase with duel properties of an oncogene and a tumor suppressor in distinctive cell types. We identified 64 and 23 direct substrates of Syk specific to B cells and breast cancer cells, respectively. Both known and unique substrates, including multiple centrosomal substrates for Syk, were identified, supporting a unique mechanism that Syk negatively affects cell division through its centrosomal kinase activity. PMID:22451900

  17. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Platelets Activated by Pro-Thrombotic Oxidized Phospholipids and Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Zimman, Alejandro; Titz, Bjoern; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Biswas, Sudipta; Graeber, Thomas G.; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Specific oxidized phospholipids (oxPCCD36) promote platelet hyper-reactivity and thrombosis in hyperlipidemia via the scavenger receptor CD36, however the signaling pathway(s) induced in platelets by oxPCCD36 are not well defined. We have employed mass spectrometry-based tyrosine, serine, and threonine phosphoproteomics for the unbiased analysis of platelet signaling pathways induced by oxPCCD36 as well as by the strong physiological agonist thrombin. oxPCCD36 and thrombin induced differential phosphorylation of 115 proteins (162 phosphorylation sites) and 181 proteins (334 phosphorylation sites) respectively. Most of the phosphoproteome changes induced by either agonist have never been reported in platelets; thus they provide candidates in the study of platelet signaling. Bioinformatic analyses of protein phosphorylation dependent responses were used to categorize preferential motifs for (de)phosphorylation, predict pathways and kinase activity, and construct a phosphoproteome network regulating integrin activation. A putative signaling pathway involving Src-family kinases, SYK, and PLCγ2 was identified in platelets activated by oxPCCD36. Subsequent ex vivo studies in human platelets demonstrated that this pathway is downstream of the scavenger receptor CD36 and is critical for platelet activation by oxPCCD36. Our results provide multiple insights into the mechanism of platelet activation and specifically in platelet regulation by oxPCCD36. PMID:24400094

  18. Identification of the PLK2-dependent phosphopeptidome by quantitative proteomics [corrected].

    PubMed

    Franchin, Cinzia; Cesaro, Luca; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Salvi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) has been recently recognized as the major enzyme responsible for phosphorylation of α-synuclein at S129 in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that this kinase may play a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. Moreover PLK2 seems to be implicated in cell division, oncogenesis, and synaptic regulation of the brain. However little is known about the phosphoproteome generated by PLK2 and, consequently the overall impact of PLK2 on cellular signaling. To fill this gap we exploited an approach based on in vitro kinase assay and quantitative phosphoproteomics. A proteome-derived peptide library obtained by digestion of undifferentiated human neuroblastoma cell line was exhaustively dephosphorylated by lambda phosphatase followed by incubation with or without PLK2 recombinant kinase. Stable isotope labeling based quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to identify the phosphosites generated by PLK2. A total of 98 unique PLK2-dependent phosphosites from 89 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. Analysis of the primary structure of the identified phosphosites allowed the detailed definition of the kinase specificity and the compilation of a list of potential PLK2 targets among those retrieved in PhosphositePlus, a curated database of in cell/vivo phosphorylation sites. PMID:25338102

  19. The proteome and phosphoproteome of maize pollen uncovers fertility candidate proteins.

    PubMed

    Chao, Qing; Gao, Zhi-Fang; Wang, Yue-Feng; Li, Zhe; Huang, Xia-He; Wang, Ying-Chun; Mei, Ying-Chang; Zhao, Biligen-Gaowa; Li, Liang; Jiang, Yu-Bo; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Maize is unique since it is both monoecious and diclinous (separate male and female flowers on the same plant). We investigated the proteome and phosphoproteome of maize pollen containing modified proteins and here we provide a comprehensive pollen proteome and phosphoproteome which contain 100,990 peptides from 6750 proteins and 5292 phosphorylated sites corresponding to 2257 maize phosphoproteins, respectively. Interestingly, among the total 27 overrepresented phosphosite motifs we identified here, 11 were novel motifs, which suggested different modification mechanisms in plants compared to those of animals. Enrichment analysis of pollen phosphoproteins showed that pathways including DNA synthesis/chromatin structure, regulation of RNA transcription, protein modification, cell organization, signal transduction, cell cycle, vesicle transport, transport of ions and metabolisms, which were involved in pollen development, the following germination and pollen tube growth, were regulated by phosphorylation. In this study, we also found 430 kinases and 105 phosphatases in the maize pollen phosphoproteome, among which calcium dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), leucine rich repeat kinase, SNF1 related protein kinases and MAPK family proteins were heavily enriched and further analyzed. From our research, we also uncovered hundreds of male sterility-associated proteins and phosphoproteins that might influence maize productivity and serve as targets for hybrid maize seed production. At last, a putative complex signaling pathway involving CDPKs, MAPKs, ubiquitin ligases and multiple fertility proteins was constructed. Overall, our data provides new insight for further investigation of protein phosphorylation status in mature maize pollen and construction of maize male sterile mutants in the future. PMID:26969016

  20. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the Chlamydia caviae elementary body and reticulate body forms

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nancy E.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria responsible for significant diseases in humans and economically important domestic animals. These pathogens undergo a unique biphasic developmental cycle transitioning between the environmentally stable elementary body (EB) and the replicative intracellular reticulate body (RB), a conversion that appears to require extensive regulation of protein synthesis and function. However, Chlamydia possess a limited number of canonical mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation of proteins in bacteria has been increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of post-translational control of protein function. We utilized 2D gel electrophoresis coupled with phosphoprotein staining and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis to map the phosphoproteome of the EB and RB forms of Chlamydia caviae. Forty-two non-redundant phosphorylated proteins were identified (some proteins were present in multiple locations within the gels). Thirty-four phosphorylated proteins were identified in EBs, including proteins found in central metabolism and protein synthesis, Chlamydia-specific hypothetical proteins and virulence-related proteins. Eleven phosphorylated proteins were identified in RBs, mostly involved in protein synthesis and folding and a single virulence-related protein. Only three phosphoproteins were found in both EB and RB phosphoproteomes. Collectively, 41 of 42 C. caviae phosphoproteins were present across Chlamydia species, consistent with the existence of a conserved chlamydial phosphoproteome. The abundance of stage-specific phosphoproteins suggests that protein phosphorylation may play a role in regulating the function of developmental-stage-specific proteins and/or may function in concert with other factors in directing EB–RB transitions. PMID:25998263

  1. Picking the right tool for the job--Phosphoproteomics of egg activation.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Gary M

    2015-12-01

    Eggs are the rarest cell in the human body, yet their study is essential for the fields of fertility, reproduction, and fetal health. Guo et al. (Proteomics 2015, 15, 4080-4095) use a "surrogate" animal to discover the phosphoproteomic pathways involved in egg activation. With datasets of several thousand phosphosites on 2500 different proteins, these investigators have defined new pathways, connections to pathways, and priorities in searches for how eggs are activated at fertilization. These results in a sea urchin are now transposable to mammals for testing on a per candidate strategy. PMID:26573262

  2. Kicking Genomic Profiling to the Curb: How Re-wiring the Phosphoproteome Can Explain Treatment Resistance in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Fred C; Yaffe, Michael B

    2016-04-11

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Wei et al. (2016) identify adaptive re-wiring of signaling nodes in glioma as major mechanisms of treatment resistance without genome-wide mutations. Targeting these nodes before treatment blocks resistance and underscores the importance of single-cell phosphoproteomics and network re-wiring in predicting cancer treatment responses. PMID:27070697

  3. SELPHI: correlation-based identification of kinase-associated networks from global phospho-proteomics data sets

    PubMed Central

    Petsalaki, Evangelia; Helbig, Andreas O.; Gopal, Anjali; Pasculescu, Adrian; Roth, Frederick P.; Pawson, Tony

    2015-01-01

    While phospho-proteomics studies have shed light on the dynamics of cellular signaling, they mainly describe global effects and rarely explore mechanistic details, such as kinase/substrate relationships. Tools and databases, such as NetworKIN and PhosphoSitePlus, provide valuable regulatory details on signaling networks but rely on prior knowledge. They therefore provide limited information on less studied kinases and fewer unexpected relationships given that better studied signaling events can mask condition- or cell-specific ‘network wiring’. SELPHI is a web-based tool providing in-depth analysis of phospho-proteomics data that is intuitive and accessible to non-bioinformatics experts. It uses correlation analysis of phospho-sites to extract kinase/phosphatase and phospho-peptide associations, and highlights the potential flow of signaling in the system under study. We illustrate SELPHI via analysis of phospho-proteomics data acquired in the presence of erlotinib—a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)—in cancer cells expressing TKI-resistant and -sensitive variants of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor. In this data set, SELPHI revealed information overlooked by the reporting study, including the known role of MET and EPHA2 kinases in conferring resistance to erlotinib in TKI sensitive strains. SELPHI can significantly enhance the analysis of phospho-proteomics data contributing to improved understanding of sample-specific signaling networks. SELPHI is freely available via http://llama.mshri.on.ca/SELPHI. PMID:25948583

  4. SELPHI: correlation-based identification of kinase-associated networks from global phospho-proteomics data sets.

    PubMed

    Petsalaki, Evangelia; Helbig, Andreas O; Gopal, Anjali; Pasculescu, Adrian; Roth, Frederick P; Pawson, Tony

    2015-07-01

    While phospho-proteomics studies have shed light on the dynamics of cellular signaling, they mainly describe global effects and rarely explore mechanistic details, such as kinase/substrate relationships. Tools and databases, such as NetworKIN and PhosphoSitePlus, provide valuable regulatory details on signaling networks but rely on prior knowledge. They therefore provide limited information on less studied kinases and fewer unexpected relationships given that better studied signaling events can mask condition- or cell-specific 'network wiring'. SELPHI is a web-based tool providing in-depth analysis of phospho-proteomics data that is intuitive and accessible to non-bioinformatics experts. It uses correlation analysis of phospho-sites to extract kinase/phosphatase and phospho-peptide associations, and highlights the potential flow of signaling in the system under study. We illustrate SELPHI via analysis of phospho-proteomics data acquired in the presence of erlotinib-a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-in cancer cells expressing TKI-resistant and -sensitive variants of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor. In this data set, SELPHI revealed information overlooked by the reporting study, including the known role of MET and EPHA2 kinases in conferring resistance to erlotinib in TKI sensitive strains. SELPHI can significantly enhance the analysis of phospho-proteomics data contributing to improved understanding of sample-specific signaling networks. SELPHI is freely available via http://llama.mshri.on.ca/SELPHI. PMID:25948583

  5. Phosphorylation-Specific MS/MS Scoring for Rapid and Accurate Phosphoproteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Samuel H.; Yau, Margaret; Smolka, Marcus B.; Tanner, Stephen; Zhou, Huilin; Bafna, Vineet

