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Sample records for encephalitis vaccine inactivated

  1. Second Generation Inactivated Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Candidates Protect Mice against a Lethal Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Honnold, Shelley P.; Bakken, Russell R.; Fisher, Diana; Lind, Cathleen M.; Cohen, Jeffrey W.; Eccleston, Lori T.; Spurgers, Kevin B.; Maheshwari, Radha K.; Glass, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are no FDA-licensed vaccines or therapeutics for eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) for human use. We recently developed several methods to inactivate CVEV1219, a chimeric live-attenuated eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV). Dosage and schedule studies were conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of three potential second-generation inactivated EEEV (iEEEV) vaccine candidates in mice: formalin-inactivated CVEV1219 (fCVEV1219), INA-inactivated CVEV1219 (iCVEV1219) and gamma-irradiated CVEV1219 (gCVEV1219). Both fCVEV1219 and gCVEV1219 provided partial to complete protection against an aerosol challenge when administered by different routes and schedules at various doses, while iCVEV1219 was unable to provide substantial protection against an aerosol challenge by any route, dose, or schedule tested. When evaluating antibody responses, neutralizing antibody, not virus specific IgG or IgA, was the best correlate of protection. The results of these studies suggest that both fCVEV1219 and gCVEV1219 should be evaluated further and considered for advancement as potential second-generation inactivated vaccine candidates for EEEV. PMID:25116127

  2. Use of an inactivated eastern equine encephalitis virus vaccine in cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Dein, F.J.; Clark, G.G.; Watts, D.M.; Crabbs, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    An unprecedented outbreak of fatal eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus occurred during the late summer and fall of 1984 in endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland. As part of efforts to prevent future epizootics of EEE. studies were conducted to evaluate the antibody response of cranes following vaccination with a formalin-inactivated EEE virus vaccine. Viral specific neutralizing antibody was elicited in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes following 1M inoculation with the vaccine. Among the 1M-inoculated cranes, peak antibody titers of 1:80 on days 30 to 60 had waned to undetectable levels by days 90 to 120. Although the initial titers were not increased by the first booster dose, the duration of the antibody was extended considerably. Whooping cranes, receiving vaccine 6 months after their first vaccination, developed titers of 1:80 to 1:320 by day 30. At 45 days after the final vaccination, these titers had dropped to 1:10 to 1:160. Cranes with preexisting EEE virus antibody, apparently reflecting natural infection, exhibited an anamnestic response indicated by a rapid increase and sustained high antibody titer. Even though EEE virus vaccine induced neutralizing antibody and produced no adverse side effects, further studies will be required to assess the significance of this response as a strategy for protecting whooping cranes against natural EEE virus infection. The loss of captive whooping cranes to the EEE virus presented a previously unrecognized risk and obstacle to recovery of this species. Not only was, there a setback in the captive breeding and reintroduction program for the whooping crane, but, because of the susceptibility of the species to the EEE virus. establishment of additional crane populations may be more complicated than initially envisioned. However, through continued surveillance, serological monitoring, and vaccination activities, we are confident that

  3. Japanese Encephalitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Monica A.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a significant human health concern in Asia, Indonesia and parts of Australia with more than 3 billion people potentially at risk of infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the causative agent of JE. Given the risk to human health and the theoretical potential for JEV use as a bioweapon, the development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent JEV infection is vital for preserving human health. The development of vaccines for JE began in the 1940s with formalin-inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccines. These vaccines have been shown to induce a protective immune response and to be very effective. Mouse brain-derived vaccines were still in use until May 2011 when the last lots of the BIKEN® JE-VAX® expired. Development of modern JE vaccines utilizes cell culture-derived viruses and improvements in manufacturing processes as well as removal of potential allergens or toxins have significantly improved vaccine safety. China has developed a live-attenuated vaccine that has proven to induce protective immunity following a single inoculation. In addition, a chimeric vaccine virus incorporating the prM and E structural proteins derived from the live-attenuated JE vaccine into the live-attenuated yellow fever 17D vaccine virus backbone is currently in clinical trials. In this article, we provide a summary of JE vaccine development and on-going clinical trials. We also discuss the potential risk of JEV as a bioweapon with a focus on virus sustainability if used as a weapon. PMID:23125946

  4. Safety and immunogenicity of a delta inulin-adjuvanted inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine in pregnant mares and foals.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Prow, Natalie A; Wang, Wenqi; Tan, Cindy S E; Coyle, Mitchell; Douma, Alysha; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Kidd, Lisa; Hall, Roy A; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, following severe flooding in Eastern Australia, an unprecedented epidemic of equine encephalitis occurred in South-Eastern Australia, caused by Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV) and a new variant strain of Kunjin virus, a subtype of West Nile virus (WNVKUN). This prompted us to assess whether a delta inulin-adjuvanted, inactivated cell culture-derived Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine (JE-ADVAX™) could be used in horses, including pregnant mares and foals, to not only induce immunity to JEV, but also elicit cross-protective antibodies against MVEV and WNVKUN. Foals, 74-152 days old, received two injections of JE-ADVAX™. The vaccine was safe and well-tolerated and induced a strong JEV-neutralizing antibody response in all foals. MVEV and WNVKUN antibody cross-reactivity was seen in 33% and 42% of the immunized foals, respectively. JE-ADVAX™ was also safe and well-tolerated in pregnant mares and induced high JEV-neutralizing titers. The neutralizing activity was passively transferred to their foals via colostrum. Foals that acquired passive immunity to JEV via maternal antibodies then were immunized with JE-ADVAX™ at 36-83 days of age, showed evidence of maternal antibody interference with low peak antibody titers post-immunization when compared to immunized foals of JEV-naïve dams. Nevertheless, when given a single JE-ADVAX™ booster immunization as yearlings, these animals developed a rapid and robust JEV-neutralizing antibody response, indicating that they were successfully primed to JEV when immunized as foals, despite the presence of maternal antibodies. Overall, JE-ADVAX™ appears safe and well-tolerated in pregnant mares and young foals and induces protective levels of JEV neutralizing antibodies with partial cross-neutralization of MVEV and WNVKUN. PMID:25516480

  5. Tick-borne Encephalitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Axel T; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a disease that is found from western Europe across Asia and into Japan. In recent years the incidence rate has been increasing as has the endemic range of the virus. Tick-borne encephalitis is caused by three genetically distinct sutypes of viruses within a single TBE virus (TBEV) serocomplex. These three subtypes consist of Far-eastern subtype TBEV (TBEV-FE), Siberian subtype (TBEV-Sib) and European subtype (TBEV-Eu). Each of these subtypes cause clinically distinct diseases with varying degrees of severity. Development of the first vaccines for TBEV began in the late 1930s shortly after the first isolation of TBEV-FE in Russia. In the 1970s Austria began large scale vaccine production and a nationalized vaccine campaign that significantly reduced the incidence rate of TBE. Currently there are four licensed TBE vaccines, two in Europe and two in Russia. These vaccines are all quite similar formalin-inactivated virus vaccines but the each use a different virus strain for production. Published studies have shown that European vaccines are cross-protective in rodent studies and elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibody responses in human vaccines. European vaccines have been licensed for a rapid vaccine schedule that could be used in response to a significant outbreak and reasonable neutralizing antibody titers can be achieved after a single dose although a second dose provides nearly complete and long-lasting protection. This review focuses on the current status of licensed TBE vaccines and provides a brief summary of technology currently being developed for new vaccines. PMID:23997980

  6. Formalin Inactivation of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Alters the Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of a Neutralization Epitope in Envelope Protein Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yi-Chin; Chiu, Hsien-Chung; Chen, Li-Kuang; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Chiou, Shyan-Song

    2015-01-01

    Formalin-inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccines are widely available, but the effects of formalin inactivation on the antigenic structure of JEV and the profile of antibodies elicited after vaccination are not well understood. We used a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to map the antigenic structure of live JEV virus, untreated control virus (UCV), formalin-inactivated commercial vaccine (FICV), and formalin-inactivated virus (FIV). The binding activity of T16 MAb against Nakayama-derived FICV and several strains of FIV was significantly lower compared to live virus and UCV. T16 MAb, a weakly neutralizing JEV serocomplex antibody, was found to inhibit JEV infection at the post-attachment step. The T16 epitope was mapped to amino acids 329, 331, and 389 within domain III (EDIII) of the envelope (E) glycoprotein. When we explored the effect of formalin inactivation on the immunogenicity of JEV, we found that Nakayama-derived FICV, FIV, and UCV all exhibited similar immunogenicity in a mouse model, inducing anti-JEV and anti-EDII 101/106/107 epitope-specific antibodies. However, the EDIII 329/331/389 epitope-specific IgG antibody and neutralizing antibody titers were significantly lower for FICV-immunized and FIV-immunized mouse serum than for UCV-immunized. Formalin inactivation seems to alter the antigenic structure of the E protein, which may reduce the potency of commercially available JEV vaccines. Virus inactivation by H2O2, but not by UV or by short-duration and higher temperature formalin treatment, is able to maintain the antigenic structure of the JEV E protein. Thus, an alternative inactivation method, such as H2O2, which is able to maintain the integrity of the E protein may be essential to improving the potency of inactivated JEV vaccines. PMID:26495991

  7. Protective efficacies of live attenuated and formaldehyde-inactivated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus vaccines against aerosol challenge in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Jahrling, P B; Stephenson, E H

    1984-01-01

    Although two investigational vaccines are used to immunize humans against Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus, neither had previously been tested for protective efficacy against aerosol exposure. Live attenuated vaccine (TC-83) protected all hamsters challenged by either aerosol or subcutaneous routes with 4.7 to 5.2 log10 PFU of virulent Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus. Formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine (C-84) failed to protect against aerosol challenge but did protect against subcutaneous challenge. Protection elicited by TC-83 vaccine did not depend solely on serum-neutralizing antibody. These studies suggest that TC-83 vaccine is preferable to C-84 vaccine for protecting laboratory workers at risk to aerosol exposure. PMID:6715512

  8. Japanese encephalitis and vaccines: past and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Paulke-Korinek, Maria; Kollaritsch, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    The Japanese encephalitis virus is the main cause of encephalitis in Asia. The vectors are mosquitoes. Every year 30,000 to 50,000 cases and 10,000 deaths from Japanese encephalitis are reported, and estimates go up to 100,000 cases. No effective antiviral therapy exists to treat this flavivirus infection. For prophylaxis vaccines are available. In Asia numerous vaccines are used regionally. The production of the only vaccine that was internationally licensed, JE-VAX, was ceased in 2005. Therefore a shortage of Japanese encephalitis vaccines might occur before new generation vaccines based on cell cultures will be available. An inactivated Vero cell-derived vaccine based on the Beijing-1 strain is developed in Japan by Biken and Kaketsuken. Another promising vaccine candidate is the inactivated whole-virus vaccine IC-51 (Strain SA14-14-2) by the Austrian company Intercell. The third interesting vaccine candidate being in the late stages of clinical trials is the genetically engineered, chimeric and live-attenuated vaccine ChimeriVaxtrade mark-JE by the UK/USA-based company Acambis. The new vaccines in the pipeline show promising results and market licensures are expected in the near future. Showing excellent tolerability, these vaccines will not only be used in the population living in endemic areas where the risk of infection is extremely high, but also for travellers and military personnel. PMID:19066766

  9. Japanese encephalitis: the virus and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sang-Im; Lee, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an infectious disease of the central nervous system caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a zoonotic mosquito-borne flavivirus. JEV is prevalent in much of Asia and the Western Pacific, with over 4 billion people living at risk of infection. In the absence of antiviral intervention, vaccination is the only strategy to develop long-term sustainable protection against JEV infection. Over the past half-century, a mouse brain-derived inactivated vaccine has been used internationally for active immunization. To date, however, JEV is still a clinically important, emerging, and re-emerging human pathogen of global significance. In recent years, production of the mouse brain-derived vaccine has been discontinued, but 3 new cell culture-derived vaccines are available in various parts of the world. Here we review current aspects of JEV biology, summarize the 4 types of JEV vaccine, and discuss the potential of an infectious JEV cDNA technology for future vaccine development. PMID:24161909

  10. Japanese encephalitis vaccines: moving away from the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Mark P; Webster, Diane E; Martin, Jenny L; Wesselingh, Steven L

    2003-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a severe disease that is widespread throughout Asia and is spreading beyond its traditional boundaries. Three vaccines are currently in use against JE but only one is available internationally, a mouse-brain-derived inactivated vaccine first used in the 1930s. Although this vaccine has been effective in reducing the incidence of JE, it is relatively expensive and has been linked to severe allergic and neurological reactions. Cell-culture-derived inactivated and attenuated vaccines have been developed but are only used in the People's Republic of China. Other vaccines currently in various stages of development are DNA vaccines, a chimeric yellow fever-JE viral vaccine, virus-like particle vaccines and poxvirus-based vaccines. Poxvirus-based vaccines and the chimeric yellow fever-JE vaccine have been tested in Phase I clinical trials. These new vaccines have the potential to significantly reduce the impact of JE in Asia, particularly if used in an oral vaccine delivery strategy. PMID:12903806

  11. The smallpox vaccine and postvaccinal encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Roos, Karen L; Eckerman, Nancy L

    2002-03-01

    Smallpox is one of the deadliest infectious diseases in history. The discovery by Edward Jenner that inoculation with a droplet of pus from a cow with cowpox protected a person from smallpox resulted in the successful vaccination of millions of people. There were, however, complications associated with smallpox vaccination; the most serious complication was postvaccinal encephalitis, which was reported to occur with an incidence of 1 in 110,000 vaccinations and a case-fatality rate of 50%. Before we become complacent with the idea that we will respond to a bioterrorism attack with a mass immunization program for smallpox, it is important to be reminded of the risk and clinical manifestations of postvaccinal encephalitis and the efficacy of antivaccinia gamma-globulin in preventing this complication. The first case of postvaccinal encephalitis as a complication of the Jennerian cowpox inoculation was observed in 1905. A century later, there is no effective therapy. PMID:12170398

  12. Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 antibody encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Mayasi, Yunis; Takhtani, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe a case of leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 (LGI1) antibody–associated encephalitis. Methods: The clinical and ancillary data and brain MRIs were gathered retrospectively by chart review. Relevant literature on similar cases was also reviewed. Results: The diagnosis of LGI1 antibody–associated autoimmune encephalitis was based on the typical clinical presentation of seizures, psychiatric symptoms, and memory loss as well as negative diagnostic testing for cancer; the diagnosis was confirmed by positive LGI1 antibody. The patient responded favorably to treatment with IV immunoglobulin and continues to do well. Conclusion: LGI1 antibody–associated encephalitis has increasingly been recognized as a primary autoimmune disorder with good prognosis and response to treatment. PMID:25520958

  13. Studies on Japanese B Encephalitis Virus Vaccines from Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balwant; Hammon, W. McD.

    1971-01-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate the reliability of and to determine the mechanism involved in an antigen extinction mouse intraperitoneal (ip) challenge test for potency of a cell culture vaccine for Japanese B encephalitis, a modification of a test originated by Sabin for a mouse brain vaccine. Some comparisons were made with the official Japanese test using an intracerebral (ic) challenge after a more prolonged immunization procedure. The Japanese method of using a lyophilized reference vaccine with each test was also employed. It was found that the ip and the ic test appeared to show similar relative differences between lots. The ip test was more quickly and readily performed, gave reasonably consistent results on repetition, and, when used with a suitable reference vaccine, gave promise of being an entirely suitable and reliable test. Immunization by the intramuscular route rather than by the regular ip route appeared to offer no advantage and was less consistent in responses shown. Neutralizing antibody responses of the mice in the standard procedure were very quick to appear, about 4 days after the first dose of vaccine and had a peak titer about the seventh day, the time of challenge. This titer fell quickly unless challenge occurred. The antibody was heat stable, but it was readily inactivated by 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). Not until the 11th or 15th day did a small amount of immunoglobulin G appear. Challenge on day 7 significantly increased titers, but this antibody was also mostly inactivated by 2-ME. Interferon did not appear to play any significant role in the protection shown by the mice. PMID:4325023

  14. Travel-acquired Japanese encephalitis and vaccination considerations.

    PubMed

    Pavli, Androula; Maltezou, Helena C

    2015-09-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a serious arboviral disease caused by a virus of the genus Flavivirus. Japanese encephalitis is the most common vaccine-preventable virus causing encephalitis in Asia, affecting more than 50,000 persons and leading to 15,000 fatalities per year in endemic countries. For most travelers to Asia, the risk of Japanese encephalitis infection is extremely low and depends on destination, duration of travel, season, and activities. This article reviews travel-acquired Japanese encephalitis with a focus on epidemiology and prevention in the light of the newly available options for active immunization against Japanese encephalitis which have become available, and of the increasing popularity of travels to Japanese encephalitis endemic countries. PMID:26409731

  15. Japanese encephalitis vaccines: current vaccines and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Monath, T P

    2002-01-01

    Vaccination against JE ideally should be practiced in all areas of Asia where the virus is responsible for human disease. The WHO has placed a high priority on the development of a new vaccine for prevention of JE. Some countries in Asia (Japan, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, and the PRC) manufacture JE vaccines and practice childhood immunization, while other countries suffering endemic or epidemic disease (India, Nepal, Laos, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines) have no JE vaccine manufacturing or policy for use. With the exception of the PRC, all countries practicing JE vaccination use formalin inactivated mouse brain vaccines, which are relatively expensive and are associated with rare but clinically significant allergic and neurological adverse events. New inactivated JE vaccines manufactured in Vero cells are in advanced preclinical or early clinical development in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and the PRC. An empirically derived, live attenuated vaccine (SA14-14-2) is widely used in the PRC. Trials in the PRC have shown SA14-14-2 to be safe and effective when administered in a two-dose regimen, but regulatory concerns over manufacturing and control have restricted international distribution. The genetic basis of attenuation of SA14-14-2 has been partially defined. A new live attenuated vaccine (ChimeriVax-JE) that uses a reliable flavivirus vaccine--yellow fever 17D--as a live vector for the envelope genes of SA14-14-2 virus is in early clinical trials and appears to be well tolerated and immunogenic after a single dose. Vaccinia and avipox vectored vaccines have also been tested clinically, but are no longer being pursued due to restricted effectiveness mediated by anti-vector immunity. Other approaches to JE vaccines--including naked DNA, oral vaccination, and recombinant subunit vaccines--have been reviewed. PMID:12082985

  16. Rabies direct fluorescent antibody test does not inactivate rabies or eastern equine encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Jodie A; Franke, Mary A; Davis, April D

    2016-08-01

    An examination using the routine rabies direct fluorescent antibody test was performed on rabies or Eastern equine encephalitis positive mammalian brain tissue to assess inactivation of the virus. Neither virus was inactivated with acetone fixation nor the routine test, thus laboratory employees should treat all samples as rabies and when appropriate Eastern equine encephalitis positive throughout the whole procedure. PMID:27079827

  17. 1,5-Iodonaphthyl azide-inactivated V3526 protects against aerosol challenge with virulent venezuelan equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Paridhi; Sharma, Anuj; Spurgers, Kevin B; Bakken, Russell R; Eccleston, Lori T; Cohen, Jeffrey W; Honnold, Shelley P; Glass, Pamela J; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2016-05-27

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a New World alphavirus. VEEV is highly infectious in aerosolized form and has been identified as a bio-terrorism agent. There is no licensed vaccine for prophylaxis against VEEV. The current IND vaccine is poorly immunogenic and does not protect against an aerosol challenge with virulent VEEV. We have previously shown that VEEV inactivated by 1,5-iodonaphthyl azide (INA) protects against footpad challenge with virulent VEEV. In this study, we inactivated an attenuated strain of VEEV, V3526, with INA and evaluated its protective efficacy against aerosol challenge with wild type VEEV. We demonstrated that among three routes of immunization, intramuscular immunization with INA-inactivate V3526 (INA-iV3526) provided complete protection against aerosol challenge with virulent VEEV. Our data suggests that INA-iV3526 can be explored further for development as an effective vaccine candidate against aerosol challenge of virulent VEEV. PMID:27129427

  18. [Recurrent encephalitis following annual influenza vaccine. Case report].

