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Sample records for enabling personalized medicine

  1. Customized care 2020: how medical sequencing and network biology will enable personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Arnaout, Ramy; Hill, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Applications of next-generation nucleic acid sequencing technologies will lead to the development of precision diagnostics that will, in turn, be a major technology enabler of precision medicine. Terabyte-scale, multidimensional data sets derived using these technologies will be used to reverse engineer the specific disease networks that underlie individual patients’ conditions. Modeling and simulation of these networks in the presence of virtual drugs, and combinations of drugs, will identify the most efficacious therapy for precision medicine and customized care. In coming years the practice of medicine will routinely employ network biology analytics supported by high-performance supercomputing. PMID:20948615

  2. Preparing the personal physician for practice: changing family medicine residency training to enable new model practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Larry A; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Pugno, Perry A

    2007-12-01

    After two years of intensive study, in 2004 the Future of Family Medicine report concluded that the current U.S. health care system is inadequate and unsustainable, and called for changes within the specialty of family medicine to ensure the future health of the American public. With guidance and encouragement from many disciplines and health experts, a set of 10 recommendations was established to accomplish a transformative change in how family physicians serve their patients and how the essential function of primary care is achieved. From these recommendations came a period of innovation and experimentation in the training of family physicians, entitled Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4). The P4 project is a carefully designed and evaluated initiative led by the American Board of Family Medicine and the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors and administered by TransforMED, a practice redesign initiative of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Fourteen family medicine programs were chosen to participate and will put their innovations into practice from 2007 to 2012, during which time regular evaluation will be conducted. The purpose of P4 is to learn how to improve the graduate medical education of family physicians such that they are prepared to be outstanding personal physicians and to work in the new models of practice now emerging. The innovations tested by P4 residencies are expected to inspire substantial changes in the content, structure, and locations of training of family physicians and to guide future revisions in accreditation and certification requirements. PMID:18046133

  3. Pharmacogenomic characterization of gemcitabine response – a framework for data integration to enable personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michael; Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Natarajan, Thanemozhi; Sheahan, Laura; Wang, Difei; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Shoulson, Ira; Filice, Ross; Steadman, Kenneth; Pishvaian, Michael J.; Deeken, John

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Response to the oncology drug gemcitabine may be variable in part due to genetic differences in the enzymes and transporters responsible for its metabolism and disposition. The aim of our in-silico study was to identify gene variants significantly associated with gemcitabine response that may help to personalize treatment in the clinic. Methods We analyzed two independent data sets: (a) genotype data from NCI-60 cell lines using the Affymetrix DMET 1.0 platform combined with gemcitabine cytotoxicity data in those cell lines, and (b) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) data from 351 pancreatic cancer patients treated on an NCI-sponsored phase III clinical trial. We also performed a subset analysis on the GWAS data set for 135 patients who were given gemcitabine+placebo. Statistical and systems biology analyses were performed on each individual data set to identify biomarkers significantly associated with gemcitabine response. Results Genetic variants in the ABC transporters (ABCC1, ABCC4) and the CYP4 family members CYP4F8 and CYP4F12, CHST3, and PPARD were found to be significant in both the NCI-60 and GWAS data sets. We report significant association between drug response and variants within members of the chondroitin sulfotransferase family (CHST) whose role in gemcitabine response is yet to be delineated. Conclusion Biomarkers identified in this integrative analysis may contribute insights into gemcitabine response variability. As genotype data become more readily available, similar studies can be conducted to gain insights into drug response mechanisms and to facilitate clinical trial design and regulatory reviews. PMID:24401833

  4. Immunoinformatics in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Gulukota, Kamalakar

    2003-01-01

    Diagnosis of human disease has been undergoing steady improvement over the past few centuries. Many ailments that were once considered a single entity have been classified into finer categories on the basis of response to therapy (e.g. type I and type II diabetes), inheritance (e.g. familial and non-familial polyposis coli), histology (e.g. small cell and adenocarcinoma of lung) and most recently transcriptional profiling (e.g. leukaemia, lymphoma). The next dimension in this finer categorization appears to be the typing of the patient rather than the disease i.e. disease X in person of type Y. The problem of personalized medicine is to devise tests which predict the type of individual, especially where the type is correlated with response to therapy. Immunology has been at the forefront of personalized medicine for quite a while, even though the term is not often used in this connection. Blood grouping and cross-matching (for blood transfusion), and anaphylaxis test (for penicillin) are just two examples. In this paper I will argue that immunological tests have an important place in the future of personalized medicine. I will describe methods we developed for personalizing vaccines based on MHC allele frequencies in human populations and methods for predicting peptide binding to class I MHC molecules. In conclusion, I will argue that immunological tests, and consequently immunoinformatics, will play a big role in making personalized medicine a reality. PMID:14712931

  5. Pharmacogenetics: implementing personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Mini, Enrico; Nobili, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    approach has helped unravel genetic variants that influence clinical drug responsiveness, gene-wide association studies have recently gained attention as they enable to associate specific genetic variants or quantitative differences in gene expression with drug response.Although research findings are accumulating, most of the potential of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics remains to be explored and must be validated in prospective randomized clinical trials.The genetic and molecular foundations of personalized medicine appear solid and evidence indicates its growing importance in healthcare. PMID:22461093

  6. Pharmacogenomics and Nanotechnology Toward Advancing Personalized Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizirianakis, Ioannis S.; Amanatiadou, Elsa P.

    The target of personalized medicine to achieve major benefits for all patients in terms of diagnosis and drug delivery can be facilitated by creating a sincere multidisciplinary information-based infrastructure in health care. To this end, nanotechnology, pharmacogenomics, and informatics can advance the utility of personalized medicine, enable clinical translation of genomic knowledge, empower healthcare environment, and finally improve clinical outcomes.

  7. Personalized medicine and ethics.

    PubMed

    Josko, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    An entire series could be dedicated to the topic of ethics in personalized medicine. Due to the advancements in NGS and genetic testing, personalized medicine is no longer something that will occur in the future, the reality is upon us now. Sequencing an individual's genome can have a substantial impact on the patient's treatment and overall quality of life. However, this can open "Pandora's box" especially if an individual does not want to know the information obtained. In addition, will insurance companies require genetic testing in order to pay for a targeted treatment? If the patient refuses to have the genetic testing, will they have to pay for their treatment out of pocket? In the human interest story presented, the researcher and his team discovered over activity of the FTL3 protein through RNA sequencing which resulted in rapid proliferation of his leukemic cells. He identified a drug marketed for advanced kidney cancer which was a FTL3 inhibitor. However, his insurance company refused to pay for the drug because it was not a known treatment for his condition of ALL. He incurred numerous out of pocket expenses in order to go into remission. Was it unethical for the insurance company to not pay for a treatment that ultimately worked but was not marketed or FDA cleared for his type of leukemia? There are so many questions and concerns when personalized medicine is implemented. Only time will tell the effects next generation sequencing and its role in personalized medicine will have in the future. PMID:25219077

  8. The emergence of point-of-care blood-based biomarker testing for psychiatric disorders: enabling personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Guest, Francesca L; Guest, Paul C; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    For psychiatric disorders, repeated failures in converting scientific discoveries into novel drugs has precipitated a crisis and eroded confidence in drug discovery. This review describes how current and future innovations driven by application of biomarkers can help to re-initiate research in this area. This will have positive impact on the field of psychiatry and result in application of sensitive and specific biochemical tests in parallel with the traditional questionnaires for improved diagnosis. Furthermore, application of emerging biosensor tools will facilitate point-of-care testing by fusion of biochemical and clinical data. In this way, patient data will be comprised of past medical histories, biopatterns and prognosis information, resulting in personalized profiles or molecular fingerprints for patients with these conditions. PMID:26999493

  9. Roadmap to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Qattan, Malak; Demonacos, Constantinos; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija

    2012-08-01

    Standard clinical protocols and the concept "one drug fits all" that are currently used to treat illness in many cases are not effective, and strikingly so in the treatment of cancer, where 75% of therapeutic schemes are ineffective. The concept of personalized medicine is that the treatment of the disease is designed on the basis of the individual needs of each patient and the factors that influence their response to different drugs. Individualization of patient care has the potential to generate novel effective therapies, limit the adverse drug effects, create optimal treatments for individual patients, and decrease the cost associated with chronic illness and complications of drug usage. However, to achieve the goals of personalized medicine many challenges must be addressed. Here we discuss possible ways to increase the consistency of data generated by basic research and their suitability for application in medicine. New technologies employing systems biology and computer based approaches will facilitate overcoming many of the scientific challenges in the field. Changes in the education of researchers, health professionals, and the public are also required to successfully implement personalized medicine as a routine in the clinic. Finally, shift of the focus away from the development of blockbuster drugs in the biopharmaceutical industry, and modifications in the legal system to accommodate novel advancements need to be considered. The joint effort of all interested parties is needed to generate an efficient roadmap that will take us rapidly and safely to effective individual treatment, which will eliminate diseases and create better health care for all. PMID:22911518

  10. Balancing personalized medicine and personalized care.

    PubMed

    Cornetta, Kenneth; Brown, Candy Gunther

    2013-03-01

    The current description of personalized medicine by the National Institutes of Health is "the science of individualized prevention and therapy." Although physicians are beginning to see the promise of genetic medicine coming to fruition, the rapid pace of sequencing technology, informatics, and computer science predict a revolution in the ability to care for patients in the near future. The enthusiasm expressed by researchers is well founded, but the expectations voiced by the public do not center on advancing technology. Rather, patients are asking for personalized care: a holistic approach that considers physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. This perspective considers psychological, religious, and ethical challenges that may arise as the precision of preventive medicine improves. Psychological studies already highlight the barriers to single gene testing and suggest significant barriers to the predictive testing envisioned by personalized medicine. Certain religious groups will likely mount opposition if they believe personalized medicine encourages embryo selection. If the technology prompts cost-containment discussions, those concerned about the sanctity of life may raise ethical objections. Consequently, the availability of new scientific developments does not guarantee advances in treatment because patients may prove unwilling to receive and act on personalized genetic information. This perspective highlights current efforts to incorporate personalized medicine and personalized care into the medical curriculum, genetic counseling, and other aspects of clinical practice. Because these efforts are generally independent, the authors offer recommendations for physicians and educators so that personalized medicine can be implemented in a manner that meets patient expectations for personalized care. PMID:23348082

  11. Fundamentals of Pharmacogenetics in Personalized, Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Roland; Yin, DeLu Tyler

    2016-09-01

    This article introduces fundamental principles of pharmacogenetics as applied to personalized and precision medicine. Pharmacogenetics establishes relationships between pharmacology and genetics by connecting phenotypes and genotypes in predicting the response of therapeutics in individual patients. We describe differences between precision and personalized medicine and relate principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to applications in laboratory medicine. We also review basic principles of pharmacogenetics, including its evolution, how it enables the practice of personalized therapeutics, and the role of the clinical laboratory. These fundamentals are a segue for understanding specific clinical applications of pharmacogenetics described in subsequent articles in this issue. PMID:27514461

  12. Personalized Medicine for Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Chibawanye I.; Holland, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine for cancer entails tailoring therapy for each patient based on unique features of the patient's tumor; physiologic, molecular, genetic and epigenetic. Our ability to molecularly characterize tumor cells has increased dramatically and shown that there are significant differences between samples from patients with the same tumor type. Given this extensive variability in mutations and pathways driving tumors in patients, seeking a single bullet is an unrealistic approach for achieving a cure. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common adult brain tumor, this inter-tumoral heterogeneity is further complicated by intra-tumoral heterogeneity within the tumor. This suggests that for personalized therapy to work for GBMs, pharmacologic agents would not only be tailored to target the differences from patient to patient but also the clonal diversity within each patient's tumor. In this review, we provide a historical perspective on clinical trials for cancer. We also discuss the current state of molecular biology and immunology based strategies for personalized therapies for glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:25722938

  13. Personalized Medicine in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moo-Sik; Flammer, Andreas J.; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a novel medical model with all decisions and practices being tailored to individual patients in whatever ways possible. In the era of genomics, personalized medicine combines the genetic information for additional benefit in preventive and therapeutic strategies. Personalized medicine may allow the physician to provide a better therapy for patients in terms of efficiency, safety and treatment length to reduce the associated costs. There was a remarkable growth in scientific publication on personalized medicine within the past few years in the cardiovascular field. However, so far, only very few cardiologists in the USA are incorporating personalized medicine into clinical treatment. We review the concepts, strengths, limitations and challenges of personalized medicine with a particular focus on cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). There are many challenges from both scientific and policy perspectives to personalized medicine, which can overcome them by comprehensive concept and understanding, clinical application, and evidence based practices. Individualized medicine serves a pivotal role in the evolution of national and global healthcare reform, especially, in the CVDs fields. Ultimately, personalized medicine will affect the entire landscape of health care system in the near future. PMID:23091501

  14. Perspective: Balancing Personalized Medicine and Personalized Care

    PubMed Central

    Cornetta, Kenneth; Brown, Candy Gunther

    2013-01-01

    The current description of personalized medicine by the National Institutes of Health is “the science of individualized prevention and therapy.” Although physicians are just beginning to see the promise of genetic medicine coming to fruition, the rapid pace of sequencing technology, informatics, and computer science predict a true revolution in the ability to care for patients in the near future. The enthusiasm expressed by researchers is well founded, but the expectations voiced by the public do not center on advancing technology. Rather, patients are asking for personalized care: a holistic approach that considers an individual’s physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. This perspective considers psychological, religious, and ethical challenges that may arise as the precision of preventive medicine improves. Psychological studies already highlight the barriers to single gene testing and suggest significant barriers to the predictive testing envisioned by personalized medicine. Certain religious groups will likely mount opposition if they believe personalized medicine encourages embryo selection. If the technology prompts cost-containment discussions, those concerned about the sanctity of life may raise ethical objections. Consequently, the availability of new scientific developments does not guarantee advances in treatment because patients may prove unwilling to receive and act upon personalized genetic information. This perspective highlights current efforts to incorporate personalized medicine and personalized care into the medical curriculum, genetic counseling, and other aspects of clinical practice. As these efforts are generally independent, the authors offer recommendations for physicians and educators so that personalized medicine can be implemented in a manner that meets patient expectations for personalized care. PMID:23348082

  15. [Personalized medicine in rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-03-31

    In rheumatology, especially in arthritides, early diagnosis and aggressive therapy may open up new dimensions of expectations, such as improvement of pain, prevention of structural, functional damage and better quality of life. Targeted (biological) therapy has brought new horizons in rheumatology. As it is a rather expensive treatment modality, it has been urgent to develop tools suitable for the prediction of therapeutic responses. Several clinical, immunological and genetic biomarkers have been established for this purpose. Among clinical markers, male sex, younger age, lower or even higher disease activity at baseline, combination treatment and quitting smoking may lead to better treatment outcome. Immunological biomarkers, such as C-reactive protein, seropositivity, peripheral blood or synovial cellular content have been associated with therapeutic responses. Finally, numerous genes or gene signatures may also predict the efficacy or safety of immunosuppressive drugs. Although sometimes there have been only few studies conducted that led to some controversy, some biomarkers have also been validated. This may lead us to optimism in terms of wider acceptance of personalized medicine in rheumatology. PMID:23524232

  16. Metabolomics: moving towards personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Baraldi, Eugenio; Carraro, Silvia; Giordano, Giuseppe; Reniero, Fabiano; Perilongo, Giorgio; Zacchello, Franco

    2009-01-01

    In many fields of medicine there is a growing interest in characterizing diseases at molecular level with a view to developing an individually tailored therapeutic approach. Metabolomics is a novel area that promises to contribute significantly to the characterization of various disease phenotypes and to the identification of personal metabolic features that can predict response to therapies. Based on analytical platforms such as mass spectrometry or NMR-based spectroscopy, the metabolomic approach enables a comprehensive overview of the metabolites, leading to the characterization of the metabolic fingerprint of a given sample. These metabolic fingerprints can then be used to distinguish between different disease phenotypes and to predict a drug's effectiveness and/or toxicity. Several studies published in the last few years applied the metabolomic approach in the field of pediatric medicine. Being a highly informative technique that can be used on samples collected non-invasively (e.g. urine or exhaled breath condensate), metabolomics has appeal for the study of pediatric diseases. Here we present and discuss the pediatric clinical studies that have taken the metabolomic approach. PMID:19852788

  17. Toward Exercise as Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Michael D.; Church, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    The early 21st century has witnessed a steady push by scientists, industry leaders, and government officials to make medicine more personalized. To date, the concept of personalized medicine has referred largely to the field of pharmacogenomics. In contrast, relatively few data exist regarding the application of preventive strategies such as physical exercise in the context of personalized medicine. Within this review, we highlight the extant literature and propose five strategies for scientists that may propel the exercise and sports science fields toward this global goal. Notably, these approaches are in addition to methods to maintain adherence to training – a well-known factor in determining exercise responsiveness. Briefly, these strategies include (1) evaluating participant responses to training at the individual as well as group level; (2) identifying sources of variability in responsiveness to training; (3) optimizing exercise dosing strategies to maximize benefits while minimizing barriers to participation; (4) evaluating the efficacy of multimodal interventions for relevant population subgroups; and (5) increasing the clinical relevance of study populations and outcomes in exercise trials. We look forward to seeing these strategies considered in trials of preventive health interventions such as exercise. Extensive future research in this area is needed for the vision of exercise as a personalized form of medicine to become a reality. PMID:23382011

  18. Essential Elements of Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Wylie; Trinidad, Susan Brown; Press, Nancy A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Genomic information has been promoted as the basis for “personalized” health care. While genomic tests will offer many potential opportunities to improve the delivery of care, such advances do not in themselves constitute a paradigm shift in the delivery of health care. A more accurate characterization of personalized medicine is as a comprehensive effort to tailor health care to the individual, spanning multiple dimensions. This concept of personalized medicine is based on a partnership between clinician and patient that utilizes shared decision making to determine the best health care options among the available choices, weighing the patient’s personal values and preferences together with clinical findings. This approach is particularly important for difficult clinical decisions involving uncertainty and trade-offs, such as those involved in prostate cancer screening and management. The delivery of personalized medicine also requires adequate health care access and assurance that basic health needs have been met. Substantial research investment will be needed to identify how genomic tests can contribute to this effort. PMID:24321254

  19. Systems approaches to biology and disease enable translational systems medicine.

    PubMed

    Hood, Leroy; Tian, Qiang

    2012-08-01

    The development and application of systems strategies to biology and disease are transforming medical research and clinical practice in an unprecedented rate. In the foreseeable future, clinicians, medical researchers, and ultimately the consumers and patients will be increasingly equipped with a deluge of personal health information, e.g., whole genome sequences, molecular profiling of diseased tissues, and periodic multi-analyte blood testing of biomarker panels for disease and wellness. The convergence of these practices will enable accurate prediction of disease susceptibility and early diagnosis for actionable preventive schema and personalized treatment regimes tailored to each individual. It will also entail proactive participation from all major stakeholders in the health care system. We are at the dawn of predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory (P4) medicine, the fully implementation of which requires marrying basic and clinical researches through advanced systems thinking and the employment of high-throughput technologies in genomics, proteomics, nanofluidics, single-cell analysis, and computation strategies in a highly-orchestrated discipline we termed translational systems medicine. PMID:23084773

  20. Role of Proteomics in the Development of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kewal K

    2016-01-01

    Advances in proteomic technologies have made import contribution to the development of personalized medicine by facilitating detection of protein biomarkers, proteomics-based molecular diagnostics, as well as protein biochips and pharmacoproteomics. Application of nanobiotechnology in proteomics, nanoproteomics, has further enhanced applications in personalized medicine. Proteomics-based molecular diagnostics will have an important role in the diagnosis of certain conditions and understanding the pathomechanism of disease. Proteomics will be a good bridge between diagnostics and therapeutics; the integration of these will be important for advancing personalized medicine. Use of proteomic biomarkers and combination of pharmacoproteomics with pharmacogenomics will enable stratification of clinical trials and improve monitoring of patients for development of personalized therapies. Proteomics is an important component of several interacting technologies used for development of personalized medicine, which is depicted graphically. Finally, cancer is a good example of applications of proteomic technologies for personalized management of cancer. PMID:26827601

  1. Personal genomes, quantitative dynamic omics and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mias, George I.; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The rapid technological developments following the Human Genome Project have made possible the availability of personalized genomes. As the focus now shifts from characterizing genomes to making personalized disease associations, in combination with the availability of other omics technologies, the next big push will be not only to obtain a personalized genome, but to quantitatively follow other omics. This will include transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes, antibodyomes, and new emerging technologies, enabling the profiling of thousands of molecular components in individuals. Furthermore, omics profiling performed longitudinally can probe the temporal patterns associated with both molecular changes and associated physiological health and disease states. Such data necessitates the development of computational methodology to not only handle and descriptively assess such data, but also construct quantitative biological models. Here we describe the availability of personal genomes and developing omics technologies that can be brought together for personalized implementations and how these novel integrated approaches may effectively provide a precise personalized medicine that focuses on not only characterization and treatment but ultimately the prevention of disease. PMID:25798291

  2. Interdisciplinary Communication in a Literature and Medicine Course: "Personalizing" the Discourse of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Kathleen

    2000-01-01

    Presents an ethnographic study into whether or not reading and writing about literature helps medical students communicate more effectively in the physician-patient encounter. Demonstrates that although medical students were embedded in the discourse of medicine, reflective writing enabled them to conceive medicine as an interpretive, personal,…

  3. Eliminating barriers to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of high-throughput discovery platforms, robust preclinical small-animal models, and efficient clinical trial pipelines, it is becoming possible to envision a time when the treatment of human neurologic diseases will become personalized. The emergence of precision medicine will require the identification of subgroups of patients most likely to respond to specific biologically based therapies. This stratification only becomes possible when the determinants that contribute to disease heterogeneity become more fully elucidated. This review discusses the defining factors that underlie disease heterogeneity relevant to the potential for individualized brain tumor (optic pathway glioma) treatments arising in the common single-gene cancer predisposition syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). In this regard, NF1 is posited as a model genetic condition to establish a workable paradigm for actualizing precision therapeutics for other neurologic disorders. PMID:24975854

  4. Crowdfunding for Personalized Medicine Research

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Danielle C.; Gouw, Arvin M.

    2015-01-01

    Given the current funding situation of the National Institutes of Health, getting funding for rare disease research is extremely difficult. In light of the enormous potential for research in the rare diseases and the scarcity of research funding, we provide a case study of a novel successful crowdfunding approach at a non-profit organization called Rare Genomics Institute. We partner with biotechnology companies willing to donate their products, such as mouse models, gene editing software, and sequencing services, for which researchers can apply. First, we find that personal stories can be powerful tools to seek funding from sympathetic donors who do not have the same rational considerations of impact and profit. Second, for foundations facing funding restrictions, company donations can be a valuable tool in addition to crowdfunding. Third, rare disease research is particularly rewarding for scientists as they proceed to be pioneers in the field during their academic careers. Overall, by connecting donors, foundations, researchers, and patients, crowdfunding has become a powerful alternative funding mechanism for personalized medicine. PMID:26604866

  5. Crowdfunding for Personalized Medicine Research.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Danielle C; Gouw, Arvin M

    2015-12-01

    Given the current funding situation of the National Institutes of Health, getting funding for rare disease research is extremely difficult. In light of the enormous potential for research in the rare diseases and the scarcity of research funding, we provide a case study of a novel successful crowdfunding approach at a non-profit organization called Rare Genomics Institute. We partner with biotechnology companies willing to donate their products, such as mouse models, gene editing software, and sequencing services, for which researchers can apply. First, we find that personal stories can be powerful tools to seek funding from sympathetic donors who do not have the same rational considerations of impact and profit. Second, for foundations facing funding restrictions, company donations can be a valuable tool in addition to crowdfunding. Third, rare disease research is particularly rewarding for scientists as they proceed to be pioneers in the field during their academic careers. Overall, by connecting donors, foundations, researchers, and patients, crowdfunding has become a powerful alternative funding mechanism for personalized medicine. PMID:26604866

  6. Personalized medicine in psychiatry: problems and promises

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The central theme of personalized medicine is the premise that an individual’s unique physiologic characteristics play a significant role in both disease vulnerability and in response to specific therapies. The major goals of personalized medicine are therefore to predict an individual’s susceptibility to developing an illness, achieve accurate diagnosis, and optimize the most efficient and favorable response to treatment. The goal of achieving personalized medicine in psychiatry is a laudable one, because its attainment should be associated with a marked reduction in morbidity and mortality. In this review, we summarize an illustrative selection of studies that are laying the foundation towards personalizing medicine in major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. In addition, we present emerging applications that are likely to advance personalized medicine in psychiatry, with an emphasis on novel biomarkers and neuroimaging. PMID:23680237

  7. Personalized Genomic Medicine and the Rhetoric of Empowerment

    PubMed Central

    Juengst, Eric T.; Flatt, Michael A.; Settersten, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Advocates of “personalized” genomic medicine maintain that it is revolutionary not just in what it can reveal to us, but in how it will enable us to take control of our health. But we should not assume that patient empowerment always yields positive outcomes. To assess the social impact of personalized medicine, we must anticipate how the virtue might go awry in practice. PMID:22976411

  8. Personalized medicine for individuals with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Linda L; McCabe, Edward R B

    2011-01-01

    As the cost of whole genome analysis decreases, we have the opportunity to explore the interactions of various gene changes in an individual that lead to their particular phenotype. This will provide the ability to move from the epidemiologic study of groups, in which, the individuals are treated collectively and homogenously, to personalized medicine, and a model in which the individual is recognized and treated as a distinct entity. We will be applying personalized medicine to individuals with Down syndrome in order to understand and develop biomarkers for increased risk of co-morbidities. Personalized medicine will change the "culture of intractability" of Down syndrome. PMID:21807541

  9. Is Personalized Medicine Achievable in Obstetrics?

    PubMed Central

    Quinney, Sara K; Flockhart, David A; Patil, Avinash S

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic make-up of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy a woman’s body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic. PMID:25282474

  10. Personalized medicine approach in mycobacterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterial diseases are a group of illnesses that cause a considerable number of deaths throughout the world, regardless of years of public health control efforts. Personalized medicine is a new but rapidly advancing field of healthcare. Personalized medicine in the field of mycobacteriology may be applied in the different levels of management such as prevention, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. A genetic predisposition and a protein dysfunction study are recommended to tailor an individual approach in mycobacterial diseases. PMID:25126491

  11. Lifetime experiences, the brain and personalized medicine: an integrative perspective.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bruce S; Getz, Linn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of personalized medicine is to base medical prevention and therapy on the unique health and disease susceptibility profile of each individual. Starting from this idea, we briefly discuss the meaning of the word 'personalized' before analyzing the practical content of personalized healthcare. From a medical perspective, knowledge of a person encompasses both biological and biographical perspectives. The latter includes significant events and experiences throughout the person's lifespan, from conception to the present, in which epigenetic influences play an important role. In practice, we believe personalized medicine should emphasize the development and maintenance of a healthy nervous system. The neurobiological processes involved here depend heavily on the psychosocial environment, in particular the presence of responsible, caring adults and integration in a reasonably fair society. A healthy brain subsequently promotes good health throughout life, both through direct, favorable influences on the body's intrinsic biological pathways, and indirectly by enabling the person to engage in supportive relationships, make wise decisions and take good care of him/herself. From a public health perspective, we conclude that hi-tech personalized medicine based on detailed bio-molecular mapping, monitoring and tailored drug interventions holds promise only as part of a wider, socio-culturally informed approach to the person. PMID:23009787

  12. Multifunctional Quantum Dots for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel; Gao, Xiaohu

    2009-01-01

    Successes in biomedical research and state-of-the-art medicine have undoubtedly improved the quality of life. However, a number of diseases, such as cancer, immunodeficiencies, and neurological disorders, still evade conventional diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. A transformation towards personalized medicine may help to combat these diseases. For this, identification of disease molecular fingerprints and their association with prognosis and targeted therapy must become available. Quantum dots (QDs), semiconductor nanocrystals with unique photo-physical properties, represent a novel class of fluorescence probes to address many of the needs of personalized medicine. This review outlines the properties of QDs that make them a suitable platform for advancing personalized medicine, examines several proof-of-concept studies showing utility of QDs for clinically relevant applications, and discusses current challenges in introducing QDs into clinical practice. PMID:20161004

  13. The Personalized Medicine Coalition: goals and strategies.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Edward; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Silver, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The concept of personalized medicine--that medical care can be tailored to the genomic and molecular profile of the individual--has repercussions that extend far beyond the technology that makes it possible. The adoption of personalized medicine will require changes in healthcare infrastructure, diagnostics and therapeutics business models, reimbursement policy from government and private payers, and a different approach to regulatory oversight. Personalized medicine will shift medical practices upstream from the reactive treatment of disease, to proactive healthcare management including screening, early treatment, and prevention, and will alter the roles of both physician and patient. It will create a greater reliance on electronic medical records and decision support systems in an industry that has a long history of resistance to information technology. Personalized medicine requires a systems approach to implementation. But in a healthcare economy that is highly decentralized and market driven, it is incumbent upon the stakeholders themselves to advocate for a consistent set of policies and legislation that pave the way for the adoption of personalized medicine. To address this need, the Personalized Medicine Coalition (PMC) was formed as a nonprofit umbrella organization of pharmaceutical, biotechnology, diagnostic, and information technology companies, healthcare providers and payers, patient advocacy groups, industry policy organizations, major academic institutions, and government agencies. The PMC provides a structure for achieving consensus positions among these stakeholders on crucial public policy issues, a role which will be vital to translating personalized medicine into widespread clinical practice. In this article, we outline the goals of the PMC, and the strategies it will take to foster communication, debate, and consensus on issues such as genetic discrimination, the reimbursement structures for pharmacogenomic drugs and diagnostics, regulation

  14. Overview of personalized medicine in the disease genomic era.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyung-Won; Oh, Bermseok

    2010-10-01

    Sir William Osler (1849-1919) recognized that "variability is the law of life, and as no two faces are the same, so no two bodies are alike, and no two individuals react alike and behave alike under the abnormal conditions we know as disease". Accordingly, the traditional methods of medicine are not always best for all patients. Over the last decade, the study of genomes and their derivatives (RNA, protein and metabolite) has rapidly advanced to the point that genomic research now serves as the basis for many medical decisions and public health initiatives. Genomic tools such as sequence variation, transcription and, more recently, personal genome sequencing enable the precise prediction and treatment of disease. At present, DNA-based risk assessment for common complex diseases, application of molecular signatures for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, genome-guided therapy, and dose selection of therapeutic drugs are the important issues in personalized medicine. In order to make personalized medicine effective, these genomic techniques must be standardized and integrated into health systems and clinical workflow. In addition, full application of personalized or genomic medicine requires dramatic changes in regulatory and reimbursement policies as well as legislative protection related to privacy. This review aims to provide a general overview of these topics in the field of personalized medicine. PMID:21034525

  15. [Personalized medicine, privatized medicine? legal and public health stakes].

    PubMed

    Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-01

    Personalized medicine is booming. It tends to provide a medical management "tailored" for groups of patients, or for one unique patient, but also to identify risk groups to develop public health strategies. In this context, some radicalization phenomenon can emerge, leading to not only personalized medicine but also privatized medicine, which can lead to a capture of the medical public resource. If the "privatization" of medicine is not limited to producing adverse effects, several potentially destabilizing phenomena for patients still remain. First, some objective factors, like the adjustment of scientific prerequisites, are emerging from personalized medicine practices (clinical trial, public health policy) and are interfering with the medical doctor/patient relationship. Another risk emerges for patients concomitantly to their demand for controlling their own health, in terms of patients' security although these risks are not clearly identified and not effectively communicated. These practices, related to a privatized medicine, develop within the healthcare system but also outside, and the government and legislators will have to take into account these new dimensions in drafting their future regulations and policies. PMID:25407457

  16. [ETHICS, MORALS AND SOCIETY IN PERSONALIZED MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Flugelman, Anath

    2015-09-01

    Following the completion of the human genome project, genomic medicine including personalized medicine, widely based on pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, is rapidly developing. This breakthrough should benefit humankind thanks to tailoring the most appropriate prevention, interventions and therapies to each individual, minimizing adverse side effects, based on inter-personal genetic variety and polymorphism. Yet wide spectrum ethical, legal and social issues carry significant implications regarding individuals, families, society and public health. The main issues concern genomic information and autonomy, justice and equity, resources allocation and solidarity, challenging the traditional role of medicine and dealing with unlimited boundaries of knowledge. Those issues are not new nor exceptional to genomic medicine, yet their wide unlimited scope and implications on many aspects of life renders them crucial. These aspects will be discussed in light of Beauchamp and Childress' four principles: non-maleficence, beneficence, autonomy and justice, and main moral philosophies, Kant's autonomy, Utilitarianism which promotes the common good, and Rawls' Theory of Justice. PMID:26665754

  17. [PERSONALIZED MEDICINE AND EBM: ETHICAL ASPECTS].

    PubMed

    Radermecker, R P

    2015-01-01

    More patients are actually treated due to the incredible improvements of medical care, especially in the field of pharmacotherapy. Medical guidelines are based on the results of controlled trials. This kind of medicine, also called Evidence Based Medicine (EBM), is actually the cornerstone of good clinical practice. Nevertheless, it remains a lot of patients disappointed by the fact that they have no medical gain of their treatment. The reason is that each patient has his/her own metabolic characteristics. Better is, the characterization of such patients, better will be the treatment targeting them. It is what is called the personalized medicine. To reach this challenge, pharmacogenetic advances would be helpful. From an antagonism between EBM and personalized medicine, this new medical paradigm has to consider these approaches as partners. To reach this goal, medical doctors, legal authorities and pharmaceutical companies have to be responsible in front of these new ethical challenges. PMID:26285464

  18. The collective nature of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, Ian Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine, incorporating personalized medicine, is an emerging medical model that holds great promise for improving the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. The future success of precision medicine, however, depends on the establishment of large databases that collate diverse data, including family genealogies, disease histories, drug sensitivities and genomic data. Herein I raise some of the social and ethical challenges that such a system faces, specifically: the enrolment of volunteers into large genetic databases; the need for a change in mindset of clinicians, patients and the wider public; and the need for interdisciplinary ethics considering the emerging issues. Finally I argue that the future potential of 'personalized' medicine crucially depends on 'collective' participation of informed citizens. PMID:26792757

  19. [Personalized medicine in radiotherapy: practitioners' perception].

    PubMed

    Britel, Manon; Foray, Nicolas; Préau, Marie

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to investigate the representations of radiotherapists in relation to personalized medicine. On the basis of current?>' available radiotherapy predictive tests, we tried to understand how these tests could be used in routine radiotherapy practice and in what way this possible change of practices could affect the role of radiotherapists in treatment protocols. In the absence of any available data allowing the construction of a quantitative tool, qualitative data were recorded by individual interviews with radiotherapists. Based on textual data analysis, a second national quantitative phase was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. Crossover analysis of the two datasets highlighted the interest of radiotherapists in personalized medicine and the use of predictive tests, while indicating certain limitations and concerns in relation to ethical issues related to personalized medicine in oncology and the physician's position. PMID:26752033

  20. Personalized medicine: ethics for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sharrer, G Terry

    2012-01-01

    Modern ethical codes in medicine were developed following World War II to provide respect for persons, beneficence, and justice in clinical research. Clinical trial medicine involves greater scrutiny than most research activities. In every instance, clinical trials have institutional review boards to ensure the medical procedure under study complies with regulatory requirements, privacy, informed consent, good practices, safety monitoring, adverse events reporting, and is free of conflicting interests. Mandatory training in medical ethics for all clinical staff is becoming more common, and at some institutions, knowledgeable patient advocates play a watchdog role. In personalized medicine, each patient becomes a clinical trial of one, based on the uniqueness of the person's illness and the relatively tailored treatment. These features imply a shared responsibility between the patient and the researchers because uncertainty exists over the outcome for each individual patient. This chapter introduces ethical considerations using case studies, with historical context, and describes general ethical guidelines for initiating a clinical trial. PMID:22081337

  1. Personalized medicine for pathological circadian dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Rachel L.; Kornhauser, Jon M.; Tate, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    The recent approval of a therapeutic for a circadian disorder has increased interest in developing additional medicines for disorders characterized by circadian disruption. However, previous experience demonstrates that drug development for central nervous system (CNS) disorders has a high failure rate. Personalized medicine, or the approach to identifying the right treatment for the right patient, has recently become the standard for drug development in the oncology field. In addition to utilizing Companion Diagnostics (CDx) that identify specific genetic biomarkers to prescribe certain targeted therapies, patient profiling is regularly used to enrich for a responsive patient population during clinical trials, resulting in fewer patients required for statistical significance and a higher rate of success for demonstrating efficacy and hence receiving approval for the drug. This personalized medicine approach may be one mechanism that could reduce the high clinical trial failure rate in the development of CNS drugs. This review will discuss current circadian trials, the history of personalized medicine in oncology, lessons learned from a recently approved circadian therapeutic, and how personalized medicine can be tailored for use in future clinical trials for circadian disorders to ultimately lead to the approval of more therapeutics for patients suffering from circadian abnormalities. PMID:26150790

  2. DNA Aptamer Technology for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Hang; Hwang, Kevin; Li, Ji; Torabi, Seyed-Fakhreddin; Lu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights recent progress in developing DNA aptamers for personalized medicine, with more focus on in vivo studies for potential clinical applications. Examples include design of aptamers in combination with DNA nanostructures, nanomaterials, or microfluidic devices as diagnostic probes or therapeutic agents for cancers and other diseases. The use of aptamers as targeting agents in drug delivery is also covered. The advantages and future directions of such DNA aptamer-based technology for the continued development of personalized medicine are discussed. PMID:24791224

  3. Personalized medicine: new genomics, old lessons.

    PubMed

    Offit, Kenneth

    2011-07-01

    Personalized medicine uses traditional, as well as emerging concepts of the genetic and environmental basis of disease to individualize prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Personalized genomics plays a vital, but not exclusive role in this evolving model of personalized medicine. The distinctions between genetic and genomic medicine are more quantitative than qualitative. Personalized genomics builds on principles established by the integration of genetics into medical practice. Principles shared by genetic and genomic aspects of medicine, include the use of variants as markers for diagnosis, prognosis, prevention, as well as targets for treatment, the use of clinically validated variants that may not be functionally characterized, the segregation of these variants in non-Mendelian as well as Mendelian patterns, the role of gene--environment interactions, the dependence on evidence for clinical utility, the critical translational role of behavioral science, and common ethical considerations. During the current period of transition from investigation to practice, consumers should be protected from harms of premature translation of research findings, while encouraging the innovative and cost-effective application of those genomic discoveries that improve personalized medical care. PMID:21706342

  4. Chasing Mendel: five questions for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Michael J; Prendergast, Franklyn G

    2014-01-01

    Ideas about personalized medicine are underpinned in part by evolutionary biology's Modern Synthesis. In this essay we link personalized medicine to the efforts of the early statistical investigators who quantified the heritability of human phenotype and then attempted to reconcile their observations with Mendelian genetics. As information about the heritability of common diseases was obtained, similar efforts were directed at understanding the genetic basis of disease phenotypes. These ideas were part of the rationale driving the Human Genome Project and subsequently the personalized medicine movement. In this context, we discuss: (1) the current state of the genotype–phenotype relationship in humans, (2) the common-disease–common-variant hypothesis, (3) the current ability of ‘omic’ information to inform clinical decision making, (4) emerging ideas about the therapeutic insight available from rare genetic variants, and (5) the social and behavioural barriers to the wider potential success of personalized medicine. There are significant gaps in knowledge as well as conceptual, intellectual, and philosophical limitations in each of these five areas. We then provide specific recommendations to mitigate these limitations and close by asking if it is time for the biomedical research community to ‘stop chasing Mendel?’ PMID:24882820

  5. Training the Future Leaders in Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mason-Suares, Heather; Sweetser, David A.; Lindeman, Neal I.; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2016-01-01

    The era of personalized medicine has arrived, and with it a need for leaders in this discipline. This generation of trainees requires a cadre of new skill sets to lead the implementation of personalized medicine into mainstream healthcare. Traditional training programs no longer provide trainees with all the skills they will need to optimize implementation of this revolution now underway in medicine. Today’s trainees must manage clinical teams, act as clinical and molecular diagnostic consultants, train other healthcare professionals, teach future generations, and be knowledgeable about clinical trials to facilitate genomic-based therapies. To prepare trainees for the transition to junior faculty positions, contemporary genomic training programs must emphasize the development of these management, teaching, and clinical skills. PMID:26751479

  6. Personalized medicine: is it a pharmacogenetic mirage?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rashmi R; Shah, Devron R

    2012-01-01

    The notion of personalized medicine has developed from the application of the discipline of pharmacogenetics to clinical medicine. Although the clinical relevance of genetically-determined inter-individual differences in pharmacokinetics is poorly understood, and the genotype-phenotype association data on clinical outcomes often inconsistent, officially approved drug labels frequently include pharmacogenetic information concerning the safety and/or efficacy of a number of drugs and refer to the availability of the pharmacogenetic test concerned. Regulatory authorities differ in their approach to these issues. Evidence emerging subsequently has generally revealed the pharmacogenetic information included in the label to be premature. Revised drugs labels, together with a flurry of other collateral activities, have raised public expectations of personalized medicine, promoted as ‘the right drug at the right dose the first time.’ These expectations place the prescribing physician in a dilemma and at risk of litigation, especially when evidence-based information on genotype-related dosing schedules is to all intent and purposes non-existent and guidelines, intended to improve the clinical utility of available pharmacogenetic information or tests, distance themselves from any responsibility. Lack of efficacy or an adverse drug reaction is frequently related to non-genetic factors. Phenoconversion, arising from drug interactions, poses another often neglected challenge to any potential success of personalized medicine by mimicking genetically-determined enzyme deficiency. A more realistic promotion of personalized medicine should acknowledge current limitations and emphasize that pharmacogenetic testing can only improve the likelihood of diminishing a specific toxic effect or increasing the likelihood of a beneficial effect and that application of pharmacogenetics to clinical medicine cannot adequately predict drug response in individual patients. PMID:22591598

  7. Personalized medicine: is it a pharmacogenetic mirage?

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi R; Shah, Devron R

    2012-10-01

    The notion of personalized medicine has developed from the application of the discipline of pharmacogenetics to clinical medicine. Although the clinical relevance of genetically-determined inter-individual differences in pharmacokinetics is poorly understood, and the genotype-phenotype association data on clinical outcomes often inconsistent, officially approved drug labels frequently include pharmacogenetic information concerning the safety and/or efficacy of a number of drugs and refer to the availability of the pharmacogenetic test concerned. Regulatory authorities differ in their approach to these issues. Evidence emerging subsequently has generally revealed the pharmacogenetic information included in the label to be premature. Revised drugs labels, together with a flurry of other collateral activities, have raised public expectations of personalized medicine, promoted as 'the right drug at the right dose the first time.' These expectations place the prescribing physician in a dilemma and at risk of litigation, especially when evidence-based information on genotype-related dosing schedules is to all intent and purposes non-existent and guidelines, intended to improve the clinical utility of available pharmacogenetic information or tests, distance themselves from any responsibility. Lack of efficacy or an adverse drug reaction is frequently related to non-genetic factors. Phenoconversion, arising from drug interactions, poses another often neglected challenge to any potential success of personalized medicine by mimicking genetically-determined enzyme deficiency. A more realistic promotion of personalized medicine should acknowledge current limitations and emphasize that pharmacogenetic testing can only improve the likelihood of diminishing a specific toxic effect or increasing the likelihood of a beneficial effect and that application of pharmacogenetics to clinical medicine cannot adequately predict drug response in individual patients. PMID:22591598

  8. [Issues of Personalized Medicine from the Viewpoint of Laboratory Medicine].

    PubMed

    Nobori, Tsutomu

    2015-08-01

    Personalized medicine is expected to provide patients with safe and effective treatment compared to conventional medical care in which patients are treated based on the diagnosis and/or histology. In personalized medicine, patients are treated based on their genetic makeup and genetic characteristics of tumor tissues in the case of cancer chemotherapy. Genomic biomarker tests are used to molecularly characterize host and tumor tissues and stratify patients for the appropriate drugs. Drugs targeting the causative genetic changes have been developed along with companion diagnostics to test such genetic changes. In this paper, I introduce the technical guidance for companion diagnostics and related drugs issued by the Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency of Japan, and discuss how to carry out a concordance study of diagnostic tests for the ALK fusion gene when new ALK inhibitors are approved. The regulations for companion diagnostics should be revised frequently to keep up with advances in this area. PMID:26638437

  9. Personalized medicine and the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Sitnik, Roberta; Mangueira, Cristóvão Luis Pitangueira

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine is the use of biomarkers, most of them molecular markers, for detection of specific genetic traits to guide various approaches for preventing and treating different conditions. The identification of several genes related to heredity, oncology and infectious diseases lead to the detection of genetic polymorphisms that are involved not only in different clinical progression of these diseases but also in variations in treatment response. Currently, it is possible to detect these polymorphisms using several methodologies: detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms using polymerase chain reaction methods; nucleic acid microarray detection; and nucleic acid sequencing with automatized DNA sequencers using Sanger-derived methods and new generation sequencing. Personalized medicine assays are directed towards detecting genetic variations that alter interactions of drugs with targets or the metabolic pathways of drugs (upstream and downstream) and can be utilized for the selection of drug formulations and detect different immunogenicities of the drug. Personalized medicine applications have already been described in different areas of Medicine and allow specific treatment approaches to be applied to each patient and pathology according to the results of these assays. The application of such a protocol demands an increasing interaction between the clinical laboratory and the clinical staff. For its implementation, a coordinated team composed of basic researchers and physicians highly specialized in their areas supported by a highly specialized team of clinical analysts particularly trained in molecular biology assays is necessary. PMID:25295459

  10. Iranian-Islamic traditional medicine: An ancient comprehensive personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Zeinalian, Mehrdad; Eshaghi, Mehdi; Naji, Homayoun; Marandi, Sayyed Mohammad Masoud; Sharbafchi, Mohammad Reza; Asgary, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine (PM) is a novel term used for a medical model in which all diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic aspects of a disease are individualized for a patient using specific molecular testing. In Iranian-Islamic traditional medicine (IITM) an ancient paradigm for PM has been described which has been introduced in this paper. We reviewed the ancient resources of IITM and many valid recent studies on personalized medicine and described an ancient feature of personalized medicine in comparison with new ones. According to IITM scholars, every person has an individual temperament which is concluded of four basic humors combination. The individual temper is influenced by internal and external factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, season, and environment. This variability leads to different physical and mental behaviors toward a particular condition; so if we could identify the patient's temper, we would predict his/her health-related behaviors rather than predisposition and prognosis to different diseases, and select the best treatment. This holistic viewpoint of IITM to the human health and disease justifies the variable phenotypes among similar illnesses; the fact around which more advanced high-tech researches are being developed to explore all specific molecular pathways. IITM offers an ancient comprehensive PM (APM) which is more available and inexpensive compared to the modern PM (MPM). Moreover, APM focuses more on fitness than illness in comparison to MPM. It seems more attention to APM introduced by IITM could help us to promote health community. Design studies using high-tech MPM techniques would likely lead to clarification of most molecular aspects of APM. PMID:26605230

  11. Iranian-Islamic traditional medicine: An ancient comprehensive personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zeinalian, Mehrdad; Eshaghi, Mehdi; Naji, Homayoun; Marandi, Sayyed Mohammad Masoud; Sharbafchi, Mohammad Reza; Asgary, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine (PM) is a novel term used for a medical model in which all diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic aspects of a disease are individualized for a patient using specific molecular testing. In Iranian-Islamic traditional medicine (IITM) an ancient paradigm for PM has been described which has been introduced in this paper. We reviewed the ancient resources of IITM and many valid recent studies on personalized medicine and described an ancient feature of personalized medicine in comparison with new ones. According to IITM scholars, every person has an individual temperament which is concluded of four basic humors combination. The individual temper is influenced by internal and external factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, season, and environment. This variability leads to different physical and mental behaviors toward a particular condition; so if we could identify the patient's temper, we would predict his/her health-related behaviors rather than predisposition and prognosis to different diseases, and select the best treatment. This holistic viewpoint of IITM to the human health and disease justifies the variable phenotypes among similar illnesses; the fact around which more advanced high-tech researches are being developed to explore all specific molecular pathways. IITM offers an ancient comprehensive PM (APM) which is more available and inexpensive compared to the modern PM (MPM). Moreover, APM focuses more on fitness than illness in comparison to MPM. It seems more attention to APM introduced by IITM could help us to promote health community. Design studies using high-tech MPM techniques would likely lead to clarification of most molecular aspects of APM. PMID:26605230

  12. Systems medicine, personalized health and therapy.

    PubMed

    Siest, Gérard; Auffray, Charles; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Murray, Helena; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Ansari, Marc; Marc, Janja; Jacobs, Peter; Meyer, Urs; Van Schaik, Ron H N; Müller, Mathias M; Wevers, Ron A; Simmaco, Maurizio; Kussmann, Martin; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Beastall, Graham; Németh, György

    2015-01-01

    The 7th Santorini Conference was held in Santorini, Greece, and brought together 200 participants from 40 countries in several continents, including Europe, USA but also Japan, Korea, Brazil and South Africa. The attendees had the opportunity to: listen to 60 oral presentations; participate in two lunch symposia; look at 103 posters, which were divided in two groups ('systems medicine and environment' and 'pharmacogenomics and cancer') and attend a dedicated exhibition with six companies. The meeting was organized by the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U1122; IGE-PCV and by 'Biologie Prospective' with the collaboration of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT), under the auspices of international organizations (e.g., International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory medicine [IFCC], European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine [EFLM], European Diagnostic Manufacturers Association [EDMA], Federation of European Pharmacological Societies [EPHAR], European Science Foundation [ESF]). The 3 days of the conference stimulated intensive discussions on systems biology and the influence of omics technologies on personalized health. Sixty speakers were invited or selected from early abstracts and gave presentations on the following topics: From systems biology to systems medicine/pharmacology; Omics/translating pharmacogenomics/proteomic biomarkers/metabolomics; Human nutrition and health/personalized medicine. We are summarizing here the main topics and presentations, according to the successive sessions. PMID:26401575

  13. Personalized medicine and human genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Goldstein, David B; Angrist, Misha; Cavalleri, Gianpiero

    2014-09-01

    Human genetic diversity has long been studied both to understand how genetic variation influences risk of disease and infer aspects of human evolutionary history. In this article, we review historical and contemporary views of human genetic diversity, the rare and common mutations implicated in human disease susceptibility, and the relevance of genetic diversity to personalized medicine. First, we describe the development of thought about diversity through the 20th century and through more modern studies including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and next-generation sequencing. We introduce several examples, such as sickle cell anemia and Tay-Sachs disease that are caused by rare mutations and are more frequent in certain geographical populations, and common treatment responses that are caused by common variants, such as hepatitis C infection. We conclude with comments about the continued relevance of human genetic diversity in medical genetics and personalized medicine more generally. PMID:25059740

  14. Personalized Medicine and Human Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Goldstein, David B.; Angrist, Misha; Cavalleri, Gianpiero

    2014-01-01

    Human genetic diversity has long been studied both to understand how genetic variation influences risk of disease and infer aspects of human evolutionary history. In this article, we review historical and contemporary views of human genetic diversity, the rare and common mutations implicated in human disease susceptibility, and the relevance of genetic diversity to personalized medicine. First, we describe the development of thought about diversity through the 20th century and through more modern studies including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and next-generation sequencing. We introduce several examples, such as sickle cell anemia and Tay–Sachs disease that are caused by rare mutations and are more frequent in certain geographical populations, and common treatment responses that are caused by common variants, such as hepatitis C infection. We conclude with comments about the continued relevance of human genetic diversity in medical genetics and personalized medicine more generally. PMID:25059740

  15. Individualized medicine enabled by genomics in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The biomedical research sector in Saudi Arabia has recently received special attention from the government, which is currently supporting research aimed at improving the understanding and treatment of common diseases afflicting Saudi Arabian society. To build capacity for research and training, a number of centres of excellence were established in different areas of the country. Among these, is the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR) at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, with its internationally ranked and highly productive team performing translational research in the area of individualized medicine. Here, we present a panorama of the recent trends in different areas of biomedical research in Saudi Arabia drawing from our vision of where genomics will have maximal impact in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We describe advances in a number of research areas including; congenital malformations, infertility, consanguinity and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, cancer and genomic classifications in Saudi Arabia, epigenetic explanations of idiopathic disease, and pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. We conclude that CEGMR will continue to play a pivotal role in advances in the field of genomics and research in this area is facing a number of challenges including generating high quality control data from Saudi population and policies for using these data need to comply with the international set up. PMID:25951871

  16. Implementing Personalized Medicine in a Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Fenstermacher, David A.; Wenham, Robert M.; Rollison, Dana E.; Dalton, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the Moffitt Cancer Center partnered with patients, community clinicians, industry, academia, and seventeen hospitals in the United States to begin a personalized cancer care initiative called Total Cancer Care™ . Total Cancer Care was designed to collect tumor specimens and clinical data throughout a patient’s lifetime with the goal of finding “the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time.” Because Total Cancer Care is a partnership with the patient and involves collection of clinical data and tumor specimens for research purposes, a formal protocol and patient consent process was developed and an information technology platform was constructed to provide a robust “warehouse” for clinical and molecular profiling data. To date, over 76,000 cancer patients from Moffitt and consortium medical centers have been enrolled in the protocol. The TCC initiative has developed many of the capabilities and resources that are building the foundation of personalized medicine. PMID:22157297

  17. Introduction to Personalized Medicine in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Glauber, Harry S.; Rishe, Naphtali; Karnieli, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an epidemic rise in diabetes mellitus (DM) incidence, which is challenging health funders, health systems, clinicians, and patients to understand and respond to a flood of research and knowledge. Evidence-based guidelines provide uniform management recommendations for “average” patients that rarely take into account individual variation in susceptibility to DM, to its complications, and responses to pharmacological and lifestyle interventions. Personalized medicine combines bioinformatics with genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, pharmacogenomic (“omics”) and other new technologies to explore pathophysiology and to characterize more precisely an individual’s risk for disease, as well as response to interventions. In this review we will introduce readers to personalized medicine as applied to DM, in particular the use of clinical, genetic, metabolic, and other markers of risk for DM and its chronic microvascular and macrovascular complications, as well as insights into variations in response to and tolerance of commonly used medications, dietary changes, and exercise. These advances in “omic” information and techniques also provide clues to potential pathophysiological mechanisms underlying DM and its complications. PMID:24498509

  18. Impact of Biomarkers on Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, Patricia; Krahn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The field of personalized medicine that involves the use of measuring biomarkers in clinical samples is an area of high interest and one that has tremendous impact on drug development. With the emergence of more sensitive and specific technologies that are now able to be run in clinical settings and the ability to accurately measure biomarkers, there is a need to understand how biomarkers are defined, how they are used in clinical trials, and most importantly how they are used in conjunction with drug treatment. Biomarker approaches have entered into early clinical trials and are increasingly being used to develop new diagnostics that help to differentiate or stratify the likely outcomes of therapeutic intervention. Tremendous efforts have been made to date to discover novel biomarkers for use in clinical practice. Still, the number of markers that make it into clinical practice is rather low. In the next following chapters, we will explain the various classifications of biomarkers, how they are applied, measured, and used in personalized medicine specifically focusing on how they are used in de-risking the 10 plus years drug development process and lastly how they are validated and transformed into companion diagnostic assays. PMID:26330258

  19. [Personalized medicine: expectations, disappointments and hopes].

    PubMed

    Baranov, V S

    2011-01-01

    Impressive advances in the studies of human genome, identification of mutant genes of hereditary diseases and candidate genes of many chronic multifactorial diseases (MFD) laid the foundation of molecular medicine. Its characteristic features, such as the focus on individual prophylactic care, give reason to consider it as personalized predictive medicine (PPM). The fundamental concept behind PPM comprises the notion of genetic passport and its methodological basis is genetic testing (GT). Recent progress in PPM has been achieved due to the introduction of comprehensive genomic screening of associations. At the same time, the contribution of known individual genes to the development of MFD appears to be relatively insignificant which does not allow to identify the main causes of MFD. It gave rise to some scepsis as regards the value of genome as a source of information for practical medicine. Possibilities for the improvement of GT and conditions for the introduction of the available data into clinical practice are discussed. The necessity to attract clinicians to the work on PPM is emphasized. The development of unified MFD gene panels for clinical application and software for the evaluation and interpretation of GT results for doctors and patients is an indispensable condition for the use of PPM knowledge in the healthcare practice. The importance of solution of relevant ethical, juridical, and social issues is underscored. PMID:22145369

  20. Personalized medicine. Closing the gap between knowledge and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan C; Bardey, David; Castiblanco, John; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Personalized medicine encompasses a broad and evolving field informed by a patient distinctive information and biomarker profile. Although terminology is evolving and some semantic interpretations exist (e.g., personalized, individualized, precision), in a broad sense personalized medicine can be coined as: "To practice medicine as it once used to be in the past using the current biotechnological tools." A humanized approach to personalized medicine would offer the possibility of exploiting systems biology and its concept of P5 medicine, where predictive factors for developing a disease should be examined within populations in order to establish preventive measures on at-risk individuals, for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory. Herein, the process of personalized medicine is presented together with the options that can be offered in health care systems with limited resources for diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes. PMID:27302209

  1. Policy perspectives on the emerging pathways of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Gregory J.

    2009-01-01

    Remarkable advances in the fundamental knowledge about the biological basis of disease and technical advances in methods to assess genomic information have led the health care system to the threshold of personalized medicine. It is now feasible to consider strategic application of genomic information to guide patient management by being predictive, preemptive, and preventive, and enabling patient participation in medical decisions. Early evidence of this transition has some hallmarks of disruptive innovation to existing health care practices. Presented here is an examination of the changes underway to enable this new concept in health care in the United States, to improve precision and quality of care through innovations aimed at individualized approaches to medical decision making. A broad range of public policy positions will need to be considered for the health care delivery enterprise to accommodate the promise of this new science and technology for the benefit of patients. PMID:20135895

  2. Intelligent security and privacy solutions for enabling personalized telepathology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Starting with the paradigm change of health systems towards personalized health services, the paper introduces the technical paradigms to be met for enabling ubiquitous pHealth including ePathology. The system-theoretical, architecture-centric approach to mobile, pervasive and autonomous solutions has to be based on an open component system framework such as the Generic Component Model. The crucial challenge to be met for comprehensive interoperability is multi-disciplinary knowledge representation, which must be integrated into the aforementioned framework. The approach is demonstrated for security and privacy services fundamental for any eHealth or ePathology environment. PMID:21489199

  3. Enabling Disabled Persons to Gain Access to Digital Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Glenn; OGrady, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    A report describes the first phase in an effort to enhance the NaviGaze software to enable profoundly disabled persons to operate computers. (Running on a Windows-based computer equipped with a video camera aimed at the user s head, the original NaviGaze software processes the user's head movements and eye blinks into cursor movements and mouse clicks to enable hands-free control of the computer.) To accommodate large variations in movement capabilities among disabled individuals, one of the enhancements was the addition of a graphical user interface for selection of parameters that affect the way the software interacts with the computer and tracks the user s movements. Tracking algorithms were improved to reduce sensitivity to rotations and reduce the likelihood of tracking the wrong features. Visual feedback to the user was improved to provide an indication of the state of the computer system. It was found that users can quickly learn to use the enhanced software, performing single clicks, double clicks, and drags within minutes of first use. Available programs that could increase the usability of NaviGaze were identified. One of these enables entry of text by using NaviGaze as a mouse to select keys on a virtual keyboard.