    2008-01-01

    The promise of mass spectrometry as a tool for probing signal-transduction is predicated on reliable identification of post-translational modifications. Phosphorylations are key mediators of cellular signaling, yet are hard to detect, partly because of unusual fragmentation patterns of phosphopeptides. In addition to being accurate, MS/MS identification software must be robust and efficient to deal with increasingly large spectral data sets. Here, we present a new scoring function for the Inspect software for phosphorylated peptide tandem mass spectra for ion-trap instruments, without the need for manual validation. The scoring function was modeled by learning fragmentation patterns from 7677 validated phosphopeptide spectra. We compare our algorithm against SEQUEST and X!Tandem on testing and training data sets. At a 1% false positive rate, Inspect identified the greatest total number of phosphorylated spectra, 13% more than SEQUEST and 39% more than X!Tandem. Spectra identified by Inspect tended to score better in several spectral quality measures. Furthermore, Inspect runs much faster than either SEQUEST or X!Tandem, making desktop phosphoproteomics feasible. Finally, we used our new models to reanalyze a corpus of 423 000 LTQ spectra acquired for a phosphoproteome analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA damage and repair pathways and discovered 43% more phosphopeptides than the previous study. PMID:18563926

  6. HOPE-fixation of lung tissue allows retrospective proteome and phosphoproteome studies.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Olga; Abidi, Nada; Klawonn, Frank; Wissing, Josef; Nimtz, Manfred; Kugler, Christian; Steinert, Michael; Goldmann, Torsten; Jänsch, Lothar

    2014-11-01

    Hepes-glutamic acid buffer-mediated organic solvent protection effect (HOPE)-fixation has been introduced as an alternative to formalin fixation of clinical samples. Beyond preservation of morphological structures for histology, HOPE-fixation was demonstrated to be compatible with recent methods for RNA and DNA sequencing. However, the suitability of HOPE-fixed materials for the inspection of proteomes by mass spectrometry so far remained undefined. This is of particular interest, since proteins constitute a prime resource for drug research and can give valuable insights into the activity status of signaling pathways. In this study, we extracted proteins from human lung tissue and tested HOPE-treated and snap-frozen tissues comparatively by proteome and phosphoproteome analyses. High confident data from accurate mass spectrometry allowed the identification of 2603 proteins and 3036 phosphorylation sites. HOPE-fixation did not hinder the representative extraction of proteins, and investigating their biochemical properties, covered subcellular localizations, and cellular processes revealed no bias caused by the type of fixation. In conclusion, proteome as well as phosphoproteome data of HOPE lung samples were qualitatively equivalent to results obtained from snap-frozen tissues. Thus, HOPE-treated tissues match clinical demands in both histology and retrospective proteome analyses of patient samples by proteomics. PMID:24702127

  7. The Global Phosphoproteome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Reveals Complex Organellar Phosphorylation in the Flagella and Thylakoid Membrane *

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Gau, Brian; Slade, William O.; Juergens, Matthew; Li, Ping; Hicks, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the most intensively-studied and well-developed model for investigation of a wide-range of microalgal processes ranging from basic development through understanding triacylglycerol production. Although proteomic technologies permit interrogation of these processes at the protein level and efforts to date indicate phosphorylation-based regulation of proteins in C. reinhardtii is essential for its underlying biology, characterization of the C. reinhardtii phosphoproteome has been limited. Herein, we report the richest exploration of the C. reinhardtii proteome to date. Complementary enrichment strategies were used to detect 4588 phosphoproteins distributed among every cellular component in C. reinhardtii. Additionally, we report 18,160 unique phosphopeptides at <1% false discovery rate, which comprise 15,862 unique phosphosites - 98% of which are novel. Given that an estimated 30% of proteins in a eukaryotic cell are subject to phosphorylation, we report the majority of the phosphoproteome (23%) of C. reinhardtii. Proteins in key biological pathways were phosphorylated, including photosynthesis, pigment production, carbon assimilation, glycolysis, and protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and it is noteworthy that hyperphosphorylation was observed in flagellar proteins. This rich data set is available via ProteomeXchange (ID: PXD000783) and will significantly enhance understanding of a range of regulatory mechanisms controlling a variety of cellular process and will serve as a critical resource for the microalgal community. PMID:24917610

  8. Phosphoproteome mapping of cardiomyocyte mitochondria in a rat model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Giorgianni, Francesco; Usman Khan, M; Weber, Karl T; Gerling, Ivan C; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondria are complex organelles essential to cardiomyocyte survival. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as a key regulator of mitochondrial function. In the study reported here, we analyzed subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria harvested from rats who have received 4 weeks of aldosterone/salt treatment to simulate the neurohormonal profile of human congestive heart failure. Our objective was to obtain an initial qualitative inventory of the phosphoproteins in this biologic system. SSM mitochondria were harvested, and the phosphoproteome was analyzed with a gel-free bioanalytical platform. Mitochondrial proteins were digested with trypsin, and the digests were enriched for phosphopeptides with immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. The phosphopeptides were analyzed by ion trap liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and the phosphoproteins identified via database searches. Based on MS/MS and MS(3) data, we characterized a set of 42 phosphopeptides that encompassed 39 phosphorylation sites. These peptides mapped to 26 proteins, for example, long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, Complex III subunit 6, and mitochondrial import receptor TOM70. Collectively, the characterized phosphoproteins belong to diverse functional modules, including bioenergetic pathways, protein import machinery, and calcium handling. The phosphoprotein panel discovered in this study provides a foundation for future differential phosphoproteome profiling toward an integrated understanding of the role of mitochondrial phosphorylation in heart failure. PMID:24395194

  9. Off-line high-pH reversed-phase fractionation for in-depth phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Batth, Tanveer S; Francavilla, Chiara; Olsen, Jesper V

    2014-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification (PTM) involved in embryonic development, adult homeostasis, and disease. Over the past decade, several advances have been made in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based technologies to identify thousands of phosphorylation sites. However, in-depth phosphoproteomics often require off-line enrichment and fractionation techniques. In this study, we provide a detailed analysis of the physicochemical characteristics of phosphopeptides, which have been fractionated by off-line high-pH chromatography (HpH) before subsequent titanium dioxide (TiO2) enrichment and LC-MS/MS analysis. Our results demonstrate that HpH is superior to standard strong-cation exchange (SCX) fractionation in the total number of phosphopeptides detected when analyzing the same number of fractions by identical LC-MS/MS gradients. From 14 HpH fractions, we routinely identified over 30,000 unique phosphopeptide variants, which is more than twice the number of that obtained from SCX fractionation. HpH chromatography displayed an exceptional ability to fractionate singly phosphorylated peptides, with minor benefits for doubly phosphorylated peptides over that with SCX. Further optimizations in the pooling and concatenation strategy increased the total number of multiphosphorylated peptides detected after HpH fractionation. In conclusion, we provide a basic framework and resource for performing in-depth phosphoproteome studies utilizing off-line basic reversed-phased fractionation. Raw data is available at ProteomeXchange (PXD001404). PMID:25338131

  10. Phosphoproteome mapping of cardiomyocyte mitochondria in a rat model of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Giorgianni, Francesco; Khan, M. Usman; Weber, Karl T.; Gerling, Ivan C.; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are complex organelles essential to cardiomyocyte survival. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as a key regulator of mitochondrial function. In the study reported here, we analyzed subsarcolemmal mitochondria harvested from rats who have received 4 weeks of aldosterone/salt treatment to simulate the neurohormonal profile of human congestive heart failure. Our objective was to obtain an initial qualitative inventory of the phosphoproteins in this biological system. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria were harvested and the phosphoproteome was analyzed with a gel-free bioanalytical platform. Mitochondrial proteins were digested with trypsin, and the digests were enriched for phosphopeptides with Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography (IMAC). The phosphopeptides were analyzed by ion trap LC-MS/MS, and the phosphoproteins identified via database searches. Based on MS/MS and MS3 data, we characterized a set of 42 phosphopeptides that encompassed 39 phosphorylation sites. These peptides mapped to 26 proteins, for example long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), Complex III subunit 6, and mitochondrial import receptor TOM70. Collectively, the characterized phosphoproteins belong to diverse functional modules, including bioenergetic pathways, protein import machinery, and calcium handling. The phosphoprotein panel discovered in this study provides a foundation for future differential phosphoproteome profiling towards an integrated understanding of the role of mitochondrial phosphorylation in heart failure. PMID:24395194

  11. Novel aspects of grapevine response to phytoplasma infection investigated by a proteomic and phospho-proteomic approach with data integration into functional networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Translational and post-translational protein modifications play a key role in the response of plants to pathogen infection. Among the latter, phosphorylation is critical in modulating protein structure, localization and interaction with other partners. In this work, we used a multiplex staining approach with 2D gels to study quantitative changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome of Flavescence dorée-affected and recovered ‘Barbera’ grapevines, compared to healthy plants. Results We identified 48 proteins that differentially changed in abundance, phosphorylation, or both in response to Flavescence dorée phytoplasma infection. Most of them did not show any significant difference in recovered plants, which, by contrast, were characterized by changes in abundance, phosphorylation, or both for 17 proteins not detected in infected plants. Some enzymes involved in the antioxidant response that were up-regulated in infected plants, such as isocitrate dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase, returned to healthy-state levels in recovered plants. Others belonging to the same functional category were even down-regulated in recovered plants (oxidoreductase GLYR1 and ascorbate peroxidase). Our proteomic approach thus agreed with previously published biochemical and RT-qPCR data which reported down-regulation of scavenging enzymes and accumulation of H2O2 in recovered plants, possibly suggesting a role for this molecule in remission from infection. Fifteen differentially phosphorylated proteins (| ratio | > 2, p < 0.05) were identified in infected compared to healthy plants, including proteins involved in photosynthesis, response to stress and the antioxidant system. Many were not differentially phosphorylated in recovered compared to healthy plants, pointing to their specific role in responding to infection, followed by a return to a steady-state phosphorylation level after remission of symptoms. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment and statistical

  12. A Phos-tag SDS-PAGE method that effectively uses phosphoproteomic data for profiling the phosphorylation dynamics of MEK1.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Kubota, Yuji; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Koike, Tohru

    2016-07-01

    MEK1, an essential component of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, is phosphorylated during activation of the pathway; 12 phosphorylation sites have been identified in human MEK1 by MS-based phosphoproteomic methods. By using Phos-tag SDS-PAGE, we found that multiple variants of MEK1 with different phosphorylation states are constitutively present in typical human cells. The Phos-tag-based strategy, which makes effective use of existing information on the location of phosphorylation sites, permits quantitative time-course profiling of MEK1 phosphospecies in their respective phosphorylation states. By subsequent immunoblotting with an anti-HaloTag antibody, we analyzed a HaloTag-fused MEK1 protein and 12 potential phosphorylation-site-directed mutants of the protein transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells. This strategy revealed that MEK1 is constitutively and mainly phosphorylated at the Thr-292, Ser-298, Thr-386, and Thr-388 residues in vivo, and that combinations of phosphorylations at these four residues produce at least six phosphorylated variants of MEK1. Like the levels of phosphorylation of the Ser-218 and Ser-222 residues by RAF1, which have been well studied, the phosphorylation statuses of Thr-292, Ser-298, Thr-386, and Thr-388 residues vary widely during activation and deactivation of the MAPK pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrated inhibitor-specific profiling of MEK1 phosphospecies by using three MEK inhibitors: TAK-733, PD98059, and U0126. PMID:27169363