    PubMed

    González, Bernardita; Fica, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Influenza vaccine is rarely associated with neurological adverse effects such as Guillain Barré syndrome, encephalitis or aseptic meningitis. We report the case of a male patient that presented two episodes of acute encephalitis in consecutive years, 16 and 20 days after his annual influenza vaccine shot, respectively. In both instances, patient required ICU admission and evolved with fast recovery and no sequels. The first episode was managed empirically as herpetic encephalitis but an extensive study was performed in the second episode without identifying any microorganism. Neuroimaging studies also discarded acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Mild pleocytosis of mononuclear predominance was detected in both cases in CSF. Naranjo score punctuated 8 points indicating a probable causal relationship. Acute encephalitis is a rare adverse effect of influenza vaccine and occurs several days after immunization. It has a broad differential diagnosis, and appears to be of self-limited duration and associated with good prognosis. PMID:27315001

  19. Comparison of Four Serological Tests for Detecting Antibodies to Japanese Encephalitis Virus after Vaccination in Children

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Go Woon; Cho, Jung Eun; Ju, Young Ran; Hong, Young-Jin; Han, Myung Guk; Lee, Won-Ja; Choi, Eui Yul; Jeong, Young Eui

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Several different methods are currently used to detect antibodies to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in serum samples or cerebrospinal fluid. These methods include the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of each method in detecting vaccine-induced antibodies to JEV. Methods The study included 29 children who had completed a primary immunization schedule with an inactivated vaccine against JEV derived from mouse brain (n = 15) or a live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine (n = 14). Serum samples were collected between 3 months and 47 months after the last immunization. The serum samples were tested by performing the PRNT, HI test, in-house IFA, and commercial ELISA. The antibody detection rates were compared between tests. Results All 29 serum samples were positive with the PRNT, showing antibody titers from 1:20 to 1:2560. The HI test showed positive rates of 86.7% (13/15) and 71.4% (10/14) in the inactivated and live attenuated vaccine groups, respectively. The results of the IFA for immunoglobulin (Ig)G were positive in 53.3% (8/15) of children in the inactivated vaccine group and 35.7% (5/14) in the live attenuated vaccine group. Neither the IFA nor ELISA detected JEV IgM antibodies in any of the 29 children. Conclusion These results show that detection rates of vaccine-induced antibodies to JEV have a wide range (0–100%) depending on the testing method as well as the time since immunization and individual differences between children. These findings are helpful in interpreting serological test results for the diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis in situations where vaccines are widely administered. PMID:25389515

  20. A collaborative study of an alternative in vitro potency assay for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Chul; Kim, Do-Keun; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Yeonhee; Lim, Jong-Mi; Hong, JiYoung; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Park, Yong-Keun; Kim, Jaeok

    2016-09-01

    The use of inactivated Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines has been ongoing in East Asia for 40 years. A mouse immunogenicity assay followed by a Plaque Reduction Neutralization (PRN) Test (PRNTest) is currently recommended for each lot release of the vaccine by many national authorities. We developed an alternative in vitro ELISA to determine the E antigen content of the Japanese encephalitis virus to observe the 3Rs strategy. A collaborative study for replacing the in vivo potency assay for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine with the in vitro ELISA assay was confirmed comparability between these two methods. The study demonstrated that an in vitro assay could perform faster and was more convenient than the established in vivo PRNTest. Moreover, this assay had better precision and reproducibility compared with the conventional in vivo assay. Additionally, the content of antigen determined using the in vitro ELISA correlated well with the potency of the in vivo assay. Furthermore, this method allowed discrimination between individual lots. Thus, we propose a progressive switch from the in vivo assay to the in vitro ELISA for JE vaccine quality control. PMID:27497622

  1. A vaccine candidate for eastern equine encephalitis virus based on IRES-mediated attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Jyotsna; Gorchakov, Rodion; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Weaver, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    To develop an effective vaccine against eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), we engineered a recombinant EEE virus (EEEV) that was attenuated and capable of replicating only in vertebrate cells, an important safety feature for live vaccines against mosquito-borne viruses. The subgenomic promoter was inactivated with 13 synonymous mutations and expression of the EEEV structural proteins was placed under the control of an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) derived from encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). We tested this vaccine candidate for virulence, viremia and efficacy in the murine model. A single subcutaneous immunization with 104 infectious units protected 100% of mice against intraperitoneal challenge with a highly virulent North American EEEV strain. None of the mice developed any signs of disease or viremia after immunization or following challenge. Our findings suggest that the IRES-based attenuation approach can be used to develop a safe and effective vaccine against EEE and other alphaviral diseases. PMID:22222869

  2. Whooping crane titers to eastern equine encephalitis vaccinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Kolski, E.; Hatfield, J.S.; Docherty, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    In 1984 an epizootic of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus killed 7 of 39 (18%) whooping cranes in captivity at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland, USA. Since that time whooping cranes have been vaccinated with a human EEE vaccine. This vaccine was unavailable for several years, necessitating use of an equine vaccine in the cranes. This study compared the antibody titers measured for three years using the human vaccine with those measured for two years using the equine form. Whooping cranes developed similarly elevated titers in one year using the human vaccine and both years using the equine vaccine. However, in two years where the human vaccine was used, the whooping cranes developed significantly lower titers compared to other years.

  3. Japanese Encephalitis Vaccines: WHO position paper, February 2015--Recommendations.

    PubMed

    2016-01-12

    This article presents the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendations on the use of Japanese Encephalitis (JE) vaccines excerpted from the WHO position paper on Japanese Encephalitis vaccines recently published in the Weekly Epidemiological Record [1]. This updated position paper on JE vaccines replaces the 2006 position paper on this subject [2]; it focuses on new information concerning the availability, safety, immunogenicity and effectiveness of JE vaccines and the duration of protection they confer. Recent data on global prevalence and burden of disease caused by JE and cost-effectiveness considerations regarding JE vaccination are also summarized. Footnotes to this paper provide a number of core references including references to grading tables that assess the quality of the scientific evidence. In accordance with its mandate to provide guidance to Member States on health policy matters, WHO issues a series of regularly updated position papers on vaccines and combinations of vaccines against diseases that have an international public health impact. These papers are concerned primarily with the use of vaccines in large-scale immunization programmes; they summarize essential background information on diseases and vaccines, and conclude with WHO's current position on the use of vaccines in the global context. This paper reflects the recommendations of WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on immunization. These recommendations were discussed by SAGE at its October 2014 meeting. Evidence presented at the meeting can be accessed at http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/previous/en/index.html. PMID:26232543

  4. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... small amount of a mercury-based preservative called thimerosal. Studies have not shown thimerosal in vaccines to be harmful, but flu vaccines that do not contain thimerosal are available.There is no live flu virus ...

  5. Cross-protection induced by Japanese encephalitis vaccines against different genotypes of Dengue viruses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jieqiong; Gao, Na; Fan, Dongying; Chen, Hui; Sheng, Ziyang; Fu, Shihong; Liang, Guodong; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause very high global disease burdens. Although cross-reactivity and cross-protection within flaviviruses have been demonstrated, the effect of JEV vaccination on susceptibility to DENV infection has not been well elucidated. In this study, we found that vaccination with the JEV inactivated vaccine (INV) and live attenuated vaccine (LAV) could induce cross-immune responses and cross-protection against DENV1-4 in mice. Despite the theoretical risk of immune enhancement, no increased mortality was observed in our mouse model. Additionally, low but consistently detectable cross-neutralizing antibodies against DENV2 and DENV3 were also observed in the sera of JEV vaccine-immunized human donors. The results suggested that both JEV-LAV and JEV-INV could elicit strong cross-immunity and protection against DENVs, indicating that inoculation with JEV vaccines may influence the distribution of DENVs in co-circulated areas and that the cross-protection induced by JEV vaccines against DENVs might provide important information in terms of DENV prevention. PMID:26818736

  6. Antibody response of sandhill and whooping cranes to an eastern equine encephalitis virus vaccine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, G.G.; Dein, F.J.; Crabbs, C.L.; Carpenter, J.W.; Watts, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    As a possible strategy to protect whooping cranes (Grus americana) from fatal eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) viral infection, studies were conducted to determine the immune response of this species and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) to a formalin-inactivated EEE viral vaccine. Viral-specific neutralizing antibody was elicited in both species after intramuscular (IM) vaccination. Subcutaneous and intravenous routes of vaccination failed to elicit detectable antibody in sandhill cranes. Among the IM vaccinated cranes, the immune response was characterized by nondetectable or low antibody titers that waned rapidly following primary exposure to the vaccine. However, one or more booster doses consistently elicited detectable antibody and/or increased antibody titers in the whooping cranes. In contrast, cranes with pre-existing EEE viral antibody, apparently induced by natural infection, exhibited a rapid increase and sustained high-antibody titers. Even though EEE virus vaccine induced neutralizing antibody and produced no adverse side effects, further studies will be required to determine the protective efficacy of the antibody.

  7. THE AUSTRIAN VACCINATION PARADOX: TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS VACCINATION VERSUS INFLUENZA VACCINATION.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula; Kunze, Michael

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a paradoxical situation in Austria. The vaccination rate against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in the general population is 82%, which is the highest worldwide, whereas the vaccination rate against influenza is about 8% and is among the lowest worldwide. A high awareness of TBE among the Austrian population achieved by an annual social marketing programme and the wide use of effective and well-tolerated vaccines have led to a successful containment of that disease. The vaccination coverage increased from 6% in 1980 to 82% in 2013 and exceeds 90% in some high-risk areas. This has led to a steady decline in the number of TBE cases from several hundred cases to 50 to 100 cases per year. The situation in regard to influenza vaccination is the opposite. Although Austria has issued one of the most extensive recommendations for influenza vaccination worldwide, the vaccination rate of the general population is extremely low. The possible reasons for the failure in the implementation of recommendations are ignorance, lack of social marketing and the predominance of a distinct discordance within the health system in general, and the Austrian medical fraternity in particular. PMID:26615654

  8. Polio inactivated vaccine costs into routine childhood immunization in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Ana Marli Christovam; Vicentine, Margarete Paganotti; Gryninger, Lígia Castelloni Figueiredo; de Soárez, Patricia Coelho; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the costs of vaccination regimens for introducing inactivated polio vaccine in routine immunization in Brazil. METHODS A cost analysis was conducted for vaccines in five vaccination regimens, including inactivated polio vaccine, compared with the oral polio vaccine-only regimen. The costs of the vaccines were estimated for routine use and for the “National Immunization Days”, during when the oral polio vaccine is administered to children aged less than five years, independent of their vaccine status, and the strategic stock of inactivated polio vaccine. The presented estimated costs are of 2011. RESULTS The annual costs of the oral vaccine-only program (routine and two National Immunization Days) were estimated at US$19,873,170. The incremental costs of inclusion of the inactivated vaccine depended on the number of vaccine doses, presentation of the vaccine (bottles with single dose or ten doses), and number of “National Immunization Days” carried out. The cost of the regimen adopted with two doses of inactivated vaccine followed by three doses of oral vaccine and one “National Immunization Day” was estimated at US$29,653,539. The concomitant replacement of the DTPw/Hib and HepB vaccines with the pentavalent vaccine enabled the introduction of the inactivated polio without increasing the number of injections or number of visits needed to complete the vaccination. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of the inactivated vaccine increased the annual costs of the polio vaccines by 49.2% compared with the oral vaccine-only regimen. This increase represented 1.13% of the expenditure of the National Immunization Program on the purchase of vaccines in 2011. PMID:25741645

  9. Long-term remission with rituximab in refractory leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 antibody encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Brown, J William L; Martin, Peter J; Thorpe, John W; Michell, Andrew W; Coles, Alasdair J; Cox, Amanda L; Vincent, Angela; Zandi, Michael S

    2014-06-15

    Autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) is recently described and there is a lack of detailed reports on the treatment of relapsing or refractory cases and long-term outcomes. Two case reports are presented. Both cases had faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS) and received rituximab after relapsing or refractory disease. Both cases achieved sustained clinical remission of up to 15 and 56 months respectively. Rituximab use allowed withdrawal of corticosteroids and was well tolerated. Randomized clinical trials are needed in LGI1 encephalitis and other autoimmune encephalitides. PMID:24703099

  10. Influenza (flu) vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... your family and other people. 2. Inactivated and recombinant flu vaccines A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every ... Vaccine Information Statement. Influenza (Flu) Vaccine (Inactivated or ... website at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/ ...

  11. Recombinant Measles AIK-C Vaccine Strain Expressing the prM-E Antigen of Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Akira; Toriniwa, Hiroko; Komiya, Tomoyoshi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    An inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine, which induces neutralizing antibodies, has been used for many years in Japan. In the present study, the JEV prM-E protein gene was cloned, inserted at the P/M junction of measles AIK-C cDNA, and an infectious virus was recovered. The JEV E protein was expressed in B95a cells infected with the recombinant virus. Cotton rats were inoculated with recombinant virus. Measles PA antibodies were detected three weeks after immunization. Neutralizing antibodies against JEV developed one week after inoculation, and EIA antibodies were detected three weeks after immunization. The measles AIK-C-based recombinant virus simultaneously induced measles and JEV immune responses, and may be a candidate for infant vaccines. Therefore, the present strategy of recombinant viruses based on a measles vaccine vector would be applicable to the platform for vaccine development. PMID:26930411

  12. Non-thermal plasma for inactivated-vaccine preparation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guomin; Zhu, Ruihao; Yang, Licong; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Qian; Su, Xia; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-02-17

    Vaccines are of great importance in controlling the spread of infectious diseases in poultry farming. The safety and efficacy of vaccines are also essential. To explore the feasibility of a novel technology (non-thermal plasma) in inactivated vaccine preparation, an alternating current atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (NTP) jet with Ar/O2/N2 as the operating gas was used to inactivate a Newcastle disease virus (NDV, LaSota) strain and H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV, A/Chicken/Hebei/WD/98) for vaccine preparation. The results showed that complete inactivation could be achieved with 2 min of NTP treatment for both NDV and AIV. Moreover, a proper NTP treatment time is needed for inactivation of a virus without destruction of the antigenic determinants. Compared to traditional formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine, the vaccine made from NDV treated by NTP for 2 min (NTP-2 min-NDV-vaccine) could induce a higher NDV-specific antibody titer in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens, and the results of a chicken challenge experiment showed that NTP-2 min-NDV-vaccine could protect SPF chickens from a lethal NDV challenge. Vaccines made from AIV treated by NTP for 2 min (NTP-2 min-AIV-vaccine) also showed a similar AIV-specific antibody titer compared with traditional AIV vaccines prepared using formaldehyde inactivation. Studies of the morphological changes of the virus, chemical analysis of NDV allantoic fluid and optical emission spectrum analysis of NTP suggested that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species produced by NTP played an important role in the virus inactivation process. All of these results demonstrated that it could be feasible to use non-thermal NTP as an alternative strategy to prepare inactivated vaccines for Newcastle disease and avian influenza. PMID:26529075

  13. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 5.0 milliliters of inactivated influenza vaccine into each...

  14. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 5.0 milliliters of inactivated influenza vaccine into each...

  15. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 5.0 milliliters of inactivated influenza vaccine into each...

  16. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 5.0 milliliters of inactivated influenza vaccine into each...

  17. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 5.0 milliliters of inactivated influenza vaccine into each...

  18. Japanese encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sang-Im; Lee, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an infectious disease of the central nervous system caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a zoonotic mosquito-borne flavivirus. JEV is prevalent in much of Asia and the Western Pacific, with over 4 billion people living at risk of infection. In the absence of antiviral intervention, vaccination is the only strategy to develop long-term sustainable protection against JEV infection. Over the past half-century, a mouse brain-derived inactivated vaccine has been used internationally for active immunization. To date, however, JEV is still a clinically important, emerging, and re-emerging human pathogen of global significance. In recent years, production of the mouse brain-derived vaccine has been discontinued, but 3 new cell culture-derived vaccines are available in various parts of the world. Here we review current aspects of JEV biology, summarize the 4 types of JEV vaccine, and discuss the potential of an infectious JEV cDNA technology for future vaccine development. PMID:24161909

  19. Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... during a certain season. Encephalitis caused by the herpes simplex virus is the leading cause of more severe cases ... show: Abnormal reflexes Increased intracranial pressure Mental confusion Mouth ulcers Muscle weakness Neck stiffness Signs in other ...

  20. Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... from an infected person Contaminated food or drink Mosquito, tick, and other insect bites Skin contact Different ... with anyone who has encephalitis. Controlling mosquitoes (a mosquito bite can transmit some viruses) may reduce the ...