  4. [Clinical and health economic challenges of personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Brüggenjürgen, B; Kornbluth, L; Ferrara, J V; Willich, S N

    2012-05-01

    Healthcare systems across the globe are currently challenged by aging populations, increases in chronic diseases and the difficult task of managing a healthcare budget. In this health economic climate, personalized medicine promises not only an improvement in healthcare delivery but also the possibility of more cost-effective therapies. It is important to remember, however, that personalized medicine has the potential to both increase and decrease costs. Each targeted therapy must be evaluated individually. However, standard clinical trial design is not suitable for personalized therapies. Therefore, both scientists and regulatory authorities will need to accept innovative study designs in order to validate personalized therapies. Hence correct economic evaluations are difficult to carry out due to lack of clear clinical evidence, longitudinal accounting and experience with patient/clinician behavior in the context of personalized medicine. In terms of reimbursement, payers, pharmaceutical companies and companion diagnostic manufacturers will also need to explore creative risk-sharing concepts. Germany is no exception to the challenges that face personalized medicine and for personalized medicine to really become the future of medicine many health economic challenges first need to be overcome. The health economic implications of personalized medicine remain unclear but it is certain that the expansion of targeted therapies in current healthcare systems will create a host of challenges. PMID:22526860

  5. Citizens' perspectives on personalized medicine: a qualitative public deliberation study.

    PubMed

    Bombard, Yvonne; Abelson, Julia; Simeonov, Dorina; Gauvin, Francois-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Our objective was to explore citizens' informed and reasoned values and expectations of personalized medicine, a timely yet novel genomics policy issue. A qualitative, public deliberation study was undertaken using a citizens' reference panel on health technologies, established to provide input to the health technology assessment process in Ontario, Canada. The citizens' panel consisted of five women and nine men, aged 18-71 years, with one member selected from each health authority region. There were shared expectations among the citizens' panel members for the potential of personalized medicine technologies to improve care, provided they are deemed clinically valid and effective. These expectations were tempered by concerns about value for money and the possibility that access to treatment may be limited by personalized medicine tests used to stratify patients. Although they questioned the presumed technological imperative presented by personalized medicine technologies, they called for increased efforts to prepare the health-care system to effectively integrate these technologies. This study represents an early but important effort to explore public values toward personalized medicine. This study also provides evidence of the public's ability to form coherent judgments about a new policy issue. Concerned that personalized tests might be used to ration care, they suggested that treatment should be made available if patients wanted it, irrespective of tests that indicate little benefit. This issue raises clinical and policy challenges that may undermine the value of personalized medicine. Further efforts to deliberate with the public are warranted to inform effective, efficient and equitable translation of personalized medicine. PMID:23340511

  6. Personal health care of internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Palabindala, Venkataraman; Foster, Paul; Kanduri, Swetha; Doppalapudi, Avanthi; Pamarthy, Amaleswari; Kovvuru, Karthik

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medical residents, as part of their job to balance the demands of their work with caring for themselves so as to be mentally, emotionally, and physically sound to stay clinically competent. While regulatory and legislative attempts at limiting medical resident work hours have materialized but have yet to attain passage, there are fairly little data looking into how residents cope up with their demands and yet attend to their own personal health. Design Anonymous mailed survey. Subjects Three hundred and thirty-seven residents from all internal medicine residency programs within United States. Methods We conducted a survey in the form of a questionnaire that was sent by e-mail to the program directors of various internal medicine residency programs within the United States, and responses were collected between May 19 and June 21, 2009. Response was well appreciated with total number of participants of 337 with even demographical distribution in gender, residency year, AMG/IMG, age group. Seventy-one percent of the residents felt that they would prefer getting admitted to their own hospital for any acute medical or surgical condition. Of the 216 residents who have had received health care in the past, almost half of them chose their own hospital because of the proximity, while 45% did not choose their own hospital despite proximity. Two out of three residents missed their doctors appointments or cancelled them due to demands of medical training. Only half of the residents have a primary care physician and almost 80% of them did not have their yearly health checkup. Close to 30% held back information regarding their social and sexual history from their provider because of privacy and confidentiality concerns. Eighty percent of residents never received information about barriers that physicians may face in obtaining care for their socially embarrassing conditions. Seventy percent felt that their performance then was suboptimal because of that health

  7. Personalized Lifestyle Medicine: Relevance for Nutrition and Lifestyle Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Minich, Deanna M.; Bland, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Public health recommendations for lifestyle modification, including diet and physical activity, have been widely disseminated for the prevention and treatment of disease. These guidelines are intended for the overall population without significant consideration for the individual with respect to one's genes and environment. Personalized lifestyle medicine is a newly developed term that refers to an approach to medicine in which an individual's health metrics from point-of-care diagnostics are used to develop lifestyle medicine-oriented therapeutic strategies for improving individual health outcomes in managing chronic disease. Examples of the application of personalized lifestyle medicine to patient care include the identification of genetic variants through laboratory tests and/or functional biomarkers for the purpose of designing patient-specific prescriptions for diet, exercise, stress, and environment. Personalized lifestyle medicine can provide solutions to chronic health problems by harnessing innovative and evolving technologies based on recent discoveries in genomics, epigenetics, systems biology, life and behavioral sciences, and diagnostics and clinical medicine. A comprehensive, personalized approach to medicine is required to promote the safety of therapeutics and reduce the cost of chronic disease. Personalized lifestyle medicine may provide a novel means of addressing a patient's health by empowering them with information they need to regain control of their health. PMID:23878520

  8. How a Patent Eligibility Case Could Affect Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    BROUGHER, JOANNA T.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine may be in danger as the doctrine of patent eligibility –which determines technological innovations that warrant patent protection –faces legal challenges. Diagnostic tests, gene patents, and more are at stake. PMID:22478808

  9. How a patent eligibility case could affect personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Brougher, Joanna T

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine may be in danger as the doctrine of patent eligibility -which determines technological innovations that warrant patent protection -faces legal challenges. Diagnostic tests, gene patents, and more are at stake. PMID:22478808

  10. Patient reactions to personalized medicine vignettes: An experimental design

    PubMed Central

    Butrick, Morgan; Roter, Debra; Kaphingst, Kimberly; Erby, Lori H.; Haywood, Carlton; Beach, Mary Catherine; Levy, Howard P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Translational investigation on personalized medicine is in its infancy. Exploratory studies reveal attitudinal barriers to “race-based medicine” and cautious optimism regarding genetically personalized medicine. This study describes patient responses to hypothetical conventional, race-based, or genetically personalized medicine prescriptions. Methods Three hundred eighty-seven participants (mean age = 47 years; 46% white) recruited from a Baltimore outpatient center were randomized to this vignette-based experimental study. They were asked to imagine a doctor diagnosing a condition and prescribing them one of three medications. The outcomes are emotional response to vignette, belief in vignette medication efficacy, experience of respect, trust in the vignette physician, and adherence intention. Results Race-based medicine vignettes were appraised more negatively than conventional vignettes across the board (Cohen’s d = −0.51−0.57−0.64, P < 0.001). Participants rated genetically personalized comparably with conventional medicine (− 0.14−0.15−0.17, P = 0.47), with the exception of reduced adherence intention to genetically personalized medicine (Cohen’s d = −0.38−0.41−0.44, P = 0.009). This relative reluctance to take genetically personalized medicine was pronounced for racial minorities (Cohen’s d =−0.38−0.31−0.25, P = 0.02) and was related to trust in the vignette physician (change in R2 = 0.23, P < 0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates a relative reluctance to embrace personalized medicine technology, especially among racial minorities, and highlights enhancement of adherence through improved doctor-patient relationships. PMID:21270639

  11. MicroRNA polymorphisms: a giant leap towards personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prasun J

    2010-01-01

    “An individual’s genetic inheritance of microRNA polymorphisms associated with disease progression, prognosis and treatment holds the key to create safer and more personalized drugs and can be a giant leap towards personalized medicine.” PMID:20428464

  12. Personalized medicine: risk prediction, targeted therapies and mobile health technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine is increasingly being employed across many areas of clinical practice, as genes associated with specific diseases are discovered and targeted therapies are developed. Mobile apps are also beginning to be used in medicine with the aim of providing a personalized approach to disease management. In some areas of medicine, patient-tailored risk prediction and treatment are applied routinely in the clinic, whereas in other fields, more work is required to translate scientific advances into individualized treatment. In this forum article, we asked specialists in oncology, neurology, endocrinology and mobile health technology to discuss where we are in terms of personalized medicine, and address their visions for the future and the challenges that remain in their respective fields. PMID:24580858

  13. Personalized Medicine in Respiratory Disease: Role of Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Priyadharshini, V S; Teran, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases affect humanity globally, with chronic lung diseases (e.g., asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, among others) and lung cancer causing extensive morbidity and mortality. These conditions are highly heterogeneous and require an early diagnosis. However, initial symptoms are nonspecific, and the clinical diagnosis is made late frequently. Over the last few years, personalized medicine has emerged as a medical care approach that uses novel technology aiming to personalize treatments according to the particular patient's medical needs. This review highlights the contributions of proteomics toward the understanding of personalized medicine in respiratory disease and its potential applications in the clinic. PMID:26827604

  14. Genomic Discoveries and Personalized Medicine in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades, we have witnessed dramatic changes in clinical diagnoses and treatments due to the revolutions of genomics and personalized medicine. Undoubtedly we also met many challenges when we use those advanced technologies in drug discovery and development. In this review, we describe when genomic information is applied in personal healthcare in general. We illustrate some case examples of genomic discoveries and promising personalized medicine applications in the area of neurological disease particular. Available data suggest that individual genomics can be applied to better treat patients in the near future. PMID:26690205

  15. The oral-systemic personalized medicine model at Marshfield Clinic.

    PubMed

    Glurich, I; Acharya, A; Shukla, S K; Nycz, G R; Brilliant, M H

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease and diabetes, two diseases that have achieved epidemic status, share a bidirectional relationship driven by micro-inflammatory processes. The present review frames the current understanding of the pathological processes that appear to link these diseases and advances the hypothesis that reversal of the epidemic is possible through application of interdisciplinary intervention and advancement of oral-systemic personalized medicine. An overview of how Marshfield Clinic's unique clinical, informatics and bio-repository resources and infrastructures are being aligned to advance oral-systemic personalized medicine is presented as an interventional model with the potential to reverse the epidemic trends seen for these two chronic diseases over the past several decades. The overall vision is to engineer a transformational shift in paradigm from 'personalized medicine' to 'personalized health'. PMID:22458294

  16. Personalized medicine: challenges and opportunities for translational bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine can be defined broadly as a model of healthcare that is predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory. Two US President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology reports illustrate challenges in personalized medicine (in a 2008 report) and in use of health information technology (in a 2010 report). Translational bioinformatics is a field that can help address these challenges and is defined by the American Medical Informatics Association as “the development of storage, analytic and interpretive methods to optimize the transformation of increasing voluminous biomedical data into proactive, predictive, preventative and participatory health.” This article discusses barriers to implementing genomics applications and current progress toward overcoming barriers, describes lessons learned from early experiences of institutions engaged in personalized medicine and provides example areas for translational bioinformatics research inquiry. PMID:24039624

  17. Implementing personalized medicine with asymmetric information on prevalence rates.

    PubMed

    Antoñanzas, Fernando; Juárez-Castelló, Carmelo A; Rodríguez-Ibeas, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Although personalized medicine is becoming the new paradigm to manage some diseases, the economics of personalized medicine have only focused on assessing the efficiency of specific treatments, lacking a theoretical framework analyzing the interactions between pharmaceutical firms and healthcare systems leading to the implementation of personalized treatments. We model the interaction between the hospitals and the manufacturer of a new treatment as an adverse selection problem where the firm does not have perfect information on the prevalence across hospitals of the genetic characteristics of the patients making them eligible to receive a new treatment. As a result of the model, hospitals with high prevalence rates benefit from the information asymmetry only when the standard treatment is inefficient when applied to the patients eligible to receive the new treatment. Otherwise, information asymmetry has no value. Personalized medicine may be fully or partially implemented depending on the proportion of high prevalence hospitals. PMID:27539222

  18. Genomic insights into ayurvedic and western approaches to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Prasher, Bhavana; Gibson, Greg; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-03-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient Indian system of medicine documented and practised since 1500 B.C., follows a systems approach that has interesting parallels with contemporary personalized genomic medicine approaches to the understanding and management of health and disease. It is based on the trisutra, which are the three aspects of causes, features and therapeutics that are interconnected through a common organizing principle termed 'tridosha'. Tridosha comprise three ascertainable physiological entities; vata (kinetic), pitta (metabolic) and kapha (potential) that are pervasive across systems, work in conjunction with each other, respond to the external environment and maintain homeostasis. Each individual is born with a specific proportion of tridosha that are not only genetically determined but also influenced by the environment during foetal development. Jointly they determine a person's basic constitution, which is termed their 'prakriti'. Development and progressi on of different diseases with their subtypes are thought to depend on the origin and mechanism of perturbation of the doshas, and the aim of therapeutic practice is to ensure that the doshas retain their homeostatic state. Similarly, western systems biology epitomized by translational P4 medicine envisages the integration of multiscalar genetic, cellular, physiological and environmental networks to predict phenotypic outcomes of perturbations. In this perspective article, we aim to outline the shape of a unifying scaffold that may allow the two intellectual traditions to enhance one another. Specifically, we illustrate how a unique integrative 'Ayurgenomics' approach can be used to integrate the trisutra concept of Ayurveda with genomics. We observe biochemical and molecular correlates of prakriti and show how these differ significantly in processes that are linked to intermediate patho-phenotypes, known to take different course in diseases. We also observe a significant enr ichment of the highly connected

  19. Enabling Self-Monitoring Data Exchange in Participatory Medicine.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Campos, Guillermo; Ofoghi, Bahadorreza; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The development of new methods, devices and apps for self-monitoring have enabled the extension of the application of these approaches for consumer health and research purposes. The increase in the number and variety of devices has generated a complex scenario where reporting guidelines and data exchange formats will be needed to ensure the quality of the information and the reproducibility of results of the experiments. Based on the Minimal Information for Self Monitoring Experiments (MISME) reporting guideline we have developed an XML format (MISME-ML) to facilitate data exchange for self monitoring experiments. We have also developed a sample instance to illustrate the concept and a Java MISME-ML validation tool. The implementation and adoption of these tools should contribute to the consolidation of a set of methods that ensure the reproducibility of self monitoring experiments for research purposes. PMID:26262401

  20. Personal Genomic Information Management and Personalized Medicine: Challenges, Current Solutions, and Roles of HIM Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Alzu'bi, Amal; Zhou, Leming; Watzlaf, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the term personalized medicine has received more and more attention in the field of healthcare. The increasing use of this term is closely related to the astonishing advancement in DNA sequencing technologies and other high-throughput biotechnologies. A large amount of personal genomic data can be generated by these technologies in a short time. Consequently, the needs for managing, analyzing, and interpreting these personal genomic data to facilitate personalized care are escalated. In this article, we discuss the challenges for implementing genomics-based personalized medicine in healthcare, current solutions to these challenges, and the roles of health information management (HIM) professionals in genomics-based personalized medicine. PMID:24808804

  1. Pharmacogenetics, Pharmacogenomics and Ayurgenomics for Personalized Medicine: A Paradigm Shift

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja D.

    2015-01-01

    The value of health care can be increased tremendously through individualized medicine. With the promise of individualized medicine, healthcare professionals will be able to better predict disease risk, prevent development of disease and manage treatments more efficiently thereby allowing people to be healthier and active longer. The developments in the area of pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics can help the physicians achieve the target of personalized medicine. Personalized medicine will come to mean not just the right drug for the right individual, but the right drug for the specific disease affecting a specific individual. The use of personalized medicine will make clinical trials more efficient by lowering the costs that would arise due to adverse drug effects and prescription of drugs that have been proven ineffective in certain genotypes. The genotypic experiments have laid valuable insights into genetic underpinnings of diseases. However it is being realized that identification of sub-groups within normal controls corresponding to contrasting disease susceptibility could lead to more effective discovery of predictive markers for diseases. However there are no modern methods available to look at the inter-individual differences within ethnically matched healthy populations. Ayurveda, an exquisitely elaborate system of predictive medicine which has been practiced for over 3500 years in India, can help in bridging this gap. In contrast to the contemporary system of medicine, the therapeutic regimen in Ayurveda is implicated on tridoshas and prakriti. According to this system, every individual is born with his or her own basic constitution, which to a great extent regulates inter-individual variability in susceptibility to diseases and response to external environment, diet and drugs. Thus the researchers in India have demonstrated that integration of this stratified approach of Ayurveda into genomics i.e. Ayurgenomics could complement personalized medicine

  2. Mild Cognitive Impairment, Neurodegeneration, and Personalized Lifestyle Medicine.

    PubMed

    Bland, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The takeaway message of this advancing science surrounding the causes and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is to recognize MCI symptoms early and intervene with a comprehensive, multifaceted, personalized lifestyle medicine program that is designed to improve neurological function and built on the components described above. The present evidence suggests this approach represents the best medicine available today for beating back the rising tide of cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. PMID:27330484

  3. The Translational Genomics Core at Partners Personalized Medicine: Facilitating the Transition of Research towards Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Blau, Ashley; Brown, Alison; Mahanta, Lisa; Amr, Sami S

    2016-01-01

    The Translational Genomics Core (TGC) at Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) serves as a fee-for-service core laboratory for Partners Healthcare researchers, providing access to technology platforms and analysis pipelines for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic research projects. The interaction of the TGC with various components of PPM provides it with a unique infrastructure that allows for greater IT and bioinformatics opportunities, such as sample tracking and data analysis. The following article describes some of the unique opportunities available to an academic research core operating within PPM, such the ability to develop analysis pipelines with a dedicated bioinformatics team and maintain a flexible Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with the support of an internal IT team, as well as the operational challenges encountered to respond to emerging technologies, diverse investigator needs, and high staff turnover. In addition, the implementation and operational role of the TGC in the Partners Biobank genotyping project of over 25,000 samples is presented as an example of core activities working with other components of PPM. PMID:26927185

  4. The Translational Genomics Core at Partners Personalized Medicine: Facilitating the Transition of Research towards Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Ashley; Brown, Alison; Mahanta, Lisa; Amr, Sami S.

    2016-01-01

    The Translational Genomics Core (TGC) at Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) serves as a fee-for-service core laboratory for Partners Healthcare researchers, providing access to technology platforms and analysis pipelines for genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic research projects. The interaction of the TGC with various components of PPM provides it with a unique infrastructure that allows for greater IT and bioinformatics opportunities, such as sample tracking and data analysis. The following article describes some of the unique opportunities available to an academic research core operating within PPM, such the ability to develop analysis pipelines with a dedicated bioinformatics team and maintain a flexible Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with the support of an internal IT team, as well as the operational challenges encountered to respond to emerging technologies, diverse investigator needs, and high staff turnover. In addition, the implementation and operational role of the TGC in the Partners Biobank genotyping project of over 25,000 samples is presented as an example of core activities working with other components of PPM. PMID:26927185

  5. [The invention of personalized medicine, between technological upheavals and utopia].

    PubMed

    Billaud, Marc; Guchet, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The idea of personalized medicine raises a series of questions. If one considers that the physician takes into account the uniqueness of his patient in the frame of the medical consultation, is the definition of medicine as "personalized" not a pleonasm? If not, why has this ambiguous denomination been adopted? In addition, is this form of medicine a novel discipline capable of revolutionizing therapeutic approaches as claimed in its accompanying discourses or is it in continuity with the molecular conception of biomedicine? Rather than attempting to directly answer these questions, we focused our attention on the organizing concepts, the technological breakthroughs and the transformations in medical practices that characterize this medicine. Following this brief analysis, it appears that the choice of a term as equivocal as personalized medicine and the emphasis on the antagonistic notions of revolution and continuity in medicine are the signs of reshuffling that is emerging between actors in the health care system, in academia and in pharmaceutical companies. PMID:26340841

  6. The microeconomics of personalized medicine: today's challenge and tomorrow's promise.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jerel C; Furstenthal, Laura; Desai, Amar A; Norris, Troy; Sutaria, Saumya; Fleming, Edd; Ma, Philip

    2009-04-01

    'Personalized medicine' promises to increase the quality of clinical care and, in some cases, decrease health-care costs. Despite this, only a handful of diagnostic tests have made it to market, with mixed success. Historically, the challenges in this field were scientific. However, as discussed in this article, with the maturation of the '-omics' sciences, it now seems that the major barriers are increasingly related to economics. Overcoming the poor microeconomic alignment of incentives among key stakeholders is therefore crucial to catalysing the further development and adoption of personalized medicine, and we propose several actions that could help achieve this goal. PMID:19300459

  7. Genomes, Populations and Diseases: Ethnic Genomics and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses the progress of ethnic genetics, the genetics of common diseases, and the concepts of personalized medicine. We show the relationship between the structure of genetic diversity in human populations and the varying frequencies of Mendelian and multifactor diseases. We also examine the population basis of pharmacogenetics and evaluate the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy, along with a review of new achievements and prospects in personalized genomics. PMID:22649660

  8. Personalized cancer immunotherapy using Systems Medicine approaches.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shailendra K; Jaitly, Tanushree; Schmitz, Ulf; Schuler, Gerold; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-05-01

    The immune system is by definition multi-scale because it involves biochemical networks that regulate cell fates across cell boundaries, but also because immune cells communicate with each other by direct contact or through the secretion of local or systemic signals. Furthermore, tumor and immune cells communicate, and this interaction is affected by the tumor microenvironment. Altogether, the tumor-immunity interaction is a complex multi-scale biological system whose analysis requires a systemic view to succeed in developing efficient immunotherapies for cancer and immune-related diseases. In this review we discuss the necessity and the structure of a systems medicine approach for the design of anticancer immunotherapies. We support the idea that the approach must be a combination of algorithms and methods from bioinformatics and patient-data-driven mathematical models conceived to investigate the role of clinical interventions in the tumor-immunity interaction. For each step of the integrative approach proposed, we review the advancement with respect to the computational tools and methods available, but also successful case studies. We particularized our idea for the case of identifying novel tumor-associated antigens and therapeutic targets by integration of patient's immune and tumor profiling in case of aggressive melanoma. PMID:26174229

  9. Personalized medicine in thrombosis: back to the future.

    PubMed

    Nagalla, Srikanth; Bray, Paul F

    2016-06-01

    Most physicians believe they practiced personalized medicine prior to the genomics era that followed the sequencing of the human genome. The focus of personalized medicine has been primarily genomic medicine, wherein it is hoped that the nucleotide dissimilarities among different individuals would provide clinicians with more precise understanding of physiology, more refined diagnoses, better disease risk assessment, earlier detection and monitoring, and tailored treatments to the individual patient. However, to date, the "genomic bench" has not worked itself to the clinical thrombosis bedside. In fact, traditional plasma-based hemostasis-thrombosis laboratory testing, by assessing functional pathways of coagulation, may better help manage venous thrombotic disease than a single DNA variant with a small effect size. There are some new and exciting discoveries in the genetics of platelet reactivity pertaining to atherothrombotic disease. Despite a plethora of genetic/genomic data on platelet reactivity, there are relatively little actionable pharmacogenetic data with antiplatelet agents. Nevertheless, it is crucial for genome-wide DNA/RNA sequencing to continue in research settings for causal gene discovery, pharmacogenetic purposes, and gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. The potential of genomics to advance medicine will require integration of personal data that are obtained in the patient history: environmental exposures, diet, social data, etc. Furthermore, without the ritual of obtaining this information, we will have depersonalized medicine, which lacks the precision needed for the research required to eventually incorporate genomics into routine, optimal, and value-added clinical care. PMID:26847245

  10. Managing the innovation supply chain to maximize personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldman, S A; Terzic, A

    2014-02-01

    Personalized medicine epitomizes an evolving model of care tailored to the individual patient. This emerging paradigm harnesses radical technological advances to define each patient's molecular characteristics and decipher his or her unique pathophysiological processes. Translated into individualized algorithms, personalized medicine aims to predict, prevent, and cure disease without producing therapeutic adverse events. Although the transformative power of personalized medicine is generally recognized by physicians, patients, and payers, the complexity of translating discoveries into new modalities that transform health care is less appreciated. We often consider the flow of innovation and technology along a continuum of discovery, development, regulation, and application bridging the bench with the bedside. However, this process also can be viewed through a complementary prism, as a necessary supply chain of services and providers, each making essential contributions to the development of the final product to maximize value to consumers. Considering personalized medicine in this context of supply chain management highlights essential points of vulnerability and/or scalability that can ultimately constrain translation of the biological revolution or potentiate it into individualized diagnostics and therapeutics for optimized value creation and delivery. PMID:24448453

  11. Translating the genetics of cystic fibrosis to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Thompson, Kristin E; Tabary, Olivier; le Rouzic, Philippe; Guillot, Loïc

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening recessive genetic disease in the Caucasian population. This multiorgan disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a chloride channel recognized as regulating several apical ion channels. The gene mutations result either in the lack of the protein at the apical surface or in an improperly functioning protein. Morbidity and mortality because of the mutation of CFTR are mainly attributable to lung disease resulting from chronic infection and inflammation. Since its discovery as the causative gene in 1989, much progress has been achieved not only in clinical genetics but also in basic science studies. Recently, combinations of these efforts have been successfully translated into development and availability for patients of new therapies targeting specific CFTR mutations to correct the CFTR at the protein level. Current technologies such as next gene sequencing and novel genomic editing tools may offer new strategies to identify new CFTR variants and modifier genes, and to correct CFTR to pursue personalized medicine, which is already developed in some patient subsets. Personalized medicine or P4 medicine ("personalized," "predictive," "preventive," and "participatory") is currently booming for CF. The various current and future challenges of personalized medicine as they apply to the issues faced in CF are discussed in this review. PMID:25940043

  12. Personalized sequencing and the future of medicine: discovery, diagnosis and defeat of disease

    PubMed Central

    Esplin, Edward D; Oei, Ling; Snyder, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    The potential for personalized sequencing to individually optimize medical treatment in diseases such as cancer and for pharmacogenomic application is just beginning to be realized, and the utility of sequencing healthy individuals for managing health is also being explored. The data produced requires additional advancements in interpretation of variants of unknown significance to maximize clinical benefit. Nevertheless, personalized sequencing, only recently applied to clinical medicine, has already been broadly applied to the discovery and study of disease. It is poised to enable the earlier and more accurate diagnosis of disease risk and occurrence, guide prevention and individualized intervention as well as facilitate monitoring of healthy and treated patients, and play a role in the prevention and recurrence of future disease. This article documents the advancing capacity of personalized sequencing, reviews its impact on disease-oriented scientific discovery and anticipates its role in the future of medicine. PMID:25493570

  13. Epigenome-based personalized medicine in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenji; Herman, James G; Guo, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has created an opportunity for precision medicine. Thus far, genetic alterations can only be used to guide treatment for small subsets of certain cancer types with these key alterations. Similar to mutations, epigenetic events are equally suitable for personalized medicine. DNA methylation alterations have been used to identify tumor-specific drug responsive markers. Methylation of MGMT sensitizes gliomas to alkylating agents is an example of epigenetic personalized medicine. Recent studies have revealed that 5-azacytidine and decitabine show activity in myelodysplasia, lung and other cancers. There are currently at least 20 kinds of histone deacetylase inhibitors in clinical testing. Inhibitors targeting other epigenetic regulators are being clinically tested, such as EZH2 inhibitor EPZ-6438. PMID:26344672

  14. Personalized medicine, genomics, and pharmacogenomics: a primer for nurses.

    PubMed

    Blix, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Personalized medicine is the study of patients' unique environmental influences as well as the totality of their genetic code-their genome-to tailor personalized risk assessments, diagnoses, prognoses, and treatments. The study of how patients' genomes affect responses to medications, or pharmacogenomics, is a related field. Personalized medicine and genomics are particularly relevant in oncology because of the genetic basis of cancer. Nurses need to understand related issues such as the role of genetic and genomic counseling, the ethical and legal questions surrounding genomics, and the growing direct-to-consumer genomics industry. As genomics research is incorporated into health care, nurses need to understand the technology to provide advocacy and education for patients and their families. PMID:25095297

  15. Gene expression analysis in RA: towards personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Burska, A N; Roget, K; Blits, M; Soto Gomez, L; van de Loo, F; Hazelwood, L D; Verweij, C L; Rowe, A; Goulielmos, G N; van Baarsen, L G M; Ponchel, F

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression has recently been at the forefront of advance in personalized medicine, notably in the field of cancer and transplantation, providing a rational for a similar approach in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a prototypic inflammatory autoimmune disease with a poorly understood etiopathogenesis. Inflammation is the main feature of RA; however, many biological processes are involved at different stages of the disease. Gene expression signatures offer management tools to meet the current needs for personalization of RA patient's care. This review analyses currently available information with respect to RA diagnostic, prognostic and prediction of response to therapy with a view to highlight the abundance of data, whose comparison is often inconclusive due to the mixed use of material source, experimental methodologies and analysis tools, reinforcing the need for harmonization if gene expression signatures are to become a useful clinical tool in personalized medicine for RA patients. PMID:24589910

  16. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Patients: Towards Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Maagdenberg, Hedy; Vijverberg, Susanne J H; Bierings, Marc B; Carleton, Bruce C; Arets, Hubertus G M; de Boer, Anthonius; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that drug responses differ among patients with regard to dose requirements, efficacy, and adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The differences in drug responses are partially explained by genetic variation. This paper highlights some examples of areas in which the different responses (dose, efficacy, and ADRs) are studied in children, including cancer (cisplatin), thrombosis (vitamin K antagonists), and asthma (long-acting β2 agonists). For childhood cancer, the replication of data is challenging due to a high heterogeneity in study populations, which is mostly due to all the different treatment protocols. For example, the replication cohorts of the association of variants in TPMT and COMT with cisplatin-induced ototoxicity gave conflicting results, possibly as a result of this heterogeneity. For the vitamin K antagonists, the evidence of the association between variants in VKORC1 and CYP2C9 and the dose is clear. Genetic dosing models have been developed, but the implementation is held back by the impossibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial with such a small and diverse population. For the long-acting β2 agonists, there is enough evidence for the association between variant ADRB2 Arg16 and treatment response to start clinical trials to assess clinical value and cost effectiveness of genotyping. However, further research is still needed to define the different asthma phenotypes to study associations in comparable cohorts. These examples show the challenges which are encountered in pediatric pharmacogenomic studies. They also display the importance of collaborations to obtain good quality evidence for the implementation of genetic testing in clinical practice to optimize and personalize treatment. PMID:27142473

  17. OncDRS: An integrative clinical and genomic data platform for enabling translational research and precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Orechia, John; Pathak, Ameet; Shi, Yunling; Nawani, Aniket; Belozerov, Andrey; Fontes, Caitlin; Lakhiani, Camille; Jawale, Chetan; Patel, Chetansharan; Quinn, Daniel; Botvinnik, Dmitry; Mei, Eddie; Cotter, Elizabeth; Byleckie, James; Ullman-Cullere, Mollie; Chhetri, Padam; Chalasani, Poornima; Karnam, Purushotham; Beaudoin, Ronald; Sahu, Sandeep; Belozerova, Yelena; Mathew, Jomol P.

    2015-01-01

    We live in the genomic era of medicine, where a patient's genomic/molecular data is becoming increasingly important for disease diagnosis, identification of targeted therapy, and risk assessment for adverse reactions. However, decoding the genomic test results and integrating it with clinical data for retrospective studies and cohort identification for prospective clinical trials is still a challenging task. In order to overcome these barriers, we developed an overarching enterprise informatics framework for translational research and personalized medicine called Synergistic Patient and Research Knowledge Systems (SPARKS) and a suite of tools called Oncology Data Retrieval Systems (OncDRS). OncDRS enables seamless data integration, secure and self-navigated query and extraction of clinical and genomic data from heterogeneous sources. Within a year of release, the system has facilitated more than 1500 research queries and has delivered data for more than 50 research studies. PMID:27054074

  18. Colorectal cancer: From prevention to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Àlex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  19. An eMERGE Clinical Center at Partners Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Smoller, Jordan W.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Green, Robert C.; Kathiresan, Sekar; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Talkowski, Michael E.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of electronic medical records (EMRs) and genomic research has become a major component of efforts to advance personalized and precision medicine. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network, initiated in 2007, is an NIH-funded consortium devoted to genomic discovery and implementation research by leveraging biorepositories linked to EMRs. In its most recent phase, eMERGE III, the network is focused on facilitating implementation of genomic medicine by detecting and disclosing rare pathogenic variants in clinically relevant genes. Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM) is a center dedicated to translating personalized medicine into clinical practice within Partners HealthCare. One component of the PPM is the Partners Healthcare Biobank, a biorepository comprising broadly consented DNA samples linked to the Partners longitudinal EMR. In 2015, PPM joined the eMERGE Phase III network. Here we describe the elements of the eMERGE clinical center at PPM, including plans for genomic discovery using EMR phenotypes, evaluation of rare variant penetrance and pleiotropy, and a novel randomized trial of the impact of returning genetic results to patients and clinicians. PMID:26805891

  20. H2020 and Beyond: Skip Discrepancy between Theory and Practice of Personalized Medicine. A Position Paper by the Italian Society of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Borro, Marina; Simmaco, Maurizio; Aceti, Antonio; Barni, Sandro; De Luca, Assunta; Fineschi, Vittorio; Frati, Paola; Girardi, Paolo; Miozzo, Monica; Nati, Giulio; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Santini, Daniele; Marchetti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Many unsolved practical issues, from technical and scientific to ethical, legal and economic topics, are slowing down the translation of Personalized Medicine principles into medical practice. The Italian Society of Personalized Medicine exposes here its point of view, based on the real-world practice of precision medicine carried-out in Italian healthcare structures. PMID:27194357

  1. AB006. Personalized and precision medicine: are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Meow-Keong

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is determined by an individual’s unique clinical, genomic and environmental information. The molecular understanding of diseases allowed development of preventive healthcare strategies and medical treatments at the pre-symptomatic or earliest stage of the disease. To achieve this promise, DNA-based risk assessment, molecular profiling, targeted therapies and dose selection of therapeutic agents were developed to facilitate customization of patient care. Commercially available genomic tests routinely are applied across a wide range of disease states in predictive or prognostic applications. Many clinicians were concerned about the lack of progress in the clinical application of genomic medicine. The development of genomic diagnostic tools such as array comparative genomic hybridization, exome and whole genome sequencing had a vital role to play in the delineation of new Mendelian loci for previously unrecognized syndromes or identification of additional genes or loci contributing to known disease entities. While the costs of these tests had decreased, the interpretation of information of uncertain significance may require increased ‘genomic counseling’ consultations to allay anxiety. Personalized medicine at present has limited roles in complex disorders or used as a tool lifestyle change decisions as public health or primary care professionals who may not be sufficiently ‘genomic-trained’. Genomic health risk assessments and statistical probabilities are difficult for clients to understand and personalized medicine must be integrated into the existing health systems. In addition, clinical workflow with significant changes required in regulatory and reimbursement policies as well as legislative protection related to patient’s confidentiality will be required. The difficulties with use of genome-wide association studies in clinical practice, with its limited phenotype-genotype impact must be addressed. Personalized medicine is

  2. [Personalized medicine from the viewpoint of patients and their relatives].

    PubMed

    Pogány, Gábor

    2013-03-01

    Our goal was to overview the situation of personalized medicine, especially to characterize the role of patient organizations. We embedded this process into the on-going procedures of the transformation of health care system, outlining the Hungarian and international tendencies. We introduce the exceptional role of rare diseases, among others the rare cancers, thanks to their special status. Some results of the recent Hungarian and international surveys are also demonstrated. The presented global tendencies give the frame for the necessary alteration of the Hungarian health care system. Beside the solution of the country-specific problems of our health care system, the main principles of the new paradigm of 21st century medicine are also influencing: personalized, participatory, preventive, predictive and proactive. The new medicine is continuously associated with the patients, instead of separated interventions. The changing of attitude is necessary for spreading these principles and also gives the basis of future medical service of society. The role of patient organizations is vital during this progress. The development is possible to the direction of patient-centred health care model by changing the structure of residential expenditure, even during the time of global financial crisis. However, a stronger community involvement is required. Good examples of this patient organization involvement are presented in the case of rare diseases, which can be, together with orphan drugs, the precursors to personalized medicine, paving the path to this direction. A closer participation of patients and their organizations is essential to transform the present health care system to the route of personalized medicine and to alter the public outlook. PMID:23573516

  3. Science, humanism, judgement, ethics: person-centered medicine as an emergent model of modern clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Miles, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The Medical University of Plovdiv (MUP) has as its motto 'Committed to humanity". But what does humanity in modern medicine mean? Is it possible to practise a form of medicine that is without humanity? In the current article, it is argued that modern medicine is increasingly being practised in a de-personalised fashion, where the patient is understood not as a unique human individual, a person, but rather as a subject or an object and more in the manner of a complex biological machine. Medicine has, it is contended, become distracted from its duty to care, comfort and console as well as to ameliorate, attenuate and cure and that the rapid development of medicine's scientific knowledge is, paradoxically, principally causative. Signal occurrences in the 'patient as a person' movement are reviewed, together with the emergence of the evidence-based medicine (EBM) and patient-centered care (PCC) movements. The characteristics of a model of medicine evolving in response to medicine's current deficiencies--person-centered healthcare (PCH)--are noted and described. In seeking to apply science with humanism, via clinical judgement, within an ethical framework, it is contended that PCH will prove to be far more responsive to the needs of the individual patient and his/her personal circumstances than current models of practice, so that neither a reductive anatomico-pathological, disease-centric model of illness (EBM), nor an aggressive patient-directed, consumerist form of care (PCC) is allowed continued dominance within modern healthcare systems. In conclusion, it is argued that PCH will enable affordable advances in biomedicine and technology to be delivered to patients within a humanistic framework of clinical practice that recognises the patient as a person and which takes full account of his/her stories, values, preferences, goals, aspirations, fears, worries, hopes, cultural context and which responds to his/her psychological, emotional, spiritual and social necessities

  4. [Rheumatoid arthritis: problems and significance of personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The last decade is prominent for significant progress in research in the field of mechanisms underlying development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) opening new prospects in pathogenetic treatment of this disease. A great success of RA pharmacotherapy during the last 10 year period is design of novel genetically engineered biological medicines. Achievements of molecular biology, pharmacological genetics and biological infornmation science promote an individual approach to treatment of RA patients within a new conception of individual medicine which considers personal aspects of genomic and proteomic sciences. This novel approach to treatment of RA patients can improve RA outcomes and noticeably reduce cost of the treatmnent. PMID:22830204

  5. Building a Personalized Medicine Infrastructure at a Major Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Farhangfar, Carol; Mendelsohn, John; Mills, Gordon B.

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of cancer biology is rapidly increasing, as is the availability and affordability of high throughput technologies for comprehensive molecular characterization of tumors and the individual's own genetic makeup. Thus, the time is right to implement personalized molecular medicine for all patients with cancer. Personalized approaches span the full cancer care spectrum from risk stratification to prevention, screening, therapy, and survivorship programs. Several molecular therapeutics have entered clinical trials creating a huge opportunity to couple genomic markers with this emerging drug tool kit. The number of patients managed in major cancer centers creates a challenge to the implementation of genomic technologies required to successfully deliver on the promise of personalized cancer care. This requires a major investment in infrastructure to facilitate rapid deployment of multiplex, cost-effective, and tissue-sparing assays relevant across multiple tumor lineages in the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) environment. Efforts must be made to ensure that assays are accessible to patients most likely to be enrolled onto molecular-marker–driven trials and that the tests are billable and payable, which will make them accessible to a wide range of patients. As the number of patients and aberrations increase, it will become critical to provide decision support for genomic medicine. Institutional commitment is needed to optimize accessibility and quality of research biopsies and to facilitate novel personalized cancer therapy trials. This article will focus on the challenges and opportunities that accompany the building of infrastructure for personalized cancer therapy. PMID:23589548

  6. Next generation sequencing: implications in personalized medicine and pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Bahareh; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Tekin, Mustafa; Mahdieh, Nejat

    2016-05-24

    A breakthrough in next generation sequencing (NGS) in the last decade provided an unprecedented opportunity to investigate genetic variations in humans and their roles in health and disease. NGS offers regional genomic sequencing such as whole exome sequencing of coding regions of all genes, as well as whole genome sequencing. RNA-seq offers sequencing of the entire transcriptome and ChIP-seq allows for sequencing the epigenetic architecture of the genome. Identifying genetic variations in individuals can be used to predict disease risk, with the potential to halt or retard disease progression. NGS can also be used to predict the response to or adverse effects of drugs or to calculate appropriate drug dosage. Such a personalized medicine also provides the possibility to treat diseases based on the genetic makeup of the patient. Here, we review the basics of NGS technologies and their application in human diseases to foster human healthcare and personalized medicine. PMID:27066891

  7. The financial hazard of personalized medicine and supportive care.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Pricivel M; Olver, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing the delivery of oncological care, promising benefits both at the patient and health system levels. The cost of targeted therapies, unfortunately, is becoming more expensive and unaffordable. Where supportive care in cancer concerns the prevention and management of the adverse effects of cancer and its treatment and is the thrust of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, financing of and value in personalized medicine is an important area of research and engagement for the association. Discussing patients' concerns with and identifying those at most risk for the financial hazard of cancer treatment and offering financial counseling and assistance and/or referral to support networks are potential key areas for (exploring and providing) better supportive care. The time is now to turn the concern of patients and their carers, providers, and other advocates regarding the affordability of cancer treatment into a collective cause towards coordinated action. PMID:26306523

  8. The Role of Surgeons in Building a Personalized Medicine Program

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Genevieve M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2014-01-01

    Changes in technology, with decreases in the cost of molecular profiling, has expanded the interest in creating institution-wide personalized medicine platforms to allow selective assessment of a given patient’s tumor in real time, with the ability to utilize that information for patient care decisions. In order for this approach to function adequately, a multidisciplinary team must be created in an environment with dedicated support at an institutional level. PMID:24964977

  9. Developing an institutional cancer biorepository for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Angen

    2014-03-01

    High quality human biospecimens, such as tissue, blood, cell derivatives, and associated patient clinical information, are key elements of a scientific infrastructure that supports discovery and identification of molecular biomarkers and diagnostic agents. The goal of most biorepositories is to collect, process, store, and distribute human biospecimen for use in basic, translational and clinical research. A biorepository serving as the central hub provides investigators with an invaluable resource with appropriately examined and characterized biospecimens with associated patient clinical information. Expertise in standardization, quality control, and information technology, and awareness of cutting edge research developments are generally required for biorepository development and management. The availability of low cost whole genome profiles of individual tumors has opened up new possibilities for personalized medicine to deliver the most appropriate treatments to individual patients with minimal toxicity. A biorepository in support of personalized medicine thus requires the highest standards of operation and adequate funding, training and certification. This review provides an overview of the development of an institutional cancer biorepository for clinical research and personalized medicine advancement. PMID:24373923

  10. Label-free microcavity biosensors: steps towards personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Amarie, Dragos; Glazier, James A

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential to improve our ability to maintain health and treat disease, while ameliorating continuously rising healthcare costs. Translation of basic research findings to clinical applications within regulatory compliance is required for personalized medicine to become the new foundation for practice of medicine. Deploying even a few of the thousands of potential diagnostic biomarkers identified each year as part of personalized treatment workflows requires clinically efficient biosensor technologies to monitor multiple biomarkers in patients in real time. This paper discusses a critical component of a regulatory system, a microcavity optical biosensor for label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions at physiologically-relevant concentrations. While most current biosensor research focuses on improving sensitivity, this paper emphasizes other characteristics a biosensor technology requires to be practical in a clinical setting, presenting robust microcavity biosensors which are easy to manufacture and integrate with microfluidics into flexible and redesignable platforms making the microcavity biosensors deployable for continuous monitoring of biomarkers in body fluids in the clinic,  in dense 2D random arrays for high-throughput applications like drug-library screening in interactomics, and of the secretory behavior of single cells in the laboratory. PMID:23443397

  11. The potential applications of Apolipoprotein E in personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Sylvia; Brisson, Diane; Marchant, Natalie L.; Gaudet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine uses various individual characteristics to guide medical decisions. Apolipoprotein (ApoE), the most studied polymorphism in humans, has been associated with several diseases. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the potential role of ApoE polymorphisms in personalized medicine, with a specific focus on neurodegenerative diseases, by giving an overview of its influence on disease risk assessment, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. This review is not a systematic inventory of the literature, but rather a summary and discussion of novel, influential and promising works in the field of ApoE research that could be valuable for personalized medicine. Empirical evidence suggests that ApoE genotype informs pre-symptomatic risk for a wide variety of diseases, is valuable for the diagnosis of type III dysbetalipoproteinemia, increases risk of dementia in neurodegenerative diseases, and is associated with a poor prognosis following acute brain damage. ApoE status appears to influence the efficacy of certain drugs, outcome of clinical trials, and might also give insight into disease prevention. Assessing ApoE genotype might therefore help to guide medical decisions in clinical practice. PMID:25071563

  12. Label-Free Microcavity Biosensors: Steps towards Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Amarie, Dragos; Glazier, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine has the potential to improve our ability to maintain health and treat disease, while ameliorating continuously rising healthcare costs. Translation of basic research findings to clinical applications within regulatory compliance is required for personalized medicine to become the new foundation for practice of medicine. Deploying even a few of the thousands of potential diagnostic biomarkers identified each year as part of personalized treatment workflows requires clinically efficient biosensor technologies to monitor multiple biomarkers in patients in real time. This paper discusses a critical component of a regulatory system, a microcavity optical biosensor for label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions at physiologically-relevant concentrations. While most current biosensor research focuses on improving sensitivity, this paper emphasizes other characteristics a biosensor technology requires to be practical in a clinical setting, presenting robust microcavity biosensors which are easy to manufacture and integrate with microfluidics into flexible and redesignable platforms making the microcavity biosensors deployable for continuous monitoring of biomarkers in body fluids in the clinic, in dense 2D random arrays for high-throughput applications like drug-library screening in interactomics, and of the secretory behavior of single cells in the laboratory. PMID:23443397

  13. Implementation and utilization of genetic testing in personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Abul-Husn, Noura S; Owusu Obeng, Aniwaa; Sanderson, Saskia C; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing began over 30 years ago with the availability of mutation detection for sickle cell disease diagnosis. Since then, the field has dramatically transformed to include gene sequencing, high-throughput targeted genotyping, prenatal mutation detection, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, population-based carrier screening, and now genome-wide analyses using microarrays and next-generation sequencing. Despite these significant advances in molecular technologies and testing capabilities, clinical genetics laboratories historically have been centered on mutation detection for Mendelian disorders. However, the ongoing identification of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence variants associated with common diseases prompted the availability of testing for personal disease risk estimation, and created commercial opportunities for direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies that assay these variants. This germline genetic risk, in conjunction with other clinical, family, and demographic variables, are the key components of the personalized medicine paradigm, which aims to apply personal genomic and other relevant data into a patient’s clinical assessment to more precisely guide medical management. However, genetic testing for disease risk estimation is an ongoing topic of debate, largely due to inconsistencies in the results, concerns over clinical validity and utility, and the variable mode of delivery when returning genetic results to patients in the absence of traditional counseling. A related class of genetic testing with analogous issues of clinical utility and acceptance is pharmacogenetic testing, which interrogates sequence variants implicated in interindividual drug response variability. Although clinical pharmacogenetic testing has not previously been widely adopted, advances in rapid turnaround time genetic testing technology and the recent implementation of preemptive genotyping programs at selected medical centers suggest that personalized

  14. Economic evaluations of personalized medicine: existing challenges and current developments

    PubMed Central

    Shabaruddin, Fatiha H; Fleeman, Nigel D; Payne, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine, with the aim of safely, effectively, and cost-effectively targeting treatment to a prespecified patient population, has always been a long-time goal within health care. It is often argued that personalizing treatment will inevitably improve clinical outcomes for patients and help achieve more effective use of health care resources. Demand is increasing for demonstrable evidence of clinical and cost-effectiveness to support the use of personalized medicine in health care. This paper begins with an overview of the existing challenges in conducting economic evaluations of genetics- and genomics-targeted technologies, as an example of personalized medicine. Our paper illustrates the complexity of the challenges faced by these technologies by highlighting the variations in the issues faced by diagnostic tests for somatic variations, generally referring to genetic variation in a tumor, and germline variations, generally referring to inherited genetic variation in enzymes involved in drug metabolic pathways. These tests are typically aimed at stratifying patient populations into subgroups on the basis of clinical effectiveness (response) or safety (avoidance of adverse events). The paper summarizes the data requirements for economic evaluations of genetics and genomics-based technologies while outlining that the main challenges relating to data requirements revolve around the availability and quality of existing data. We conclude by discussing current developments aimed to address the challenges of assessing the cost-effectiveness of genetics and genomics-based technologies, which revolve around two central issues that are interlinked: the need to adapt available evaluation methods and identifying who is responsible for generating evidence for these technologies. PMID:26309416

  15. [Genome sequencing and personalized medicine: perspectives and limitations].

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Jean-Yves; Debré, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    (e.g. imatinib and Bcr/Abl rearrangement; verumafemib and the BRAF V600E mutation). Systematic sequencing of all the genes involved in drug metabolism and responsiveness will lead to individualized pharmacogenetics. Finally, sequencing of the tumoral and constitutional genomes, identfication of somatic mutations, and detection of pharmacogenetic variants will open up the era of personalized medicine. The first results of these targeted therapeutic indications show a gain in the duration of remission and survival, although the cost-effectiveness of these approaches remains to be determined. Finally, this huge capacity for genome sequencing raises a number of regulatory and ethical issues. PMID:26259290

  16. Personality and Longevity: Knowns, Unknowns, and Implications for Public Health and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Roberts, Brent; Duberstein, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We review evidence for links between personality traits and longevity. We provide an overview of personality for health scientists, using the primary organizing framework used in the study of personality and longevity. We then review data on various aspects of personality linked to longevity. In general, there is good evidence that higher level of conscientiousness and lower levels of hostility and Type D or “distressed” personality are associated with greater longevity. Limited evidence suggests that extraversion, openness, perceived control, and low levels of emotional suppression may be associated with longer lifespan. Findings regarding neuroticism are mixed, supporting the notion that many component(s) of neuroticism detract from life expectancy, but some components at some levels may be healthy or protective. Overall, evidence suggests various personality traits are significant predictors of longevity and points to several promising directions for further study. We conclude by discussing the implications of these links for epidemiologic research and personalized medicine and lay out a translational research agenda for integrating the psychology of individual differences into public health and medicine. PMID:21766032

  17. The role of psychoneuroimmunology in personalized and systems medicine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) may provide the scientific basis for personalized and systems medicine. The exploration of the extensive interactions among psychological and behavioral factors, the nervous system, the immune system, and the endocrine system may help understand the mechanisms underlying health, wellness, and diseases. PNI theories based on systems biology methodologies may contribute to the identification of patient patterns for establishing psychological and physiological profiles for personalized medicine. A biopsychosocial model will help elucidate the systemic interrelationships between psychosocial and bio-physiological factors for the development of systems medicine. Many evidences have supported the close relationships between stress, depression, inflammation, and disorders including obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, arthritis, skin diseases, infectious diseases, and sleep disorders. As inflammation is a critical connection among different diseases, the elucidation of the associations may contribute to the findings of systemic therapeutic targets. With the understanding of the translational implications of PNI, integrative interventions in multiple dimensions can be applied to modulate stress responses and promote healthier behaviors. These interventions include combination drug therapies, diets, nutritional supplements, meditation, and other behavioral and mind-body strategies. PMID:22933138

  18. Genetic Knowledge Among Participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Schmidlen, Tara J; Scheinfeldt, Laura; Zhaoyang, Ruixue; Kasper, Rachel; Sweet, Kevin; Gordon, Erynn S; Keller, Margaret; Stack, Cathy; Gharani, Neda; Daly, Mary B; Jarvis, Joseph; Christman, Michael F

    2016-04-01

    Genetic literacy is essential for the effective integration of genomic information into healthcare; yet few recent studies have been conducted to assess the current state of this knowledge base. Participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC), a prospective study assessing the impact of personalized genetic risk reports for complex diseases and drug response on behavior and health outcomes, completed genetic knowledge questionnaires and other surveys through an online portal. To assess the association between genetic knowledge and genetic education background, multivariate linear regression was performed. 4 062 participants completed a genetic knowledge and genetic education background questionnaire. Most were older (mean age: 50), Caucasian (90 %), female (59 %), highly educated (69 % bachelor's or higher), with annual household income over $100 000 (49 %). Mean percent correct was 76 %. Controlling for demographics revealed that health care providers, participants previously exposed to genetics, and participants with 'better than most' self-rated knowledge were significantly more likely to have a higher knowledge score (p < 0.001). Overall, genetic knowledge was high with previous genetic education experience predictive of higher genetic knowledge score. Education is likely to improve genetic literacy, an important component to expanded use of genomics in personalized medicine. PMID:26306685

  19. Surgery for NSCLC in the era of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Suda, Kenichi; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2013-04-01

    The discovery in 2004 of activating mutations in the EGFR gene opened the era of personalized medicine in thoracic oncology. Treatment with drugs that target EGFR typically results in dramatic tumour response compared with conventional chemotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Subsequently, newer driver oncogenes such as ALK, ROS1 and RET have been discovered. Nevertheless, surgery has become safer and less invasive in the past 10-15 years. In the era of personalized medicine, thoracic surgeons have to think about their evolving roles. In this article, we discuss four topics relevant to this issue. Firstly, the value of surgical specimens as opposed to biopsy specimens for further understanding tumour biology is discussed. Secondly, extended indication of surgery in the era of targeted therapy is considered. Thirdly, in clinical trials that examine neoadjuvant therapy in patients selected by appropriate biomarkers, the important role of surgeons is highlighted. Finally, the possibility of personalizing the surgical procedure itself according to lung cancer subtypes defined by biomarkers is reviewed. PMID:23438759

  20. Infrastructure for Personalized Medicine at Partners HealthCare

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Scott T.; Shin, Meini Sumbada

    2016-01-01

    Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine (PPM) is a center within the Partners HealthCare system (founded by Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital) whose mission is to utilize genetics and genomics to improve the care of patients in a cost effective manner. PPM consists of five interconnected components: (1) Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM), a CLIA laboratory performing genetic testing for patients world-wide; (2) Translational Genomics Core (TGC), a core laboratory providing genomic platforms for Partners investigators; (3) Partners Biobank, a biobank of samples (DNA, plasma and serum) for 50,000 Consented Partners patients; (4) Biobank Portal, an IT infrastructure and viewer to bring together genotypes, samples, phenotypes (validated diagnoses, radiology, and clinical chemistry) from the electronic medical record to Partners investigators. These components are united by (5) a common IT system that brings researchers, clinicians, and patients together for optimal research and patient care. PMID:26927187

  1. Genome Paths: A Way to Personalized and Predictive Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The review is devoted to the impact of human genome research on progress in modern medicine. Basic achievements in genome research have resulted in the deciphering of the human genome and creation of a molecular landmarks map of the human haploid genome (HapMap Project), which has made a tremendous contribution to our understanding of common genetic and multifactorial (complex) disorders. Current genome studies mainly focus on genetic testing and gene association studies of multifactorial (complex) diseases, with the purpose of their efficient diagnostics and prevention . Identification of candidate ("predisposition") genes participating in the functional genetic modules underlying each common disorder and the use of this genetic background to elaborate sophisticated measures to efficiently prevent them constitutes a major goal in personalized molecular medicine. The concept of a genetic pass as an individual DNA databank reflecting inherited human predisposition to different complex and monogenic disorders, with special emphasis on its present state, and the numerous difficulties related to the practical implementation of personalized medicine are outlined. The problems related to the uncertainness of the results of genetic testing could be overcome at least partly by means of new technological achievements in genome research methods, such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS), massive parallel DNA sequencing, and genetic and epigenetic profiling. The basic tasks of genomic today could be determined as the need to properly estimate the clinical value of genetic testing and its applicability in clinical practice. Feasible ways towards the gradual implementation of personal genetic data, in line with routine laboratory tests, for the benefit of clinical practice are discussed. PMID:22649616

  2. Molecular imaging and personalized medicine: an uncertain future.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Adrian D

    2007-12-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has described their view of the role that imaging will play in the approval, and perhaps postapproval, use of new therapeutic drugs. The therapeutic drug industry and regulatory authorities have turned to imaging to help them achieve better efficiency and efficacy. We must extend this initiative by demonstrating that molecular imaging can also improve the efficiency and efficacy of routine treatment with these same drugs. The role of molecular imaging in personalized medicine, using targeted drugs in oncology, is very attractive because of the regional information that it provides (in many cases, with a functional or dynamic component), which cannot be provided by in vitro methods ("regional proteomics"). There is great potential for molecular imaging to play a major role in selecting appropriate patients and providing early proof of response, which is critical to addressing the conflict between the high price of treatment and limited reimbursement budgets. This is a new venture in both molecular imaging and targeted drugs. However, there are various regulatory, financial, and practical barriers that must be overcome to achieve this aim, in addition to the normal scientific challenges of drug discovery. There is an urgent need to reduce the cost (i.e., time and money) of developing imaging agents for routine clinical use. The mismatch between the current regulations and personalized medicine includes molecular imaging and requires the engagement of the regulatory authorities to correct. Therapeutic companies must be engaged early in the development of new targeted drugs and molecular imaging agents to improve the fit between the two drug types. Clinical trials must be performed to generate data that not only shows the efficacy of imaging plus therapy in a medical sense, but also in a financial sense. Molecular imaging must be accepted as not just good science but also as central to routine patient management in the personalized

  3. Immune biomarkers: the promises and pitfalls of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Willis, Joanna C D; Lord, Graham M

    2015-05-01

    Substantial progress in molecular immunology, coupled with an increasing focus on translational research and an enthusiasm for personalized medicine, has resulted in a rapid expansion in the field of immune biomarkers in recent years. In this Science and Society article, we provide a conceptual overview of the field and discuss the progress that has been made so far, as well as the future potential in the context of the scientific, logistical, financial, legal and ethical framework within which this research is being carried out and translated into clinical use. PMID:25814400

  4. Personalized Cancer Medicine: Molecular Diagnostics, Predictive biomarkers, and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez de Castro, D; Clarke, P A; Al-Lazikani, B; Workman, P

    2013-01-01

    The progressive elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of cancer has fueled the rational development of targeted drugs for patient populations stratified by genetic characteristics. Here we discuss general challenges relating to molecular diagnostics and describe predictive biomarkers for personalized cancer medicine. We also highlight resistance mechanisms for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors in lung cancer. We envisage a future requiring the use of longitudinal genome sequencing and other omics technologies alongside combinatorial treatment to overcome cellular and molecular heterogeneity and prevent resistance caused by clonal evolution. PMID:23361103

  5. Progress in oral personalized medicine: contribution of ‘omics’

    PubMed Central

    Glurich, Ingrid; Acharya, Amit; Brilliant, Murray H.; Shukla, Sanjay K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Precision medicine (PM), representing clinically applicable personalized medicine, proactively integrates and interprets multidimensional personal health data, including clinical, ‘omics’, and environmental profiles, into clinical practice. Realization of PM remains in progress. Objective The focus of this review is to provide a descriptive narrative overview of: 1) the current status of oral personalized medicine; and 2) recent advances in genomics and related ‘omic’ and emerging research domains contributing to advancing oral-systemic PM, with special emphasis on current understanding of oral microbiomes. Design A scan of peer-reviewed literature describing oral PM or ‘omic’-based research conducted on humans/data published in English within the last 5 years in journals indexed in the PubMed database was conducted using mesh search terms. An evidence-based approach was used to report on recent advances with potential to advance PM in the context of historical critical and systematic reviews to delineate current state-of-the-art technologies. Special focus was placed on oral microbiome research associated with health and disease states, emerging research domains, and technological advances, which are positioning realization of PM. Results This review summarizes: 1) evolving conceptualization of personalized medicine; 2) emerging insight into roles of oral infectious and inflammatory processes as contributors to both oral and systemic diseases; 3) community shifts in microbiota that may contribute to disease; 4) evidence pointing to new uncharacterized potential oral pathogens; 5) advances in technological approaches to ‘omics’ research that will accelerate PM; 6) emerging research domains that expand insights into host–microbe interaction including inter-kingdom communication, systems and network analysis, and salivaomics; and 7) advances in informatics and big data analysis capabilities to facilitate interpretation of host and

  6. A new era of personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis – at last!

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Bradley S; Wilcox, Pearce G

    2015-01-01

    The gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF) was discovered 25 years ago. This breakthrough has enabled a sophisticated understanding of how various mutations lead to specific alterations in the structure and function of the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) protein. Until recently, all therapies in CF were focused on ameliorating the downstream consequences of CFTR dysfunction. High-throughput drug screening approaches have yielded compounds that can modify CFTR structure and function, thus targeting the basic defect in CF. The present article describes the CFTR mutational classes, reviews mutation-specific therapies currently in late-phase clinical development, and highlights research opportunities and challenges with personalized medicine in CF. PMID:26083544

  7. A new era of personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis - at last!

    PubMed

    Quon, Bradley S; Wilcox, Pearce G

    2015-01-01

    The gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF) was discovered 25 years ago. This breakthrough has enabled a sophisticated understanding of how various mutations lead to specific alterations in the structure and function of the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) protein. Until recently, all therapies in CF were focused on ameliorating the downstream consequences of CFTR dysfunction. High-throughput drug screening approaches have yielded compounds that can modify CFTR structure and function, thus targeting the basic defect in CF. The present article describes the CFTR mutational classes, reviews mutation-specific therapies currently in late-phase clinical development, and highlights research opportunities and challenges with personalized medicine in CF. PMID:26083544

  8. Jumping on the Train of Personalized Medicine: A Primer for Non- Geneticist Clinicians: Part 3. Clinical Applications in the Personalized Medicine Area

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aihua; Meyre, David

    2014-01-01

    The rapid decline of sequencing costs brings hope that personal genome sequencing will become a common feature of medical practice. This series of three reviews aim to help non-geneticist clinicians to jump into the fast-moving field of personalized genetic medicine. In the first two articles, we covered the fundamental concepts of molecular genetics and the methodologies used in genetic epidemiology. In this third article, we discuss the evolution of personalized medicine and illustrate the most recent success in the fields of Mendelian and complex human diseases. We also address the challenges that currently limit the use of personalized medicine to its full potential. PMID:25598768

  9. The evolution of personalized cancer genetic counseling in the era of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Vig, Hetal S.; Wang, Catharine

    2014-01-01

    Practice changes in cancer genetic counseling have occurred to meet the demand for cancer genetic services. As cancer genetics continues to impact not only prevention strategies but also treatment decisions, current cancer genetic counseling models will need to be tailored to accommodate emerging clinical indications. These clinical indications include: surgical prophylactic bilateral mastectomy candidates, PARP-inhibitor candidates, patients with abnormal tumor screening results for Lynch syndrome, and post-test counseling patients (after genetic testing is ordered by another healthcare provider). A more personalized, multidisciplinary approach to selecting the best framework, for a given clinical indication, may become increasingly necessary in this era of personalized medicine. PMID:22419176

  10. What's in a word? The person of personalized (nano)medicine.

    PubMed

    Guchet, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Personalized medicine has recently become a main goal for healthcare policy. It is often defined as the tailoring of diagnosis and therapies to the genetic profile of each patient, and as such it is supposed to overcome the major thorny issues at stake in biomedicine today. This challenging program is primarily carried out by new approaches in biomedical imaging, molecular analysis, drug delivery and follow-up, taking more and more advantage of nanotechnology. However, in current literature and debates, the term 'personalized medicine' appears to be polysemous. The paper examines this polysemy. It links it to rival epistemic and technological choices in research programs, and it finally argues that this techno-epistemic plurality echoes conflicting expectations and values among today's biomedicine actors. PMID:26446343

  11. Personalized medicine in diabetes: the role of 'omics' and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Pearson, E R

    2016-06-01

    Personalized medicine, otherwise called stratified or precision medicine, aims to better target intervention to the individual to maximize benefit and minimize harm. This review discusses how diabetes aetiology, pathophysiology and patient genotype influence response to or side effects of the commonly used diabetes treatments. C-peptide is a useful biomarker that is underused to guide treatment choice, severe insulin deficiency predicts non-response to glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, and thiazolidinediones are more effective in insulin-resistant patients. The field of pharmacogenetics is now yielding clinically important results, with three examples outlined: sulphonylurea sensitivity in patients with HNF1A maturity-onset diabetes of the young; sulphonylurea sensitivity in patients with Type 2 diabetes with reduced function alleles at CYP2C9, resulting in reduced metabolism of sulphonylureas; and severe metformin intolerance associated with reduced function organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) variants, exacerbated by drugs that also inhibit OCT1. Genome-wide approaches and the potential of other 'omics', including metagenomics and metabolomics, are then outlined, highlighting the complex interacting networks that we need to understand before we can truly personalize diabetes treatments. PMID:26802434

  12. Reverse Phase Protein Arrays: Mapping the path towards personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Rosa I.; Espina, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Reverse phase protein array (RPPA) technology evolved from the advent of miniaturized immunoassays and gene microarray technology. Reverse phase protein arrays provide either a low throughput or high throughput methodology for quantifying proteins and their post-translationally modified forms in both cellular and non-cellular samples. As the demand for patient tailored therapies increases so does the need for precise and sensitive technology to accurately profile the molecular circuitry driving an individual patient’s disease. RPPAs are currently utilized in clinical trials for profiling and comparing the functional state of protein signaling pathways, either temporally within tumors, between patients, or within the same patients before/after treatment. RPPAs are generally employed for quantifying large numbers of samples on one array, under identical experimental conditions. However, the goal of personalized cancer medicine is to design therapies based on the molecular portrait of a patient’s tumor, which in turn result in more efficacious treatments with less toxicity. Therefore, RPPAs are also being validated for low throughput assays of individual patient samples. This review explores reverse phase protein array technology in the cancer research field, concentrating on its role as a fundamental tool for deciphering protein signaling networks and its emerging role in personalized medicine. PMID:25358623

  13. What is personalized medicine and what should it replace?

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, David C

    2012-07-01

    Personalized medicine is a new framework for medical care that involves modelling and simulation of a disease on the basis of its underlying mechanisms. This strategy must replace the 20(th) century paradigm of defining disease by pathology or associated signs and symptoms and conducting outcomes research that is based on the presence or absence of the disease syndrome. New technologies, including next-generation sequencing, the 'omics' and powerful computers provide massive amounts of accurate data. However, attempts to understand complex disorders by applying these new technologies within the 20(th) century framework have failed to produce the expected medical advances. To help physicians embrace a paradigm shift, the limitations of the old framework and major advantages of the new framework must be demonstrated. Chronic pancreatitis is an ideal complex disorder to study to consider the pros and cons of the two frameworks, because the pancreas is such a simple organ for disease modelling, and the advantages of personalized medicine are so profound. PMID:22614753

  14. An epidemiological perspective of personalized medicine: the Estonian experience

    PubMed Central

    Milani, L; Leitsalu, L; Metspalu, A

    2015-01-01

    Milani L, Leitsalu L, Metspalu A (University of Tartu). An epidemiological perspective of personalized medicine: the Estonian experience (Review). J Intern Med 2015; 277: 188–200. The Estonian Biobank and several other biobanks established over a decade ago are now starting to yield valuable longitudinal follow-up data for large numbers of individuals. These samples have been used in hundreds of different genome-wide association studies, resulting in the identification of reliable disease-associated variants. The focus of genomic research has started to shift from identifying genetic and nongenetic risk factors associated with common complex diseases to understanding the underlying mechanisms of the diseases and suggesting novel targets for therapy. However, translation of findings from genomic research into medical practice is still lagging, mainly due to insufficient evidence of clinical validity and utility. In this review, we examine the different elements required for the implementation of personalized medicine based on genomic information. First, biobanks and genome centres are required and have been established for the high-throughput genomic screening of large numbers of samples. Secondly, the combination of susceptibility alleles into polygenic risk scores has improved risk prediction of cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and several other diseases. Finally, national health information systems are being developed internationally, to combine data from electronic medical records from different sources, and also to gradually incorporate genomic information. We focus on the experience in Estonia, one of several countries with national goals towards more personalized health care based on genomic information, where the unique combination of elements required to accomplish this goal are already in place. PMID:25339628

  15. Addressing phenoconversion: the Achilles' heel of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rashmi R; Smith, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Phenoconversion is a phenomenon that converts genotypic extensive metabolizers (EMs) into phenotypic poor metabolizers (PMs) of drugs, thereby modifying their clinical response to that of genotypic PMs. Phenoconversion, usually resulting from nongenetic extrinsic factors, has a significant impact on the analysis and interpretation of genotype-focused clinical outcome association studies and personalizing therapy in routine clinical practice. The high phenotypic variability or genotype–phenotype mismatch, frequently observed due to phenoconversion within the genotypic EM population, means that the real number of phenotypic PM subjects may be greater than predicted from their genotype alone, because many genotypic EMs would be phenotypically PMs. If the phenoconverted population with genotype–phenotype mismatch, most extensively studied for CYP2D6, is as large as the evidence suggests, there is a real risk that genotype-focused association studies, typically correlating only the genotype with clinical outcomes, may miss clinically strong pharmacogenetic associations, thus compromising any potential for advancing the prospects of personalized medicine. This review focuses primarily on co-medication-induced phenoconversion and discusses potential approaches to rectify some of the current shortcomings. It advocates routine phenotyping of subjects in genotype-focused association studies and proposes a new nomenclature to categorize study populations. Even with strong and reliable data associating patients' genotypes with clinical outcome(s), there are problems clinically in applying this knowledge into routine pharmacotherapy because of potential genotype–phenotype mismatch. Drug-induced phenoconversion during routine clinical practice remains a major public health issue. Therefore, the principal challenges facing personalized medicine, which need to be addressed, include identification of the following factors: (i) drugs that are susceptible to phenoconversion