  13. Recent findings and technological advances in phosphoproteomics for cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    von Stechow, Louise; Francavilla, Chiara; Olsen, Jesper V

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific phosphorylation is a fast and reversible covalent post-translational modification that is tightly regulated in cells. The cellular machinery of enzymes that write, erase and read these modifications (kinases, phosphatases and phospho-binding proteins) is frequently deregulated in different diseases, including cancer. Large-scale studies of phosphoproteins – termed phosphoproteomics – strongly rely on the use of high-performance mass spectrometric instrumentation. This powerful technology has been applied to study a great number of phosphorylation-based phenotypes. Nevertheless, many technical and biological challenges have to be overcome to identify biologically relevant phosphorylation sites in cells and tissues. This review describes different technological strategies to identify and quantify phosphorylation sites with high accuracy, without significant loss of analysis speed and reproducibility in tissues and cells. Moreover, computational tools for analysis, integration and biological interpretation of phosphorylation events are discussed. PMID:26400465

  14. Unbiased phosphoproteomic method identifies the initial effects of a methacrylic acid copolymer on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Michael Dean; Wells, Laura A; Lisovsky, Alexandra; Guo, Hongbo; Isserlin, Ruth; Talior-Volodarsky, Ilana; Mahou, Redouan; Emili, Andrew; Sefton, Michael V

    2015-08-25

    An unbiased phosphoproteomic method was used to identify biomaterial-associated changes in the phosphorylation patterns of macrophage-like cells. The phosphorylation differences between differentiated THP1 (dTHP1) cells treated for 10, 20, or 30 min with a vascular regenerative methacrylic acid (MAA) copolymer or a control methyl methacrylate (MM) copolymer were determined by MS. There were 1,470 peptides (corresponding to 729 proteins) that were differentially phosphorylated in dTHP1 cells treated with the two materials with a greater cellular response to MAA treatment. In addition to identifying pathways (such as integrin signaling and cytoskeletal arrangement) that are well known to change with cell-material interaction, previously unidentified pathways, such as apoptosis and mRNA splicing, were also discovered. PMID:26261332

  15. Development of the affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment in phosphoproteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Lv, Nan; Bi, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2015-04-29

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a key event in numerous biological processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) is the most powerful analysis tool in modern phosphoproteomics. However, the direct MS analysis of phosphorylated proteins/peptides is still a big challenge because of the low abundance and insufficient ionization of phosphorylated proteins/peptides as well as the suppression effects of nontargets. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins/peptides by affinity materials from complex biosamples is the most widely used strategy to enhance the MS detection. The demand of efficiently enriching phosphorylated proteins/peptides has spawned diverse affinity materials based on different enrichment principles (e.g., electronic attraction, chelating). In this review, we summarize the recent development of various affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment. We will highlight the design and fabrication of these affinity materials, discuss the enrichment mechanisms involved in different affinity materials, and suggest the future challenges and research directions in this field. PMID:25845677

  16. Single-Cell Phosphoproteomics Resolves Adaptive Signaling Dynamics and Informs Targeted Combination Therapy in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Shin, Young Shik; Xue, Min; Matsutani, Tomoo; Masui, Kenta; Yang, Huijun; Ikegami, Shiro; Gu, Yuchao; Herrmann, Ken; Johnson, Dazy; Ding, Xiangming; Hwang, Kiwook; Kim, Jungwoo; Zhou, Jian; Su, Yapeng; Li, Xinmin; Bonetti, Bruno; Chopra, Rajesh; James, C David; Cavenee, Webster K; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Mischel, Paul S; Heath, James R; Gini, Beatrice

    2016-04-11

    Intratumoral heterogeneity of signaling networks may contribute to targeted cancer therapy resistance, including in the highly lethal brain cancer glioblastoma (GBM). We performed single-cell phosphoproteomics on a patient-derived in vivo GBM model of mTOR kinase inhibitor resistance and coupled it to an analytical approach for detecting changes in signaling coordination. Alterations in the protein signaling coordination were resolved as early as 2.5 days after treatment, anticipating drug resistance long before it was clinically manifest. Combination therapies were identified that resulted in complete and sustained tumor suppression in vivo. This approach may identify actionable alterations in signal coordination that underlie adaptive resistance, which can be suppressed through combination drug therapy, including non-obvious drug combinations. PMID:27070703

  17. Unbiased phosphoproteomic method identifies the initial effects of a methacrylic acid copolymer on macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Michael Dean; Wells, Laura A.; Lisovsky, Alexandra; Guo, Hongbo; Isserlin, Ruth; Talior-Volodarsky, Ilana; Mahou, Redouan; Emili, Andrew; Sefton, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    An unbiased phosphoproteomic method was used to identify biomaterial-associated changes in the phosphorylation patterns of macrophage-like cells. The phosphorylation differences between differentiated THP1 (dTHP1) cells treated for 10, 20, or 30 min with a vascular regenerative methacrylic acid (MAA) copolymer or a control methyl methacrylate (MM) copolymer were determined by MS. There were 1,470 peptides (corresponding to 729 proteins) that were differentially phosphorylated in dTHP1 cells treated with the two materials with a greater cellular response to MAA treatment. In addition to identifying pathways (such as integrin signaling and cytoskeletal arrangement) that are well known to change with cell–material interaction, previously unidentified pathways, such as apoptosis and mRNA splicing, were also discovered. PMID:26261332

  18. Characterization of the human plasma phosphoproteome using linear ion trap mass spectrometry and multiple search engines.

    PubMed

    Carrascal, Montserrat; Gay, Marina; Ovelleiro, David; Casas, Vanessa; Gelpí, Emilio; Abian, Joaquin

    2010-02-01

    Major plasma protein families play different roles in blood physiology and hemostasis and in immunodefense. Other proteins in plasma can be involved in signaling as chemical messengers or constitute biological markers of the status of distant tissues. In this respect, the plasma phosphoproteome holds potentially relevant information on the mechanisms modulating these processes through the regulation of protein activity. In this work we describe for the first time a collection of phosphopeptides identified in human plasma using immunoaffinity separation of the seven major serum protein families from other plasma proteins, SCX fractionation, and TiO(2) purification prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. One-hundred and twenty-seven phosphosites in 138 phosphopeptides mapping 70 phosphoproteins were identified with FDR < 1%. A high-confidence collection of phosphosites was obtained using a combined search with the OMSSA, SEQUEST, and Phenyx search engines. PMID:19941383

  19. Automated Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for Enrichment of Escherichia coli Phosphoproteome

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Wu, Si; Zhao, Rui; Zink, Erika M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Meng, Da; Clauss, Therese RW; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2013-06-05

    Enrichment of bacterial phosphopeptides is an essential step prior to bottom-up mass spectrometry-based analysis of the phosphoproteome, which is fundamental to understanding the role of phosphoproteins in cell signaling and regulation of protein activity. We developed an automated IMAC system to enrich strong cation exchange-fractionated phosphopeptides from the soluble proteome of Escherichia coli MG1655 grown on minimal medium. Initial demonstration of the system resulted in identification of 75 phosphopeptides covering 52 phosphoproteins. Consistent with previous studies, many of these phosphoproteins are involved in the carbohydrate portion of central metabolism. The automated system utilizes a large capacity IMAC column that can effectively enrich phosphopeptides from a bacterial sample by increasing peptide loading and reducing the wash time. An additional benefit of the automated IMAC system is reduced labor and associated costs.

  20. The beginnings of crop phosphoproteomics: exploring early warning systems of stress

    PubMed Central

    Rampitsch, Christof; Bykova, Natalia V.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines why a knowledge of plant protein phosphorylation events is important in devising strategies to protect crops from both biotic and abiotic stresses, and why proteomics should be included when studying stress pathways. Most of the achievements in elucidating phospho-signaling pathways in biotic and abiotic stress are reported from model systems: while these are discussed, this review attempts mainly to focus on work done with crops, with examples of achievements reported from rice, maize, wheat, grape, Brassica, tomato, and soy bean after cold acclimation, hormonal and oxidative hydrogen peroxide treatment, salt stress, mechanical wounding, or pathogen challenge. The challenges that remain to transfer this information into a format that can be used to protect crops against biotic and abiotic stresses are enormous. The tremendous increase in the speed and ease of DNA sequencing is poised to reveal the whole genomes of many crop species in the near future, which will facilitate phosphoproteomics and phosphogenomics research. PMID:22783265

  1. Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver 3 (PRL3) Provokes a Tyrosine Phosphoproteome to Drive Prometastatic Signal Transduction*

    PubMed Central

    Walls, Chad D.; Iliuk, Anton; Bai, Yunpeng; Wang, Mu; Tao, W. Andy; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL3) is suspected to be a causative factor toward cellular metastasis when in excess. To date, the molecular basis for PRL3 function remains an enigma, making efforts at distilling a concerted mechanism for PRL3-mediated metastatic dissemination very difficult. We previously discovered that PRL3 expressing cells exhibit a pronounced increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Here we take an unbiased mass spectrometry-based approach toward identifying the phosphoproteins exhibiting enhanced levels of tyrosine phosphorylation with a goal to define the “PRL3-mediated signaling network.” Phosphoproteomic data support intracellular activation of an extensive signaling network normally governed by extracellular ligand-activated transmembrane growth factor, cytokine, and integrin receptors in the PRL3 cells. Additionally, data implicate the Src tyrosine kinase as the major intracellular kinase responsible for “hijacking” this network and provide strong evidence that aberrant Src activation is a major consequence of PRL3 overexpression. Importantly, the data support a PDGF(α/β)-, Eph (A2/B3/B4)-, and Integrin (β1/β5)-receptor array as being the predominant network coordinator in the PRL3 cells, corroborating a PRL3-induced mesenchymal-state. Within this network, we find that tyrosine phosphorylation is increased on a multitude of signaling effectors responsible for Rho-family GTPase, PI3K-Akt, STAT, and ERK activation, linking observations made by the field as a whole under Src as a primary signal transducer. Our phosphoproteomic data paint the most comprehensive picture to date of how PRL3 drives prometastatic molecular events through Src activation. PMID:24030100