  1. Phase III Clinical Trials Comparing the Immunogenicity and Safety of the Vero Cell-Derived Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine Encevac with Those of Mouse Brain-Derived Vaccine by Using the Beijing-1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Chiaki; Okada, Kenji; Ozaki, Takao; Hirose, Mizuo; Iribe, Kaneshige; Ishikawa, Yuji; Togashi, Takehiro; Ueda, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    The immunogenicity and safety of an inactivated cell culture Japanese encephalitis vaccine (CC-JEV) were compared with those of an inactivated mouse brain-derived Japanese encephalitis vaccine (MB-JEV) in phase III clinical multicenter trials conducted in children. The vaccines contain the same Japanese encephalitis virus strain, the Beijing-1 strain. Two independent clinical trials (trials 1 and 2) were conducted. Trial 1 was conducted in 468 healthy children. Each subject was injected with 17 μg per dose of either CC-JEV or MB-JEV, and the immunogenicity and safety of the vaccines were investigated. Trial 1 showed that CC-JEV was more immunogenic and reactive than MB-JEV at the same dose. Therefore, to adjust the immunogenicity of CC-JEV to that of MB-JEV, a vaccine that has had a good track record regarding its efficacy for a long time, trial 2 was conducted in 484 healthy children. To improve the stability, CC-JEV was converted from a liquid type to a freeze-dried type of vaccine. Each subject was injected subcutaneously with either 4 μg per dose of CC-JEV, 8 μg per dose of CC-JEV, or 17 μg per dose of MB-JEV twice, at an interval of 2 to 4 weeks, followed by an additional booster immunization 1 to 15 months after the primary immunization. Based on the results of trial 2, 4 μg per dose of the freeze-dried CC-JEV (under the label Encevac) was selected as a substitute for the MB-JEV. Encevac was approved and launched in 2011 and has since been in use as a 2nd-generation Japanese encephalitis vaccine in Japan. (These studies have been registered at the JapicCTI under registration no. JapicCTI-132063 and JapicCTI-080586 for trials 1 and 2, respectively.) PMID:24334689

  2. The efficacy of Japanese encephalitis vaccine in Henan, China: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Luo, D; Yin, H; Xili, L; Song, J; Wang, Z

    1994-12-01

    A population based case-control study to evaluate Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine efficacy was carried out in Gusi County, Henan Province, China from June to September in 1991. This study showed that the JE vaccine had a strong protective effect. The estimate of the vaccine efficacy was 78% (95% CI = 16-94%). An unimmunized child was at 4.54 times greater risk of developing JE than were fully immunized children during the study period. The present study may have underestimated the vaccine efficacy due to evaluation based on routine vaccination which might have been affected by vaccination management and the local cold chain system. PMID:7667706

  3. Efficacy Evaluation of an Inactivated Duck Tembusu Virus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Liu, Yuehuan; Wang, Xiuqing; Yang, Baoshou; He, Pingyou; Yang, Zhiyuan; Duan, Huijuan; Xie, Jia; Zou, Lihong; Zhao, Jicheng; Pan, Jie

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the potential use of an inactivated virus-based vaccine for the control and prevention of the newly emerged duck Tembusu virus infection in China, a duck Tembusu virus isolate, Tembusu-HB, was propagated in 12-day-old duck embryos and inactivated by treatment with formaldehyde. The inactivated viral antigen was emulsified with mineral oil, and five batches of the vaccine were manufactured. The immunogenicity and protection efficacy of the vaccine were evaluated in Beijing ducks and Beijing white geese. Results showed that more than 80% of immunized ducks were protected against virulent virus challenge after two intramuscular or subcutaneous injections of the inactivated vaccine, as evidenced by the negative virus isolation results. The protection is also correlated with a positive virus-specific antibody response as detected by ELISA. In contrast, none of the control ducks and geese had any detectable antibody response. Virus was isolated from all control ducks and geese after virulent virus challenge. Interestingly, a variable level of protection (20%-80%) was observed in Beijing white geese immunized twice with the same batches of vaccine, suggesting a species-specific effect of the vaccine. Overall, the results clearly suggest that the inactivated duck Tembusu virus vaccine is immunogenic and provides protection against virulent virus challenge. PMID:26473674

  4. Immunogenicity and safety of currently available Japanese encephalitis vaccines: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing; Ma, Shu-Juan; Liu, Xie; Jiang, Li-Na; Zhou, Jun-Hua; Xiong, Yi-Quan; Ding, Hong; Chen, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A number of Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines have been used for preventing Japanese encephalitis around the world. We here reviewed the immunogenicity and safety of the currently available Japanese encephalitis vaccines. We searched Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library and other online databases up to March 25, 2014 for studies focusing on currently used JE vaccines in any language. The primary outcomes were the seroconversion rate against JEV and adverse events. Meta-analysis was performed for the primary outcome when available. A total of 51 articles were included. Studies were grouped on the basic types of vaccines. This systematic review led to 2 aspects of the conclusions. On one hand, all the currently available JE vaccines are safe and effective. On the other hand, the overall of JE vaccine evaluation is disorganized, the large variation in study designs, vaccine types, schedules, doses, population and few hand-to-hand trails, make direct comparisons difficult. In order to make a more evidence-based decision on optimizing the JE vaccine, it is warranted to standardize the JE vaccine evaluation research. PMID:25668666

  5. Economic benefits of inactivated influenza vaccines in the prevention of seasonal influenza in children

    PubMed Central

    Salleras, Luis; Navas, Encarna; Torner, Nuria; Prat, Andreu A.; Garrido, Patricio; Soldevila, Núria; Domínguez, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review published studies that evaluated the efficiency of inactivated influenza vaccination in preventing seasonal influenza in children. The vaccine evaluated was the influenza-inactivated vaccine in 10 studies and the virosomal inactivated vaccine in 3 studies. The results show that yearly vaccination of children with the inactivated influenza vaccine saves money from the societal and family perspectives but not from the public or private provider perspective. When vaccination does not save money, the cost-effectiveness ratios were very acceptable. It can be concluded, that inactivated influenza vaccination of children is a very efficient intervention. PMID:23295894

  6. Tailored Vaccines Targeting the Elderly Using Whole Inactivated Influenza Vaccines Bearing Cytokine Immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tila; Heffron, Connie L.; High, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza and its complications disproportionately affect the elderly, leading to high morbidity and mortality in this ever-increasing population. Despite widespread vaccination efforts, the current influenza vaccines are less effective in the elderly; hence newer vaccine strategies are needed to improve their efficacy in this age group. We have previously shown that co-presentation of cytokines on the surface of inactivated influenza virus particles affords better protection from lethal homotypic viral challenge in young adult mice than conventional non-adjuvanted whole inactivated vaccine. Here, we determined the efficacy of these vaccine formulations in Balb/c mice “aged” to 17 months (“aged mice”) along with the addition of a membrane-bound interleukin-12 (IL-12) vaccine formulation. Our investigations found that a single low-dose intramuscular vaccination with inactivated whole influenza vaccine co-presenting IL-12 was sufficient to provide enhanced protection from subsequent influenza challenge as compared with non-adjuvanted whole inactivated vaccine. Our results indicate that incorporation of cytokines such as IL-12 in a membrane-bound formulation in whole inactivated vaccine may provide a means to lower the vaccine dose while eliciting enhanced protective responses in the elderly, an age group that responds poorly to current vaccination regimens. PMID:24102577

  7. [Experimental study of an antirabies vaccine from sheep brain tissue inactivated by UV rays (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Pospeeva, N A; Morogova, V M; Gil'dina, S S; Nikolaeva, N V; Losev, M N

    1975-01-01

    The optimal regimen of sheep brain rabies vaccine inactivation with UV rays has been developed. The immunogenic activity of 22 experimental lots of UV-inactivated rabies vaccine was found to be considerably higher than that of commercial Fermi vaccine. The antigenic activity of the inactivated vaccine in animals was also high. PMID:1210319

  8. Recommendations for tick-borne encephalitis vaccination from the Central European Vaccination Awareness Group (CEVAG)

    PubMed Central

    Zavadska, Dace; Anca, Ioana; André, Francis; Bakir, Mustafa; Chlibek, Roman; Čižman, Milan; Ivaskeviciene, Inga; Mangarov, Atanas; Mészner, Zsófia; Pokorn, Marko; Prymula, Roman; Richter, Darko; Salman, Nuran; Šimurka, Pavol; Tamm, Eda; Tešović, Goran; Urbancikova, Ingrid; Usonis, Vytautas

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a viral neurological zoonotic disease transmitted to humans by ticks or by consumption of unpasteurized dairy products from infected cows, goats, or sheep. TBE is highly endemic in areas of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia where it is a major public health concern. However, it is difficult to diagnose TBE as clinical manifestations tend to be relatively nonspecific and a standardized case definition does not exist across the region. TBE is becoming more important in Europe due to the appearance of new endemic areas. Few Central European Vaccination Awareness Group (CEVAG) member countries have implemented universal vaccination programmes against TBE and vaccination coverage is not considered sufficient to control the disease. When implemented, immunization strategies only apply to risk groups under certain conditions, with no harmonized recommendations available to date across the region. Effective vaccination programmes are essential in preventing the burden of TBE. This review examines the current situation of TBE in CEVAG countries and contains recommendations for the vaccination of children and high-risk groups. For countries at very high risk of TBE infections, CEVAG strongly recommends the introduction of universal TBE vaccination in children > 1 y of age onwards. For countries with a very low risk of TBE, recommendations should only apply to those traveling to endemic areas. Overall, it is generally accepted that each country should be free to make its own decision based on regional epidemiological data and the vaccination calendar, although recommendations should be made, especially for those living in endemic areas. PMID:23291941

  9. Encephalitis in dogs associated with a batch of canine distemper (Rockborn) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, H J; Thompson, H; McCandlish, I A; Macartney, L; Nash, A S

    1988-01-16

    During a period of seven months in 1982-83 cases of postvaccinal encephalitis were recorded in dogs in various parts of Britain after the administration of a particular batch of combined distemper/hepatitis vaccine. Detailed investigations of one of these cases revealed that the distemper component was responsible and the vaccine virus was recovered from the brain of an affected dog. PMID:2895528

  10. Influenza (flu) vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/flu.html CDC review information for Inactivated Influenza VIS: ...

  11. Adjuvants and Inactivated Polio Vaccine: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hawken, Jennifer; Troy, Stephanie B.

    2012-01-01

    Poliomyelitis is nearing universal eradication; in 2011, there were 650 cases reported globally. When wild polio is eradicated, global oral polio vaccine (OPV) cessation followed by universal use of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is believed to be the safest vaccination strategy as IPV does not mutate or run the risk of vaccine derived outbreaks that OPV does. However, IPV is significantly more expensive than OPV. One strategy to make IPV more affordable is to reduce the dose by adding adjuvants, compounds that augment the immune response to the vaccine. No adjuvants are currently utilized in stand-alone IPV; however, several have been explored over the past six decades. From aluminum, used in many licensed vaccines, to newer and more experimental adjuvants such as synthetic DNA, a diverse group of compounds has been assessed with varying strengths and weaknesses. This review summarizes the studies to date evaluating the efficacy and safety of adjuvants used with IPV. PMID:23041122

  12. Establishment of the 3rd national standard for lot release testing of the Japanese encephalitis vaccine (Nakayama-NIH strain) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunmi; Moon, Hyungsil; Kim, Min Gyu; Kim, Do Keun; Chung, Hye Joo; Park, Yong Keun; Oh, Ho Jung

    2016-07-01

    In Korea, 2 inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccines from Nakayama-NIH and Beijing-1 strain have been utilized to date. The 1(st) national standard for lot release testing of the JE vaccine was established in 2002. The 2(nd) national standard, established in 2007, is currently in use for JE vaccine (Nakayama-NIH strain) potency testing. However, the supply of this standard is expected to be exhausted by 2015, necessitating the establishment of a new national standard with quality equivalent to that of the existing standard. Quality control tests were performed to verify that the new standard candidate material was equivalent to that of the 2(nd) national standard, proving its appropriateness for potency testing of JE vaccine. In addition, based on the results of a collaborative study conducted among 4 institutions including Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, the potency of the new national standard material was determined to be 2.69 neutralizing-antibody titer (log10) per vial. Therefore, the newly established national standard material is expected to be used for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine lot release in Korea. PMID:26890572

  13. Establishment of the 3rd national standard for lot release testing of the Japanese encephalitis vaccine (Nakayama-NIH strain) in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunmi; Moon, Hyungsil; Kim, Min Gyu; Kim, Do Keun; Chung, Hye Joo; Park, Yong Keun; Oh, Ho Jung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Korea, 2 inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccines from Nakayama-NIH and Beijing-1 strain have been utilized to date. The 1st national standard for lot release testing of the JE vaccine was established in 2002. The 2nd national standard, established in 2007, is currently in use for JE vaccine (Nakayama-NIH strain) potency testing. However, the supply of this standard is expected to be exhausted by 2015, necessitating the establishment of a new national standard with quality equivalent to that of the existing standard. Quality control tests were performed to verify that the new standard candidate material was equivalent to that of the 2nd national standard, proving its appropriateness for potency testing of JE vaccine. In addition, based on the results of a collaborative study conducted among 4 institutions including Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, the potency of the new national standard material was determined to be 2.69 neutralizing-antibody titer (log10) per vial. Therefore, the newly established national standard material is expected to be used for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine lot release in Korea. PMID:26890572

  14. Chimeric Alphavirus Vaccine Candidates Protect Mice from Intranasal Challenge with Western Equine Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Wang, Eryu; Adams, A. Paige; Plante, Kenneth S.; Ni, Sai; Taylor, Katherine; Miller, Mary E.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    We developed two types of chimeric Sindbis virus (SINV)/western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) alphaviruses to investigate their potential use as live virus vaccines against WEE. The first-generation vaccine candidate, SIN/CO92, was derived from structural protein genes of WEEV strain CO92-1356, and two second-generation candidates were derived from WEEV strain McMillan. For both first- and second-generation vaccine candidates, the nonstructural protein genes were derived from SINV strain AR339. Second-generation vaccine candidates SIN/SIN/McM and SIN/EEE/McM included the envelope glycoprotein genes from WEEV strain McMillan; however, the amino-terminal half of the capsid, which encodes the RNA-binding domain, was derived from either SINV or eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) strain FL93-939. All chimeric viruses replicated efficiently in mammalian and mosquito cell cultures and were highly attenuated in 6-week-old mice. Vaccinated mice developed little or no detectable disease and showed little or no evidence of challenge virus replication; however, all developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Upon intranasal challenge with high doses of virulent WEEV strains, mice vaccinated with ≥105 PFU of SIN/CO92 or ≥104 PFU of SIN/SIN/McM or SIN/EEE/McM were completely protected from disease. These findings support the potential use of these live-attenuated vaccine candidates as safe and effective vaccines against WEE. PMID:19446595

  15. Vaccine-associated herpes zoster ophthalmicus [correction of opthalmicus] and encephalitis in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Chouliaras, Giorgos; Spoulou, Vana; Quinlivan, Mark; Breuer, Judith; Theodoridou, Maria

    2010-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus vaccine has diminished the consequences of chicken pox in terms of health and economical burden. The increasing number of doses administered worldwide has revealed rare but important adverse effects that had not occurred during clinical trials. We report here the case of an immunocompetent 3(1/2)-year-old girl who developed encephalitis and herpes zoster opthalmicus 20 months after her immunization with varicella-zoster virus vaccine. Molecular analysis confirmed the vaccine strain as the causative agent. After an intravenous course with acyclovir, the child made a full recovery with no neurologic sequelae. PMID:20194287

  16. [Inactivated saponin vaccine against salmonellal abortion in sheep].

    PubMed

    Girginov, G; Vodas, K; Bozhilov, B

    1978-01-01

    An inactivated saponine vaccine is prepared from five highly immunogenic Salmonella abortus ovis strains, selected by means of a biological test on white rats. Saline was used as a diluent of the vaccine, with the addition of 30 per cent glycerine, 0.012 per cent saponine and 0.1 per cent propiolactone. The optimum immunization dose of 5 cm3 is injected singly subcutaneously behind the elbow, two and a half months after impregnation. The vaccine is applied on infected farms before the disease occurs. The cellular-humoral immunity, which forms 14 days after the injection, lasts 4--5 months and protects the sheep against salmonellosis abortion. PMID:571645

  17. Low Protective Efficacy of the Current Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine against the Emerging Genotype 5 Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoyan; Li, Minghua; Cui, Shiheng; Li, Xiaolong; Cao, Yuxi; Lei, Wenwen; Lu, Zhi; He, Ying; Wang, Huanyu; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George Fu; Liang, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Background The current Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine derived from G3 JE virus (JEV) can induce protective immunity against G1–G4 JEV genotypes. However, protective efficacy against the emerging G5 genotype has not been reported. Methods/Principal Findings Using in vitro and in vivo tests, biological phenotype and cross-immunoreactions were compared between G3 JEV and G5 JEV (wild strains). The PRNT90 method was used to detect neutralizing antibodies against different genotypes of JEV in JE vaccine-immunized subjects and JE patients. In JE vaccine-immunized mice, the lethal challenge protection rates against G3 and G5 JEV wild strains were 100% and 50%, respectively. The seroconversion rates (SCRs) of virus antibodies against G3 and G5 JEV among vaccinated healthy subjects were 100% and 35%, respectively. All clinically identified JE patients showed high levels of G3 JEV neutralizing antibodies (≥1:10–1280) with positive serum geometric mean titers (GMTs) of 43.2, while for G5 JEV, neutralizing antibody conversion rates were only 64% with positive serum GMTs of 11.14. Moreover, the positive rate of JEV neutralizing antibodies against G5 JEV in pediatric patients was lower than in adults. Conclusions/Significance Low levels of neutralizing/protective antibodies induced by the current JE vaccine, based on the G3 genotype, were observed against the emerging G5 JEV genotype. Our results demonstrate the need for more detailed studies to reevaluate whether or not the apparent emergence of G5 JEV can be attributed to failure of the current vaccine to induce appropriate immune protectivity against this genotype of JEV. PMID:27139722

  18. Anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 limbic encephalitis: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JINGYAO; LI, MIN; LI, GUIBO; ZHOU, CHUNKUI; ZHANG, RENSHENG

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the case of a 41-year-old woman admitted for anterograde memory loss, right facial grimacing and right arm posturing that had begun 1 month previously. Cranial magnetic resonance-diffusion weighted imaging and -fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging revealed a hyperintense signal in the left hippocampus and right basal ganglia, but no contrast enhancement. An electroencephalogram revealed rhythmic sharp and slow waves and rhythmic θ build-ups in the left temporal area. Single-photon emission computed tomography showed increased regional blood flow perfusion in the left cerebral frontal lobe and the right basal ganglia. The cerebrospinal fluid was normal, with the exception of the presence of leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) antibodies, and LGI1 antibodies were also found in the blood serum. The presence of the antibodies, the faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDSs) and the memory loss indicated limbic encephalitis. After 3 months of immunotherapy, the patient was free from epileptic seizures and had undergone a partial memory restoration. FBDSs alone justify the immediate initiation of immunotherapy, even prior to laboratory confirmation of the disease, as early treatment limits the duration of the illness. PMID:26889260

  19. CHIMERIC SINDBIS/EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VACCINE CANDIDATES ARE HIGHLY ATTENUATED AND IMMUNOGENIC IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eryu; Petrakova, Olga; Adams, A. Paige; Aguilar, Patricia V.; Kang, Wenli; Paessler, Slobodan; Volk, Sara M.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2007-01-01

    We developed chimeric Sindbis (SINV)/Eastern equine encephalitis (EEEV) viruses and investigated their potential for use as live virus vaccines against EEEV. One vaccine candidate contained structural protein genes from a typical North American EEEV strain, while the other had structural proteins from a naturally attenuated Brazilian isolate. Both chimeric viruses replicated efficiently in mammalian and mosquito cell cultures and were highly attenuated in mice. Vaccinated mice did not develop detectable disease or viremia, but developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Upon challenge with EEEV, mice vaccinated with >104PFU of the chimeric viruses were completely protected from disease. These findings support the potential use of these SIN/EEEV chimeras as safe and effective vaccines. PMID:17904699

  20. Use of Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine in US Travel Medicine Practices in Global TravEpiNet

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Bhushan R.; Rao, Sowmya R.; Jentes, Emily S.; Hills, Susan L.; Fischer, Marc; Gershman, Mark D.; Brunette, Gary W.; Ryan, Edward T.; LaRocque, Regina C.

    2014-01-01

    Few data regarding the use of Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine in clinical practice are available. We identified 711 travelers at higher risk and 7,578 travelers at lower risk for JE who were seen at US Global TravEpiNet sites from September of 2009 to August of 2012. Higher-risk travelers were younger than lower-risk travelers (median age = 29 years versus 40 years, P < 0.001). Over 70% of higher-risk travelers neither received JE vaccine during the clinic visit nor had been previously vaccinated. In the majority of these instances, clinicians determined that the JE vaccine was not indicated for the higher-risk traveler, which contradicts current recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Better understanding is needed of the clinical decision-making regarding JE vaccine in US travel medicine practices. PMID:25070999

  1. Tick-borne encephalitis in a child with previous history of completed primary vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zlamy, Manuela; Haberlandt, Edda; Brunner, Jürgen; Dozcy, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 13-year-old girl who presented with fever, headache, nausea and pain behind the right ear. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF; leukocytes 227/μL), electroencephalogram and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging were indicative of meningoencephalitis. Despite intensive therapy the general condition worsened and the patient was admitted to the intensive care unit. Serological analysis of CSF and serum indicated acute tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection (IgG and IgM positive). TBEV infection has been reported after incomplete and complete vaccination. TBEV vaccination breakthrough in childhood has been shown to cause severe disease. It has been suggested that immunized patients develop more severe disease due to altered immune response, but the exact mechanism is unknown. In the presence of typical symptoms and a history of vaccination, possible vaccination breakthrough or missing booster vaccination should be considered. PMID:26541246

  2. A chimeric Sindbis-based vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against a lethal aerosol challenge of eastern equine encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Chad J.; Adams, A. Paige; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Seymour, Robert L.; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K.; Mega, William; Frolov, Ilya; Didier, Peter J.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes sporadic, often fatal disease outbreaks in humans and equids, and is also a biological threat agent. Two chimeric vaccine candidates were constructed using a cDNA clone with a Sindbis virus (SINV) backbone and structural protein genes from either a North (SIN/NAEEEV) or South American (SIN/SAEEEV) strain of EEEV. The vaccine candidates were tested in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE). Cynomolgus macaques were either sham-vaccinated, or vaccinated with a single dose of either SIN/NAEEEV or SIN/SAEEEV. After vaccination, animals were challenged by aerosol with a virulent North American strain of EEEV (NA EEEV). The SIN/NAEEEV vaccine provided significant protection, and most vaccinated animals survived EEEV challenge (82%) with little evidence of disease, whereas most SIN/SAEEEV-vaccinated (83%) and control (100%) animals died. Protected animals exhibited minimal changes in temperature and cardiovascular rhythm, whereas unprotected animals showed profound hyperthermia and changes in heart rate post-exposure. Acute inflammation and neuronal necrosis were consistent with EEEV-induced encephalitis in unprotected animals, whereas no encephalitis-related histopathologic changes were observed in the SIN/NAEEEV-vaccinated animals. These results demonstrate that the chimeric SIN/NAEEEV vaccine candidate protects against an aerosol EEEV exposure. PMID:23333212

  3. Influenza vaccination with live-attenuated and inactivated virus-vaccines during an outbreak of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rocchi, G.; Ragona, G.; Piga, C.; Pelosio, A.; Volpi, A.; Vella, S.; Legniti, N.; de Felici, A.