  16. Translational research: precision medicine, personalized medicine, targeted therapies: marketing or science?

    PubMed

    Marquet, Pierre; Longeray, Pierre-Henry; Barlesi, Fabrice; Ameye, Véronique; Augé, Pascale; Cazeneuve, Béatrice; Chatelut, Etienne; Diaz, Isabelle; Diviné, Marine; Froguel, Philippe; Goni, Sylvia; Gueyffier, François; Hoog-Labouret, Natalie; Mourah, Samia; Morin-Surroca, Michèle; Perche, Olivier; Perin-Dureau, Florent; Pigeon, Martine; Tisseau, Anne; Verstuyft, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is based on: 1) improved clinical or non-clinical methods (including biomarkers) for a more discriminating and precise diagnosis of diseases; 2) targeted therapies of the choice or the best drug for each patient among those available; 3) dose adjustment methods to optimize the benefit-risk ratio of the drugs chosen; 4) biomarkers of efficacy, toxicity, treatment discontinuation, relapse, etc. Unfortunately, it is still too often a theoretical concept because of the lack of convenient diagnostic methods or treatments, particularly of drugs corresponding to each subtype of pathology, hence to each patient. Stratified medicine is a component of personalized medicine employing biomarkers and companion diagnostics to target the patients likely to present the best benefit-risk balance for a given active compound. The concept of targeted therapy, mostly used in cancer treatment, relies on the existence of a defined molecular target, involved or not in the pathological process, and/or on the existence of a biomarker able to identify the target population, which should logically be small as compared to the population presenting the disease considered. Targeted therapies and biomarkers represent important stakes for the pharmaceutical industry, in terms of market access, of return on investment and of image among the prescribers. At the same time, they probably represent only the first generation of products resulting from the combination of clinical, pathophysiological and molecular research, i.e. of translational research. PMID:25679189

  17. Development and validation of a personality assessment instrument for traditional korean medicine: sasang personality questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chae, Han; Lee, Siwoo; Park, Soo Hyun; Jang, Eunsu; Lee, Soo Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Sasang typology is a traditional Korean medicine based on the biopsychosocial perspectives of Neo-Confucianism and utilizes medical herbs and acupuncture for type-specific treatment. This study was designed to develop and validate the Sasang Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) for future use in the assessment of personality based on Sasang typology. Design and Methods. We selected questionnaire items using internal consistency analysis and examined construct validity with explorative factor analysis using 245 healthy participants. Test-retest reliability as well as convergent validity were examined. Results. The 14-item SPQ showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .817) and test-retest reliability (r = .837). Three extracted subscales, SPQ-behavior, SPQ-emotionality, and SPQ-cognition, were found, explaining 55.77% of the total variance. The SPQ significantly correlated with Temperament and Character Inventory novelty seeking (r = .462), harm avoidance (r = -.390), and NEO Personality Inventory extraversion (r = .629). The SPQ score of the So-Eum (24.43 ± 4.93), Tae-Eum (27.33 ± 5.88), and So-Yang (30.90 ± 5.23) types were significantly different from each other (P < .01). Conclusion. Current results demonstrated the reliability and validity of the SPQ and its subscales that can be utilized as an objective instrument for conducting personalized medicine research incorporating the biopsychosocial perspective. PMID:22567034

  18. Development and Validation of a Personality Assessment Instrument for Traditional Korean Medicine: Sasang Personality Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Han; Lee, Siwoo; Park, Soo Hyun; Jang, Eunsu; Lee, Soo Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Sasang typology is a traditional Korean medicine based on the biopsychosocial perspectives of Neo-Confucianism and utilizes medical herbs and acupuncture for type-specific treatment. This study was designed to develop and validate the Sasang Personality Questionnaire (SPQ) for future use in the assessment of personality based on Sasang typology. Design and Methods. We selected questionnaire items using internal consistency analysis and examined construct validity with explorative factor analysis using 245 healthy participants. Test-retest reliability as well as convergent validity were examined. Results. The 14-item SPQ showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .817) and test-retest reliability (r = .837). Three extracted subscales, SPQ-behavior, SPQ-emotionality, and SPQ-cognition, were found, explaining 55.77% of the total variance. The SPQ significantly correlated with Temperament and Character Inventory novelty seeking (r = .462), harm avoidance (r = −.390), and NEO Personality Inventory extraversion (r = .629). The SPQ score of the So-Eum (24.43 ± 4.93), Tae-Eum (27.33 ± 5.88), and So-Yang (30.90 ± 5.23) types were significantly different from each other (P < .01). Conclusion. Current results demonstrated the reliability and validity of the SPQ and its subscales that can be utilized as an objective instrument for conducting personalized medicine research incorporating the biopsychosocial perspective. PMID:22567034

  19. Translating personality psychology to help personalize preventive medicine for young adult patients.

    PubMed

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-03-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by health care reform will soon increase demands on primary care physicians. Physicians will face more young adult patients, which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the present study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults' personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the cohort of 1,000 individuals from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (Moffitt, Caspi, Rutter, & Silva, 2001), we show that very brief measures of young adults' personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for health care professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing health care electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient

  20. Translating Personality Psychology to Help Personalize Preventive Medicine for Young-Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Belsky, Daniel W.; Hancox, Robert J.; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W. Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-01-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by healthcare reform will soon increase demands on primary-care physicians. Physicians will face more young-adult patients which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the current study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults’ personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the Dunedin Study cohort of 1,000 individuals, we show that very brief measures of young adults’ personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness-to-Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health-risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for healthcare professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing healthcare electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient outcomes. PMID:24588093

  1. An integrated framework of personalized medicine: from individual genomes to participatory health care.

    PubMed

    Evers, Andrea W M; Rovers, Maroeska M; Kremer, Jan A M; Veltman, Joris A; Schalken, Jack A; Bloem, Bas R; van Gool, Alain J

    2012-08-01

    Promising research developments in both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics and participatory health care approaches, have generated widespread interest in personalized medicine among almost all scientific areas and clinicians. The term personalized medicine is, however, frequently used without defining a clear theoretical and methodological background. In addition, to date most personalized medicine approaches still lack convincing empirical evidence regarding their contribution and advantages in comparison to traditional models. Here, we propose that personalized medicine can only fulfill the promise of optimizing our health care system by an interdisciplinary and translational view that extends beyond traditional diagnostic and classification systems. PMID:22911520

  2. Ethical, legal and social implications of incorporating personalized medicine into healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Kyle B; Rothstein, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    As research focused on personalized medicine has developed over the past decade, bioethics scholars have contemplated the ethical, legal and social implications of this type of research. In the next decade, there will be a need to broaden the focus of this work as personalized medicine moves into clinical settings. We consider two broad issues that will grow in importance and urgency. First, we analyze the consequences of the significant increase in health information that will be brought about by personalized medicine. Second, we raise concerns about the potential of personalized medicine to exacerbate existing disparities in healthcare. PMID:25601880

  3. Integrative network modeling approaches to personalized cancer medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Brian A; Readhead, Ben P; Eden, Caroline; Parekh, Samir; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-01-01

    The ability to collect millions of molecular measurements from patients is a now a reality for clinical medicine. This reality has created the challenge of how to integrate these vast amounts of data into models that accurately predict complex pathophysiology and can translate this complexity into clinically actionable outputs. Integrative informatics and data-driven approaches provide a framework for analyzing large-scale datasets and combining them into multiscale models that can be used to determine the key drivers of disease and identify optimal therapies for treating tumors. In this perspective we discuss how an integrative modeling approach is being used to inform individual treatment decisions, highlighting a recent case report that illustrates the challenges and opportunities for personalized oncology. PMID:27019658

  4. Respiratory proteomics: from descriptive studies to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Teran, Luis M; Montes-Vizuet, Rosalia; Li, Xinping; Franz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are highly prevalent and affect humankind worldwide, causing extensive morbidity and mortality with the environment playing an important role. Given the complex structure of the airways, sophisticated tools are required for early diagnosis; initial symptoms are nonspecific, and the clinical diagnosis is made frequently late. Over the past few years, proteomics has made high technological progress in mass-spectrometry-based protein identification and has allowed us to gain new insights into disease mechanisms and identify potential novel therapeutic targets. This review will highlight the contributions of proteomics toward the understanding of the respiratory proteome listing potential biomarkers and its potential application to the clinic. We also outline the contributions of proteomics to creating a personalized approach in respiratory medicine. PMID:25382407

  5. Mitochondrial and nuclear genomics and the emergence of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Developing early detection biosensors for disease has been the long‒held goal of the Human Genome Project, but with little success. Conversely, the biological properties of the mitochondrion coupled with the relative simplicity of the mitochondrial genome give this organelle extraordinary functionality as a biosensor and places the field of mitochondrial genomics in a position of strategic advantage to launch significant advances in personalized medicine. Numerous factors make the mitochondrion organelle uniquely suited to be an early detection biosensor with applications in oncology as well as many other aspects of human health and disease. Early detection of disease translates into more effective, less expensive treatments for disease and overall better prognoses for those at greater risk for developing diseases. PMID:23244780

  6. Why personalized medicine will fail if we stay the course

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Edward; Callier, Shawneequa L; Rotimi, Charles N

    2013-01-01

    Genomic science and associated technologies are providing scientists and clinicians with novel insights that are transforming the delivery of healthcare and the overall well-being of society. However, these insights inform us that historical population sampling approaches for investigating rare and common genetic variations are not representative of the complex ancestral backgrounds of today's patients. In order for personalized medicine to be meaningful and applicable to the global populations, we will need to know how common and rare genetic variants found in different parts of the world influence health and drug response. This article demonstrates the importance of increasing ethnic and racial diversity among participants in genomic research, highlights areas of opportunity for improving our understanding of genomic diversity among populations, and provides examples of successful models that help to resolve these concerns. PMID:23543886

  7. The road from next-generation sequencing to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Moving from a traditional medical model of treating pathologies to an individualized predictive and preventive model of personalized medicine promises to reduce the healthcare cost on an overburdened and overwhelmed system. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the potential to accelerate the early detection of disorders and the identification of pharmacogenetics markers to customize treatments. This review explains the historical facts that led to the development of NGS along with the strengths and weakness of NGS, with a special emphasis on the analytical aspects used to process NGS data. There are solutions to all the steps necessary for performing NGS in the clinical context where the majority of them are very efficient, but there are some crucial steps in the process that need immediate attention. PMID:26000024

  8. Forward Individualized Medicine from Personal Genomes to Interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; Groen, Albert K.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the variation in the genome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome, and their interaction with the environment, every individual can be rightfully considered as a unique biological entity. Individualized medicine promises to take this uniqueness into account to optimize disease treatment and thereby improve health benefits for every patient. The success of individualized medicine relies on a precise understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship. Although omics technologies advance rapidly, there are several challenges that need to be overcome: Next generation sequencing can efficiently decipher genomic sequences, epigenetic changes, and transcriptomic variation in patients, but it does not automatically indicate how or whether the identified variation will cause pathological changes. This is likely due to the inability to account for (1) the consequences of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, and (2) (post)transcriptional as well as (post)translational processes that eventually determine the concentration of key metabolites. The technologies to accurately measure changes in these latter layers are still under development, and such measurements in humans are also mainly restricted to blood and circulating cells. Despite these challenges, it is already possible to track dynamic changes in the human interactome in healthy and diseased states by using the integration of multi-omics data. In this review, we evaluate the potential value of current major bioinformatics and systems biology-based approaches, including genome wide association studies, epigenetics, gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks, and genome-scale metabolic modeling. Moreover, we address the question whether integrative analysis of personal multi-omics data will help understanding of personal genotype-phenotype relationships. PMID:26696898

  9. Marriage and Medicine: The Physician as Partner, Parent, and Person

    PubMed Central

    Christie-Seely, J.

    1986-01-01

    Physicians are beginning to see the need to heal themselves, and to change the statistics on their morbidity, mortality, and marital distress. Stress for physicians comes from five sources: the nature of the work, their training, their public image, their families, and themselves. Medical school stress as an ‘initiation rite’ is discussed. Three theoretical frameworks are described which will enable family physicians to take a closer look at their own marriages and families as well as those of patients. A systems orientation will help avoid blame of self or partner or parents; object relations theory clarifies the human tendency to repeat history; a theory connecting self-esteem and communication styles will allow physicians to be more open at work and with their families. The importance of developing priorities and meaningful interests outside medicine is also discussed. PMID:21267270

  10. BioMiner: Paving the Way for Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Chris; Stec, Karol; Glintschert, Alexander; Gruden, Kristina; Schichor, Christian; Or-Guil, Michal; Selbig, Joachim; Schuchhardt, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is promising a revolution for medicine and human biology in the 21st century. The scientific foundation for this revolution is accomplished by analyzing biological high-throughput data sets from genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Currently, access to these data has been limited to either rather simple Web-based tools, which do not grant much insight or analysis by trained specialists, without firsthand involvement of the physician. Here, we present the novel Web-based tool "BioMiner," which was developed within the scope of an international and interdisciplinary project (SYSTHER) and gives access to a variety of high-throughput data sets. It provides the user with convenient tools to analyze complex cross-omics data sets and grants enhanced visualization abilities. BioMiner incorporates transcriptomic and cross-omics high-throughput data sets, with a focus on cancer. A public instance of BioMiner along with the database is available at http://systherDB.microdiscovery.de/, login and password: "systher"; a tutorial detailing the usage of BioMiner can be found in the Supplementary File. PMID:26005322

  11. BioMiner: Paving the Way for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Chris; Stec, Karol; Glintschert, Alexander; Gruden, Kristina; Schichor, Christian; Or-Guil, Michal; Selbig, Joachim; Schuchhardt, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is promising a revolution for medicine and human biology in the 21st century. The scientific foundation for this revolution is accomplished by analyzing biological high-throughput data sets from genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Currently, access to these data has been limited to either rather simple Web-based tools, which do not grant much insight or analysis by trained specialists, without firsthand involvement of the physician. Here, we present the novel Web-based tool “BioMiner,” which was developed within the scope of an international and interdisciplinary project (SYSTHER†) and gives access to a variety of high-throughput data sets. It provides the user with convenient tools to analyze complex cross-omics data sets and grants enhanced visualization abilities. BioMiner incorporates transcriptomic and cross-omics high-throughput data sets, with a focus on cancer. A public instance of BioMiner along with the database is available at http://systherDB.microdiscovery.de/, login and password: “systher”; a tutorial detailing the usage of BioMiner can be found in the Supplementary File. PMID:26005322

  12. Personal, Electronic, Secure National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records Conference

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues EHR Personal, Electronic, Secure: National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records ... One suggestion for saving money is to implement electronic personal health records. With this in mind, the ...

  13. The Information Technology Infrastructure for the Translational Genomics Core and the Partners Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Natalie; Holzbach, Ana; Mahanta, Lisa; Aldama, Jackie; Cerretani, Xander; Embree, Kevin; Leon, Irene; Rathi, Neeta; Vickers, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    The Biobank and Translational Genomics core at Partners Personalized Medicine requires robust software and hardware. This Information Technology (IT) infrastructure enables the storage and transfer of large amounts of data, drives efficiencies in the laboratory, maintains data integrity from the time of consent to the time that genomic data is distributed for research, and enables the management of complex genetic data. Here, we describe the functional components of the research IT infrastructure at Partners Personalized Medicine and how they integrate with existing clinical and research systems, review some of the ways in which this IT infrastructure maintains data integrity and security, and discuss some of the challenges inherent to building and maintaining such infrastructure. PMID:26805892

  14. The Information Technology Infrastructure for the Translational Genomics Core and the Partners Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Boutin, Natalie; Holzbach, Ana; Mahanta, Lisa; Aldama, Jackie; Cerretani, Xander; Embree, Kevin; Leon, Irene; Rathi, Neeta; Vickers, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    The Biobank and Translational Genomics core at Partners Personalized Medicine requires robust software and hardware. This Information Technology (IT) infrastructure enables the storage and transfer of large amounts of data, drives efficiencies in the laboratory, maintains data integrity from the time of consent to the time that genomic data is distributed for research, and enables the management of complex genetic data. Here, we describe the functional components of the research IT infrastructure at Partners Personalized Medicine and how they integrate with existing clinical and research systems, review some of the ways in which this IT infrastructure maintains data integrity and security, and discuss some of the challenges inherent to building and maintaining such infrastructure. PMID:26805892

  15. Perceptions of Personalized Medicine in an Academic Health System: Educational Findings

    PubMed Central

    Vorderstrasse, Allison; Katsanis, Sara Huston; Minear, Mollie A.; Yang, Nancy; Rakhra-Burris, Tejinder; Reeves, Jason W.; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Ann Simmons, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Prior reports demonstrate that personalized medicine implementation in clinical care is lacking. Given the program focus at Duke University on personalized medicine, we assessed health care providers’ perspectives on their preparation and educational needs to effectively integrate personalized medicine tools and applications into their clinical practices. Methods Data from 78 health care providers who participated in a larger study of personalized and precision medicine at Duke University were analyzed using Qualtrics (descriptive statistics). Individuals age 18 years and older were recruited for the larger study through broad email contacts across the university and health system. All participants completed an online 35-question survey that was developed, pilot-tested, and administered by a team of interdisciplinary researchers and clinicians at the Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine. Results Overall, providers reported being ill-equipped to implement personalized medicine in clinical practice. Many respondents identified educational resources as critical for strengthening personalized medicine implementation in both research and clinical practice. Responses did not differ significantly between specialists and primary providers or by years since completion of the medical degree. Conclusions Survey findings support prior calls for provider and patient education in personalized medicine. Respondents identified focus areas in training, education, and research for improving personalized medicine uptake. Given respondents’ emphasis on educational needs, now may be an ideal time to address these needs in clinical training and public education programs. PMID:26236542

  16. [Billroth and Brahms: personal encounter of medicine and music].

    PubMed

    Hadaschik, B A; Hadaschik, E N; Hohenfellner, M

    2012-02-01

    Theodor Billroth and Johannes Brahms shared a decades long personal friendship. The music-loving Billroth influenced the work of the famous composer and in turn Brahms also left traces within Billroth's lifetime achievements. To shed light on the close relationship of medicine and music, this manuscript describes both Billroth's life and surgical career as they were influenced and stimulated by his close friendship to Brahms.Theodor Billroth and Johannes Brahms first met in 1865 in Zurich, Switzerland. After Billroth accepted the chair of surgery at the University of Vienna in 1867, Brahms moved to Vienna in 1869. During the following years, Billroth analyzed most of Brahms' compositions prior to publication. Similar to his effective way of teaching medical students and assistants, Billroth stimulated Brahms to publish many of his later compositions. Brahms on the other hand supported Billroth in writing his essay"Who is musical?". Furthermore, music helped Billroth to cope with the demanding working life of a surgeon.Music and surgery share both structural and emotional analogies. While both professions require meticulous techniques, personal interaction is a prerequisite for success. "Science and art scoop from the same well." PMID:22269990

  17. Personalized medicine for ARDS: the 2035 research agenda.

    PubMed

    Beitler, Jeremy R; Goligher, Ewan C; Schmidt, Matthieu; Spieth, Peter M; Zanella, Alberto; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Calfee, Carolyn S; Cavalcanti, Alexandre B

    2016-05-01

    In the last 20 years, survival among patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has increased substantially with advances in lung-protective ventilation and resuscitation. Building on this success, personalizing mechanical ventilation to patient-specific physiology for enhanced lung protection will be a top research priority for the years ahead. However, the ARDS research agenda must be broader in scope. Further understanding of the heterogeneous biology, from molecular to mechanical, underlying early ARDS pathogenesis is essential to inform therapeutic discovery and tailor treatment and prevention strategies to the individual patient. The ARDSne(x)t research agenda for the next 20 years calls for bringing personalized medicine to ARDS, asking simultaneously both whether a treatment affords clinically meaningful benefit and for whom. This expanded scope necessitates standard acquisition of highly granular biological, physiological, and clinical data across studies to identify biologically distinct subgroups that may respond differently to a given intervention. Clinical trials will need to consider enrichment strategies and incorporate long-term functional outcomes. Tremendous investment in research infrastructure and global collaboration will be vital to fulfilling this agenda. PMID:27040103

  18. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    PubMed

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. PMID:26335952

  19. Strategies to overcome clinical, regulatory, and financial challenges in the implementation of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Ringborg, Ulrik; Schilsky, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights major developments over the last decade in personalized medicine in cancer. Emerging data from clinical studies demonstrate that the use of targeted agents in patients with targetable molecular aberrations improves clinical outcomes. Despite a surge of studies, however, significant gaps in knowledge remain, especially in identifying driver molecular aberrations in patients with multiple aberrations, understanding molecular networks that control carcinogenesis and metastasis, and most importantly, discovering effective targeted agents. Implementation of personalized medicine requires continued scientific and technological breakthroughs; standardization of tumor tissue acquisition and molecular testing; changes in oncology practice and regulatory standards for drug and device access and approval; modification of reimbursement policies by health care payers; and innovative ways to collect and analyze electronic patient information that are linked to prospective clinical registries and rapid learning systems. Informatics systems that integrate clinical, laboratory, radiologic, molecular, and economic data will improve clinical care and will provide infrastructure to enable clinical research. The initiative of the EurocanPlatform aims to overcome the challenges of implementing personalized medicine in Europe by sharing patients, biologic materials, and technological resources across borders. The EurocanPlatform establishes a complete translational cancer research program covering the drug development process and strengthening collaborations among academic centers, pharmaceutical companies, regulatory authorities, health technology assessment organizations, and health care systems. The CancerLinQ rapid learning system being developed by ASCO has the potential to revolutionize how all stakeholders in the cancer community assemble and use information obtained from patients treated in real-world settings to guide clinical practice, regulatory

  20. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  1. Personalized medicine in diabetes mellitus: current opportunities and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kleinberger, Jeffrey W; Pollin, Toni I

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects approximately 382 million individuals worldwide and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Over 40 and nearly 80 genetic loci influencing susceptibility to type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively, have been identified. In addition, there is emerging evidence that some genetic variants help to predict response to treatment. Other variants confer apparent protection from diabetes or its complications and may lead to development of novel treatment approaches. Currently, there is clear clinical utility to genetic testing to find the at least 1% of diabetic individuals who have monogenic diabetes (e.g., maturity-onset diabetes of the young and KATP channel neonatal diabetes). Diagnosing many of these currently underdiagnosed types of diabetes enables personalized treatment, resulting in improved and less invasive glucose control, better prediction of prognosis, and enhanced familial risk assessment. Efforts to enhance the rate of detection, diagnosis, and personalized treatment of individuals with monogenic diabetes should set the stage for effective clinical translation of current genetic, pharmacogenetic, and pharmacogenomic research of more complex forms of diabetes. PMID:25907167

  2. Nutrigenetics and nutraceuticals: the next wave riding on personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, M T Ravi

    2007-02-01

    The Human Genome Project and subsequent identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within populations has played a major role in predicting individual response to drugs (pharmacogenetics) leading to the concept of "personalized medicine." Nutritional genomics is a recent off-shoot of this genetic revolution that includes (1) nutrigenomics: the study of interaction of dietary components with the genome and the resulting proteonomic and metabolomic changes; and (2) nutrigenetics: understanding the gene-based differences in response to dietary components and developing nutraceuticals that are most compatible with health based on individual genetic makeup. Despite the extensive data on genetic polymorphisms in humans, its translation into medical practice has been slow because of the time required to accumulate population data on SNP incidence, understand the significance of a given SNP in disease, and develop suitable diagnostic tests. Nutrigenomics revitalized the field by showing that nutrients and botanicals can interact with the genome and modify subsequent gene expression, which has provided a great impetus for nutrigenetic research and nutraceutical development based on nutrigenetics. Polymorphisms in methlyene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (involved in folate metabolism), apolipoprotein E (Apo E) and ApoA1 (in cardiovascular disease), and leptin/leptin receptor (obesity) genes are some good examples for understanding basic nutrigenetics. Developing nutraceuticals to prevent and manage thrombosis risk in women with thrombophilic gene mutations are discussed in the context of the opportunities that exist at the nutrigenetic/pharmacogenetic interphase leading to "personalized nutrition." Further research on individual differences in genetic profiles and nutrient requirements will help establish nutrigenetics as an essential discipline for nutrition and dietetics practice. PMID:17240315

  3. Individualizing breast cancer treatment-The dawn of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Argha; Gangopadhyay, Sudeshna; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2014-01-01

    Identification of breast cancer not being a single disease but backed by multiple heterogeneous oncogenic subpopulations is of growing interest in developing personalized therapies to provide optimal outcomes. Through this review, we bring attention to evolution of tumor and microenvironment heterogeneity as a predominant challenge in stratifying therapies. Establishment of a 'precancer niche' serves as a prerequisite for genetically initiated cells to survive and promote neoplastic evolution towards clinically established cancer through development of tumor and its microenvironment. Additionally, continuous evolutionary interplay between tumor and recruited stromal cells along with many other components in the tumor microenvironment adds up to further complexity in developing targeted therapies. However, through continued excellence in developing high throughput technologies including the advent of single-nucleus sequencing, which makes it possible to sequence individual tumor cells, leads to improved abilities in decoding the heterogenic perturbations through reconstruction of tumor evolutionary lineages. Furthermore, simple liquid-biopsies in form of enumeration/characterization of circulating tumor cells and tumor microvesicles found in peripheral circulation, shed from distinct tumor lesions, show great promise as prospective biomarkers towards better prognosis in tailoring individualized therapies to breast cancer patients. Lastly, by means of network medicinal approaches, it is seemingly possible to develop a map of the cell's intricate wiring network, helping to identify appropriate interconnected protein networks through which the disease spreads, offering a more patient-specific outcome. Although these therapeutic interventions through designing personalized oncology-based trials are promising, owing to continuous tumor evolution, targeting genome instability survival pathways might become an economically viable alternative. PMID:24051330

  4. Empowering Personalized Medicine with Big Data and Semantic Web Technology: Promises, Challenges, and Use Cases

    PubMed Central

    Panahiazar, Maryam; Taslimitehrani, Vahid; Jadhav, Ashutosh; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2015-01-01

    In healthcare, big data tools and technologies have the potential to create significant value by improving outcomes while lowering costs for each individual patient. Diagnostic images, genetic test results and biometric information are increasingly generated and stored in electronic health records presenting us with challenges in data that is by nature high volume, variety and velocity, thereby necessitating novel ways to store, manage and process big data. This presents an urgent need to develop new, scalable and expandable big data infrastructure and analytical methods that can enable healthcare providers access knowledge for the individual patient, yielding better decisions and outcomes. In this paper, we briefly discuss the nature of big data and the role of semantic web and data analysis for generating “smart data” which offer actionable information that supports better decision for personalized medicine. In our view, the biggest challenge is to create a system that makes big data robust and smart for healthcare providers and patients that can lead to more effective clinical decision-making, improved health outcomes, and ultimately, managing the healthcare costs. We highlight some of the challenges in using big data and propose the need for a semantic data-driven environment to address them. We illustrate our vision with practical use cases, and discuss a path for empowering personalized medicine using big data and semantic web technology. PMID:25705726

  5. Narrowing the gap of personalized medicine in emerging countries: the case of multiple endocrine neoplasias in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Rodrigo A; Sekiya, Tomoko; Longuini, Viviane C; Coutinho, Flavia L; Lourenço, Delmar M; Toledo, Sergio P A

    2012-01-01

    The finished version of the human genome sequence was completed in 2003, and this event initiated a revolution in medical practice, which is usually referred to as the age of genomic or personalized medicine. Genomic medicine aims to be predictive, personalized, preventive, and also participative (4Ps). It offers a new approach to several pathological conditions, although its impact so far has been more evident in mendelian diseases. This article briefly reviews the potential advantages of this approach, and also some issues that may arise in the attempt to apply the accumulated knowledge from genomic medicine to clinical practice in emerging countries. The advantages of applying genomic medicine into clinical practice are obvious, enabling prediction, prevention, and early diagnosis and treatment of several genetic disorders. However, there are also some issues, such as those related to: (a) the need for approval of a law equivalent to the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which was approved in 2008 in the USA; (b) the need for private and public funding for genetics and genomics; (c) the need for development of innovative healthcare systems that may substantially cut costs (e.g. costs of periodic medical followup); (d) the need for new graduate and postgraduate curricula in which genomic medicine is emphasized; and (e) the need to adequately inform the population and possible consumers of genetic testing, with reference to the basic aspects of genomic medicine. PMID:22584698

  6. Narrowing the gap of personalized medicine in emerging countries: the case of multiple endocrine neoplasias in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Rodrigo A.; Sekiya, Tomoko; Longuini, Viviane C.; L. Coutinho, Flavia; Lourenço, Delmar M.; Toledo, Sergio P. A.

    2012-01-01

    The finished version of the human genome sequence was completed in 2003, and this event initiated a revolution in medical practice, which is usually referred to as the age of genomic or personalized medicine. Genomic medicine aims to be predictive, personalized, preventive, and also participative (4Ps). It offers a new approach to several pathological conditions, although its impact so far has been more evident in mendelian diseases. This article briefly reviews the potential advantages of this approach, and also some issues that may arise in the attempt to apply the accumulated knowledge from genomic medicine to clinical practice in emerging countries. The advantages of applying genomic medicine into clinical practice are obvious, enabling prediction, prevention, and early diagnosis and treatment of several genetic disorders. However, there are also some issues, such as those related to: (a) the need for approval of a law equivalent to the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which was approved in 2008 in the USA; (b) the need for private and public funding for genetics and genomics; (c) the need for development of innovative healthcare systems that may substantially cut costs (e.g. costs of periodic medical follow-up); (d) the need for new graduate and postgraduate curricula in which genomic medicine is emphasized; and (e) the need to adequately inform the population and possible consumers of genetic testing, with reference to the basic aspects of genomic medicine. PMID:22584698

  7. "Personalizing" academic medicine: opportunities and challenges in implementing genomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Tweardy, David J; Belmont, John W

    2009-12-01

    BCM faculty members spearheaded the development of a first-generation Personal Genome Profile (Baylor PGP) assay to assist physicians in diagnosing and managing patients in this new era of medicine. The principles that guided the design and implementation of the Baylor PGP were high quality, robustness, low expense, flexibility, practical clinical utility, and the ability to facilitate broad areas of clinical research. The most distinctive feature of the approach taken is an emphasis on extensive screening for rare disease-causing mutations rather than common risk-increasing polymorphisms. Because these variants have large direct effects, the ability to screen for them inexpensively could have a major immediate clinical impact in disease diagnosis, carrier detection, presymptomatic detection of late onset disease, and even prenatal diagnosis. In addition to creating a counseling tool for individual "consumers," this system will fit into the established medical record and be used by physicians involved in direct patient care. This article describes an overall framework for clinical diagnostic array genotyping and the available technologies, as well as highlights the opportunities and challenges for implementation. PMID:19931194

  8. Incidentalome from Genomic Sequencing: A Barrier to Personalized Medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Jamuar, Saumya Shekhar; Kuan, Jyn Ling; Brett, Maggie; Tiang, Zenia; Tan, Wilson Lek Wen; Lim, Jiin Ying; Liew, Wendy Kein Meng; Javed, Asif; Liew, Woei Kang; Law, Hai Yang; Tan, Ee Shien; Lai, Angeline; Ng, Ivy; Teo, Yik Ying; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Reversade, Bruno; Tan, Ene Choo; Foo, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background In Western cohorts, the prevalence of incidental findings (IFs) or incidentalome, referring to variants in genes that are unrelated to the patient's primary condition, is between 0.86% and 8.8%. However, data on prevalence and type of IFs in Asian population is lacking. Methods In 2 cohorts of individuals with genomic sequencing performed in Singapore (total n = 377), we extracted and annotated variants in the 56 ACMG-recommended genes and filtered these variants based on the level of pathogenicity. We then analyzed the precise distribution of IFs, class of genes, related medical conditions, and potential clinical impact. Results We found a total of 41,607 variants in the 56 genes in our cohort of 377 individuals. After filtering for rare and coding variants, we identified 14 potential variants. After reviewing primary literature, only 4 out of the 14 variants were classified to be pathogenic, while an additional two variants were classified as likely pathogenic. Overall, the cumulative prevalence of IFs (pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants) in our cohort was 1.6%. Conclusion The cumulative prevalence of IFs through genomic sequencing is low and the incidentalome may not be a significant barrier to implementation of genomics for personalized medicine. PMID:27077130

  9. Personalized medicine: an update of salivary biomarkers for periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Korte, Dina L; Kinney, Janet

    2016-02-01

    This article provides an up-to-date review of the more robust salivary biomarkers, as well as of panels of combinatorial markers and periodontal pathogens, that reveal high sensitivity and specificity for enhancing clinical decision-making in periodontal disease progression, risk and diagnosis. Periodontal diseases are complex and require an inflammatory response to bacterial pathogens in a susceptible host to stimulate tissue destruction. When used alone, traditional clinical assessments provide a diagnosis of periodontitis only after the biologic onset of the disease process, and are unable to substantiate disease activity or future risk. New technologies are becoming available that are capable of measuring combinations of inflammatory cytokines and proteinases for rapid chair-side testing. Utilizing saliva to identify and measure specific phenotypes and host-derived mediators will allow highly individualized diagnosis, prognosis and treatments for periodontal diseases. This personalized medicine approach will strengthen the power of the clinical oral examination and medical history assessments, providing patients with evidence-based, targeted risk care. PMID:26662480

  10. Personalized medicine for targeted and platinum-based chemotherapy of lung and bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, George D; Pan, Chong-xian; Henderson, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    The personalized medicine revolution is occurring for cancer chemotherapy. Biomarkers are increasingly capable of distinguishing genotypic or phenotypic traits of individual tumors, and are being linked to the selection of treatment protocols. This review covers the molecular basis for biomarkers of response to targeted and cytotoxic lung and bladder cancer treatment with an emphasis on platinum-based chemotherapy. Platinum derivatives are a class of drugs commonly employed against solid tumors that kill cells by covalent attachment to DNA. Platinum–DNA adduct levels in patient tissues have been correlated to response and survival. The sensitivity and precision of adduct detection has increased to the point of enabling subtherapeutic dosing for diagnostics applications, termed diagnostic microdosing, prior to the initiation of full-dose therapy. The clinical status of this unique phenotypic marker for lung and bladder cancer applications is detailed along with discussion of future applications. PMID:23394702

  11. Personal Network Recovery Enablers and Relapse Risks for Women With Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Suzanne; Tracy, Elizabeth M.; Jun, MinKyoung; Park, Hyunyong; Min, Meeyoung O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the experiences of women in treatment for substance dependence and their treatment providers about personal networks and recovery. We conducted six focus groups at three women’s intensive substance abuse treatment programs. Four coders used thematic analysis to guide the data coding and an iterative process to identify major themes. Coders identified social network characteristics that enabled and impeded recovery and a reciprocal relationship between internal states, relationship management, and recovery. Although women described adding individuals to their networks, they also described managing existing relationships through distancing from or isolating some members to diminish their negative impact on recovery. Treatment providers identified similar themes but focused more on contextual barriers than the women. The focus of interventions with this population should be on both internal barriers to personal network change such as mistrust and fear, and helping women develop skills for managing enduring network relationships. PMID:25231945

  12. Integrating Genomics into Clinical Oncology: Ethical and Social Challenges from Proponents of Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Settersten, Richard A.; Juengst, Eric T.; Fishman, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The use of molecular tools to individualize health care, predict appropriate therapies and prevent adverse health outcomes has gained significant traction in the field of oncology, under the banner of “personalized medicine.” Enthusiasm for personalized medicine in oncology has been fueled by success stories of targeted treatments for a variety of cancers based on their molecular profiles. Though these are clear indications of optimism for personalized medicine, little is known about the ethical and social implications of personalized approaches in clinical oncology. The objective of this study is to assess how a range of stakeholders engaged in promoting, monitoring, and providing personalized medicine understand the challenges of integrating genomic testing and targeted therapies into clinical oncology. The study involved the analysis of in-depth interviews with 117 basic scientists, clinician-researchers, clinicians in private practice, health professional educators, representatives of funding agencies, medical journal editors, entrepreneurs, and insurers whose experiences and perspectives on personalized medicine span a wide variety of institutional and professional settings. Despite considerable enthusiasm for this shift, promoters, monitors and providers of personalized medicine identified four domains which will still provoke heightened ethical and social concerns: (1) informed consent for cancer genomic testing, (2) privacy, confidentiality, and disclosure of genomic test results, (3) access to genomic testing and targeted therapies in oncology, and (4) the costs of scaling up pharmacogenomic testing and targeted cancer therapies. These specific concerns are not unique to oncology, or even genomics. However, those most invested in the success of personalized medicine view oncologists’ responses to these challenges as precedent-setting because oncology is farther along the path of clinical integration of genomic technologies than other fields

  13. Personalized Medicine for Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bechis, Seth K.; Otsetov, Alexander G.; Ge, Rongbin; Olumi, Aria F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) affects over 50 percent of men by age 60 and is the cause of millions of dollars of healthcare expenditure for treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and urinary obstruction. Despite the widespread use of medical therapy, there is no universal therapy that treats all men with symptomatic BPH, and at least 30% of patients do not respond to medical management and a subset require surgery. Significant advances have been made in understanding the natural history and development of the prostate, such as elucidating the role of the enzyme 5α reductase Type 2 (5AR2), and advances in genomics and biomarker discovery offer the potential for a more targeted approach to therapy. We review the current understanding of BPH progression as well as key genes and signaling pathways implicated in the process such as 5α reductase. We also explore the potential of biomarker screening and gene-specific therapies as tools to risk stratify BPH patients and identify those with symptomatic or medically resistant forms. Materials and Methods A PubMed® literature search of current and past peer-reviewed literature on prostate development, lower urinary tract symptoms, BPH pathogenesis, targeted therapy, biomarkers, epigenetics, 5AR2 and personalized medicine was performed. An additional Google Scholar™ search was conducted to broaden the scope of the review. Relevant reviews and original research articles were examined as well as their cited references, and a synopsis of original data was generated with the goal of informing the practicing urologist of these advances and their implications. Results BPH is associated with a state of hyperplasia of both the stromal and epithelial compartments, with 5AR2 and androgen signaling playing key roles in development and maintenance of the prostate. Chronic inflammation, multiple growth factor and hormonal signaling pathways, and medical comorbidities play an intricate role in prostate tissue

  14. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: defining phenotypic diversity through personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David J; Cairns, Nigel J; Grossman, Murray; McMillan, Corey T; Lee, Edward B; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-04-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises two main classes of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by neuronal/glial proteinaceous inclusions (i.e., proteinopathies) including tauopathies (i.e., FTLD-Tau) and TDP-43 proteinopathies (i.e., FTLD-TDP) while other very rare forms of FTLD are known such as FTLD with FUS pathology (FTLD-FUS). This review focuses mainly on FTLD-Tau and FLTD-TDP, which may present as several clinical syndromes: a behavioral/dysexecutive syndrome (behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia); language disorders (primary progressive aphasia variants); and motor disorders (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, corticobasal syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome). There is considerable heterogeneity in clinical presentations of underlying neuropathology and current clinical criteria do not reliably predict underlying proteinopathies ante-mortem. In contrast, molecular etiologies of hereditary FTLD are consistently associated with specific proteinopathies. These include MAPT mutations with FTLD-Tau and GRN, C9orf72, VCP and TARDBP with FTLD-TDP. The last decade has seen a rapid expansion in our knowledge of the molecular pathologies associated with this clinically and neuropathologically heterogeneous group of FTLD diseases. Moreover, in view of current limitations to reliably diagnose specific FTLD neuropathologies prior to autopsy, we summarize the current state of the science in FTLD biomarker research including neuroimaging, biofluid and genetic analyses. We propose that combining several of these biomarker modalities will improve diagnostic specificity in FTLD through a personalized medicine approach. The goals of these efforts are to enhance power for clinical trials focused on slowing or preventing progression of spread of tau, TDP-43 and other FTLD-associated pathologies and work toward the goal of defining clinical endophenotypes of FTD. PMID:25549971

  15. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: Defining Phenotypic Diversity Through Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David J; Cairns, Nigel J.; Grossman, Murray; McMillan, Corey T.; Lee, Edward B.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises two main classes of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by neuronal/glial proteinaceous inclusions (ie. proteinopathies) including tauopathies (i.e. FTLD-Tau) and TDP-43 proteinopathies (i.e. FTLD-TDP) while other very rare forms of FTLD are known such as FTLD with FUS pathology (FTLD-FUS). This review focuses mainly on FTLD-Tau and FLTD-TDP, which may present as several clinical syndromes: a behavioral/dysexecutive syndrome (behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia); language disorders (primary progressive aphasia variants); and motor disorders (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, corticobasal syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome). There is considerable heterogeneity in clinical presentations of underlying neuropathology and current clinical criteria do not reliably predict underlying proteinopathies ante-mortem. In contrast, molecular etiologies of hereditary FTLD are consistently associated with specific proteinopathies. These include MAPT mutations with FTLD-Tau and GRN, C9orf72, VCP and TARDBP with FTLD-TDP. The last decade has seen a rapid expansion in our knowledge of the molecular pathologies associated with this clinically and neuropathologically heterogeneous group of FTLD diseases. Moreover, in view of current limitations to reliably diagnose specific FTLD neuropathologies prior to autopsy, we summarize the current state of the science in FTLD biomarker research including neuroimaging, biofluid and genetic analyses. We propose that combining several of these biomarker modalities will improve diagnostic specificity in FTLD through a personalized medicine approach. The goals of these efforts are to enhance power for clinical trials focused on slowing or preventing progression of spread of tau, TDP-43 and other FTLD-associated pathologies and work towards the goal of defining clinical endophenotypes of FTD. PMID:25549971

  16. Gene patents and personalized medicine - what lies ahead?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Gene patents have generally not impeded biomedical research, but some problems that arise in genetic diagnostics can be attributed to exclusively licensed gene patents. Gene patents for therapeutics have often been litigated but have received surprisingly little public outcry. In stark contrast, genetic diagnostics have been highly controversial but rarely litigated: no case has gone to trial and there is little case law to guide policy. Most recently the Secretary's Advisory Committee for Genetics Health and Society (SACGHS) released a draft report examining how patenting and licensing affect access to clinical genetic testing in the US. The SACGHS reported that patents neither greatly hindered nor facilitated patient access to genetic testing; both the harms and the benefits of patents on genetic diagnostics have been exaggerated. Problems do occur when patents are exclusively licensed to a single provider and no alternative is available. Courts have been changing the thresholds for what can be patented, and how strongly patents can be enforced. Technologies for sequencing, genotyping and gene expression profiling promise to guide clinical decisions in managing common chronic diseases and infectious diseases, and will likely be an integral part of personalized medicine. Developing such genomic tests may require mapping a complex intellectual property landscape and cutting through thickets of patented DNA sequences and related methods. Our preliminary studies have found patent claims that, if strictly enforced, might block the use of multi-gene tests or full-genome sequence data. Yet new technologies promise to reduce the costs of complete genomic sequencing to prices that are comparable to current genetic tests for a single condition. Courts, companies, and policy makers seem unlikely to allow intellectual property to obstruct such technological advance, but prudent policy will depend on careful analysis and foresight. The SACGHS report signals that the US

  17. Between hype and hope: What is really at stake with personalized medicine?

    PubMed

    Abettan, Camille

    2016-09-01

    Over the last decade, personalized medicine has become a buzz word, which covers a broad spectrum of meanings and generates many different opinions. The purpose of this article is to achieve a better understanding of the reasons why personalized medicine gives rise to such conflicting opinions. We show that a major issue of personalized medicine is the gap existing between its claims and its reality. We then present and analyze different possible reasons for this gap. We propose an hypothesis inspired by the Windelband's distinction between nomothetic and idiographic methodology. We argue that the fuzzy situation of personalized medicine results from a mix between idiographic claims and nomothetic methodological procedures. Hence we suggest that the current quandary about personalized medicine cannot be solved without getting involved in a discussion about the complex epistemological and methodological status of medicine. To conclude, we show that the Gadamer's view of medicine as a dialogical process can be fruitfully used and reveals that personalization is not a theoretical task, but a practical one, which takes place within the clinical encounter. PMID:26951521

  18. Ontological Knowledge Engine and Health Screening Data Enabled Ubiquitous Personalized Physical Fitness (UFIT)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chuan-Jun; Chiang, Chang-Yu; Chih, Meng-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Good physical fitness generally makes the body less prone to common diseases. A personalized exercise plan that promotes a balanced approach to fitness helps promotes fitness, while inappropriate forms of exercise can have adverse consequences for health. This paper aims to develop an ontology-driven knowledge-based system for generating custom-designed exercise plans based on a user's profile and health status, incorporating international standard Health Level Seven International (HL7) data on physical fitness and health screening. The generated plan exposing Representational State Transfer (REST) style web services which can be accessed from any Internet-enabled device and deployed in cloud computing environments. To ensure the practicality of the generated exercise plans, encapsulated knowledge used as a basis for inference in the system is acquired from domain experts. The proposed Ubiquitous Exercise Plan Generation for Personalized Physical Fitness (UFIT) will not only improve health-related fitness through generating personalized exercise plans, but also aid users in avoiding inappropriate work outs. PMID:24608002

  19. Personalized medicine and treatment approaches in hypertension: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, James Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the US, hypertension affects one in three adults. Current guideline-based treatment of hypertension involves little diagnostic testing. A more personalized approach to the treatment of hypertension might be of use. Several methods of personalized treatment have been proposed and vetted to varying degrees. The purpose of this narrative review is to discuss the rationale for personalized therapy in hypertension, barriers to its development and implementation, some influential examples of proposed personalization measures, and a view of future efforts. PMID:27103841

  20. Personal, Electronic, Secure National Library of Medicine Hosts Health Records Conference

    MedlinePlus

    ... more efficient. Titled "Personal Electronic Health Records: From Biomedical Research to People's Health," the conference was in ... affecting their care."— Daniel Masys, Chair, Department of Biomedical Informatics, and Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical ...

  1. (Video 8 of 8) Omics: Advancing Personalized Medicine from Space to Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Human Research Program (HRP) is releasing the video “Omics: Advancing Personalized Medicine from Space to Earth”, to highlight its Twins Study, coinciding with National Twins Days. This is t...

  2. ePatient Conference Explores Future of Personalized Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. ePatient Conference Explores Future of Personalized Medicine Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 ... FNLM Chairman How are computer networks and digital technologies changing the future of health care? Will you ...

  3. The Future of Personalized Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The Future of Personalized Medicine, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. ... your physician to be sure you are taking advantage of all possible methods for surveillance and early ...

  4. Prediction of Cancer Drug Resistance and Implications for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Volm, Manfred; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    treatment options, such as antibody therapy, adoptive immune therapy, hyperthermia, gene therapy, etc. The high accuracy to predict resistant tumors may be exploited to develop new strategies for individualized cancer therapy. This new concept bears the potential of a revival of predictive tests for personalized medicine. PMID:26734568

  5. Predictive diagnostics and personalized medicine for the prevention of chronic degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Progressive increase of mean age and life expectancy in both industrialized and emerging societies parallels an increment of chronic degenerative diseases (CDD) such as cancer, cardiovascular, autoimmune or neurodegenerative diseases among the elderly. CDD are of complex diagnosis, difficult to treat and absorbing an increasing proportion in the health care budgets worldwide. However, recent development in modern medicine especially in genetics, proteomics, and informatics is leading to the discovery of biomarkers associated with different CDD that can be used as indicator of disease’s risk in healthy subjects. Therefore, predictive medicine is merging and medical doctors may for the first time anticipate the deleterious effect of CDD and use markers to identify persons with high risk of developing a given CDD before the clinical manifestation of the diseases. This innovative approach may offer substantial advantages, since the promise of personalized medicine is to preserve individual health in people with high risk by starting early treatment or prevention protocols. The pathway is now open, however the road to an effective personalized medicine is still long, several (diagnostic) predictive instruments for different CDD are under development, some ethical issues have to be solved. Operative proposals for the heath care systems are now needed to verify potential benefits of predictive medicine in the clinical practice. In fact, predictive diagnostics, personalized medicine and personalized therapy have the potential of changing classical approaches of modern medicine to CDD. PMID:21172060

  6. Translation in Data Mining to Advance Personalized Medicine for Health Equity

    PubMed Central

    Estape, Estela S.; Mays, Mary Helen; Sternke, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Personalized medicine is the development of ‘tailored’ therapies that reflect traditional medical approaches, with the incorporation of the patient’s unique genetic profile and the environmental basis of the disease. These individualized strategies encompass disease prevention, diagnosis, as well as treatment strategies. Today’s healthcare workforce is faced with the availability of massive amounts of patient- and disease-related data. When mined effectively, these data will help produce more efficient and effective diagnoses and treatment, leading to better prognoses for patients at both the individual and population level. Designing preventive and therapeutic interventions for those patients who will benefit most while minimizing side effects and controlling healthcare costs, requires bringing diverse data sources together in an analytic paradigm. A resource to clinicians in the development and application of personalized medicine is largely facilitated, perhaps even driven, by the analysis of “big data”. For example, the availability of clinical data warehouses is a significant resource for clinicians in practicing personalized medicine. These “big data” repositories can be queried by clinicians, using specific questions, with data used to gain an understanding of challenges in patient care and treatment. Health informaticians are critical partners to data analytics including the use of technological infrastructures and predictive data mining strategies to access data from multiple sources, assisting clinicians’ interpretation of data and development of personalized, targeted therapy recommendations. In this paper, we look at the concept of personalized medicine, offering perspectives in four important, influencing topics: 1) the availability of ‘big data’ and the role of biomedical informatics in personalized medicine, 2) the need for interdisciplinary teams in the development and evaluation of personalized therapeutic approaches, and 3

  7. Living Long and Well: Prospects for a Personalized Approach to the Medicine of Ageing.

    PubMed

    Fuellen, Georg; Schofield, Paul; Flatt, Thomas; Schulz, Ralf-Joachim; Boege, Fritz; Kraft, Karin; Rimbach, Gerald; Ibrahim, Saleh; Tietz, Alexander; Schmidt, Christian; Köhling, Rüdiger; Simm, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Research into ageing and its underlying molecular basis enables us to develop and implement targeted interventions to ameliorate or cure its consequences. However, the efficacy of interventions often differs widely between individuals, suggesting that populations should be stratified or even individualized. Large-scale cohort studies in humans, similar systematic studies in model organisms as well as detailed investigations into the biology of ageing can provide individual validated biomarkers and mechanisms, leading to recommendations for targeted interventions. Human cohort studies are already ongoing, and they can be supplemented by in silico simulations. Systematic studies in animal models are made possible by the use of inbred strains or genetic reference populations of mice. Combining the two, a comprehensive picture of the various determinants of ageing and 'health span' can be studied in detail, and an appreciation of the relevance of results from model organisms to humans is emerging. The interactions between genotype and environment, particularly the psychosocial environment, are poorly studied in both humans and model organisms, presenting serious challenges to any approach to a personalized medicine of ageing. To increase the success of preventive interventions, we argue that there is a pressing need for an individualized evaluation of interventions such as physical exercise, nutrition, nutraceuticals and calorie restriction mimetics as well as psychosocial and environmental factors, separately and in combination. The expected extension of the health span enables us to refocus health care spending on individual prevention, starting in late adulthood, and on the brief period of morbidity at very old age. PMID:26675034

  8. Marijuana: A Fifty-Year Personal Addiction Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, David E

    2016-01-01

    As of September 2015, the cultivation, possession, and/or use of marijuana is illegal under U.S. federal law as a Schedule I narcotic; however, it is legal in four states and Washington, D.C. Forty-six states allow some form of medicinal marijuana or decriminalization. Marijuana has been used medicinally for thousands of years; Marijuana's regulation by law enforcement in the U.S., rather than the medical community, led to an almost complete halt to academic and scientific research after the 1930s. The late 1960s saw an upsurge in recreational marijuana use by middle-class youth, the majority of whom experienced minimal adverse effects aside from arrest and attendant legal complications. Since the mid-1990s, the use of medicinal marijuana for certain conditions has gained increasing acceptance. Stronger strains and formulations of marijuana pose a risk to the developing brains of adolescents. Within the addiction medicine community, there is currently no consensus on marijuana. In the East, the feeling is primarily that marijuana continue to be proscribed. In the West, where clinicians must face the realities of medicalization, decriminalization, and/or legalization, as well as widespread recreational use, there is more of a movement to minimize adverse effects, particularly on youth. PMID:26757396

  9. Review and Updates in Regenerative and Personalized Medicine, Preclinical Animal Models, and Clinical Care in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Emanuele; Barton, Paul J; Bartunek, Jozef; Huber, Sally; Ibanez, Borja; Judge, Daniel P; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Stolen, Craig M; Taylor, Angela; Hall, Jennifer L

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide an updated review for scientists and clinicians on the major areas in cardiovascular medicine published in the Journal. Leading topics in regenerative and personalized medicine are presented along with a critical overview of the field. New standards in large preclinical animal models of pulmonary hypertension and left bundle branch block are highlighted. Finally, clinical care in the areas of atherosclerosis, the aortic valve, platelet biology, and myocarditis is discussed as well as autonomic modulation therapies. PMID:26453460

  10. Printing Tablets with Fully Customizable Release Profiles for Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yajuan; Soh, Siowling

    2015-12-16

    Personalizing the release profiles of drugs is important for different people with different medical and biological conditions. A technically simple and low-cost method to fabricate fully customizable tablets that can deliver drugs with any type of release profile is described. The customization is intuitively straightforward: the desired profile can simply be "drawn" and printed by a 3D printer. PMID:26498272

  11. The rights of persons with Disability Bill, 2014: How "enabling" is it for persons with mental illness?

    PubMed

    Rao, Gundugurti Prasad; Ramya, Vemulokonda Sri; Bada, Math Suresh

    2016-01-01

    India ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Person with Disabilities (UNCRPD) in 2007. This is a welcome step towards realizing the rights of the persons with disability. The UNCRPD proclaims that disability results from interaction of impairments with attitudinal and environmental barriers which hinders full and active participation in society on an equal basis with others. Further, the convention also mandates the signatory governments to change their local laws, to identify and eliminate obstacles and barriers and to comply with the terms of the UNCRPD in order to protect the rights of the person with disabilities, hence the amendments of the national laws. Hence, the Government of India drafted two important bill the Right of Persons with Disabilities Bill, 2014 (RPWD Bill, 2014) and Mental Health Care Bill, 2013 (MHC Bill, 2013). There is no doubt that persons with mental illness are stigmatized and discriminated across the civil societies, which hinders full and active participation in society. This situation becomes worse with regard to providing mental health care, rehabilitation and social welfare measures to persons with mental illness. There is an urgent need to address this issue of attitudinal barrier so that the rights of persons with mental illness is upheld. Hence, this article discusses shortcomings in the Right of Persons with Disabilities Bill, 2014 (RPWD Bill, 2014) from the perspective of persons with mental illness. Further, the article highlights the need to synchronize both the RPWD Bill, 2014 and Mental Health Care Bill, 2013 to provide justice for persons with mental illness. PMID:27385843

  12. New Strategies in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Leukemogenesis and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have unraveled the complexity of leukemogenesis and provided the opportunity to design more personalized and pathophysiology-targeted therapeutic strategies. Despite the use of intensive chemotherapy, relapse remains the most common cause for therapeutic failure in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The interactions between leukemia stem cells (LSC) and marrow microenvironment appear to be critical in promoting therapeutic resistance through progressive acquisition of genetic and epigenetic changes within leukemia cells and immune evasion, resulting in leukemia cell survival. With advances in genomic sequencing efforts, epigenetic and phenotypic characterization, personalized therapeutic strategies aimed at critical leukemia survival mechanisms may be feasible in the near future. Here, we review select novel approaches to therapy of AML such as targeting LSC, altering leukemia/marrow microenvironment interactions, inhibiting DNA repair or cell cycle checkpoints, and augmenting immune-based anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25324141

  13. Health 2050: The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsourcing, the Quantified Self, and the Participatory Biocitizen

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The concepts of health and health care are moving towards the notion of personalized preventive health maintenance and away from an exclusive focus on the cure of disease. This is against the backdrop of contemporary public health challenges that include increasing costs, worsening outcomes, ‘diabesity’ epidemics, and anticipated physician shortages. Personalized preventive medicine could be critical to solving public health challenges at their causal root. This paper sets forth a vision and plan for the realization of preventive medicine by 2050 and examines efforts already underway such as participatory health initiatives, the era of big health data, and qualitative shifts in mindset. PMID:25562203

  14. Overcoming Obstacles To Enable Access To Medicines For Noncommunicable Diseases In Poor Countries.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Sandeep P; Kolappa, Kavitha; Jarvis, Jordan D; Park, Paul H; Belt, Rachel; Balasubramaniam, Thirukumaran; Kiddell-Monroe, Rachel

    2015-09-01

    The modern access-to-medicines movement grew largely out of the civil-society reaction to the HIV/AIDS pandemic three decades ago. While the movement was successful with regard to HIV/AIDS medications, the increasingly urgent challenge to address access to medicines for noncommunicable diseases has lagged behind-and, in some cases, has been forgotten. In this article we first ask what causes the access gap with respect to lifesaving essential noncommunicable disease medicines and then what can be done to close the gap. Using the example of the push for access to antiretrovirals for HIV/AIDS patients for comparison, we highlight the problems of inadequate global financing and procurement for noncommunicable disease medications, intellectual property barriers and concerns raised by the pharmaceutical industry, and challenges to building stronger civil-society organizations and a patient and humanitarian response from the bottom up to demand treatment. We provide targeted policy recommendations, specific to the public sector, the private sector, and civil society, with the goal of improving access to noncommunicable disease medications globally. PMID:26355060

  15. Precision medicine and personalized breast cancer: combination pertuzumab therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Kerry; Sarangi, Sasmit; Bardia, Aditya; Dizon, Don S

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2 (HER2), is the poster child for antibody-based targeted therapy in breast cancer. Pertuzumab, another humanized monoclonal antibody, binds to a different domain of HER2 and prevents the formation of HER2:HER3 dimers, which is the most potent heterodimer in the HER family. The combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab has synergistic activity, and is associated with improved clinical outcomes. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab-based chemotherapy originally as first-line therapy for metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer in 2012, and more recently as neoadjuvant therapy for localized disease in 2013. Pertuzumab is the first neoadjuvant drug to receive accelerated approval by the FDA based on pathological complete response as the primary end point. In this article, we review the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and current role of pertuzumab in the management of breast cancer, as well as ongoing clinical trials and future directions regarding the utility of pertuzumab as a personalized therapeutic option for HER2-positive breast cancer. In the coming years, we anticipate increased utilization of neoadjuvant trials for drug development, biomarker discovery, and validation, and envision conduct of personalized breast cancer clinics in which therapies will be routinely selected based on genetic alterations in the tumor. Regardless of the targeted therapy combinations employed based on tumor genomic profile, trastuzumab and pertuzumab will likely continue to form the backbone of the personalized regimen for HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:24715764

  16. Personalized Medicine for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Therapies: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Bradley A; Landry, Shane; Joosten, Simon A; Hamilton, Garun S

    2016-09-01

    Currently there is no method to predict which treatments for obstructive sleep apnea will have the best outcomes in individual patients. Given that there is increasing interest in a personalized medicine approach to the treatment of a variety of disorders, this review describes the personalized approaches that are currently available for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea as well as future directions for individualized obstructive sleep apnea treatment. PMID:27542876

  17. Molecular imaging in the framework of personalized cancer medicine.

    PubMed

    Belkić, Dzevad; Belkić, Karen

    2013-11-01

    With our increased understanding of cancer cell biology, molecular imaging offers a strategic bridge to oncology. This complements anatomic imaging, particularly magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which is sensitive but not specific. Among the potential harms of false positive findings is lowered adherence to recommended surveillance post-therapy and by persons at increased cancer risk. Positron emission tomography (PET) plus computerized tomography (CT) is the molecular imaging modality most widely used in oncology. In up to 40% of cases, PET-CT leads to changes in therapeutic management. Newer PET tracers can detect tumor hypoxia, bone metastases in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-expressive tumors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides insight into several metabolites at the same time. Combined with MRI, this yields magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), which does not entail ionizing radiation and is thus suitable for repeated monitoring. Using advanced signal processing, quantitative information can be gleaned about molecular markers of brain, breast, prostate and other cancers. Radiation oncology has benefited from molecular imaging via PET-CT and MRSI. Advanced mathematical approaches can improve dose planning in stereotactic radiosurgery, stereotactic body radiotherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy. Molecular imaging will likely impact profoundly on clinical decision making in oncology. Molecular imaging via MR could facilitate early detection especially in persons at high risk for specific cancers. PMID:24511645

  18. Macrophage responses to implants: prospects for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gudima, Alexandru; Riabov, Vladimir; Dollinger, Camille; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2015-12-01

    Implants, transplants, and implantable biomedical devices are mainstream solutions for a wide variety of human pathologies. One of the persistent problems around nondegradable metallic and polymeric implants is failure of macrophages to resolve the inflammation and their tendency to stay in a state, named "frustrated phagocytosis." During the initial phase, proinflammatory macrophages induce acute reactions to trauma and foreign materials, whereas tolerogenic anti-inflammatory macrophages control resolution of inflammation and induce the subsequent healing stage. However, implanted materials can induce a mixed pro/anti-inflammatory phenotype, supporting chronic inflammatory reactions accompanied by microbial contamination and resulting in implant failure. Several materials based on natural polymers for improved interaction with host tissue or surfaces that release anti-inflammatory drugs/bioactive agents have been developed for implant coating to reduce implant rejection. However, no definitive, long-term solution to avoid adverse immune responses to the implanted materials is available to date. The prevention of implant-associated infections or chronic inflammation by manipulating the macrophage phenotype is a promising strategy to improve implant acceptance. The immunomodulatory properties of currently available implant coatings need to be improved to develop personalized therapeutic solutions. Human primary macrophages exposed to the implantable materials ex vivo can be used to predict the individual's reactions and allow selection of an optimal coating composition. Our review describes current understanding of the mechanisms of macrophage interactions with implantable materials and outlines the prospects for use of human primary macrophages for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to personalized implant therapy. PMID:26168797

  19. Personalized Medicine in Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery: Precision Neurosurgical Management of Cerebral Aneurysms and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Achrol, Achal Singh; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are common vascular lesions. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these lesions and the process by which they destabilize and progress to rupture. Treatment decisions are motivated by a desire to prevent rupture and the devastating morbidity and mortality associated with resulting subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). For patients presenting with SAH, urgent intervention is required to stabilize the lesion and prevent re-rupture. Those patients fortunate enough to survive a presenting SAH and subsequent securing of their aneurysm must still face a spectrum of secondary sequelae, which can include cerebral vasospasm, delayed ischemia, seizures, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and endocrinologic and catecholamine-induced systemic dysfunction in cardiac, pulmonary, and renal systems. Increased focus on understanding the pathophysiology and molecular characteristics of these secondary processes will enable the development of targeted therapeutics and novel diagnostics for improved patient selection in personalized medicine trials for SAH. In unruptured cerebral aneurysms, treatment decisions are less clear and currently based solely on treating larger lesions, using rigid aneurysm size cutoffs generalized from recent studies that are the subject of ongoing controversy. Further compounding this controversy is the fact that the vast majority of aneurysms that come to clinical attention at the time of a hemorrhagic presentation are of smaller size, suggesting that small aneurysms are indeed not benign lesions. As such, patient-specific biomarkers that better predict which aneurysms represent high-risk lesions that warrant clinical intervention are of vital importance. Recent advancements in genomic and proteomic technologies have enabled the identification of molecular characteristics that may prove useful in tracking aneurysm growth and progression and identifying targets for prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Novel quantitative neuroimaging

  20. Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Enabling a New Age of Discovery in Biology and Medicine Through Molecular Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-06-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a valuable tool for the production of molecular maps in samples ranging from solid inorganic materials to biologicals such as cells and tissues. The unique features of IMS are its ability to map a wide variety of different types of molecules, its superb molecular specificity, and its potential for discovery since no target-specific reagents are needed. IMS has made significant contributions in biology and medicine and promises to be a next generation tool in anatomic pathology.

  1. Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Enabling a New Age of Discovery in Biology and Medicine Through Molecular Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a valuable tool for the production of molecular maps in samples ranging from solid inorganic materials to biologicals such as cells and tissues. The unique features of IMS are its ability to map a wide variety of different types of molecules, its superb molecular specificity, and its potential for discovery since no target specific reagents are needed. IMS has made significant contributions in biology and medicine and promises to be a next generation tool in anatomic pathology. PMID:25801587

  2. Precision medicine at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: clinical next-generation sequencing enabling next-generation targeted therapy trials.