  2. Multiplexed Detection of O-GlcNAcome, Phosphoproteome, and Whole Proteome within the Same Gel

    PubMed Central

    Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Dupont, Erwan; Deracinois, Barbara; Lambert, Matthias; Bastide, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The cellular diversity of proteins results in part from their post-translational modifications. Among all of them, the O-GlcNAcylation is an atypical glycosylation, more similar to phosphorylation than classical glycosylations. Highly dynamic, reversible, and exclusively localized on cytosolic, nuclear, and mitochondrial proteins, O-GlcNAcylation is known to regulate almost all if not all cellular processes. Fundamental for the cell life, O-GlcNAcylation abnormalities are involved in the etiology of several inherited diseases. Assessing to O-GlcNAcylation pattern will permit to get relevant data about the role of O-GlcNAcylation in cell physiology. To get understanding about the role of O-GlcNAcylation, as also considering its interplay with phosphorylation, the O-GlcNAc profiling remains a real challenge for the community of proteomists/glycoproteomists. The development of multiplexed proteomics based on fluorescent detection of proteins permits to go further in the understanding of the proteome complexity. We propose herein a multiplexed proteomic strategy to detect O-GlcNAcylated proteins, phosphoproteins, and the whole proteome within the same bidimensional gel. In particular, we investigated the phosphoproteome through the ProQ Diamond staining, while the whole proteome was visualized through Sypro Ruby staining, or after the labeling of proteins with a T-Dye fluorophore. The O-GlcNAcome was revealed by the way of the Click chemistry and the azide–alkyne cycloaddition of a fluorophore on GlcNAc moieties. This method permits, after sequential image acquisition, the direct in-gel detection of O-GlcNAcome, phosphoproteome, and whole proteome. PMID:25389416

  3. Identification of kinase inhibitor targets in the lung cancer microenvironment by chemical and phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Gridling, Manuela; Ficarro, Scott B.; Breitwieser, Florian P.; Song, Lanxi; Parapatics, Katja; Colinge, Jacques; Haura, Eric B.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Rix, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of gene mutations, which are recognized as cancer drivers, can be successfully targeted with drugs. The redundant and dynamic nature of oncogenic signaling networks and complex interactions between cancer cells and the microenvironment, however, can cause drug resistance. Whereas these challenges can be addressed by developing drug combinations or polypharmacology drugs, this benefits greatly from a detailed understanding of the proteome-wide target profiles. Using mass spectrometry-based chemical proteomics, we report the comprehensive characterization of the drug-protein interaction networks for the multikinase inhibitors dasatinib and sunitinib in primary lung cancer tissue specimens derived from patients. We observed in excess of 100 protein kinase targets plus various protein complexes involving, for instance, AMPK, TBK1 (sunitinib) and ILK (dasatinib). Importantly, comparison with lung cancer cell lines and mouse xenografts thereof showed that most targets were shared between cell lines and tissues. Several targets, however, were only present in tumor tissues. In xenografts, most of these proteins were of mouse origin suggesting that they originate from the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, intersection with subsequent global phosphoproteomic analysis identified several activated signaling pathways. These included MAPK, immune and integrin signaling, which were affected by these drugs in both cancer cells and the microenvironment. Thus, the combination of chemical and phosphoproteomics can generate a systems view of proteins, complexes and signaling pathways that are simultaneously engaged by multi-targeted drugs in cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment. This may allow for the design of novel anticancer therapies that concurrently target multiple tumor compartments. PMID:25189542

  4. Structural insight into effector proteins of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that modulate the phosphoproteome of their host

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, Andrey M; Beyrakhova, Ksenia A; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Invading pathogens manipulate cellular process of the host cell to establish a safe replicative niche. To this end they secrete a spectrum of proteins called effectors that modify cellular environment through a variety of mechanisms. One of the most important mechanisms is the manipulation of cellular signaling through modifications of the cellular phosphoproteome. Phosphorylation/dephosphorylation plays a pivotal role in eukaryotic cell signaling, with ∼500 different kinases and ∼130 phosphatases in the human genome. Pathogens affect the phosphoproteome either directly through the action of bacterial effectors, and/or indirectly through downstream effects of host proteins modified by the effectors. Here we review the current knowledge of the structure, catalytic mechanism and function of bacterial effectors that modify directly the phosphorylation state of host proteins. These effectors belong to four enzyme classes: kinases, phosphatases, phospholyases and serine/threonine acetylases. PMID:25565677

  5. The phosphoproteome in regenerating protoplasts from Physcomitrella patens protonemata shows changes paralleling postembryonic development in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    He, Yikun

    2014-01-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an ideal model plant to study plant developmental processes. To better understand the mechanism of protoplast regeneration, a phosphoproteome analysis was performed. Protoplasts were prepared from protonemata. By 4 d of protoplast regeneration, the first cell divisions had ensued. Through a highly selective titanium dioxide (TiO2)-based phosphopeptide enrichment method and mass spectrometric technology, more than 300 phosphoproteins were identified as protoplast regeneration responsive. Of these, 108 phosphoproteins were present on day 4 but not in fresh protoplasts or those cultured for 2 d. These proteins are catalogued here. They were involved in cell-wall metabolism, transcription, signal transduction, cell growth/division, and cell structure. These protein functions are related to cell morphogenesis, organogenesis, and development adjustment. This study presents a comprehensive analysis of phosphoproteome involved in protoplast regeneration and indicates that the mechanism of plant protoplast regeneration is similar to that of postembryonic development. PMID:24700621

  6. Searching for Novel Cdk5 Substrates in Brain by Comparative Phosphoproteomics of Wild Type and Cdk5−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Vallejos, Erick; Utreras, Elías; Bórquez, Daniel A.; Prochazkova, Michaela; Terse, Anita; Jaffe, Howard; Toledo, Andrea; Arruti, Cristina; Pant, Harish C.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; González-Billault, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is the most common post-translational modification that regulates several pivotal functions in cells. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase which is mostly active in the nervous system. It regulates several biological processes such as neuronal migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity among others. In search for novel substrates of Cdk5 in the brain we performed quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis, isolating phosphoproteins from whole brain derived from E18.5 Cdk5+/+ and Cdk5−/− embryos, using an Immobilized Metal-Ion Affinity Chromatography (IMAC), which specifically binds to phosphorylated proteins. The isolated phosphoproteins were eluted and isotopically labeled for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry identification. We found 40 proteins that showed decreased phosphorylation at Cdk5−/− brains. In addition, out of these 40 hypophosphorylated proteins we characterized two proteins, :MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich protein Kinase C substrate) and Grin1 (G protein regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1). MARCKS is known to be phosphorylated by Cdk5 in chick neural cells while Grin1 has not been reported to be phosphorylated by Cdk5. When these proteins were overexpressed in N2A neuroblastoma cell line along with p35, serine phosphorylation in their Cdk5 motifs was found to be increased. In contrast, treatments with roscovitine, the Cdk5 inhibitor, resulted in an opposite effect on serine phosphorylation in N2A cells and primary hippocampal neurons transfected with MARCKS. In summary, the results presented here identify Grin 1 as novel Cdk5 substrate and confirm previously identified MARCKS as a a bona fide Cdk5 substrate. PMID:24658276

  7. Technology Enabled Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on technology-enabled learning and human resource development. Among results found in "Current State of Technology-enabled Learning Programs in Select Federal Government Organizations: a Case Study of Ten Organizations" (Letitia A. Combs) are the following: the dominant delivery method is traditional…

  8. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of polyethylene glycol-induced osmotic stress in root tips of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Walter Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced osmotic stress (OS) reduces cell-wall (CW) porosity and limits aluminium (Al) uptake by root tips of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). A subsequent transcriptomic study suggested that genes related to CW processes are involved in adjustment to OS. In this study, a proteomic and phosphoproteomic approach was applied to identify OS-induced protein regulation to further improve our understanding of how OS affects Al accumulation. Analysis of total soluble proteins in root tips indicated that, in total, 22 proteins were differentially regulated by OS; these proteins were functionally categorized. Seventy-seven per- cent of the total expressed proteins were involved in metabolic pathways, particularly of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. An analysis of the apoplastic proteome revealed that OS reduced the level of five proteins and increased that of seven proteins. Investigation of the total soluble phosphoproteome suggested that dehydrin responded to OS with an enhanced phosphorylation state without a change in abundance. A cellular immunolocalization analysis indicated that dehydrin was localized mainly in the CW. This suggests that dehydrin may play a major protective role in the OS-induced physical breakdown of the CW structure and thus maintenance of the reversibility of CW extensibility during recovery from OS. The proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses provided novel insights into the complex mechanisms of OS-induced reduction of Al accumulation in the root tips of common bean and highlight a key role for modification of CW structure. PMID:24123251

  9. Integrated approach using multistep enzyme digestion, TiO2 enrichment, and database search for in-depth phosphoproteomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Han, Dohyun; Jin, Jonghwa; Yu, Jiyoung; Kim, Kyunggon; Kim, Youngsoo

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major PTM that regulates important cell signaling mechanisms. In-depth phosphoproteomic analysis provides a method of examining this complex interplay, yielding a mechanistic understanding of the cellular processes and pathogenesis of various diseases. However, the analysis of protein phosphorylation is challenging, due to the low concentration of phosphoproteins in highly complex mixtures and the high variability of phosphorylation sites. Thus, typical phosphoproteome studies that are based on MS require large amounts of starting material and extensive fractionation steps to reduce the sample complexity. To this end, we present a simple strategy (integrated multistep enzyme digestion, enrichment, database search-iMEED) to improve coverage of the phosphoproteome from lower sample amounts which is faster than other commonly used approaches. It is inexpensive and adaptable to low sample amounts and saves time and effort with regard to sample preparation and mass spectrometric analysis, allowing samples to be prepared without prefractionation or specific instruments, such as HPLC. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001033 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001033). PMID:25159016

  10. In-depth Analyses of Kinase-dependent Tyrosine Phosphoproteomes Based on Metal Ion-functionalized Soluble Nanopolymers*

    PubMed Central

    Iliuk, Anton B.; Martin, Victoria A.; Alicie, Bethany M.; Geahlen, Robert L.; Tao, W. Andy

    2010-01-01

    The ability to obtain in-depth understanding of signaling networks in cells is a key objective of systems biology research. Such ability depends largely on unbiased and reproducible analysis of phosphoproteomes. We present here a novel proteomics tool, polymer-based metal ion affinity capture (PolyMAC), for the highly efficient isolation of phosphopeptides to facilitate comprehensive phosphoproteome analyses. This approach uses polyamidoamine dendrimers multifunctionalized with titanium ions and aldehyde groups to allow the chelation and subsequent isolation of phosphopeptides in a homogeneous environment. Compared with current strategies based on solid phase micro- and nanoparticles, PolyMAC demonstrated outstanding reproducibility, exceptional selectivity, fast chelation times, and high phosphopeptide recovery from complex mixtures. Using the PolyMAC method combined with antibody enrichment, we identified 794 unique sites of tyrosine phosphorylation in malignant breast cancer cells, 514 of which are dependent on the expression of Syk, a protein-tyrosine kinase with unusual properties of a tumor suppressor. The superior sensitivity of PolyMAC allowed us to identify novel components in a variety of major signaling networks, including cell migration and apoptosis. PolyMAC offers a powerful and widely applicable tool for phosphoproteomics and molecular signaling. PMID:20562096