    1979-01-01

    Immunization procedures with live attenuated and inactivated vaccines were carried out on a group of young recruits at the beginning of an outbreak of infection due to an A/Victoria/3/75-related virus strain, which occurred in February 1977 in a military camp. A retrospective investigation on protection from clinical influenza was then performed in order to investigate whether immunization with live virus vaccines, administered at the beginning of an epidemic, could provide early protection from the disease. In the course of the two weeks following vaccination, laboratory-confirmed clinical influenza cases occurred in 4 subjects among the 110 volunteers of the control group which received placebo, and in 8, 7 and 4 subjects respectively of the 3 groups of about 125 individuals, each of which received one of the following vaccine preparations: (a), live attenuated A/Victoria/3/75 influenza virus oral vaccine, grown on chick embryo kidney culture; (b), live attenuated nasal vaccine, a recombinant of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 with A/Victoria/3/75 virus; and (c), inactivated A/Victoria/3/75 virus intramuscular vaccine. These data do not support the hypothesis that, during an epidemic of infection, early protection from clinical influenza can be achieved through immunization with live attenuated or inactivated influenza virus vaccines, in spite of the high immunizing capability of the vaccine preparations. PMID:512351

  4. Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine candidates generated by chimerization with dengue virus type 4.

    PubMed

    Gromowski, Gregory D; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Hanson, Christopher T; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2014-05-23

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a leading cause of viral encephalitis worldwide and vaccination is one of the most effective ways to prevent disease. A suitable live-attenuated JEV vaccine could be formulated with a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine for the control of these viruses in endemic areas. Toward this goal, we generated chimeric virus vaccine candidates by replacing the precursor membrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein structural genes of recombinant dengue virus type 4 (rDEN4) or attenuated vaccine candidate rDEN4Δ30 with those of wild-type JEV strain India/78. Mutations were engineered in E, NS3 and NS4B protein genes to improve replication in Vero cells. The chimeric viruses were attenuated in mice and some elicited modest but protective levels of immunity after a single dose. One particular chimeric virus, bearing E protein mutation Q264H, replicated to higher titer in tissue culture and was significantly more immunogenic in mice. The results are compared with live-attenuated JEV vaccine strain SA14-14-2. PMID:24699473

  5. Anti-tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus neutralizing antibodies dynamics in natural infections versus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Remoli, Maria Elena; Marchi, Antonella; Fortuna, Claudia; Benedetti, Eleonora; Minelli, Giada; Fiorentini, Cristiano; Mel, Rosanna; Venturi, Giulietta; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia

    2015-03-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus infection elicits a life-long lasting protection. However, little is known about the neutralizing antibodies titres following natural infection. In this study, subjects with past TBE disease (n = 62) were analysed for the presence and titre of anti-TBE neutralizing antibodies, and compared with a vaccinated cohort (n = 101). Neutralizing antibody titres were higher in individuals with past TBE and did not show an age-dependent decrease when compared with vaccinees. PMID:25722483

  6. Vaccine Strategies for the Control and Prevention of Japanese Encephalitis in Mainland China, 1951–2011

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghua; Fu, Shihong; Wang, Huanyu; Lu, Zhi; Cao, Yuxi; He, Ying; Zhu, Wuyang; Zhang, Tingting; Gould, Ernest A.; Liang, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is arguably one of the most serious viral encephalitis diseases worldwide. China has a long history of high prevalence of Japanese encephalitis, with thousands of cases reported annually and incidence rates often exceeding 15/100,000. In global terms, the scale of outbreaks and high incidence of these pandemics has almost been unique, placing a heavy burden on the Chinese health authorities. However, the introduction of vaccines, developed in China, combined with an intensive vaccination program initiated during the 1970s, as well as other public health interventions, has dramatically decreased the incidence from 20.92/100,000 in 1971, to 0.12/100,000 in 2011. Moreover, in less readily accessible areas of China, changes to agricultural practices designed to reduce chances of mosquito bites as well as mosquito population densities have also been proven effective in reducing local JE incidence. This unprecedented public health achievement has saved many lives and provided valuable experience that could be directly applicable to the control of vector-borne diseases around the world. Here, we review and discuss strategies for promotion and expansion of vaccination programs to reduce the incidence of JE even further, for the benefit of health authorities throughout Asia and, potentially, worldwide. PMID:25121596

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of a live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (IMOJEV®) in children.

    PubMed

    Chokephaibulkit, K; Houillon, G; Feroldi, E; Bouckenooghe, A

    2016-01-01

    JE-CV (IMOJEV®, Sanofi Pasteur, France) is a live attenuated virus vaccine constructed by inserting coding sequences of the prM and E structural proteins of the Japanese encephalitis SA14-14-2 virus into the genome of yellow fever 17D virus. Primary immunization with JE-CV requires a single dose of the vaccine. This article reviews clinical trials of JE-CV in children aged up to 6 years conducted in countries across South-East Asia. Strong and persistent antibody responses were observed after single primary and booster doses, with 97% of children seroprotected up to five years after booster vaccination. Models of long-term antibody persistence predict a median duration of protection of approximately 30 years after a booster dose. The safety and reactogenicity profiles of JE-CV primary and booster doses are comparable to other widely used childhood vaccines. PMID:26588242

  8. A spatial and temporal analysis of Japanese encephalitis in mainland China, 1963-1975: a period without Japanese encephalitis vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Ren, Zhoupeng; Cao, Yuxi; Wang, Jinfeng; Liang, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    More than a million Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases occurred in mainland China from the 1960s to 1970s without vaccine interventions. The aim of this study is to analyze the spatial and temporal pattern of JE cases reported in mainland China from 1965 to 1973 in the absence of JE vaccination, and to discuss the impacts of climatic and geographical factors on JE during that period. Thus, the data of reported JE cases at provincial level and monthly precipitation and monthly mean temperature from 1963 to 1975 in mainland China were collected. Local Indicators of Spatial Association analysis was performed to identify spatial clusters at the province level. During that period, The epidemic peaked in 1966 and 1971 and the JE incidence reached up to 20.58/100000 and 20.92/100000, respectively. The endemic regions can be divided into three classes including high, medium, and low prevalence regions. Through spatial cluster analysis, JE epidemic hot spots were identified; most were located in the Yangtze River Plain which lies in the southeast of China. In addition, JE incidence was shown to vary among eight geomorphic units in China. Also, the JE incidence in the Loess Plateau and the North China Plain was showed to increase with the rise of temperature. Likewise, JE incidence in the Loess Plateau and the Yangtze River Plain was observed a same trend with the increase of rainfall. In conclusion, the JE cases clustered geographically during the epidemic period. Besides, the JE incidence was markedly higher on the plains than plateaus. These results may provide an insight into the epidemiological characteristics of JE in the absence of vaccine interventions and assist health authorities, both in China and potentially in Europe and Americas, in JE prevention and control strategies. PMID:24911168

  9. Inactivated virus vaccines from chemistry to prophylaxis: merits, risks and challenges.

    PubMed

    Delrue, Iris; Verzele, Dieter; Madder, Annemieke; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this review is to make researchers aware of the benefits of an efficient quality control system for prediction of a developed vaccine's efficacy. Two major goals should be addressed when inactivating a virus for vaccine purposes: first, the infectious virus should be inactivated completely in order to be safe, and second, the viral epitopes important for the induction of protective immunity should be conserved after inactivation in order to have an antigen of high quality. Therefore, some problems associated with the virus inactivation process, such as virus aggregate formation, protein crosslinking, protein denaturation and degradation should be addressed before testing an inactivated vaccine in vivo. PMID:22873127

  10. Characterization of 10 adjuvants for inactivated avian influenza virus (AIV) vaccines against challenge with highly pathogenic AIV in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inactivated vaccines comprise 95% of all vaccine used for avian influenza virus (AIV) by dose. Optimizing the adjuvant is one way to improve vaccine efficacy. Inactivated vaccines were produced with beta-propiolactone inactivated A/chicken/BC/314514-1/2004 H7N3 low pathogenicity AIV and standardiz...

  11. Formaldehyde-inactivated human enterovirus 71 vaccine is compatible for co-immunization with a commercial pentavalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Lee, Yi-Ping; Wang, Ya-Fang; Yu, Chun-Keung

    2011-03-24

    In this study we tested the effectiveness of a formaldehyde-inactivated EV71 vaccine and its compatibility for co-immunization with a pentavalent vaccine that contained inactivated poliovirus (PV) vaccine. The inactivated EV71 vaccine (C2 genogroup) elicited an antibody response which broadly neutralized homologous and heterologous genogroups, including B4, C4, and B5. Pups from vaccinated dams were resistant to the EV71 challenge and had a high survival rate and a low tissue viral burden when compared to those from non-vaccinated counterparts. Co-immunization with pentavalent and inactivated EV71 vaccines elicited antibodies against the major components of the pentavalent vaccine including the PV, Bordetella pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae type b, diphtheria toxoid, and tetanus toxoid at the same levels as in mice immunized with pentavalent vaccine alone. Likewise, EV71 neutralizing antibody titers were comparable between EV71-vaccinated mice and mice co-immunized with the two vaccines. These results indicate that formaldehyde-inactivated whole virus EV71 vaccine is feasible for designing multivalent vaccines. PMID:21315698

  12. Review of tick-borne encephalitis and vaccines: clinical and economical aspects.

    PubMed

    Šmit, Renata; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-05-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) disease is an increasing burden not only locally but also globally. In most endemic countries, vaccination coverage is too low to reduce the TBE burden significantly; however, vaccination is the most effective protection against TBE, with various vaccines currently available. In spite of rising awareness of TBE, little attention is directed toward the health economics of the disease. The purpose of the present review is to compile information on TBE and its explicit clinical and economical aspects. Given the scarcity of studies, the authors conclude that more attention is needed for health economics of TBE. Notably, this would help establish guidance on efficient policies for TBE prevention, reduce disease burden and achieve population health benefits. PMID:25427237

  13. IRES-Based Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Vaccine Candidate Elicits Protective Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Guerbois, Mathilde; Gorchakov, Rodion; Plante, Kenneth S.; Forrester, Naomi L.; Weaver, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an arbovirus that causes periodic outbreaks that impact equine and human populations in the Americas. One of the VEEV subtypes located in Mexico and Central America (IE) has recently been recognized as an important cause of equine disease and death, and human exposure also appears to be widespread. Here, we describe the use of an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) from encephalomyocarditis virus to stably attenuate VEEV, creating a vaccine candidate independent of unstable point mutations. Mice infected with this virus produced antibodies and were protected against lethal VEEV challenge. This IRES-based vaccine was unable to establish productive infection in mosquito cell cultures or in intrathoracically injected Aedes taeniorhynchus, demonstrating that it cannot be transmitted from a vaccinee. These attenuation, efficacy and safety results justify further development for humans or equids of this new VEEV vaccine candidate. PMID:23351391

  14. IRES-Containing VEEV Vaccine Protects Cynomolgus Macaques from IE Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Killeen, Stephanie Z.; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Weaver, Scott C.; Roy, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an arbovirus endemic to the Americas that is responsible for severe, sometimes fatal, disease in humans and horses. We previously described an IRES-based VEE vaccine candidate based up the IE serotype that offers complete protection against a lethal subtype IE VEEV challenge in mice. Here we demonstrate the IRES-based vaccine’s ability to protect against febrile disease in cynomolgus macaques. Vaccination was well tolerated and elicited robust neutralizing antibody titers noticed as early as day 14. Moreover, complete protection from disease characterized by absence of viremia and characteristic fever following aerosolized IE VEEV challenge was observed in all vaccinees compared to control animals, which developed clinical disease. Together, these results highlight the safety and efficacy of IRES-based VEEV vaccine to protect against an endemic, pathogenic VEEV IE serotype. PMID:26020513

  15. Chemical-free inactivated whole influenza virus vaccine prepared by ultrashort pulsed laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei David; Donthi, Nisha; La, Victor; Hsieh, Wen-Han; Li, Yen-Der; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Hung, Chien-Fu; Achilefu, Samuel; Tsen, Kong-Thon

    2015-05-01

    There is an urgent need for rapid methods to develop vaccines in response to emerging viral pathogens. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines represent an ideal strategy for this purpose; however, a universal method for producing safe and immunogenic inactivated vaccines is lacking. Conventional pathogen inactivation methods such as formalin, heat, ultraviolet light, and gamma rays cause structural alterations in vaccines that lead to reduced neutralizing antibody specificity, and in some cases, disastrous T helper type 2-mediated immune pathology. We have evaluated the potential of a visible ultrashort pulsed (USP) laser method to generate safe and immunogenic WIV vaccines without adjuvants. Specifically, we demonstrate that vaccination of mice with laser-inactivated H1N1 influenza virus at about a 10-fold lower dose than that required using conventional formalin-inactivated influenza vaccines results in protection against lethal H1N1 challenge in mice. The virus, inactivated by the USP laser irradiation, has been shown to retain its surface protein structure through hemagglutination assay. Unlike conventional inactivation methods, laser treatment did not generate carbonyl groups in protein, thereby reducing the risk of adverse vaccine-elicited T helper type 2 responses. Therefore, USP laser treatment is an attractive potential strategy to generate WIV vaccines with greater potency and safety than vaccines produced by current inactivation techniques. PMID:25423046

  16. Chemical-free inactivated whole influenza virus vaccine prepared by ultrashort pulsed laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei David; Donthi, Nisha; La, Victor; Hsieh, Wen-Han; Li, Yen-Der; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Hung, Chien-Fu; Achilefu, Samuel; Tsen, Kong-Thon

    2015-05-01

    There is an urgent need for rapid methods to develop vaccines in response to emerging viral pathogens. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines represent an ideal strategy for this purpose; however, a universal method for producing safe and immunogenic inactivated vaccines is lacking. Conventional pathogen inactivation methods such as formalin, heat, ultraviolet light, and gamma rays cause structural alterations in vaccines that lead to reduced neutralizing antibody specificity, and in some cases, disastrous T helper type 2-mediated immune pathology. We have evaluated the potential of a visible ultrashort pulsed (USP) laser method to generate safe and immunogenic WIV vaccines without adjuvants. Specifically, we demonstrate that vaccination of mice with laser-inactivated H1N1 influenza virus at about a 10-fold lower dose than that required using conventional formalin-inactivated influenza vaccines results in protection against lethal H1N1 challenge in mice. The virus, inactivated by the USP laser irradiation, has been shown to retain its surface protein structure through hemagglutination assay. Unlike conventional inactivation methods, laser treatment did not generate carbonyl groups in protein, thereby reducing the risk of adverse vaccine-elicited T helper type 2 responses. Therefore, USP laser treatment is an attractive potential strategy to generate WIV vaccines with greater potency and safety than vaccines produced by current inactivation techniques.

  17. Clinical data on Fluarix: an inactivated split seasonal influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    El Sahly, Hana M; Keitel, Wendy A

    2008-08-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual winter epidemics in temperate regions, with significant morbidity, mortality and economical impact. Fluarix is a split, trivalent, inactivated vaccine, manufactured from highly purified, egg-grown influenza viruses by GlaxoSmithKline. In 2005, Fluarix underwent accelerated approval for use in adults by the US FDA following a US-based, randomized, placebo-controlled trial that established its safety and immunogenicity in adults. The vaccine has been licensed in Europe since 1992 for all age groups. Multiple registration trials in all age groups in Europe have demonstrated that the vaccine was safe and well tolerated and of immunogenicity standards that met the requirements of the European Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use. There are no published clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness or efficacy of Fluarix against influenza and its complications. Currently, Fluarix plays an important role in the diversification of the supply chain of influenza vaccine to the community. However, vaccines with improved immunogenicity in at-risk populations, such as the elderly, and with less reliance on growth in eggs, as well as the inherent demanding timelines, are needed to enhance the control of influenza. PMID:18665769

  18. Antibody to the nonstructural protein NS1 of Japanese encephalitis virus: potential application of mAb-based indirect ELISA to differentiate infection from vaccination.