    PubMed

    Hyman, David M; Solit, David B; Arcila, Maria E; Cheng, Donavan T; Sabbatini, Paul; Baselga, Jose; Berger, Michael F; Ladanyi, Marc

    2015-12-01

    Implementing a center-wide precision medicine strategy at a major cancer center is a true multidisciplinary effort and requires comprehensive alignment of a broad screening strategy with a clinical research enterprise that can use these data to accelerate development of new treatments. Here, we describe the genomic screening approach at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, a hybridization capture-based next-generation sequencing clinical assay for solid tumor molecular oncology designated MSK-IMPACT, and how it enables and supports a large clinical trial portfolio enriched for multi-histology, biomarker-selected, 'basket' studies of targeted therapies. PMID:26320725

  3. The Importance of Functional Tests in Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. Jay; Lerman, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most prevalent disease mainly in the Western society and becoming the leading cause of death worldwide. Standard methods by which healthcare providers screen for cardiovascular disease have only minimally reduced the burden of disease while exponentially increasing costs. As such, more specific and individualized methods for functionally assessing cardiovascular threats are needed to identify properly those at greatest risk, and appropriately treat these patients so as to avoid a fate such as heart attack, stroke, or death. Currently, endothelial function testing—in both the coronary and peripheral circulation—is well established as being associated with the disease process and future cardiovascular events. Improving such testing can lead to a reduction in the risk of future events. Combining this functional assessment of vascular fitness with other, more personalized, testing methods should serve to identify those at the greatest risk of cardiovascular disease earlier and subsequently reduce the affliction of such diseases worldwide. PMID:23908864

  4. Soluble biomarkers development in osteoarthritis: from discovery to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Henrotin, Yves; Sanchez, Christelle; Cornet, Anne; Van de Put, Joachim; Douette, Pierre; Gharbi, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: Specific soluble biomarkers could be a precious tool for diagnosis, prognosis and personalized management of osteoarthritic (OA) patients. Objective: To describe the path of soluble biomarker development from discovery to clinical qualification and regulatory adoption toward OA-related biomarker qualification. Methods and results: This review summarizes current guidance on the use of biomarkers in OA in clinical trials and their utility at five stages, including preclinical development and phase 1 to phase 4 trials. It also presents all the available regulatory requirements. Conclusions: The path through the adoption of a specific soluble biomarker for OA is steep but is worth the challenge due to the benefit that it can provide. PMID:26954785

  5. "Personal Knowledge" in Medicine and the Epistemic Shortcomings of Scientism.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Hugh Marshall; Walker, Simon Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we outline a framework for understanding the different kinds of knowledge required for medical practice and use this framework to show how scientism undermines aspects of this knowledge. The framework is based on Michael Polanyi's claim that knowledge is primarily the product of the contemplations and convictions of persons and yet at the same time carries a sense of universality because it grasps at reality. Building on Polanyi's ideas, we propose that knowledge can be described along two intersecting "dimensions": the tacit-explicit and the particular-general. These dimensions supersede the familiar "objective-subjective" dichotomy, as they more accurately describe the relationship between medical science and medical practice. Scientism, we argue, excludes tacit and particular knowledge and thereby distorts "clinical reality" and impairs medical practice and medical ethics. PMID:26615541

  6. Tailoring the Treatment of Melanoma: Implications for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Linna; Mukherjee, Eric M.; Narayan, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Oncology has been revolutionized by the ability to selectively inhibit the growth of cancerous cells while ostensibly avoiding the disruption of proteins and pathways necessary for normal cellular function. This paradigm has triggered an explosion of targeted therapies for cancer, creating a burgeoning billion-dollar industry of small molecules and monoclonal antibodies [1]. Largely due to these new treatments, spending on cancer pharmaceuticals has surpassed $100 billion worldwide [2]. In particular, the treatment of melanoma, a deadly and fast-spreading form of skin cancer, has been transformed by these new targeted therapies. In this mini-review, we summarize the progress made in the field of personalized treatment of melanoma, with an emphasis on targeted therapies. We then outline future directions for treatment, including novel cell-mediated therapies and new potential targets. PMID:26604863

  7. On the safety of persons accompanying nuclear medicine patients.

    PubMed

    Díaz Barreto, Marlenin; López Bejerano, Gladys M; Varela Corona, Consuelo; Fleitas Estévez, Ileana

    2012-12-01

    The presence of caretakers/comforters during nuclear medicine examinations is relatively common. These caretakers receive higher doses than the general public, who receive only environmental/background exposure. The aim of this research was to know about the doses received by two significant groups of caretakers: comforters of cancer patients (Group I) and mothers of small children (Group II). The patients were scheduled to undergo two different diagnostic studies: Inmuno-Scintigraphy using a monoclonal antibody bound to (99m)Tc (for adults) and Renal Scintigraphy using (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (for children). The average effective doses were 0.27 and 0.29 mSv for Groups I and II, respectively. Additionally, environmental monitoring was performed in the waiting room for injected patients (Room I) and inside the procedure room (Room II). Equivalent environmental doses of 0.28 and 0.24 mSv for Rooms 1 and II, respectively, were found, which are similar to values reported by other authors. PMID:22517979

  8. Going MAD: development of a "matrix academic division" to facilitate translating research to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, David C

    2011-11-01

    Personalized medicine integrates an individual's genetic and other information for the prevention or treatment of complex disorders, and translational research seeks to identify those data most important to disease processes based on observations at the bench and the bedside. To understand complex disorders such as chronic pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, liver cirrhosis, and other idiopathic chronic inflammatory diseases, physician-scientists must systematically collect data on relevant risks, clinical status, biomarkers, and outcomes. The author describes a "matrix academic division" (MAD), a highly effective academic program created at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center using translational research to rapidly develop personalized medicine for digestive diseases. MAD is designed to capture patient-specific data and biologic samples for analysis of steps in a complex process (reverse engineering), reconstructing the system conceptually and mathematically (disease modeling), and deciphering disease mechanism in individual patients to predict the effects of interventions (personalized medicine). MAD draws on the expertise of the medical school's and medical center's physician-scientists to translate essential disease information between the bed and the bench and to communicate with researchers from multiple domains, including epidemiology, genetics, cell biology, immunology, regenerative medicine, neuroscience, and oncology. The author illustrates this approach by describing its successful application to the reverse engineering of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:21952059

  9. Personalized peer-comparison feedback and its effect on emergency medicine resident ultrasound scan numbers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinician-performed ultrasound has become a widely utilized tool in emergency medicine and is a mandatory component of the residency curricula. We aimed to assess the effect of personalized peer-comparison feedback on the number of ultrasound scans performed by emergency medicine residents. Findings A personalized peer-comparison feedback was performed by sending 44 emergency medicine residents a document including personally identified scan numbers and class averages. The number of ultrasound scans per clinical shift for a 3-month period before and after the feedback intervention was calculated. The average number of ultrasound exams per shift improved from 0.39 scans/shift before to 0.61 scans/shift after feedback (p = 0.04). Among the second year residents, the scans/shift ratio improved from 0.35 to 0.87 (p = 0.07); for third year residents, from 0.51 to 0.58 (p = 0.46); and from 0.33 to 0.41 (p = 0.21) for the fourth year residents before and after the intervention, respectively. Conclusions A personalized peer-comparison feedback provided to emergency medicine residents resulted in increased ultrasound scan numbers per clinical shift. Incorporating this method of feedback may help encourage residents to scan more frequently. PMID:24422791

  10. The Translational Medicine Ontology and Knowledge Base: driving personalized medicine by bridging the gap between bench and bedside

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Translational medicine requires the integration of knowledge using heterogeneous data from health care to the life sciences. Here, we describe a collaborative effort to produce a prototype Translational Medicine Knowledge Base (TMKB) capable of answering questions relating to clinical practice and pharmaceutical drug discovery. Results We developed the Translational Medicine Ontology (TMO) as a unifying ontology to integrate chemical, genomic and proteomic data with disease, treatment, and electronic health records. We demonstrate the use of Semantic Web technologies in the integration of patient and biomedical data, and reveal how such a knowledge base can aid physicians in providing tailored patient care and facilitate the recruitment of patients into active clinical trials. Thus, patients, physicians and researchers may explore the knowledge base to better understand therapeutic options, efficacy, and mechanisms of action. Conclusions This work takes an important step in using Semantic Web technologies to facilitate integration of relevant, distributed, external sources and progress towards a computational platform to support personalized medicine. Availability TMO can be downloaded from http://code.google.com/p/translationalmedicineontology and TMKB can be accessed at http://tm.semanticscience.org/sparql. PMID:21624155

  11. Next-generation biobanking of metastases to enable multidimensional molecular profiling in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Zuanel; Aguilar-Mahecha, Adriana; Paquet, Eric R; Basik, Mark; Orain, Michèle; Camlioglu, Errol; Constantin, André; Benlimame, Naciba; Bachvarov, Dimcho; Jannot, Guillaume; Simard, Martin J; Chabot, Benoit; Gologan, Adrian; Klinck, Roscoe; Gagnon-Kugler, Thérèse; Lespérance, Bernard; Samson, Benoit; Kavan, Petr; Alcindor, Thierry; Dalfen, Richard; Lan, Cathy; Chabot, Catherine; Buchanan, Marguerite; Przybytkowski, Ewa; Qureshi, Samia; Rousseau, Caroline; Spatz, Alan; Têtu, Bernard; Batist, Gerald

    2013-11-01

    Great advances in analytical technology coupled with accelerated new drug development and growing understanding of biological challenges, such as tumor heterogeneity, have required a change in the focus for biobanking. Most current banks contain samples of primary tumors, but linking molecular signatures to therapeutic questions requires serial biopsies in the setting of metastatic disease, next-generation of biobanking. Furthermore, an integration of multidimensional analysis of various molecular components, that is, RNA, DNA, methylome, microRNAome and post-translational modifications of the proteome, is necessary for a comprehensive view of a tumor's biology. While data using such biopsies are now regularly presented, the preanalytical variables in tissue procurement and processing in multicenter studies are seldom detailed and therefore are difficult to duplicate or standardize across sites and across studies. In the context of a biopsy-driven clinical trial, we generated a detailed protocol that includes morphological evaluation and isolation of high-quality nucleic acids from small needle core biopsies obtained from liver metastases. The protocol supports stable shipping of samples to a central laboratory, where biopsies are subsequently embedded in support media. Designated pathologists must evaluate all biopsies for tumor content and macrodissection can be performed if necessary to meet our criteria of >60% neoplastic cells and <20% necrosis for genomic isolation. We validated our protocol in 40 patients who participated in a biopsy-driven study of therapeutic resistance in metastatic colorectal cancer. To ensure that our protocol was compatible with multiplex discovery platforms and that no component of the processing interfered with downstream enzymatic reactions, we performed array comparative genomic hybridization, methylation profiling, microRNA profiling, splicing variant analysis and gene expression profiling using genomic material isolated from liver biopsy cores. Our standard operating procedures for next-generation biobanking can be applied widely in multiple settings, including multicentered and international biopsy-driven trials. PMID:23743930

  12. Personalizing medicine for metastatic colorectal cancer: Current developments

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andrea Marin; Turner, Alice; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is still one of the tumor types with the highest incidence and mortality. In 2012, colorectal cancer was the second most prevalence cancer among males (9%) and the third among females (8%). In this disease, early diagnosis is important to improve treatment outcomes. However, at the time of diagnosis, about one quarter of patients already have metastases, and overall survival of these patients at 5-years survival is very low. Because of these poor statistics, the development of new drugs against specific targets, including the pathway of angiogenesis, has witnessed a remarkable increase. So, targets therapies through epidermal growth factor and its receptor and also KRAS pathways modulation acquired a main role whether in association with standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. With the current knowledge in the field of molecular biology, including genetic mutations and polymorphisms, we know better why patients respond so differently to the same treatments. So, in the future we can develop increasingly personalized treatments to the patient and not the disease. This review aims to summarize some molecular pathways and their relation to tumor growth, as well as novel targeted developing drugs and recently approved for mCRC. PMID:25132758

  13. Genetics and Vaccines in the Era of Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Castiblanco, John; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most successful and sustainable tactic to prevent and counteract infection. A vaccine generally improves immunity to a particular disease upon administration by inducing specific protective and efficient immune responses in all of the receiving population. The main known factors influencing the observed heterogeneity for immune re-sponses induced by vaccines are gender, age, co-morbidity, immune system, and genetic background. This review is mainly focused on the genetic status effect to vaccine immune responses and how this could contribute to the development of novel vaccine candidates that could be better directed and predicted relative to the genetic history of an individual and/or population. The text offers a brief history of vaccinology as a field, a description of the genetic status of the most relevant and studied genes and their functionality and correlation with exposure to specific vaccines; followed by an inside look into autoimmunity as a concern when designing vaccines as well as perspectives and conclusions looking towards an era of personalized and predictive vaccinology instead of a one size fits all approach. PMID:25937813

  14. CTC enumeration and characterization: moving toward personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Toss, Angela; Mu, Zhaomei; Fernandez, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The primary cause of tumor-related death in breast cancer (BC) is still represented by distant metastasization. The dissemination of tumor cells from the primary tumor to distant sites through bloodstream cannot be early detected by standard imaging methods. The enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represents an effective prognostic and predictive biomarker, which is able to monitor efficacy of adjuvant therapies, detect early development of (micro)metastases and at last, assess therapeutic responses of advanced disease earlier than traditional imaging methods. Moreover, since repeated tissue biopsies are invasive, costly and not always feasible, the assessment of tumor characteristics on CTCs, by a peripheral blood sample as a ‘liquid biopsy’, represents an attractive opportunity. The implementation of molecular and genomic characterization of CTCs could contribute to improve the treatment selection and thus, to move toward more personalized treatments. This review describes the current state of the art on CTC detection strategies, the evidence to demonstrate their clinical validity, and their potential impact for both future clinical trial design and, decision-making process in our daily practice. PMID:25489582

  15. Genetics and vaccines in the era of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco, John; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2015-02-01

    Vaccines represent the most successful and sustainable tactic to prevent and counteract infection. A vaccine generally improves immunity to a particular disease upon administration by inducing specific protective and efficient immune responses in all of the receiving population. The main known factors influencing the observed heterogeneity for immune re-sponses induced by vaccines are gender, age, co-morbidity, immune system, and genetic background. This review is mainly focused on the genetic status effect to vaccine immune responses and how this could contribute to the development of novel vaccine candidates that could be better directed and predicted relative to the genetic history of an individual and/or population. The text offers a brief history of vaccinology as a field, a description of the genetic status of the most relevant and studied genes and their functionality and correlation with exposure to specific vaccines; followed by an inside look into autoimmunity as a concern when designing vaccines as well as perspectives and conclusions looking towards an era of personalized and predictive vaccinology instead of a one size fits all approach. PMID:25937813

  16. The oral microbiome in health and disease and the potential impact on personalized dental medicine.

    PubMed

    Zarco, M F; Vess, T J; Ginsburg, G S

    2012-03-01

    Every human body contains a personalized microbiome that is essential to maintaining health but capable of eliciting disease. The oral microbiome is particularly imperative to health because it can cause both oral and systemic disease. The oral microbiome rests within biofilms throughout the oral cavity, forming an ecosystem that maintains health when in equilibrium. However, certain ecological shifts in the microbiome allow pathogens to manifest and cause disease. Severe forms of oral disease may result in systemic disease at different body sites. Microbiomics and metagenomics are two fields of research that have emerged to identify the presence of specific microbes in the body and understand the nature of the microbiome activity during both health and disease. The analysis of the microbiome and its genomes will pave the way for more effective therapeutic and diagnostic techniques and, ultimately, contribute to the development of personalized medicine and personalized dental medicine. PMID:21902769

  17. Structured Decision-Making: Using Personalized Medicine to Improve the Value of Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Bradford R.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer care is often inconsistently delivered with inadequate incorporation of patient values and objective evidence into decision-making. Utilization of time limited trials of care with predefined decision points that are based on iteratively updated best evidence, tools that inform providers about a patient’s experience and values, and known information about a patient’s disease will allow superior matched care to be delivered. Personalized medicine does not merely refer to the incorporation of genetic information into clinical care, it involves utilization of the wide array of data points relevant to care, many of which are readily available at the bedside today. By pushing uptake of personalized matching available today, clinicians can better address the triple aim of improved health, lowers costs, and enhanced patient experience, and we can prepare the health care landscape for the iterative inclusion of progressively more sophisticated information as newer tests and information become available to support the personalized medicine paradigm. PMID:25562407

  18. Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research: Interdisciplinary research and educational activities in pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Innocenti, Federico; van Schaik, Ron H.; Lezhava, Alexander; Tzimas, Giannis; Kollia, Panagoula; Macek, Milan; Fortina, Paolo; Patrinos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    The Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research is an international non-profit scientific organization with interdisciplinary research and educational activities in the field of genome medicine in Europe, Asia and Latin America. These activities are supervised by an international scientific advisory council, consisting of world leaders in the field of genomics and translational medicine. Research activities include the regional coordination of the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative in Europe, in an effort to integrate pharmacogenomics in developing countries, the development of several National/Ethnic Genetic databases and related web services and the critical assessment of the impact of genetics and genomic medicine to society in various countries. Also, educational activities include the organization of the Golden Helix Symposia®, which are high profile scientific research symposia in the field of personalized medicine, and the Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days, an international educational activity focused on pharmacogenomics, as part of its international pharmacogenomics education and outreach efforts. PMID:22379996

  19. Nanodiamonds: The intersection of nanotechnology, drug development, and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dean; Wang, Chung-Huei Katherine; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of nanomedicine in cellular, preclinical, and clinical studies has led to exciting advances ranging from fundamental to translational, particularly in the field of cancer. Many of the current barriers in cancer treatment are being successfully addressed using nanotechnology-modified compounds. These barriers include drug resistance leading to suboptimal intratumoral retention, poor circulation times resulting in decreased efficacy, and off-target toxicity, among others. The first clinical nanomedicine advances to overcome these issues were based on monotherapy, where small-molecule and nucleic acid delivery demonstrated substantial improvements over unmodified drug administration. Recent preclinical studies have shown that combination nanotherapies, composed of either multiple classes of nanomaterials or a single nanoplatform functionalized with several therapeutic agents, can image and treat tumors with improved efficacy over single-compound delivery. Among the many promising nanomaterials that are being developed, nanodiamonds have received increasing attention because of the unique chemical-mechanical properties on their faceted surfaces. More recently, nanodiamond-based drug delivery has been included in the rational and systematic design of optimal therapeutic combinations using an implicitly de-risked drug development platform technology, termed Phenotypic Personalized Medicine–Drug Development (PPM-DD). The application of PPM-DD to rapidly identify globally optimized drug combinations successfully addressed a pervasive challenge confronting all aspects of drug development, both nano and non-nano. This review will examine various nanomaterials and the use of PPM-DD to optimize the efficacy and safety of current and future cancer treatment. How this platform can accelerate combinatorial nanomedicine and the broader pharmaceutical industry toward unprecedented clinical impact will also be discussed. PMID:26601235

  20. Biologic efficacy optimization-a step towards personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Patrick D W

    2016-05-01

    This following is a review of the factors that influence the outcome of biologic agents in the treatment of adult RA and, when synthesized into the clinical decision-making process, enhance optimization. Adiposity can exacerbate inflammatory diseases; patients with high BMI have worse outcomes from RA, including TNF inhibitors (TNFis), whereas the efficacy of abatacept and tocilizumab is unaffected. Smoking adversely affects TNFi outcomes but has less or no effect on the efficacy of rituximab and tocilizumab, and the effect on abatacept is unknown. Patients who are positive for ACPA and RF have better efficacy with rituximab and abatacept than those who are seronegative, whereas the influence of serotype is less significant for tocilizumab and more complex for TNFis. All biologics seem to do better when co-prescribed with MTX, whereas in monotherapy, tocilizumab is superior to adalimumab and prescription of a non-MTX DMARD has advantages over no DMARD for rituximab and adalimumab. Monitoring of TNFi drug levels is an exciting new field, correlating closely with efficacy in RA and PsA, and is influenced by BMI, adherence, co-prescribed DMARDs and anti-drug antibodies. The measurement of trough levels provides a potential tool for patients who are not doing well to determine early whether to switch within the TNFi class (if levels are low) or to a biologic with an alternative mode of action (if levels are normal or high). Conversely, the finding of supratherapeutic levels has the potential to enable individual patient selection for dose reduction without the risk of flare. PMID:26424837

  1. Enabling Precision Medicine With Digital Case Classification at the Point-of-Care.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, Patrick; Muehlhans, Susann; Hoppe, Christian; Karsch, Katharina; Tief, Franziska; Seeber, Lea; Chen, Xi; Conrad, Tim; Boettcher, Sindy; Diedrich, Sabine; Rath, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system are difficult to identify early. Case definitions for aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) are available, but rarely put to use. The VACC-Tool (Vienna Vaccine Safety Initiative Automated Case Classification-Tool) is a mobile application enabling immediate case ascertainment based on consensus criteria at the point-of-care. The VACC-Tool was validated in a quality management program in collaboration with the Robert-Koch-Institute. Results were compared to ICD-10 coding and retrospective analysis of electronic health records using the same case criteria. Of 68,921 patients attending the emergency room in 10/2010-06/2013, 11,575 were hospitalized, with 521 eligible patients (mean age: 7.6 years) entering the quality management program. Using the VACC-Tool at the point-of-care, 180/521 cases were classified successfully and 194/521 ruled out with certainty. Of the 180 confirmed cases, 116 had been missed by ICD-10 coding, 38 misclassified. By retrospective application of the same case criteria, 33 cases were missed. Encephalitis and ADEM cases were most likely missed or misclassified. The VACC-Tool enables physicians to ask the right questions at the right time, thereby classifying cases consistently and accurately, facilitating translational research. Future applications will alert physicians when additional diagnostic procedures are required. PMID:26981582

  2. Enabling Precision Medicine With Digital Case Classification at the Point-of-Care☆

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, Patrick; Muehlhans, Susann; Hoppe, Christian; Karsch, Katharina; Tief, Franziska; Seeber, Lea; Chen, Xi; Conrad, Tim; Boettcher, Sindy; Diedrich, Sabine; Rath, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system are difficult to identify early. Case definitions for aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, myelitis, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) are available, but rarely put to use. The VACC-Tool (Vienna Vaccine Safety Initiative Automated Case Classification-Tool) is a mobile application enabling immediate case ascertainment based on consensus criteria at the point-of-care. The VACC-Tool was validated in a quality management program in collaboration with the Robert-Koch-Institute. Results were compared to ICD-10 coding and retrospective analysis of electronic health records using the same case criteria. Of 68,921 patients attending the emergency room in 10/2010–06/2013, 11,575 were hospitalized, with 521 eligible patients (mean age: 7.6 years) entering the quality management program. Using the VACC-Tool at the point-of-care, 180/521 cases were classified successfully and 194/521 ruled out with certainty. Of the 180 confirmed cases, 116 had been missed by ICD-10 coding, 38 misclassified. By retrospective application of the same case criteria, 33 cases were missed. Encephalitis and ADEM cases were most likely missed or misclassified. The VACC-Tool enables physicians to ask the right questions at the right time, thereby classifying cases consistently and accurately, facilitating translational research. Future applications will alert physicians when additional diagnostic procedures are required. PMID:26981582

  3. Commercial Opportunities and Ethical Pitfalls in Personalized Medicine: A Myriad of Reasons to Revisit the Myriad Genetics Saga.

    PubMed

    So, Derek; Joly, Yann

    2013-06-01

    In 1996, the US-based biotechnology company Myriad Genetics began offering genetic diagnostic tests for mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are linked to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Since that time, Myriad has been a forerunner in the field of personalized medicine through the use of effective commercialization strategies which have been emulated by other commercial biotechnology companies. Myriad's strategies include patent acquisition and active enforcement, direct-to-consumer advertising, diversification, and trade secrets. These business models have raised substantial ethical controversy and criticism, often related to the company's focus on market dominance and the potential conflict between private sector profitability and the promotion of public health. However, these strategies have enabled Myriad to survive the economic challenges that have affected the biotechnology sector and to become financially successful in the field of personalized medicine. Our critical assessment of the legal, economic and ethical aspects of Myriad's practices over this period allows the identification of the company's more effective business models. It also discusses of the consequences of implementing economically viable models without first carrying out broader reflection on the socio-cultural, ethical and political contexts in which they would apply. PMID:23885284

  4. Commercial Opportunities and Ethical Pitfalls in Personalized Medicine: A Myriad of Reasons to Revisit the Myriad Genetics Saga

    PubMed Central

    So, Derek; Joly, Yann

    2013-01-01

    In 1996, the US-based biotechnology company Myriad Genetics began offering genetic diagnostic tests for mutations in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are linked to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Since that time, Myriad has been a forerunner in the field of personalized medicine through the use of effective commercialization strategies which have been emulated by other commercial biotechnology companies. Myriad’s strategies include patent acquisition and active enforcement, direct-to-consumer advertising, diversification, and trade secrets. These business models have raised substantial ethical controversy and criticism, often related to the company’s focus on market dominance and the potential conflict between private sector profitability and the promotion of public health. However, these strategies have enabled Myriad to survive the economic challenges that have affected the biotechnology sector and to become financially successful in the field of personalized medicine. Our critical assessment of the legal, economic and ethical aspects of Myriad’s practices over this period allows the identification of the company’s more effective business models. It also discusses of the consequences of implementing economically viable models without first carrying out broader reflection on the socio-cultural, ethical and political contexts in which they would apply. PMID:23885284

  5. Traditional, complementary and alternative medical systems and their contribution to personalisation, prediction and prevention in medicine-person-centred medicine.

    PubMed

    Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Alivia, Mauro; Guadagni, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Traditional, complementary and alternative medical (TCAM) systems contribute to the foundation of person-centred medicine (PCM), an epistemological orientation for medical science which places the person as a physical, psychological and spiritual entity at the centre of health care and of the therapeutic process. PCM wishes to broaden the bio-molecular reductionistic approach of medical science towards an integration that allows people, doctors, nurses, health-care professionals and patients to become the real protagonists of the health-care scene. The doctor or caregiver needs to act out of empathy to meet the unique value of each human being, which unfolds over the course of a lifetime from conception to natural death. Knowledge of the human being should not be instrumental to economic or political interests, ideology, theories or religious dogma. Research needs to be broadened with methodological tools to investigate person-centred medical interventions. Salutogenesis is a fundamental principle of PCM, promoting health and preventing illness by strengthening the individual's self-healing abilities. TCAM systems also give tools to predict the insurgence of illness and treat it before the appearance of overt organic disease. A task of PCM is to educate people to take better care of their physical, psychological and spiritual health. Health-care education needs to be broadened to give doctors and health-care workers of the future the tools to act in innovative and highly differentiated ways, always guided by deep respect for individual autonomy, personal culture, religion and beliefs. PMID:23126628

  6. CellCAN: a unique enabler of regenerative medicine and cell therapy in Canada.

    PubMed

    Roy, Denis-Claude; Alarco, Anne-Marie; Isasi, Rosario

    2014-12-01

    Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapy (RMCT) is paving the way for the most innovative and promising medical breakthroughs of the 21st century. Indeed, its curative potential is immense and builds on the already proven benefits of stem cell transplantation. Successful and broad clinical implementation of RMCT, as well as reaping of its full social and economic benefits, is contingent on the resolution of a range of issues. The CellCAN network, a not-for-profit corporation, was created to tackle these challenges, gathering the key forces of the numerous Canadian organizations involved in basic research, assay development, manufacturing, clinical research, clinical trials, legal and ethical regulations, and policies, all working to move RMCT forward. CellCAN creates a national enterprise by bringing together a community of renowned researchers, industries, clinicians, funders and regulators, and aligning it with cell-handling facilities involved in processing cell products and other products for cell therapy clinical trials to ensure capacity and know-how for stem cell research and efficient execution of cell therapy clinical trials. CellCAN is uniquely positioned to accelerate the implementation of RMCT in Canada and disseminate novel developments and findings, thus significantly contributing to the world's knowledge in cellular therapeutics. As such, the CellCAN model could also serve as a useful benchmark to accelerate RMCT implementation in other countries. PMID:25457957

  7. Applications of Two-Photon Absorption in Medicine and Biology Enabled by Specially Designed Biological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobizhev, M.

    2008-05-01

    We quantitatively study how the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of biological molecules depend on their structure. 2PA is advantageous over regular one-photon absorption because of deeper penetration and more localized excitation in biological tissues. However, 2PA cross sections of biological chromophores are usually rather small to be useful in real life applications. Using quantum-mechanical few-level description of molecular electronic states, we interpret our data and predict new structures with considerably increased 2PA cross sections. These new materials either synthesized or genetically engineered make 2PA-based techniques applicable in medicine and biology. We show how our new porphyrin photosensitizers with drastically enhanced 2PA (˜1000 times compared to regular porphyrins) can be used for in vivo two-photon-induced closing of blood vessels in Age-Related Macular Degeneration. The second example describes the application of fluorescent proteins in two-photon laser microscopy of biological cells. We demonstrate how the 2PA properties of fluorescent proteins can be considerably improved by smart mutations of the environment of chromophore inside the protein.

  8. Nanomedicine-Based Neuroprotective Strategies in Patient Specific-iPSC and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Shih-Fan; Liu, Wei-Hsiu; Song, Wen-Shin; Chiang, Kuan-Lin; Ma, Hsin-I; Kao, Chung-Lan; Chen, Ming-Teh

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, nanotechnology has attracted major interests in view of drug delivery systems and therapies against diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and many others. Nanotechnology provides the opportunity for nanoscale particles or molecules (so called “Nanomedicine”) to be delivered to the targeted sites, thereby, reducing toxicity (or side effects) and improving drug bioavailability. Nowadays, a great deal of nano-structured particles/vehicles has been discovered, including polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based nanoparticles, and mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Nanomedical utilizations have already been well developed in many different aspects, including disease treatment, diagnostic, medical devices designing, and visualization (i.e., cell trafficking). However, while quite a few successful progressions on chemotherapy using nanotechnology have been developed, the implementations of nanoparticles on stem cell research are still sparsely populated. Stem cell applications and therapies are being considered to offer an outstanding potential in the treatment for numbers of maladies. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are adult cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell-like state. Although the exact mechanisms underlying are still unclear, iPSCs are already being considered as useful tools for drug development/screening and modeling of diseases. Recently, personalized medicines have drawn great attentions in biological and pharmaceutical studies. Generally speaking, personalized medicine is a therapeutic model that offers a customized healthcare/cure being tailored to a specific patient based on his own genetic information. Consequently, the combination of nanomedicine and iPSCs could actually be the potent arms for remedies in transplantation medicine and personalized medicine. This review will focus on current use of nanoparticles on therapeutical applications, nanomedicine-based neuroprotective

  9. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term “theranostics” was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging. PMID:27239470

  10. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term "theranostics" was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging. PMID:27239470

  11. Impact of personal goals on the internal medicine R4 subspecialty match: a Q methodology study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been a decline in interest in general internal medicine that has resulted in a discrepancy between internal medicine residents’ choice in the R4 subspecialty match and societal need. Few studies have focused on the relative importance of personal goals and their impact on residents’ choice. The purpose of this study was to assess if internal medicine residents can be grouped based on their personal goals and how each group prioritizes these goals compared to each other. A secondary objective was to explore whether we could predict a resident’s desired subspecialty choice based on their constellation of personal goals. Methods We used Q methodology to examine how postgraduate year 1–3 internal medicine residents could be grouped based on their rankings of 36 statements (derived from our previous qualitative study). Using each groups’ defining and distinguishing statements, we predicted their subspecialties of interest. We also collected the residents’ first choice in the subspecialty match and used a kappa test to compare our predicted subspecialty group to the residents’ self-reported first choice. Results Fifty-nine internal medicine residents at the University of Alberta participated between 2009 and 2010 with 46 Q sorts suitable for analysis. The residents loaded onto four factors (groups) based on how they ranked statements. Our prediction of each groups’ desired subspecialties with their defining and/or distinguishing statements are as follows: group 1 – general internal medicine (variety in practice); group 2 – gastroenterology, nephrology, and respirology (higher income); group 3 – cardiology and critical care (procedural, willing to entertain longer training); group 4 – rest of subspecialties (non-procedural, focused practice, and valuing more time for personal life). There was moderate agreement (kappa = 0.57) between our predicted desired subspecialty group and residents’ self-reported first choice (p < 0

  12. The promise and challenge of personalized medicine: aging populations, complex diseases, and unmet medical need.

    PubMed

    Henney, Adriano M

    2012-06-01

    The concept of personalized medicine is not new. It is being discussed with increasing interest in the medical, scientific, and general media because of the availability of advanced scientific and computational technologies, and the promise of the potential to improve the targeting and delivery of novel medicines. It is also being seen as one approach that may have a beneficial impact on reducing health care budgets. But what are the challenges that need to be addressed in its implementation in the clinic? This article poses some provocative questions and suggests some things that need to be considered. PMID:22661132

  13. Personalized Cardiovascular Medicine Today: A Food and Drug Administration/Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Perspective.

    PubMed

    Blaus, Alison; Madabushi, Rajanikanth; Pacanowski, Michael; Rose, Martin; Schuck, Robert N; Stockbridge, Norman; Temple, Robert; Unger, Ellis F

    2015-10-13

    Over the past decade, personalized medicine has received considerable attention from researchers, drug developers, and regulatory agencies. Personalized medicine includes identifying patients most likely to benefit and those most likely to experience adverse reactions in response to a drug, and tailoring therapy based on pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamic response, as well. Perhaps most exciting is finding ways to identify likely responders through genetic, proteomic, or other tests, so that only likely responders will be treated. However, less precise methods such as identifying historical, demographic, or other indicators of increased or reduced responsiveness are also important aspects of personalized medicine. The cardiovascular field has not used many genetic or proteomic markers, but has regularly used prognostic variables to identify likely responders. The development of biomarker-based approaches to personalized medicine in cardiovascular disease has been challenging, in part, because most cardiovascular therapies treat acquired syndromes, such as acute coronary syndrome and heart failure, which develop over many decades and represent the end result of several pathophysiological mechanisms. More precise disease classification and greater understanding of individual variations in disease pathology could drive the development of targeted therapeutics. Success in designing clinical trials for personalized medicine will require the selection of patient populations with attributes that can be targeted or that predict outcome, and the use of appropriate enrichment strategies once such attributes are identified. Here, we describe examples of personalized medicine in cardiovascular disease, discuss its impact on clinical trial design, and provide insight into the future of personalized cardiovascular medicine from a regulatory perspective. PMID:26459078

  14. The continuum of personalized cardiovascular medicine: a position paper of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Sipido, Karin R; Cowie, Martin R; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Fox, Keith A A; Katus, Hugo; Schroeder, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Priori, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    There is strong need to develop the current stratified practice of CVD management into a better personalized cardiovascular medicine, within a broad framework of global patient care. Clinical information obtained from history and physical examination, functional and imaging studies, biochemical biomarkers, genetic/epigenetic data, and pathophysiological insights into disease-driving processes need to be integrated into a new taxonomy of CVDs to allow personalized disease management. This has the potential for major health benefits for the population suffering from cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25148837

  15. [Individualized, personalized and stratified medicine: a challenge for allergology in ENT?].

    PubMed

    Chaker, Adam M; Klimek, L

    2015-05-01

    Individualized, personalized or stratified medicine approaches offer emerging opportunities in the field of allergy and ENT. Avoidance of side effects, targeted therapy approaches and stratified prevention promise better outcomes and optimal results for patients. Conceptual incongruencies remain with regard to definitions and perceptions of "personalized medicine". Serious ethical considerations have to be taken into account. The development of pharmacogenomics, molecular phenotyping, genomic sequencing and other -omics opens the door to unique mechanistic therapeutic advances. The molecular allergology and recombinant diagnostics available are tools that offer substantial improved diagnostics for the benefit of allergic patients, e. g. in anaphylaxis and food allergy. For stratified therapeutic approaches, however, regulatory affairs will have to keep pace with medical and scientific discovery. PMID:25940007

  16. Translating genetic discoveries to improvements in cardiovascular care: the path to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer L

    2008-03-01

    Research and development has provided us with several solutions to reduce morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease. More solutions are anticipated in the areas of clinical medicine, personal handheld devices, and DNA technology that will continue to enhance the era of personalized medicine. Genome-wide association studies have recently identified genetic variants on chromosome 9 (interval 9p21) and chromosome 4 (4q25) that confer increased risk for myocardial infarction and atrial fibrillation, respectively. The regions on these chromosomes containing the SNPs associated with disease contain no known genes - creating a challenge for scientists. Unraveling the code on these chromosomes may reveal a deeper insight into the mechanisms underlying disease and the design of new therapeutics to prevent or slow the progression of the disease. PMID:20559956

  17. Multimodal pain management and the future of a personalized medicine approach to pain.

    PubMed

    Manworren, Renee C B

    2015-03-01

    In the soon-to-be-released clinical practice guidelines from the American Pain Society, multimodal analgesia is recommended for pain management after all surgical procedures. Multimodal analgesia is a surgery-specific population-based approach to optimize pain relief by treating pain through multiple mechanisms along multiple sites of the nociceptive pathway. The reliance on multiple medications and therapies inherent to the multimodal approach also may address individual patient differences in analgesic pharmacogenetics (ie, the influence of allelic differences in single genes and the associated variability in specific medication responses). Perioperative nurses may see a shift from surgery-specific population-based multimodal analgesic protocols to a personalized medicine approach as knowledge of the genetic influences of analgesic metabolism and pain sensitivity is translated into clinical practice. Personalized medicine is proposed as an individualized pain management treatment plan that eventually may be based on each patient's genetic coding for metabolism of analgesics and pain sensitivity. PMID:25707723

  18. Genetic and molecular alterations in pancreatic cancer: Implications for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yantian; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Zongyou; Xiang, Jianbin; William, Fisher E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Chen, Changyi

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in human genomics and biotechnologies have profound impacts on medical research and clinical practice. Individual genomic information, including DNA sequences and gene expression profiles, can be used for prediction, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment for many complex diseases. Personalized medicine attempts to tailor medical care to individual patients by incorporating their genomic information. In a case of pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, alteration in many genes as well as molecular profiles in blood, pancreas tissue, and pancreas juice has recently been discovered to be closely associated with tumorigenesis or prognosis of the cancer. This review aims to summarize recent advances of important genes, proteins, and microRNAs that play a critical role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, and to provide implications for personalized medicine in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24172537

  19. A contact-lens-on-a-chip companion diagnostic tool for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Guan, Allan; Wang, Yi; Phillips, K Scott; Li, Zhenyu

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel, microfluidic platform that integrates human tears (1 μL) with commercial contact lens materials to provide personalized assessment of lens care solution performance. This device enabled the detection of significant differences in cleaning and disinfection outcomes between subjects and between biofilms vs. planktonic bacteria. PMID:26923038

  20. Autoantibodies, complement and type I interferon as biomarkers for personalized medicine in SLE.

    PubMed

    Biesen, R; Rose, T; Hoyer, B F; Alexander, T; Hiepe, F

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a mysterious disease, presenting with extremely divergent clinical phenotypes. Already, biomarkers are very helpful tools for diagnosis, assessment and monitoring of disease activity, differential diagnosis of clinical manifestations, prediction of the disease course and stratified therapy, and they hold the key to personalized medicine in SLE. We summarize the clinical information that can only be supplied by autoantibodies, complement components and interferon biomarkers in this diverse disease. PMID:27252258

  1. From integrative disease modeling to predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    With the significant advancement of high-throughput technologies and diagnostic techniques throughout the past decades, molecular underpinnings of many disorders have been identified. However, translation of patient-specific molecular mechanisms into tailored clinical applications remains a challenging task, which requires integration of multi-dimensional molecular and clinical data into patient-centric models. This task becomes even more challenging when dealing with complex diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders. Integrative disease modeling is an emerging knowledge-based paradigm in translational research that exploits the power of computational methods to collect, store, integrate, model and interpret accumulated disease information across different biological scales from molecules to phenotypes. We argue that integrative disease modeling will be an indispensable part of any P4 medicine research and development in the near future and that it supports the shift from descriptive to causal mechanistic diagnosis and treatment of complex diseases. For each ‘P’ in predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) medicine, we demonstrate how integrative disease modeling can contribute to addressing the real-world issues in development of new predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory measures. With the increasing recognition that application of integrative systems modeling is the key to all activities in P4 medicine, we envision that translational bioinformatics in general and integrative modeling in particular will continue to open up new avenues of scientific research for current challenges in P4 medicine. PMID:24195840

  2. Just caring: assessing the ethical and economic costs of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Leonard M

    2014-02-01

    Personalized medicine has been touted as a revolutionary form of cancer care. It has been portrayed as precision medicine, targeting with deadly accuracy cancer cells and sparing patients the debilitating broad-spectrum side effects of more traditional forms of cancer therapy. But personalized medicine still has its costs to patients and society, both moral and economic costs. How to recognize and address those issues will be the focus of this essay. We start with these questions: Does everyone faced with cancer have a moral right to the most effective cancer care available, no matter what the cost, no matter whether a particular individual has the personal ability to pay for that care or not? Or are there limits to the cancer care that anyone has a right to at social expense? If so, what are those limits and how are those limits to be determined? Are those limits a matter of both morality and economics? I will answer this last question in the affirmative. This is what I refer to as the "Just Caring" problem in health care. PMID:24445288

  3. An Integrative Pharmacogenomic Approach Identifies Two-drug Combination Therapies for Personalized Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Fei, Teng; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Brown, Myles; Zhang, Peng; Liu, X. Shirley; Wang, Haiyun

    2016-01-01

    An individual tumor harbors multiple molecular alterations that promote cell proliferation and prevent apoptosis and differentiation. Drugs that target specific molecular alterations have been introduced into personalized cancer medicine, but their effects can be modulated by the activities of other genes or molecules. Previous studies aiming to identify multiple molecular alterations for combination therapies are limited by available data. Given the recent large scale of available pharmacogenomic data, it is possible to systematically identify multiple biomarkers that contribute jointly to drug sensitivity, and to identify combination therapies for personalized cancer medicine. In this study, we used pharmacogenomic profiling data provided from two independent cohorts in a systematic in silico investigation of perturbed genes cooperatively associated with drug sensitivity. Our study predicted many pairs of molecular biomarkers that may benefit from the use of combination therapies. One of our predicted biomarker pairs, a mutation in the BRAF gene and upregulated expression of the PIM1 gene, was experimentally validated to benefit from a therapy combining BRAF inhibitor and PIM1 inhibitor in lung cancer. This study demonstrates how pharmacogenomic data can be used to systematically identify potentially cooperative genes and provide novel insights to combination therapies in personalized cancer medicine. PMID:26916442

  4. An Integrative Pharmacogenomic Approach Identifies Two-drug Combination Therapies for Personalized Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Fei, Teng; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Brown, Myles; Zhang, Peng; Liu, X Shirley; Wang, Haiyun

    2016-01-01

    An individual tumor harbors multiple molecular alterations that promote cell proliferation and prevent apoptosis and differentiation. Drugs that target specific molecular alterations have been introduced into personalized cancer medicine, but their effects can be modulated by the activities of other genes or molecules. Previous studies aiming to identify multiple molecular alterations for combination therapies are limited by available data. Given the recent large scale of available pharmacogenomic data, it is possible to systematically identify multiple biomarkers that contribute jointly to drug sensitivity, and to identify combination therapies for personalized cancer medicine. In this study, we used pharmacogenomic profiling data provided from two independent cohorts in a systematic in silico investigation of perturbed genes cooperatively associated with drug sensitivity. Our study predicted many pairs of molecular biomarkers that may benefit from the use of combination therapies. One of our predicted biomarker pairs, a mutation in the BRAF gene and upregulated expression of the PIM1 gene, was experimentally validated to benefit from a therapy combining BRAF inhibitor and PIM1 inhibitor in lung cancer. This study demonstrates how pharmacogenomic data can be used to systematically identify potentially cooperative genes and provide novel insights to combination therapies in personalized cancer medicine. PMID:26916442

  5. Tissue Banking, Bioinformatics, and Electronic Medical Records: The Front-End Requirements for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Suh, K. Stephen; Sarojini, Sreeja; Youssif, Maher; Nalley, Kip; Milinovikj, Natasha; Elloumi, Fathi; Russell, Steven; Pecora, Andrew; Schecter, Elyssa; Goy, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine promises patient-tailored treatments that enhance patient care and decrease overall treatment costs by focusing on genetics and “-omics” data obtained from patient biospecimens and records to guide therapy choices that generate good clinical outcomes. The approach relies on diagnostic and prognostic use of novel biomarkers discovered through combinations of tissue banking, bioinformatics, and electronic medical records (EMRs). The analytical power of bioinformatic platforms combined with patient clinical data from EMRs can reveal potential biomarkers and clinical phenotypes that allow researchers to develop experimental strategies using selected patient biospecimens stored in tissue banks. For cancer, high-quality biospecimens collected at diagnosis, first relapse, and various treatment stages provide crucial resources for study designs. To enlarge biospecimen collections, patient education regarding the value of specimen donation is vital. One approach for increasing consent is to offer publically available illustrations and game-like engagements demonstrating how wider sample availability facilitates development of novel therapies. The critical value of tissue bank samples, bioinformatics, and EMR in the early stages of the biomarker discovery process for personalized medicine is often overlooked. The data obtained also require cross-disciplinary collaborations to translate experimental results into clinical practice and diagnostic and prognostic use in personalized medicine. PMID:23818899

  6. Personalized Medicine in the U.S. and Germany: Awareness, Acceptance, Use and Preconditions for the Wide Implementation into the Medical Standard.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Kateryna; Marschall, Paul; Flessa, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our research was to collect comprehensive data about the public and physician awareness, acceptance and use of Personalized Medicine (PM), as well as their opinions on PM reimbursement and genetic privacy protection in the U.S. and Germany. In order to give a better overview, we compared our survey results with the results from other studies and discussed Personalized Medicine preconditions for its wide implementation into the medical standard. For the data collection, using the same methodology, we performed several surveys in Pennsylvania (U.S.) and Bavaria (Germany). Physicians were contacted via letter, while public representatives in person. Survey results, analyzed by means of descriptive and non-parametric statistic methods, have shown that awareness, acceptance, use and opinions on PM aspects in Pennsylvania and Bavaria were not significantly different. In both states there were strong concerns about genetic privacy protection and no support of one genetic database. The costs for Personalized Medicine were expected to be covered by health insurances and governmental funds. Summarizing, we came to the conclusion that for PM wide implementation there will be need to adjust the healthcare reimbursement system, as well as adopt new laws which protect against genetic misuse and simultaneously enable voluntary data provision. PMID:27144585

  7. Personalized Medicine in the U.S. and Germany: Awareness, Acceptance, Use and Preconditions for the Wide Implementation into the Medical Standard

    PubMed Central

    Kichko, Kateryna; Marschall, Paul; Flessa, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our research was to collect comprehensive data about the public and physician awareness, acceptance and use of Personalized Medicine (PM), as well as their opinions on PM reimbursement and genetic privacy protection in the U.S. and Germany. In order to give a better overview, we compared our survey results with the results from other studies and discussed Personalized Medicine preconditions for its wide implementation into the medical standard. For the data collection, using the same methodology, we performed several surveys in Pennsylvania (U.S.) and Bavaria (Germany). Physicians were contacted via letter, while public representatives in person. Survey results, analyzed by means of descriptive and non-parametric statistic methods, have shown that awareness, acceptance, use and opinions on PM aspects in Pennsylvania and Bavaria were not significantly different. In both states there were strong concerns about genetic privacy protection and no support of one genetic database. The costs for Personalized Medicine were expected to be covered by health insurances and governmental funds. Summarizing, we came to the conclusion that for PM wide implementation there will be need to adjust the healthcare reimbursement system, as well as adopt new laws which protect against genetic misuse and simultaneously enable voluntary data provision. PMID:27144585

  8. Asthma pharmacogenetics and the development of genetic profiles for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Victor E; Meyers, Deborah A; Bleecker, Eugene R

    2015-01-01

    Human genetics research will be critical to the development of genetic profiles for personalized or precision medicine in asthma. Genetic profiles will consist of gene variants that predict individual disease susceptibility and risk for progression, predict which pharmacologic therapies will result in a maximal therapeutic benefit, and predict whether a therapy will result in an adverse response and should be avoided in a given individual. Pharmacogenetic studies of the glucocorticoid, leukotriene, and β2-adrenergic receptor pathways have focused on candidate genes within these pathways and, in addition to a small number of genome-wide association studies, have identified genetic loci associated with therapeutic responsiveness. This review summarizes these pharmacogenetic discoveries and the future of genetic profiles for personalized medicine in asthma. The benefit of a personalized, tailored approach to health care delivery is needed in the development of expensive biologic drugs directed at a specific biologic pathway. Prior pharmacogenetic discoveries, in combination with additional variants identified in future studies, will form the basis for future genetic profiles for personalized tailored approaches to maximize therapeutic benefit for an individual asthmatic while minimizing the risk for adverse events. PMID:25691813

  9. Ontology-Driven Monitoring of Patient's Vital Signs Enabling Personalized Medical Detection and Alert

    PubMed Central

    Hristoskova, Anna; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Zacharioudakis, Giorgos; Tsiknakis, Manolis; De Turck, Filip

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge related to caring for patients with chronic conditions is the early detection of exacerbations of the disease. Medical personnel should be contacted immediately in order to intervene in time before an acute state is reached, ensuring patient safety. This paper proposes an approach to an ambient intelligence (AmI) framework supporting real-time remote monitoring of patients diagnosed with congestive heart failure (CHF). Its novelty is the integration of: (i) personalized monitoring of the patients health status and risk stage; (ii) intelligent alerting of the dedicated physician through the construction of medical workflows on-the-fly; and (iii) dynamic adaptation of the vital signs’ monitoring environment on any available device or smart phone located in close proximity to the physician depending on new medical measurements, additional disease specifications or the failure of the infrastructure. The intelligence lies in the adoption of semantics providing for a personalized and automated emergency alerting that smoothly interacts with the physician, regardless of his location, ensuring timely intervention during an emergency. It is evaluated on a medical emergency scenario, where in the case of exceeded patient thresholds, medical personnel are localized and contacted, presenting ad hoc information on the patient's condition on the most suited device within the physician's reach. PMID:24445411

  10. Impact of the US Patent System on the promise of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Louis M; Sieczkiewicz, Gregory J

    2007-09-01

    The biotechnology revolution promises unfathomable future scientific discovery. One of the potential benefits is the accelerated introduction of new diagnostics and treatments to the general public. The right medication for the right patient is the goal of personalized medicine, which directly benefits from many of biotechnology's biggest and most recent advances. The US patent system rewards innovation in medicine and other arts and sciences by granting innovators, for a period of time, the right to exclude others from using what was invented. One of the purposes of the patent system is to trade that right to exclude, and in its stead obtain the patent holder's obligation to fully and publicly disclose the essence of the innovations so that they can be improved, thus advancing the common welfare. A tension exists between personalized medicine's need for access to and use of scientific advances and the patent system's reward of exclusive use or nonuse to innovators. This tension may result in fewer diagnostic and therapeutic tools brought to the market and generally adopted. The risk seems particularly acute with respect to the diagnostic and therapeutic tools arising from genetic testing that hold specific value for a subset of the population. The judicial system has introduced ethical exceptions that overcome a patent holder's right to exclude; these judicial overrides relate to the provision of certain types of medical procedures and the development of certain types of new drugs, and not, apparently, to the use of diagnostic and therapeutic tools essential to the success of personalized medicine. A serious question exists as to whether legislative action is necessary to increase public access to genetic testing. PMID:18022586

  11. A Perspective on Implementing a Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Platform for Drug Discovery and the Advancement of Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Andrew M.; Schurdak, Mark E.; Bahar, Ivet; Berg, Jeremy M.; Taylor, D. Lansing

    2016-01-01

    Drug candidates exhibiting well-defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles that are otherwise safe often fail to demonstrate proof-of-concept in phase II and III trials. Innovation in drug discovery and development has been identified as a critical need for improving the efficiency of drug discovery, especially through collaborations between academia, government agencies, and industry. To address the innovation challenge, we describe a comprehensive, unbiased, integrated, and iterative quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP)–driven drug discovery and development strategy and platform that we have implemented at the University of Pittsburgh Drug Discovery Institute. Intrinsic to QSP is its integrated use of multiscale experimental and computational methods to identify mechanisms of disease progression and to test predicted therapeutic strategies likely to achieve clinical validation for appropriate subpopulations of patients. The QSP platform can address biological heterogeneity and anticipate the evolution of resistance mechanisms, which are major challenges for drug development. The implementation of this platform is dedicated to gaining an understanding of mechanism(s) of disease progression to enable the identification of novel therapeutic strategies as well as repurposing drugs. The QSP platform will help promote the paradigm shift from reactive population-based medicine to proactive personalized medicine by focusing on the patient as the starting and the end point. PMID:26962875

  12. A Perspective on Implementing a Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Platform for Drug Discovery and the Advancement of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Stern, Andrew M; Schurdak, Mark E; Bahar, Ivet; Berg, Jeremy M; Taylor, D Lansing

    2016-07-01

    Drug candidates exhibiting well-defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles that are otherwise safe often fail to demonstrate proof-of-concept in phase II and III trials. Innovation in drug discovery and development has been identified as a critical need for improving the efficiency of drug discovery, especially through collaborations between academia, government agencies, and industry. To address the innovation challenge, we describe a comprehensive, unbiased, integrated, and iterative quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP)-driven drug discovery and development strategy and platform that we have implemented at the University of Pittsburgh Drug Discovery Institute. Intrinsic to QSP is its integrated use of multiscale experimental and computational methods to identify mechanisms of disease progression and to test predicted therapeutic strategies likely to achieve clinical validation for appropriate subpopulations of patients. The QSP platform can address biological heterogeneity and anticipate the evolution of resistance mechanisms, which are major challenges for drug development. The implementation of this platform is dedicated to gaining an understanding of mechanism(s) of disease progression to enable the identification of novel therapeutic strategies as well as repurposing drugs. The QSP platform will help promote the paradigm shift from reactive population-based medicine to proactive personalized medicine by focusing on the patient as the starting and the end point. PMID:26962875

  13. Co-production of Health enabled by next generation personal health systems.

    PubMed

    Boye, Niels

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the theoretical principles for the establishment of a parallel and complementary modality of healthcare delivery - named Coproduction of Health (CpH). This service-model activates digital data, information, and knowledge about health, healthy choices, and the individuals' health-state and computes through personalized models context-aware communication and advice. "Lightweight technologies" (smartphones, tablets, application stores) would serve as the technology close to the end-users (citizens, patients, clients, customers), connecting them with "big data" in conventionally and non-conventionally organized data repositories. The CpH modality aims at providing synergies between professional healthcare, selfcare, informal care and provides data-fusion from several sources such as health characteristics of consumer goods, from sensors, actuators, and health related data-repositories, and turns this into "health added value" for the individual. A theoretical business model respecting healthcare values, ethics, and legal foundation is also sketched out. PMID:22942030

  14. Pharmacogenetics in primary care: the promise of personalized medicine and the reality of racial profiling.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Linda M; Kreiner, Meta J

    2013-03-01

    Many anticipate that expanding knowledge of genetic variations associated with disease risk and medication response will revolutionize clinical medicine, making possible genetically based Personalized Medicine where health care can be tailored to individuals, based on their genome scans. Pharmacogenetics has received especially strong interest, with many pharmaceutical developers avidly working to identify genetic variations associated with individual differences in drug response. While clinical applications of emerging genetic knowledge are becoming increasingly available, genetic tests for drug selection are not as yet widely accessible, and many primary care clinicians are unprepared to interpret genetic information. We conducted interviews with 58 primary care clinicians, exploring how they integrate emerging pharmacogenetic concepts into their practices. We found that in their current practices, pharmacogenetic innovations have not led to individually tailored treatment, but instead have encouraged use of essentialized racial/ethnic identity as a proxy for genetic heritage. Current manifestations of Personalized Medicine appear to be reinforcing entrenched notions of inherent biological differences between racial groups, and promoting the belief that racial profiling in health care is supported by cutting-edge scientific authority. Our findings raise concern for how pharmacogenetic innovations will actually affect diverse populations, and how unbiased treatment can be assured. PMID:23264029

  15. Biobanks in the era of personalized medicine: objectives, challenges, and innovation: Overview.

    PubMed

    Kinkorová, Judita

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are an important compound of personalized medicine and strongly support the scientific progress in stratification of population and biomarker discovery and validation due to progress in personalized medicine. Biobanks are an essential tool for new drug discoveries and drug development. Biobanks play an important role in the whole process of patient prevention and prediction, follow-up, and therapy monitoring and optimalization. Biobanks have the specificity in that they cover multidisciplinary approach to the human health combining biological and medical approaches, as well as informative bioinformatics technologies, computationing, and modeling. The importance of biobanks has during the last decade increased in variety and capacity from small collections of samples to large-scale national or international repositories. Collected samples are population-based, disease-specific or rare diseases originating from a diverse profile of individuals. There are various purposes of biobanks, such as diagnostics, pharmacology, or research. Biobanks involve, store, and operate with specific personal information, and as a consequence, such a diversity of biobanking is associated with a broad spectrum of ethical and legal issues. Biobanks are an international phenomenon because any single country, state, or society at the moment is not able to cover all issues involving the whole biobank problematic. Biobanks have an enormous innovative potential in the whole process of biomedical research in the twenty-first century. PMID:26904153

  16. Bioinformatics Workflow for Clinical Whole Genome Sequencing at Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ellen A.; Shakbatyan, Rimma; Evans, Jason; Rossetti, Peter; Graham, Chet; Sharma, Himanshu; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lebo, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Effective implementation of precision medicine will be enhanced by a thorough understanding of each patient’s genetic composition to better treat his or her presenting symptoms or mitigate the onset of disease. This ideally includes the sequence information of a complete genome for each individual. At Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine, we have developed a clinical process for whole genome sequencing (WGS) with application in both healthy individuals and those with disease. In this manuscript, we will describe our bioinformatics strategy to efficiently process and deliver genomic data to geneticists for clinical interpretation. We describe the handling of data from FASTQ to the final variant list for clinical review for the final report. We will also discuss our methodology for validating this workflow and the cost implications of running WGS. PMID:26927186

  17. Molecular imaging with optics: primer and case for near-infrared fluorescence techniques in personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Rasmussen, John C.

    2010-01-01

    We compare and contrast the development of optical molecular imaging techniques with nuclear medicine with a didactic emphasis for initiating readers into the field of molecular imaging. The nuclear imaging techniques of gamma scintigraphy, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography are first briefly reviewed. The molecular optical imaging techniques of bioluminescence and fluorescence using gene reporter/probes and gene reporters are described prior to introducing the governing factors of autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. The use of dual-labeled, near-infrared excitable and radio-labeled agents are described with comparative measurements between planar fluorescence and nuclear molecular imaging. The concept of time-independent and -dependent measurements is described with emphasis on integrating time-dependent measurements made in the frequency domain for 3-D tomography. Finally, we comment on the challenges and progress for translating near-infrared (NIR) molecular imaging agents for personalized medicine. PMID:19021311

  18. From prenatal genomic diagnosis to fetal personalized medicine: progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Diana W

    2015-01-01

    Thus far, the focus of personalized medicine has been the prevention and treatment of conditions that affect adults. Although advances in genetic technology have been applied more frequently to prenatal diagnosis than to fetal treatment, genetic and genomic information is beginning to influence pregnancy management. Recent developments in sequencing the fetal genome combined with progress in understanding fetal physiology using gene expression arrays indicate that we could have the technical capabilities to apply an individualized medicine approach to the fetus. Here I review recent advances in prenatal genetic diagnostics, the challenges associated with these new technologies and how the information derived from them can be used to advance fetal care. Historically, the goal of prenatal diagnosis has been to provide an informed choice to prospective parents. We are now at a point where that goal can and should be expanded to incorporate genetic, genomic and transcriptomic data to develop new approaches to fetal treatment. PMID:22772565

  19. PART of the WHOLE: A Case Study in Wellness-Oriented Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Greg; Marigorta, Urko M.; Ojagbeghru, Elohor R.; Park, Subin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the Wellness and Health Omics Linked to the Environment (WHOLE) personalized medicine profile for a 50-year-old Caucasian male living in Atlanta, Georgia. Based on the principle that genomic medicine will be most effective when presented in the context of an individual’s clinical and lifestyle data, we propose the use of a “risk radar” that summarizes health risks in eight domains. Rather than providing overwhelming lists of potentially deleterious genetic variants, we argue that profiles should be palatable, actionable, reproducible, and teachable: the PART principle. Genetic risk scores for this individual are strikingly concordant for his height, body mass index (BMI), waist hip ration (WHR), and cholesterol, and blood transcriptome data agrees with and complements his complete blood counts. Despite enjoying currently good health, his risk radar highlights metabolic disease as his major health concern. PMID:26604864

  20. Cancer Subclonal Genetic Architecture as a Key to Personalized Medicine1

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2013-01-01

    The future of personalized oncological therapy will likely rely on evidence-based medicine to integrate all of the available evidence to delineate the most efficacious treatment option for the patient. To undertake evidence-based medicine through use of targeted therapy regimens, identification of the specific underlying causative mutation(s) driving growth and progression of a patient's tumor is imperative. Although molecular subtyping is important for planning and treatment, intraclonal genetic diversity has been recently highlighted as having significant implications for biopsy-based prognosis. Overall, delineation of the clonal architecture of a patient's cancer and how this will impact on the selection of the most efficacious therapy remain a topic of intense interest. PMID:24403863

  1. Available Tools to Facilitate Early Patient Access to Medicines in the EU and the USA: Analysis of Conditional Approvals and the Implications for Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Leyens, Lada; Richer, Étienne; Melien, Øyvind; Ballensiefen, Wolfgang; Brand, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Scientific knowledge and our understanding of the human body and diseases have limited any possible treatment tailoring to each patient. The technological advances enabling the integration of various data sets (e.g. '-omics', microbiome, epigenetics and environmental exposure) have facilitated a greater understanding of the human body, the molecular basis of disease and all the factors influencing disease onset, progression and response to treatment, thereby ushering in the era of personalized medicine. We evaluate the regulatory approaches available to facilitate early patient access to efficacious and safe compounds in the EU and the USA in order to make more informed recommendations in the future as to the gaps in regulations for early patient access. An in-depth analysis of conditional approvals (EU) and accelerated approvals (USA) is performed based on the publicly available information (European public assessment reports and a summary review of products approved under both programmes). The types of product, indications, time to approval and type of evidence submitted were analysed. Between 2007 and early 2015, 17 products were conditionally approved in the EU and 25 in the USA, most of them in the area of oncology and based on evidence from phase II clinical trial data. Early approval of promising products based on data from early phases of development is already possible in the EU and the USA. Some of the improvements could entail implementing a rolling assessment of evidence in Europe and extending the scope of early dialogues. PMID:26316202

  2. Use of indigenous and indigenised medicines to enhance personal well-being: a South African case study.

    PubMed

    Cocks, Michelle; Møller, Valerie

    2002-02-01

    An estimated 27 million South Africans use indigenous medicines (Mander, 1997, Medicinal plant marketing and strategies for sustaining the plant supply in the Bushbuckridge area and Mpumalanga Province. Institute for Natural Resources, University of Natal. Pietermaritzburg, South Africa). Although herbal remedies are freely available in amayeza stores, or Xhosa chemists, for self-medication, little is known about the motivations of consumers. According to African belief systems, good health is holistic and extends to the person's social environment. The paper makes a distinction between traditional medicines which are used to enhance personal well-being generally and for cultural purposes, on the one hand, and medicines used to treat physical conditions only, on the other. Drawing on an eight-month study of Xhosa chemists in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, in 1996, the paper identifies 90 medicines in stock which are used to enhance personal well-being. Just under one-third of all purchases were of medicines to enhance well-being. Remedies particularly popular included medicines believed to ward off evil spirits and bring good luck. The protection of infants with medicines which repel evil spirits is a common practice. Consumer behaviours indicate that the range of medicines available is increased by indigenisation of manufactured traditional medicines and cross-cultural borrowing. Case studies confirm that self- and infant medication with indigenous remedies augmented by indigenised medicines plays an important role in primary health care by allaying the fears and anxieties of everyday life within the Xhosa belief system. thereby promoting personal well-being. PMID:11824915

  3. Nanoengineered glycan sensors enabling native glycoprofiling for medicinal applications: towards profiling glycoproteins without labeling or liberation steps.