  11. Identification of BCAP-{sub L} as a negative regulator of the TLR signaling-induced production of IL-6 and IL-10 in macrophages by tyrosine phosphoproteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Takayuki; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Ishikawa, Kosuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Muta, Tatsushi; Semba, Kentaro; Inoue, Jun-ichiro

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Twenty five tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in LPS-stimulated macrophages were determined. {yields} BCAP is a novel tyrosine-phosphorylated protein in LPS-stimulated macrophages. {yields} BCAP-{sub L} inhibits IL-6 and IL-10 production in LPS-stimulated macrophages. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in macrophages is essential for anti-pathogen responses such as cytokine production and antigen presentation. Although numerous reports suggest that protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are involved in cytokine induction in response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS; TLR4 ligand) in macrophages, the PTK-mediated signal transduction pathway has yet to be analyzed in detail. Here, we carried out a comprehensive and quantitative dynamic tyrosine phosphoproteomic analysis on the TLR4-mediated host defense system in RAW264.7 macrophages using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). We determined the temporal profiles of 25 proteins based on SILAC-encoded peptide(s). Of these, we focused on the tyrosine phosphorylation of B-cell adaptor for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (BCAP) because the function of BCAP remains unknown in TLR signaling in macrophages. Furthermore, Bcap has two distinct transcripts, a full-length (Bcap-{sub L}) and an alternatively initiated or spliced (Bcap-{sub S}) mRNA, and little is known about the differential functions of the BCAP-{sub L} and BCAP-{sub S} proteins. Our study showed, for the first time, that RNAi-mediated selective depletion of BCAP-{sub L} enhanced IL-6 and IL-10 production but not TNF-{alpha} production in TLR ligand-stimulated macrophages. We propose that BCAP-{sub L} (but not BCAP-{sub S}) is a negative regulator of the TLR-mediated host defense system in macrophages.

  12. Phosphoproteomics of collagen receptor networks reveals SHP-2 phosphorylation downstream of wild-type DDR2 and its lung cancer mutants

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Leo K.; Payne, Leo S.; Luczynski, Maciej T.; Chang, Francis; Xu, Huifang; Clinton, Ryan W.; Paul, Angela; Esposito, Edward A.; Gridley, Scott; Leitinger, Birgit; Naegle, Kristen M.; Huang, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is an important extracellular matrix component that directs many fundamental cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation and motility. The signalling networks driving these processes are propagated by collagen receptors such as the β1 integrins and the DDRs (discoidin domain receptors). To gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms of collagen receptor signalling, we have performed a quantitative analysis of the phosphorylation networks downstream of collagen activation of integrins and DDR2. Temporal analysis over seven time points identified 424 phosphorylated proteins. Distinct DDR2 tyrosine phosphorylation sites displayed unique temporal activation profiles in agreement with in vitro kinase data. Multiple clustering analysis of the phosphoproteomic data revealed several DDR2 candidate downstream signalling nodes, including SHP-2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2), NCK1 (non-catalytic region of tyrosine kinase adaptor protein 1), LYN, SHIP-2 [SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain-containing inositol phosphatase 2], PIK3C2A (phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit type 2α) and PLCL2 (phospholipase C-like 2). Biochemical validation showed that SHP-2 tyrosine phosphorylation is dependent on DDR2 kinase activity. Targeted proteomic profiling of a panel of lung SCC (squamous cell carcinoma) DDR2 mutants demonstrated that SHP-2 is tyrosine-phosphorylated by the L63V and G505S mutants. In contrast, the I638F kinase domain mutant exhibited diminished DDR2 and SHP-2 tyrosine phosphorylation levels which have an inverse relationship with clonogenic potential. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that SHP-2 is a key signalling node downstream of the DDR2 receptor which may have therapeutic implications in a subset of DDR2 mutations recently uncovered in genome-wide lung SCC sequencing screens. PMID:23822953

  13. Changes in the Phosphoproteome and Metabolome Link Early Signaling Events to Rearrangement of Photosynthesis and Central Metabolism in Salinity and Oxidative Stress Response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanmei; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Salinity and oxidative stress are major factors affecting and limiting the productivity of agricultural crops. The molecular and biochemical processes governing the plant response to abiotic stress have often been researched in a reductionist manner. Here, we report a systemic approach combining metabolic labeling and phosphoproteomics to capture early signaling events with quantitative metabolome analysis and enzyme activity assays to determine the effects of salt and oxidative stress on plant physiology. K(+) and Na(+) transporters showed coordinated changes in their phosphorylation pattern, indicating the importance of dynamic ion homeostasis for adaptation to salt stress. Unique phosphorylation sites were found for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SNF1 kinase homolog10 and 11, indicating their central roles in the stress-regulated responses. Seven Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinase2 kinases showed varying levels of phosphorylation at multiple serine/threonine residues in their kinase domain upon stress, showing temporally distinct modulation of the various isoforms. Salinity and oxidative stress also lead to changes in protein phosphorylation of proteins central to photosynthesis, in particular the kinase State Transition Protein7 required for state transition and light-harvesting II complex proteins. Furthermore, stress-induced changes of the phosphorylation of enzymes of central metabolism were observed. The phosphorylation patterns of these proteins were concurrent with changes in enzyme activity. This was reflected by altered levels of metabolites, such as the sugars sucrose and fructose, glycolysis intermediates, and amino acids. Together, our study provides evidence for a link between early signaling in the salt and oxidative stress response that regulates the state transition of photosynthesis and the rearrangement of primary metabolism. PMID:26471895

  14. Dust control for Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Kevin; Karl, Chad; Litherland, Mark; Ritchie, David; Sun, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    The dust control group designed a system to restrict dust that is disturbed by the Enabler during its operation from interfering with astronaut or camera visibility. This design also considers the many different wheel positions made possible through the use of artinuation joints that provide the steering and wheel pitching for the Enabler. The system uses a combination of brushes and fenders to restrict the dust when the vehicle is moving in either direction and in a turn. This design also allows for each of maintenance as well as accessibility of the remainder of the vehicle.

  15. Dust control for Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Kevin; Karl, Chad; Litherland, Mark; Ritchie, David; Sun, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    The dust control group designed a system to restrict dust that is disturbed by the Enabler during its operation from interfering with astronaut or camera visibility. This design also considers the many different wheel positions made possible through the use of artinuation joints that provide the steering and wheel pitching for the Enabler. The system uses a combination of brushes and fenders to restrict the dust when the vehicle is moving in either direction and in a turn. This design also allows for ease of maintenance as well as accessibility of the remainder of the vehicle.

  16. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2014-06-23

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  17. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2012-07-02

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  18. Phosphoproteome and Transcriptome of RA-Responsive and RA-Resistant Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Marilyn; Joint, Mathilde; Lutzing, Régis; Page, Adeline; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the main active vitamin A metabolite, controls multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation through genomic programs and kinase cascades activation. Due to these properties, RA has proven anti-cancer capacity. Several breast cancer cells respond to the antiproliferative effects of RA, while others are RA-resistant. However, the overall signaling and transcriptional pathways that are altered in such cells have not been elucidated. Here, in a large-scale analysis of the phosphoproteins and in a genome-wide analysis of the RA-regulated genes, we compared two human breast cancer cell lines, a RA-responsive one, the MCF7 cell line, and a RA-resistant one, the BT474 cell line, which depicts several alterations of the “kinome”. Using high-resolution nano-LC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry associated to phosphopeptide enrichment, we found that several proteins involved in signaling and in transcription, are differentially phosphorylated before and after RA addition. The paradigm of these proteins is the RA receptor α (RARα), which was phosphorylated in MCF7 cells but not in BT474 cells after RA addition. The panel of the RA-regulated genes was also different. Overall our results indicate that RA resistance might correlate with the deregulation of the phosphoproteome with consequences on gene expression. PMID:27362937

  19. Phosphoproteomics reveals that Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2 regulates a subset of Rab GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Martin; Tonelli, Francesca; Ito, Genta; Davies, Paul; Trost, Matthias; Vetter, Melanie; Wachter, Stefanie; Lorentzen, Esben; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Stephen; Baptista, Marco AS; Fiske, Brian K; Fell, Matthew J; Morrow, John A; Reith, Alastair D; Alessi, Dario R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Park8, encoding for the multidomain Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein, comprise the predominant genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). G2019S, the most common amino acid substitution activates the kinase two- to threefold. This has motivated the development of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors; however, poor consensus on physiological LRRK2 substrates has hampered clinical development of such therapeutics. We employ a combination of phosphoproteomics, genetics, and pharmacology to unambiguously identify a subset of Rab GTPases as key LRRK2 substrates. LRRK2 directly phosphorylates these both in vivo and in vitro on an evolutionary conserved residue in the switch II domain. Pathogenic LRRK2 variants mapping to different functional domains increase phosphorylation of Rabs and this strongly decreases their affinity to regulatory proteins including Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). Our findings uncover a key class of bona-fide LRRK2 substrates and a novel regulatory mechanism of Rabs that connects them to PD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12813.001 PMID:26824392

  20. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A; Clauss, Therese; Petyuk, Vlad; Camp, David; Smith, Richard; Cate, Jamie H D; Yang, Feng; Glass, N Louise

    2014-11-01

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium vs sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi. PMID:24881580

  1. Phosphoproteomics reveals that Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2 regulates a subset of Rab GTPases.