    PubMed

    Shu, P Y; Chen, L K; Chang, S F; Yueh, Y Y; Chow, L; Chien, L J; Chin, C; Lin, T H; Huang, J H

    2001-02-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect and differentiate the antibody responses to Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus nonstructural protein NS1 between infected and vaccinated individuals. The results showed that all convalescent sera from JE patients contained NS1-specific IgG antibodies, while 65 and 40% of these sera showed detectable NS1-specific IgM and IgA antibodies, respectively. Specificity analysis showed that NS1-specific IgM and IgA antibodies from JE patients do not cross-react to dengue virus NS1 glycoprotein, while IgG antibodies from 10% of JE patients showed significant cross-reaction to dengue virus NS1 glycoprotein. To differentiate infection from vaccination, the immune sera from 24 children vaccinated with inactivated JE vaccine were analyzed. The data showed that none of these immune sera had detectable NS1-specific IgG antibodies. The results demonstrated the potential application of JE NS1-specific indirect ELISA to differentiate infection from vaccination. PMID:11166901

  19. Clinically mild encephalitis with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) after mumps vaccination.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Jun-Ichi; Shiihara, Takashi; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takayanagi, Masaru; Hara, Munetsugu; Okumura, Akihisa; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2015-02-15

    We retrospectively collected three patients with clinically mild encephalitis with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) after mumps vaccination, and reviewed five patients, including two patients previously reported. The five patients (all males, aged 1 to 9) presented with fever, vomiting, or headache as the initial symptoms (day 0), suggesting meningitis, at 13 to 21 days after mumps vaccination. Consciousness disturbance, delirious behavior, seizures, or dysarthria was observed on days 1 to 3, which had completely resolved before day 11. Hyponatremia was observed in all patients. A cerebrospinal fluid study showed pleocytosis, and confirmed the vaccine strain genome. MRI revealed reduced diffusion in the splenium of the corpus callosum on days 2 to 4, which had completely disappeared on the follow-up studies performed on days 7-15. EEG showed high voltage slow wave in three patients, which later normalized. These findings led to a diagnosis of MERS after mumps vaccination. MERS after mumps vaccination may be more common than previously considered. MERS is suspected when a male patient after mumps vaccination presents with neurological symptoms with hyponatremia, following symptoms of aseptic meningitis, and MRI would be performed to examine the splenium of the corpus callosum. PMID:25542078

  20. Correlates of Protection Following Vaccination with Inactivated Porcine Circovirus 2 Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Cinzia; Martinelli, Nicola; Lelli, Davide; Amadori, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is associated with a number of diseases and syndromes, collectively referred to as porcine circovirus-associated disease. The main objective of this study was to define some in vitro correlates of protection after injection of inactivated PCV2 vaccines with a defined antigen mass. Twelve pigs were vaccinated with three different doses of inactivated, whole-virus antigen (211-844 ng), while four animals were injected with a commercial vaccine (positive control) and four other pigs were mock-vaccinated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) in the same oil emulsion. Four weeks later, they were intranasally challenged with 2 × 10(5) TCID50 of a PCV2a strain. Antibody was measured in blood and oral fluids by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a neutralization assay. PCV2 was quantified in serum by real-time polymerase chain reaction for ORF2 gene. PCV2-specific cell-mediated responses were investigated by an IFN-γ release assay in whole blood, IFN-γ ELISPOT, and lymphocyte proliferation (Ki-67 and BrDU assays). All the vaccines under study but mock provided complete or incomplete protection from PCV2 infection in terms of post-challenge viremia. Serum antibody titers (ELISA and neutralizing) after vaccination were not correlated with protection, as opposed to the early neutralizing antibody levels of vaccinated pigs at day 7 after infection. Cell-mediated immune parameters showed a good correlation with vaccine efficacy. In particular, the IFN-γ release assay at 3 weeks after vaccination was an effective marker for predicting protection. All control pigs always tested negative in assays of cell-mediated immunity. Our results outline in vitro testing procedures toward reduced animal usage in the control of PCV2 vaccine batches. PMID:26401584

  1. Polio eradication. Efficacy of inactivated poliovirus vaccine in India.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Hamid; Deshpande, Jagadish M; Sutter, Roland W; Bahl, Sunil; Verma, Harish; Ahmad, Mohammad; Kunwar, Abhishek; Vishwakarma, Rakesh; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Jain, Shilpi; Estivariz, Concepcion; Sethi, Raman; Molodecky, Natalie A; Grassly, Nicholas C; Pallansch, Mark A; Chatterjee, Arani; Aylward, R Bruce

    2014-08-22

    Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is efficacious against paralytic disease, but its effect on mucosal immunity is debated. We assessed the efficacy of IPV in boosting mucosal immunity. Participants received IPV, bivalent 1 and 3 oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV), or no vaccine. A bOPV challenge was administered 4 weeks later, and excretion was assessed 3, 7, and 14 days later. Nine hundred and fifty-four participants completed the study. Any fecal shedding of poliovirus type 1 was 8.8, 9.1, and 13.5% in the IPV group and 14.4, 24.1, and 52.4% in the control group by 6- to 11-month, 5-year, and 10-year groups, respectively (IPV versus control: Fisher's exact test P < 0.001). IPV reduced excretion for poliovirus types 1 and 3 between 38.9 and 74.2% and 52.8 and 75.7%, respectively. Thus, IPV in OPV-vaccinated individuals boosts intestinal mucosal immunity. PMID:25146288

  2. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues da Silva, A C; Caporale, G M; Gonçalves, C A; Targueta, M C; Comin, F; Zanetti, C R; Kotait, I

    2000-01-01

    Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac) and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac) vaccine. The antibody titers were appraised by cell-culture neutralization test and ELISA, and the percentage of seropositivity was ascertained for a period of 180 days. IPVvac elicited complete seropositivity rates from day 30 to day 150, and even on day 180, 87% of the sera showed virus-neutralizing antibody titers (VNA) higher than 0.5IU/ml. There were no significant differences between the VNA titers and seropositivity rates obtained with IPVvac in the two methods tested. AEvac, however, elicited significantly lower titers than those observed in the group receiving inactivated vaccine. In addition, the profiles of antirabies IgG antibodies, evaluated by ELISA, and VNA, appraised by cell-culture neutralization test, were slightly different, when both vaccines were compared. PMID:10810324

  3. Specificities of human CD4+ T cell responses to an inactivated flavivirus vaccine and infection: correlation with structure and epitope prediction.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Julia; Aberle, Judith H; Stiasny, Karin; Knapp, Bernhard; Schreiner, Wolfgang; Fae, Ingrid; Fischer, Gottfried; Scheinost, Ondrej; Chmelik, Vaclav; Heinz, Franz X

    2014-07-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus is endemic in large parts of Europe and Central and Eastern Asia and causes more than 10,000 annual cases of neurological disease in humans. It is closely related to the mosquito-borne yellow fever, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and West Nile viruses, and vaccination with an inactivated whole-virus vaccine can effectively prevent clinical disease. Neutralizing antibodies are directed to the viral envelope protein (E) and an accepted correlate of immunity. However, data on the specificities of CD4(+) T cells that recognize epitopes in the viral structural proteins and thus can provide direct help to the B cells producing E-specific antibodies are lacking. We therefore conducted a study on the CD4(+) T cell response against the virion proteins in vaccinated people in comparison to TBE patients. The data obtained with overlapping peptides in interleukin-2 (IL-2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays were analyzed in relation to the three-dimensional structures of the capsid (C) and E proteins as well as to epitope predictions based on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II peptide affinities. In the C protein, peptides corresponding to two out of four alpha helices dominated the response in both vaccinees and patients, whereas in the E protein concordance of immunodominance was restricted to peptides of a single domain (domain III). Epitope predictions were much better for C than for E and were especially erroneous for the transmembrane regions. Our data provide evidence for a strong impact of protein structural features that influence peptide processing, contributing to the discrepancies observed between experimentally determined and computer-predicted CD4(+) T cell epitopes. Importance: Tick-borne encephalitis virus is endemic in large parts of Europe and Asia and causes more than 10,000 annual cases of neurological disease in humans. It is closely related to yellow fever, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and

  4. Adjuvant effects of chitosan and calcium phosphate particles in an inactivated Newcastle disease vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adjuvant activity of chitosan and calcium phosphate-particles (CAP) was studied following intranasal coadministration of commercial chickens with inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine. After three vaccinations with inactivated NDV in combination with chitosan or CAP an increase in an...

  5. Adenovirus vectored vaccines against influenza a virus do not result in vaccine associated enhanced respiratory disease following heterologous challenge in contrast to whole inactivated virus vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterologous influenza A virus (IAV) challenge following vaccination with an intramuscular (IM) whole inactivated vaccine (WIV) can result in vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD). The objective of this study was to use an adenovirus (Ad5) vector vaccine platform that expressed IAV...

  6. Japanese Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Page How long does the Japanese encephalitis vaccination last? The duration of protection is unknown. For ... What are the side effects of Japanese encephalitis vaccination? Pain and tenderness are the most commonly reported ...

  7. Persistence of antibodies and anamnestic response in calves vaccinated with inactivated infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus and parainfluenza-3 virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sweat, R L

    1983-04-15

    Persistence of antibodies in calves vaccinated with 2 types of inactivated infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus and parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) virus vaccines were determined. Calves seronegative for IBR and PI-3 viruses were inoculated with 2 doses of inactivated IBR virus-PI-3 virus vaccines administered 2 weeks apart. Blood samples were obtained from the calves for serum at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after vaccination. The serums were tested by serum-neutralization tests. Antibody response to the vaccines persisted on a declining scale for 1 year. The anamnestic responses to the vaccines were determined by inoculating the same calves with a booster dose of vaccine 1 year after the original 2 doses were given. Blood samples were obtained from the calves for serum 2 weeks later. The serums were tested by serum-neutralization tests. The single booster dose of vaccine elicited an anamnestic response to both IBR and PI-3 viruses. PMID:6303996

  8. Safety, Immunogenicity and Duration of Immunity Elicited by an Inactivated Bovine Ephemeral Fever Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Aziz-Boaron, Orly; Leibovitz, Keren; Gelman, Boris; Kedmi, Maor; Klement, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is an economically important viral vector-borne cattle disease. Several live-attenuated, inactivated and recombinant vaccines have been tested, demonstrating varying efficacy. However, to the best of our knowledge, duration of immunity conferred by an inactivated vaccine has never been reported. In the last decade, Israel has faced an increasing number of BEF outbreaks. The need for an effective vaccine compatible with strains circulating in the Middle East region led to the development of a MONTANIDE™ ISA 206 VG (water-in-oil-in-water), inactivated vaccine based on a local strain. We tested the safety, immunogenicity and duration of immunity conferred by this vaccine. The induced neutralizing antibody (NA) response was followed for 493 days in 40 cows vaccinated by different protocols. The vaccine did not cause adverse reactions or a decrease in milk production. All cows [except 2 (6.7%) which did not respond to vaccination] showed a significant rise in NA titer of up to 1:256 following the second, third or fourth booster vaccination. Neutralizing antibody levels declined gradually to 1:16 up to 120 days post vaccination. This decline continued in cows vaccinated only twice, whereas cows vaccinated 3 or 4 times showed stable titers of approximately 1:16 for up to 267 days post vaccination. At least three vaccinations with the inactivated BEF vaccine were needed to confer long-lasting immunity. These results may have significant implications for the choice of vaccination protocol with inactivated BEF vaccines. Complementary challenge data should however be added to the above results in order to determine what is the minimal NA response conferring protection from clinical disease. PMID:24349225

  9. An inactivated yellow fever 17DD vaccine cultivated in Vero cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Renata C; Silva, Andrea N M R; Souza, Marta Cristina O; Silva, Marlon V; Neves, Patrícia P C C; Silva, Andrea A M V; Matos, Denise D C S; Herrera, Miguel A O; Yamamura, Anna M Y; Freire, Marcos S; Gaspar, Luciane P; Caride, Elena

    2015-08-20

    Yellow fever is an acute infectious disease caused by prototype virus of the genus Flavivirus. It is endemic in Africa and South America where it represents a serious public health problem causing epidemics of hemorrhagic fever with mortality rates ranging from 20% to 50%. There is no available antiviral therapy and vaccination is the primary method of disease control. Although the attenuated vaccines for yellow fever show safety and efficacy it became necessary to develop a new yellow fever vaccine due to the occurrence of rare serious adverse events, which include visceral and neurotropic diseases. The new inactivated vaccine should be safer and effective as the existing attenuated one. In the present study, the immunogenicity of an inactivated 17DD vaccine in C57BL/6 mice was evaluated. The yellow fever virus was produced by cultivation of Vero cells in bioreactors, inactivated with β-propiolactone, and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide (alum). Mice were inoculated with inactivated 17DD vaccine containing alum adjuvant and followed by intracerebral challenge with 17DD virus. The results showed that animals receiving 3 doses of the inactivated vaccine (2 μg/dose) with alum adjuvant had neutralizing antibody titers above the cut-off of PRNT50 (Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test). In addition, animals immunized with inactivated vaccine showed survival rate of 100% after the challenge as well as animals immunized with commercial attenuated 17DD vaccine. PMID:25862300

  10. Incompatibility of lyophilized inactivated polio vaccine with liquid pentavalent whole-cell-pertussis-containing vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kraan, Heleen; Ten Have, Rimko; van der Maas, Larissa; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-31

    A hexavalent vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, whole cell pertussis, Haemophilius influenza type B, hepatitis B and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) may: (i) increase the efficiency of vaccination campaigns, (ii) reduce the number of injections thereby reducing needlestick injuries, and (iii) ensure better protection against pertussis as compared to vaccines containing acellular pertussis antigens. An approach to obtain a hexavalent vaccine might be reconstituting lyophilized polio vaccine (IPV-LYO) with liquid pentavalent vaccine just before intramuscular delivery. The potential limitations of this approach were investigated including thermostability of IPV as measured by D-antigen ELISA and rat potency, the compatibility of fluid and lyophilized IPV in combination with thimerosal and thimerosal containing hexavalent vaccine. The rat potency of polio type 3 in IPV-LYO was 2 to 3-fold lower than standardized on the D-antigen content, suggesting an alteration of the polio type 3 D-antigen particle by lyophilization. Type 1 and 2 had unaffected antigenicity/immunogenicity ratios. Alteration of type 3 D-antigen could be detected by showing reduced thermostability at 45°C compared to type 3 in non-lyophilized liquid controls. Reconstituting IPV-LYO in the presence of thimerosal (TM) resulted in a fast temperature dependent loss of polio type 1-3 D-antigen. The presence of 0.005% TM reduced the D-antigen content by ∼20% (polio type 2/3) and ∼60% (polio type 1) in 6h at 25°C, which are WHO open vial policy conditions. At 37°C, D-antigen was diminished even faster, suggesting that very fast, i.e., immediately after preparation, intramuscular delivery of the conceived hexavalent vaccine would not be a feasible option. Use of the TM-scavenger, l-cysteine, to bind TM (or mercury containing TM degradation products), resulted in a hexavalent vaccine mixture in which polio D-antigen was more stable. PMID:27470209

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of universal influenza vaccination with quadrivalent inactivated vaccine in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Karen M; Meier, Genevieve; McGarry, Lisa J; Pruttivarasin, Narin; Misurski, Derek A

    2014-01-01

    To address influenza B lineage mismatch and co-circulation, several quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (IIV4s) containing two type A strains and both type B lineages have recently been approved in the United States. Currently available trivalent inactivated vaccines (IIV3s) or trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV3s) comprise two influenza A strains and one of the two influenza B lineages that have co-circulated in the United States since 2001. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a policy of universal vaccination with IIV4 vs. IIV3/LAIV3 during 1 year in the United States. On average per influenza season, IIV4 was predicted to result in 30 251 fewer influenza cases, 3512 fewer hospitalizations, 722 fewer deaths, 4812 fewer life-years lost, and 3596 fewer quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) lost vs. IIV3/LAIV3. Using the Fluarix QuadrivalentTM (GlaxoSmithKline) prices and the weighted average IIV3/LAIV3 prices, the model predicts that the vaccination program costs would increase by $452.2 million, while direct medical and indirect costs would decrease by $111.6 million and $218.7 million, respectively, with IIV4. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) comparing IIV4 to IIV3/LAIV3 is predicted to be $90 301/QALY gained. Deterministic sensitivity analyses found that influenza B vaccine-matched and mismatched efficacies among adults aged ≥65 years had the greatest impact on the ICER. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the cost per QALY remained below $100 000 for 61% of iterations. In conclusion, vaccination with IIV4 in the US is predicted to reduce morbidity and mortality. This strategy is also predicted to be cost-effective vs. IIV3/LAIV3 at conventional willingness-to-pay thresholds. PMID:24609063

  12. [Evaluation of an experimental rabies vaccine by the oral and intestinal route with inactivated vaccines, concentrated or non-concentrated].

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, P; Metianu, T; Bolanos, A

    1982-01-01

    Application of beta-propiolactone inactivated rabies vaccine prepared in bovine embryo kidney cells, concentrated or non concentrated, by intestinal or oral route resulted in antibody production in rats and cats. 80-100% of vaccinated rats were protected against challenge with street rabies virus. The same vaccines (lyophilized in gelatin capsules) stimulated antibody production in more than 50% (5/8) cats which received the vaccine by the oral route. PMID:7128069

  13. Immunization of foxes Vulpes vulpes by the oral and intramuscular routes with inactivated rabies vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, K F; Johnston, D H; Patterson, J M; Black, J G; Rhodes, A J; Zalan, E

    1982-01-01

    Inactivated rabies vaccines prepared from common vaccine strains of virus were inoculated into foxes by the intramuscular and intestinal route. There were differences among the vaccines in the duration of antibody produced after intramuscular administration. Inactivated vaccines deposited directly into the lumen of the duodenum by means of a fiberscope caused seroconversion in some foxes, especially following a booster dose, but the antibodies produced were for the most part of short duration. The ERA modified live virus vaccine, in contrast, produced a satisfactory and long lasting antibody after intestinal instillation. PMID:7172102

  14. Comparison of Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccine in Weaned Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare humoral and cellular immune responses to inactivated swine influenza virus (SIV) vaccine. Methods: Fifty 3-week-old weaned pigs from a herd free of SIV and PRRSV were randomly divided into the non-vaccinated control group and vaccinated group containing 25 pigs each....

  15. Comparison of Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccine in Weaned Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humoral and cellular immune responses to inactivated swine influenza virus (SIV) vaccine were evaluated and compared. Fifty 3-week-old weaned pigs from a herd free of SIV and PRRSV were randomly divided into the non-vaccinated control group and vaccinated group containing 25 pigs each. Pigs were va...

  16. A summary of antibody titration experiments in some animal species treated with ERA vaccine and an inactivated rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, A; Caporale, V; Ciuchini, F; Di Trani, L; Irsara, A; Prosperi, S

    1982-01-01

    The results of antibody titrations in different animal species vaccinated against rabies are reported. The following points are considered: (1) antibody titration may be used to detect an immunity status in dogs, (2) equines should be vaccinated in infected areas, (3) experiments in progress are comparing ERA vaccine and an inactivated vaccine in bovines, and (4) the vaccination of fallow deer (Dama dama) and moufflons (Ovis ammon musimon) produced results suggesting an extension of the experiment with the purpose of vaccinating wild ruminants whenever possible. PMID:7128062

  17. Protection against Tuberculosis in Eurasian Wild Boar Vaccinated with Heat-Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Joseba M.; Sevilla, Iker A.; Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Ballesteros, Cristina; Galindo, Ruth C.; Boadella, Mariana; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Romero, Beatriz; Geijo, Maria Victoria; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Aranaz, Alicia; Juste, Ramón A.; Vicente, Joaquín; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis and closely related members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex continues to affect humans and animals worldwide and its control requires vaccination of wildlife reservoir species such as Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa). Vaccination efforts for TB control in wildlife have been based primarily on oral live BCG formulations. However, this is the first report of the use of oral inactivated vaccines for controlling TB in wildlife. In this study, four groups of 5 wild boar each were vaccinated with inactivated M. bovis by the oral and intramuscular routes, vaccinated with oral BCG or left unvaccinated as controls. All groups were later challenged with a field strain of M. bovis. The results of the IFN-gamma response, serum antibody levels, M. bovis culture, TB lesion scores, and the expression of C3 and MUT genes were compared between these four groups. The results suggested that vaccination with heat-inactivated M. bovis or BCG protect wild boar from TB. These results also encouraged testing combinations of BCG and inactivated M. bovis to vaccinate wild boar against TB. Vaccine formulations using heat-inactivated M. bovis for TB control in wildlife would have the advantage of being environmentally safe and more stable under field conditions when compared to live BCG vaccines. The antibody response and MUT expression levels can help differentiating between vaccinated and infected wild boar and as correlates of protective response in vaccinated animals. These results suggest that vaccine studies in free-living wild boar are now possible to reveal the full potential of protecting against TB using oral M. bovis inactivated and BCG vaccines. PMID:21935486

  18. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingliang; Liu, Guanchen; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jiaxin; Chang, Junliang; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-07-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71), both of which can cause hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development. A Vero cell-based inactivated CA16 vaccine was developed by our group. Screening identified a CA16 vaccine strain (CC024) isolated from HFMD patients, which had broad cross-protective abilities and satisfied all requirements for vaccine production. Identification of the biological characteristics showed that the CA16CC024 strain had the highest titer (107.5 CCID50/mL) in Vero cells, which would benefit the development of an EV71/CA16 divalent vaccine. A potential vaccine manufacturing process was established, including the selection of optimal time for virus harvesting, membrane for diafiltration and concentration, gel-filtration chromatography for the down-stream virus purification and virus inactivation method. Altogether, the analyses suggested that the CC-16, a limiting dilution clone of the CC024 strain, with good genetic stability, high titer and broad-spectrum immunogenicity, would be the best candidate strain for a CA16 inactivated vaccine. Therefore, our study provides valuable information for the development of a Vero cell-based CA16 or EV71-CA16 divalent inactivated vaccine. PMID:26193302