    PubMed

    Reuel, Nigel F; Mu, Bin; Zhang, Jingqing; Hinckley, Allison; Strano, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Nanoengineered glycan sensors may help realize the long-held goal of accurate and rapid glycoprotein profiling without labeling or glycan liberation steps. Current methods of profiling oligosaccharides displayed on protein surfaces, such as liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, capillary electrophoresis, and microarray methods, are limited by sample pretreatment and quantitative accuracy. Microarrayed platforms can be improved with methods that better estimate kinetic parameters rather than simply reporting relative binding information. These quantitative glycan sensors are enabled by an emerging class of nanoengineered materials that differ in their mode of signal transduction from traditional methods. Platforms that respond to mass changes include a quartz crystal microbalance and cantilever sensors. Electronic response can be detected from electrochemical, field effect transistor, and pore impedance sensors. Optical methods include fluorescent frontal affinity chromatography, surface plasmon resonance methods, and fluorescent carbon nanotubes. After a very brief primer on glycobiology and its connection to medicine, these emerging systems are critically reviewed for their potential use as core sensors in future glycoprofiling tools. PMID:22868627

  4. Extreme respiratory sinus arrhythmia enables overwintering black bear survival--physiological insights and applications to human medicine.

    PubMed

    Laske, Timothy G; Harlow, Henry J; Garshelis, David L; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2010-10-01

    American black bears survive winter months without food and water while in a mildly hypothermic, hypometabolic, and inactive state, yet they appear to be able to return to near-normal systemic function within minutes of arousal. This study's goal was to characterize the cardiovascular performance of overwintering black bears and elicit the underlying mechanisms enabling survival. Mid-winter cardiac electrophysiology was assessed in four wild black bears using implanted data recorders. Paired data from early and late winter were collected from 37 wild bears, which were anesthetized and temporarily removed from their dens to record cardiac electrophysiological parameters (12-lead electrocardiograms) and cardiac dimensional changes (echocardiography). Left ventricular thickness, primary cardiac electrophysiological parameters, and cardiovascular response to threats ("fight or flight" response) were preserved throughout winter. Dramatic respiratory sinus arrhythmias were recorded (cardiac cycle length variations up to 865%) with long sinus pauses between breaths (up to 13 s). The accelerated heart rate during breathing efficiently transports oxygen, with the heart "resting" between breaths to minimize energy usage. This adaptive cardiac physiology may have broad implications for human medicine. PMID:20559779

  5. Information and Communication Technology–Enabled Person-Centered Care for the “Big Five” Chronic Conditions: Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Simonse, Lianne WL

    2015-01-01

    respiratory (63%, 46/73) and cardiovascular (53%, 47/89) diseases. We found 60 relevant studies (17.1%, 60/350) on person-centered shared management ICT, primarily using telemedicine systems as personalized ICT. The highest impact measured related to the increase in empowerment (15.4%, 54/350). Health-related quality of life accounted for 8%. The highest impact connected to health professionals was an increase in clinical outcome (11.7%, 41/350). The impacts on organization outcomes were decrease in hospitalization (12.3%, 43/350) and increase of cost efficiency (10.9%, 38/350). Conclusions This scoping review outlined ICT-enabled PCC in chronic disease management. Persons with a chronic disease could benefit from an ICT-enabled PCC approach, but ICT-PCC also yields organizational paybacks. It could lead to an increase in health care usage, as reported in some studies. Few interventions could be regarded as “fully” addressing PCC. This review will be especially helpful to those deciding on areas where further development of research or implementation of ICT-enabled PCC may be warranted. PMID:25831199

  6. Smart fabrics and interactive textile enabling wearable personal applications: R&D state of the art and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Lymberis, A; Paradiso, R

    2008-01-01

    Smart fabrics and interactive textiles (SFIT) are fibrous structures that are capable of sensing, actuating, generating/storing power and/or communicating. Research and development towards wearable textile-based personal systems allowing e.g. health monitoring, protection & safety, and healthy lifestyle gained strong interest during the last 10 years. Under the Information and Communication Programme of the European Commission, a cluster of R&D projects dealing with smart fabrics and interactive textile wearable systems regroup activities along two different and complementary approaches i.e. 'application pull' and 'technology push'. This includes projects aiming at personal health management through integration, validation, and use of smart clothing and other networked mobile devices as well as projects targeting the full integration of sensors/actuators, energy sources, processing and communication within the clothes to enable personal applications such as protection/safety, emergency and healthcare. The integration part of the technologies into a real SFIT product is at present stage on the threshold of prototyping and testing. Several issues, technical as well user-centred, societal and business, remain to be solved. The paper presents on going major R&D activities, identifies gaps and discuss key challenges for the future. PMID:19163906

  7. miRNAs as biomarkers of myocardial infarction: a step forward towards personalized medicine?

    PubMed

    Goretti, Emeline; Wagner, Daniel R; Devaux, Yvan

    2014-12-01

    miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs known to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are expressed in the heart where they regulate multiple pathophysiological processes. The discovery of stable cardiac miRNAs in the bloodstream has also motivated the investigation of their potential as biomarkers. This review gathers the current knowledge on the use of miRNAs as novel biomarkers to improve risk stratification, diagnosis, and prognosis of patients with myocardial infarction. In the rapidly evolving era of biomarkers, the potential of miRNAs as promising tools to move personalized medicine a step forward is discussed. PMID:25457620

  8. Getting Personal: Head and Neck Cancer Management in the Era of Genomic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Uhlmann, Wendy R.; Brenner, J. Chad; Shuman, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic testing is rapidly becoming an important tool in the management of patients with head and neck cancer. As we enter the era of genomics and personalized medicine, providers should be aware of testing options, counseling resources, and the benefits, limitations and future of personalized therapy. Methods This manuscript offers a primer to assist clinicians treating patients in anticipating and managing the inherent practical and ethical challenges of cancer care in the genomic era. Results Clinical applications of genomics for head and neck cancer are emerging. We discuss the indications for genetic testing, types of testing available, implications for care, privacy/disclosure concerns and ethical considerations. Hereditary genetic syndromes associated with head and neck neoplasms are reviewed, and online genetics resources are provided. Conclusions This article summarizes and contextualizes the evolving diagnostic and therapeutic options that impact the care of patients with head and neck cancer in the genomic era. PMID:25995036

  9. Open Access Integrated Therapeutic and Diagnostic Platforms for Personalized Cardiovascular Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gladding, Patrick A.; Cave, Andrew; Zareian, Mehran; Smith, Kevin; Hussan, Jagir; Hunter, Peter; Erogbogbo, Folarin; Aguilar, Zoraida; Martin, David S.; Chan, Eugene; Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Kassemi, Mohammad; Thomas, James D.; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2013-01-01

    It is undeniable that the increasing costs in healthcare are a concern. Although technological advancements have been made in healthcare systems, the return on investment made by governments and payers has been poor. The current model of care is unsustainable and is due for an upgrade. In developed nations, a law of diminishing returns has been noted in population health standards, whilst in the developing world, westernized chronic illnesses, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease have become emerging problems. The reasons for these trends are complex, multifactorial and not easily reversed. Personalized medicine has the potential to have a significant impact on these issues, but for it to be truly successful, interdisciplinary mass collaboration is required. We propose here a vision for open-access advanced analytics for personalized cardiac diagnostics using imaging, electrocardiography and genomics. PMID:25562653

  10. Testing personalized medicine: patient and physician expectations of next-generation genomic sequencing in late-stage cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Fiona A; Hayeems, Robin Z; Bytautas, Jessica P; Bedard, Philippe L; Ernst, Scott; Hirte, Hal; Hotte, Sebastien; Oza, Amit; Razak, Albiruni; Welch, Stephen; Winquist, Eric; Dancey, Janet; Siu, Lillian L

    2014-01-01

    Developments in genomics, including next-generation sequencing technologies, are expected to enable a more personalized approach to clinical care, with improved risk stratification and treatment selection. In oncology, personalized medicine is particularly advanced and increasingly used to identify oncogenic variants in tumor tissue that predict responsiveness to specific drugs. Yet, the translational research needed to validate these technologies will be conducted in patients with late-stage cancer and is expected to produce results of variable clinical significance and incidentally identify genetic risks. To explore the experiential context in which much of personalized cancer care will be developed and evaluated, we conducted a qualitative interview study alongside a pilot feasibility study of targeted DNA sequencing of metastatic tumor biopsies in adult patients with advanced solid malignancies. We recruited 29/73 patients and 14/17 physicians; transcripts from semi-structured interviews were analyzed for thematic patterns using an interpretive descriptive approach. Patient hopes of benefit from research participation were enhanced by the promise of novel and targeted treatment but challenged by non-findings or by limited access to relevant trials. Family obligations informed a willingness to receive genetic information, which was perceived as burdensome given disease stage or as inconsequential given faced challenges. Physicians were optimistic about long-term potential but conservative about immediate benefits and mindful of elevated patient expectations; consent and counseling processes were expected to mitigate challenges from incidental findings. These findings suggest the need for information and decision tools to support physicians in communicating realistic prospects of benefit, and for cautious approaches to the generation of incidental genetic information. PMID:23860039

  11. Testing personalized medicine: patient and physician expectations of next-generation genomic sequencing in late-stage cancer care.

    PubMed

    Miller, Fiona A; Hayeems, Robin Z; Bytautas, Jessica P; Bedard, Philippe L; Ernst, Scott; Hirte, Hal; Hotte, Sebastien; Oza, Amit; Razak, Albiruni; Welch, Stephen; Winquist, Eric; Dancey, Janet; Siu, Lillian L

    2014-03-01

    Developments in genomics, including next-generation sequencing technologies, are expected to enable a more personalized approach to clinical care, with improved risk stratification and treatment selection. In oncology, personalized medicine is particularly advanced and increasingly used to identify oncogenic variants in tumor tissue that predict responsiveness to specific drugs. Yet, the translational research needed to validate these technologies will be conducted in patients with late-stage cancer and is expected to produce results of variable clinical significance and incidentally identify genetic risks. To explore the experiential context in which much of personalized cancer care will be developed and evaluated, we conducted a qualitative interview study alongside a pilot feasibility study of targeted DNA sequencing of metastatic tumor biopsies in adult patients with advanced solid malignancies. We recruited 29/73 patients and 14/17 physicians; transcripts from semi-structured interviews were analyzed for thematic patterns using an interpretive descriptive approach. Patient hopes of benefit from research participation were enhanced by the promise of novel and targeted treatment but challenged by non-findings or by limited access to relevant trials. Family obligations informed a willingness to receive genetic information, which was perceived as burdensome given disease stage or as inconsequential given faced challenges. Physicians were optimistic about long-term potential but conservative about immediate benefits and mindful of elevated patient expectations; consent and counseling processes were expected to mitigate challenges from incidental findings. These findings suggest the need for information and decision tools to support physicians in communicating realistic prospects of benefit, and for cautious approaches to the generation of incidental genetic information. PMID:23860039

  12. Economic incentives for evidence generation: promoting an efficient path to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Towse, Adrian; Garrison, Louis P

    2013-01-01

    The preceding articles in this volume have identified and discussed a wide range of methodological and practical issues in the development of personalized medicine. This concluding article uses the resulting insights to identify implications for the economic incentives for evidence generation. It argues that promoting an efficient path to personalized medicine is going to require appropriate incentives for evidence generation including: 1) a greater willingness on the part of payers to accept prices that reflect value; 2) consideration of some form of intellectual property protection (e.g., data exclusivity) for diagnostics to incentivize generation of evidence of clinical utility; 3) realistic expectations around the standards for evidence; and 4) public investment in evidence collection to complement the efforts of payers and manufacturers. It concludes that such incentives could build and maintain a balance among: 1) realistic thresholds for evidence and the need for payers to have confidence in the clinical utility of the drugs and tests they use; 2) payment for value, with prices that ensure cost-effectiveness for health systems; and 3) levels of intellectual property protection for evidence generation that provide a return for those financing research and development, while encouraging competition to produce both better and more efficient tests. PMID:24034311

  13. Infectious Disease Management through Point-of-Care Personalized Medicine Molecular Diagnostic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Luc; Bergeron, Michel G.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious disease management essentially consists in identifying the microbial cause(s) of an infection, initiating if necessary antimicrobial therapy against microbes, and controlling host reactions to infection. In clinical microbiology, the turnaround time of the diagnostic cycle (>24 hours) often leads to unnecessary suffering and deaths; approaches to relieve this burden include rapid diagnostic procedures and more efficient transmission or interpretation of molecular microbiology results. Although rapid nucleic acid-based diagnostic testing has demonstrated that it can impact on the transmission of hospital-acquired infections, we believe that such life-saving procedures should be performed closer to the patient, in dedicated 24/7 laboratories of healthcare institutions, or ideally at point of care. While personalized medicine generally aims at interrogating the genomic information of a patient, drug metabolism polymorphisms, for example, to guide drug choice and dosage, personalized medicine concepts are applicable in infectious diseases for the (rapid) identification of a disease-causing microbe and determination of its antimicrobial resistance profile, to guide an appropriate antimicrobial treatment for the proper management of the patient. The implementation of point-of-care testing for infectious diseases will require acceptance by medical authorities, new technological and communication platforms, as well as reimbursement practices such that time- and life-saving procedures become available to the largest number of patients. PMID:25562799

  14. Should direct-to-consumer personalized genomic medicine remain unregulated?: a rebuttal of the defenses.

    PubMed

    Valles, Sean A

    2012-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer personalized genomic medicine has recently grown into a small industry that sells mail-order DNA sample kits and then provides disease risk assessments, typically based upon results from genome-trait association studies. The companies selling these services have been largely exempted from FDA regulation in the United States. Testing kit companies and their supporters have defended the industry's unregulated status using two arguments. First, defenders have argued that mere absence of harm is all that must be proved for mail-order tests to be acceptable. Second, defenders of mail-order testing have argued that there is an individual right to the tests' information. This article rebuts these arguments. The article demonstrates that the direct-to-consumer market has resulted in the sidelining of clinical utility (medical value to patients), leading to the development of certain mail-order tests that do not promote customers' interests and to defenders' downplaying of a potentially damaging empirical study of mail-order genomic testing's effects on consumers. The article also shows that the notion of an individual right to these tests rests on a flawed reading of the key service provided by mail-order companies, which is the provision of medical interpretations, not simply genetic information. Absent these two justifications, there is no reason to exempt direct-to-consumer personalized genomic medicine from stringent federal oversight. PMID:22643762

  15. Unraveling human complexity and disease with systems biology and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Stephen; Chen, Jake Y

    2010-01-01

    We are all perplexed that current medical practice often appears maladroit in curing our individual illnesses or disease. However, as is often the case, a lack of understanding, tools and technologies are the root cause of such situations. Human individuality is an often-quoted term but, in the context of human biology, it is poorly understood. This is compounded when there is a need to consider the variability of human populations. In the case of the former, it is possible to quantify human complexity as determined by the 35,000 genes of the human genome, the 1–10 million proteins (including antibodies) and the 2000–3000 metabolites of the human metabolome. Human variability is much more difficult to assess, since many of the variables, such as the definition of race, are not even clearly agreed on. In order to accommodate human complexity, variability and its influence on health and disease, it is necessary to undertake a systematic approach. In the past decade, the emergence of analytical platforms and bioinformatics tools has led to the development of systems biology. Such an approach offers enormous potential in defining key pathways and networks involved in optimal human health, as well as disease onset, progression and treatment. The tools and technologies now available in systems biology analyses offer exciting opportunities to exploit the emerging areas of personalized medicine. In this article, we discuss the current status of human complexity, and how systems biology and personalized medicine can impact at the individual and population level. PMID:20577569

  16. High-Performance Affinity Chromatography: Applications in Drug-Protein Binding Studies and Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Beeram, Sandya R; Bi, Cong; Suresh, D; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2016-01-01

    The binding of drugs with proteins and other agents in serum is of interest in personalized medicine because this process can affect the dosage and action of drugs. The extent of this binding may also vary with a given disease state. These interactions may involve serum proteins, such as human serum albumin or α1-acid glycoprotein, or other agents, such as lipoproteins. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a tool that has received increasing interest as a means for studying these interactions. This review discusses the general principles of HPAC and the various approaches that have been used in this technique to examine drug-protein binding and in work related to personalized medicine. These approaches include frontal analysis and zonal elution, as well as peak decay analysis, ultrafast affinity extraction, and chromatographic immunoassays. The operation of each method is described and examples of applications for these techniques are provided. The type of information that can be obtained by these methods is also discussed, as related to the analysis of drug-protein binding and the study of clinical or pharmaceutical samples. PMID:26827600

  17. The 3 H and BMSEST Models for Spirituality in Multicultural Whole-Person Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anandarajah, Gowri

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE The explosion of evidence in the last decade supporting the role of spirituality in whole-person patient care has prompted proposals for a move to a biopsychosocial-spiritual model for health. Making this paradigm shift in today’s multicultural societies poses many challenges, however. This article presents 2 theoretical models that provide common ground for further exploration of the role of spirituality in medicine. METHODS The 3 H model (head, heart, hands) and the BMSEST models (body, mind, spirit, environment, social, transcendent) evolved from the author’s 12-year experience with curricula development regarding spirituality and medicine, 16-year experience as an attending family physician and educator, lived experience with both Hinduism and Christianity since childhood, and a lifetime study of the world’s great spiritual traditions. The models were developed, tested with learners, and refined. RESULTS The 3 H model offers a multidimensional definition of spirituality, applicable across cultures and belief systems, that provides opportunities for a common vocabulary for spirituality. Therapeutic options, from general spiritual care (compassion, presence, and the healing relationship), to specialized spiritual care (eg, by clinical chaplains), to spiritual self-care are discussed. The BMSEST model provides a conceptual framework for the role of spirituality in the larger health care context, useful for patient care, education, and research. Interactions among the 6 BMSEST components, with references to ongoing research, are proposed. CONCLUSIONS Including spirituality in whole-person care is a way of furthering our understanding of the complexities of human health and well-being. The 3 H and BMSEST models suggest a multidimensional and multidisciplinary approach based on universal concepts and a foundation in both the art and science of medicine. PMID:18779550

  18. Personalized Multilayer Daily Life Profiling Through Context Enabled Activity Classification and Motion Reconstruction: An Integrated System Approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, James Y; Wang, Yan; Barrett, Mick; Dobkin, Bruce; Pottie, Greg J; Kaiser, William J

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the daily activity of a physically disabled person in the community would enable healthcare professionals to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of their patients' compliance with recommendations for exercise, fitness, and practice of skilled movements, as well as enable feedback about performance in real-world situations. Based on our early research in in-community activity profiling, we present in this paper an end-to-end system capable of reporting a patient's daily activity at multiple levels of granularity: 1) at the highest level, information on the location categories a patient is able to visit; 2) within each location category, information on the activities a patient is able to perform; and 3) at the lowest level, motion trajectory, visualization, and metrics computation of each activity. Our methodology is built upon a physical activity prescription model coupled with MEMS inertial sensors and mobile device kits that can be sent to a patient at home. A novel context-guided activity-monitoring concept with categorical location context is used to achieve enhanced classification accuracy and throughput. The methodology is then seamlessly integrated with motion reconstruction and metrics computation to provide comprehensive layered reporting of a patient's daily life. We also present an implementation of the methodology featuring a novel location context detection algorithm using WiFi augmented GPS and overlays, with motion reconstruction and visualization algorithms for practical in-community deployment. Finally, we use a series of experimental field evaluations to confirm the accuracy of the system. PMID:25546868

  19. Practicing Pathology in the Era of Big Data and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiang; Taylor, Clive R.; Phil, D

    2014-01-01

    The traditional task of the pathologist is to assist physicians in making the correct diagnosis of diseases at the earliest possible stage to effectuate the optimal treatment strategy for each individual patient. In this respect surgical pathology (the traditional tissue diagnosis) is but a tool. It is not, of itself, the purpose of pathology practice; and change is in the air. This January 2014 issue of Applied Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Morphology (AIMM) embraces that change by the incorporation of the agenda and content of the journal Diagnostic Molecular Morphology (DMP). Over a decade ago AIMM introduced and promoted the concept of “molecular morphology,” and has sought to publish molecular studies that correlate with the morphologic features that continue to define cancer and many diseases. That intent is now reinforced and extended by the merger with DMP, as a logical and timely response to the growing impact of a wide range of genetic and molecular technologies that are beginning to reshape the way in which pathology is practiced. The use of molecular and genomic techniques already demonstrates clear value in the diagnosis of disease, with treatment tailored specifically to individual patients. Personalized medicine is the future, and personalized medicine demands personalized pathology. The need for integration of the flood of new molecular data, with surgical pathology, digital pathology, and the full range of pathology data in the electronic medical record has never been greater. This review describes the possible impact of these pressures upon the discipline of pathology, and examines possible outcomes. There is a sense of excitement and adventure. Active adaption and innovation are required. The new AIMM, incorporating DMP, seeks to position itself for a central role in this process. PMID:24326463

  20. Challenges, Solutions, and Quality Metrics of Personal Genome Assembly in Advancing Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenming; Wu, Leihong; Yavas, Gokhan; Simonyan, Vahan; Ning, Baitang; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    -response, tailoring drug therapy and detecting tumors. We believe the precision medicine would largely benefit from bioinformatics solutions, particularly for personal genome assembly. PMID:27110816

  1. Challenges, Solutions, and Quality Metrics of Personal Genome Assembly in Advancing Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenming; Wu, Leihong; Yavas, Gokhan; Simonyan, Vahan; Ning, Baitang; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    drug therapy and detecting tumors. We believe the precision medicine would largely benefit from bioinformatics solutions, particularly for personal genome assembly. PMID:27110816

  2. Relationship between Personality Profiles and Suicide Attempt via Medicine Poisoning among Hospitalized Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee-Kandjani, Ali Reza; Amiri, Shahrokh; Arfaie, Asghar; Ahmadi, Azadeh; Farvareshi, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Inflexible personality traits play an important role in the development of maladaptive behaviors among patients who attempt suicide. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between personality profiles and suicide attempt via medicine poisoning among the patients hospitalized in a public hospital. Materials and Methods. Fifty-nine patients who attempted suicide for the first time and hospitalized in the poisoning ward were selected as the experimental group. Sixty-three patients hospitalized in the other wards for a variety of reasons were selected as the adjusted control group. Millon Clinical Multiaxial Personality Inventory, 3rd version (MCMI-III) was used to assess the personality profiles. Results. The majority of the suicide attempters were low-level graduates (67.8% versus 47.1%, OR = 2.36). 79.7% of the suicide attempters were suffering from at least one maladaptive personality profile. The most common maladaptive personality profiles among the suicide attempters were depressive personality disorder (40.7%) and histrionic personality disorder (32.2%). Among the syndromes the most common ones were anxiety clinical syndrome (23.7%) and major depression (23.7%). Conclusion. Major depression clinical syndrome, histrionic personality disorder, anxiety clinical syndrome, and depressive personality disorder are among the predicators of first suicide attempts for the patients hospitalized in the public hospital due to the medicine poisoning. PMID:27433491

  3. Personalized preventive medicine: genetics and the response to regular exercise in preventive interventions.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Claude; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M; Ashley, Euan A; Franklin, Nina; Hwang, Paul M; Mattsson, C Mikael; Negrao, Carlos E; Phillips, Shane A; Sarzynski, Mark A; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Wheeler, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise and a physically active lifestyle have favorable effects on health. Several issues related to this theme are addressed in this report. A comment on the requirements of personalized exercise medicine and in-depth biological profiling along with the opportunities that they offer is presented. This is followed by a brief overview of the evidence for the contributions of genetic differences to the ability to benefit from regular exercise. Subsequently, studies showing that mutations in TP53 influence exercise capacity in mice and humans are succinctly described. The evidence for effects of exercise on endothelial function in health and disease also is covered. Finally, changes in cardiac and skeletal muscle in response to exercise and their implications for patients with cardiac disease are summarized. Innovative research strategies are needed to define the molecular mechanisms involved in adaptation to exercise and to translate them into useful clinical and public health applications. PMID:25559061

  4. Personalized medicine and economic evaluation in oncology: all theory and no practice?

    PubMed

    Garattini, Livio; Curto, Alessandro; Freemantle, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The clinical definition of personalized medicine (PM) is closely related to that of pharmacogenomics. Ideally, PM could lead the pharmaceutical industry to differentiate products by subgroups of patients with the same pathology and find new gene targets for drug discovery. Here, we focus on the potential impact of PM on the design of clinical trials and economic evaluations limited to oncology (its first and main field of application). Then, we assess the European economic evaluations focused on trastuzumab and cetuximab, the two drugs usually mentioned as emblematic examples of targeted therapies. Clinical results of PM in oncology have not been as encouraging as hoped so far. Of course, economic evaluations on targeted therapies cannot help overcome the lack of clinical evidence for most of them. The two paradigmatic examples of cetuximab and trastuzumab indicate that the methodological implications on economic evaluations debated in the literature are more theoretical than practical. PMID:26289733

  5. GeneNews Limited: bringing the blood transcriptome to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Novak, David J; Liew, Gailina J; Liew, Choong-Chin

    2012-03-01

    GeneNews Limited (TSX:GEN) is a molecular diagnostics company, uniquely positioned to deliver on the promise of personalized medicine. GeneNews has developed and patented the Sentinel Principle(®), an innovative approach to identify clinically actionable disease biomarkers from the blood transcriptome. Novel biomarker panels have been identified to address unmet clinical needs in a broad spectrum of malignancy, including those for oncology, cardiovascular, metabolic and neurological related disorders. Currently available products and services from GeneNews are: ColonSentry™, the world's first blood-based molecular test for colorectal cancer, and; the SentinelGX™ Pharmacogenomic and Companion Diagnostic BloodRNA™ services, established to effectively support pharmaceutical partners in their companion diagnostic, development efforts. PMID:22379995

  6. Research Ethics in the Era of Personalized Medicine: Updating Science's Contract with Society

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Eric M.; Cho, Mildred K.

    2010-01-01

    With the completed sequence of the human genome has come the prospect of substantially improving the quality of life for millions through personalized medicine approaches. Still, any advances in this direction require research involving human subjects. For decades science and ethics have enjoyed an allegiance reflected in a common set of ethical principles and procedures guiding the conduct of research with human subjects. Some of these principles emphasize avoiding harm over maximizing benefit. In this paper we revisit the priority given to these ethical principles – particularly the principles that support a cautious approach to science – and propose a reframing of the ‘social contract’ between science and society that emphasizes reciprocity and meeting public needs. PMID:20805701

  7. Hybrid 3D printing: a game-changer in personalized cardiac medicine?

    PubMed

    Kurup, Harikrishnan K N; Samuel, Bennett P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing in congenital heart disease has the potential to increase procedural efficiency and patient safety by improving interventional and surgical planning and reducing radiation exposure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are usually the source datasets to derive 3D printing. More recently, 3D echocardiography has been demonstrated to derive 3D-printed models. The integration of multiple imaging modalities for hybrid 3D printing has also been shown to create accurate printed heart models, which may prove to be beneficial for interventional cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, and as an educational tool. Further advancements in the integration of different imaging modalities into a single platform for hybrid 3D printing and virtual 3D models will drive the future of personalized cardiac medicine. PMID:26465262

  8. Predictive Modeling of Drug Treatment in the Area of Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Wierling, Christoph; Kessler, Thomas; Lehrach, Hans; Lange, Bodo M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a growing body of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of cancer, treatment success rates in oncology are at best modest. Current approaches use statistical methods that fail to embrace the inherent and expansive complexity of the tumor/patient/drug interaction. Computational modeling, in particular mechanistic modeling, has the power to resolve this complexity. Using fundamental knowledge on the interactions occurring between the components of a complex biological system, large-scale in silico models with predictive capabilities can be generated. Here, we describe how mechanistic virtual patient models, based on systematic molecular characterization of patients and their diseases, have the potential to shift the theranostic paradigm for oncology, both in the fields of personalized medicine and targeted drug development. In particular, we highlight the mechanistic modeling platform ModCell™ for individualized prediction of patient responses to treatment, emphasizing modeling techniques and avenues of application. PMID:26692759

  9. A Personalized Medicine Approach for Asian Americans with the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2*2 Variant

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Eric R.; Zambelli, Vanessa O.; Small, Bryce A.; Ferreira, Julio C.B.; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Asian Americans are one of the fastest-growing populations in the United States. A relatively large subset of this population carries a unique loss-of-function point mutation in aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), ALDH2*2. Found in approximately 560 million people of East Asian descent, ALDH2*2 reduces enzymatic activity by approximately 60% to 80% in heterozygotes. Furthermore, this variant is associated with a higher risk for several diseases affecting many organ systems, including a particularly high incidence relative to the general population of esophageal cancer, myocardial infarction, and osteoporosis. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology associated with the ALDH2*2 variant, describe why this variant needs to be considered when selecting drug treatments, and suggest a personalized medicine approach for Asian American carriers of this variant. We also discuss future clinical and translational perspectives regarding ALDH2*2 research. PMID:25292432

  10. From animal models to human disease: a genetic approach for personalized medicine in ALS.

    PubMed

    Picher-Martel, Vincent; Valdmanis, Paul N; Gould, Peter V; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Dupré, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most frequent motor neuron disease in adults. Classical ALS is characterized by the death of upper and lower motor neurons leading to progressive paralysis. Approximately 10 % of ALS patients have familial form of the disease. Numerous different gene mutations have been found in familial cases of ALS, such as mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), fused in sarcoma (FUS), C9ORF72, ubiquilin-2 (UBQLN2), optineurin (OPTN) and others. Multiple animal models were generated to mimic the disease and to test future treatments. However, no animal model fully replicates the spectrum of phenotypes in the human disease and it is difficult to assess how a therapeutic effect in disease models can predict efficacy in humans. Importantly, the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of ALS leads to a variety of responses to similar treatment regimens. From this has emerged the concept of personalized medicine (PM), which is a medical scheme that combines study of genetic, environmental and clinical diagnostic testing, including biomarkers, to individualized patient care. In this perspective, we used subgroups of specific ALS-linked gene mutations to go through existing animal models and to provide a comprehensive profile of the differences and similarities between animal models of disease and human disease. Finally, we reviewed application of biomarkers and gene therapies relevant in personalized medicine approach. For instance, this includes viral delivering of antisense oligonucleotide and small interfering RNA in SOD1, TDP-43 and C9orf72 mice models. Promising gene therapies raised possibilities for treating differently the major mutations in familial ALS cases. PMID:27400686

  11. Personalized Medicine: how to Switch from the Concept to the Integration into the Clinical Development Plan to Obtain Marketing Authorization.

    PubMed

    Becquemont, Laurent; Bordet, Régis; Cellier, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges of the coming years is to personalize medicine in order to provide each patient with an individualized treatment plan. The three objectives of personalized medicine are to refine diagnosis, rationalize treatment and engage patients in a preventive approach. Personalization can be characterized by various descriptors whether related to the field, biology, imaging, type of lesion of the entity to be treated, comorbidity factors, coprescriptions or the environment As part of personalized medicine focused on biological markers including genetics or genomics, the integration of the clinical development plan to obtain marketing authorization may be segmented in 3 stages with a known descriptor identified before clinical development, a known descriptor discovered during clinical development or a known descriptor known after clinical development. For each stage, it is important to clearly define the technical optimization elements, to specify the expectations and objectives, to examine the methodological aspects of each clinical development phase and finally to consider the fast changing regulatory requirements in view of the few registered therapeutics complying with the definition of personalized medicine as well as the significant technological breakthroughs according to the screened and selected biomarkers. These considerations should be integrated in view of the time required for clinical development from early phase to MA, i.e. more than 10 years. Moreover, business models related to the economic environment should be taken into account when deciding whether or not to retain a biomarker allowing the selection of target populations in a general population. PMID:23110835

  12. Gene Variant Databases and Sharing: Creating a Global Genomic Variant Database for Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Bean, Lora J H; Hegde, Madhuri R

    2016-06-01

    Revolutionary changes in sequencing technology and the desire to develop therapeutics for rare diseases have led to the generation of an enormous amount of genomic data in the last 5 years. Large-scale sequencing done in both research and diagnostic laboratories has linked many new genes to rare diseases, but has also generated a number of variants that we cannot interpret today. It is clear that we remain a long way from a complete understanding of the genomic variation in the human genome and its association with human health and disease. Recent studies identified susceptibility markers to infectious diseases and also the contribution of rare variants to complex diseases in different populations. The sequencing revolution has also led to the creation of a large number of databases that act as "keepers" of data, and in many cases give an interpretation of the effect of the variant. This interpretation is based on reports in the literature, prediction models, and in some cases is accompanied by functional evidence. As we move toward the practice of genomic medicine, and consider its place in "personalized medicine," it is time to ask ourselves how we can aggregate this wealth of data into a single database for multiple users with different goals. PMID:26931283

  13. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by persons with HIV infection in Europe.

    PubMed

    Colebunders, R; Dreezen, C; Florence, E; Pelgrom, Y; Schrooten, W

    2003-10-01

    Between June 1996-September 1997 and December 1998-December 1999, two surveys using an anonymous questionnaire were carried out in Europe among persons living with HIV infection. The questionnaire included questions on use of antiretrovirals, complementary or alternative medicines. Vitamins/minerals were taken by 528 (58%) of the 1996-97 participants, compared to 326 (63%) of the 1998-99 participants (P =0.06). Homeopathy was taken by respectively 176 (21%) and 55 (14%) (P =0.003) participants and herbal products respectively by 213 (25%) and 77 (20%) (P =0.06). In multiple regression analysis a longer time since HIV diagnosis, having a higher education level and having a lower CD(+) lymphocyte count were associated with the use of homeopathy. A longer time since HIV diagnosis and a more advanced stage of the disease were associated with the use of herbal products. The study shows that despite the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy many people with HIV infection still take complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:14596770

  14. Electrodeless electro-hydrodynamic printing of nano-suspensions for personalized medicines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elele, Ezinwa; Shen, Yueyang; Boppana, Rajyalakshmi; Afolabi, Afolawemi; Bilgili, Ecevit A.; Khusid, Boris

    2012-11-01

    Drop-on-demand (DOD) dosing is a promising strategy for manufacturing of personalized medicines. However, current DOD methods developed for chemically and thermally stable, low-viscosity inks are of limited use for pharmaceuticals due to fundamentally different functional requirements. To overcome their deficiency, we developed an electro-hydrodynamic (EHD) DOD method (Appl Phys Lett 97, 233501, 2010) that operates on fluids of up to 30 Pas over a wide range of droplet sizes, does not require direct contact of a fluid with electrodes and provides a precise control over the droplet volume. As most drugs are poorly water soluble, the use of nanoparticles dispersed in water is a promising method for enhancing the drug dissolution rate and bioavailability. The work demonstrates the EHD DOD ability to print aqueous suspensions of drug nanoparticles on highly-porous polymer films. We present a scaling analysis that captures the essential physics of drop evolution. These results show that EHD DOD offers a powerful tool for the evolving field of pharmaceutical technologies for tailoring medicines to individual patient's needs by printing a vast array of predefined amounts of therapeutics arranged in a specific pattern on a porous film. The work was supported by NSF Engineering Research Center on Structured Organic Particulate Systems.

  15. Integrating Personalized Medicine in the Canadian Environment: Efforts Facilitating Oncology Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Syme, Rachel; Carleton, Bruce; Leyens, Lada; Richer, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a rapid evolution of clinical practices based on the introduction of patient stratification and molecular diagnosis that is likely to improve health outcomes. Building on a strong research base, complemented by strong support from clinicians and health authorities, the oncology field is at the forefront of this evolution. Yet, clinical research is still facing many challenges that need to be addressed in order to conduct necessary studies and effectively translate medical breakthroughs based on personalized medicine into standards of care. Leveraging its universal health care system and on resources developed to support oncology clinical research, Canada is well positioned to join the international efforts deployed to address these challenges. Available resources include a broad range of structures and funding mechanisms, ranging from direct clinical trial support to post-marketing surveillance. Here, we propose a clinical model for the introduction of innovation for precision medicine in oncology that starts with patients' and clinicians' unmet needs to initiate a cycle of discovery, validation, translation and sustainability development. PMID:26565702

  16. Harnessing next-generation informatics for personalizing medicine: a report from AMIA's 2014 Health Policy Invitational Meeting.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Laura K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Denny, Joshua C; Freimuth, Robert R; Overby, Casey L; Shah, Nigam; Martin, Ross D; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2016-03-01

    The American Medical Informatics Association convened the 2014 Health Policy Invitational Meeting to develop recommendations for updates to current policies and to establish an informatics research agenda for personalizing medicine. In particular, the meeting focused on discussing informatics challenges related to personalizing care through the integration of genomic or other high-volume biomolecular data with data from clinical systems to make health care more efficient and effective. This report summarizes the findings (n = 6) and recommendations (n = 15) from the policy meeting, which were clustered into 3 broad areas: (1) policies governing data access for research and personalization of care; (2) policy and research needs for evolving data interpretation and knowledge representation; and (3) policy and research needs to ensure data integrity and preservation. The meeting outcome underscored the need to address a number of important policy and technical considerations in order to realize the potential of personalized or precision medicine in actual clinical contexts. PMID:26911808

  17. Personalized Medicine Across Disciplines and without Borders. Vural Özdemir speaks to Hannah Wilson, Commissioning Editor

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Vural

    2015-01-01

    Vural Özdemir began his career as a medical doctor in Turkey in 1990, as a scientist at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (ON, Canada), where he obtained his MSc and PhD in clinical pharmacology (1998), and subsequently completed a 4-year postdoctoral fellowship in personalized medicine with the late Werner Kalow, a founding pioneer in the field of pharmacogenetics. Özdemir contributed to the conception and development of the repeated drug administration (RDA) method as a novel way of measuring pharmacological heritability, pharmacogenetics of psychiatric drugs and studying the clinical role of CYP2D6 genetic variations for endogenous neurotransmitter metabolism in the human brain. Recognizing that scientific knowledge is a product of both technology and social systems that often remain unaccounted for (e.g., human values, distribution of power and human agency, immigration, racial disparities, socioeconomic class and equity), Özdemir discovered the literature in the field of science and technology studies, a rich scholarly enquiry that asks fundamental questions and challenges assumptions regarding the backstage of technoscience, situates technology within its political context and makes hitherto unseen connections that frame science in ways that enable robust, responsible and sustainable innovation. From 2008 to 2012, Özdemir was awarded a mid-career “science and society” fellowship in order to retool as independent faculty and senior scientist in science and technology studies (STS), conducting research on research and examining his own trade – pharmacogenetics science – as an insider on the outside. Recently, Özdemir was awarded senior career support from the Scientific and Tehnological Research Council of Turkey, is an Associate Professor of both Communications and Human Genetics at the Faculty of Communications and serves as an advisor to the Rector for International Technology and Innovation Policy, Gaziantep University in Turkey

  18. Personalized Medicine in Ophthalmology: From Pharmacogenetic Biomarkers to Therapeutic and Dosage Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Frank S.; Kuo, Jane Z.; Wu, Wei-Chi; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Taylor, Brian L.; Grody, Wayne W.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Lai, Chi-Chun; Wong, Tien Y.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid progress in genomics and nanotechnology continue to advance our approach to patient care, from diagnosis and prognosis, to targeting and personalization of therapeutics. However, the clinical application of molecular diagnostics in ophthalmology has been limited even though there have been demonstrations of disease risk and pharmacogenetic associations. There is a high clinical need for therapeutic personalization and dosage optimization in ophthalmology and may be the focus of individualized medicine in this specialty. In several retinal conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic macular edema, retinal vein occlusion and pre-threshold retinopathy of prematurity, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapeutics have resulted in enhanced outcomes. In glaucoma, recent advances in cytoskeletal agents and prostaglandin molecules that affect outflow and remodel the trabecular meshwork have demonstrated improved intraocular pressure control. Application of recent developments in nanoemulsion and polymeric micelle for targeted delivery and drug release are models of dosage optimization, increasing efficacy and improving outcomes in these major eye diseases. PMID:24624293

  19. Integration of metabolomics and proteomics in multiple sclerosis: From biomarkers discovery to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Del Boccio, Piero; Rossi, Claudia; di Ioia, Maria; Cicalini, Ilaria; Sacchetta, Paolo; Pieragostino, Damiana

    2016-04-01

    Personalized medicine is the science of individualized prevention and therapy. In the last decade, advances in high-throughput approaches allowed the development of proteomic and metabolomic studies in evaluating the association of genetic and phenotypic variability with disease sensitivity and analgesic response. These considerations have more value in case of multiple sclerosis (MuS), a multifactorial disease with high heterogeneity in clinical course and treatment response. In this review, we reported and updated about proteomic and metabolomic studies for the research of new candidate biomarkers in MuS, and difficulties in their clinical applications. We focused especially on the description of both "omics" approaches that, once integrated, may synergically describe pathophysiology conditions. To prove this assumption, we rebuilt interaction between proteins and metabolites described in the literature as potential biomarkers for MuS, and a pathway analysis of these molecules was performed. The result of such speculation demonstrated a strong convergence of proteomic and metabolomic results in this field, showing also a poorness of available tools for incorporating "omics" approaches. In conclusion, the integration of Metabolomics and Proteomics may allow a more complete characterization of such a heterogeneous disease, providing further insights into personalized healthcare. PMID:27061322

  20. Paving the way to personalized medicine: production of some theragnostic radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava S. C.

    2011-06-06

    This paper introduces a relatively novel paradigm that involves specific individual radionuclides or radionuclide pairs that have emissions that allow pre-therapy low-dose imaging plus higher-dose therapy in the same patient. We have made an attempt to sort out and organize a number of such theragnostic radionuclides and radionuclide pairs that may potentially bring us closer to the age-long dream of personalized medicine for performing tailored low-dose molecular imaging (SPECT/CT or PET/CT) to provide the necessary pre-therapy information on biodistribution, dosimetry, the limiting or critical organ or tissue, and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), etc. If the imaging results then warrant it, it would be possible to perform higher-dose targeted molecular therapy in the same patient with the same radiopharmaceutical. A major problem that remains yet to be fully resolved is the lack of availability, in sufficient quantities, of a majority of the best candidate theragnostic radionuclides in a no-carrier-added (NCA) form. A brief description of the recently developed new or modified methods at BNL for the production of four theragnostic radionuclides, whose nuclear, physical, and chemical characteristics seem to show great promise for personalized cancer therapy are described.

  1. Translating personalized medicine using new genetic technologies in clinical practice: the ethical issues

    PubMed Central

    Ormond, Kelly E; Cho, Mildred K

    2014-01-01

    The integration of new genetic technologies into clinical practice holds great promise for the personalization of medical care, particularly the use of large-scale DNA sequencing for genome-wide genetic testing. However, these technologies also yield unprecedented amounts of information whose clinical implications are not fully understood, and we are still developing technical standards for measuring sequence accuracy. These technical and clinical challenges raise ethical issues that are similar to but qualitatively different from those that we are accustomed to dealing with for traditional medical genetics. The sheer amount of information afforded by genome sequencing requires rethinking of how to implement core ethical principles including, but not limited to: informed consent, privacy and data ownership and sharing, technology regulation, issues of access, particularly as new technology is integrated into clinical practice, and issues of potential stigma and impact on perceptions of disability. In this article, we will review the issues of informed consent, privacy, data ownership and technology regulation as they relate to the emerging field of personalized medicine and genomics. PMID:25221608

  2. The Terry Fox Research Institute’s Ontario Dialogue: how will personalized medicine change health care?

    PubMed Central

    Curwin, K.; Paige, C.J.; Sutcliffe, S.

    2011-01-01

    This is the final instalment in a series of three articles by the Terry Fox Research Institute about its pan-Canadian dialogue series, Cancer: Let’s Get Personal, a public research and outreach project undertaken in 2010. The dialogues served to launch a national and continuing conversation on personalized medicine with the medical and scientific communities and the public, including cancer survivors, patients, and caregivers. Participants at the Ontario dialogue, held in Toronto, October 18, 2010, discussed the challenges that Canadians and the health care system face as they move forward on a pathway created by advanced science and technology that will phenomenally transform cancer care and treatment. The one-size-fits-all approach to treating cancer patients is being rapidly eclipsed by an approach that treats patients and their tumours as individually as possible. As a result, a paradigm shift is occurring both in the laboratory and in the clinic, creating new approaches to conducting research and delivering treatment and care that place each and every patient—and tumour—at the centre of treatment. New approaches and practices in health care are necessary to ensure successful uptake and implementation of these advances for the benefit of all Canadians. Participating partners and supporters of the Ontario dialogue were the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and the University Health Network.

  3. Functional maintenance of differentiated embryoid bodies in microfluidic systems: a platform for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Guven, Sinan; Lindsey, Jennifer S; Poudel, Ishwari; Chinthala, Sireesha; Nickerson, Michael D; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Gurkan, Umut A; Anchan, Raymond M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-03-01

    Hormone replacement therapies have become important for treating diseases such as premature ovarian failure or menopausal complications. The clinical use of bioidentical hormones might significantly reduce some of the potential risks reportedly associated with the use of synthetic hormones. In the present study, we demonstrate the utility and advantage of a microfluidic chip culture system to enhance the development of personalized, on-demand, treatment modules using embryoid bodies (EBs). Functional EBs cultured on microfluidic chips represent a platform for personalized, patient-specific treatment cassettes that can be cryopreserved until required for treatment. We assessed the viability, differentiation, and functionality of EBs cultured and cryopreserved in this system. During extended microfluidic culture, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and anti-müllerian hormone levels were measured, and the expression of differentiated steroidogenic cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry assay for the ovarian tissue markers anti-müllerian hormone receptor type II, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, and inhibin β-A and the estrogen biosynthesis enzyme aromatase. Our studies showed that under microfluidic conditions, differentiated steroidogenic EBs continued to secrete estradiol and progesterone at physiologically relevant concentrations (30-120 pg/ml and 150-450 pg/ml, respectively) for up to 21 days. Collectively, we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using a microfluidic chip system with continuous flow for the differentiation and extended culture of functional steroidogenic stem cell-derived EBs, the differentiation of EBs into cells expressing ovarian antigens in a microfluidic system, and the ability to cryopreserve this system with restoration of growth and functionality on thawing. These results present a platform for the development of a new therapeutic system for personalized medicine. PMID:25666845

  4. Functional Maintenance of Differentiated Embryoid Bodies in Microfluidic Systems: A Platform for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Sinan; Lindsey, Jennifer S.; Poudel, Ishwari; Chinthala, Sireesha; Nickerson, Michael D.; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2015-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapies have become important for treating diseases such as premature ovarian failure or menopausal complications. The clinical use of bioidentical hormones might significantly reduce some of the potential risks reportedly associated with the use of synthetic hormones. In the present study, we demonstrate the utility and advantage of a microfluidic chip culture system to enhance the development of personalized, on-demand, treatment modules using embryoid bodies (EBs). Functional EBs cultured on microfluidic chips represent a platform for personalized, patient-specific treatment cassettes that can be cryopreserved until required for treatment. We assessed the viability, differentiation, and functionality of EBs cultured and cryopreserved in this system. During extended microfluidic culture, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and anti-müllerian hormone levels were measured, and the expression of differentiated steroidogenic cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry assay for the ovarian tissue markers anti-müllerian hormone receptor type II, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, and inhibin β-A and the estrogen biosynthesis enzyme aromatase. Our studies showed that under microfluidic conditions, differentiated steroidogenic EBs continued to secrete estradiol and progesterone at physiologically relevant concentrations (30–120 pg/ml and 150–450 pg/ml, respectively) for up to 21 days. Collectively, we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using a microfluidic chip system with continuous flow for the differentiation and extended culture of functional steroidogenic stem cell-derived EBs, the differentiation of EBs into cells expressing ovarian antigens in a microfluidic system, and the ability to cryopreserve this system with restoration of growth and functionality on thawing. These results present a platform for the development of a new therapeutic system for personalized medicine. PMID:25666845

  5. Personalized medicine and genomics: challenges and opportunities in assessing effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and future research priorities.

    PubMed

    Conti, Rena; Veenstra, David L; Armstrong, Katrina; Lesko, Lawrence J; Grosse, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine is health care that tailors interventions to individual variation in risk and treatment response. Although medicine has long strived to achieve this goal, advances in genomics promise to facilitate this process. Relevant to present-day practice is the use of genomic information to classify individuals according to disease susceptibility or expected responsiveness to a pharmacologic treatment and to provide targeted interventions. A symposium at the annual meeting of the Society for Medical Decision Making on 23 October 2007 highlighted the challenges and opportunities posed in translating advances in molecular medicine into clinical practice. A panel of US experts in medical practice, regulatory policy, technology assessment, and the financing and organization of medical innovation was asked to discuss the current state of practice and research on personalized medicine as it relates to their own field. This article reports on the issues raised, discusses potential approaches to meet these challenges, and proposes directions for future work. The case of genetic testing to inform dosing with warfarin, an anticoagulant, is used to illustrate differing perspectives on evidence and decision making for personalized medicine. PMID:20086232

  6. Strategic aspects of higher education reform to cultivate specialists in diagnostic and biopharma industry as applicable to Predictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine as the Medicine of the Future.

    PubMed

    Studneva, М; Mandrik, M; Song, Sh; Tretyak, E; Krasnyuk, I; Yamada, Y; Tukavin, A; Ansari, A; Kozlov, I; Reading, C; Ma, Y; Krapfenbauer, K; Svistunov, A; Suchkov, S

    2015-01-01

    Predictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine as the Medicine of the Future represents an innovative model for advanced healthcare and robust platform for relevant industrial branches for diagnostics and pharmaceutics. However, rapid market penetration of new medicines and technologies demands the implementation of reforms not only in the spheres of biopharmaceutical industries and healthcare, but also in education. Therefore, the problem of the fundamental, modern preparation of specialists in bioengineering and affiliated fields is becoming particularly urgent, and it requires significant revision of training programs of higher education practice into current medical universities. Modernization and integration of widely accepted medical and teaching standards require consolidation of both the natural sciences and medical sciences that may become the conceptual basis for a university medical education. The main goal of this training is not simply to achieve advanced training and expansion of technological skills, but to provide development of novel multifaceted approaches to build academic schools for future generations. PMID:26379805

  7. Designing Laboratory Exercises for the Undergraduate Molecular Biology/Biochemistry Student: Techniques and Ethical Implications Involved in Personalized Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinlander, Kenneth M.; Hall, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized medicine refers to medical care that involves genetically screening patients for their likelihood to develop various disorders. Commercial genome screening only involves identifying a consumer's genotype for a few single nucleotide polymorphisms. A phenotype (such as an illness) is greatly influenced by three factors: genes, gene…

  8. A personal reflection on social media in medicine: I stand, no wiser than before.

    PubMed

    Weiner, John

    2015-04-01

    Social media has enabled information, communication and reach for health professionals. There are clear benefits to patients and consumers when health information is broadcast. But there are unanswered questions on professionalism, education, and the complex mentoring relationship between doctor and student. This personal perspective raises a number of questions: What is online medical professionalism? Can online medical professionalism be taught? Can online medical professionalism be enforced? Is an online presence necessary to achieve the highest level of clinical excellence? Is there evidence that social media is superior to traditional methods of teaching in medical education? Does social media encourage multitasking and impairment of the learning process? Are there downsides to the perfunctory laconic nature of social media? Does social media waste time that is better spent attaining clinical skills? PMID:25847332

  9. Multiple sclerosis: clinical profiling and data collection as prerequisite for personalized medicine approach.

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Kern, Raimar; Thomas, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a highly heterogeneous disease as it can present inter-individually as well as intra-individually, with different disease phenotypes emerging during different stages in the long-term disease course. In addition to advanced immunological, genetic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profiling of the patient, the clinical profiling of MS patients needs to be widely implemented in clinical practice and improved by including a greater range of relevant parameters as patient-reported outcomes. It is crucial to implement a high standard of clinical characterization of individual patients as this is key to effective long-term observation and evaluation.To generate reliable real-world data, individual clinical data should be collected in specific MS registries and/or using intelligent software instruments as the Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System 3D. Computational analysis of biological processes will play a key role in the transition to personalized MS treatment. Major breakthroughs in the areas of bioinformatics and computational systems biology will be required to process this complex information to enable improved personalization of treatment for MS patients. PMID:27484848

  10. Looking for a Person-Centered Medicine: Non Conventional Medicine in the Conventional European and Italian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Iseppato, Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    In Italy, the use of non conventional medicines (NCMs) is spreading among people as in the rest of Europe. Sales of alternative remedies are growing, and likewise the number of medical doctors (MDs) who practise NCM/complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, in Italy as in other countries of the European Union, at the present time the juridical/legal status of NCM/CAM is not well established, mainly due to the lack of any national law regulating NCM/CAM professional training, practice and public supply and the absence of government-promoted scientific research in this field. This is an obstacle to safeguarding the patient's interests and freedom of choice, especially now that dissatisfaction with biomedicine is inclining more and more people to look for a holistic and patient-centered form of medicine. PMID:19505973

  11. Culture and Drug Profiling of Patient Derived Malignant Pleural Effusions for Personalized Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pietilae, Elina; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Baschiera, Betty; Arabi, Leila; Lorber, Thomas; Oeggerli, Martin; Savic, Spasenija; Obermann, Ellen; Singer, Thomas; Rothschild, Sacha I.; Zippelius, Alfred; Roth, Adrian B.; Bubendorf, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of patients’ own cancer cells for in vitro selection of the most promising treatment is an attractive concept in personalized medicine. Human carcinoma cells from malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) are suited for this purpose since they have already adapted to the liquid environment in the patient and do not depend on a stromal cell compartment. Aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach for the in-vitro culture of MPEs to analyze the effect of chemotherapeutic as well as targeted drugs. Methods MPEs from patients with solid tumors were selected for this study. After morphological and molecular characterization, they were cultured in medium supplemented with patient-derived sterile-filtered effusion supernatant. Growth characteristics were monitored in real-time using the xCELLigence system. MPEs were treated with a targeted therapeutic (erlotinib) according to the mutational status or chemotherapeutics based on the recommendation of the oncologists. Results We have established a robust system for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro. The use of an antibody based magnetic cell separation system for epithelial cells before culture allowed treatment of effusions with only moderate tumor cell proportion. Experiments using drugs and drug-combinations revealed dose-dependent and specific growth inhibitory effects of targeted drugs. Conclusions We developed a new approach for the ex-vivo culture of MPEs and the application of drug tests in-vitro using real-time measuring of cell growth, which precisely reproduced the effect of clinically established treatments by standard chemotherapy and targeted drugs. This sets the stage for future studies testing agents against specific targets from genomic profiling of metastatic tumor cells and multiple drug-combinations in a personalized manner. PMID:27548442

  12. Towards Structural Systems Pharmacology to Study Complex Diseases and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lei; Ge, Xiaoxia; Tan, Hepan; Xie, Li; Zhang, Yinliang; Hart, Thomas; Yang, Xiaowei; Bourne, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), whole genome sequencing, and high-throughput omics techniques have generated vast amounts of genotypic and molecular phenotypic data. However, these data have not yet been fully explored to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of drug discovery, which continues along a one-drug-one-target-one-disease paradigm. As a partial consequence, both the cost to launch a new drug and the attrition rate are increasing. Systems pharmacology and pharmacogenomics are emerging to exploit the available data and potentially reverse this trend, but, as we argue here, more is needed. To understand the impact of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors on drug action, we must study the structural energetics and dynamics of molecular interactions in the context of the whole human genome and interactome. Such an approach requires an integrative modeling framework for drug action that leverages advances in data-driven statistical modeling and mechanism-based multiscale modeling and transforms heterogeneous data from GWAS, high-throughput sequencing, structural genomics, functional genomics, and chemical genomics into unified knowledge. This is not a small task, but, as reviewed here, progress is being made towards the final goal of personalized medicines for the treatment of complex diseases. PMID:24830652

  13. [Application of molecular diagnostic techniques in precision medicine of personalized treatment for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Fu, Ji; Lin, Guole

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine is to customize the treatment options for individual patient based on the personal genome information. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancer worldwide. Molecular heterogeneity of CRC, which includes the MSI phenotype, hypermutation phenotype, and their relationship with clinical preferences, is believed to be one of the main factors responsible for the considerable variability in treatment response. The development of powerful next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies allows us to further understand the biological behavior of colorectal cancer, and to analyze the prognosis and chemotherapeutic drug reactions by molecular diagnostic techniques, which can guide the clinical treatment. This paper will introduce the new findings in this field. Meanwhile we integrate the new progress of key pathways including EGFR, RAS, PI3K/AKT and VEGF, and the experience in selective patients through associated molecular diagnostic screening who gain better efficacy after target therapy. The technique for detecting circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is introduced here as well, which can identify patients with high risk for recurrence, and demonstrate the risk of chemotherapy resistance. Mechanism of tumor drug resistance may be revealed by dynamic observation of gene alteration during treatment. PMID:26797832

  14. Genetic determinants in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and their influence on global personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Michmerhuizen, Nicole L.; Birkeland, Andrew C.; Bradford, Carol R.; Brenner, J. Chad

    2016-01-01

    While sequencing studies have provided an improved understanding of the genetic landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), there remains a significant lack of genetic data derived from non-Caucasian cohorts. Additionally, there is wide variation in HNSCC incidence and mortality worldwide both between and within various geographic regions. These epidemiologic differences are in part accounted for by varying exposure to environmental risk factors such as tobacco, alcohol, high risk human papilloma viruses and betel quid. However, inherent genetic factors may also play an important role in this variability. As limited sequencing data is available for many populations, the involvement of unique genetic factors in HNSCC pathogenesis from epidemiologically diverse groups is unknown. Here, we review current knowledge about the epidemiologic, environmental, and genetic variation in HNSCC cohorts globally and discuss future studies necessary to further our understanding of these differences. Long-term, a more complete understanding of the genetic drivers found in diverse HNSCC cohorts may help the development of personalized medicine protocols for patients with rare or complex genetic events. PMID:27551333

  15. The many different faces of major depression: it is time for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Korte, S Mechiel; Prins, Jolanda; Krajnc, Anne M; Hendriksen, Hendrikus; Oosting, Ronald S; Westphal, Koen G; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Olivier, Berend

    2015-04-15

    First line antidepressants are the so-called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), e.g. fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine and escitalopram. Unfortunately, these drugs mostly do not provide full symptom relief and have a slow onset of action. Therefore other antidepressants are also being prescribed that inhibit the reuptake of norepinephrine (e.g. reboxetine, desipramine) or the reuptake of both serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (e.g. venlafaxine, duloxetine, milnacipran). Nevertheless, many patients encounter residual symptoms such as impaired pleasure, impaired motivation, and lack of energy. It is hypothesized that an impaired brain reward system may underlie these residual symptoms. In agreement, there is some evidence that reuptake inhibitors of both norepinephrine and dopamine (e.g. methylphenidate, bupropion, nomifensine) affect these residual symptoms. In the pipeline are new drugs that block all three monoamine transporters for the reuptake of 5-HT, norepinephrine and dopamine, the so-called triple reuptake inhibitors (TRI). The working mechanisms of the above-mentioned antidepressants are discussed, and it is speculated whether depressed patients with different symptoms, sometimes even opposite ones due to atypical or melancholic features, can be matched with the different drug treatments available. In other words, is personalized medicine for major depression an option in the near future? PMID:25592320

  16. Genetic determinants in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and their influence on global personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Michmerhuizen, Nicole L; Birkeland, Andrew C; Bradford, Carol R; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-05-01

    While sequencing studies have provided an improved understanding of the genetic landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), there remains a significant lack of genetic data derived from non-Caucasian cohorts. Additionally, there is wide variation in HNSCC incidence and mortality worldwide both between and within various geographic regions. These epidemiologic differences are in part accounted for by varying exposure to environmental risk factors such as tobacco, alcohol, high risk human papilloma viruses and betel quid. However, inherent genetic factors may also play an important role in this variability. As limited sequencing data is available for many populations, the involvement of unique genetic factors in HNSCC pathogenesis from epidemiologically diverse groups is unknown. Here, we review current knowledge about the epidemiologic, environmental, and genetic variation in HNSCC cohorts globally and discuss future studies necessary to further our understanding of these differences. Long-term, a more complete understanding of the genetic drivers found in diverse HNSCC cohorts may help the development of personalized medicine protocols for patients with rare or complex genetic events. PMID:27551333

  17. Resiniferatoxin for Pain Treatment: An Interventional Approach to Personalized Pain Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Iadarola, Michael J.; Gonnella, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    This review examines existing preclinical and clinical studies related to resiniferatoxin (RTX) and its potential uses in pain treatment. Like capsaicin, RTX is a vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) agonist, only more potent. This increased potency confers both quantitative and qualitative advantages in terms of drug action on the TRPV1 containing nerve terminal, which result in an increased efficacy and a long duration of action. RTX can be delivered by a central route of administration through injection into the subarachnoid space around the lumbosacral spinal cord. It can also be administered peripherally into a region of skin or deep tissue where primary afferents nerves terminate, or directly into a nerve trunk or a dorsal root ganglion. The central route is currently being evaluated as a treatment for intractable pain in patients with advanced cancer. Peripheral administration offers the possibility to treat a wide diversity of pain problems because of the ability to bring the treatment to the site of the pain (the peripheral generator). While not all pain disorders are appropriate for RTX, tailoring treatment to an individual patient's needs via a selective and local intervention that chemically targets a specific population of nerve terminals provides a new capability for pain therapy and a simplified and effective approach to personalized pain medicine. PMID:26779292

  18. Personalized Medicine Approaches in Prostate Cancer Employing Patient Derived 3D Organoids and Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartucci, Monica; Ferrari, Anna C.; Kim, Isaac Yi; Ploss, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin; Sabaawy, Hatem E.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death in Western men. Despite its prevalence, PCa has proven very difficult to propagate in vitro. PCa represents a complex organ-like multicellular structure maintained by the dynamic interaction of tumoral cells with parenchymal stroma, endothelial and immune cells, and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The lack of PCa models that recapitulate this intricate system has hampered progress toward understanding disease progression and lackluster therapeutic responses. Tissue slices, monolayer cultures and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) fail to mimic the complexities of the PCa microenvironment or reproduce the diverse mechanisms of therapy resistance. Moreover, patient derived xenografts (PDXs) are expensive, time consuming, difficult to establish for prostate cancer, lack immune cell-tumor regulation, and often tumors undergo selective engraftments. Here, we describe an interdisciplinary approach using primary PCa and tumor initiating cells (TICs), three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering, genetic and morphometric profiling, and humanized mice to generate patient-derived organoids for examining personalized therapeutic responses in vitro and in mice co-engrafted with a human immune system (HIS), employing adaptive T-cell- and chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR) immunotherapy. The development of patient specific therapies targeting the vulnerabilities of cancer, when combined with antiproliferative and immunotherapy approaches could help to achieve the full transformative power of cancer precision medicine. PMID:27446916

  19. Personalized Medicine Approaches in Prostate Cancer Employing Patient Derived 3D Organoids and Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Bartucci, Monica; Ferrari, Anna C; Kim, Isaac Yi; Ploss, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death in Western men. Despite its prevalence, PCa has proven very difficult to propagate in vitro. PCa represents a complex organ-like multicellular structure maintained by the dynamic interaction of tumoral cells with parenchymal stroma, endothelial and immune cells, and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The lack of PCa models that recapitulate this intricate system has hampered progress toward understanding disease progression and lackluster therapeutic responses. Tissue slices, monolayer cultures and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) fail to mimic the complexities of the PCa microenvironment or reproduce the diverse mechanisms of therapy resistance. Moreover, patient derived xenografts (PDXs) are expensive, time consuming, difficult to establish for prostate cancer, lack immune cell-tumor regulation, and often tumors undergo selective engraftments. Here, we describe an interdisciplinary approach using primary PCa and tumor initiating cells (TICs), three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering, genetic and morphometric profiling, and humanized mice to generate patient-derived organoids for examining personalized therapeutic responses in vitro and in mice co-engrafted with a human immune system (HIS), employing adaptive T-cell- and chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR) immunotherapy. The development of patient specific therapies targeting the vulnerabilities of cancer, when combined with antiproliferative and immunotherapy approaches could help to achieve the full transformative power of cancer precision medicine. PMID:27446916

  20. Nanosuspensions as advanced printing ink for accurate dosing of poorly soluble drugs in personalized medicines.

    PubMed

    Pardeike, Jana; Strohmeier, Daniela M; Schrödl, Nina; Voura, Christine; Gruber, Michael; Khinast, Johannes G; Zimmer, Andreas

    2011-11-25

    Folic acid was used as a model drug to demonstrate the advantages of formulating poorly soluble drugs as nanosuspensions and their use in an inkjet-type printing technique to produce personalized medicines. 10% folic acid nanosuspensions stabilized with Tween 20, a stabilizer showing the best wetting potential for folic acid, were prepared via high pressure homogenization. The particle size of the folic acid nanosuspension was well below 5 μm being a prerequisite for inkjet type printing technique. A good reproducibility of the particle size of folic acid nanosuspension prepared via high pressure homogenization was found. As indicated by the zeta potential the formulation showed a good storage stability. High pressure homogenization had no influence on the crystalline state of folic acid. An increase in the saturation solubility by 53.7% was found reducing the particle size from the micrometer range to the nanometer range. The dissolution velocity of the folic acid nanosuspension was significantly enhanced compared to a folic acid suspension, i.e. after 5 min 78.6% of the folic acid was dissolved from the nanosuspension and only 6.2% from the suspension. Moreover, the printing of 10% folic acid nanosuspension could be successfully demonstrated. PMID:21889582

  1. Assessing value of innovative molecular diagnostic tests in the concept of predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Akhmetov, Ildar; Bubnov, Rostyslav V

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnostic tests drive the scientific and technological uplift in the field of predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine offering invaluable clinical and socioeconomic benefits to the key stakeholders. Although the results of diagnostic tests are immensely influential, molecular diagnostic tests (MDx) are still grudgingly reimbursed by payers and amount for less than 5 % of the overall healthcare costs. This paper aims at defining the value of molecular diagnostic test and outlining the most important components of "value" from miscellaneous assessment frameworks, which go beyond accuracy and feasibility and impact the clinical adoption, informing healthcare resource allocation decisions. The authors suggest that the industry should facilitate discussions with various stakeholders throughout the entire assessment process in order to arrive at a consensus about the depth of evidence required for positive marketing authorization or reimbursement decisions. In light of the evolving "value-based healthcare" delivery practices, it is also recommended to account for social and ethical parameters of value, since these are anticipated to become as critical for reimbursement decisions and test acceptance as economic and clinical criteria. PMID:26425215

  2. Integrating precision medicine in the study and clinical treatment of a severely mentally ill person

    PubMed Central

    O’Rawe, Jason A.; Fang, Han; Rynearson, Shawn; Robison, Reid; Kiruluta, Edward S.; Higgins, Gerald; Eilbeck, Karen; Reese, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    .Glu429Ala allele in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and the p.Asp7Asn allele in ChAT, encoding choline O-acetyltransferase, with both alleles having been shown to confer an elevated susceptibility to psychoses. We have found thousands of other variants in his genome, including pharmacogenetic and copy number variants. This information has been archived and offered to this person alongside the clinical sequencing data, so that he and others can re-analyze his genome for years to come. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the clinical neurosciences that integrates detailed neuropsychiatric phenotyping, deep brain stimulation for OCD and clinical-grade WGS with management of genetic results in the medical treatment of one person with severe mental illness. We offer this as an example of precision medicine in neuropsychiatry including brain-implantable devices and genomics-guided preventive health care. PMID:24109560

  3. Integrating precision medicine in the study and clinical treatment of a severely mentally ill person.

    PubMed

    O'Rawe, Jason A; Fang, Han; Rynearson, Shawn; Robison, Reid; Kiruluta, Edward S; Higgins, Gerald; Eilbeck, Karen; Reese, Martin G; Lyon, Gholson J

    2013-01-01

    .Glu429Ala allele in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and the p.Asp7Asn allele in ChAT, encoding choline O-acetyltransferase, with both alleles having been shown to confer an elevated susceptibility to psychoses. We have found thousands of other variants in his genome, including pharmacogenetic and copy number variants. This information has been archived and offered to this person alongside the clinical sequencing data, so that he and others can re-analyze his genome for years to come. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the clinical neurosciences that integrates detailed neuropsychiatric phenotyping, deep brain stimulation for OCD and clinical-grade WGS with management of genetic results in the medical treatment of one person with severe mental illness. We offer this as an example of precision medicine in neuropsychiatry including brain-implantable devices and genomics-guided preventive health care. PMID:24109560

  4. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  5. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... you get better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring ... can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with food or other medicines you may be taking. They ...