    PubMed

    Steger, Martin; Tonelli, Francesca; Ito, Genta; Davies, Paul; Trost, Matthias; Vetter, Melanie; Wachter, Stefanie; Lorentzen, Esben; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Stephen; Baptista, Marco As; Fiske, Brian K; Fell, Matthew J; Morrow, John A; Reith, Alastair D; Alessi, Dario R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Park8, encoding for the multidomain Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein, comprise the predominant genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). G2019S, the most common amino acid substitution activates the kinase two- to threefold. This has motivated the development of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors; however, poor consensus on physiological LRRK2 substrates has hampered clinical development of such therapeutics. We employ a combination of phosphoproteomics, genetics, and pharmacology to unambiguously identify a subset of Rab GTPases as key LRRK2 substrates. LRRK2 directly phosphorylates these both in vivo and in vitro on an evolutionary conserved residue in the switch II domain. Pathogenic LRRK2 variants mapping to different functional domains increase phosphorylation of Rabs and this strongly decreases their affinity to regulatory proteins including Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). Our findings uncover a key class of bona-fide LRRK2 substrates and a novel regulatory mechanism of Rabs that connects them to PD. PMID:26824392

  2. Phosphoproteomics Identified an NS5A Phosphorylation Site Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Chong, Weng Man; Hsu, Shih-Chin; Kao, Wei-Ting; Lo, Chieh-Wen; Lee, Kuan-Ying; Shao, Jheng-Syuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chang, Justin; Chen, Steve S-L; Yu, Ming-Jiun

    2016-02-19

    The non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein indispensable for the viral life cycle. Many prior papers have pinpointed several serine residues in the low complexity sequence I region of NS5A responsible for NS5A phosphorylation; however, the functions of specific phosphorylation sites remained obscure. Using phosphoproteomics, we identified three phosphorylation sites (serines 222, 235, and 238) in the NS5A low complexity sequence I region. Reporter virus and replicon assays using phosphorylation-ablated alanine mutants of these sites showed that Ser-235 dominated over Ser-222 and Ser-238 in HCV replication. Immunoblotting using an Ser-235 phosphorylation-specific antibody showed a time-dependent increase in Ser-235 phosphorylation that correlated with the viral replication activity. Ser-235 phosphorylated NS5A co-localized with double-stranded RNA, consistent with its role in HCV replication. Mechanistically, Ser-235 phosphorylation probably promotes the replication complex formation via increasing NS5A interaction with the human homologue of the 33-kDa vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein. Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) directly phosphorylated Ser-235 in vitro. Inhibition of CKIα reduced Ser-235 phosphorylation and the HCV RNA levels in the infected cells. We concluded that NS5A Ser-235 phosphorylated by CKIα probably promotes HCV replication via increasing NS5A interaction with the 33-kDa vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein. PMID:26702051

  3. Human embryonic stem cell phosphoproteome revealed by electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Swaney, Danielle L.; Wenger, Craig D.; Thomson, James A.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is central to the understanding of cellular signaling, and cellular signaling is suggested to play a major role in the regulation of human embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency. Here, we describe the use of conventional tandem mass spectrometry-based sequencing technology—collision-activated dissociation (CAD)—and the more recently developed method electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to characterize the human ES cell phosphoproteome. In total, these experiments resulted in the identification of 11,995 unique phosphopeptides, corresponding to 10,844 nonredundant phosphorylation sites, at a 1% false discovery rate (FDR). Among these phosphorylation sites are 5 localized to 2 pluripotency critical transcription factors—OCT4 and SOX2. From these experiments, we conclude that ETD identifies a larger number of unique phosphopeptides than CAD (8,087 to 3,868), more frequently localizes the phosphorylation site to a specific residue (49.8% compared with 29.6%), and sequences whole classes of phosphopeptides previously unobserved. PMID:19144917

  4. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese; Petyuk, Vlad; Camp, David; Smith, Richard; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Yang, Feng; Glass, N. Louise

    2014-05-29

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) -based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium versus sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Finally, we found mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.

  5. Site-Specific Ser/Thr/Tyr Phosphoproteome of Sinorhizobium meliloti at Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, a facultative microsymbiont of alfalfa, should fine-tune its cellular processes to live saprophytically in soils characterized with limited nutrients and diverse stresses. In this study, TiO2 enrichment and LC-MS/MS were used to uncover the site-specific Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphoproteome of S. meliloti in minimum medium at stationary phase. There are a total of 96 unique phosphorylated sites, with a Ser/Thr/Tyr distribution of 63:28:5, in 77 proteins. Phosphoproteins identified in S. meliloti showed a wide distribution pattern regarding to functional categories, such as replication, transcription, translation, posttranslational modification, transport and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrate, inorganic ion, succinoglycan etc. Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphosites identified within the conserved motif in proteins of key cellular function indicate a crucial role of phosphorylation in modulating cellular physiology. Moreover, phosphorylation in proteins involved in processes related to rhizobial adaptation was also discussed, such as those identified in SMa0114 and PhaP2 (polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis), ActR (pH stress and microaerobic adaption), SupA (potassium stress), chaperonin GroEL2 (viability and potentially symbiosis), and ExoP (succinoglycan synthesis and secretion). These Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphosites identified herein would be helpful for our further investigation and understanding of the role of phosphorylation in rhizobial physiology. PMID:26401955

  6. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese; Petyuk, Vlad; Camp, David; Smith, Richard; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Yang, Feng; et al

    2014-05-29

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) -based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggestsmore » that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium versus sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Finally, we found mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.« less

  7. A solid phase extraction-based platform for rapid phosphoproteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steven P.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is among the most common and intensely studied post-translational protein modification. It plays crucial roles in virtually all cellular processes and has been implicated in numerous human diseases, including cancer. Traditional biochemical and genetic methods for identifying and monitoring sites of phosphorylation are laborious and slow and in recent years have largely been replaced by mass spectrometric analysis. Improved methods for phosphopeptide enrichment coupled with faster and more sensitive mass spectrometers have led to an explosion in the size of phosphoproteomic datasets. However, wider application of these methods is limited by equipment costs and the resultant high demand for instrument time as well as by a technology gap between biologists and mass spectrometrists. Here we describe a modified two-step enrichment strategy that employs lysC digestion and step elution from self-packed strong cation exchange (SCX) solid phase extraction (SPE) columns followed by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) and LC-MS/MS analysis using a hybrid LTQ Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. The SCX procedure does not require an HPLC system, demands little expertise, and because multiple samples can be processed in parallel, can provide a large savings of time and labor. We demonstrate this method in conjunction with stable isotope labeling to quantify peptides harboring >8,000 unique phosphorylation sites in yeast in 12 hours of instrument analysis time and examine the impact of enzyme choice and instrument platform. PMID:21440633

  8. Identification of in vivo protein phosphorylation sites in human pathogen Schistosoma japonicum by a phosphoproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rong; Zhou, Chunjing; Lin, Jiaojiao; Yang, Dehao; Shi, Yaojun; Cheng, Guofeng

    2012-01-01

    Schistosome is the causative agent of human schistosomiasis and related animal disease. Reversible protein phosphorylation plays a key role in signaling processing that are vital for a cell and organism. However, it remains to be undercharacterized in schistosomes. In the present study, we characterized in vivo protein phosphorylation events in different developmental stages (schistosomula and adult worms) of Schistosoma japonicum by using microvolume immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) pipette tips coupled to nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS. In total, 127 distinct phosphorylation sites were identified in 92 proteins in S. japonicum. A comparison of the phosphopeptides identified between the schistosomula and the adult worms revealed 30 phosphoproteins co-detected in both of the two worms. These proteins included several signal molecules and enzymes such as 14-3-3 protein, cysteine string protein, heat shock protein 90, epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8, proliferation-associated protein 2G4, peptidyl-prolyl isomerase G, phosphofructokinase and thymidylate kinase. Additionally, the phosphorylation sites were examined for phosphorylation specific motif and evolutionarily conservation. The study represents the first attempt to determine in vivo protein phosphorylation in S. japonicum by using a phosphoproteomic approach. The results by providing an inventory of phosphorylated proteins may facilitate to further understand the mechanisms involved in schistosome development and growth, and then may result in the development of novel vaccine candidates and drug targets for schistosomiasis control. PMID:22036931

  9. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Cate, Jamie H.; Yang, Feng; Glass, Louise

    2014-11-01

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) -based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium versus sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.

  10. Plasmodiumfalciparum infection induces dynamic changes in the erythrocyte phospho-proteome.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Guillaume; Reininger, Luc; Ramdani, Ghania; D Phillips, Lee; Sharma, Vikram; Egee, Stephane; Langsley, Gordon; Lasonder, Edwin

    2016-05-01

    The phosphorylation status of red blood cell proteins is strongly altered during the infection by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We identify the key phosphorylation events that occur in the erythrocyte membrane and cytoskeleton during infection, by a comparative analysis of global phospho-proteome screens between infected (obtained at schizont stage) and uninfected RBCs. The meta-analysis of reported mass spectrometry studies revealed a novel compendium of 495 phosphorylation sites in 182 human proteins with regulatory roles in red cell morphology and stability, with about 25% of these sites specific to infected cells. A phosphorylation motif analysis detected 7 unique motifs that were largely mapped to kinase consensus sequences of casein kinase II and of protein kinase A/protein kinase C. This analysis highlighted prominent roles for PKA/PKC involving 78 phosphorylation sites. We then compared the phosphorylation status of PKA (PKC) specific sites in adducin, dematin, Band 3 and GLUT-1 in uninfected RBC stimulated or not by cAMP to their phosphorylation status in iRBC. We showed cAMP-induced phosphorylation of adducin S59 by immunoblotting and we were able to demonstrate parasite-induced phosphorylation for adducin S726, Band 3 and GLUT-1, corroborating the protein phosphorylation status in our erythrocyte phosphorylation site compendium. PMID:27067487

  11. Phosphoproteome profiling using a fluorescent phosphosensor dye in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Otani, Mieko; Taniguchi, Taizo; Sakai, Akiko; Seta, Jouji; Kadoyama, Keiichi; Nakamura-Hirota, Tooru; Matsuyama, Shogo; Sano, Keiji; Takano, Masaoki

    2011-07-01

    We validated the novel PhosphoQUANTI SolidBlue Complex (PQSC) dye for the sensitive fluorescent detection of phosphorylated proteins in polyacrylamide- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (PAGE and 2DE, respectively). PQSC can detect as little as 15.6 ng of ß-casein, a pentaphosphorylated protein, and 61.3 ng of ovalbumin, a diphosphorylated protein. Fluorescence intensity correlates with the number of phosphorylated residues on the protein. To demonstrate the specificity of PQSC for phosphoproteins, enzymatically dephosphorylated lysates of Swiss 3T3 cells were separated in 2DE gels and stained by PQSC. The fluorescence signals in these gels were markedly reduced following dephosphorylation. When the phosphorylated proteins in Swiss 3T3 cell lysates were concentrated using a phosphoprotein enrichment column, the majority of phosphoproteins showed fluorescence signals in the pI 4-5 range. Finally, we performed phosphoproteome analysis to study differences in the protein phosphorylation profiles of proliferating and quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells. Over 135 discernible protein spots were detected, from which a selection of 15 spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF-MS). The PQSC staining procedure for phosphoprotein detection is simple, reversible, and fully compatible with MALDI TOF-MS. PMID:21384102

  12. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese; Petyuk, Vlad; Camp, David; Smith, Richard; Cate, Jamie H.D.; Yang, Feng; Glass, N. Louise

    2014-01-01

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based LC–MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium vs sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi. PMID:24881580

  13. Analytical bioconjugates, aptamers, enable specific quantitative detection of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Ahn, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyeong-Ah; Um, Hyun-Ju; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Sun Park, Tae; Min, Jiho; Kim, Yang-Hoon