  19. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingliang; Liu, Guanchen; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jiaxin; Chang, Junliang; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71), both of which can cause hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development. A Vero cell-based inactivated CA16 vaccine was developed by our group. Screening identified a CA16 vaccine strain (CC024) isolated from HFMD patients, which had broad cross-protective abilities and satisfied all requirements for vaccine production. Identification of the biological characteristics showed that the CA16CC024 strain had the highest titer (107.5 CCID50/mL) in Vero cells, which would benefit the development of an EV71/CA16 divalent vaccine. A potential vaccine manufacturing process was established, including the selection of optimal time for virus harvesting, membrane for diafiltration and concentration, gel-filtration chromatography for the down-stream virus purification and virus inactivation method. Altogether, the analyses suggested that the CC-16, a limiting dilution clone of the CC024 strain, with good genetic stability, high titer and broad-spectrum immunogenicity, would be the best candidate strain for a CA16 inactivated vaccine. Therefore, our study provides valuable information for the development of a Vero cell-based CA16 or EV71-CA16 divalent inactivated vaccine. PMID:26193302

  20. Comparison of antibody responses after vaccination with two inactivated rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Minke, J M; Bouvet, J; Cliquet, F; Wasniewski, M; Guiot, A L; Lemaitre, L; Cariou, C; Cozette, V; Vergne, L; Guigal, P M

    2009-01-13

    Thirty laboratory dogs were randomly assigned to two groups (A and B) of 15 dogs and subcutaneously vaccinated with a single dose of one of two commercially available monovalent inactivated rabies vaccines: RABISIN (Merial, France) (group A) and NOBIVAC Rabies (Intervet International) (group B). Rabies antibodies were measured over a period of 4 months using the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test. The two vaccines performed differently in terms of magnitude and persistence of rabies antibodies titers in dogs. Two weeks after vaccination, average rabies antibody titers peaked at 2.53 IU/mL (range, 0.17-13.77 IU/mL) and 1.26 IU/mL (range, 0.50-4.56 IU/mL) in groups A and B dogs, respectively. The average FAVN antibody titres against rabies on D28, D56, D84, D112 and D120 were significantly higher in group A than in group B. Although all dogs from group B serologically responded to vaccination, the proportion of dogs with antibody titres >or=0.5 IU/mL dropped significantly after D28 and was statistically significantly lower on D56, D84 and D112 compared to group A dogs. In conclusion, in the context of international trade, the choice of the vaccine and the timing of blood tests are critical factors in achieving successful serological test results after rabies vaccination. RABISIN induces high and sustained antibody titres against rabies, increasing the flexibility for the time of blood sampling after primo-vaccination. PMID:18757142

  1. Epidemiological trends and characteristics of Japanese encephalitis changed based on the vaccination program between 1960 and 2013 in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, southern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Liang, Nengxiu; Tan, Yi; Xie, Zhichun

    2016-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of the most severe kinds of viral encephalitis and is prevalent in Asia and the Western Pacific. In China, JE was first reported in the 1940s and became the main cause of viral encephalitis, including in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. In 1951, JE was included in the Chinese mandatory disease reporting system. In the pre-vaccine era of the 1960s and 1970s, the incidence of JE continued to rise without any vaccine supply. Since JE vaccines became available in the late 1970s (MBD) and 1989 (LAV-SA-14-14-2), and as JE vaccine became freely available to patients beginning in 2008, the incidence of JE has declined significantly. Despite these gains, outbreaks continue to occur among children in rural and suburban areas. Strengthening vaccine delivery models and improving swine vaccine production are important in order to sustain continuous declines in the incidence of JE in Guangxi. PMID:26972041

  2. Inactivated or Live-Attenuated Bivalent Vaccines That Confer Protection against Rabies and Ebola Viruses ▿

    PubMed Central

    Blaney, Joseph E.; Wirblich, Christoph; Papaneri, Amy B.; Johnson, Reed F.; Myers, Carey J.; Juelich, Terry L.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Bernbaum, John G.; Jahrling, Peter B.; Paragas, Jason; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2011-01-01

    The search for a safe and efficacious vaccine for Ebola virus continues, as no current vaccine candidate is nearing licensure. We have developed (i) replication-competent, (ii) replication-deficient, and (iii) chemically inactivated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV) glycoprotein (GP) by a reverse genetics system based on the SAD B19 RABV wildlife vaccine. ZEBOV GP is efficiently expressed by these vaccine candidates and is incorporated into virions. The vaccine candidates were avirulent after inoculation of adult mice, and viruses with a deletion in the RABV glycoprotein had greatly reduced neurovirulence after intracerebral inoculation in suckling mice. Immunization with live or inactivated RABV vaccines expressing ZEBOV GP induced humoral immunity against each virus and conferred protection from both lethal RABV and EBOV challenge in mice. The bivalent RABV/ZEBOV vaccines described here have several distinct advantages that may speed the development of inactivated vaccines for use in humans and potentially live or inactivated vaccines for use in nonhuman primates at risk of EBOV infection in endemic areas. PMID:21849459

  3. Inactivated or live-attenuated bivalent vaccines that confer protection against rabies and Ebola viruses.

    PubMed

    Blaney, Joseph E; Wirblich, Christoph; Papaneri, Amy B; Johnson, Reed F; Myers, Carey J; Juelich, Terry L; Holbrook, Michael R; Freiberg, Alexander N; Bernbaum, John G; Jahrling, Peter B; Paragas, Jason; Schnell, Matthias J

    2011-10-01

    The search for a safe and efficacious vaccine for Ebola virus continues, as no current vaccine candidate is nearing licensure. We have developed (i) replication-competent, (ii) replication-deficient, and (iii) chemically inactivated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV) glycoprotein (GP) by a reverse genetics system based on the SAD B19 RABV wildlife vaccine. ZEBOV GP is efficiently expressed by these vaccine candidates and is incorporated into virions. The vaccine candidates were avirulent after inoculation of adult mice, and viruses with a deletion in the RABV glycoprotein had greatly reduced neurovirulence after intracerebral inoculation in suckling mice. Immunization with live or inactivated RABV vaccines expressing ZEBOV GP induced humoral immunity against each virus and conferred protection from both lethal RABV and EBOV challenge in mice. The bivalent RABV/ZEBOV vaccines described here have several distinct advantages that may speed the development of inactivated vaccines for use in humans and potentially live or inactivated vaccines for use in nonhuman primates at risk of EBOV infection in endemic areas. PMID:21849459

  4. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease is influenced by hemagglutinin and neuraminidase in whole inactivated influenza virus vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple subtypes and many antigenic variants of influenza A virus (IAV) co-circulate in swine in the USA, complicating effective use of commercial vaccines to control disease and transmission. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines may provide partial protection against IAV with substantial antigen...

  5. The Willingness to Pay for Vaccination against Tick-Borne Encephalitis and Implications for Public Health Policy: Evidence from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Slunge, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in Sweden and several other European countries has sparked a discussion about the need for a public vaccination strategy. However, TBE vaccination coverage is incomplete and there is little knowledge about the factors influencing vaccination behavior. Based on a survey of 1,500 randomly selected respondents in Sweden, we estimate vaccination coverage in areas with different TBE risk levels and analyze the role of vaccine price and other factors influencing the demand for vaccination. First, we find that the average rate of TBE vaccination in Sweden is 33% in TBE risk areas and 18% elsewhere. Income, age and risk-related factors such as incidence of TBE in the area of residence, frequency of visits to areas with TBE risk, and experience with tick bites are positively associated with demand for TBE vaccine. Next, using contingent valuation methodology, we estimate the willingness to pay for TBE vaccination among the unvaccinated respondents and the effect of a possible subsidy. Among the unvaccinated respondents in TBE risk areas, we estimate the mean willingness to pay for the recommended three doses of TBE vaccine to be 465 SEK (approximately 46 euros or 40% of the current market price). We project that a subsidy making TBE vaccines free of charge could increase the vaccination rate in TBE risk areas to around 78%, with a larger effect on low-income households, whose current vaccination rate is only 15% in risk areas. However, price is not the only factor affecting demand. We find significant effects on vaccination behavior associated with trust in vaccine recommendations, perceptions about tick bite-related health risks and knowledge about ticks and tick-borne diseases. Hence, increasing knowledge and trust, as well as ease of access to vaccinations, can also be important measures for public health agencies that want to increase the vaccination rate. PMID:26641491

  6. Inactivated and subunit vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome: Current status and future direction.

    PubMed

    Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Calvert, Jay G; Roof, Michael; Lager, Kelly M

    2015-06-17

    Within a few years of its emergence in the late 1980s, the PRRS virus had spread globally to become the foremost infectious disease concern for the pork industry. Since 1994, modified live-attenuated vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV-MLV) have been widely used, but have failed to provide complete protection against emerging and heterologous field strains of the virus. Moreover, like many other MLVs, PRRSV-MLVs have safety concerns including vertical and horizontal transmission of the vaccine virus and several documented incidences of reversion to virulence. Thus, the development of efficacious inactivated vaccines is warranted for the control and eradication of PRRS. Since the early 1990s, researchers have been attempting to develop inactivated PRRSV vaccines, but most of the candidates have failed to elicit protective immunity even against homologous virus challenge. Recent research findings relating to both inactivated and subunit candidate PRRSV vaccines have shown promise, but they need to be pursued further to improve their heterologous efficacy and cost-effectiveness before considering commercialization. In this comprehensive review, we provide information on attempts to develop PRRSV inactivated and subunit vaccines. These includes various virus inactivation strategies, adjuvants, nanoparticle-based vaccine delivery systems, DNA vaccines, and recombinant subunit vaccines produced using baculovirus, plant, and replication-deficient viruses as vector vaccines. Finally, future directions for the development of innovative non-infectious PRRSV vaccines are suggested. Undoubtedly there remains a need for novel PRRSV vaccine strategies targeted to deliver cross-protective, non-infectious vaccines for the control and eradication of PRRS. PMID:25980425

  7. Dengue encephalitis-associated immunopathology in the mouse model: Implications for vaccine developers and antigens inducer of cellular immune response.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Gil, Lázaro; Izquierdo, Alienys; Suzarte, Edith; Valdés, Iris; Blanco, Aracelys; Ancizar, Julio; Alba, José Suárez; Pérez, Yusleydis de la C; Cobas, Karen; Romero, Yaremis; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G; Hermida, Lisset

    2016-08-01

    Despite the many efforts made by the scientific community in the development of vaccine candidates against dengue virus (DENV), no vaccine has been licensed up to date. Although the immunopathogenesis associated to the disease is a key factor to take into account by vaccine developers, the lack of animal models that reproduce the clinical signs of the disease has hampered the vaccine progress. Non-human primates support viral replication, but they are very expensive and do not show signs of disease. Immunocompromised mice develop viremia and some signs of the disease; however, they are not valuable for vaccine testing. Nowadays, immunocompetent mice are the most used model to evaluate the immunogenicity of vaccine candidates. These animals are resistant to DENV infection; therefore, the intracranial inoculation with neuroadapted virus, which provokes viral encephalitis, represents an alternative to evaluate the protective capacity of vaccine candidates. Previous results have demonstrated the crucial role of cellular immune response in the protection induced by the virus and vaccine candidates in this mouse encephalitis model. However, in the present work we are proposing that the magnitude of the cell-mediated immunity and the inflammatory response generated by the vaccine can modulate the survival rate after viral challenge. We observed that the intracranial challenge of naïve mice with DENV-2 induces the recruitment of immune cells that contribute to the reduction of viral load, but does not increase the survival rate. On the contrary, animals treated with cyclophosphamide, an immunosuppressive drug that affects proliferating lymphocytes, had a higher viral load but a better survival rate than untreated animals. These results suggest that the immune system is playing an immunopathogenic role in this model and the survival rate may not be a suitable endpoint in the evaluation of vaccine candidates based on antigens that induce a strong cellular immune response

  8. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine Protects Nonhuman Primates from Intramuscular and Aerosol Challenge with Ebolavirus

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew S.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Barth, James F.; Ortiz, Ramon A.; Nichols, Donald K.; Zak, Samantha E.; Stonier, Spencer W.; Muhammad, Majidat A.; Bakken, Russell R.; Prugar, Laura I.; Olinger, Gene G.; Groebner, Jennifer L.; Lee, John S.; Pratt, William D.; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt I.; Smith, Jonathan F.; Hart, Mary Kate

    2013-01-01

    There are no vaccines or therapeutics currently approved for the prevention or treatment of ebolavirus infection. Previously, a replicon vaccine based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) demonstrated protective efficacy against Marburg virus in nonhuman primates. Here, we report the protective efficacy of Sudan virus (SUDV)- and Ebola virus (EBOV)-specific VEEV replicon particle (VRP) vaccines in nonhuman primates. VRP vaccines were developed to express the glycoprotein (GP) of either SUDV or EBOV. A single intramuscular vaccination of cynomolgus macaques with VRP expressing SUDV GP provided complete protection against intramuscular challenge with SUDV. Vaccination against SUDV and subsequent survival of SUDV challenge did not fully protect cynomolgus macaques against intramuscular EBOV back-challenge. However, a single simultaneous intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP combined with VRP expressing EBOV GP did provide complete protection against intramuscular challenge with either SUDV or EBOV in cynomolgus macaques. Finally, intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP completely protected cynomolgus macaques when challenged with aerosolized SUDV, although complete protection against aerosol challenge required two vaccinations with this vaccine. PMID:23408633

  9. Oral and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccines in the Newborn: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Farrah J.; Shinohara, Russell T.; Sutter, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) remains the vaccine-of-choice for routine immunization and supplemental immunization activities (SIAs) to eradicate poliomyelitis globally. Recent data from India suggested lowerthanexpected immunogenicity of an OPV birth dose, prompting a review of the immunogenicity of OPV or inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) when administered at birth. Methods We evaluated the seroconversion and reported adverse events among infants given a single birth dose (given ≤7 days of life) of OPV or IPV through a systematic review of published articles and conference abstracts from 1959-2011 in any language found on PubMed, Google Scholar, or reference lists of selected articles. Results 25 articles from 13 countries published between1959 and 2011 documented seroconversion rates in newborns following an OPV dose given within the first seven days of life. There were 10 studies that measured seroconversion rates between 4 and 8 weeks of a single birth dose of TOPV, using an umbilical cord blood draw at the time of birth to establish baseline antibody levels. The percentage of newborns who seroconverted at 8 weeks range 6-42% for poliovirus type 1, 2-63% for type 2, and 1-35% for type 3). For mOPV type 1, seroconversion ranged from 10-76%; mOPV type 3, the range was 12-58%; and for the one study reporting bOPV, it was 20% for type 1 and 7% for type 3. There were four studies of IPV in newborns with a seroconversion rate of 8-100% for serotype 1, 15-100% for serotype 2, and 15-94% for serotype 3, measured at 4-6 weeks of life. No serious adverse events related to newborn OPV or IPV dosing were reported, including no cases of acute flaccid paralysis. Conclusions There is great variability of the immunogenicity of a birth dose of OPV for reasons largely unknown. Our review confirms the utility of a birth dose of OPV, particularly in countries where early induction of polio immunity is imperative. IPV has higher seroconversion rates in newborns and

  10. Alternative delivery of a thermostable inactivated polio vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kraan, Heleen; Ploemen, Ivo; van de Wijdeven, Gijsbert; Que, Ivo; Löwik, Clemens; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-21

    In the near future oral polio vaccine (OPV) will be replaced by inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) as part of the eradication program of polio. For that reason, there is a need for substantial amount of safe and more affordable IPV for low-income countries. Bioneedles, which are biodegradable mini-implants, have the potential to deliver vaccines outside the cold-chain and administer them without the use of needles and syringes. In the current study, Bioneedles were filled with IPV, subsequently lyophilized, and antigenic recoveries were determined both directly after IPV-Bioneedle preparation as well as after elevated stability testing. Further, we assessed the immunogenicity of IPV-Bioneedles in rats and the residence time at the site of administration. Trivalent IPV was formulated in Bioneedles with recoveries of 101±10%, 113±18%, and 92±15%, respectively for serotypes 1, 2 and 3. IPV in Bioneedles is more resistant to elevated temperatures than liquid IPV: liquid IPV retained less than half of its antigenicity after 1 day at 45°C and IPV in Bioneedles showed remaining recoveries of 80±10%, 85±4% and 63±4% for the three serotypes. In vivo imaging revealed that IPV administered via Bioneedles as well as subcutaneously injected liquid IPV showed a retention time of 3 days at the site of administration. Finally, an immunogenicity study showed that IPV-filled Bioneedles are able to induce virus-neutralizing antibody titers similar to those obtained by liquid intramuscular injection when administered in a booster regime. The addition of LPS-derivate PagL in IPV-filled Bioneedles did not increase immunogenicity compared to IPV-Bioneedles without adjuvant. The current study demonstrates the pre-clinical proof of concept of IPV-filled Bioneedles as a syringe-free alternative delivery system. Further pre-clinical and clinical studies will be required to assess the feasibility whether IPV-Bioneedles show sufficient safety and efficacy, and may contribute to the efforts

  11. Comparison of the efficacy of autogenous inactivated Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) vaccines with that of commercial vaccines against homologous and heterologous challenges

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a rapidly evolving pathogen of swine. At present, there is a high demand for safe and more effective vaccines that can be adapted regularly to emerging virus variants. A recent study showed that, by the use of a controlled inactivation procedure, an experimental BEI-inactivated PRRSV vaccine can be developed that offers partial protection against homologous challenge with the prototype strain LV. At present, it is however not known if this vaccine can be adapted to currently circulating virus variants. In this study, two recent PRRSV field isolates (07 V063 and 08 V194) were used for BEI-inactivated vaccine production. The main objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of these experimental BEI-inactivated vaccines against homologous and heterologous challenge and to compare it with an experimental LV-based BEI-inactivated vaccine and commercial inactivated and attenuated vaccines. In addition, the induction of challenge virus-specific (neutralizing) antibodies by the different vaccines was assessed. Results In a first experiment (challenge with 07 V063), vaccination with the experimental homologous (07 V063) inactivated vaccine shortened the viremic phase upon challenge with approximately 2 weeks compared to the mock-vaccinated control group. Vaccination with the commercial attenuated vaccines reduced the duration of viremia with approximately one week compared to the mock-vaccinated control group. In contrast, the experimental heterologous (LV) inactivated vaccine and the commercial inactivated vaccine did not influence viremia. Interestingly, both the homologous and the heterologous experimental inactivated vaccine induced 07 V063-specific neutralizing antibodies upon vaccination, while the commercial inactivated and attenuated vaccines failed to do so. In the second experiment (challenge with 08 V194), use of the experimental homologous (08 V194) inactivated vaccine shortened

  12. Development and introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines derived from Sabin strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    During the endgame of global polio eradication, the universal introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines is urgently required to reduce the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis and polio outbreaks due to wild and vaccine-derived polioviruses. In particular, the development of inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPVs) derived from the attenuated Sabin strains is considered to be a highly favorable option for the production of novel IPV that reduce the risk of facility-acquired transmission of poliovirus to the communities. In Japan, Sabin-derived IPVs (sIPVs) have been developed and introduced for routine immunization in November 2012. They are the first licensed sIPVs in the world. Consequently, trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine was used for polio control in Japan for more than half a century but has now been removed from the list of vaccines licensed for routine immunization. This paper reviews the development, introduction, characterization, and global status of IPV derived from attenuated Sabin strains. PMID:25448090

  13. Investigation of antigen specific lymphocyte responses in healthy horses vaccinated with an inactivated West Nile virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth G; Zhang, Yuwen; Tuttle, John; Hankins, Kevin; Wilkerson, Melinda