  6. Molecular and immunologic markers of kidney cancer-potential applications in predictive, preventive and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Mickley, Amanda; Kovaleva, Olga; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Gratchev, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Kidney cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies due to frequent late diagnosis (33 % or renal cell carcinoma are metastatic at diagnosis) and poor treatment options. There are two major subtypes of kidney cancer: renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and renal pelvis carcinoma. The risk factors for RCC, accounting for more than 90 % of all kidney cancers, are smoking, obesity, hypertension, misuse of pain medication, and some genetic diseases. The most common molecular markers of kidney cancer include mutations and epigenetic inactivation of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, genes of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, and carbonic anhydrase IX (CIAX). The role of epigenetic pathways, including DNA methylation and chromatin structure remodeling, was also demonstrated. Immunologic properties of RCC enable this type of tumor to escape immune response effectively. An important role in this process is played by tumor-associated macrophages that demonstrate mixed M1/M2 phenotype. In this review, we discuss molecular and cellular aspects for RCC development and current state of knowledge allowing personalized approaches for diagnostics and prognostic prediction of this disease. A set of macrophage markers is suggested for the analysis of the association of macrophage phenotype and disease prognosis. PMID:26500709

  7. Concepts of ‘personalization’ in personalized medicine: implications for economic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Wolf; Payne, Katherine; Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Manca, Andrea; Rochau, Ursula; Jahn, Beate; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Leidl, Reiner; Siebert, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Context This paper assesses if, and how, existing methods for economic evaluation are applicable to the evaluation of PM and if not, where extension to methods may be required. Method Structured workshop with a pre-defined group of experts (n=47), run using a modified nominal group technique. Workshop findings were recorded using extensive note taking and summarised using thematic data analysis. The workshop was complemented by structured literature searches. Results The key finding emerging from the workshop, using an economic perspective, was that two distinct, but linked, interpretations of the concept of PM exist (personalization by ‘physiology’ or ‘preferences’). These interpretations involve specific challenges for the design and conduct of economic evaluations. Existing evaluative (extra-welfarist) frameworks were generally considered appropriate for evaluating PM. When ‘personalization’ is viewed as using physiological biomarkers, challenges include: representing complex care pathways; representing spill-over effects; meeting data requirements such as evidence on heterogeneity; choosing appropriate time horizons for the value of further research in uncertainty analysis. When viewed as tailoring medicine to patient preferences, further work is needed regarding: revealed preferences, e.g. treatment (non)adherence; stated preferences, e.g. risk interpretation and attitude; consideration of heterogeneity in preferences; and the appropriate framework (welfarism vs. extra-welfarism) to incorporate non-health benefits. Conclusion Ideally, economic evaluations should take account of both interpretations of PM and consider physiology and preferences. It is important for decision makers to be cognizant of the issues involved with the economic evaluation of PM to appropriately interpret the evidence and target future research funding. PMID:25249200

  8. Population based allele frequencies of disease associated polymorphisms in the Personalized Medicine Research Project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a lack of knowledge regarding the frequency of disease associated polymorphisms in populations and population attributable risk for many populations remains unknown. Factors that could affect the association of the allele with disease, either positively or negatively, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, may not be possible to determine without population based allele frequencies. Here we used a panel of 51 polymorphisms previously associated with at least one disease and determined the allele frequencies within the entire Personalized Medicine Research Project population based cohort. We compared these allele frequencies to those in dbSNP and other data sources stratified by race. Differences in allele frequencies between self reported race, region of origin, and sex were determined. Results There were 19544 individuals who self reported a single racial category, 19027 or (97.4%) self reported white Caucasian, and 11205 (57.3%) individuals were female. Of the 11,208 (57%) individuals with an identifiable region of origin 8337 or (74.4%) were German. 41 polymorphisms were significantly different between self reported race at the 0.05 level. Stratification of our Caucasian population by self reported region of origin revealed 19 polymorphisms that were significantly different (p = 0.05) between individuals of different origins. Further stratification of the population by gender revealed few significant differences in allele frequencies between the genders. Conclusions This represents one of the largest population based allele frequency studies to date. Stratification by self reported race and region of origin revealed wide differences in allele frequencies not only by race but also by region of origin within a single racial group. We report allele frequencies for our Asian/Hmong and American Indian populations; these two minority groups are not typically selected for population allele frequency detection. Population wide allele frequencies are

  9. KNOWLEDGE DRIVEN BINNING AND PHEWAS ANALYSIS IN MARSHFIELD PERSONALIZED MEDICINE RESEARCH PROJECT USING BIOBIN*

    PubMed Central

    BASILE, ANNA O; WALLACE, JOHN R; PEISSIG, PEGGY; MCCARTY, CATHERINE A; BRILLIANT, MURRAY

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has presented an opportunity for rare variant discovery and association of these variants with disease. To address the challenges of rare variant analysis, multiple statistical methods have been developed for combining rare variants to increase statistical power for detecting associations. BioBin is an automated tool that expands on collapsing/binning methods by performing multi-level variant aggregation with a flexible, biologically informed binning strategy using an internal biorepository, the Library of Knowledge (LOKI). The databases within LOKI provide variant details, regional annotations and pathway interactions which can be used to generate bins of biologically-related variants, thereby increasing the power of any subsequent statistical test. In this study, we expand the framework of BioBin to incorporate statistical tests, including a dispersion-based test, SKAT, thereby providing the option of performing a unified collapsing and statistical rare variant analysis in one tool. Extensive simulation studies performed on gene-coding regions showed a Bin-KAT analysis to have greater power than BioBin-regression in all simulated conditions, including variants influencing the phenotype in the same direction, a scenario where burden tests often retain greater power. The use of Madsen-Browning variant weighting increased power in the burden analysis to that equitable with Bin-KAT; but overall Bin-KAT retained equivalent or higher power under all conditions. Bin-KAT was applied to a study of 82 pharmacogenes sequenced in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP). We looked for association of these genes with 9 different phenotypes extracted from the electronic health record. This study demonstrates that Bin-KAT is a powerful tool for the identification of genes harboring low frequency variants for complex phenotypes. PMID:26776191

  10. KNOWLEDGE DRIVEN BINNING AND PHEWAS ANALYSIS IN MARSHFIELD PERSONALIZED MEDICINE RESEARCH PROJECT USING BIOBIN.

    PubMed

    Basile, Anna O; Wallace, John R; Peissig, Peggy; McCarty, Catherine A; Brilliant, Murray; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has presented an opportunity for rare variant discovery and association of these variants with disease. To address the challenges of rare variant analysis, multiple statistical methods have been developed for combining rare variants to increase statistical power for detecting associations. BioBin is an automated tool that expands on collapsing/binning methods by performing multi-level variant aggregation with a flexible, biologically informed binning strategy using an internal biorepository, the Library of Knowledge (LOKI). The databases within LOKI provide variant details, regional annotations and pathway interactions which can be used to generate bins of biologically-related variants, thereby increasing the power of any subsequent statistical test. In this study, we expand the framework of BioBin to incorporate statistical tests, including a dispersion-based test, SKAT, thereby providing the option of performing a unified collapsing and statistical rare variant analysis in one tool. Extensive simulation studies performed on gene-coding regions showed a Bin-KAT analysis to have greater power than BioBin-regression in all simulated conditions, including variants influencing the phenotype in the same direction, a scenario where burden tests often retain greater power. The use of Madsen- Browning variant weighting increased power in the burden analysis to that equitable with Bin-KAT; but overall Bin-KAT retained equivalent or higher power under all conditions. Bin-KAT was applied to a study of 82 pharmacogenes sequenced in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP). We looked for association of these genes with 9 different phenotypes extracted from the electronic health record. This study demonstrates that Bin-KAT is a powerful tool for the identification of genes harboring low frequency variants for complex phenotypes. PMID:26776191

  11. From space medicine to preventive and personalized health care on earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongaro, Filippo

    2014-11-01

    The experience of human spaceflight has taught us that aging can be modulated, accelerated and decelerated. This is also confirmed by a number of experiments on animal models. However in order to be effective in managing aging and maintaining quality of life, a new approach needs to be adopted, one that many today call functional medicine or anti-aging medicine that in its essence is very similar to the medical approach provided to the astronauts by space agencies. Space medicine therefore can become a vehicle for the promotion of a new way of doing medicine on Earth.

  12. Effective visualization of integrated knowledge and data to enable informed decisions in drug development and translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Brynne, Lena; Bresell, Anders; Sjögren, Niclas

    2013-01-01

    Integrative understanding of preclinical and clinical data is imperative to enable informed decisions and reduce the attrition rate during drug development. The volume and variety of data generated during drug development have increased tremendously. A new information model and visualization tool was developed to effectively utilize all available data and current knowledge. The Knowledge Plot integrates preclinical, clinical, efficacy and safety data by adding two concepts: knowledge from the different disciplines and protein binding.Internal and public available data were gathered and processed to allow flexible and interactive visualizations. The exposure was expressed as the unbound concentration of the compound and the treatment effect was normalized and scaled by including expert opinion on what a biologically meaningful treatment effect would be.The Knowledge Plot has been applied both retrospectively and prospectively in project teams in a number of different therapeutic areas, resulting in closer collaboration between multiple disciplines discussing both preclinical and clinical data. The Plot allows head to head comparisons of compounds and was used to support Candidate Drug selections and differentiation from comparators and competitors, back translation of clinical data, understanding the predictability of preclinical models and assays, reviewing drift in primary endpoints over the years, and evaluate or benchmark compounds in due diligence comparing multiple attributes.The Knowledge Plot concept allows flexible integration and visualization of relevant data for interpretation in order to enable scientific and informed decision-making in various stages of drug development. The concept can be used for communication, decision-making, knowledge management, and as a forward and back translational tool, that will result in an improved understanding of the competitive edge for a particular project or disease area portfolio. In addition, it also builds up a

  13. Understanding the "black box" of a health-promotion program: Keys to enable health among older persons aging in the context of migration.

    PubMed

    Barenfeld, Emmelie; Gustafsson, Susanne; Wallin, Lars; Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve

    2015-01-01

    Although the need to make health services more accessible to persons who have migrated has been identified, knowledge about health-promotion programs (HPPs) from the perspective of older persons born abroad is lacking. This study explores the design experiences and content implemented in an adapted version of a group-based HPP developed in a researcher-community partnership. Fourteen persons aged 70-83 years or older who had migrated to Sweden from Finland or the Balkan Peninsula were included. A grounded theory approach guided the data collection and analysis. The findings showed how participants and personnel jointly helped raise awareness. The participants experienced three key processes that could open doors to awareness: enabling community, providing opportunities to understand and be understood, and confirming human values and abilities. Depending on how the HPP content and design are being shaped by the group, the key processes could both inhibit or encourage opening doors to awareness. Therefore, this study provides key insights into how to enable health by deepening the understanding of how the exchange of health-promoting messages is experienced to be facilitated or hindered. This study adds to the scientific knowledge base of how the design and content of HPP may support and recognize the capabilities of persons aging in the context of migration. PMID:26654636

  14. Understanding the “black box” of a health-promotion program: Keys to enable health among older persons aging in the context of migration

    PubMed Central

    Barenfeld, Emmelie; Gustafsson, Susanne; Wallin, Lars; Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve

    2015-01-01

    Although the need to make health services more accessible to persons who have migrated has been identified, knowledge about health-promotion programs (HPPs) from the perspective of older persons born abroad is lacking. This study explores the design experiences and content implemented in an adapted version of a group-based HPP developed in a researcher–community partnership. Fourteen persons aged 70–83 years or older who had migrated to Sweden from Finland or the Balkan Peninsula were included. A grounded theory approach guided the data collection and analysis. The findings showed how participants and personnel jointly helped raise awareness. The participants experienced three key processes that could open doors to awareness: enabling community, providing opportunities to understand and be understood, and confirming human values and abilities. Depending on how the HPP content and design are being shaped by the group, the key processes could both inhibit or encourage opening doors to awareness. Therefore, this study provides key insights into how to enable health by deepening the understanding of how the exchange of health-promoting messages is experienced to be facilitated or hindered. This study adds to the scientific knowledge base of how the design and content of HPP may support and recognize the capabilities of persons aging in the context of migration. PMID:26654636

  15. Personalized medicine in human space flight: using Omics based analyses to develop individualized countermeasures that enhance astronaut safety and performance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael A; Goodwin, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Space flight is one of the most extreme conditions encountered by humans. Advances in Omics methodologies (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) have revealed that unique differences exist between individuals. These differences can be amplified in extreme conditions, such as space flight. A better understanding of individual differences may allow us to develop personalized countermeasure packages that optimize the safety and performance of each astronaut. In this review, we explore the role of "Omics" in advancing our ability to: (1) more thoroughly describe the biological response of humans in space; (2) describe molecular attributes of individual astronauts that alter the risk profile prior to entering the space environment; (3) deploy Omics techniques in the development of personalized countermeasures; and (4) develop a comprehensive Omics-based assessment and countermeasure platform that will guide human space flight in the future. In this review, we advance the concept of personalized medicine in human space flight, with the goal of enhancing astronaut safety and performance. Because the field is vast, we explore selected examples where biochemical individuality might significantly impact countermeasure development. These include gene and small molecule variants associated with: (1) metabolism of therapeutic drugs used in space; (2) one carbon metabolism and DNA stability; (3) iron metabolism, oxidative stress and damage, and DNA stability; and (4) essential input (Mg and Zn) effects on DNA repair. From these examples, we advance the case that widespread Omics profiling should serve as the foundation for aerospace medicine and research, explore methodological considerations to advance the field, and suggest why personalized medicine may become the standard of care for humans in space. PMID:24273472

  16. Personalized comprehensive molecular profiling of high risk osteosarcoma: Implications and limitations for precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Wagner, Michael J.; McGuire, Mary F.; Sarwari, Nawid M.; Devarajan, Eswaran; Lewis, Valerae O.; Westin, Shanon; Kato, Shumei; Brown, Robert E.; Anderson, Pete

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite advances in molecular medicine over recent decades, there has been little advancement in the treatment of osteosarcoma. We performed comprehensive molecular profiling in two cases of metastatic and chemotherapy-refractory osteosarcoma to guide molecularly targeted therapy. Patients and Methods Hybridization capture of >300 cancer-related genes plus introns from 28 genes often rearranged or altered in cancer was applied to >50 ng of DNA extracted from tumor samples from two patients with recurrent, metastatic osteosarcoma. The DNA from each sample was sequenced to high, uniform coverage. Immunohistochemical probes and morphoproteomics analysis were performed, in addition to fluorescence in situ hybridization. All analyses were performed in CLIA-certified laboratories. Molecularly targeted therapy based on the resulting profiles was offered to the patients. Biomedical analytics were performed using QIAGEN's Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis. Results In Patient #1, comprehensive next-generation exome sequencing showed MET amplification, PIK3CA mutation, CCNE1 amplification, and PTPRD mutation. Immunohistochemistry-based morphoproteomic analysis revealed c-Met expression [(p)-c-Met (Tyr1234/1235)] and activation of mTOR/AKT pathway [IGF-1R (Tyr1165/1166), p-mTOR [Ser2448], p-Akt (Ser473)] and expression of SPARC and COX2. Targeted therapy was administered to match the P1K3CA, c-MET, and SPARC and COX2 aberrations with sirolimus+ crizotinib and abraxane+ celecoxib. In Patient #2, aberrations included NF2 loss in exons 2–16, PDGFRα amplification, and TP53 mutation. This patient was enrolled on a clinical trial combining targeted agents temsirolimus, sorafenib and bevacizumab, to match NF2, PDGFRα and TP53 aberrations. Both the patients did not benefit from matched therapy. Conclusions Relapsed osteosarcoma is characterized by complex signaling and drug resistance pathways. Comprehensive molecular profiling holds great promise for tailoring personalized

  17. The Ocular Communicator: A Device to Enable Persons with Severe Physical Disabilities to Communicate Using Eye Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, James L.; Mercer, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    The article describes the "Ocular Communicator" and its use with a severely physically disabled 14-year-old male. The device is designed for persons who have minimal motor function and employs eye movements for the operation of a printer or computer keyboard. (Author/DB)

  18. A Computer-Aided Telephone System to Enable Five Persons with Alzheimer's Disease to Make Phone Calls Independently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perilli, Viviana; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Laporta, Dominga; Paparella, Adele; Caffo, Alessandro O.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta

    2013-01-01

    This study extended the assessment of a computer-aided telephone system to enable five patients with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease to make phone calls independently. The patients were divided into two groups and exposed to intervention according to a non-concurrent multiple baseline design across groups. All patients started with baseline in…

  19. Genetics, Genomics and Cancer Risk Assessment: State of the art and future directions in the era of personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; MacDonald, Deborah J.; Culver, Julie O.; Offit, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Scientific and technologic advances are revolutionizing our approach to genetic cancer risk assessment, cancer screening and prevention, and targeted therapy, fulfilling the promise of personalized medicine. In this monograph we review the evolution of scientific discovery in cancer genetics and genomics, and describe current approaches, benefits and barriers to the translation of this information to the practice of preventive medicine. Summaries of known hereditary cancer syndromes and highly penetrant genes are provided and contrasted with recently-discovered genomic variants associated with modest increases in cancer risk. We describe the scope of knowledge, tools, and expertise required for the translation of complex genetic and genomic test information into clinical practice. The challenges of genomic counseling include the need for genetics and genomics professional education and multidisciplinary team training, the need for evidence-based information regarding the clinical utility of testing for genomic variants, the potential dangers posed by premature marketing of first-generation genomic profiles, and the need for new clinical models to improve access to and responsible communication of complex disease-risk information. We conclude that given the experiences and lessons learned in the genetics era, the multidisciplinary model of genetic cancer risk assessment and management will serve as a solid foundation to support the integration of personalized genomic information into the practice of cancer medicine. PMID:21858794

  20. Public health concerns for anti-obesity medicines imported for personal use through the internet: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakanishi, Yoko; Yoshida, Naoko; Tsuboi, Hirohito; Kimura, Kazuko

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the circulation of anti-obesity medicines via the internet and their quality. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Internet pharmacies and pharmaceutical suppliers accessible from Japan. Participants Anti-obesity medicines were purchased using relevant keywords on Japanese Google search engine. Blogs and advertisement-only sites were excluded. Primary and secondary outcome measures The authenticity of the samples was investigated in collaboration with the manufacturers of the samples and medicine regulatory authorities. Quality of the samples was assessed by pharmacopoeial analyses using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results 82 samples were purchased from 36 internet sites. Approximately half of the sites did not mention a physical address, and 45% of the samples did not contain a package insert. A variety of custom declarations were made for the shipments of the samples: personal health items, supplement, medicines, general merchandise, tea and others. Among 82 samples, 52 samples were analysed to check their pharmacopoeial quality. Authenticity responses were received from only five of 20 manufacturing companies. According to the pharmacopoeial analyses and authenticity investigation, three of the samples were identified as counterfeits and did not contain any active ingredients. Two of these samples were confirmed as counterfeits by the manufacturer of the authentic products. The manufacturer of the other sample did not respond to our request for an authenticity check even after several communication attempts. These counterfeit cases have been reported at the rapid alert system of Western Pacific Region of the WHO. Conclusions Many counterfeit and unapproved anti-obesity medicines may be easily bypassing regulatory checks during shipping and are widely circulated through the internet. Regulatory authorities should take measures to prevent these medicines from entering countries to safeguard their citizens. PMID:22581794

  1. From Systems Understanding to Personalized Medicine: Lessons and Recommendations Based on a Multidisciplinary and Translational Analysis of COPD.

    PubMed

    Roca, Josep; Cano, Isaac; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Systems medicine, using and adapting methods and approaches as developed within systems biology, promises to be essential in ongoing efforts of realizing and implementing personalized medicine in clinical practice and research. Here we review and critically assess these opportunities and challenges using our work on COPD as a case study. We find that there are significant unresolved biomedical challenges in how to unravel complex multifactorial components in disease initiation and progression producing different clinical phenotypes. Yet, while such a systems understanding of COPD is necessary, there are other auxiliary challenges that need to be addressed in concert with a systems analysis of COPD. These include information and communication technology (ICT)-related issues such as data harmonization, systematic handling of knowledge, computational modeling, and importantly their translation and support of clinical practice. For example, clinical decision-support systems need a seamless integration with new models and knowledge as systems analysis of COPD continues to develop. Our experience with clinical implementation of systems medicine targeting COPD highlights the need for a change of management including design of appropriate business models and adoption of ICT providing and supporting organizational interoperability among professional teams across healthcare tiers, working around the patient. In conclusion, in our hands the scope and efforts of systems medicine need to concurrently consider these aspects of clinical implementation, which inherently drives the selection of the most relevant and urgent issues and methods that need further development in a systems analysis of disease. PMID:26677188

  2. It's Not About "Freudian Couches and Personality Changing Drugs": An Investigation Into Men's Mental Health Help-Seeking Enablers.

    PubMed

    Harding, Christine; Fox, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Enabling factors that influenced men to seek assistance for mental health concerns--a previous underresearched area--was the primary focus of this research. Past research spanning four decades has focused on men's barriers to mental health help-seeking with limited research positing social norms within men's peer groups and reciprocity as potential mental health help-seeking enablers. Using a qualitative design, nine men were interviewed to identify the positive factors they believed assisted their help-seeking decisions. Social norms, reciprocity, a significant other, and helpfulness of their general practitioner were domains identified in the analysis of participant narratives. The study revealed the participants' mental health and treatment illiteracy. Ignorance and misplaced stereotypes, initially acted as barriers to help-seeking, leading to denial of illness, impeding treatment, and perpetuating stigma. Sportsmen disclosing their mental health issues were identified as a positive influence for other men's help-seeking and assisted in the development of help-seeking as a social norm. The results of this study contribute to understanding the factors that enable men to seek mental health help. PMID:25237040

  3. Personal networks: a tool for gaining insight into the transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyrolean (Austrian) migrants in Australia, Brazil and Peru

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigations into knowledge about food and medicinal plants in a certain geographic area or within a specific group are an important element of ethnobotanical research. This knowledge is context specific and dynamic due to changing ecological, social and economic circumstances. Migration processes affect food habits and the knowledge and use of medicinal plants as a result of adaptations that have to be made to new surroundings and changing environments. This study analyses and compares the different dynamics in the transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyrolean migrants in Australia, Brazil and Peru. Methods A social network approach was used to collect data on personal networks of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyroleans who have migrated to Australia, Brazil and Peru and their descendants. A statistical analysis of the personal network maps and a qualitative analysis of the narratives were combined to provide insight into the process of transmitting knowledge about food and medicinal plants. Results 56 personal networks were identified in all (food: 30; medicinal plants: 26) across all the field sites studied here. In both sets of networks, the main source of knowledge is individual people (food: 71%; medicinal plants: 68%). The other sources mentioned are print and audiovisual media, organisations and institutions. Personal networks of food knowledge are larger than personal networks of medicinal plant knowledge in all areas of investigation. Relatives play a major role as transmitters of knowledge in both domains. Conclusions Human sources, especially relatives, play an important role in knowledge transmission in both domains. Reference was made to other sources as well, such as books, television, the internet, schools and restaurants. By taking a personal network approach, this study reveals the mode of transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants within a migrational context. PMID:24398225

  4. From the Bench to the Bedside: The Role of Semantic Web and Translational Medicine for Enabling the Next Generation Healthcare Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Vipul

    The success of new innovations and technologies are very often disruptive in nature. At the same time, they enable novel next generation infrastructures and solutions. These solutions introduce great efficiencies in the form of efficient processes and the ability to create, organize, share and manage knowledge effectively; and the same time provide crucial enablers for proposing and realizing new visions. In this paper, we propose a new vision of the next generation healthcare enterprise and discuss how Translational Medicine, which aims to improve communication between the basic and clinical sciences, is a key requirement for achieving this vision. This will lead therapeutic insights may be derived from new scientific ideas - and vice versa. Translation research goes from bench to bedside, where theories emerging from preclinical experimentation are tested on disease-affected human subjects, and from bedside to bench, where information obtained from preliminary human experimentation can be used to refine our understanding of the biological principles underpinning the heterogeneity of human disease and polymorphism(s). Informatics and semantic technologies in particular, has a big role to play in making this a reality. We identify critical requirements, viz., data integration, clinical decision support and knowledge maintenance and provenance; and illustrate semantics-based solutions wrt example scenarios and use cases.

  5. Traditional, complementary and alternative medical systems and their contribution to personalisation, prediction and prevention in medicine—person-centred medicine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Traditional, complementary and alternative medical (TCAM) systems contribute to the foundation of person-centred medicine (PCM), an epistemological orientation for medical science which places the person as a physical, psychological and spiritual entity at the centre of health care and of the therapeutic process. PCM wishes to broaden the bio-molecular reductionistic approach of medical science towards an integration that allows people, doctors, nurses, health-care professionals and patients to become the real protagonists of the health-care scene. The doctor or caregiver needs to act out of empathy to meet the unique value of each human being, which unfolds over the course of a lifetime from conception to natural death. Knowledge of the human being should not be instrumental to economic or political interests, ideology, theories or religious dogma. Research needs to be broadened with methodological tools to investigate person-centred medical interventions. Salutogenesis is a fundamental principle of PCM, promoting health and preventing illness by strengthening the individual's self-healing abilities. TCAM systems also give tools to predict the insurgence of illness and treat it before the appearance of overt organic disease. A task of PCM is to educate people to take better care of their physical, psychological and spiritual health. Health-care education needs to be broadened to give doctors and health-care workers of the future the tools to act in innovative and highly differentiated ways, always guided by deep respect for individual autonomy, personal culture, religion and beliefs. PMID:23126628

  6. Enabling individualized therapy through nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Jason H.; van de Ven, Anne L.; Godin, Biana; Blanco, Elvin; Serda, Rita E.; Grattoni, Alessandro; Ziemys, Arturas; Bouamrani, Ali; Hu, Tony; Ranganathan, Shivakumar I.; De Rosa, Enrica; Martinez, Jonathan O.; Smid, Christine A.; Buchanan, Rachel M.; Lee, Sei-Young; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Landry, Matthew; Meyn, Anne; Tasciotti, Ennio; Liu, Xuewu; Decuzzi, Paolo; Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Individualized medicine is the healthcare strategy that rebukes the idiomatic dogma of ‘losing sight of the forest for the trees’. We are entering a new era of healthcare where it is no longer acceptable to develop and market a drug that is effective for only 80% of the patient population. The emergence of “-omic” technologies (e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) and advances in systems biology are magnifying the deficiencies of standardized therapy, which often provide little treatment latitude for accommodating patient physiologic idiosyncrasies. A personalized approach to medicine is not a novel concept. Ever since the scientific community began unraveling the mysteries of the genome, the promise of discarding generic treatment regimens in favor of patient-specific therapies became more feasible and realistic. One of the major scientific impediments of this movement towards personalized medicine has been the need for technological enablement. Nanotechnology is projected to play a critical role in patient-specific therapy; however, this transition will depend heavily upon the evolutionary development of a systems biology approach to clinical medicine based upon “-omic” technology analysis and integration. This manuscript provides a forward looking assessment of the promise of nanomedicine as it pertains to individualized medicine and establishes a technology “snapshot” of the current state of nano-based products over a vast array of clinical indications and range of patient specificity. Other issues such as market driven hurdles and regulatory compliance reform are anticipated to “self-correct” in accordance to scientific advancement and healthcare demand. These peripheral, non-scientific concerns are not addressed at length in this manuscript; however they do exist, and their impact to the paradigm shifting healthcare transformation towards individualized medicine will be critical for its success. PMID:20045055

  7. Timothy Ley, M.D., Advocates for Personalized Medicine in AML - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Oncologist Dr. Timothy Ley talks about how repurposing of existing drugs based on better understanding of the genetic basis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can help patients receive personalized care.

  8. Assessment of heritable genetic effects using new genetic tools and sentinels in an era of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Elespuru, Rosalie K

    2011-05-01

    The challenge of estimating human health effects from damage to the germ line may be met in the genomic era. Understanding the genetic, as opposed to postconception developmental basis of birth defects is critical to their use in monitoring heritable genetic damage. The causes of common birth defects are analyzed here: mendelian genetic, multigenic, developmental, inherited, or combinational. Only a small fraction of these (noninherited, mendelian genetic) are likely to be informative relative to germ cell mutagenesis, and these won't be discernible against the general background of birth defects. Targeted genetic testing as part of personalized medicine could be integrated into a strategy for assessing germ cell alterations in populations. Thus, "sentinel mutations," as originally proposed by Mulvihill and Ceizel, need not be restricted to X-linked or dominant mutations or conditions visible at birth. Several new sentinels related to personalized medicine are proposed, based on health impact (likelihood of monitoring), frequency, and genetic target suitability (responsiveness to diverse mutational mechanisms). Candidates could include CYP genes (related to metabolism of xenobiotics) important in optimizing drug doses and avoiding adverse reactions. High frequency LDLR mutations (related to familial high cholesterol) predict myocardial infarction in approximately50% of individuals. The more common recessive genetic diseases (cystic fibrosis, phenylketonuria, and others) monitored in newborn screening programs could be informative given parental analysis. New opportunities for genetic analyses need to be coupled with epidemiological studies on environmental exposures. These could focus on adverse outcomes related to tobacco, the mostubiquitous and potent environmental mutagen. PMID:21472782

  9. Enzyme-Encapsulated Liposome-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Enabling Sensitive Personal Glucose Meter Readout for Portable Detection of Disease Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bingqian; Liu, Dan; Yan, Jinmao; Qiao, Zhi; Zhong, Yunxin; Yan, Jiawei; Zhu, Zhi; Ji, Tianhai; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-03-23

    There is considerable demand for sensitive, selective, and portable detection of disease-associated proteins, particularly in clinical practice and diagnostic applications. Portable devices are highly desired for detection of disease biomarkers in daily life due to the advantages of being simple, rapid, user-friendly, and low-cost. Herein we report an enzyme-encapsulated liposome-linked immunosorbent assay for sensitive detection of proteins using personal glucose meters (PGM) for portable quantitative readout. Liposomes encapsulating a large amount of amyloglucosidase or invertase are surface-coated with recognition elements such as aptamers or antibodies for target recognition. By translating molecular recognition signal into a large amount of glucose with the encapsulated enzyme, disease biomarkers such as thrombin or C-reactive protein (CRP) can be quantitatively detected by a PGM with a high detection limit of 1.8 or 0.30 nM, respectively. With the advantages of portability, ease of use, and low-cost, the method reported here has potential for portable and quantitative detection of various targets for different POC testing scenarios, such as rapid diagnosis in clinic offices, health monitoring at the bedside, and chemical/biochemical safety control in the field. PMID:26918445

  10. Sustainable medical research by effective and comprehensive medical skills: overcoming the frontiers by predictive, preventive and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical research and practice require affordable objectives, sustainable tools, rewarding training strategies and meaningful collaboration. Method Our unit delivers courses on project design and management promoting ideas, useful skills, teaching and exploring implementation of networks and existing collaborations. We investigated the effectiveness of a sustainable approach of comprehensive diagnosis and care and its usefulness within concrete models of research project teaching methodology. Results The model of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM) of adolescent hypertension, developed since 1976 and still active, was displayed. This is a paradigm of comprehensive PPPM aimed at the management of a recognized, but actually neglected, societal and clinical problem. The second model was addressed to the analysis of performance of an outpatient diagnostic and therapy unit and its relationship with the emergency department. Part of the patients, 4,057 cancer patients presenting at the emergency care, were addressed to the outpatient diagnostic and therapy unit for further assessment, treatment and follow-up. The stay in DH was 6.3 ± 2.1 non-consecutive days, with shortage of costs, vs. in-hospital stays. Research planning courses, based on these models, ensued in an increase of competitive project submission and successful funding. Discussion Active promotion of interdisciplinary knowledge and skills is warranted. Misleading messages and information are detrimental not only to healthy and sick people but, equally, to all health professionals: efforts for basing on evidence by research any statement are needed. The actual pre-requisite of personalized medicine is the coherent and articulated promotion of the professional quality of staff. Health professionals should and can be skilled in sustainable non-invasive diagnostic procedures, in non-pharmacological intervention, in translational research (from epidemiology to personalized

  11. Medicine in Europe: a personal view of the SHO 'European Centres of Excellence Exchange Scheme'.

    PubMed

    Kessel, A

    There has been much attention recently on the working conditions, practice and training of junior doctors in Britain. This article is a personal account of an exchange year spent as a senior house officer in Germany (1993-4). It illustrates differences between the countries and suggests what can be learnt from the experience. PMID:7613721

  12. Can Self-Declared Personal Values Be Used to Identify Those with Family Medicine Career Aspirations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Renee A.; Eva, Kevin W.; Reiter, Harold I.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Self-declaration of personal values has been suggested as a means of identifying students with greater predilection for future primary care careers. While statistically significant differences have been demonstrated, absolute differences between those interested in primary care and those interested in specialist careers tend to be small.…

  13. The attractions of medicine: the generic motivations of medical school applicants in relation to demography, personality and achievement

    PubMed Central

    McManus, IC; Livingston, G; Katona, Cornelius

    2006-01-01

    Background The motivational and other factors used by medical students in making their career choices for specific medical specialities have been looked at in a number of studies in the literature. There are however few studies that assess the generic factors which make medicine itself of interest to medical students and to potential medical students. This study describes a novel questionnaire that assesses the interests and attractions of different aspects of medical practice in a varied range of medical scenarios, and relates them to demographic, academic, personality and learning style measures in a large group of individuals considering applying to medical school. Methods A questionnaire study was conducted among those attending Medlink, a two-day conference for individuals considering applying to medical school for a career in medicine. The main outcome measure was the Medical Situations Questionnaire, in which individuals ranked the attraction of three different aspects of medical practise in each of nine detailed, realistic medical scenarios in a wide range of medical specialities. As well as requiring clear choices, the questionnaire was also designed so that all of the possible answers were attractive and positive, thereby helping to eliminate social demand characteristics. Factor analysis of the responses found four generic motivational dimensions, which we labelled Indispensability, Helping People, Respect and Science. Background factors assessed included sex, ethnicity, class, medical parents, GCSE academic achievement, the 'Big Five' personality factors, empathy, learning styles, and a social desirability scale. Results 2867 individuals, broadly representative of applicants to medical schools, completed the questionnaire. The four generic motivational factors correlated with a range of background factors. These correlations were explored by multiple regression, and by path analysis, using LISREL to assess direct and indirect effects upon the factors

  14. Taking Personalized Medicine Seriously: Biomarker Approaches in Phase IIb/III Studies in Major Depression and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Laughren, Thomas; Lamers, Femke; Picard, Rosalind; Walther, Sebastian; Goff, Donald; Sainati, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The success rate in the development of psychopharmacological compounds is insufficient. Two main reasons for failure have been frequently identified: 1) treating the wrong patients and 2) using the wrong dose. This is potentially based on the known heterogeneity among patients, both on a syndromal and a biological level. A focus on personalized medicine through better characterization with biomarkers has been successful in other therapeutic areas. Nevertheless, obstacles toward this goal that exist are 1) the perception of a lack of validation, 2) the perception of an expensive and complicated enterprise, and 3) the perception of regulatory hurdles. The authors tackle these concerns and focus on the utilization of biomarkers as predictive markers for treatment outcome. The authors primarily cover examples from the areas of major depression and schizophrenia. Methodologies covered include salivary and plasma collection of neuroendocrine, metabolic, and inflammatory markers, which identified subgroups of patients in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. A battery of vegetative markers, including sleep-electroencephalography parameters, heart rate variability, and bedside functional tests, can be utilized to characterize the activity of a functional system that is related to treatment refractoriness in depression (e.g., the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system). Actigraphy and skin conductance can be utilized to classify patients with schizophrenia and provide objective readouts for vegetative activation as a functional marker of target engagement. Genetic markers, related to folate metabolism, or folate itself, has prognostic value for the treatment response in patients with schizophrenia. Already, several biomarkers are routinely collected in standard clinical trials (e.g., blood pressure and plasma electrolytes), and appear to be differentiating factors for treatment outcome. Given the availability of a wide variety of markers, the further development

  15. microRNAs and Personalized Medicine: Evaluating Their Potential as Cancer Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Saumet, Anne; Lecellier, Charles-Henri

    2015-01-01

    microRNA deregulations are often, if not invariably, associated with human malignancies, including cancers. Though most of these deregulations may not be functionally implicated in tumorigenesis, the fact that microRNA expression can be monitored in a variety of human specimens, including biological fluids, supports studies aimed at characterizing microRNA signatures able to detect various cancers (diagnosis), predict their outcome (prognosis), monitor their treatment (theranosis), and adapt therapy to a patient (precision medicine). Here, we review and discuss pros and cons of microRNA-based approaches that can support their exploitation as cancer biomarkers. PMID:26663176

  16. Genomics, molecular imaging, bioinformatics, and bio-nano-info integration are synergistic components of translational medicine and personalized healthcare research

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Supported by National Science Foundation (NSF), International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (ISIBM), International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design and International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine, IEEE 7th Bioinformatics and Bioengineering attracted more than 600 papers and 500 researchers and medical doctors. It was the only synergistic inter/multidisciplinary IEEE conference with 24 Keynote Lectures, 7 Tutorials, 5 Cutting-Edge Research Workshops and 32 Scientific Sessions including 11 Special Research Interest Sessions that were designed dynamically at Harvard in response to the current research trends and advances. The committee was very grateful for the IEEE Plenary Keynote Lectures given by: Dr. A. Keith Dunker (Indiana), Dr. Jun Liu (Harvard), Dr. Brian Athey (Michigan), Dr. Mark Borodovsky (Georgia Tech and President of ISIBM), Dr. Hamid Arabnia (Georgia and Vice-President of ISIBM), Dr. Ruzena Bajcsy (Berkeley and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Member of United States Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), Dr. Mary Yang (United States National Institutes of Health and Oak Ridge, DOE), Dr. Chih-Ming Ho (UCLA and Member of United States National Academy of Engineering and Academician of Academia Sinica), Dr. Andy Baxevanis (United States National Institutes of Health), Dr. Arif Ghafoor (Purdue), Dr. John Quackenbush (Harvard), Dr. Eric Jakobsson (UIUC), Dr. Vladimir Uversky (Indiana), Dr. Laura Elnitski (United States National Institutes of Health) and other world-class scientific leaders. The Harvard meeting was a large academic event 100% full-sponsored by IEEE financially and academically. After a rigorous peer-review process, the committee selected 27 high-quality research papers from 600 submissions. The committee is grateful for contributions from keynote speakers Dr. Russ Altman (IEEE BIBM conference keynote lecturer on combining simulation and machine

  17. Evidence-based medicine meets person-centred care: a collaborative perspective on the relationship.

    PubMed

    Price, Amy I; Djulbegovic, Ben; Biswas, Rakesh; Chatterjee, Pranab

    2015-12-01

    In a recent list-serve, the way forward for evidence-based medicine was discussed. The purpose of this paper was to share the reflections and multiple perspectives discussed in this peer-to-peer encounter and to invite the reader to think with a mind for positive change in the practice of health care. Let us begin with a simple question. What if we dared to look at evidence-based medicine (EBM) and informed shared decision making like two wheels on a bike? They both need to be full of substance, well connected, lubricated and working in balance, propelled and guided by a competent driver, with good vision to get the bike where we want it to go. We need all the tools in the toolkit for the bike to stay operational and to meet the needs of the driver. By the same rationale, evidence alone is necessary but not sufficient for decision making; values are necessary and if neglected, may default to feelings based on social pressures and peer influence. Medical decisions, even shared ones, lack focus without evidence and application. Just as a bike may need a tune up from time to time to maintain optimal performance, EBM may benefit from a tune up where we challenge ourselves to move away from general assumptions and traditions and instead think clearly about the issues we face and how to ask well-formed, specific questions to get the answers to meet the needs we face in health care. PMID:26358758

  18. Model-guided therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: a role for information technology in predictive, preventive and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM) may have the potential to eventually improve the nature of health care delivery. However, the tools required for a practical and comprehensive form of PPPM that is capable of handling the vast amounts of medical information that is currently available are currently lacking. This article reviews a rationale and method for combining and integrating diagnostic and therapeutic management with information technology (IT), in a manner that supports patients through their continuum of care. It is imperative that any program devised to explore and develop personalized health care delivery must be firmly rooted in clinically confirmed and accepted principles and technologies. Therefore, a use case, relating to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), was developed. The approach to the management of medical information we have taken is based on model theory and seeks to implement a form of model-guided therapy (MGT) that can be used as a decision support system in the treatment of patients with HCC. The IT structures to be utilized in MGT include a therapy imaging and model management system (TIMMS) and a digital patient model (DPM). The system that we propose will utilize patient modeling techniques to generate valid DPMs (which factor in age, physiologic condition, disease and co-morbidities, genetics, biomarkers and responses to previous treatments). We may, then, be able to develop a statistically valid methodology, on an individual basis, to predict certain diseases or conditions, to predict certain treatment outcomes, to prevent certain diseases or complications and to develop treatment regimens that are personalized for that particular patient. An IT system for predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (ITS-PM) for HCC is presented to provide a comprehensive system to provide unified access to general medical and patient-specific information for medical researchers and health care providers from different

  19. Structure and function of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) and their relevance to drug therapy and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Nies, Anne T; Damme, Katja; Kruck, Stephan; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE; SLC47A) proteins are membrane transporters mediating the excretion of organic cations and zwitterions into bile and urine and thereby contributing to the hepatic and renal elimination of many xenobiotics. Transported substrates include creatinine as endogenous substrate, the vitamin thiamine and a number of drug agents with in part chemically different structures such as the antidiabetic metformin, the antiviral agents acyclovir and ganciclovir as well as the antibiotics cephalexin and cephradine. This review summarizes current knowledge on the structural and molecular features of human MATE transporters including data on expression and localization in different tissues, important aspects on regulation and their functional role in drug transport. The role of genetic variation of MATE proteins for drug pharmacokinetics and drug response will be discussed with consequences for personalized medicine. PMID:27165417

  20. Comprehensive establishment and characterization of orthoxenograft mouse models of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Castellsagué, Joan; Gel, Bernat; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Llatjós, Roger; Blanco, Ignacio; Benavente, Yolanda; Pérez-Sidelnikova, Diana; García-del Muro, Javier; Viñals, Joan Maria; Vidal, August; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Terribas, Ernest; López-Doriga, Adriana; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S; Serra, Eduard; Villanueva, Alberto; Lázaro, Conxi

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are soft-tissue sarcomas that can arise either sporadically or in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). These aggressive malignancies confer poor survival, with no effective therapy available. We present the generation and characterization of five distinct MPNST orthoxenograft models for preclinical testing and personalized medicine. Four of the models are patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTX), two independent MPNSTs from the same NF1 patient and two from different sporadic patients. The fifth model is an orthoxenograft derived from an NF1-related MPNST cell line. All MPNST orthoxenografts were generated by tumor implantation, or cell line injection, next to the sciatic nerve of nude mice, and were perpetuated by 7–10 mouse-to-mouse passages. The models reliably recapitulate the histopathological properties of their parental primary tumors. They also mimic distal dissemination properties in mice. Human stroma was rapidly lost after MPNST engraftment and replaced by murine stroma, which facilitated genomic tumor characterization. Compatible with an origin in a catastrophic event and subsequent genome stabilization, MPNST contained highly altered genomes that remained remarkably stable in orthoxenograft establishment and along passages. Mutational frequency and type of somatic point mutations were highly variable among the different MPNSTs modeled, but very consistent when comparing primary tumors with matched orthoxenografts generated. Unsupervised cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) using an MPNST expression signature of ~1,000 genes grouped together all primary tumor–orthoxenograft pairs. Our work points to differences in the engraftment process of primary tumors compared with the engraftment of established cell lines. Following standardization and extensive characterization and validation, the orthoxenograft models were used for initial preclinical drug testing. Sorafenib (a

  1. A semi-supervised approach to extract pharmacogenomics-specific drug-gene pairs from biomedical literature for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Wang, Quanqiu

    2013-08-01

    Personalized medicine is to deliver the right drug to the right patient in the right dose. Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is to identify genetic variants that may affect drug efficacy and toxicity. The availability of a comprehensive and accurate PGx-specific drug-gene relationship knowledge base is important for personalized medicine. However, building a large-scale PGx-specific drug-gene knowledge base is a difficult task. In this study, we developed a bootstrapping, semi-supervised learning approach to iteratively extract and rank drug-gene pairs according to their relevance to drug pharmacogenomics. Starting with a single PGx-specific seed pair and 20 million MEDLINE abstracts, the extraction algorithm achieved a precision of 0.219, recall of 0.368 and F1 of 0.274 after two iterations, a significant improvement over the results of using non-PGx-specific seeds (precision: 0.011, recall: 0.018, and F1: 0.014) or co-occurrence (precision: 0.015, recall: 1.000, and F1: 0.030). After the extraction step, the ranking algorithm further improved the precision from 0.219 to 0.561 for top ranked pairs. By comparing to a dictionary-based approach with PGx-specific gene lexicon as input, we showed that the bootstrapping approach has better performance in terms of both precision and F1 (precision: 0.251 vs. 0.152, recall: 0.396 vs. 0.856 and F1: 0.292 vs. 0.254). By integrative analysis using a large drug adverse event database, we have shown that the extracted drug-gene pairs strongly correlate with drug adverse events. In conclusion, we developed a novel semi-supervised bootstrapping approach for effective PGx-specific drug-gene pair extraction from large number of MEDLINE articles with minimal human input. PMID:23570835

  2. Personalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca Martin

    1996-01-01

    Describes how a typical high school in Huntington Beach, California, curbed disruptive student behavior by personalizing the school experience for "problem" students. Through mostly volunteer efforts, an adopt-a-kid program was initiated that matched kids' learning styles to adults' personality styles and resulted in fewer suspensions and numerous…

  3. Simplistic and complex thought in medicine: the rationale for a person-centered care model as a medical revolution

    PubMed Central

    Reach, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    According to the concept developed by Thomas Kuhn, a scientific revolution occurs when scientists encounter a crisis due to the observation of anomalies that cannot be explained by the generally accepted paradigm within which scientific progress has thereto been made: a scientific revolution can therefore be described as a change in paradigm aimed at solving a crisis. Described herein is an application of this concept to the medical realm, starting from the reflection that during the past decades, the medical community has encountered two anomalies that, by their frequency and consequences, represent a crisis in the system, as they deeply jeopardize the efficiency of care: nonadherence of patients who do not follow the prescriptions of their doctors, and clinical inertia of doctors who do not comply with good practice guidelines. It is proposed that these phenomena are caused by a contrast between, on the one hand, the complex thought of patients and doctors that sometimes escapes rationalization, and on the other hand, the simplification imposed by the current paradigm of medicine dominated by the technical rationality of evidence-based medicine. It is suggested therefore that this crisis must provoke a change in paradigm, inventing a new model of care defined by an ability to take again into account, on an individual basis, the complex thought of patients and doctors. If this overall analysis is correct, such a person-centered care model should represent a solution to the two problems of patients’ nonadherence and doctors’ clinical inertia, as it tackles their cause. These considerations may have important implications for the teaching and the practice of medicine. PMID:27103790

  4. Simplistic and complex thought in medicine: the rationale for a person-centered care model as a medical revolution.

    PubMed

    Reach, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    According to the concept developed by Thomas Kuhn, a scientific revolution occurs when scientists encounter a crisis due to the observation of anomalies that cannot be explained by the generally accepted paradigm within which scientific progress has thereto been made: a scientific revolution can therefore be described as a change in paradigm aimed at solving a crisis. Described herein is an application of this concept to the medical realm, starting from the reflection that during the past decades, the medical community has encountered two anomalies that, by their frequency and consequences, represent a crisis in the system, as they deeply jeopardize the efficiency of care: nonadherence of patients who do not follow the prescriptions of their doctors, and clinical inertia of doctors who do not comply with good practice guidelines. It is proposed that these phenomena are caused by a contrast between, on the one hand, the complex thought of patients and doctors that sometimes escapes rationalization, and on the other hand, the simplification imposed by the current paradigm of medicine dominated by the technical rationality of evidence-based medicine. It is suggested therefore that this crisis must provoke a change in paradigm, inventing a new model of care defined by an ability to take again into account, on an individual basis, the complex thought of patients and doctors. If this overall analysis is correct, such a person-centered care model should represent a solution to the two problems of patients' nonadherence and doctors' clinical inertia, as it tackles their cause. These considerations may have important implications for the teaching and the practice of medicine. PMID:27103790

  5. In Search of the Perfect Business Model: As personalized medicine moves into the mainstream, makers of diagnostics must face a new economic reality. How to develop a value proposition in a healthcare market that is becoming increasingly elastic?

    PubMed

    Carlson, Bob

    2012-01-01

    As personalized medicine edges toward the mainstream, economic realities threaten its existence. But without companion diagnostics, "getting the right drug to the right person" could wind up being just a slogan. What's the right business model? PMID:22606077

  6. Targeted Nanotheranostics for Future Personalized Medicine: Recent Progress in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sung Duk; Ku, Sook Hee; Won, You-Yeon; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, many theranostic nanomaterials have been developed by integrating therapeutic and diagnostic agents in a single regimen. Real-time visualization of nano drug carrier biodistributions, drug release processes and therapeutic responses can provide critical information needed for dynamically optimizing treatment operations in a personalized manner in real time. This review highlights recent progresses in the development of multifunctional nanoparticles possessing both therapeutic and imaging functionalities for cancer therapy. The advantages of using nanoparticle platforms are discussed. Examples demonstrating various combinations of imaging and therapeutic modalities are highlighted. PMID:27375785

  7. New era for personalized medicine: the diagnosis and management of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Paul N; Hageman, Gregory S; Franzco, Robyn H Guymer

    2014-01-01

    It can be argued that age-related macular degeneration is one of the best characterized complex trait diseases. Extensive information related to genetic and environmental risk factors exists, and a number of different biological pathways are strongly implicated in its aetiology. Along with recent improvements in high throughput and relatively inexpensive genetic technologies, we are now in a position to consider developing a presymptomatic, personalized approach towards the assessment, management and treatment of this disease. We explore the applicability and challenges of this approach if it is to become commonplace for guiding treatment decisions for individuals with pre-existing disease or for those at high risk of developing it. PMID:19878229

  8. Targeted Nanotheranostics for Future Personalized Medicine: Recent Progress in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sung Duk; Ku, Sook Hee; Won, You-Yeon; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, many theranostic nanomaterials have been developed by integrating therapeutic and diagnostic agents in a single regimen. Real-time visualization of nano drug carrier biodistributions, drug release processes and therapeutic responses can provide critical information needed for dynamically optimizing treatment operations in a personalized manner in real time. This review highlights recent progresses in the development of multifunctional nanoparticles possessing both therapeutic and imaging functionalities for cancer therapy. The advantages of using nanoparticle platforms are discussed. Examples demonstrating various combinations of imaging and therapeutic modalities are highlighted. PMID:27375785

  9. Single-cell analysis of CTCs with diagnostic precision: opportunities and challenges for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Alberter, Barbara; Klein, Christoph A; Polzer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The generation of variant cancer cells is the major cause of acquired resistance against systemic therapies and consequently, of our inability to cure advanced cancer patients. Circulating tumor cells are gaining increasing clinical attention because they may enable the monitoring cancer progression and adjustment of treatment. In recent years multiple technologies for enrichment, isolation as well as molecular and functional analysis of circulating tumor cells have been developed. Implementation of these technologies in standardized and automated workflows in clinical diagnostics could provide valuable information for real-time monitoring of cancer and eventually new therapeutic strategies for the benefit of patients. PMID:26567956

  10. Personalized Cardiovascular Disease Prediction and Treatment-A Review of Existing Strategies and Novel Systems Medicine Tools.

    PubMed

    Björnson, Elias; Borén, Jan; Mardinoglu, Adil

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to constitute the leading cause of death globally. CVD risk stratification is an essential tool to sort through heterogeneous populations and identify individuals at risk of developing CVD. However, applications of current risk scores have recently been shown to result in considerable misclassification of high-risk subjects. In addition, despite long standing beneficial effects in secondary prevention, current CVD medications have in a primary prevention setting shown modest benefit in terms of increasing life expectancy. A systems biology approach to CVD risk stratification may be employed for improving risk-estimating algorithms through addition of high-throughput derived omics biomarkers. In addition, modeling of personalized benefit-of-treatment may help in guiding choice of intervention. In the area of medicine, realizing that CVD involves perturbations of large complex biological networks, future directions in drug development may involve moving away from a reductionist approach toward a system level approach. Here, we review current CVD risk scores and explore how novel algorithms could help to improve the identification of risk and maximize personalized treatment benefit. We also discuss possible future directions in the development of effective treatment strategies for CVD through the use of genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) as well as other biological network-based approaches. PMID:26858650

  11. The resonance phenomenon in population persistence: can the same theory guide both national security policies and personalized medicine?

    PubMed

    Agur, Zvia

    2014-04-01

    The theory of resonance in population persistence proposes that the survival of a population that is exposed to externally inflicted loss processes (disturbances) during part of its life cycle is dependent on the relation between the average period of the disturbances and the average generation time of the population. This suggests that the size of a population can be controlled by manipulating the period between external disturbances. This theory, first formalized in a study of intertidal Red Sea mollusks exposed to periodic storms, has been found to apply to such seemingly disparate phenomena as the spread of a pathogen among susceptible individuals and the response of malignant cancer cells to chemotherapy. The current article provides a brief review of the evolution of the resonance theory into a tool that can be applied to designing vaccination policies - specifically, in preparedness for bio-terrorism attacks - and in personalized medicine. A personalized protocol based on the resonance theory was applied to a cancer patient, stabilizing his tumor progression, relieving his hematopoietic toxicity, and extending his survival. PMID:24778095

  12. Personalized Cardiovascular Disease Prediction and Treatment—A Review of Existing Strategies and Novel Systems Medicine Tools

    PubMed Central

    Björnson, Elias; Borén, Jan; Mardinoglu, Adil

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to constitute the leading cause of death globally. CVD risk stratification is an essential tool to sort through heterogeneous populations and identify individuals at risk of developing CVD. However, applications of current risk scores have recently been shown to result in considerable misclassification of high-risk subjects. In addition, despite long standing beneficial effects in secondary prevention, current CVD medications have in a primary prevention setting shown modest benefit in terms of increasing life expectancy. A systems biology approach to CVD risk stratification may be employed for improving risk-estimating algorithms through addition of high-throughput derived omics biomarkers. In addition, modeling of personalized benefit-of-treatment may help in guiding choice of intervention. In the area of medicine, realizing that CVD involves perturbations of large complex biological networks, future directions in drug development may involve moving away from a reductionist approach toward a system level approach. Here, we review current CVD risk scores and explore how novel algorithms could help to improve the identification of risk and maximize personalized treatment benefit. We also discuss possible future directions in the development of effective treatment strategies for CVD through the use of genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) as well as other biological network-based approaches. PMID:26858650

  13. The resonance phenomenon in population persistence: can the same theory guide both national security policies and personalized medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Agur, Zvia

    2014-01-01

    The theory of resonance in population persistence proposes that the survival of a population that is exposed to externally inflicted loss processes (disturbances) during part of its life cycle is dependent on the relation between the average period of the disturbances and the average generation time of the population. This suggests that the size of a population can be controlled by manipulating the period between external disturbances. This theory, first formalized in a study of intertidal Red Sea mollusks exposed to periodic storms, has been found to apply to such seemingly disparate phenomena as the spread of a pathogen among susceptible individuals and the response of malignant cancer cells to chemotherapy. The current article provides a brief review of the evolution of the resonance theory into a tool that can be applied to designing vaccination policies – specifically, in preparedness for bio-terrorism attacks – and in personalized medicine. A personalized protocol based on the resonance theory was applied to a cancer patient, stabilizing his tumor progression, relieving his hematopoietic toxicity, and extending his survival. PMID:24778095

  14. [Personal and dignified death. The role of pastoral care in palliative medicine].

    PubMed

    Breit-Keßler, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Palliative pastoral care is not about "adding days to life, but about "adding life to days". It does not matter whether the dying process is short or long. What matters is to ensure the best possible quality of life until the very end through mindful companionship. Palliative pastoral care is a path towards a personal dying, dying where the person is taken seriously as an individual until the last moment. Palliative care includes medical assistance, careful care, psychosocial support, and counselling that addresses the spiritual needs of the dying. This palliative care includes inpatient and outpatient hospice work and accompanies not only the patients but also their relatives. It must become the standard procedure in end of life care. The palliative pastoral care also take the needs of medical staff into account: Time-consuming care for the dying exceeds the staff's time budget. A sudden death can be perceived as traumatic. In this case palliative pastoral care must perform the tasks of crisis management, crisis intervention and de-escalation. The debriefing of involved staff can prevent the development of burn-out syndrome. In the view of holistic healthcare, health insurance funds should co-finance pastoral care. Society and humanity benefit from addressing the needs of the dying. In an economically dominated environment it is a social responsibility to make dying humane. PMID:26983110

  15. Personalized Medicine and Opioid Analgesic Prescribing for Chronic Pain: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Apkarian, A. Vania; Ballantyne, Jane C.; Berger, Ann; Borsook, David; Chen, Wen G.; Farrar, John T.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Horn, Susan D.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Inturrisi, Charles E.; Lao, Lixing; Mackey, Sean; Mao, Jianren; Sawczuk, Andrea; Uhl, George R.; Witter, James; Woolf, Clifford J.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Lin, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Use of opioid analgesics for pain management has increased dramatically over the past decade, with corresponding increases in negative sequelae including overdose and death. There is currently no well-validated objective means of accurately identifying patients likely to experience good analgesia with low side effects and abuse risk prior to initiating opioid therapy. This paper discusses the concept of data-based personalized prescribing of opioid analgesics as a means to achieve this goal. Strengths, weaknesses, and potential synergism of traditional randomized placebo-controlled trial (RCT) and practice-based evidence (PBE) methodologies as means to acquire the clinical data necessary to develop validated personalized analgesic prescribing algorithms are overviewed. Several predictive factors that might be incorporated into such algorithms are briefly discussed, including genetic factors, differences in brain structure and function, differences in neurotransmitter pathways, and patient phenotypic variables such as negative affect, sex, and pain sensitivity. Currently available research is insufficient to inform development of quantitative analgesic prescribing algorithms. However, responder subtype analyses made practical by the large numbers of chronic pain patients in proposed collaborative PBE pain registries, in conjunction with follow-up validation RCTs, may eventually permit development of clinically useful analgesic prescribing algorithms. Perspective Current research is insufficient to base opioid analgesic prescribing on patient characteristics. Collaborative PBE studies in large, diverse pain patient samples in conjunction with follow-up RCTs may permit development of quantitative analgesic prescribing algorithms which could optimize opioid analgesic effectiveness, and mitigate risks of opioid-related abuse and mortality. PMID:23374939

  16. Prospective Molecular Profiling of Canine Cancers Provides a Clinically Relevant Comparative Model for Evaluating Personalized Medicine (PMed) Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mazcko, Christina; Cherba, David; Hendricks, William; Lana, Susan; Ehrhart, E. J.; Charles, Brad; Fehling, Heather; Kumar, Leena; Vail, David; Henson, Michael; Childress, Michael; Kitchell, Barbara; Kingsley, Christopher; Kim, Seungchan; Neff, Mark; Davis, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    into the preclinical modeling of personalized medicine. Future comparative oncology studies optimizing the delivery of PMed strategies may aid cancer drug development. PMID:24637659

  17. Cancer: an emergent property of disturbed resource-rich environments? Ecology meets personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ducasse, Hugo; Arnal, Audrey; Vittecoq, Marion; Daoust, Simon P; Ujvari, Beata; Jacqueline, Camille; Tissot, Tazzio; Ewald, Paul; Gatenby, Robert A; King, Kayla C; Bonhomme, François; Brodeur, Jacques; Renaud, François; Solary, Eric; Roche, Benjamin; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    For an increasing number of biologists, cancer is viewed as a dynamic system governed by evolutionary and ecological principles. Throughout most of human history, cancer was an uncommon cause of death and it is generally accepted that common components of modern culture, including increased physiological stresses and caloric intake, favor cancer development. However, the precise mechanisms for this linkage are not well understood. Here, we examine the roles of ecological and physiological disturbances and resource availability on the emergence of cancer in multicellular organisms. We argue that proliferation of ‘profiteering phenotypes’ is often an emergent property of disturbed, resource-rich environments at all scales of biological organization. We review the evidence for this phenomenon, explore it within the context of malignancy, and discuss how this ecological framework may offer a theoretical background for novel strategies of cancer prevention. This work provides a compelling argument that the traditional separation between medicine and evolutionary ecology remains a fundamental limitation that needs to be overcome if complex processes, such as oncogenesis, are to be completely understood. PMID:26136819

  18. Personalized respiratory medicine: exploring the horizon, addressing the issues. Summary of a BRN-AJRCCM workshop held in Barcelona on June 12, 2014.