    2015-06-15

    As a major human pathogen in the Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes causes the bacterial disease listeriosis, which is a serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with the bacteria. We have developed an aptamer-based sandwich assay (ABSA) platform that demonstrates a promising potential for use in pathogen detection using aptamers as analytical bioconjugates. The whole-bacteria SELEX (WB-SELEX) strategy was adopted to generate aptamers with high affinity and specificity against live L. monocytogenes. Of the 35 aptamer candidates tested, LMCA2 and LMCA26 reacted to L. monocytogenes with high binding, and were consequently chosen as sensing probes. The ABSA platform can significantly enhance the sensitivity by employing a very specific aptamer pair for the sandwich complex. The ABSA platform exhibited a linear response over a wide concentration range of L. monocytogenes from 20 to 2×10(6) CFU per mL and was closely correlated with the following relationship: y=9533.3x+1542.3 (R(2)=0.99). Our proposed ABSA platform also provided excellent specificity for the tests to distinguish L. monocytogenes from other Listeria species and other bacterial genera (3 Listeria spp., 4 Salmonella spp., 2 Vibrio spp., 3 Escherichia coli and 3 Shigella spp.). Improvements in the sensitivity and specificity have not only facilitated the reliable detection of L. monocytogenes at extremely low concentrations, but also allowed for the development of a 96-well plate-based routine assay platform for multivalent diagnostics. PMID:25590973

  14. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  15. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, Zayas; Michael, Derby; Patrick, Gilman; Ananthan, Shreyas; Lantz, Eric; Cotrell, Jason; Beck, Fredic; Tusing, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Leveraging this experience, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office has evaluated the potential for wind power to generate electricity in all 50 states. This report analyzes and quantifies the geographic expansion that could be enabled by accessing higher above ground heights for wind turbines and considers the means by which this new potential could be responsibly developed.

  16. Bedrails: restraints or enablers?

    PubMed

    Mullette, Betty; Zulkowski, Karen

    2004-08-01

    Bedrails presently are used as both mobility restraints and enablers in long-term care facilities. As enablers, bedrails facilitate movement and may reduce the risk of pressure ulcer development. As restraints, they impede movement and may increase risk of ulcer development. Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act regulations on restraint use have led to confusion for state Medicare surveyors and facilities regarding the definition of appropriate bedrail use and need for supportive documentation. Consequently, some facilities receive deficiency citations for inappropriate use or documentation while others do not. The purpose of this survey was to compare responses of Directors of Nursing in long-term care facilities and Medicare state surveyors to determine how each interprets the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act bedrail language for use and documentation. Questionnaires on bedrail use and documentation were sent to state surveyors and Directors of Nursing. One hundred, three (103) Directors of Nursing in 45 states and 65 surveyors from 39 states participated in the survey (response rate 61%). Study results demonstrated general acceptance of bedrail use as an enabler but not as a restraint by both Directors of Nursing and state surveyors. Four percent (4%) of Directors of Nursing reported receiving a citation for bedrail use and 59% of surveyors reported issuing citations for bedrail use. Significant differences were noted between the two groups regarding appropriate bedrail use and necessary documentation. The intent of Medicare guidelines and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is to standardize care for nursing home residents in the United States; yet, current regulations are open to individual interpretation by state surveyors and confusion exists between the intent of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act and the daily operations of nursing homes. Educating clinicians about the risks and benefits of bedrail use, either as restraint or enabler, and

  17. iPhos: a toolkit to streamline the alkaline phosphatase-assisted comprehensive LC-MS phosphoproteome investigation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comprehensive characterization of the phosphoproteome in living cells is critical in signal transduction research. But the low abundance of phosphopeptides among the total proteome in cells remains an obstacle in mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. To provide a solution, an alternative analytic strategy to confidently identify phosphorylated peptides by using the alkaline phosphatase (AP) treatment combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry was provided. While the process is applicable, the key integration along the pipeline was mostly done by tedious manual work. Results We developed a software toolkit, iPhos, to facilitate and streamline the work-flow of AP-assisted phosphoproteome characterization. The iPhos tookit includes one assister and three modules. The iPhos Peak Extraction Assister automates the batch mode peak extraction for multiple liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) runs. iPhos Module-1 can process the peak lists extracted from the LC-MS analyses derived from the original and dephosphorylated samples to mine out potential phosphorylated peptide signals based on mass shift caused by the loss of some multiples of phosphate groups. And iPhos Module-2 provides customized inclusion lists with peak retention time windows for subsequent targeted LC-MS/MS experiments. Finally, iPhos Module-3 facilitates to link the peptide identifications from protein search engines to the quantification results from pattern-based label-free quantification tools. We further demonstrated the utility of the iPhos toolkit on the data of human metastatic lung cancer cells (CL1-5). Conclusions In the comparison study of the control group of CL1-5 cell lysates and the treatment group of dasatinib-treated CL1-5 cell lysates, we demonstrated the applicability of the iPhos toolkit and reported the experimental results based on the iPhos-facilitated phosphoproteome investigation. And further, we also compared the strategy with pure DDA-based LC

  18. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography on collapsed Langmuir-Blodgett iron(III) stearate films and iron(III) oxide nanoparticles for bottom-up phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Gladilovich, Vladimir; Greifenhagen, Uta; Sukhodolov, Nikolai; Selyutin, Artem; Singer, David; Thieme, Domenika; Majovsky, Petra; Shirkin, Alexey; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Bonitenko, Evgeny; Podolskaya, Ekaterina; Frolov, Andrej

    2016-04-22

    Phosphorylation is the enzymatic reaction of site-specific phosphate transfer from energy-rich donors to the side chains of serine, threonine, tyrosine, and histidine residues in proteins. In living cells, reversible phosphorylation underlies a universal mechanism of intracellular signal transduction. In this context, analysis of the phosphoproteome is a prerequisite to better understand the cellular regulatory networks. Conventionally, due to the low contents of signaling proteins, selective enrichment of proteolytic phosphopeptides by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) is performed prior to their LC-MS or -MS/MS analysis. Unfortunately, this technique still suffers from low selectivity and compromised analyte recoveries. To overcome these limitations, we propose IMAC systems comprising stationary phases based on collapsed Langmuir-Blodgett films of iron(III) stearate (FF) or iron(III) oxide nanoparticles (FO) and mobile phases relying on ammonia, piperidine and heptadecafluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). Experiments with model phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein tryptic digests showed superior binding capacity, selectivity and recovery for both systems in comparison to the existing commercial analogs. As evidenced by LC-MS/MS analysis of the HeLa phosphoproteome, these features of the phases resulted in increased phosphoproteome coverage in comparison to the analogous commercially available phases, indicating that our IMAC protocol is a promising chromatographic tool for in-depth phosphoproteomic research. PMID:27016113

  19. Multidimensional strategy for sensitive phosphoproteomics incorporating protein prefractionation combined with SIMAC, HILIC, and TiO(2) chromatography applied to proximal EGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Hansen, Thomas Aarup; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Larsen, Martin R

    2011-12-01

    Comprehensive enrichment and fractionation is essential to obtain a broad coverage of the phosphoproteome. This inevitably leads to sample loss, and thus, phosphoproteomics studies are usually only performed on highly abundant samples. Here, we present a comprehensive phosphoproteomics strategy applied to 400 μg of protein from EGF-stimulated HeLa cells. The proteins are separated into membrane and cytoplasmic fractions using sodium carbonate combined with ultracentrifugation. The phosphopeptides were separated into monophosphorylated and multiphosphorylated pools using sequential elution from IMAC (SIMAC) followed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography of the mono- and nonphosphorylated peptides and subsequent titanium dioxide chromatography of the HILIC fractions. This strategy facilitated the identification of >4700 unique phosphopeptides, while 636 phosphosites were changing following short-term EGF stimulation, many of which were not previously known to be involved in EGFR signaling. We further compared three different data processing programs and found large differences in their peptide identification rates due to different implementations of recalibration and filtering. Manually validating a subset of low-scoring peptides exclusively identified using the MaxQuant software revealed a large percentage of false positive identifications. This indicates that, despite having highly accurate precursor mass determination, peptides with low fragment ion scores should not automatically be reported in phosphoproteomics studies. PMID:21955146

  20. Enable, mediate, advocate.

    PubMed

    Saan, Hans; Wise, Marilyn

    2011-12-01

    The authors of the Ottawa Charter selected the words enable, mediate and advocate to describe the core activities in what was, in 1986, the new Public Health. This article considers these concepts and the values and ideas upon which they were based. We discuss their relevance in the current context within which health promotion is being conducted, and discuss the implications of changes in the health agenda, media and globalization for practice. We consider developments within health promotion since 1986: its central role in policy rhetoric, the increasing understanding of complexities and the interlinkage with many other societal processes. So the three core activities are reviewed: they still fit well with the main health promotion challenges, but should be refreshed by new ideas and values. As the role of health promotion in the political arena has grown we have become part of the policy establishment and that is a mixed blessing. Making way for community advocates is now our challenge. Enabling requires greater sensitivity to power relations involved and an understanding of the role of health literacy. Mediating keeps its central role as it bridges vital interests of parties. We conclude that these core concepts in the Ottawa Charter need no serious revision. There are, however, lessons from the last 25 years that point to ways to address present and future challenges with greater sensitivity and effectiveness. We invite the next generation to avoid canonizing this text: as is true of every heritage, the heirs must decide on its use. PMID:22080073

  1. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-10-15

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  2. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  3. Phosphoproteomic Approach to Characterize Protein Mono- and Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Sites from Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose), or PAR, is a cellular polymer implicated in DNA/RNA metabolism, cell death, and cellular stress response via its role as a post-translational modification, signaling molecule, and scaffolding element. PAR is synthesized by a family of proteins known as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, or PARPs, which attach PAR polymers to various amino acids of substrate proteins. The nature of these polymers (large, charged, heterogeneous, base-labile) has made these attachment sites difficult to study by mass spectrometry. Here we propose a new pipeline that allows for the identification of mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation sites via the enzymatic product of phosphodiesterase-treated ADP-ribose, or phospho(ribose). The power of this method lies in the enrichment potential of phospho(ribose), which we show to be enriched by phosphoproteomic techniques when a neutral buffer, which allows for retention of the base-labile attachment site, is used for elution. Through the identification of PARP-1 in vitro automodification sites as well as endogenous ADP-ribosylation sites from whole cells, we have shown that ADP-ribose can exist on adjacent amino acid residues as well as both lysine and arginine in addition to known acidic modification sites. The universality of this technique has allowed us to show that enrichment of ADP-ribosylated proteins by macrodomain leads to a bias against ADP-ribose modifications conjugated to glutamic acids, suggesting that the macrodomain is either removing or selecting against these distinct protein attachments. Ultimately, the enrichment pipeline presented here offers a universal approach for characterizing the mono- and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteome. PMID:24920161