    2008-12-15

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a single-stranded, enveloped RNA virus capable of causing encephalitic disease in horses. Unvaccinated horses are at risk for developing WNV disease in endemic geographic regions. Effective vaccination reduces disease frequency and diminishes disease severity in vaccinated individuals that become infected with WNV. Recent data indicate CD4+ lymphocytes are required for effective protection against disease; in particular, cross talk between CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes must be functional. The objective of this project was to investigate immune responses in horses throughout a series of three vaccinations using a commercial inactivated vaccine under natural conditions. Immune responses to vaccination were determined by neutralizing antibody titers with plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), IgM titer (capture ELISA), WNV specific antibody Ig subclass responses, WNV lymphocyte proliferative responses and intracellular cytokine expression. Horses were vaccinated with a series of three vaccines at 3-week intervals using an inactivated product. An initial measure of immune activation following vaccination was determined by evaluating changes in lymphocyte cytokine expression. Interferon (IFN) gamma and interleukin (IL)-4 expressing CD4+ lymphocytes significantly increased 14 days following initial vaccination compared to unvaccinated horses (P<0.05). IFN-gamma expressing CD8+ lymphocytes also increased and remained elevated for 110 days. Antigen specific lymphocyte proliferative responses were significantly increased up to 90 days following the third vaccination (P<0.05). As expected, vaccinated horses produced increased neutralizing antibody based on PRNT data and WNV antigen-specific Ig subclass responses compared with unvaccinated horses (P<0.05). Our data indicate that WNV vaccination with an inactivated product effectively induced an antigen-specific antibody responses, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte activation. PMID:18838173

  14. Introduction of sequential inactivated polio vaccine-oral polio vaccine schedule for routine infant immunization in Brazil's National Immunization Program.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Carla Magda Allan S; de Fátima Pereira, Sirlene; Cunha Marreiros, Ana Carolina; Menezes, Nair; Flannery, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    In August 2012, the Brazilian Ministry of Health introduced inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) as part of sequential polio vaccination schedule for all infants beginning their primary vaccination series. The revised childhood immunization schedule included 2 doses of IPV at 2 and 4 months of age followed by 2 doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV) at 6 and 15 months of age. One annual national polio immunization day was maintained to provide OPV to all children aged 6 to 59 months. The decision to introduce IPV was based on preventing rare cases of vaccine-associated paralytic polio, financially sustaining IPV introduction, ensuring equitable access to IPV, and preparing for future OPV cessation following global eradication. Introducing IPV during a national multivaccination campaign led to rapid uptake, despite challenges with local vaccine supply due to high wastage rates. Continuous monitoring is required to achieve high coverage with the sequential polio vaccine schedule. PMID:25316829

  15. Development of an inactivated iridovirus vaccine against turbot viral reddish body syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tingjun; Hu, Xiuzhong; Wang, Liyan; Geng, Xiaofen; Jiang, Guojian; Yang, Xiuxia; Yu, Miaomiao

    2012-03-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.) reddish body iridovirus (TRBIV) was propagated in turbot fin cells (TF cells) and inactivated as the TRBIV vaccine with its protection efficiency evaluated in this study. TF cells were cultured in 10% bovine calf serum (BCS)-containing MEM medium (pH7.0) at 22°C, in which TRBIV propagated to a titer as high as 105.6 TCID50 mL-1. The TRBIV was inactivated with 0.1% formalin and formulated with 0.5% aluminum hydroxide. The inactivated vaccine caused neither cytopathogenic effect (CPE) on TF cells nor pathogenic effect on turbots. After being administered with the vaccine twice via muscle injection, the turbot developed high-tittered TRBIV neutralizing antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. The vaccine protected the turbot from dying with an immunoprotection rate of 83.3% as was determined via subcutaneous vaccination in the laboratory and 90.5% via bath vaccination in turbot farms, respectively. The inactivated vaccine was very immunogenic, efficiently preventing turbot from death. It holds the potential of being applied in aquaculture.

  16. Efficacy of an inactivated genotype 2b porcine epidemic diarrhea virus vaccine in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Baek, Pil-Soo; Choi, Hwan-Won; Lee, Sunhee; Yoon, In-Joong; Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Du Sik; Lee, Seungyoon; Lee, Changhee

    2016-06-01

    Massive outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) recurred in South Korea in 2013-2014 and affected approximately 40% of the swine breeding herds across the country, incurring a tremendous financial impact on producers and consumers. Despite the nationwide use of commercially available attenuated and inactivated vaccines in South Korea, PEDV has continued to plague the domestic pork industry, raising concerns regarding their protective efficacies and the need for new vaccine development. In a previous study, we isolated and serially cultivated a Korean PEDV epidemic strain, KOR/KNU-141112/2014, in Vero cells. With the availability of a cell culture-propagated PEDV strain, we are able to explore vaccination and challenge studies on pigs. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to produce an inactivated PEDV vaccine using the KNU-141112 strain and evaluate its effectiveness in neonatal piglets. Pregnant sows were immunized intramuscularly with the inactivated adjuvanted monovalent vaccine at six and three weeks prior to farrowing. Six-day-old piglets born to vaccinated or unvaccinated sows were challenged with the homogeneous KNU-141112 virus. The administration of the inactivated vaccine to sows greatly increased the survival rate of piglets challenged with the virulent strain, from 0% to approximately 92% (22/24), and significantly reduced diarrhea severity including viral shedding in feces. In addition, litters from unvaccinated sows continued to lose body weight throughout the experiment, whereas litters from vaccinated sows started recovering their daily weight gain at 7 days after the challenge. Furthermore, strong neutralizing antibody responses to PEDV were verified in immunized sows and their offspring, but were absent in the unvaccinated controls. Altogether, our data demonstrated that durable lactogenic immunity was present in dams administrated with the inactivated vaccine and subsequently conferred critical passive immune protection to

  17. Preliminary results on innocuity and immunogenicity of an inactivated vaccine against Peste des petits ruminants.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, Gaetano Federico; Monaco, Federica; Harrak, Mehdi El; Chafiqa, Loutfi; Capista, Sara; Bortone, Grazia; Orsini, Gianluca; Pinoni, Chiara; Iorio, Mariangela; Iapaolo, Federica; Pini, Attilio; Di Ventura, Mauro

    2016-06-30

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) virus belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae and represents a major threat to small livestock industry. In recent years, outbreaks of PPR have occurred in Turkey and North Africa. In endemic areas, disease prevention is accomplished using live‑attenuated vaccines. However, the use of live vaccines in non‑endemic regions, such as Europe, is not approved by Veterinary Authorities. In these regions inactivated vaccines are then the only viable alternative. In this study an inactivated vaccine (iPPRVac) was formulated with either a water‑in‑oil emulsion (ISA 71 VG) or with delta inulin adjuvant, alone (AFSA1) or combined with a TLR9 agonist oligonucleotide (AFSA2). These formulations were then tested for immunogenicity on rats. The iPPRV formulation with AFSA2 adjuvant induced 100% seroconversion in rats after 2 injections and was subsequently evaluated in goats. Five goats were immunised twice subcutaneously, 36 days apart with iPPRVac + AFSA2. The immunised goats all seroconverted to PPR by day 9 and remained seropositive until the end of the experimental period (133 days). These data indicate that the rat model is useful in predicting vaccine responses in goats and that inactivated vaccine, when formulated with a delta inulin adjuvant, represents a promising alternative to live attenuated vaccines for PPR vaccination campaigns in non‑endemic areas. PMID:27393872

  18. Reduction of high pathogenicity avian influenza virus in eggs from chickens once or twice vaccinated with an oil-emulsified inactivated H5 avian influenza vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The negative impact of high pathogenicity avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection on egg production and deposition of virus in eggs, as well as any protective effect of vaccination, is unknown. Individually housed non-vaccinated, sham-vaccinated and inactivated H5N9 vaccinated once or twice adult Wh...

  19. Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease is influenced by haemagglutinin and neuraminidase in whole inactivated influenza virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rajão, Daniela S; Chen, Hongjun; Perez, Daniel R; Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Phillip C; Loving, Crystal L; Shanks, G Dennis; Vincent, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Multiple subtypes and many antigenic variants of influenza A virus (IAV) co-circulate in swine in the USA, complicating effective use of commercial vaccines to control disease and transmission. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines may provide partial protection against IAV with substantial antigenic drift, but have been shown to induce vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) when challenged with an antigenic variant of the same haemagglutinin (HA) subtype. This study investigated the role the immune response against HA, neuraminidase (NA) and nucleoprotein (NP) may play in VAERD by reverse engineering vaccine and challenge viruses on a common backbone and using them in a series of vaccination/challenge trials. Mismatched HA between vaccine and challenge virus was necessary to induce VAERD. However, vaccines containing a matched NA abrogated the VAERD phenomenon induced by the HA mismatch and this was correlated with NA-inhibiting (NI) antibodies. Divergence between the two circulating swine N2 lineages (92 % identity) resulted in a loss of NI cross-reactivity and also resulted in VAERD with the mismatched HA. The NP lineage selected for use in the WIV vaccine strains did not affect protection or pathology. Thus the combination of HA and NA in the vaccine virus strains played a substantial role in vaccine protection versus immunopathology, suggesting that vaccines that target the HA protein alone could be more prone to VAERD due to the absence of cross-protective NI antibodies. PMID:27031847

  20. Vaccination of pigs against Aujeszky's disease by the intradermal route using live attenuated and inactivated virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vannier, P; Cariolet, R

    1989-09-01

    A study was undertaken of the protection induced by inactivated and live Aujeszky's disease virus vaccines. The vaccines were administered using a special device which, without the use of a needle, delivered the preparation intradermally. The trials were performed on 88 pigs which were vaccinated at the beginning of the fattening period both in experimental conditions and in pig herds. All the pigs were challenged at the end of the fattening period in isolation units. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the same vaccines injected intramuscularly. It was shown that vaccination via the intradermal route induced good protection in the vaccinated animals and was similar to that conferred by live virus vaccine injected intramuscularly. The results, with the inactivated virus vaccine, were not so good when it was injected via the intradermal route. Studies with intradermal vaccination showed no local lesion or very small nodules strictly localized to the dermis. The results also confirmed that the effects of challenge exposure depended on the health status of animals prior to infection and show the necessity to use a synthetic value (delta G) to interpret the data and mainly to compare the results objectively. In fattening pigs this vaccination procedure is attractive because (i) less animal constraint is needed than would be for intramuscular injections, (ii) injection can be checked by the presence of a visible papula at the site of inoculation and, (iii) pigs can be vaccinated in the ham while they are feeding. Injection without a needle also contributes to avoiding bacterial contamination under practical farm conditions of vaccination. PMID:2554623

  1. Rabies virus pathogenesis in relationship to intervention with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Franka, Richard; Wu, Xianfu; Jackson, Felix R; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Palmer, Dustyn P; Henderson, Heather; Hayat, Wajid; Green, Douglas B; Blanton, Jesse D; Greenberg, Lauren; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2009-11-27

    Despite progress in vaccine development in the past century the mechanisms behind immune responses elicited by rabies biologics or via natural infection remain largely unknown. In this study, we compared protection elicited by standard, early, or delayed prophylaxis with a reduced number of vaccine doses using inactivated and live-attenuated vaccines. Two-month-old Syrian hamsters, 4-week-old ICR mice or adult rhesus macaques were inoculated with canine rabies virus variants. Thereafter, prophylaxis was initiated 6h, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7 days post-exposure (p.e.). One or several doses of inactivated (HDCV), or reverse genetically attenuated (live), or gamma-irradiated (inactivated)-ERAG333 vaccines were administered intramuscularly. The dynamics of virus spread were measured over time in the rodent models. Rabies virus reached the spinal cord at day 4 and brain at day 6 p.e. All hamsters succumbed in groups in which live ERAG333 was delayed until days 5 and 6 p.e. However, 78%, 44%, 56% and 22% of hamsters survived when one dose of live ERAG333 was administered 6h, 1, 2, 3, and 4 days p.e., respectively. Similarly, 67% survived when inactivated ERAG333 was administered at 24h p.e. All hamsters succumbed when standard prophylaxis (the Essen regimen) was delayed until days 3-6, but 67% and 33% of hamsters survived when PEP began 1 or 2 days p.e., respectively. Macaques were protected by one dose of attenuated ERAG333 at 24h p.e. The highly attenuated (live) and inactivated ERAG333 vaccines elicited potent protective immune responses, even when prophylaxis initiation was delayed. When 2-5 doses of commercial vaccine and HRIG were administered according to the Essen scheme, 89-100% of the animals survived. Reduced vaccine schedules provided efficacious intervention, regardless of the total number of vaccine doses administered. PMID:19925945

  2. Antibody and cellular immune responses of naïve mares to repeated vaccination with an inactivated equine herpesvirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wagner, B; Goodman, L B; Babasyan, S; Freer, H; Torsteinsdóttir, S; Svansson, V; Björnsdóttir, S; Perkins, G A

    2015-10-13

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) continues to cause severe outbreaks of abortions or myeloencephalopathy in horses despite widely used vaccination. The aim of this work was to determine the effects of frequent vaccination with an inactivated EHV vaccine on immune development in horses. Fifteen EHV-1 naïve mares were vaccinated a total of 5 times over a period of 8 months with intervals of 20, 60, 90 and 60 days between vaccine administrations. Total antibody and antibody isotype responses were evaluated with a new sensitive EHV-1 Multiplex assay to glycoprotein C (gC) and gD for up to 14 months after initial vaccination. Antibodies peaked after the first two vaccine doses and then declined despite a third administration of the vaccine. The fourth vaccine dose was given at 6 months and the gC and gD antibody titers increased again. Mixed responses with increasing gC but decreasing gD antibody values were observed after the fifth vaccination at 8 months. IgG4/7 isotype responses mimicked the total Ig antibody production to vaccination most closely. Vaccination also induced short-lasting IgG1 antibodies to gC, but not to gD. EHV-1-specific cellular immunity induced by vaccination developed slower than antibodies, was dominated by IFN-γ producing T-helper 1 (Th1) cells, and was significantly increased compared to pre-vaccination values after administration of 3 vaccine doses. Decreased IFN-γ production and reduced Th1-cell induction were also observed after the second and fourth vaccination. Overall, repeated EHV vaccine administration did not always result in increasing immunity. The adverse effects on antibody and cellular immunity that were observed here when the EHV vaccine was given in short intervals might in part explain why EHV-1 outbreaks are observed worldwide despite widely used vaccination. The findings warrant further evaluation of immune responses to EHV vaccines to optimize vaccination protocols for different vaccines and horse groups at risk. PMID

  3. An inactivated avian polyomavirus vaccine is safe and immunogenic in various Psittaciformes.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, B W; Niagro, F D; Latimer, K S; Pritchard, N; Campagnoli, R P; Lukert, P D

    1996-08-01

    The safety and immunogenicity of adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted inactivated avian polyomavirus vaccines, administered either intramuscularly or subcutaneously (s.c.), were evaluated in a group of mixed species Psittaciformes. In 233 vaccinates representing species of macaws, cockatoos, conures, and parrots, gross reactions were limited to small scab formation at the s.c. injection site in three African grey parrots. Both vaccines stimulated a virus neutralizing (VN) antibody response, particularly in birds that were seronegative prior to vaccination. Ninety-three percent of the birds that were seronegative at the beginning of the study seroconverted (greater than fourfold increase in VN antibody titer) by 2 weeks after the second vaccination. Seventy-six percent of all the vaccinates had at least a fourfold increase in VN antibody titer at this time. There was no significant difference in seroconversion between the birds vaccinated with adjuvanted or nonadjuvanted vaccines. This study indicates that an inactivated avian polyomavirus vaccine can be used to safely immunize various species of psittacine birds in a field setting. PMID:8911004

  4. Limited efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccine in elderly individuals is associated with decreased production of vaccine-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Sanae; Sullivan, Meghan; Narvaez, Carlos F.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Furman, David; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Nishtala, Madhuri; Wrammert, Jens; Smith, Kenneth; James, Judith A.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Davis, Mark M.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Greenberg, Harry B.; He, Xiao-Song

    2011-01-01

    During seasonal influenza epidemics, disease burden is shouldered predominantly by the very young and the elderly. Elderly individuals are particularly affected, in part because vaccine efficacy wanes with age. This has been linked to a reduced ability to induce a robust serum antibody response. Here, we show that this is due to reduced quantities of vaccine-specific antibodies, rather than a lack of antibody avidity or affinity. We measured levels of vaccine-specific plasmablasts by ELISPOT 1 week after immunization of young and elderly adults with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine. Plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibodies (PPAbs) were generated from bulk-cultured B cells, while recombinant monoclonal antibodies (re-mAbs) were produced from single plasmablasts. The frequency of vaccine-specific plasmablasts and the concentration of PPAbs were lower in the elderly than in young adults, whereas the yields of secreted IgG per plasmablast were not different. Differences were not detected in the overall vaccine-specific avidity or affinity of PPAbs and re-mAbs between the 2 age groups. In contrast, reactivity of the antibodies induced by the inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine toward the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, which was not present in the vaccine, was higher in the elderly than in the young. These results indicate that the inferior antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly is primarily due to reduced quantities of vaccine-specific antibodies. They also suggest that exposure history affects the cross-reactivity of vaccination-induced antibodies. PMID:21785218

  5. Pressure-inactivated yellow fever 17DD virus: implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Luciane P; Mendes, Ygara S; Yamamura, Anna M Y; Almeida, Luiz F C; Caride, Elena; Gonçalves, Rafael B; Silva, Jerson L; Oliveira, Andréa C; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos S

    2008-06-01

    The successful Yellow Fever (YF) vaccine consists of the live attenuated 17D-204 or 17DD viruses. Despite its excellent record of efficacy and safety, serious adverse events have been recorded and influenced extensive vaccination in endemic areas. Therefore, alternative strategies should be considered, which may include inactivated whole virus. High hydrostatic pressure has been described as a method for viral inactivation and vaccine development. The present study evaluated whether high hydrostatic pressure would inactivate the YF 17DD virus. YF 17DD virus was grown in Vero cells in roller bottle cultures and subjected to 310MPa for 3h at 4 degrees C. This treatment abolished YF infectivity and eliminated the ability of the virus to cause disease in mice. Pressure-inactivated virus elicited low level of neutralizing antibody titers although exhibited complete protection against an otherwise lethal challenge with 17DD virus in the murine model. The data warrant further development of pressure-inactivated vaccine against YF. PMID:18420285

  6. Failure to detect infection by oral polio vaccine virus following natural exposure among inactivated polio vaccine recipients

    PubMed Central

    GARY, H. E.; SMITH, B.; JENKS, J.; RUIZ, J.; SESSIONS, W.; VINJE, J.; SOBSEY, M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY While oral polio vaccine (OPV) has been shown to be safe and effective, it has been observed that it can circulate within a susceptible population and revert to a virulent form. Inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) confers protection from paralytic disease, but provides limited protection against infection. It is possible, then, that an IPV-immunized population, when exposed to OPV, could sustain undetected circulation of vaccine-derived poliovirus. This study examines the possibility of polio vaccine virus circulating within the United States (highly IPV-immunized) population that borders Mexico (OPV-immunized). A total of 653 stool and 20 sewage samples collected on the US side of the border were tested for the presence of poliovirus. All samples were found to be negative. These results suggest that the risk of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus is low in fully immunized IPV-using populations in developed countries that border OPV-using populations. PMID:17376256

  7. Serological response to vaccination against avian influenza in zoo-birds using an inactivated H5N9 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Klausen, Joan; Holm, Elisabeth; Grøndahl, Carsten; Jørgensen, Poul H

    2007-05-30

    Five hundred and forty birds in three zoos were vaccinated twice against avian influenza with a 6-week interval using an inactivated H5N9 vaccine. Serological response was evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition test 4-6 weeks following the second vaccine administration. 84% of the birds seroconverted, and 76% developed a titre > or =32. The geometric mean titre after vaccination was 137. A significant species variation in response was noted; penguins, pelicans, ducks, geese, herons, Guinea fowl, cranes, cockatiels, lovebirds, and barbets showed very poor response to vaccination, while very high titres and seroconversion rates were seen in flamingos, ibis, rheas, Congo peafowl, black-winged stilts, amazon parrots, and kookaburras. PMID:17467857

  8. Concomitant turkey herpesvirus-infectious bursal disease vector vaccine and oil-adjuvanted inactivated Newcastle disease vaccine administration: consequences for vaccine intake and protection.