    PubMed

    Agustí, Alvar; Antó, Josep Maria; Auffray, Charles; Barbé, Ferran; Barreiro, Esther; Dorca, Jordi; Escarrabill, Joan; Faner, Rosa; Furlong, Laura I; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gea, Joaquim; Lindmark, Bertil; Monsó, Eduard; Plaza, Vicente; Puhan, Milo A; Roca, Josep; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Sanz, Ferran; Serrano, Luis; Sharpe, James; Sibila, Oriol; Silverman, Edwin K; Sterk, Peter J; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2015-02-15

    This Pulmonary Perspective summarizes the content and main conclusions of an international workshop on personalized respiratory medicine coorganized by the Barcelona Respiratory Network ( www.brn.cat ) and the AJRCCM in June 2014. It discusses (1) its definition and historical, social, legal, and ethical aspects; (2) the view from different disciplines, including basic science, epidemiology, bioinformatics, and network/systems medicine; (3) the bottlenecks and opportunities identified by some currently ongoing projects; and (4) the implications for the individual, the healthcare system and the pharmaceutical industry. The authors hope that, although it is not a systematic review on the subject, this document can be a useful reference for researchers, clinicians, healthcare managers, policy-makers, and industry parties interested in personalized respiratory medicine. PMID:25531178

  19. Kinomic Profiling of Electromagnetic Navigational Bronchoscopy Specimens: A New Approach for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joshua C.; Minnich, Douglas J.; Dobelbower, M. Christian; Denton, Alexander J.; Dussaq, Alex M.; Gilbert, Ashley N.; Rohrbach, Timothy D.; Arafat, Waleed; Welaya, Karim; Bonner, James A.; Willey, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Researchers are currently seeking relevant lung cancer biomarkers in order to make informed decisions regarding therapeutic selection for patients in so-called “precision medicine.” However, there are challenges to obtaining adequate lung cancer tissue for molecular analyses. Furthermore, current molecular testing of tumors at the genomic or transcriptomic level are very indirect measures of biological response to a drug, particularly for small molecule inhibitors that target kinases. Kinase activity profiling is therefore theorized to be more reflective of in vivo biology than many current molecular analysis techniques. As a result, this study seeks to prove the feasibility of combining a novel minimally invasive biopsy technique that expands the number of lesions amenable for biopsy with subsequent ex vivo kinase activity analysis. Methods Eight patients with lung lesions of varying location and size were biopsied using the novel electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy (ENB) technique. Basal kinase activity (kinomic) profiles and ex vivo interrogation of samples in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib, crizotinib, and lapatinib were performed by PamStation 12 microarray analysis. Results Kinomic profiling qualitatively identified patient specific kinase activity profiles as well as patient and drug specific changes in kinase activity profiles following exposure to inhibitor. Thus, the study has verified the feasibility of ENB as a method for obtaining tissue in adequate quantities for kinomic analysis and has demonstrated the possible use of this tissue acquisition and analysis technique as a method for future study of lung cancer biomarkers. Conclusions We demonstrate the feasibility of using ENB-derived biopsies to perform kinase activity assessment in lung cancer patients. PMID:25549342

  20. Personalized medicine in gastric cancer: Where are we and where are we going?

    PubMed Central

    Jácome, Alexandre A; Coutinho, Anelisa K; Lima, Enaldo M; Andrade, Aline C; dos Santos, José Sebastião

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in adjuvant therapies for gastric cancer in recent years, the disease is characterized by high recurrence rates and a dismal prognosis. The major improvement in the treatment of recurrent or metastatic gastric cancer in recent years has been the incorporation of trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) heterodimerization, after the demonstrated predictive value of the overexpression and/or amplification of this receptor. Beyond HER2, other genetic abnormalities have been identified, and these mutations may be targetable by tyrosine kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies. The demonstration of four distinct molecular subtypes of gastric cancer by the Cancer Genome Atlas study highlight the enormous heterogeneity of the disease and its complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations and provide a roadmap to implement genome-guided personalized therapy in gastric cancer. In the present review, we aim to discuss, from a clinical point of view, the genomic landscape of gastric cancer described in recent studies, the therapeutic insights derived from these findings, and the clinical trials that have been conducted and those in progress that take into account tailored therapies for gastric cancer. PMID:26811654

  1. Molecular inimitability amongst tumors: implications for precision cancer medicine in the age of personalized oncology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip P; Schwaederle, Maria; Daniels, Gregory A; Fanta, Paul T; Schwab, Richard B; Shimabukuro, Kelly A; Kesari, Santosh; Piccioni, David E; Bazhenova, Lyudmila A; Helsten, Teresa L; Lippman, Scott M; Parker, Barbara A; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-10-20

    Tumor sequencing has revolutionized oncology, allowing for detailed interrogation of the molecular underpinnings of cancer at an individual level. With this additional insight, it is increasingly apparent that not only do tumors vary within a sample (tumor heterogeneity), but also that each patient's individual tumor is a constellation of unique molecular aberrations that will require an equally unique personalized therapeutic regimen. We report here the results of 439 patients who underwent Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA)-certified next generation sequencing (NGS) across histologies. Among these patients, 98.4% had a unique molecular profile, and aside from three primary brain tumor patients with a single genetic lesion (IDH1 R132H), no two patients within a given histology were molecularly identical. Additionally, two sets of patients had identical profiles consisting of two mutations in common and no other anomalies. However, these profiles did not segregate by histology (lung adenocarcinoma-appendiceal cancer (KRAS G12D and GNAS R201C), and lung adenocarcinoma-liposarcoma (CDK4 and MDM2 amplification pairs)). These findings suggest that most advanced tumors are molecular singletons within and between histologies, and that tumors that differ in histology may still nonetheless exhibit identical molecular portraits, albeit rarely. PMID:26418953

  2. Molecular inimitability amongst tumors: implications for precision cancer medicine in the age of personalized oncology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sandip P.; Schwaederle, Maria; Daniels, Gregory A.; Fanta, Paul T.; Schwab, Richard B.; Shimabukuro, Kelly A.; Kesari, Santosh; Piccioni, David E.; Bazhenova, Lyudmila A.; Helsten, Teresa L.; Lippman, Scott M.; Parker, Barbara A.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor sequencing has revolutionized oncology, allowing for detailed interrogation of the molecular underpinnings of cancer at an individual level. With this additional insight, it is increasingly apparent that not only do tumors vary within a sample (tumor heterogeneity), but also that each patient's individual tumor is a constellation of unique molecular aberrations that will require an equally unique personalized therapeutic regimen. We report here the results of 439 patients who underwent Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA)-certified next generation sequencing (NGS) across histologies. Among these patients, 98.4% had a unique molecular profile, and aside from three primary brain tumor patients with a single genetic lesion (IDH1 R132H), no two patients within a given histology were molecularly identical. Additionally, two sets of patients had identical profiles consisting of two mutations in common and no other anomalies. However, these profiles did not segregate by histology (lung adenocarcinoma-appendiceal cancer (KRAS G12D and GNAS R201C), and lung adenocarcinoma-liposarcoma (CDK4 and MDM2 amplification pairs)). These findings suggest that most advanced tumors are molecular singletons within and between histologies, and that tumors that differ in histology may still nonetheless exhibit identical molecular portraits, albeit rarely. PMID:26418953

  3. Pharmacogenetics: implications of race and ethnicity on defining genetic profiles for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Victor E; Meyers, Deborah A

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is being used to develop personalized therapies specific to subjects from different ethnic or racial groups. To date, pharmacogenetic studies have been primarily performed in trial cohorts consisting of non-Hispanic white subjects of European descent. A "bottleneck" or collapse of genetic diversity associated with the first human colonization of Europe during the Upper Paleolithic period, followed by the recent mixing of African, European, and Native American ancestries, has resulted in different ethnic groups with varying degrees of genetic diversity. Differences in genetic ancestry might introduce genetic variation, which has the potential to alter the therapeutic efficacy of commonly used asthma therapies, such as β2-adrenergic receptor agonists (β-agonists). Pharmacogenetic studies of admixed ethnic groups have been limited to small candidate gene association studies, of which the best example is the gene coding for the receptor target of β-agonist therapy, the β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2). Large consortium-based sequencing studies are using next-generation whole-genome sequencing to provide a diverse genome map of different admixed populations, which can be used for future pharmacogenetic studies. These studies will include candidate gene studies, genome-wide association studies, and whole-genome admixture-based approaches that account for ancestral genetic structure, complex haplotypes, gene-gene interactions, and rare variants to detect and replicate novel pharmacogenetic loci. PMID:24369795

  4. Clinical Application of CYP2C19 Pharmacogenetics Toward More Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Jun

    2013-01-01

    More than 30 years of genetic research on the CYP2C19 gene alone has identified approximately 2,000 reference single nucleotide polymorphisms (rsSNPs) containing 28 registered alleles in the P450 Allele Nomenclature Committee and the number continues to increase. However, knowledge of CYP2C19 SNPs remains limited with respect to biological functions. Functional information on the variant is essential for justifying its clinical use. Only common variants (minor allele frequency >5%) that represent CYP2C19*2, *3, *17, and others have been mostly studied. Discovery of new genetic variants is outstripping the generation of knowledge on the biological meanings of existing variants. Alternative strategies may be needed to fill this gap. The present study summarizes up-to-date knowledge on functional CYP2C19 variants discovered in phenotyped humans studied at the molecular level in vitro. Understanding the functional meanings of CYP2C19 variants is an essential step toward shifting the current medical paradigm to highly personalized therapeutic regimens. PMID:23378847

  5. BRAFV600E Mutation in Melanotic Neuroectodermal Tumor of Infancy: Toward Personalized Medicine?

    PubMed

    Gomes, Carolina C; Diniz, Marina G; de Menezes, Grazielle Helena F; Castro, Wagner H; Gomez, Ricardo S

    2015-07-01

    The melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy (MNTI) is a rare neoplasm that primarily affects the maxilla of infants during their first year of life. Complete resection is the conventional treatment and recurrence rates vary from 10% to 60%. The recurrent tumors grow more aggressively and can invade other anatomic structures, such as the nasal cavity, the orbit, and the skull base. The aggressive behavior of MNTIs may require radical resection, which may not be possible in some cases because of its rapid and invading growth together with invasion of vital structures. In these situations, adjunct radiotherapy or chemotherapy has been used. However, as there are no conclusive data regarding the molecular profile of this tumor, currently there is no targeted therapy that may be used in the treatment of selected aggressive cases. On the basis of MNTI similarities with melanomas, such as derivation from the neural crest cells and presence of large melanin-containing cells, we hypothesized that MNTIs also may harbor the BRAFV600E oncogenic mutation. We show for the first time that this important pediatric tumor may harbor the oncogenic BRAFV600E mutation, providing the first insights to their personalized treatment. PMID:26122804

  6. Pharmacogenetics: Implications of Race and Ethnicity on Defining Genetic Profiles for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Victor E.; Meyers, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is being used to develop personalized therapies specific to individuals from different ethnic or racial groups. Pharmacogenetic studies to date have been primarily performed in trial cohorts consisting of non-Hispanic whites of European descent. A “bottleneck” or collapse of genetic diversity associated with the first human colonization of Europe during the Upper Paleolithic period, followed by the recent mixing of African, European, and Native American ancestries has resulted in different ethnic groups with varying degrees of genetic diversity. Differences in genetic ancestry may introduce genetic variation which has the potential to alter the therapeutic efficacy of commonly used asthma therapies, for example β2-adrenergic receptor agonists (beta agonists). Pharmacogenetic studies of admixed ethnic groups have been limited to small candidate gene association studies of which the best example is the gene coding for the receptor target of beta agonist therapy, ADRB2. Large consortium-based sequencing studies are using next-generation whole-genome sequencing to provide a diverse genome map of different admixed populations which can be used for future pharmacogenetic studies. These studies will include candidate gene studies, genome-wide association studies, and whole-genome admixture-based approaches which account for ancestral genetic structure, complex haplotypes, gene-gene interactions, and rare variants to detect and replicate novel pharmacogenetic loci. PMID:24369795

  7. Genetic data: The new challenge of personalized medicine, insights for rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Goulielmos, George N; Zervou, Maria I; Myrthianou, Effie; Burska, Agata; Niewold, Timothy B; Ponchel, Frederique

    2016-06-01

    Rapid advances in genotyping technology, analytical methods, and the establishment of large cohorts for population genetic studies have resulted in a large new body of information about the genetic basis of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Improved understanding of the root pathogenesis of the disease holds the promise of improved diagnostic and prognostic tools based upon this information. In this review, we summarize the nature of new genetic findings in human RA, including susceptibility loci and gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, as well as genetic loci associated with sub-groups of patients and those associated with response to therapy. Possible uses of these data are discussed, such as prediction of disease risk as well as personalized therapy and prediction of therapeutic response and risk of adverse events. While these applications are largely not refined to the point of clinical utility in RA, it seems likely that multi-parameter datasets including genetic, clinical, and biomarker data will be employed in the future care of RA patients. PMID:26869316

  8. Does the Integration of Personalized Ultrasound Change Patient Management in Critical Care Medicine? Observational Trials

    PubMed Central

    Breitkreutz, Raoul; Campo delľ Orto, Marco; Hamm, Christian; Cuca, Colleen; Zechner, Peter M.; Stenger, Tanja; Walcher, Felix; Seeger, Florian H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To test the influence of personalized ultrasound (PersUS) on patient management in critical care. Design of the Study. Prospective, observational, and critical care setting. Four substudies compared PersUS and mobile ultrasound, work distribution, and diagnostic and procedural quality. Patients and Interventions. 640 patient ultrasound exams including 548 focused diagnostic exams and 92 interventional procedures. Main Outcome Measures. Number of studies, physician's judgement of feasibility, time of usage per patient, and referrals to echo lab. Results. Randomized availability of PersUS increased its application in ICU work shifts more than twofold from 33 to 68 exams mainly for detection and therapy of effusions. Diagnostic and procedural quality was rated as excellent/very good in PersUS-guided puncture in 95% of cases. Integrating PersUS within an initial physical examination of 48 randomized cases in an emergency department, PersUS extended the examination time by 100 seconds. Interestingly, PersUS integration into 53 randomized regular ward rounds of 1007 patients significantly reduced average contact time per patient by 103 seconds from 8.9 to 7.2 minutes. Moreover, it lowered the patient referral rate to an echo lab from 20% to 2% within the study population. Conclusions. We propose the development of novel ultrasound-based clinical pathways by integration of PersUS. PMID:24455272

  9. Does the integration of personalized ultrasound change patient management in critical care medicine? Observational trials.

    PubMed

    Breitkreutz, Raoul; Campo Delľ Orto, Marco; Hamm, Christian; Cuca, Colleen; Zechner, Peter M; Stenger, Tanja; Walcher, Felix; Seeger, Florian H

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To test the influence of personalized ultrasound (PersUS) on patient management in critical care. Design of the Study. Prospective, observational, and critical care setting. Four substudies compared PersUS and mobile ultrasound, work distribution, and diagnostic and procedural quality. Patients and Interventions. 640 patient ultrasound exams including 548 focused diagnostic exams and 92 interventional procedures. Main Outcome Measures. Number of studies, physician's judgement of feasibility, time of usage per patient, and referrals to echo lab. Results. Randomized availability of PersUS increased its application in ICU work shifts more than twofold from 33 to 68 exams mainly for detection and therapy of effusions. Diagnostic and procedural quality was rated as excellent/very good in PersUS-guided puncture in 95% of cases. Integrating PersUS within an initial physical examination of 48 randomized cases in an emergency department, PersUS extended the examination time by 100 seconds. Interestingly, PersUS integration into 53 randomized regular ward rounds of 1007 patients significantly reduced average contact time per patient by 103 seconds from 8.9 to 7.2 minutes. Moreover, it lowered the patient referral rate to an echo lab from 20% to 2% within the study population. Conclusions. We propose the development of novel ultrasound-based clinical pathways by integration of PersUS. PMID:24455272

  10. PREDICT: a method for inferring novel drug indications with application to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Stein, Gideon Y; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded

    2011-01-01

    Inferring potential drug indications, for either novel or approved drugs, is a key step in drug development. Previous computational methods in this domain have focused on either drug repositioning or matching drug and disease gene expression profiles. Here, we present a novel method for the large-scale prediction of drug indications (PREDICT) that can handle both approved drugs and novel molecules. Our method is based on the observation that similar drugs are indicated for similar diseases, and utilizes multiple drug–drug and disease–disease similarity measures for the prediction task. On cross-validation, it obtains high specificity and sensitivity (AUC=0.9) in predicting drug indications, surpassing existing methods. We validate our predictions by their overlap with drug indications that are currently under clinical trials, and by their agreement with tissue-specific expression information on the drug targets. We further show that disease-specific genetic signatures can be used to accurately predict drug indications for new diseases (AUC=0.92). This lays the computational foundation for future personalized drug treatments, where gene expression signatures from individual patients would replace the disease-specific signatures. PMID:21654673

  11. Jumping on the Train of Personalized Medicine: A Primer for Non-Geneticist Clinicians: Part 2. Fundamental Concepts in Genetic Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aihua; Meyre, David

    2014-01-01

    With the decrease in sequencing costs, personalized genome sequencing will eventually become common in medical practice. We therefore write this series of three reviews to help non-geneticist clinicians to jump into the fast-moving field of personalized medicine. In the first article of this series, we reviewed the fundamental concepts in molecular genetics. In this second article, we cover the key concepts and methods in genetic epidemiology including the classification of genetic disorders, study designs and their implementation, genetic marker selection, genotyping and sequencing technologies, gene identification strategies, data analyses and data interpretation. This review will help the reader critically appraise a genetic association study. In the next article, we will discuss the clinical applications of genetic epidemiology in the personalized medicine area. PMID:25598767

  12. Immunohistochemical, genetic and epigenetic profiles of hereditary and triple negative breast cancers. Relevance in personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Murria, Rosa; Palanca, Sarai; de Juan, Inmaculada; Alenda, Cristina; Egoavil, Cecilia; Seguí, Francisco J; García-Casado, Zaida; Juan, María J; Sánchez, Ana B; Segura, Ángel; Santaballa, Ana; Chirivella, Isabel; Llop, Marta; Pérez, Gema; Barragán, Eva; Salas, Dolores; Bolufer, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the profile of immunohistochemical (IHC) parameters, copy number aberrations (CNAs) and epigenetic alterations [promoter methylation (PM) and miR expression] related to hereditary (H) and triple negative (TN) breast cancer (BC). This profile could be of relevance for guiding tumor response to treatment with targeting therapy. The study comprises 278 formalin fixed paraffin-embedded BCs divided into two groups: H group, including 88 hereditary BC (HBC) and 190 non hereditary (NHBC), and TN group, containing 79 TNBC and 187 non TNBC (NTNBC). We assessed IHC parameters (Ki67, ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, CK18 and Cadherin-E), CNA of 20 BC related genes, and PM of 24 tumor suppressor genes employing MLPA/MS-MLPA (MRC Holland, Amsterdam). MiR-4417, miR-423-3p, miR-590-5p and miR-187-3p expression was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR (Applied Biosystems). Binary logistic regression was applied to select the parameters that better differentiate the HBC or TN groups. For HBC we found that, ER expression, ERBB2 CNA and PM in RASSF1 and TIMP3 were associated with NHBC whereas; MYC and AURKA CNA were linked to HBC. For TNBC, we found that CDC6 CNA, GSTP1 and RASSF1 PM and miR-423-3p hyperexpression were characteristic of NTNBC, while MYC aberrations, BRCA1 hypermethylation and miR-590-5p and miR-4417 hyperexpression were more indicative of TNBC. The selected markers allow establishing BC subtypes, which are characterized by showing similar etiopathogenetic mechanisms, some of them being molecular targets for known drugs or possible molecular targets. These results could be the basis to implement a personalized therapy. PMID:26328265

  13. Discovery of a low order drug-cell response surface for applications in personalized medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xianting; Liu, Wenjia; Weiss, Andrea; Li, Yiyang; Wong, Ieong; Griffioen, Arjan W.; van den Bergh, Hubert; Xu, Hongquan; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2014-12-01

    The cell is a complex system involving numerous components, which may often interact in a non-linear dynamic manner. Diseases at the cellular level are thus likely to involve multiple cellular constituents and pathways. As some drugs, or drug combinations, may act synergistically on these multiple pathways, they might be more effective than the respective single target agents. Optimizing a drug mixture for a given disease in a particular patient is particularly challenging due to both the difficulty in the selection of the drug mixture components to start out with, and the all-important doses of these drugs to be applied. For n concentrations of m drugs, in principle, nm combinations will have to be tested. As this may lead to a costly and time-consuming investigation for each individual patient, we have developed a Feedback System Control (FSC) technique which can rapidly select the optimal drug-dose combination from the often millions of possible combinations. By testing this FSC technique in a number of experimental systems representing different disease states, we found that the response of cells to multiple drugs is well described by a low order, rather smooth, drug-mixture-input/drug-effect-output multidimensional surface. The main consequences of this are that optimal drug combinations can be found in a surprisingly small number of tests, and that translation from in vitro to in vivo is simplified. This points to the possibility of personalized optimal drug mixtures in the near future. This unexpectedly simple input-output relationship may also lead to a simple solution for handling the issue of human diversity in cancer therapeutics.

  14. Knowledge-Based Personal Health System to empower outpatients of diabetes mellitus by means of P4 Medicine.

    PubMed

    Bresó, Adrián; Sáez, Carlos; Vicente, Javier; Larrinaga, Félix; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and it imposes a large economic burden on healthcare systems. We present a web patient empowering system (PHSP4) that ensures continuous monitoring and assessment of the health state of patients with DM (type I and II). PHSP4 is a Knowledge-Based Personal Health System (PHS) which follows the trend of P4 Medicine (Personalized, Predictive, Preventive, and Participative). It provides messages to outpatients and clinicians about the achievement of objectives, follow-up, and treatments adjusted to the patient condition. Additionally, it calculates a four-component risk vector of the associated pathologies with DM: Nephropathy, Diabetic retinopathy, Diabetic foot, and Cardiovascular event. The core of the system is a Rule-Based System which Knowledge Base is composed by a set of rules implementing the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) (American Diabetes Association: http://www.diabetes.org/ ) clinical guideline. The PHSP4 is designed to be standardized and to facilitate its interoperability by means of terminologies (SNOMED-CT [The International Health Terminology Standards Development Organization: http://www.ihtsdo.org/snomed-ct/ ] and UCUM [The Unified Code for Units of Measure: http://unitsofmeasure.org/ ]), standardized clinical documents (HL7 CDA R2 [Health Level Seven International: http://www.hl7.org/index.cfm ]) for managing Electronic Health Record (EHR). We have evaluated the functionality of the system and its users' acceptance of the system using simulated and real data, and a questionnaire based in the Technology Acceptance Model methodology (TAM). Finally results show the reliability of the system and the high acceptance of clinicians. PMID:25417090

  15. ‘N-of-1- pathways ’ unveils personal deregulated mechanisms from a single pair of RNA-Seq samples: Towards precision medicine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardeux, Vincent; Achour, Ikbel; Li, Jianrong; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Li, Haiquan; Pesce, Lorenzo; Parinandi, Gurunadh; Bahroos, Neil; Winn, Robert; Garcia, Joe G. N.; et al

    2014-11-01

    Background: The emergence of precision medicine allowed the incorporation of individual molecular data into patient care. This research entails, DNA sequencing predicts somatic mutations in individual patients. However, these genetic features overlook dynamic epigenetic and phenotypic response to therapy. Meanwhile, accurate personal transcriptome interpretation remains an unmet challenge. Further, N-of-1 (single-subject) efficacy trials are increasingly pursued, but are underpowered for molecular marker discovery. Method: ‘N-of-1-pathways’ is a global framework relying on three principles: (i) the statistical universe is a single patient; (ii) significance is derived from geneset/biomodules powered by paired samples from the same patient; and (iii) similarity between genesets/biomodulesmore » assesses commonality and differences, within-study and cross-studies. Thus, patient gene-level profiles are transformed into deregulated pathways. From RNA-Seq of 55 lung adenocarcinoma patients, N-of-1-pathways predicts the deregulated pathways of each patient. Results: Cross-patient N-of-1-pathways obtains comparable results with conventional genesets enrichment analysis (GSEA) and differentially expressed gene (DEG) enrichment, validated in three external evaluations. Moreover, heatmap and star plots highlight both individual and shared mechanisms ranging from molecular to organ-systems levels (eg, DNA repair, signaling, immune response). Patients were ranked based on the similarity of their deregulated mechanisms to those of an independent gold standard, generating unsupervised clusters of diametric extreme survival phenotypes (p=0.03). Conclusions: The N-of-1-pathways framework provides a robust statistical and relevant biological interpretation of individual disease-free survival that is often overlooked in conventional cross-patient studies. It enables mechanism-level classifiers with smaller cohorts as well as N-of-1 studies.« less

  16. ‘N-of-1-pathways’ unveils personal deregulated mechanisms from a single pair of RNA-Seq samples: towards precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gardeux, Vincent; Achour, Ikbel; Li, Jianrong; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Li, Haiquan; Pesce, Lorenzo; Parinandi, Gurunadh; Bahroos, Neil; Winn, Robert; Foster, Ian; Garcia, Joe G N; Lussier, Yves A

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of precision medicine allowed the incorporation of individual molecular data into patient care. Indeed, DNA sequencing predicts somatic mutations in individual patients. However, these genetic features overlook dynamic epigenetic and phenotypic response to therapy. Meanwhile, accurate personal transcriptome interpretation remains an unmet challenge. Further, N-of-1 (single-subject) efficacy trials are increasingly pursued, but are underpowered for molecular marker discovery. Method ‘N-of-1-pathways’ is a global framework relying on three principles: (i) the statistical universe is a single patient; (ii) significance is derived from geneset/biomodules powered by paired samples from the same patient; and (iii) similarity between genesets/biomodules assesses commonality and differences, within-study and cross-studies. Thus, patient gene-level profiles are transformed into deregulated pathways. From RNA-Seq of 55 lung adenocarcinoma patients, N-of-1-pathways predicts the deregulated pathways of each patient. Results Cross-patient N-of-1-pathways obtains comparable results with conventional genesets enrichment analysis (GSEA) and differentially expressed gene (DEG) enrichment, validated in three external evaluations. Moreover, heatmap and star plots highlight both individual and shared mechanisms ranging from molecular to organ-systems levels (eg, DNA repair, signaling, immune response). Patients were ranked based on the similarity of their deregulated mechanisms to those of an independent gold standard, generating unsupervised clusters of diametric extreme survival phenotypes (p=0.03). Conclusions The N-of-1-pathways framework provides a robust statistical and relevant biological interpretation of individual disease-free survival that is often overlooked in conventional cross-patient studies. It enables mechanism-level classifiers with smaller cohorts as well as N-of-1 studies. Software http://lussierlab.org/publications/N-of-1-pathways

  17. ‘N-of-1- pathways ’ unveils personal deregulated mechanisms from a single pair of RNA-Seq samples: Towards precision medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gardeux, Vincent; Achour, Ikbel; Li, Jianrong; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Li, Haiquan; Pesce, Lorenzo; Parinandi, Gurunadh; Bahroos, Neil; Winn, Robert; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Foster, Ian; Lussier, Yves A.

    2014-11-01

    Background: The emergence of precision medicine allowed the incorporation of individual molecular data into patient care. This research entails, DNA sequencing predicts somatic mutations in individual patients. However, these genetic features overlook dynamic epigenetic and phenotypic response to therapy. Meanwhile, accurate personal transcriptome interpretation remains an unmet challenge. Further, N-of-1 (single-subject) efficacy trials are increasingly pursued, but are underpowered for molecular marker discovery. Method: ‘N-of-1-pathways’ is a global framework relying on three principles: (i) the statistical universe is a single patient; (ii) significance is derived from geneset/biomodules powered by paired samples from the same patient; and (iii) similarity between genesets/biomodules assesses commonality and differences, within-study and cross-studies. Thus, patient gene-level profiles are transformed into deregulated pathways. From RNA-Seq of 55 lung adenocarcinoma patients, N-of-1-pathways predicts the deregulated pathways of each patient. Results: Cross-patient N-of-1-pathways obtains comparable results with conventional genesets enrichment analysis (GSEA) and differentially expressed gene (DEG) enrichment, validated in three external evaluations. Moreover, heatmap and star plots highlight both individual and shared mechanisms ranging from molecular to organ-systems levels (eg, DNA repair, signaling, immune response). Patients were ranked based on the similarity of their deregulated mechanisms to those of an independent gold standard, generating unsupervised clusters of diametric extreme survival phenotypes (p=0.03). Conclusions: The N-of-1-pathways framework provides a robust statistical and relevant biological interpretation of individual disease-free survival that is often overlooked in conventional cross-patient studies. It enables mechanism-level classifiers with smaller cohorts as well as N-of-1 studies.

  18. Profiling gene mutations, translocations, and multidrug resistance in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a step forward to personalizing medicine.

    PubMed

    Rose-James, Alphy; Shiji, R; Kusumakumary, P; Nair, Manjusha; George, Suraj K; Sreelekha, T T

    2016-09-01

    Precise risk stratification and tailored therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can lead to enhanced survival rates among children. Translocations and mutations along with multidrug resistance markers are important factors that determine therapeutic efficacy. Gene mutation profiling of patients at the time of diagnosis can offer accurate clinical decision-making. Multiplex PCR was used to screen for various translocations, mutations, and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) status in pediatric ALL samples. The roles of P-gp were analyzed at the transcriptional and translational levels by using real-time PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. ALL specific cell line Jurkat was used to validate the functional role of P-gp in imparting drug resistance by siRNA knockdown studies. Co-occurrence of translocations and mutations contributes to cellular drug resistance. Presence of any translocation in addition to FLT3/ITD hints for overactive P-gp. Co-occurrence of E2A/PBX and TEL/AML has also been positively correlated with P-gp status. Multiplex PCR provides a rapid and cost effective technique for profiling translocations, mutations, and multidrug resistance status that determines what therapy patients could be administered. Mutation profiling in patients for analyzing genetic lesions along with drug resistance profiling will help improve risk stratification and personalized medicine, thereby increasing the treatment success rates among pediatric patients with leukemia. PMID:27449773

  19. Using the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative Data to conduct a genome-wide association study of sleep duration.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeldt, Laura B; Gharani, Neda; Kasper, Rachel S; Schmidlen, Tara J; Gordon, Erynn S; Jarvis, Joseph P; Delaney, Susan; Kronenthal, Courtney J; Gerry, Norman P; Christman, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    Sleep is critical to health and functionality, and several studies have investigated the inherited component of insomnia and other sleep disorders using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, genome-wide studies focused on sleep duration are less common. Here, we used data from participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC) (n = 4,401) to examine putative associations between self-reported sleep duration, demographic and lifestyle variables, and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data to better understand genetic contributions to variation in sleep duration. We employed stepwise ordered logistic regression to select our model and retained the following predictive variables: age, gender, weight, physical activity, physical activity at work, smoking status, alcohol consumption, ethnicity, and ancestry (as measured by principal components analysis) in our association testing. Several of our strongest candidate genes were previously identified in GWAS related to sleep duration (TSHZ2, ABCC9, FBXO15) and narcolepsy (NFATC2, SALL4). In addition, we have identified novel candidate genes for involvement in sleep duration including SORCS1 and ELOVL2. Our results demonstrate that the self-reported data collected through the CPMC are robust, and our genome-wide association analysis has identified novel candidate genes involved in sleep duration. More generally, this study contributes to a better understanding of the complexity of human sleep. PMID:26333835

  20. Prioritization of anticancer drugs against a cancer using genomic features of cancer cells: A step towards personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudheer; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Rahul; Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Brahmachari, Samir Kumar; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated drug profile of 24 anticancer drugs tested against a large number of cell lines in order to understand the relation between drug resistance and altered genomic features of a cancer cell line. We detected frequent mutations, high expression and high copy number variations of certain genes in both drug resistant cell lines and sensitive cell lines. It was observed that a few drugs, like Panobinostat, are effective against almost all types of cell lines, whereas certain drugs are effective against only a limited type of cell lines. Tissue-specific preference of drugs was also seen where a drug is more effective against cell lines belonging to a specific tissue. Genomic features based models have been developed for each anticancer drug and achieved average correlation between predicted and actual growth inhibition of cell lines in the range of 0.43 to 0.78. We hope, our study will throw light in the field of personalized medicine, particularly in designing patient-specific anticancer drugs. In order to serve the scientific community, a webserver, CancerDP, has been developed for predicting priority/potency of an anticancer drug against a cancer cell line using its genomic features (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cancerdp/). PMID:27030518

  1. Aptamer-Functionalized Nanoparticles as "Smart Bombs": The Unrealized Potential for Personalized Medicine and Targeted Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Gregory; Vestal, C Greer; Richardson, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Conventional delivery of chemotherapeutic agents leads to multiple systemic side effects and toxicity, limiting the doses that can be used. The development of targeted therapies to selectively deliver anti-cancer agents to tumor cells without damaging neighboring unaffected cells would lead to higher effective local doses and improved response rates. Aptamers are single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind to target molecules with both high affinity and high specificity. The high specificity exhibited by aptamers promotes localization and uptake by specific cell populations, such as tumor cells, and their conjugation to anti-cancer drugs has been explored for targeted therapy. Advancements in the development of polymeric nanoparticles allow anti-cancer drugs to be encapsulated in protective nonreactive shells for controlled drug delivery with reduced toxicity. The conjugation of aptamers to nanoparticle-based therapeutics may further enhance direct targeting and personalized medicine. Here we present how the combinatorial use of aptamer and nanoparticle technologies has the potential to develop "smart bombs" for targeted cancer treatment, highlighting recent pre-clinical studies demonstrating efficacy for the direct targeting to particular tumor cell populations. However, despite these pre-clinical promising results, there has been little progress in moving this technology to the bedside. PMID:25989948

  2. 'Personal Care' and General Practice Medicine in the UK: A qualitative interview study with patients and General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent policy and organisational changes within UK primary care have emphasised graduated access to care, speed of access to the first available general practitioner (GP) and care being provided by a range of healthcare professionals. These trends have been strengthened by the current GP contract and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF). Concern has been expressed that the potential for personal care is being diminished as a result and that this will reduce quality standards. This paper presents data from a study that explored with patients and GPs what personal care means and whether it has continuing importance to them. Methods A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview participants and Framework Analysis supported analysis of emerging themes. Twenty-nine patients, mainly women with young children, and twenty-three GPs were interviewed from seven practices in Lothian, Scotland, ranged by practice size and relative deprivation score. Results and Discussion Personal care was defined mainly, though not exclusively, as care given within the context of a continuing relationship in which there is an interpersonal connection and the doctor adopts a particular consultation style. Defined in this way, it was reported to have benefits for both health outcomes and patients' experience of care. In particular, such care was thought to be beneficial in attending to the emotions that can be elicited when seeking and receiving health care and in enabling patients to be known by doctors as legitimate seekers of care from the health service. Its importance was described as being dependent upon the nature of the health problem and patients' wider familial and social circumstances. In particular, it was found to provide support to patients in their parenting and other familial caring roles. Conclusion Personal care has continuing salience to patients and GPs in modern primary care in the UK. Patients equate the experience of care, not just outcomes, with high

  3. Environment-wide association study (EWAS) for type 2 diabetes in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project Biobank.

    PubMed

    Hall, Molly A; Dudek, Scott M; Goodloe, Robert; Crawford, Dana C; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Peissig, Peggy; Brilliant, Murray; McCarty, Catherine A; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2014-01-01

    Environment-wide association studies (EWAS) provide a way to uncover the environmental mechanisms involved in complex traits in a high-throughput manner. Genome-wide association studies have led to the discovery of genetic variants associated with many common diseases but do not take into account the environmental component of complex phenotypes. This EWAS assesses the comprehensive association between environmental variables and the outcome of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project Biobank (Marshfield PMRP). We sought replication in two National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). The Marshfield PMRP currently uses four tools for measuring environmental exposures and outcome traits: 1) the PhenX Toolkit includes standardized exposure and phenotypic measures across several domains, 2) the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) is a food frequency questionnaire, 3) the Measurement of a Person's Habitual Physical Activity scores the level of an individual's physical activity, and 4) electronic health records (EHR) employs validated algorithms to establish T2D case-control status. Using PLATO software, 314 environmental variables were tested for association with T2D using logistic regression, adjusting for sex, age, and BMI in over 2,200 European Americans. When available, similar variables were tested with the same methods and adjustment in samples from NHANES III and NHANES 1999-2002. Twelve and 31 associations were identified in the Marshfield samples at p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively. Seven and 13 measures replicated in at least one of the NHANES at p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively, with the same direction of effect. The most significant environmental exposures associated with T2D status included decreased alcohol use as well as increased smoking exposure in childhood and adulthood. The results demonstrate the utility of the EWAS method and survey tools for identifying environmental components of complex diseases

  4. Robotics in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, D. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technologies play a very important role in our lives. It is hard to imagine how people can get along without personal computers, and companies - without powerful computer centers. Nowadays, many devices make modern medicine more effective. Medicine is developing constantly, so introduction of robots in this sector is a very promising activity. Advances in technology have influenced medicine greatly. Robotic surgery is now actively developing worldwide. Scientists have been carrying out research and practical attempts to create robotic surgeons for more than 20 years, since the mid-80s of the last century. Robotic assistants play an important role in modern medicine. This industry is new enough and is at the early stage of development; despite this, some developments already have worldwide application; they function successfully and bring invaluable help to employees of medical institutions. Today, doctors can perform operations that seemed impossible a few years ago. Such progress in medicine is due to many factors. First, modern operating rooms are equipped with up-to-date equipment, allowing doctors to make operations more accurately and with less risk to the patient. Second, technology has enabled to improve the quality of doctors' training. Various types of robots exist now: assistants, military robots, space, household and medical, of course. Further, we should make a detailed analysis of existing types of robots and their application. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the most popular types of robots used in medicine.

  5. The new physician as unwitting quantum mechanic: is adapting Dirac's inference system best practice for personalized medicine, genomics, and proteomics?

    PubMed

    Robson, Barry

    2007-08-01

    What is the Best Practice for automated inference in Medical Decision Support for personalized medicine? A known system already exists as Dirac's inference system from quantum mechanics (QM) using bra-kets and bras where A and B are states, events, or measurements representing, say, clinical and biomedical rules. Dirac's system should theoretically be the universal best practice for all inference, though QM is notorious as sometimes leading to bizarre conclusions that appear not to be applicable to the macroscopic world of everyday world human experience and medical practice. It is here argued that this apparent difficulty vanishes if QM is assigned one new multiplication function @, which conserves conditionality appropriately, making QM applicable to classical inference including a quantitative form of the predicate calculus. An alternative interpretation with the same consequences is if every i = radical-1 in Dirac's QM is replaced by h, an entity distinct from 1 and i and arguably a hidden root of 1 such that h2 = 1. With that exception, this paper is thus primarily a review of the application of Dirac's system, by application of linear algebra in the complex domain to help manipulate information about associations and ontology in complicated data. Any combined bra-ket can be shown to be composed only of the sum of QM-like bra and ket weights c(), times an exponential function of Fano's mutual information measure I(A; B) about the association between A and B, that is, an association rule from data mining. With the weights and Fano measure re-expressed as expectations on finite data using Riemann's Incomplete (i.e., Generalized) Zeta Functions, actual counts of observations for real world sparse data can be readily utilized. Finally, the paper compares identical character, distinguishability of states events or measurements, correlation, mutual information, and orthogonal character, important issues in data mining

  6. The state of cell block variation and satisfaction in the era of molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Crapanzano, John P.; Heymann, Jonas J.; Monaco, Sara; Nassar, Aziza; Saqi, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the recent past, algorithms and recommendations to standardize the morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular classification of lung cancers on cytology specimens have been proposed, and several organizations have recommended cell blocks (CBs) as the preferred modality for molecular testing. Based on the literature, there are several different techniques available for CB preparation-suggesting that there is no standard. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of CB preparation techniques utilized in various practice settings and analyze current issues, if any. Materials and Methods: A single E-mail with a link to an electronic survey was distributed to members of the American Society of Cytopathology and other pathologists. Questions pertaining to the participants’ practice setting and CBs-volume, method, quality and satisfaction-were included. Results: Of 95 respondents, 90/95 (94%) completed the survey and comprise the study group. Most participants practice in a community hospital/private practice (44%) or academic center (41%). On average, 14 CBs (range 0-50; median 10) are prepared by a laboratory daily. Over 10 methods are utilized: Plasma thrombin (33%), HistoGel (27%), Cellient automated cell block system (8%) and others (31%) respectively. Forty of 90 (44%) respondents are either unsatisfied or sometimes satisfied with their CB quality, with low-cellular yield being the leading cause of dissatisfaction. There was no statistical significance between the three most common CB preparation methods and satisfaction with quality. Discussion: Many are dissatisfied with their current method of CB preparation, and there is no consistent method to prepare CBs. In today's era of personalized medicine with an increasing array of molecular tests being applied to cytological specimens, there is a need for a standardized protocol for CB optimization to enhance cellularity. PMID:24799951

  7. Towards personal health care with model-guided medicine: long-term PPPM-related strategies and realisation opportunities within ‘Horizon 2020’

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    At the international EPMA Summit carried out in the EU Parliament (September 2013), the main challenges in Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine have been discussed and strategies outlined in order to implement scientific and technological innovation in medicine and healthcare utilising new strategic programmes such as ‘Horizon 2020’. The joint EPMA (European Association for Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine) / IFCARS (International Foundation for Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery) paper emphasises the consolidate position of the leading experts who are aware of the great responsibility of being on a forefront of predictive, preventive and personalised medicine. Both societies consider long-term international partnerships and multidisciplinary projects to create PPPM relevant innovation in science, technological tools and practical implementation in healthcare. Personalisation in healthcare urgently needs innovation in design of PPPM-related medical services, new products, research, education, didactic materials, propagation of targeted prevention in the society and treatments tailored to the person. For the paradigm shift from delayed reactive to predictive, preventive and personalised medicine, a new culture should be created in communication between individual professional domains, between doctor and patient, as well as in communication with individual social (sub)groups and patient cohorts. This is a long-term mission in personalised healthcare with the whole spectrum of instruments available and to be created in the field. PMID:24883142

  8. Towards personal health care with model-guided medicine: long-term PPPM-related strategies and realisation opportunities within 'Horizon 2020'.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Heinz U; Golubnitschaja, Olga

    2014-01-01

    At the international EPMA Summit carried out in the EU Parliament (September 2013), the main challenges in Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine have been discussed and strategies outlined in order to implement scientific and technological innovation in medicine and healthcare utilising new strategic programmes such as 'Horizon 2020'. The joint EPMA (European Association for Predictive, Preventive and Personalised Medicine) / IFCARS (International Foundation for Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery) paper emphasises the consolidate position of the leading experts who are aware of the great responsibility of being on a forefront of predictive, preventive and personalised medicine. Both societies consider long-term international partnerships and multidisciplinary projects to create PPPM relevant innovation in science, technological tools and practical implementation in healthcare. Personalisation in healthcare urgently needs innovation in design of PPPM-related medical services, new products, research, education, didactic materials, propagation of targeted prevention in the society and treatments tailored to the person. For the paradigm shift from delayed reactive to predictive, preventive and personalised medicine, a new culture should be created in communication between individual professional domains, between doctor and patient, as well as in communication with individual social (sub)groups and patient cohorts. This is a long-term mission in personalised healthcare with the whole spectrum of instruments available and to be created in the field. PMID:24883142

  9. Bernard Lerer: recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine (Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics).

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Vural; Endrenyi, Laszlo; Aynacıoğlu, Sükrü; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Dandara, Collet; Dove, Edward S; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hafen, Ernst; Kesim, Belgin Eroğlu; Kolker, Eugene; Lee, Edmund J D; Llerena, Adrian; Nacak, Muradiye; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Someya, Toshiyuki; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tomlinson, Brian; Vayena, Effy; Warnich, Louise; Yaşar, Umit

    2014-04-01

    This article announces the recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine by the Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics (PRACP): Bernard Lerer, professor of psychiatry and director of the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. The Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize is given to an exceptional interdisciplinary scholar who has made highly innovative and enduring contributions to global omics science and personalized medicine, with both vertical and horizontal (transdisciplinary) impacts. The prize is established in memory of a beloved colleague, mentor, and friend, the late Professor Werner Kalow, who cultivated the idea and practice of pharmacogenetics in modern therapeutics commencing in the 1950s. PRACP, the prize's sponsor, is one of the longest standing learned societies in the Asia-Pacific region, and was founded by Kalow and colleagues more than two decades ago in the then-emerging field of pharmacogenetics. In announcing this inaugural prize and its winner, we seek to highlight the works of prize winner, Professor Lerer. Additionally, we contextualize the significance of the prize by recalling the life and works of Professor Kalow and providing a brief socio-technical history of the rise of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine as a veritable form of 21(st) century scientific practice. The article also fills a void in previous social science analyses of pharmacogenetics, by bringing to the fore the works of Kalow from 1995 to 2008, when he presciently noted the rise of yet another field of postgenomics inquiry--pharmacoepigenetics--that railed against genetic determinism and underscored the temporal and spatial plasticity of genetic components of drug response, with invention of the repeated drug administration (RDA) method that estimates the dynamic heritabilities of drug response. The prize goes a long way

  10. A touchscreen-equipped medicine case as a medical interface for assisting an elderly person in medication management.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuo; Jose, Yuta; Nakauchi, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new intelligent medicine case with a home medical interface (iMec G2) to assist an elderly recipient in taking his/her medicine adequately. A touchscreen was equipped in the front surface of the iMec which was tilted backward. The home medical interface for self-medication support was displayed on the touchscreen and handled by the recipient's fingers. The elderly recipient could confirm the information related to his/her prescription by touching a virtual medicine and could contact a recipient's caregiver by clicking an icon if necessary. The new iMec recognized medicine in its storage cartridge by an improved image processing method and evaluated the adequacy of dosage and dosing timing. By an experiment, we verified that the iMec G2 was able to create the home medical interface correctly and indicate a particular medicine which should be taken. PMID:22255543

  11. Personality disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000939.htm Personality disorders To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Personality disorders are a group of mental conditions in ...

  12. Validation of PhenX measures in the personalized medicine research project for use in gene/environment studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to describe the data collection efforts and validation of PhenX measures in the Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP) cohort. Methods Thirty-six measures were chosen from the PhenX Toolkit within the following domains: demographics; anthropometrics; alcohol, tobacco and other substances; cardiovascular; environmental exposures; cancer; psychiatric; neurology; and physical activity and physical fitness. Eligibility criteria for the current study included: living PMRP subjects with known addresses who consented to future contact and were not currently living in a nursing home, available GWAS data from eMERGE I for subjects where age-related cataract, HDL, dementia and resistant hypertension were the primary phenotypes, thus biasing the sample to the older PMRP participants. The questionnaires were mailed twice. Data from the PhenX measures were compared with information from PMRP questionnaires and data from Marshfield Clinic electronic medical records. Results Completed PhenX questionnaires were returned by 2271 subjects for a final response rate of 70%. The mean age reported on the PhenX questionnaire (73.1 years) was greater than the PMRP questionnaire (64.8 years) because the data were collected at different time points. The mean self-reported weight, and subsequently calculated BMI, were less on the PhenX survey than the measured values at the time of enrollment into PMRP (PhenX means 173.5 pounds and BMI 28.2 kg/m2 versus PMRP 182.9 pounds and BMI 29.6 kg/m2). There was 95.3% agreement between the two questionnaires about having ever smoked at least 100 cigarettes. 139 (6.2%) of subjects indicated on the PhenX questionnaire that they had been told they had a stroke. Of them, only 15 (10.8%) had no electronic indication of a prior stroke or TIA. All of the age-and gender-specific 95% confidence limits around point estimates for major depressive episodes overlap and show that 31% of women aged 50–64 reported

  13. Personalized Biochemistry and Biophysics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Whole human genome sequencing of individuals is becoming rapid and inexpensive, enabling new strategies for using personal genome information to help diagnose, treat, and even prevent human disorders for which genetic variations are causative or are known to be risk factors. Many of the exploding number of newly discovered genetic variations alter the structure, function, dynamics, stability, and/or interactions of specific proteins and RNA molecules. Accordingly, there are a host of opportunities for biochemists and biophysicists to participate in (1) developing tools to allow accurate and sometimes medically actionable assessment of the potential pathogenicity of individual variations and (2) establishing the mechanistic linkage between pathogenic variations and their physiological consequences, providing a rational basis for treatment or preventive care. In this review, we provide an overview of these opportunities and their associated challenges in light of the current status of genomic science and personalized medicine, the latter often termed precision medicine. PMID:25856502

  14. Thumbnail Sketches: EDTA-Type Chelating Agents in Everyday Consumer Products: Some Medicinal and Personal Care Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, J. Roger

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)-type chelating agents found in ophthalmic products, personal care products, and disinfectants. Also discusses the properties and action of these EDTA agents. (JN)

  15. Emerging Patient-Driven Health Care Models: An Examination of Health Social Networks, Consumer Personalized Medicine and Quantified Self-Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    A new class of patient-driven health care services is emerging to supplement and extend traditional health care delivery models and empower patient self-care. Patient-driven health care can be characterized as having an increased level of information flow, transparency, customization, collaboration and patient choice and responsibility-taking, as well as quantitative, predictive and preventive aspects. The potential exists to both improve traditional health care systems and expand the concept of health care though new services. This paper examines three categories of novel health services: health social networks, consumer personalized medicine and quantified self-tracking. PMID:19440396

  16. Differences in CYP2C9 Genotype and Enzyme Activity Between Swedes and Koreans of Relevance for Personalized Medicine: Role of Ethnicity, Genotype, Smoking, Age, and Sex.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Fazleen H M; Lundblad, Mia; Ramsjo, Margareta; Kang, Ju-Hee; Roh, Hyung-Keun; Bertilsson, Leif; Eliasson, Erik; Aklillu, Eleni

    2015-06-01

    Global personalized medicine demands the characterization of person-to-person and between-population differences in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. CYP2C9 pharmacokinetic pathway is subject to modulation by both genetic and environmental factors. CYP2C9 genotype-based dose recommendations (e.g., for warfarin) is advocated. However, the overall contribution of genotype for variation in enzyme activity may differ between populations. We evaluated the importance of ethnicity, genotype, smoking, body weight, age, and sex for CYP2C9 enzyme activity. CYP2C9 genotype and phenotype was determined in 148 Swedes and 146 Koreans using losartan as a probe. CYP2C9 enzyme activity was assessed using urinary losartan/metabolite E-3174 ratio. The frequency of CYP2C9 defective variant alleles (*2 and *3) was significantly higher in Swedes (10.8% and 12.5%) than in Koreans (0% and 5.8%). In matched genotypes, CYP2C9 enzyme activity was significantly lower in Swedes compared to Koreans (p<0.0001). In a univariate analysis, age, weight, ethnicity, genotype, and smoking were significant predictors of CYP2C9 phenotype. A stepwise multivariate analysis indicated ethnicity, genotype, and smoking remained as significant predictors of CYP2C9 enzyme activity, accounting for 50% of the total variance. In both study populations, CYP2C9 genotype was a significant predictor of CYP2C9 enzyme activity, but its contribution in explaining the total variance was lower in Koreans (26.6%) than Swedes (40%). In conclusion, we report significantly lower CYP2C9 enzyme activity in Swedes compared to Koreans, partly but not exclusively due to CYP2C9 pharmacogenetic variations. Ethnicity and environment factors need to be considered together with genotype for population-specific dose optimization and global personalized medicine. PMID:25977991

  17. Commentary: Personalized health planning and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: an opportunity for academic medicine to lead health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dinan, Michaela A; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Snyderman, Ralph

    2010-11-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) mandates the exploration of new approaches to coordinated health care delivery--such as patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, and disease management programs--in which reimbursement is aligned with desired outcomes. PPACA does not, however, delineate a standardized approach to improve the delivery process or a specific means to quantify performance for value-based reimbursement; these details are left to administrative agencies to develop and implement. The authors propose that coordinated care can be implemented more effectively and performance quantified more accurately by using personalized health planning, which employs individualized strategic health planning and care relevant to the patient's specific needs. Personalized health plans, developed by providers in collaboration with their patients, quantify patients' health and health risks over time, identify strategies to mitigate risks and/or treat disease, deliver personalized care, engage patients in their care, and measure outcomes. Personalized health planning is a core clinical process that can standardize coordinated care approaches while providing the data needed for performance-based reimbursement. The authors argue that academic health centers have a significant opportunity to lead true health care reform by adopting personalized health planning to coordinate care delivery while conducting the research and education necessary to enable its broad clinical application. PMID:20844424

  18. 4Ps medicine of the fatty liver: the research model of predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory medicine-recommendations for facing obesity, fatty liver and fibrosis epidemics.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Francesca Maria; Catalano, Daniela; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2014-01-01

    Relationship between adipose tissue and fatty liver, and its possible evolution in fibrosis, is supported by clinical and research experience. Given the multifactorial pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), treatments for various contributory risk factors have been proposed; however, there is no single validated therapy or drug association recommended for all cases which can stand alone. Mechanisms, diagnostics, prevention and treatment of obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance are displayed along with recommendations and position points. Evidences and practice can get sustainable and cost-benefit valuable outcomes by participatory interventions. These recommendations can be enhanced by comprehensive research projects, addressed to societal issues and innovation, market appeal and industry development, cultural acceptance and sustainability. The basis of participatory medicine is a greater widespread awareness of a condition which is both a disease and an easy documented and inclusive clue for associated diseases and unhealthy lifestyle. This model is suitable for addressing prevention and useful for monitoring improvement, worsening and adherence with non-invasive imaging tools which allow targeted approaches. The latter include health psychology and nutritional and physical exercise prescription expertise disseminated by continuous medical education but, more important, by concrete curricula for training undergraduate and postgraduate students. It is possible and recommended to do it by early formal teaching of ultrasound imaging procedures and of practical lifestyle intervention strategies, including approaches aimed to healthier fashion suggestions. Guidelines and requirements of research project funding calls should be addressed also to NAFLD and allied conditions and should encompass the goal of training by research and the inclusion of participatory medicine topics. A deeper awareness of ethics of competences in health professionals

  19. Current and Future Challenges in Point-of-Care Technologies: A Paradigm-Shift in Affordable Global Healthcare With Personalized and Preventive Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Heetderks, William J.; Pavel, Misha; Acharya, Soumyadipta; Akay, Metin; Mairal, Anurag; Wheeler, Bruce; Dacso, Clifford C.; Sunder, T.; Lovell, Nigel; Gerber, Martin; Shah, Milind; Senthilvel, S. G.; Wang, May D.; Bhargava, Balram

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the panel discussion at the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Point-of-Care Healthcare Technology Conference (POCHT 2013) held in Bangalore India from Jan 16–18, 2013. Modern medicine has witnessed interdisciplinary technology innovations in healthcare with a continuous growth in life expectancy across the globe. However, there is also a growing global concern on the affordability of rapidly rising healthcare costs. To provide quality healthcare at reasonable costs, there has to be a convergence of preventive, personalized, and precision medicine with the help of technology innovations across the entire spectrum of point-of-care (POC) to critical care at hospitals. The first IEEE EMBS Special Topic POCHT conference held in Bangalore, India provided an international forum with clinicians, healthcare providers, industry experts, innovators, researchers, and students to define clinical needs and technology solutions toward commercialization and translation to clinical applications across different environments and infrastructures. This paper presents a summary of discussions that took place during the keynote presentations, panel discussions, and breakout sessions on needs, challenges, and technology innovations in POC technologies toward improving global healthcare. Also presented is an overview of challenges and trends in developing and developed economies with respect to priority clinical needs, technology innovations in medical devices, translational engineering, information and communication technologies, infrastructure support, and patient and clinician acceptance of POC healthcare technologies. PMID:27170902

  20. Current and Future Challenges in Point-of-Care Technologies: A Paradigm-Shift in Affordable Global Healthcare With Personalized and Preventive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Atam P; Heetderks, William J; Pavel, Misha; Acharya, Soumyadipta; Akay, Metin; Mairal, Anurag; Wheeler, Bruce; Dacso, Clifford C; Sunder, T; Lovell, Nigel; Gerber, Martin; Shah, Milind; Senthilvel, S G; Wang, May D; Bhargava, Balram

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the panel discussion at the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Point-of-Care Healthcare Technology Conference (POCHT 2013) held in Bangalore India from Jan 16-18, 2013. Modern medicine has witnessed interdisciplinary technology innovations in healthcare with a continuous growth in life expectancy across the globe. However, there is also a growing global concern on the affordability of rapidly rising healthcare costs. To provide quality healthcare at reasonable costs, there has to be a convergence of preventive, personalized, and precision medicine with the help of technology innovations across the entire spectrum of point-of-care (POC) to critical care at hospitals. The first IEEE EMBS Special Topic POCHT conference held in Bangalore, India provided an international forum with clinicians, healthcare providers, industry experts, innovators, researchers, and students to define clinical needs and technology solutions toward commercialization and translation to clinical applications across different environments and infrastructures. This paper presents a summary of discussions that took place during the keynote presentations, panel discussions, and breakout sessions on needs, challenges, and technology innovations in POC technologies toward improving global healthcare. Also presented is an overview of challenges and trends in developing and developed economies with respect to priority clinical needs, technology innovations in medical devices, translational engineering, information and communication technologies, infrastructure support, and patient and clinician acceptance of POC healthcare technologies. PMID:27170902

  1. Bernard Lerer: Recipient of the 2014 Inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine (Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics)

    PubMed Central

    Aynacıoğlu, Şükrü; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Dandara, Collet; Dove, Edward S.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hafen, Ernst; Kesim, Belgin Eroğlu; Kolker, Eugene; Lee, Edmund J.D.; LLerena, Adrian; Nacak, Muradiye; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Someya, Toshiyuki; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tomlinson, Brian; Vayena, Effy; Warnich, Louise; Yaşar, Ümit

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article announces the recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine by the Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics (PRACP): Bernard Lerer, professor of psychiatry and director of the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. The Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize is given to an exceptional interdisciplinary scholar who has made highly innovative and enduring contributions to global omics science and personalized medicine, with both vertical and horizontal (transdisciplinary) impacts. The prize is established in memory of a beloved colleague, mentor, and friend, the late Professor Werner Kalow, who cultivated the idea and practice of pharmacogenetics in modern therapeutics commencing in the 1950s. PRACP, the prize's sponsor, is one of the longest standing learned societies in the Asia-Pacific region, and was founded by Kalow and colleagues more than two decades ago in the then-emerging field of pharmacogenetics. In announcing this inaugural prize and its winner, we seek to highlight the works of prize winner, Professor Lerer. Additionally, we contextualize the significance of the prize by recalling the life and works of Professor Kalow and providing a brief socio-technical history of the rise of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine as a veritable form of 21st century scientific practice. The article also fills a void in previous social science analyses of pharmacogenetics, by bringing to the fore the works of Kalow from 1995 to 2008, when he presciently noted the rise of yet another field of postgenomics inquiry—pharmacoepigenetics—that railed against genetic determinism and underscored the temporal and spatial plasticity of genetic components of drug response, with invention of the repeated drug administration (RDA) method that estimates the dynamic heritabilities of drug response. The prize goes a

  2. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process. PMID:27544982

  3. Deceit and facial expression in children: the enabling role of the “poker face” child and the dependent personality of the detector

    PubMed Central

    Gadea, Marien; Aliño, Marta; Espert, Raúl; Salvador, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the relation between the facial expression of a group of children when they told a lie and the accuracy in detecting the lie by a sample of adults. To evaluate the intensity and type of emotional content of the children’s faces, we applied an automated method capable of analyzing the facial information from the video recordings (FaceReader 5.0 software). The program classified videos as showing a neutral facial expression or an emotional one. There was a significant higher mean of hits for the emotional than for the neutral videos, and a significant negative correlation between the intensity of the neutral expression and the number of hits from the detectors. The lies expressed with emotional facial expression were more easily recognized by adults than the lies expressed with a “poker face”; thus, the less expressive the child the harder it was to guess. The accuracy of the lie detectors was then correlated with their subclinical traits of personality disorders, to find that participants scoring higher in the dependent personality were significantly better lie detectors. A non-significant tendency for women to discriminate better was also found, whereas men tended to be more suspicious than women when judging the children’s veracity. This study is the first to automatically decode the facial information of the lying child and relate these results with personality characteristics of the lie detectors in the context of deceptive behavior research. Implications for forensic psychology were suggested: to explore whether the induction of an emotion in a child during an interview could be useful to evaluate the testimony during legal trials. PMID:26284012

  4. Independent ethical review of studies involving personal medical records. Report of a working group to the Royal College of Physicians Committee on Ethical Issues in Medicine.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    There is a duty to use available information for the general good where this can be done without detriment. It is, in principle, ethically acceptable to use personal medical records without approaching or involving the patients concerned, provided that confidentiality and anonymity are preserved; such use does not require independent ethical approval provided that confidentiality is assured and subject to safeguards described below. Epidemiologists have a special interest in the use of personal medical records in their work (in this context the use of health-related registers and existing biological samples may be included), though access to such data involves professional staff in all medical specialties, not only those in epidemiology. The following guidance is based on a report of a working group (which included non-medical members) to the Royal College of Physicians Committee on Ethical Issues in Medicine. Activities such as medical audit, epidemiological surveillance, inquiries designed to establish indices of morbidity and mortality and outbreak investigations all constitute medical practice and as such do not require independent ethical review. Research involving access to medical records, health-related registers, or existing biological samples only, without direct patient involvement, requires neither explicit individual patient consent nor independent ethical review provided that: a) explicit consent to access a person's records is obtained either from official custodians of the records (who have a duty to satisfy themselves as to the bona fides and competence of the investigator) or from the patient's clinician: the decision to access personal medical information should not be left to the sole discretion of the investigator.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7807434

  5. Health-care seeking behaviour and the use of traditional medicine among persons with type 2 diabetes in south-western Uganda: a study of focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    Atwine, Fortunate; Hultsjö, Sally; Albin, Björn; Hjelm, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Health-care seeking behaviour is important as it determines acceptance of health care and outcomes of chronic conditions but it has been investigated to a limited extent among persons with diabetes in developing countries. The aim of the study was to explore health-care seeking behaviour among persons with type 2 diabetes to understand reasons for using therapies offered by traditional healers. Methods Descriptive study using focus-group interviews. Three purposive focus-groups were conducted in 2011 of 10 women and 7 men aged 39–72 years in Uganda. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and qualitatively analysed according to a method described for focus-groups. Results Reasons for seeking help from traditional healers were symptoms related to diabetes such as polydipsia, fatigue and decreased sensitivity in lower limbs. Failure of effect from western medicine was also reported. Treatment was described to be unknown extracts, of locally made products taken as herbs or food, and participants had sought help from different health facilities with the help of relatives and friends. Conclusion The pattern of seeking care was inconsistent, with a switch between different health care providers under the influence of the popular and folk sectors. Despite beliefs in using different healthcare providers seeking complementary and alternative medicine, participants still experienced many physical health problems related to diabetes complications. Health professionals need to be aware of the risk of switches between different health care providers, and develop strategies to initiate health promotion interventions to include in the care actors of significance to the patient from the popular, folk and professional sectors, to maintain continuity of effective diabetes care. PMID:26090034

  6. Taking it Personally: Personalized Utilization of the Human Microbiome in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Zmora, Niv; Zeevi, David; Korem, Tal; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2016-01-13

    The genomic revolution enabled the clinical inclusion of an immense body of person-specific information to an extent that is revolutionizing medicine and science. The gut microbiome, our "second genome," dynamically integrates signals from the host and its environment, impacting health and risk of disease. Herein, we summarize how individualized characterization of the microbiome composition and function may assist in personalized diagnostic assessment, risk stratification, disease prevention, treatment decision-making, and patients' follow up. We further discuss the limitations, pitfalls, and challenges that the microbiome field faces in integrating patient-specific microbial data into the clinical realm. Finally, we highlight how recent insights into personalized modulation of the microbiome, by nutritional and pre-, pro-, and post-biotic intervention, may lead to development of individualized approaches that may enable us to harness the microbiome as a central precision medicine target. PMID:26764593

  7. [Mild radium therapy: radiation medicine-, life-, body- and personal hygiene remedies in the first half of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Helmstädter, Axel

    2005-01-01

    During the first half of the 20th century numerous drugs, foodstuffs and cosmetics were brought on the market, whose supposed effects were explained with their weak radioactivity. Their subtle radiation was believed to stimulate the vital forces of the body, thus leading to recovery from illness, or to an improvement in beauty and to rejuvenation. Among others, bath and drinking waters enriched with radioactive materials were advertised for this purpose. The then known radioactive medicines included preparations of healing earth, the so-called Salus-Oil, the TRUW preparations, and "Radithor", which was popular in the United States. There were also radioactive foodstuffs (butter, chocolate, rusk) and cosmetics. This mild radiotherapy may be characterised as a form of bio-dynamistic healing. PMID:16382691

  8. Community-owned resource persons for malaria vector control: enabling factors and challenges in an operational programme in Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Community participation in vector control and health services in general is of great interest to public health practitioners in developing countries, but remains complex and poorly understood. The Urban Malaria Control Program (UMCP) in Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania, implements larval control of malaria vector mosquitoes. The UMCP delegates responsibility for routine mosquito control and surveillance to community-owned resource persons (CORPs), recruited from within local communities via the elected local government. Methods A mixed method, cross-sectional survey assessed the ability of CORPs to detect mosquito breeding sites and larvae, and investigated demographic characteristics of the CORPs, their reasons for participating in the UMCP, and their work performance. Detection coverage was estimated as the proportion of wet habitats found by the investigator which had been reported by CORP. Detection sensitivity was estimated as the proportion of wet habitats found by the CORPS which the investigator found to contain Anopheles larvae that were also reported to be occupied by the CORP. Results The CORPs themselves perceived their role as professional rather than voluntary, with participation being a de facto form of employment. Habitat detection coverage was lower among CORPs that were recruited through the program administrative staff, compared to CORPs recruited by local government officials or health committees (Odds Ratio = 0.660, 95% confidence interval = [0.438, 0.995], P = 0.047). Staff living within their areas of responsibility had > 70% higher detection sensitivity for both Anopheline (P = 0.016) and Culicine (P = 0.012): positive habitats compared to those living outside those same areas. Discussion and conclusions Improved employment conditions as well as involving the local health committees in recruiting individual program staff, communication and community engagement skills are required to optimize achieving effective community

  9. Why the Shift? Taking a Closer Look at the Growing Interest in Niche Markets and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Shannon; Raziee, Hamid R; Lemmens, Trudo

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical research and development is increasingly focused on niche markets, most notably treatments for rare diseases and “personalized” medicine. Drawing on the results of a qualitative study of 34 key Canadian stakeholders (including drug regulators, funders, scientists, policy experts, pharmaceutical industry representatives, and patient advocates), we explore the major trends that are reportedly contributing to the growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in niche markets. Informed by both these key informant interviews and a review of the relevant literature, our paper provides a critical analysis of the many different—and sometimes conflicting—views on the reasons for and extent of the shift toward niche markets. We consider some of the potential advantages to industry, as well the important implications and risks that arise from the increasing pursuit of niche markets and pharmacogenomics. While there are many potential benefits associated with targeted therapies and drug development for historically neglected rare diseases, niche market therapies also present evidentiary challenges (e.g., smaller clinical trials and enrichment strategies) that can make approval decisions difficult, and uncertainties remain around the true benefits of many therapies. PMID:25914853

  10. SU-E-P-26: Oncospace: A Shared Radiation Oncology Database System Designed for Personalized Medicine, Decision Support, and Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, M; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Wong, J; DeWeese, T; McNutt, T; Phillips, M; Hendrickson, K; Song, W; Kwok, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Advancement in Radiation Oncology (RO) practice develops through evidence based medicine and clinical trial. Knowledge usable for treatment planning, decision support and research is contained in our clinical data, stored in an Oncospace database. This data store and the tools for populating and analyzing it are compatible with standard RO practice and are shared with collaborating institutions. The question is - what protocol for system development and data sharing within an Oncospace Consortium? We focus our example on the technology and data meaning necessary to share across the Consortium. Methods: Oncospace consists of a database schema, planning and outcome data import and web based analysis tools.1) Database: The Consortium implements a federated data store; each member collects and maintains its own data within an Oncospace schema. For privacy, PHI is contained within a single table, accessible to the database owner.2) Import: Spatial dose data from treatment plans (Pinnacle or DICOM) is imported via Oncolink. Treatment outcomes are imported from an OIS (MOSAIQ).3) Analysis: JHU has built a number of webpages to answer analysis questions. Oncospace data can also be analyzed via MATLAB or SAS queries.These materials are available to Consortium members, who contribute enhancements and improvements. Results: 1) The Oncospace Consortium now consists of RO centers at JHU, UVA, UW and the University of Toronto. These members have successfully installed and populated Oncospace databases with over 1000 patients collectively.2) Members contributing code and getting updates via SVN repository. Errors are reported and tracked via Redmine. Teleconferences include strategizing design and code reviews.3) Successfully remotely queried federated databases to combine multiple institutions’ DVH data for dose-toxicity analysis (see below – data combined from JHU and UW Oncospace). Conclusion: RO data sharing can and has been effected according to the Oncospace

  11. Evidence-based medicine training in a resource-poor country, the importance of leveraging personal and institutional relationships

    PubMed Central

    Tomatis, Cristina; Taramona, Claudia; Rizo-Patrón, Emiliana; Hernández, Fiorela; Rodríguez, Patricia; Piscoya, Alejandro; Gonzales, Elsa; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Heudebert, Gustavo; Centor, Robert M.; Estrada, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Efforts to implement evidence-based medicine (EBM) training in developing countries are limited. We describe the results of an international effort to improve research capacity in a developing country; we conducted a course aimed at improving basic EBM attitudes and identified challenges. Method Between 2005 and 2009, we conducted an annual 3-day course in Perú consisting of interactive lectures and case-based workshops. We assessed self-reported competence and importance in EBM using a Likert scale (1 = low, 5 = high). Results Totally 220 clinicians participated. For phase I (2005–2007), self-reported EBM competence increased from a median of 2 to 3 (P < 0.001) and the perceived importance of EBM did not change (median = 5). For phase II (2008–2009), before the course, 8–72% graded their competence very low (score of 1–2). After the course, 67–92% of subjects graded their increase in knowledge very high (score of 4–5). The challenges included limited availability of studies relevant to the local reality written in Spanish, participants’ limited time and lack of long-term follow-up on practice change. Informal discussion and written evaluation from participants were universally in agreement that more training in EBM is needed. Conclusions In an EBM course in a resource-poor country, the baseline self-reported competence and experience on EBM were low, and the course had measurable improvements of self-reported competence, perceived utility and readiness to incorporate EBM into their practices. Similar to developed countries, translational research and building the research capacity in developing countries is critical for translating best available evidence into practice. PMID:21276140

  12. Assessment of personal occupational radiation exposures received by nuclear medicine and oncology staff in Punjab (2003-2012).