  4. Salt-Induced Changes in Cardiac Phosphoproteome in a Rat Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengxiu; Zhu, Hongguo; Zhang, Menghuan; Wang, Liangliang; He, Hanchang; Jiang, Shaoling; Hou, Fan Fan; Li, Aiqing

    2014-01-01

    Heart damage is widely present in patients with chronic kidney disease. Salt diet is the most important environmental factor affecting development of chronic renal failure and cardiovascular diseases. The proteins involved in chronic kidney disease -induced heart damage, especially their posttranslational modifications, remain largely unknown to date. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure model) or sham operation were treated for 2 weeks with a normal-(0.4% NaCl), or high-salt (4% NaCl) diet. We employed TiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for phosphoproteomic profiling of left ventricular free walls in these animals. A total of 1724 unique phosphopeptides representing 2551 non-redundant phosphorylation sites corresponding to 763 phosphoproteins were identified. During normal salt feeding, 89 (54%) phosphopeptides upregulated and 76 (46%) phosphopeptides downregulated in chronic renal failure rats relative to sham rats. In chronic renal failure rats, high salt intake induced upregulation of 84 (49%) phosphopeptides and downregulation of 88 (51%) phosphopeptides. Database searches revealed that most of the identified phospholproteins were important signaling molecules such as protein kinases, receptors and phosphatases. These phospholproteins were involved in energy metabolism, cell communication, cell differentiation, cell death and other biological processes. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes analysis revealed functional links among 15 significantly regulated phosphoproteins in chronic renal failure rats compared to sham group, and 23 altered phosphoproteins induced by high salt intake. The altered phosphorylation levels of two proteins involved in heart damage, lamin A and phospholamban were validated. Expression of the downstream genes of these two proteins, desmin and SERCA2a, were also analyzed. PMID:24945867

  5. Use of 32P to Study Dynamics of the Mitochondrial Phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Aponte, Angel M.; Phillips, Darci; Hopper, Rachel K.; Johnson, D. Thor; Harris, Robert A.; Blinova, Ksenia; Boja, Emily S.; French, Stephanie; Balaban, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a well characterized regulatory mechanism in the cytosol, but remains poorly defined in the mitochondrion. In this study, we characterized the use of 32P-labeling to monitor the turnover of protein phosphorylation in the heart and liver mitochondria matrix. The 32P labeling technique was compared and contrasted to Phos-tag protein phosphorylation fluorescent stain and 2D isoelectric focusing. Of the 64 proteins identified by MS spectroscopy in the Phos-Tag gels, over 20 proteins were correlated with 32P labeling. The high sensitivity of 32P incorporation detected proteins well below the mass spectrometry and even 2D gel protein detection limits. Phosphate-chase experiments revealed both turnover and phosphate associated protein pool size alterations dependent on initial incubation conditions. Extensive weak phosphate/phosphate metabolite interactions were observed using non-disruptive native gels, providing a novel approach to screen for potential allosteric interactions of phosphate metabolites with matrix proteins. We confirmed the phosphate associations in Complexes V and I due to their critical role in oxidative phosphorylation and to validate the 2D methods. These complexes were isolated by immunocapture, after 32P labeling in the intact mitochondria, and revealed 32P-incorporation for the α, β, γ, OSCP, and d subunits in Complex V and the 75kDa, 51kDa, 42kDa, 23kDa, and 13a kDa subunits in Complex I. These results demonstrate that a dynamic and extensive mitochondrial matrix phosphoproteome exists in heart and liver. PMID:19351177

  6. Biosynthesis and Regulation of Wheat Amylose and Amylopectin from Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Characterization of Granule-binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guan-Xing; Zhou, Jian-Wen; Liu, Yan-Lin; Lu, Xiao-Bing; Han, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Wen-Ying; Xu, Yan-Hao; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Waxy starch has an important influence on the qualities of breads. Generally, grain weight and yield in waxy wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are significantly lower than in bread wheat. In this study, we performed the first proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of starch granule-binding proteins by comparing the waxy wheat cultivar Shannong 119 and the bread wheat cultivar Nongda 5181. These results indicate that reduced amylose content does not affect amylopectin synthesis, but it causes significant reduction of total starch biosynthesis, grain size, weight and grain yield. Two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis identified 40 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots in waxy and non-waxy wheats, which belonged mainly to starch synthase (SS) I, SS IIa and granule-bound SS I. Most DEPs involved in amylopectin synthesis showed a similar expression pattern during grain development, suggesting relatively independent amylose and amylopectin synthesis pathways. Phosphoproteome analysis of starch granule-binding proteins, using TiO2 microcolumns and LC-MS/MS, showed that the total number of phosphoproteins and their phosphorylation levels in ND5181 were significantly higher than in SN119, but proteins controlling amylopectin synthesis had similar phosphorylation levels. Our results revealed the lack of amylose did not affect the expression and phosphorylation of the starch granule-binding proteins involved in amylopectin biosynthesis. PMID:27604546

  7. In vivo Phosphoproteome of Human Skeletal Muscle Revealed by Phosphopeptide Enrichment and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Højlund, Kurt; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Hwang, Hyonson; Flynn, Charles R.; Madireddy, Lohith; Thangiah, Geetha; Langlais, Paul; Meyer, Christian; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in signal transduction pathways that regulate substrate and energy metabolism, contractile function, and muscle mass in human skeletal muscle. Abnormal phosphorylation of signaling enzymes has been identified in insulin resistant muscle using phosphoepitope-specific antibodies, but its role in other skeletal muscle disorders remains largely unknown. This may be in part due to insufficient knowledge of relevant targets. Here, we therefore present the first large-scale in vivo phosphoproteomic study of human skeletal muscle from 3 lean, healthy volunteers. Trypsin digestion of 3-5 mg human skeletal muscle protein was followed by phosphopeptide enrichment using SCX and TiO2. The resulting phosphopeptides were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Using this unbiased approach, we identified 306 distinct in vivo phosphorylation sites in 127 proteins, including 240 phosphoserines, 53 phosphothreonines and 13 phosphotyrosines in at least 2 out of 3 subjects. In addition, 61 ambiguous phosphorylation sites were identified in at least 2 out of 3 subjects. The majority of phosphoproteins detected are involved in sarcomeric function, excitation-contraction coupling (the Ca2+-cycle), glycolysis and glycogen metabolism. Of particular interest, we identified multiple novel phosphorylation sites on several sarcomeric Z-disc proteins known to be involved in signaling and muscle disorders. These results provide numerous new targets for the investigation of human skeletal muscle phosphoproteins in health and disease and demonstrate feasibility of phosphoproteomics research of human skeletal muscle in vivo. PMID:19764811

  8. Alterations in the Cerebellar (Phospho)Proteome of a Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent Protein Kinase Knockout Mouse*

    PubMed Central

    Corradini, Eleonora; Vallur, Raghavan; Raaijmakers, Linsey M.; Feil, Susanne; Feil, Robert; Heck, Albert J. R.; Scholten, Arjen

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in learning and memory, but its signaling mechanisms in the mammalian brain are not fully understood. Using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics, we evaluated how the cerebellum adapts its (phospho)proteome in a knockout mouse model of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI). Our data reveal that a small subset of proteins in the cerebellum (∼3% of the quantified proteins) became substantially differentially expressed in the absence of cGKI. More changes were observed at the phosphoproteome level, with hundreds of sites being differentially phosphorylated between wild-type and knockout cerebellum. Most of these phosphorylated sites do not represent known cGKI substrates. An integrative computational network analysis of the data indicated that the differentially expressed proteins and proteins harboring differentially phosphorylated sites largely belong to a tight network in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum involving important cGMP/cAMP signaling nodes (e.g. PDE5 and PKARIIβ) and Ca2+ signaling (e.g. SERCA3). In this way, removal of cGKI could be linked to impaired cerebellar long-term depression at Purkinje cell synapses. In addition, we were able to identify a set of novel putative (phospho)proteins to be considered in this network. Overall, our data improve our understanding of cerebellar cGKI signaling and suggest novel players in cGKI-regulated synaptic plasticity. PMID:24925903

  9. Biosynthesis and Regulation of Wheat Amylose and Amylopectin from Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Characterization of Granule-binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Xing; Zhou, Jian-Wen; Liu, Yan-Lin; Lu, Xiao-Bing; Han, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Wen-Ying; Xu, Yan-Hao; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Waxy starch has an important influence on the qualities of breads. Generally, grain weight and yield in waxy wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are significantly lower than in bread wheat. In this study, we performed the first proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of starch granule-binding proteins by comparing the waxy wheat cultivar Shannong 119 and the bread wheat cultivar Nongda 5181. These results indicate that reduced amylose content does not affect amylopectin synthesis, but it causes significant reduction of total starch biosynthesis, grain size, weight and grain yield. Two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis identified 40 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots in waxy and non-waxy wheats, which belonged mainly to starch synthase (SS) I, SS IIa and granule-bound SS I. Most DEPs involved in amylopectin synthesis showed a similar expression pattern during grain development, suggesting relatively independent amylose and amylopectin synthesis pathways. Phosphoproteome analysis of starch granule-binding proteins, using TiO2 microcolumns and LC-MS/MS, showed that the total number of phosphoproteins and their phosphorylation levels in ND5181 were significantly higher than in SN119, but proteins controlling amylopectin synthesis had similar phosphorylation levels. Our results revealed the lack of amylose did not affect the expression and phosphorylation of the starch granule-binding proteins involved in amylopectin biosynthesis. PMID:27604546

  10. Meta-Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Phospho-Proteomics Data Reveals Compartmentalization of Phosphorylation Motifs[C][W

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Klaas J.; Friso, Giulia; Walther, Dirk; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    Protein (de)phosphorylation plays an important role in plants. To provide a robust foundation for subcellular phosphorylation signaling network analysis and kinase-substrate relationships, we performed a meta-analysis of 27 published and unpublished in-house mass spectrometry–based phospho-proteome data sets for Arabidopsis thaliana covering a range of processes, (non)photosynthetic tissue types, and cell cultures. This resulted in an assembly of 60,366 phospho-peptides matching to 8141 nonredundant proteins. Filtering the data for quality and consistency generated a set of medium and a set of high confidence phospho-proteins and their assigned phospho-sites. The relation between single and multiphosphorylated peptides is discussed. The distribution of p-proteins across cellular functions and subcellular compartments was determined and showed overrepresentation of protein kinases. Extensive differences in frequency of pY were found between individual studies due to proteomics and mass spectrometry workflows. Interestingly, pY was underrepresented in peroxisomes but overrepresented in mitochondria. Using motif-finding algorithms motif-x and MMFPh at high stringency, we identified compartmentalization of phosphorylation motifs likely reflecting localized kinase activity. The filtering of the data assembly improved signal/noise ratio for such motifs. Identified motifs were linked to kinases through (bioinformatic) enrichment analysis. This study also provides insight into the challenges/pitfalls of using large-scale phospho-proteomic data sets to nonexperts. PMID:24894044