    PubMed

    Zafar, T; Masood, K; Zafar, J

    2015-09-01

    The impact of occupational radiation exposures on oncology staff working in the disciplines of Nuclear Medicine (NM), Radiotherapy (RT), and Diagnostic Radiology (DR) is of significance to ensure a health risk free environment. In this study, occupationally received radiation doses amongst Pakistani oncology staff in NM, RT and DR during the period (2003-2012) were assessed. The Film Badge Dosimetry (FBD) technique has been utilized to process over 81,000 films (13,237 workers) concerning the occupationally exposed workers data (2003-2012) at a national scale. The annual effective doses were found to range between 0.30-0.97 mSv for NM, 0.44-1.02 mSv for RT and 0.31-1.09 mSv for DR. The annual effective doses averaged over a period of 10 years were assessed to be 0.63, 0.70 and 0.68 mSv for NM, RT and DR respectively. The exposure data were categorized into three exposure levels (≤0.99, 1-4.99 and 5-9.99 mSv) to establish the staff distribution in these categories. It was found that 89.8-96% in NM, 82-94.5% in RT and 76-96.8% staff workers in DR have received doses within the range from the Minimum Detectable Limit (MDL)--0.99 mSv. The annual effective doses, in all categories, were measured to be less than the recommended annual limit of 20 mSv. PMID:26260188

  13. Ovarian Cancer: Prevention, Detection and Treatment of the Disease and Its Recurrence. Molecular Mechanisms and Personalized Medicine Meeting Report

    PubMed Central

    Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the current understanding of the underlying molecular, biologic and genetic mechanisms involved in ovarian cancer development and how these mechanisms can be targets for prevention, detection and treatment of the disease and its recurrence. Methods In May 2012, we convened a meeting of researchers, clinicians and consumer advocates to review the state of current knowledge on molecular mechanisms and identify fruitful areas for further investigations. Results The meeting consisted of seven scientific sessions, ranging from Epidemiology, Early Detection, and Biology to Therapeutics and Quality of Life. Sessions consisted of talks and panel discussions by international leaders in ovarian cancer research. A special career-development session by the CDMRP Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Academy as well as an oral abstract and poster session showcased promising new research by junior scientists. Conclusions Technological advances in the last decade have increased our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in a host of biological activities related to ovarian cancer. Understanding the role these mechanisms play in cancer initiation and progression will help lead to the development of prevention and treatment modalities that can be personalized to each patient, thereby helping to overcome this highly-fatal malignancy. PMID:23013733

  14. Targeting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in gastric carcinoma: A reality for personalized medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shikha Satendra; Yap, Wei Ney; Arfuso, Frank; Kar, Shreya; Wang, Chao; Cai, Wanpei; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam M; Sethi, Gautam; Kumar, Alan Prem

    2015-01-01

    Frequent activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinases (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in gastric cancer (GC) is gaining immense popularity with identification of mutations and/or amplifications of PIK3CA gene or loss of function of PTEN, a tumor suppressor protein, to name a few; both playing a crucial role in regulating this pathway. These aberrations result in dysregulation of this pathway eventually leading to gastric oncogenesis, hence, there is a need for targeted therapy for more effective anticancer treatment. Several inhibitors are currently in either preclinical or clinical stages for treatment of solid tumors like GC. With so many inhibitors under development, further studies on predictive biomarkers are needed to measure the specificity of any therapeutic intervention. Herein, we review the common dysregulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in GC and the various types of single or dual pathway inhibitors under development that might have a superior role in GC treatment. We also summarize the recent developments in identification of predictive biomarkers and propose use of predictive biomarkers to facilitate more personalized cancer therapy with effective PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibition. PMID:26604635

  15. Personalized medicine approach for optimizing the dose of tafamidis to potentially ameliorate wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis (cardiomyopathy).

    PubMed

    Cho, Younhee; Baranczak, Aleksandra; Helmke, Stephen; Teruya, Sergio; Horn, Evelyn M; Maurer, Mathew S; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2015-01-01

    Placebo-controlled clinical trials are useful for identifying the dose of a drug candidate that produces a meaningful clinical response in a patient population. Currently, Pfizer, Inc. is enrolling a 400-person clinical trial to test the efficacy of 20 or 80 mg of tafamidis to ameliorate transthyretin (TTR)-associated cardiomyopathy using clinical endpoints. Herein, we provide guidance for how to optimize the dose of tafamidis for each WT TTR cardiomyopathy patient using its mechanism of action as the key readout, i.e. we identify the dose of tafamidis that maximally kinetically stabilizes TTR in the blood. Tetramer dissociation is rate limiting for TTR aggregation, which appears to drive the pathology of the TTR amyloidoses. Hence, we measure the TTR tetramer dissociation rate (kinetic stability) in the patient's plasma as a function of tafamidis dose to optimize the dose employed to maximize kinetic stability. Historical data tell us that a subset of patients exhibiting higher tafamidis plasma concentrations are maximally kinetically stabilized at the 20-mg tafamidis dose, whereas the patient studied herein required a 60 mg once daily dose to achieve maximum kinetic stabilization. We anticipate that establishing the dose of tafamidis that achieves maximal TTR kinetic stabilization will translate into a maximal clinical effect, but that remains to be demonstrated. PMID:26193961

  16. CYP2C19 Phenoconversion by Routinely Prescribed Proton Pump Inhibitors Omeprazole and Esomeprazole: Clinical Implications for Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Klieber, Martin; Oberacher, Herbert; Hofstaetter, Silvia; Beer, Beate; Neururer, Martin; Amann, Anton; Alber, Hannes; Modak, Anil

    2015-09-01

    The phenotype pantoprazole-(13)C breath test (Ptz-BT) was used to evaluate the extent of phenoconversion of CYP2C19 enzyme activity caused by commonly prescribed proton pump inhibitors (PPI) omeprazole and esomprazole. The Ptz-BT was administered to 26 healthy volunteers and 8 stable cardiovascular patients twice at baseline and after 28 days of PPI therapy to evaluate reproducibility of the Ptz-BT and changes in CYP2C19 enzyme activity (phenoconversion) after PPI therapy. The average intrapatient interday variability in CYP2C19 phenotype (n = 31) determined by Ptz-BT was considerably low (coefficient of variation, 17%). Phenotype conversion resulted in 25 of 26 (96%) nonpoor metabolizer (non-PM) volunteers/patients as measured by the Ptz-BT at baseline and after PPI therapy. The incidence of PM status by phenotype following administration of omeprazole/esomeprazole (known inhibitors of CYP2C19) was 10-fold higher than those who are genetically PMs in the general population, which could have critical clinical implications for personalizing medications primarily metabolized by CYP2C19, such as clopidogrel, PPI, cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, citalopram, clonazepam, diazepam, phenytoin, etc. The Ptz-BT can rapidly (30 minutes) evaluate CYP2C19 phenotype and, more importantly, can identify patients with phenoconversion in CYP2C19 enzyme activity caused by nongenetic factors such as concomitant drugs. PMID:26159874

  17. Access to personalized medicine: factors influencing the use and value of gene expression profiling in breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bombard, Y.; Rozmovits, L.; Trudeau, M.; Leighl, N.B.; Deal, K.; Marshall, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic information is increasingly being used to personalize health care. One example is gene expression profiling (gep) tests, which estimate recurrence risk to inform chemotherapy decisions in breast cancer. Recently, gep tests were publicly funded in Ontario. We explored the perceived utility of gep tests, focusing on the factors influencing their use and value in treatment decision-making by patients and oncologists. Methods We conducted interviews with oncologists (n = 14) and interviews and a focus group with early-stage breast cancer patients (n = 28) who underwent gep testing. Both groups were recruited through oncology clinics in Ontario. Data were analyzed using the content analysis and constant comparison techniques. Results Narratives from patients and oncologists provided insights into various factors facilitating and restricting access to gep. First, oncologists are positioned as gatekeepers of gep, providing access in medically appropriate cases. However, varying perceptions of appropriateness led to perceived inequities in access and negative impacts on the doctor–patient relationship. Second, media attention facilitated patient awareness of gep, but also complicated gatekeeping. Third, the dedicated administration attached to gep was burdensome and led to long waits for results and also to increased patient anxiety and delayed treatment. Collectively, because of barriers to access, those factors inadvertently heightened the perceived value of gep for patients relative to other prognostic indicators. Conclusions Our study delineates the factors facilitating and restricting access to gep, and highlights the roles of media and organization of services in the perceived value and utilization of gep. The results identify a need for administrative changes and practice guidelines to support streamlined and standardized use of gep tests. PMID:24940102

  18. Early Prediction of Disease Progression in Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Model-Based Personalized Medicine in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Buil-Bruna, Núria; Sahota, Tarjinder; López-Picazo, José-María; Moreno-Jiménez, Marta; Martín-Algarra, Salvador; Ribba, Benjamin; Trocóniz, Iñaki F

    2015-06-15

    Predictive biomarkers can play a key role in individualized disease monitoring. Unfortunately, the use of biomarkers in clinical settings has thus far been limited. We have previously shown that mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling enables integration of nonvalidated biomarker data to provide predictive model-based biomarkers for response classification. The biomarker model we developed incorporates an underlying latent variable (disease) representing (unobserved) tumor size dynamics, which is assumed to drive biomarker production and to be influenced by exposure to treatment. Here, we show that by integrating CT scan data, the population model can be expanded to include patient outcome. Moreover, we show that in conjunction with routine medical monitoring data, the population model can support accurate individual predictions of outcome. Our combined model predicts that a change in disease of 29.2% (relative standard error 20%) between two consecutive CT scans (i.e., 6-8 weeks) gives a probability of disease progression of 50%. We apply this framework to an external dataset containing biomarker data from 22 small cell lung cancer patients (four patients progressing during follow-up). Using only data up until the end of treatment (a total of 137 lactate dehydrogenase and 77 neuron-specific enolase observations), the statistical framework prospectively identified 75% of the individuals as having a predictable outcome in follow-up visits. This included two of the four patients who eventually progressed. In all identified individuals, the model-predicted outcomes matched the observed outcomes. This framework allows at risk patients to be identified early and therapeutic intervention/monitoring to be adjusted individually, which may improve overall patient survival. PMID:25939602

  19. Personalized Cancer Genetics Training for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Blazer, Kathleen R.; MacDonald, Deborah J.; Culver, Julie O.; Huizenga, Carin R.; Morgan, Robert J.; Uman, Gwen C.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of a multi-modal interdisciplinary course in genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) and research collaboration for community-based clinicians. Clinicians are increasingly requested to conduct GCRA, but many are inadequately prepared to provide these services. Methods A prospective analysis of 131 participants (48 physicians, 41 advanced-practice nurses and 42 genetic counselors) from community settings across the U.S. The course was delivered in three phases: distance didactic learning, face-to-face training and 12 months of Web-based professional development activities to support integration of skills into practice. Cancer genetics knowledge, skills, professional self-efficacy and practice changes were measured at baseline, immediate- and 14-months-post course. Results Knowledge, skills and self-efficacy scores were significantly different between practice disciplines; however, post scores increased significantly overall and for each discipline (p<.001). Fourteen-month practice outcomes reflect significant increases in provision of GCRA services (p=.018), dissemination of cancer prevention information (p=.005) and high-risk screening recommendations (p=.004) to patients, patient enrollment in research (p=.013), and educational outreach about GCRA (p=.003). Conclusions Results support the efficacy of the multi-modal course as a tool to develop a genetically literate workforce. Sustained alumni participation in Web-based professional development activities has evolved into a distance-mediated Community of Practice in clinical cancer genetics, modeling the lifelong learning goals envisioned by leading CME stakeholders. PMID:21629123

  20. Quantitative, single-step dual measurement of hemoglobin A1c and total hemoglobin in human whole blood using a gold sandwich immunochromatographic assay for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Ang, Shu Hwang; Rambeli, Musalman; Thevarajah, T Malathi; Alias, Yatimah Binti; Khor, Sook Mei

    2016-04-15

    We describe a gold nanoparticle-based sandwich immunoassay for the dual detection and measurement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and total hemoglobin in the whole blood (without pretreatment) in a single step for personalized medicine. The optimized antibody-functionalized gold nanoparticles immunoreact simultaneously with HbA1c and total hemoglobin to form a sandwich at distinctive test lines to transduce visible signals. The applicability of this method as a personal management tool was demonstrated by establishing a calibration curve to relate % HbA1c, a useful value for type 2 diabetes management, to the signal ratio of captured HbA1c to all other forms of hemoglobin. The platform showed excellent selectivity (100%) toward HbA1c at distinctive test lines when challenged with HbA0, glycated HbA0 and HbA2. The reproducibility of the measurement was good (6.02%) owing to the dual measurement of HbA1c and total hemoglobin. A blood sample stability test revealed that the quantitative measurement of % HbA1c was consistent and no false-positive results were detected. Also, this method distinguished the blood sample with elevated HbF from the normal samples and the variants. The findings of this study highlight the potential of a lateral flow immunosensor as a simple, inexpensive, consistent, and convenient strategy for the dual measurement of HbA1c and total Hb to provide useful % HbA1c values for better on-site diabetes care. PMID:26606311

  1. MEDICINAL CANNABIS LAW REFORM: LESSONS FROM CANADIAN LITIGATION.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian

    2015-06-01

    This editorial reviews medicinal cannabis litigation in Canada's superior courts between 1998 and 2015. It reflects upon the outcomes of the decisions and the reasoning within them. It identifies the issues that have driven Canada's jurisprudence in relation to access to medicinal cannabis, particularly insofar as it has engaged patients' rights to liberty and security of the person. It argues that the sequence of medicinal schemes adopted and refined in Canada provides constructive guidance for countries such as Australia which are contemplating introduction of medicinal cannabis as a therapeutic option in compassionate circumstances for patients. In particular, it contends that Canada's experience suggests that strategies calculated to introduce such schemes in a gradualist way, enabling informed involvement by medical practitioners and pharmacists, and that provide for safe and inexpensive accessibility to forms of medicinal cannabis that are clearly distinguished from recreational use and unlikely to be diverted criminally maximise the chances of such schemes being accepted by key stakeholders. PMID:26349373

  2. Moving toward Personalized Medicine in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program: A Pilot Study on the Evaluation of Treatment Responses in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-Ya; Li, Jih-Heng; Sheu, Yuh-Ling; Tang, Hsin-Pei; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Tang, Tze-Chun; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Wang, Shing-Yaw; Liu, Ray-H.

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study simultaneously evaluated the effects of various factors, including genetic variations of CYP2B6, CYP2C19, and ABCB1, demographic characteristics, disease states, methadone-drug interactions (MDIs), and poly-substance use, on the treatment responses among non-HIV patients in the methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) in Taiwan. A total of 178 patients were recruited from two major hospitals that provided MMTP services in southern Taiwan, and information regarding concomitant medications and diseases was acquired from the National Health Insurance (NHI) program. The results demonstrated that the methadone maintenance dose, CYP2B6 785G allele, and ABCB1 2677T allele have positive effects on the methadone plasma concentration. In contrast, patients with HCV coinfection, alcohol problems, and psychiatric diseases may have a negative response to treatment. Thus, a comprehensive evaluation of treatment responses in the MMTP should include not only genetic polymorphisms in methadone metabolism and transporter proteins, but also concomitant diseases, MDIs, and poly-substance use. The results also suggest that personalized medicine may be indispensable for a better outcome of the MMTP. PMID:24455721

  3. Bilski: assessing the impact of a newly invigorated patent-eligibility doctrine on the pharmaceutical industry and the future of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Holman, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    The patent-eligibility doctrine serves a gatekeeper role in excluding from patent protection natural phenomena, principles of nature, abstract ideas, and mental processes. Beginning around 1980, the U.S. patent system embarked upon a pronounced expansion in its definition of patent-eligible subject matter, particularly with respect to software and business method inventions, but also in the life sciences. In recent years, however, we have seen a backlash, with many critics from the public and private sectors arguing that the threshold for patent-eligibility needs to be raised in order to ensure that patents fulfill their constitutional objective of encouraging innovation rather than impeding it. The courts and PTO appear to have heard these critics, and have begun to actively rein in the scope of patent-eligible subject matter. This shift in the swing of the patent-eligibility pendulum will likely have a profound impact on the patentability of innovations arising out of the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, particularly those relating to diagnostics and personalized medicine. In this article, I discuss the current status of the patent-eligibility doctrine, how it is that we got here, and what the future might hold, particularly for the life science industries. PMID:20615185

  4. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine: part 1: the radiation risk from CT.

    PubMed

    Westra, Sjirk J

    2014-10-01

    The theory of radiation carcinogenesis has been debated for decades. Most estimates of the radiation risks from CT have been based on extrapolations from the lifespan follow-up study of atomic bomb survivors and on follow-up studies after therapeutic radiation, using the linear no-threshold theory. Based on this, many population-based projections of induction of future cancers by CT have been published that should not be used to estimate the risk to an individual because of their large margin of error. This has changed recently with the publication of three large international cohort follow-up studies, which link observed cancers to CT scans received in childhood. A fourth ongoing multi-country study in Europe is expected to have enough statistical power to address the limitations of the prior studies. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) report released in 2013 specifically addresses variability in response of the pediatric population exposed to ionizing radiation. Most authorities now conclude that there is enough evidence to link future cancers to the radiation exposure from a single CT scan in childhood but that cancer risk estimates for individuals must be based on the specifics of exposure, age at exposure and absorbed dose to certain tissues. Generalizations are not appropriate, and the communication of the CT risk to individuals should be conducted within the framework of personalized medicine. PMID:25304714

  5. The challenge to bring personalized cancer medicine from clinical trials into routine clinical practice: the case of the Institut Gustave Roussy.

    PubMed

    Arnedos, Monica; André, Fabrice; Farace, Françoise; Lacroix, Ludovic; Besse, Benjamin; Robert, Caroline; Soria, Jean Charles; Eggermont, Alexander M M

    2012-04-01

    Research with high throughput technologies has propitiated the segmentation of different types of tumors into very small subgroups characterized by the presence of very rare molecular alterations. The identification of these subgroups and the apparition of new agents targeting these infrequent alterations are already affecting the way in which clinical trials are being conducted with an increased need to identify those patients harboring specific molecular alterations. In this review we describe some of the currently ongoing and future studies at the Institut Gustave Roussy that aim for the identification of potential therapeutic targets for cancer patients with the incorporation of high throughput technologies into daily practice including aCGH, next generation sequencing and the creation of a software that allows for target identification specific for each tumor. The initial intention is to enrich clinical trials with cancer patients carrying certain molecular alterations in order to increase the possibility of demonstrating benefit from a targeted agent. Mid and long term aims are to facilitate and speed up the process of drug development as well as to implement the concept of personalized medicine. PMID:22483534

  6. Travel medicine

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  7. Emerging roles of frailty and inflammaging in risk assessment of age-related chronic diseases in older adults: the intersection between aging biology and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Wu, I-Chien; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Hsiung, Chao A

    2015-01-01

    A chronic disease in older adults usually runs a course that is less predictable than in younger individuals. Unexplained variations in disease incidence, prognosis, therapeutic responses, and toxicity are frequently observed among older adults. This heterogeneity poses huge challenges to the current one-size-fits-all health care systems, and calls for more personalized managements of chronic diseases in older adults. Aging is characterized by progressive deterioration of bodily functions with increasing risk of failure over time. The entire process is hierarchically organized, and progresses from intracellular events to changes at systemic and ultimately organism levels at different rates among different individuals. Aging biology exerts great influences on the development and progression of most age-related chronic diseases. Thus, aging biology could contribute to the complexity of illnesses that increase with age, and aging biomarkers possess a great potential to enable personalized health risk assessment and health care. We review evidences supporting the roles of aging biomarkers in risk assessment of prevalent age-related diseases. Frailty phenotype is an objectively measured indicator of advanced-stage aging that is characterized by organism-level dysfunction. In contrast, altered inflammation markers level signifies an earlier stage between cellular abnormalities and systems dysfunction. Results of human observational studies and randomized controlled trials indicate that these measures, albeit simple, greatly facilitate classification of older patients with cancer, chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus into groups that vary in disease incidence, prognosis and therapeutic response/toxicity. As the detailed mechanisms underlying the complex biologic process of aging are unraveled in the future, a larger array of biomarkers that correlate with biologic aging at different stages will be discovered. Following the

  8. Personalized medicine in severe influenza.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Sánchez, F; Valenzuela-Méndez, B; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, J F; Rello, J

    2016-06-01

    Existing therapies against infectious diseases may only be effective in limited subpopulations during specific phases of diseases, incorporating theranostics, and there is a clear need to individualize different therapeutic approaches depending on the host. Influenza A virus infection evolves into a severe respiratory failure in some young adult patients, related to an exaggerated inflammatory response. Mortality rates remain high despite antiviral treatment and aggressive respiratory support. The influenza A virus (IAV) infection will induce a proinflammatory innate immune response through recognition of viral RNA by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 and retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) molecules by nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB route). Anti-inflammatory therapies focused on modulating this inflammatory response to "all patients" have not been satisfactory. Steroids should be avoided because they do not improve survival and promote superinfections. Since clinical judgment has often been proven inadequate, interest in the use of biomarkers to monitor host response and to assess severity and complications is growing. It is well known that, if used appropriately, these can be helpful tools to predict not only severity but also mortality. We need more biomarkers that predict host response: it is time to change lactate measurement to proteomics and transcriptomics. Theranostics describes an approach covering both diagnosis and coupled therapy. Death is usually a fatal complication of a dysregulated immune response more than the acute virulence of the infectious agent. Future research demonstrating the usefulness of adjunctive therapy in a subset of critically ill patients with IAV pneumonia is an unmet clinical need. PMID:26936615

  9. The Promise of Personalized Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a multiplicity of media to increase the health literacy of the public. Klose: How does this new need for communication affect the future of health literacy? Dr. Zerhouni : We are in a revolutionary period ...

  10. Personalizing medicine with clinical pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Stuart A.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing has grown substantially over the past 30 years as the causative mutations for Mendelian diseases have been identified, particularly aided in part by the recent advances in molecular-based technologies. Importantly, the adoption of new tests and testing strategies (e.g., diagnostic confirmation, prenatal testing, and population-based carrier screening) has often been met with caution and careful consideration before clinical implementation, which facilitates the appropriate use of new genetic tests. Although the field of pharmacogenetics was established in the 1950s, clinical testing for constitutional pharmacogenetic variants implicated in interindividual drug response variability has only recently become available to help clinicians guide pharmacotherapy, in part due to US Food and Drug Administration-mediated product insert revisions that include pharmacogenetic information for selected drugs. However, despite pharmacogenetic associations with adverse outcomes, physician uptake of clinical pharmacogenetic testing has been slow. Compared with testing for Mendelian diseases, pharmacogenetic testing for certain indications can have a lower positive predictive value, which is one reason for underutilization. A number of other barriers remain with implementing clinical pharmacogenetics, including clinical utility, professional education, and regulatory and reimbursement issues, among others. This review presents some of the current opportunities and challenges with implementing clinical pharmacogenetic testing. PMID:22095251

  11. The Promise of Personalized Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... This will require much more health education, more literacy on the part of patients, and much more ... a multiplicity of media to increase the health literacy of the public. Klose: How does this new ...

  12. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  13. Dependent personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000941.htm Dependent personality disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dependent personality disorder is a mental condition in which people ...

  14. Histrionic personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001531.htm Histrionic personality disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Histrionic personality disorder is a mental condition in which people ...

  15. Schizotypal personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001525.htm Schizotypal personality disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Schizotypal personality disorder is a mental condition in which a ...

  16. The communication of the radiation risk from CT in relation to its clinical benefit in the era of personalized medicine: part 2: benefits versus risk of CT.

    PubMed

    Westra, Sjirk J

    2014-10-01

    In order to personalize the communication of the CT risk, we need to describe the risk in the context of the clinical benefit of CT, which will generally be much higher, provided a CT scan has a well-established clinical indication. However as pediatric radiologists we should be careful not to overstate the benefit of CT, being aware that medico-legal pressures and the realities of health care economics have led to overutilization of the technology. And even though we should not use previously accumulated radiation dose to a child as an argument against conducting a clinically indicated scan (the "sunk-cost" bias), we should consider patients' radiation history in the diagnostic decision process. As a contribution to future public health, it makes more sense to look for non-radiating alternatives to CT in the much larger group of basically healthy children who are receiving occasional scans for widely prevalent conditions such as appendicitis and trauma than to attempt lowering CT use in the smaller group of patients with chronic conditions with a limited life expectancy. When communicating the CT risk with individual patients and their parents, we should acknowledge and address their concerns within the framework of informed decision-making. When appropriate, we may express the individual radiation risk, based on estimates of summated absorbed organ dose, as an order of magnitude rather than as an absolute number, and compare this with the much larger natural cancer incidence over a child's lifetime, and with other risks in medicine and daily life. We should anticipate that many patients cannot make informed decisions on their own in this complex matter, and we should offer our guidance while maintaining respect for patient autonomy. Proper documentation of the informed decision process is important for future reference. In concert with our referring physicians, pediatric radiologists are well-equipped to tackle the complexities associated with the communication

  17. Genomics in personalized cancer medicine and its impact on early drug development in China: report from the 6th Annual Meeting of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) at the 50th ASCO Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Hou, Li-Fang; Yan, Li; Tong, Yun-Guang

    2014-08-01

    The 6th Annual Meeting of the United States Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) was held in conjunction with the 50th Annual Meeting of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) on May 30, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois, the United States of America. With a focus on personalized medicine, the conference featured novel approaches to investigate genomic aberrations in cancer cells and innovative clinical trial designs to expedite cancer drug development in biomarker-defined patient populations. A panel discussion further provided in-depth advice on advancing development of personalized cancer medicines in China. The conference also summarized USCACA key initiatives and accomplishments, including two awards designated to recognize young investigators from China for their achievements and to support their training in the United States. As an effort to promote international collaboration, USCACA will team up with Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) to host a joint session on "Breakthrough Cancer Medicines" at the upcoming CSCO Annual Meeting on September 20th, 2014 in Xiamen, China. PMID:25096543

  18. Personalized Cancer Medicine 2011: Toward Individualized Cancer Treatments. XV International Fritz Bender Symposium Held on February 21 to 23, 2011 at Matrix, Biopolis, Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Zaenker, Kurt S; Mihich, Enrico; Liu, Edison

    2011-01-01

    At the symposium, approaches to individualized cancer medicine were considered, from basic sciences (genetics, epigenetics, biological tumor signatures) to clinical investigations, including strategies about how best to undertake the clinical development of targeted agents. PMID:21804914

  19. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Diabetes Medicines What do diabetes medicines do? Over time, high levels of blood glucose, ... your diabetes medicines, food choices, and physical activity. Medicines for My Diabetes Ask your doctor what type ...

  20. The Challenges of Precision Medicine in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Gozal, David

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent condition that remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. The onerous and labor-intensive nature of polysomnography or similar diagnostic multichannel-based approaches paves the way for exploration of biomarkers aimed at diagnosis, morbidity detection, and monitoring of therapy and its outcomes. To this effect, "Omics" technologies coupled with appropriate bioinformatic approaches should enable discovery of unique biomarker-based signatures, enabling simplified and highly precise algorithms for the evaluation and treatment of symptomatic individuals. Such approaches are likely to not only lead to improved outcomes but also permit personalized medicine to become reality in the context of OSA. PMID:27236058

  1. Literature and medicine: contributions to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Charon, R; Banks, J T; Connelly, J E; Hawkins, A H; Hunter, K M; Jones, A H; Montello, M; Poirer, S

    1995-04-15

    Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people; 2) great works of fiction about medicine enable physicians to recognize the power and implications of what they do; 3) through the study of narrative, the physician can better understand patients' stories of sickness and his or her own personal stake in medical practice; 4) literary study contributes to physicians' expertise in narrative ethics; and 5) literary theory offers new perspectives on the work and the genres of medicine. Particular texts and methods have been found to be well suited to the fulfillment of each of these goals. Chosen from the traditional literary canon and from among the works of contemporary and culturally diverse writers, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama can convey both the concrete particularity and the metaphorical richness of the predicaments of sick people and the challenges and rewards offered to their physicians. In more than 20 years of teaching literature to medical students and physicians, practitioners of literature and medicine have clarified its conceptual frameworks and have identified the means by which its studies strengthen the human competencies of doctoring, which are a central feature of the art of medicine. PMID:7887555

  2. An integrated framework for reporting clinically relevant biomarkers from paired tumor/normal genomic and transcriptomic sequencing data in support of clinical trials in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Sara; Kurdolgu, Ahmet A; Izatt, Tyler; Aldrich, Jessica; Russell, Megan L; Christoforides, Alexis; Tembe, Wiabhav; Keifer, Jeffery A; Corneveaux, Jason J; Byron, Sara A; Forman, Karen M; Zuccaro, Clarice; Keats, Jonathan J; Lorusso, Patricia M; Carpten, John D; Trent, Jeffrey M; Craig, David W

    2015-01-01

    The ability to rapidly sequence the tumor and germline DNA of an individual holds the eventual promise of revolutionizing our ability to match targeted therapies to tumors harboring the associated genetic biomarkers. Analyzing high throughput genomic data consisting of millions of base pairs and discovering alterations in clinically actionable genes in a structured and real time manner is at the crux of personalized testing. This requires a computational architecture that can monitor and track a system within a regulated environment as terabytes of data are reduced to a small number of therapeutically relevant variants, delivered as a diagnostic laboratory developed test. These high complexity assays require data structures that enable real-time and retrospective ad-hoc analysis, with a capability of updating to keep up with the rapidly changing genomic and therapeutic options, all under a regulated environment that is relevant under both CMS and FDA depending on application. We describe a flexible computational framework that uses a paired tumor/normal sample allowing for complete analysis and reporting in approximately 24 hours, providing identification of single nucleotide changes, small insertions and deletions, chromosomal rearrangements, gene fusions and gene expression with positive predictive values over 90%. In this paper we present the challenges in integrating clinical, genomic and annotation databases to provide interpreted draft reports which we utilize within ongoing clinical research protocols. We demonstrate the need to retire from existing performance measurements of accuracy and specificity and measure metrics that are meaningful to a genomic diagnostic environment. This paper presents a three-tier infrastructure that is currently being used to analyze an individual genome and provide available therapeutic options via a clinical report. Our framework utilizes a non-relational variant-centric database that is scaleable to a large amount of data and

  3. Paranoid personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Concern that other people have hidden motives Expectation that they will be exploited (used) by others ... medicines can sometimes reduce paranoia and limit its impact on the person's daily functioning.

  4. Personalized ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Porter, LF; Black, GCM

    2014-01-01

    Porter L.F., Black G.C.M. Personalized ophthalmology. Clin Genet 2014: 86: 1–11. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2014 Ophthalmology has been an early adopter of personalized medicine. Drawing on genomic advances to improve molecular diagnosis, such as next-generation sequencing, and basic and translational research to develop novel therapies, application of genetic technologies in ophthalmology now heralds development of gene replacement therapies for some inherited monogenic eye diseases. It also promises to alter prediction, diagnosis and management of the complex disease age-related macular degeneration. Personalized ophthalmology is underpinned by an understanding of the molecular basis of eye disease. Two important areas of focus are required for adoption of personalized approaches: disease stratification and individualization. Disease stratification relies on phenotypic and genetic assessment leading to molecular diagnosis; individualization encompasses all aspects of patient management from optimized genetic counseling and conventional therapies to trials of novel DNA-based therapies. This review discusses the clinical implications of these twin strategies. Advantages and implications of genetic testing for patients with inherited eye diseases, choice of molecular diagnostic modality, drivers for adoption of personalized ophthalmology, service planning implications, ethical considerations and future challenges are considered. Indeed, whilst many difficulties remain, personalized ophthalmology truly has the potential to revolutionize the specialty. PMID:24665880

  5. History, Medicine, and Culture: History for Science Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balog, C. Edward

    1980-01-01

    Describes college level history course entitled "Healers and Persons" for undergraduate medicine students. Topics include Greek medicine and Hippocrates, Galen of Pergamum, Islamic and Roman culture, medieval medicine, the Renaissance, Harvey, Pasteur, Lister, and Mendel. (KC)

  6. [The Essenes and medicine].

    PubMed

    Kottek, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    The Essenes were a Jewish sect, which flourished around the first century. We have limited our study to hygienic and medical aspects, as documented in the works of Josephus Flavius, Philo of Alexandria, and Pliny the Elder; Josephus and Philo were personally in contact with these sectarian Jews. We have described the regimen of life of these communities, who lived in strictly organised fashion, their meals taken in common, their bathing in cold water, their clothing, the Sabbath rest, the lavatories, and more. Most Essenes remained single, they adopted however small children, and educated them in accordance to their principles. There was no private property, but old people and sick residents were taken care of by the community. The Essenes, as well as the Therapeuts described by Philo, were knowledgeable in medical lore, they treasured old books and studied the virtues of medicinal plants. There is no clear-cut consensus whether the Essenes, the Therapeuts, and the Qumran residents were one and the same sect, or whether they were similar sub-sects. The calm, strictly regulated and frugal way of life of the Essenes enabled them to attain old age, often beyond 100 years. PMID:22400470

  7. Ad vesice dolorem et ad eos qui urinam non faciunt (For bladder pain and when a person cannot urinate): nephrological disorders in Anglo-Saxon medicine.

    PubMed

    D'Aronco, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    The attitude of 19th century (and even of 20th century) scholars toward medieval and, particularly, Anglo-Saxon medicine has been of severe criticism. According to them it was filled with superstition and stupidities. However, in these last fifty years research has proved that, compared with the Continent, Anglo-Saxon England was not a backwater. At the end of the ninth century, medical compendia in Old English began to appear, similar in structure and contents to the Latin dynamidia and to the Latin herbals. These medical treatises were written in the vernacular of the Anglo-Saxons, not in Latin, the western European language for all significant and valuable works on medicine. Bladder, kidney and urinating problems are mentioned throughout the Old English medical treatises together with their cures, that is remedies from herbs and animals. These texts contain no theoretical reflections, only very concise descriptions of symptoms (pain in the bladder, in the kidneys, difficulty in urinating etc.), while prognosis is limited to affirmations such as "he will heal very quickly," "soon there will be no pain," "it will soon be healed," etc. Remedies are made basically out of a body of medicinal plants and materials which can be traced to Greek and Roman medicine. The remedies from plants reflect a wide rational and practical knowledge of medicinal herbs. As a matter of fact, not only there is no amuletic use of plants, but most of the herbs that appear in these recipes have diuretic or analgesic properties and have been in use for centuries. PMID:20013730

  8. Nanotechnology: emerging tools for biology and medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ian Y.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Toner, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Historically, biomedical research has been based on two paradigms. First, measurements of biological behaviors have been based on bulk assays that average over large populations. Second, these behaviors have then been crudely perturbed by systemic administration of therapeutic treatments. Nanotechnology has the potential to transform these paradigms by enabling exquisite structures comparable in size with biomolecules as well as unprecedented chemical and physical functionality at small length scales. Here, we review nanotechnology-based approaches for precisely measuring and perturbing living systems. Remarkably, nanotechnology can be used to characterize single molecules or cells at extraordinarily high throughput and deliver therapeutic payloads to specific locations as well as exhibit dynamic biomimetic behavior. These advances enable multimodal interfaces that may yield unexpected insights into systems biology as well as new therapeutic strategies for personalized medicine. PMID:24240230

  9. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, ... pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and ...

  10. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  11. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  12. Palliative medicine in Britain.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Derek

    In Britain, Palliative Medicine was recognized as a subspecialty of Internal Medicine exactly 20 years after Cicely Saunders founded St Christopher's, at exactly the same time that government was at last recognizing the worth and the needs of general practice. Both had far-reaching effects and implications for patients, doctors, and the future of medicine. For Palliative Medicine it meant units wishing to train specialists going through a rigorous selection process; the development of an equally rigorous training program for the doctors who had already gained a higher qualification before starting Palliative Medicine, demonstrating the need for and benefits of palliative medicine to the sceptics in the profession and, now, continuing to recruit the staff for the steadily increasing number of new services. Today there are more Palliative Medicine consultants/specialists than there are oncologists and neurologists combined, with Hospital Palliative Care Teams in every major hospital and cancer center. With nine Chairs in Palliative Medicine, there is now a drive for research and professional education. The specialty faces major challenges, however, ranging from training to care for patients with non-malignant disease to enabling patients to die in the place of their choice-something that rarely happens today; from defining what is distinctive or unique about palliative medicine to clarifying the respective place of general practice and the specialty. Most would agree that the biggest challenge for the young, thriving specialty is how to share its principles with other doctors wherever they work. PMID:18051021

  13. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  14. [Phronesis: Medicine's indispensable virtue].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Facing those who defend that Medicine is not but an applied science, Pellegrino argues that the ultimate goal of Medicine is facing to a human being in his illness condition. Thus, it is not sufficient to have scientific knowledge but proximity to man kindness. Cure is not the only goal -achievable in only a few cases- but healing, caring with a person as an ill person and as a person. For this reason, professional competence is not enough; the physician needs to have the necessary dispositions to be a good person, a good professional. To get the goals of Medicine, the physician has to achieve those qualities who allow him to do the good he is intended to, that is, he needs to be virtuous. Prudence -phronesis- is the virtue that allows him to apply a general rule to a particular case and, furthermore, addresses his actions to be not only technically correct, but excellent. Prudence is, then, the link between intellectual virtues and moral virtues. Pellegrino's main objective has been to elaborate a Philosophy of Medicine, different from the Philosophy of Science, useful for clinical practice and used by clinical practitioners. By nurturing prudence, a small bit of the final goal is reached: the healing, the goodness for the sick. This should be possible if we are embedded in a moral community, and for Pellegrino, sharing knowledge and ethical values is the way of being part of a moral community. PMID:24836033

  15. Science, Medicine, and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosteson, Daniel C.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of the new biology on what, how, and why persons learn in medicine is discussed. The transformation of medical education is reflected in the radical changes in views of man as organism that are arising from new discoveries in molecular and cellular biology. (MLW)

  16. Medicine 2.0: Social Networking, Collaboration, Participation, Apomediation, and Openness

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In a very significant development for eHealth, a broad adoption of Web 2.0 technologies and approaches coincides with the more recent emergence of Personal Health Application Platforms and Personally Controlled Health Records such as Google Health, Microsoft HealthVault, and Dossia. “Medicine 2.0” applications, services, and tools are defined as Web-based services for health care consumers, caregivers, patients, health professionals, and biomedical researchers, that use Web 2.0 technologies and/or semantic web and virtual reality approaches to enable and facilitate specifically 1) social networking, 2) participation, 3) apomediation, 4) openness, and 5) collaboration, within and between these user groups. The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) publishes a Medicine 2.0 theme issue and sponsors a conference on “How Social Networking and Web 2.0 changes Health, Health Care, Medicine, and Biomedical Research”, to stimulate and encourage research in these five areas. PMID:18725354

  17. Medicine 2.0: social networking, collaboration, participation, apomediation, and openness.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2008-01-01

    In a very significant development for eHealth, broad adoption of Web 2.0 technologies and approaches coincides with the more recent emergence of Personal Health Application Platforms and Personally Controlled Health Records such as Google Health, Microsoft HealthVault, and Dossia. "Medicine 2.0" applications, services and tools are defined as Web-based services for health care consumers, caregivers, patients, health professionals, and biomedical researchers, that use Web 2.0 technologies and/or semantic web and virtual reality approaches to enable and facilitate specifically 1) social networking, 2) participation, 3) apomediation, 4) openness and 5) collaboration, within and between these user groups. The Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR) publishes a Medicine 2.0 theme issue and sponsors a conference on "How Social Networking and Web 2.0 changes Health, Health Care, Medicine and Biomedical Research", to stimulate and encourage research in these five areas. PMID:18725354

  18. Community Medicine in India — Which Way Forward?

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Today, the Community Medicine professionals in India feel both “confused” and “threatened” by the mushrooming of schools of public health and departments of family medicine. The phenomenon of identity crisis and low-self esteem is not a recent one, nor is it restricted to India. The disciplines of community medicine and public health have evolved differently and despite some overlaps have differences especially in the need for clinical training. The core of the issue is that while the community medicine fraternity is keen to retain its clinical tag, what differentiates it from clinicians is the use of public health approach. I believe the strength of community medicine is that it bridges the gap between traditional fields of public health and clinical medicine and brings community perspective into health. The perceived threat from non-medical persons led public health is largely a result of us undervaluing our strength and our inability to foster partnership on equal footing with non-clinicians. While departments of community medicine have a fully functional rural or urban field practice area used for training at primary level care, these can serve as an excellent platform for training in secondary level care required for family medicine. National needs dictate that all three disciplines are required for improvement of population health, whether these are housed together or separately can be left to individual institutions to decide as long as they enable collaborations between them. We need to strengthen community medicine and market it appropriately to ministries of health. PMID:26917866

  19. Technology Enabled Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on technology-enabled learning and human resource development. Among results found in "Current State of Technology-enabled Learning Programs in Select Federal Government Organizations: a Case Study of Ten Organizations" (Letitia A. Combs) are the following: the dominant delivery method is traditional…

  20. Handheld Computing in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sandra; Stewart, Thomas E.; Mehta, Sangeeta; Wax, Randy; Lapinsky, Stephen E.

    2003-01-01

    Handheld computers have become a valuable and popular tool in various fields of medicine. A systematic review of articles was undertaken to summarize the current literature regarding the use of handheld devices in medicine. A variety of articles were identified, and relevant information for various medical fields was summarized. The literature search covered general information about handheld devices, the use of these devices to access medical literature, electronic pharmacopoeias, patient tracking, medical education, research, business management, e-prescribing, patient confidentiality, and costs as well as specialty-specific uses for personal digital assistants (PDAs). The authors concluded that only a small number of articles provide evidence-based information about the use of PDAs in medicine. The majority of articles provide descriptive information, which is nevertheless of value. This article aims to increase the awareness among physicians about the potential roles for handheld computers in medicine and to encourage the further evaluation of their use. PMID:12595403

  1. Handheld computing in medicine.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sandra; Stewart, Thomas E; Mehta, Sangeeta; Wax, Randy; Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2003-01-01

    Handheld computers have become a valuable and popular tool in various fields of medicine. A systematic review of articles was undertaken to summarize the current literature regarding the use of handheld devices in medicine. A variety of articles were identified, and relevant information for various medical fields was summarized. The literature search covered general information about handheld devices, the use of these devices to access medical literature, electronic pharmacopoeias, patient tracking, medical education, research, business management, e-prescribing, patient confidentiality, and costs as well as specialty-specific uses for personal digital assistants (PDAs). The authors concluded that only a small number of articles provide evidence-based information about the use of PDAs in medicine. The majority of articles provide descriptive information, which is nevertheless of value. This article aims to increase the awareness among physicians about the potential roles for handheld computers in medicine and to encourage the further evaluation of their use. PMID:12595403

  2. [Personalized therapy for diabetes in retrospect and prospect].

    PubMed

    Tkáč, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, the term "personalized medicine" has been increasingly mentioned in relation to the endeavours to tailor the pharmaceutical as well as regimen therapy to the needs and requirements of individual patients. The personalization of antidiabetic treatment has undergone a dramatic advancement in relation to the expansion of knowledge about diabetes. From the empirical it moved forward to the phenotypic level which made it possible to differentiate between individual types of diabetes. The pathogenetic personalization which began to be used within Type 2 diabetes in the 1960s, was based on the assumption that while insulin resistance predominates in some patients, others are mainly affected by insulin secretion deficit. Biostatistics-personalized medicine (evidence based medicine) gathered evidence based on which metformin was included in recommendations on the therapy for Type 2 diabetes as a first-line drug. Although randomized studies during the first decade of the 21st century did not prove superiority of any other treatment modality as an adjunctive therapy used with metformin, they brought with them individualization of the goals of glycemic con-trol. At present, personalization is heading towards the pharmacogenetic level that will enable in the near future individualized therapy in terms of choice of first-, second- and third-line drugs depending on the panel of key gene polymorphisms which characterize sensitivity of an individual to specific antidiabetics. Finally, the "tailor-maded therapy" should be chosen based on a synthesis of pathogenetic, biostatistic and pharmacogenetic knowledge that will reflect the translation of results of the basic biomedical research into the clinical practice.Key words: evidence based medicine - pathogenesis - personalized therapy - pharmacogenetics - type 2 diabetes. PMID:25294772

  3. Widening Consumer Access to Medicines: A Comparison of Prescription to Non-Prescription Medicine Switch in Australia and New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Gauld, Natalie J.; Kelly, Fiona S.; Emmerton, Lynne M.; Buetow, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite similarities in health systems and Trans-Tasman Harmonization of medicines scheduling, New Zealand is more active than Australia in ‘switching’ (reclassifying) medicines from prescription to non-prescription. Objectives To identify and compare enablers and barriers to switch in New Zealand and Australia. Methods We conducted and analyzed 27 in-depth personal interviews with key participants in NZ and Australia and international participants previously located in Australia, and analyzed records of meetings considering switches (2000–2013). Analysis of both sets of data entailed a heuristic qualitative approach that embraced the lead researcher’s knowledge and experience. Results The key themes identified were conservatism and political influences in Australia, and an open attitude, proactivity and flexibility in NZ. Pharmacist-only medicine schedules and individuals holding a progressive attitude were proposed to facilitate switch in both countries. A pharmacy retail group drove many switches in NZ (‘third-party switch’), unlike Australia. Barriers to switch in both countries included small market sizes, funding of prescription medicines and cost of doctor visits, and lack of market exclusivity. In Australia, advertising limitations for pharmacist-only medicines reportedly discouraged industry from submitting switch applications. Perceptions of pharmacy performance could help or hinder switches. Conclusion Committee and regulator openness to switch, and confidence in pharmacy appear to influence consumer access to medicines. The pharmacist-only medicine schedule in Australasia and the rise of third-party switch and flexibility in switch in NZ could be considered elsewhere to enable switch. PMID:25785589

  4. Dramatic response to dabrafenib and trametinib combination in a BRAF V600E-mutated cholangiocarcinoma: implementation of a molecular tumour board and next-generation sequencing for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Loaiza-Bonilla, Arturo; Clayton, Erica; Furth, Emma; O’Hara, Mark; Morrissette, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This is the case of a 47-year-old woman diagnosed with chemotherapy and radiation-refractory BRAF V600E mutant, poorly differentiated intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), with multiple metastatic lesions within the liver, lungs, pleura, and bone, stage IV. Discussion of her malignancy’s next-generation sequencing genomic information at a multidisciplinary molecular tumour board took place. The patient was considered a suitable candidate for dual BRAF and MEK inhibition, with the intent to prolong her survival and optimize the quality of life. We report her excellent tolerance and exceptional response to dual therapy with dabrafenib and trametinib, including symptomatic and sustained near-complete radiological improvement. We also briefly review the current knowledge of the genomics of cholangiocarcinoma with a focus on BRAF mutations, and make a point of the importance of the establishment of a molecular tumour board for personalized genomic medicine approaches. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the use of personalized genomic information for the successful management of a patient with ICC, and it is also the first description of dual BRAF and MEK targeted therapy in this malignancy, leading to what is considered an exceptional response. PMID:25435907

  5. 'Ethos' Enabling Organisational Knowledge Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsudaira, Yoshito

    This paper examines knowledge creation in relation to improvements on the production line in the manufacturing department of Nissan Motor Company and aims to clarify embodied knowledge observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation will be clarified. For that purpose, this study adopts an approach that adds a first, second, and third-person's viewpoint to the theory of knowledge creation. Embodied knowledge, observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation, is the continued practice of 'ethos' (in Greek) founded in Nissan Production Way as an ethical basis. Ethos is knowledge (intangible) assets for knowledge creating companies. Substantiated analysis classifies ethos into three categories: the individual, team and organisation. This indicates the precise actions of the organisational members in each category during the knowledge creation process. This research will be successful in its role of showing the indispensability of ethos - the new concept of knowledge assets, which enables knowledge creation -for future knowledge-based management in the knowledge society.

  6. Moving beyond silos: How do we provide distributed personalized medicine to pregnant women everywhere at scale? Insights from PRE-EMPT.

    PubMed

    von Dadelszen, Peter; Magee, Laura A; Payne, Beth A; Dunsmuir, Dustin T; Drebit, Sharla; Dumont, Guy A; Miller, Suellen; Norman, Jane; Pyne-Mercier, Lee; Shennan, Andrew H; Donnay, France; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2015-10-01

    While we believe that pre-eclampsia matters-because it remains a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide-we are convinced that the time has come to look beyond single clinical entities (e.g. pre-eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, obstetric sepsis) and to look for an integrated approach that will provide evidence-based personalized care to women wherever they encounter the health system. Accurate outcome prediction models are a powerful way to identify individuals at incrementally increased (and decreased) risks associated with a given condition. Integrating models with decision algorithms into mobile health (mHealth) applications could support community and first level facility healthcare providers to identify those women, fetuses, and newborns most at need of facility-based care, and to initiate lifesaving interventions in their communities prior to transportation. In our opinion, this offers the greatest opportunity to provide distributed individualized care at scale, and soon. PMID:26433496

  7. Holistic Medicine in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Borins, Mel

    1984-01-01

    During the twentieth century there have been great advances in medicine in the area of science and technology. At the same time, there has been a trend back to a more natural, humanistic approach to counteract patients' feelings of alienation. Holistic medicine approaches the physical, emotional, spiritual, and social aspects of a person as they relate to health and disease. It emphasizes prevention; concern for the environment and the food we eat; patient responsibility; using illness as a creative force to teach people to change; the `physician, heal thyself' philosophy; and appropriate alternatives to orthodox medicine. Family medicine faces the challenge of integrating these humanistic concepts with science. PMID:21283496

  8. Herbal Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  9. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  10. Medicine Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.; Jeanotte, Holly, Ed.

    Described as a survival manual for Indian women in medicine, this collected work contains diverse pieces offering inspiration and practical advice for Indian women pursuing or considering careers in medicine. Introductory material includes two legends symbolizing the Medicine or Spirit Woman's role in Indian culture and an overview of Indians Into…

  11. Stem cell platforms for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Timothy J; Behfar, Atta; Yamada, Satsuki; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Terzic, Andre

    2009-06-01

    The pandemic of chronic degenerative diseases associated with aging demographics mandates development of effective approaches for tissue repair. As diverse stem cells directly contribute to innate healing, the capacity for de novo tissue reconstruction harbors a promising role for regenerative medicine. Indeed, a spectrum of natural stem cell sources ranging from embryonic to adult progenitors has been recently identified with unique characteristics for regeneration. The accessibility and applicability of the regenerative armamentarium has been further expanded with stem cells engineered by nuclear reprogramming. Through strategies of replacement to implant functional tissues, regeneration to transplant progenitor cells or rejuvenation to activate endogenous self-repair mechanisms, the overarching goal of regenerative medicine is to translate stem cell platforms into practice and achieve cures for diseases limited to palliative interventions. Harnessing the full potential of each platform will optimize matching stem cell-based biologics with the disease-specific niche environment of individual patients to maximize the quality of long-term management, while minimizing the needs for adjunctive therapy. Emerging discovery science with feedback from clinical translation is therefore poised to transform medicine offering safe and effective stem cell biotherapeutics to enable personalized solutions for incurable diseases. PMID:19779576

  12. Personalized medicine in cystic fibrosis: genistein supplementation as a treatment option for patients with a rare S1045Y-CFTR mutation.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavisha; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Zhang, Weiqiang; Moon, ChangSuk; Bouquet, Erin; Srinivasan, Saumini; Li, Chunying; Stokes, Dennis C; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease caused by the mutations that generate nonfunctional CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. A rare serine-to-tyrosine (S1045Y) CFTR mutation was earlier reported to result in CF-associated fatality. We identified an African-American patient with the S1045Y mutation in CFTR, as well as a stop-codon mutation, who has a mild CF phenotype. The underlying mechanism of CF caused by S1045Y-CFTR has not been elucidated. In this study, we determined that S1045Y-CFTR exhibits twofold attenuated function compared with wild-type (WT)-CFTR. We report that serine-to-tyrosine mutation leads to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of S1045Y-CFTR, followed by recruitment and binding of E3-ubiquitin ligase c-cbl, resulting in enhanced ubiquitination and passage of S1045Y-CFTR in the endosome/lysosome degradative compartments. We demonstrate that inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation partially rescues S1045Y-CFTR surface expression and function. Based on our findings, it could be suggested that consuming genistein (a tyrosine phosphorylation inhibitor) would likely ameliorate CF symptoms in individuals with S1045Y-CFTR, providing a unique personalized therapy for this rare CF mutation. PMID:27261451

  13. Building the Partners HealthCare Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine: Informed Consent, Return of Research Results, Recruitment Lessons and Operational Considerations.

    PubMed

    Karlson, Elizabeth W; Boutin, Natalie T; Hoffnagle, Alison G; Allen, Nicole L

    2016-01-01

    The Partners HealthCare Biobank is a Partners HealthCare enterprise-wide initiative whose goal is to provide a foundation for the next generation of translational research studies of genotype, environment, gene-environment interaction, biomarker and family history associations with disease phenotypes. The Biobank has leveraged in-person and electronic recruitment methods to enroll >30,000 subjects as of October 2015 at two academic medical centers in Partners HealthCare since launching in 2010. Through a close collaboration with the Partners Human Research Committee, the Biobank has developed a comprehensive informed consent process that addresses key patient concerns, including privacy and the return of research results. Lessons learned include the need for careful consideration of ethical issues, attention to the educational content of electronic media, the importance of patient authentication in electronic informed consent, the need for highly secure IT infrastructure and management of communications and the importance of flexible recruitment modalities and processes dependent on the clinical setting for recruitment. PMID:26784234

  14. Building the Partners HealthCare Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine: Informed Consent, Return of Research Results, Recruitment Lessons and Operational Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Boutin, Natalie T.; Hoffnagle, Alison G.; Allen, Nicole L.

    2016-01-01

    The Partners HealthCare Biobank is a Partners HealthCare enterprise-wide initiative whose goal is to provide a foundation for the next generation of translational research studies of genotype, environment, gene-environment interaction, biomarker and family history associations with disease phenotypes. The Biobank has leveraged in-person and electronic recruitment methods to enroll >30,000 subjects as of October 2015 at two academic medical centers in Partners HealthCare since launching in 2010. Through a close collaboration with the Partners Human Research Committee, the Biobank has developed a comprehensive informed consent process that addresses key patient concerns, including privacy and the return of research results. Lessons learned include the need for careful consideration of ethical issues, attention to the educational content of electronic media, the importance of patient authentication in electronic informed consent, the need for highly secure IT infrastructure and management of communications and the importance of flexible recruitment modalities and processes dependent on the clinical setting for recruitment. PMID:26784234

  15. Bayesian predictive modeling for genomic based personalized treatment selection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junsheng; Stingo, Francesco C; Hobbs, Brian P

    2016-06-01

    Efforts to personalize medicine in oncology have been limited by reductive characterizations of the intrinsically complex underlying biological phenomena. Future advances in personalized medicine will rely on molecular signatures that derive from synthesis of multifarious interdependent molecular quantities requiring robust quantitative methods. However, highly parameterized statistical models when applied in these settings often require a prohibitively large database and are sensitive to proper characterizations of the treatment-by-covariate interactions, which in practice are difficult to specify and may be limited by generalized linear models. In this article, we present a Bayesian predictive framework that enables the integration of a high-dimensional set of genomic features with clinical responses and treatment histories of historical patients, providing a probabilistic basis for using the clinical and molecular information to personalize therapy for future patients. Our work represents one of the first attempts to define personalized treatment assignment rules based on large-scale genomic data. We use actual gene expression data acquired from The Cancer Genome Atlas in the settings of leukemia and glioma to explore the statistical properties of our proposed Bayesian approach for personalizing treatment selection. The method is shown to yield considerable improvements in predictive accuracy when compared to penalized regression approaches. PMID:26575856

  16. Dust control for Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Kevin; Karl, Chad; Litherland, Mark; Ritchie, David; Sun, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    The dust control group designed a system to restrict dust that is disturbed by the Enabler during its operation from interfering with astronaut or camera visibility. This design also considers the many different wheel positions made possible through the use of artinuation joints that provide the steering and wheel pitching for the Enabler. The system uses a combination of brushes and fenders to restrict the dust when the vehicle is moving in either direction and in a turn. This design also allows for each of maintenance as well as accessibility of the remainder of the vehicle.

  17. Dust control for Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Kevin; Karl, Chad; Litherland, Mark; Ritchie, David; Sun, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    The dust control group designed a system to restrict dust that is disturbed by the Enabler during its operation from interfering with astronaut or camera visibility. This design also considers the many different wheel positions made possible through the use of artinuation joints that provide the steering and wheel pitching for the Enabler. The system uses a combination of brushes and fenders to restrict the dust when the vehicle is moving in either direction and in a turn. This design also allows for ease of maintenance as well as accessibility of the remainder of the vehicle.

  18. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2014-06-23

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  19. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2012-07-02

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  20. Healthcare professionals’ acceptance of BelRAI, a web-based system enabling person-centred recording and data sharing across care settings with interRAI instruments: a UTAUT analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare and social care environments are increasingly confronted with older persons with long-term care needs. Consequently, the need for integrated and coordinated assessment systems increases. In Belgium, feasibility studies have been conducted on the implementation and use of interRAI instruments offering opportunities to improve continuity and quality of care. However, the development and implementation of information technology to support a shared dataset is a difficult and gradual process. We explore the applicability of the UTAUT theoretical model in the BelRAI healthcare project to analyse the acceptance of the BelRAI web application by healthcare professionals in home care, nursing home care and acute hospital care for older people with disabilities. Methods A structured questionnaire containing items based on constructs validated in the original UTAUT study was distributed to 661 Flemish caregivers. We performed a complete case analysis using data from 282 questionnaires to obtain information regarding the effects of performance expectancy (PE), effort expectancy (EE), social influence (SI), facilitating conditions (FC), anxiety (ANX), self-efficacy (SE) and attitude towards using technology (ATUT) on behavioural intention (BI) to use the BelRAI web application. Results The values of the internal consistency evaluation of each construct demonstrated adequate reliability of the survey instrument. Convergent and discriminant validity were established. However, the items of the ATUT construct cross-loaded on PE. FC proved to have the most significant influence on BI to use BelRAI, followed by SE. Other constructs (PE, EE, SI, ANX, ATUT) had no significant influence on BI. The ‘direct effects only’ model explained 30.8% of the variance in BI to use BelRAI. Conclusions Critical factors in stimulating the behavioural intention to use new technology are good-quality software, inter