    PubMed

    Lemiere, Stephane; Fernández, Rafael; Pritchard, Nikki; Cruz-Coy, Julio; Rojo, Francisco; Wong, Siam Yit; Saint-Gerand, Anne-Lise; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Perozo, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    Hatchery vaccination protocols in day-old chicks are designed to provide early priming and protection against several poultry diseases including, but not limited to, Marek's disease (MD), infectious bursal disease (IBD), and Newcastle disease (ND). The constraint of concomitant administration of live MD and IBD vaccines plus ND inactivated oil-adjuvanted vaccines (IOAVs) requires improvements in vaccine technology. Single-needle concomitant subcutaneous (SC) application of IBD/MDV and killed NDV vaccine and the use of viral vectors for expression of immunogenic proteins are a current trend in the industry. The objective of this work was to assess the compatibility of a turkey herpesvirus (HVT)-infectious bursal disease (vHVT-IBD) vector vaccine applied simultaneously with IOAV and to evaluate the consequences for vaccine intake, the need for additional immunizations with the respective vaccines, and protection. Five separate trials were performed using double- and/or single-needle injectors. The levels and persistence of vaccine intake, serologic response, vHVT-IBD virus combination with the MD Rispens strain, and/or live NDV vaccination were also assessed. Histopathology and PCR at injection sites showed adequate vaccine intake detected up to 44 days postvaccination. Serologic evidence of vaccine priming was observed, and all vaccinated groups differed (P < 0.05) from the control at different time points. MD, NDV, and IBD protection results after concomitant double-shot single-needle vaccination were near 85%, 95%, and 100%, respectively. Taken together the results indicate no deleterious effects on the efficacy of the vHVT-IBD vaccine monitored by vaccine intake, serologic and challenge results, and combinations after concomitant live/killed vaccination, suggesting the suitability of its use in hatchery vaccination. All types of injectors used as well as injection techniques, vaccines injected separately or together, gave the same results. PMID:22312985

  9. [Modalities of production and immunity conferred by an inactivated rabies vaccine originating from cell culture].

    PubMed

    Précausta, P; Soulebot, J P; Bugand, M; Brun, A; Chappuis, G

    1982-01-01

    Further to guidelines advised by the World Health Organization, an inactivated Rabies vaccine was prepared from virus propagated on cell culture. This vaccine is presented either in the freeze-dried form or in the liquid form together with an immunity adjuvant. The specific and nonspecific immunity of the vaccine is excellent. The potency, tested in laboratory animals and in species for which the vaccine is intended, satisfies recommendations published by the W.H.O. The immunity persistence, evaluated by the titration of serum antibodies and by challenge with a pathogenic virus, proves to be excellent 3 years following primovaccination. Finally, the stability of this vaccine is an interesting factor for its application, especially in the form of a combined vaccine. PMID:7128075

  10. Live attenuated and inactivated viral vaccine formulation and nasal delivery: potential and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tlaxca, José L; Ellis, Scott; Remmele, Richard L

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are cost-effective for the prevention of infectious diseases and have significantly reduced mortality and morbidity. Novel approaches are needed to develop safe and effective vaccines against disease. Major challenges in vaccine development include stability in a suitable dosage form and effective modes of delivery. Many live attenuated vaccines are capable of eliciting both humoral and cell mediated immune responses if physicochemically stable in an appropriate delivery vehicle. Knowing primary stresses that impart instability provides a general rationale for formulation development and mode of delivery. Since most pathogens enter the body through the mucosal route, live-attenuated vaccines have the advantage of mimicking natural immunization via non-invasive delivery. This presentation will examine aspects of formulation design, types of robust dosage forms to consider, effective routes of delivery (invasive and noninvasive), and distinctions between live attenuated or inactivated vaccines. PMID:25312673

  11. Assessment of inactivated human rabies vaccines: biochemical characterization and genetic identification of virus strains.

    PubMed

    Finke, Stefan; Karger, Axel; Freuling, Conrad; Müller, Thomas

    2012-05-21

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the periodic evaluation of the purity of the cell lines used in the production of rabies vaccines, as well as the antigenic identity of the virus strains. Here, we analyzed seventeen marketed inactivated human rabies virus vaccines for viral and non-viral proteins by SDS-PAGE and Coomassie/silver staining. Mass spectrometric analysis of an abundant 60-70 kDa signal indicated that in most vaccines serum albumin of human origin (HSA) was the major component. Quantification of HSA in the vaccines revealed a mean concentration of 22 mg HSA/dose in all tested PVRV (purified vero cell rabies vaccine), HDCV (human diploid cell rabies vaccine) and PHK (primary hamster kidney) vaccines. In contrast, 1000-fold lower HSA levels and no HSA were detected in PCECV (purified chick embryo cell-culture vaccine) and PDEV (duck embryo rabies vaccine), respectively. Western blot analyses further confirmed a high bias in the HSA content, whereas the virus protein levels were rather similar in all tested vaccines. In addition, the vaccine viruses were sequenced within the N- and G-genes to identify the strain. In the majority of sequenced vaccines, the declared vaccine strain was confirmed. However, some discrepancies in the genetic identification were observed, supporting WHO's recommendation for the molecular characterization of vaccine seed strains. This research highlights the variation in purity found between different human rabies virus vaccines, and suggests that further research is needed to establish the impact non-active components have on the potency of such vaccines. PMID:22469862

  12. [Development and evaluation of an inactivated bivalent vaccine against duck viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Yin, Fenggui; Jing, Li; Zhang, Shuang; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Wanlin; Fan, Guobing; Dong, Xiukai; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-11-01

    The rapid mutation and widely spread of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) lead to the vast economic loss of the duck industry. To prepare and evaluate bivalent inactivated vaccine laboratory products of DHAV, 6 strains were screened from 201 DHAV-1 strains and 38 DHAV-3 strains by using serotype epidemiological analysis in most of the duck factory. Vaccine candidate strains were selected by ELD50 and LD50 tests in the 6 strains. Continuously passaged, the 5th passaged duck embryos bodies grinding fluid was selected as vaccine virus seeds. The virus seeds were treated with formaldehyde and water in oil in water (W/O/W) emulsions, making into three batches of two bivalent inactivated vaccine laboratory products. The safety test, antibody neutralization test, challenged protection and cross immune protection experiment suggested that the vaccines possessed good safety, and neutralizing antibodies were detected at 7th day and the challenged protection rate reached 90% to 100% at the 14th and 21st day. Moreover, immune duration of ducklings lasted more than five weeks. However, cross-immunity protection experiments with DHAV-SH and DHAV-FS only had 20%-30%. The two bivalent inactivated vaccine laboratory products of duck viral hepatitis were effective and reliable, providing a new method as well as a new product for DHAV prevention and control. PMID:26939441

  13. Preclinical Development of Inactivated Rabies Virus-Based Polyvalent Vaccine Against Rabies and Filoviruses.

    PubMed

    Willet, Mallory; Kurup, Drishya; Papaneri, Amy; Wirblich, Christoph; Hooper, Jay W; Kwilas, Steve A; Keshwara, Rohan; Hudacek, Andrew; Beilfuss, Stefanie; Rudolph, Grit; Pommerening, Elke; Vos, Adriaan; Neubert, Andreas; Jahrling, Peter; Blaney, Joseph E; Johnson, Reed F; Schnell, Matthias J

    2015-10-01

    We previously described the generation of a novel Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine based on inactivated rabies virus (RABV) containing EBOV glycoprotein (GP) incorporated in the RABV virion. Our results demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). Protection against viral challenge depended largely on the quality of the humoral immune response against EBOV GP.Here we present the extension and improvement of this vaccine by increasing the amount of GP incorporation into virions via GP codon-optimization as well as the addition of Sudan virus (SUDV) and Marburg virus (MARV) GP containing virions. Immunogenicity studies in mice indicate similar immune responses for both SUDV GP and MARV GP compared to EBOV GP. Immunizing mice with multiple antigens resulted in immune responses similar to immunization with a single antigen. Moreover, immunization of NHP with the new inactivated RABV EBOV vaccine resulted in high titer neutralizing antibody levels and 100% protection against lethal EBOV challenge when applied with adjuvant.Our results indicate that an inactivated polyvalent vaccine against RABV filoviruses is achievable. Finally, the novel vaccines are produced on approved VERO cells and a clinical grade RABV/EBOV vaccine for human trials has been produced. PMID:26063224

  14. Development of a dried influenza whole inactivated virus vaccine for pulmonary immunization.

    PubMed

    Audouy, Sandrine A L; van der Schaaf, Gieta; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Wilschut, Jan; Huckriede, Anke

    2011-06-10

    Stabilization and ease of administration are two ways to substantially improve the use of current vaccines. In the present study an influenza whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccine was freeze-dried or spray-freeze dried in the presence of inulin as a cryoprotectant. Only spray-freeze drying rendered powders compatible with administration to the lungs by insufflation. Pulmonary administration of the powder vaccine obtained by this method to BALB/c mice led to a transient influx of neutrophils and a concomitant decrease in the number of macrophages as did administration of liquid vaccine. Inflammatory reactions to both vaccines were mild and short-lived. Immunization studies showed that the immunogenic properties of WIV vaccine were not affected by drying. Pulmonary administration of the powder WIV vaccine induced a systemic immune response of the same magnitude as liquid vaccine while mucosal IgA responses were higher for powder WIV. In a challenge study where immunized mice were exposed to a lethal dose of live virus, two pulmonary doses of either liquid or powder WIV vaccine were equally effective as a single intramuscular injection of subunit vaccine in terms of reduction of the viral load in the lungs. To conclude, in the models employed for these studies the use of a dry powder WIV vaccine for pulmonary immunization was shown to be safe and efficient. PMID:21514345

  15. Colostral antibody induced interference of inactivated bluetongue serotype-8 vaccines in calves

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction into northern Europe in 2006, bluetongue has become a major threat to animal health. While the efficacy of commercial vaccines has been clearly demonstrated in livestock, little is known regarding the effect of maternal immunity on vaccinal efficacy. Here, we have investigated the duration and amplitude of colostral antibody-induced immunity in calves born to dams vaccinated against bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) and the extent of colostral antibody-induced interference of vaccination in these calves. Twenty-two calf-cow pairs were included in this survey. The median age at which calves became seronegative for BTV was 84 and 112 days as assayed by seroneutralisation test (SNT) and VP7 BTV competitive ELISA (cELISA), respectively. At the mean age of 118 days, 13/22 calves were immunized with inactivated BTV-8 vaccine. In most calves vaccination elicited a weak immune response, with seroconversion in only 3/13 calves. The amplitude of the humoral response to vaccination was inversely proportional to the maternal antibody level prior to vaccination. Thus, the lack of response was attributed to the persistence of virus-specific colostral antibodies that interfered with the induction of the immune response. These data suggest that the recommended age for vaccination of calves born to vaccinated dams needs to be adjusted in order to optimize vaccinal efficacy. PMID:21314901

  16. Cessation of Trivalent Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and Introduction of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine - Worldwide, 2016.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Lee M; Farrell, Margaret; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Menning, Lisa; Shendale, Stephanie; Lewis, Ian; Rubin, Jennifer; Garon, Julie; Harris, Jennifer; Hyde, Terri; Wassilak, Steven; Patel, Manish; Nandy, Robin; Chang-Blanc, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1988 World Health Assembly resolution to eradicate poliomyelitis, transmission of the three types of wild poliovirus (WPV) has been sharply reduced (1). WPV type 2 (WPV2) has not been detected since 1999 and was declared eradicated in September 2015. Because WPV type 3 has not been detected since November 2012, WPV type 1 (WPV1) is likely the only WPV that remains in circulation (1). This marked progress has been achieved through widespread use of oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs), most commonly trivalent OPV (tOPV), which contains types 1, 2, and 3 live, attenuated polioviruses and has been a mainstay of efforts to prevent polio since the early 1960s. However, attenuated polioviruses in OPV can undergo genetic changes during replication, and in communities with low vaccination coverage, can result in vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) that can cause paralytic polio indistinguishable from the disease caused by WPVs (2). Among the 721 polio cases caused by circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs*) detected during January 2006-May 2016, type 2 cVDPVs (cVDPV2s) accounted for >94% (2). Eliminating the risk for polio caused by VDPVs will require stopping all OPV use. The first stage of OPV withdrawal involved a global, synchronized replacement of tOPV with bivalent OPV (bOPV) containing only types 1 and 3 attenuated polioviruses, planned for April 18-May 1, 2016, thereby withdrawing OPV type 2 from all immunization activities (3). Complementing the switch from tOPV to bOPV, introduction of at least 1 dose of injectable, trivalent inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into childhood immunization schedules reduces risks from and facilitates responses to cVDPV2 outbreaks. All 155 countries and territories that were still using OPV in immunization schedules in 2015 have reported that they had ceased use of tOPV by mid-May 2016.(†) As of August 31, 2016, 173 (89%) of 194 World Health Organization (WHO) countries included IPV in their immunization schedules.(§) The cessation of

  17. Clinical analysis of leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 protein antibody associated with limbic encephalitis onset with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhimei; Cui, Tao; Shi, Weixiong; Wang, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We summarized the clinical characteristics of patients presenting with seizures and limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 protein antibody (LGI1) in order help recognize and treat this condition at its onset. We analyzed clinical, video electroencephalogram (VEEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and laboratory data of 10 patients who presented with LGI1-LE and followed up their outcomes from 2 to 16 (9.4 ± 4.2) months. All patients presented with seizures onset, including faciobrachial dystonic seizure (FBDS), partial seizure (PS), and generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS). Four patients (Cases 3, 5, 7, and 8) had mild cognitive deficits. Interictal VEEG showed normal patterns, focal slowing, or sharp waves in the temporal or frontotemporal lobes. Ictal VEEG of Cases 4, 5, and 7 showed diffuse voltage depression preceding FBDS, a left frontal/temporal origin, and a bilateral temporal origin, respectively. Ictal foci could not be localized in other cases. MRI scan revealed T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensity and evidence of edema in the right medial temporal lobe in Case 3, left hippocampal atrophy in Case 5, hyperintensities in the bilateral medial temporal lobes in Case 7, and hyperintensities in the basal ganglia and frontal cortex in Case 10. All 10 serum samples were positive for LGI1 antibody, but it was only detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 7 patients. Five patients (Cases 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8) presented with hyponatremia. One patient (Case 2) was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer. While responses to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were poor, most patients (except Case 2) responded favorably to immunotherapy. LGI1-LE may initially manifest with various types of seizures, particularly FBDS and complex partial seizures (CPS) of mesial temporal origin, and slowly progressive cognitive involvement. Clinical follow-up, VEEG monitoring, and MRI scan are helpful in early

  18. Safety and immunogenicity of an inactivated thimerosal‐free influenza vaccine in infants and children

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Terry; Richmond, Peter C.; McVernon, Jodie; Skeljo, Maryanne V.; Hartel, Gunter F.; Bennet, Jillian; Basser, Russell L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective  Few prospective studies of inactivated split virion influenza vaccine have been conducted in infants and children. Our objective was to evaluate the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a thimerosal‐free inactivated influenza vaccine (Fluvax®; CSL Limited, Parkville, Australia) in children aged 6 months to <9 years. Methods  A prospective, open‐label, phase III clinical trial was conducted in 298 healthy children previously unvaccinated with influenza, commencing in the Southern Hemisphere 2005 autumn. Participants were divided into two groups (Group A: ≥6 months to <3 years; Group B: ≥3 years to <9 years), and received two doses of the 2005 vaccine, and one dose of the 2006 vaccine one year later (Group A: 0·25 ml per dose; Group B: 0·5 ml per dose). Vaccine safety and reactogenicity was evaluated for 30 days after each dose. Immunogenicity was assessed using hemagglutination inhibition and single radial hemolysis assays. Results  There were no withdrawals due to adverse events (AEs). The majority of solicited local and systemic AEs were of mild severity. A maximum intensity of severe was reported for injection site pain and fever by only 3·0% and 3·4% of participants, respectively. The vaccine was immunogenic for all antigens, with ≥95% of both younger and older children achieving seroprotection after dose 2. Conclusions  This thimerosal‐free inactivated influenza vaccine had a favorable safety profile and was immunogenic in children aged ≥6 months and <9 years. Primary and booster vaccination produced consistently immunogenic responses including in children under 3 years of age receiving 0·25 ml doses of vaccine. PMID:19903213

  19. Influenza Vaccine Manufacturing: Effect of Inactivation, Splitting and Site of Manufacturing. Comparison of Influenza Vaccine Production Processes.

    PubMed

    Kon, Theone C; Onu, Adrian; Berbecila, Laurentiu; Lupulescu, Emilia; Ghiorgisor, Alina; Kersten, Gideon F; Cui, Yi-Qing; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Van der Pol, Leo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different inactivation and splitting procedures on influenza vaccine product composition, stability and recovery to support transfer of process technology. Four split and two whole inactivated virus (WIV) influenza vaccine bulks were produced and compared with respect to release criteria, stability of the bulk and haemagglutinin recovery. One clarified harvest of influenza H3N2 A/Uruguay virus prepared on 25.000 fertilized eggs was divided equally over six downstream processes. The main unit operation for purification was sucrose gradient zonal ultracentrifugation. The inactivation of the virus was performed with either formaldehyde in phosphate buffer or with beta-propiolactone in citrate buffer. For splitting of the viral products in presence of Tween®, either Triton™ X-100 or di-ethyl-ether was used. Removal of ether was established by centrifugation and evaporation, whereas removal of Triton-X100 was performed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All products were sterile filtered and subjected to a 5 months real time stability study. In all processes, major product losses were measured after sterile filtration; with larger losses for split virus than for WIV. The beta-propiolactone inactivation on average resulted in higher recoveries compared to processes using formaldehyde inactivation. Especially ether split formaldehyde product showed low recovery and least stability over a period of five months. PMID:26959983

  20. Influenza Vaccine Manufacturing: Effect of Inactivation, Splitting and Site of Manufacturing. Comparison of Influenza Vaccine Production Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Theone C.; Onu, Adrian; Berbecila, Laurentiu; Lupulescu, Emilia; Ghiorgisor, Alina; Kersten, Gideon F.; Cui, Yi-Qing; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Van der Pol, Leo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different inactivation and splitting procedures on influenza vaccine product composition, stability and recovery to support transfer of process technology. Four split and two whole inactivated virus (WIV) influenza vaccine bulks were produced and compared with respect to release criteria, stability of the bulk and haemagglutinin recovery. One clarified harvest of influenza H3N2 A/Uruguay virus prepared on 25.000 fertilized eggs was divided equally over six downstream processes. The main unit operation for purification was sucrose gradient zonal ultracentrifugation. The inactivation of the virus was performed with either formaldehyde in phosphate buffer or with beta-propiolactone in citrate buffer. For splitting of the viral products in presence of Tween®, either Triton™ X-100 or di-ethyl-ether was used. Removal of ether was established by centrifugation and evaporation, whereas removal of Triton-X100 was performed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All products were sterile filtered and subjected to a 5 months real time stability study. In all processes, major product losses were measured after sterile filtration; with larger losses for split virus than for WIV. The beta-propiolactone inactivation on average resulted in higher recoveries compared to processes using formaldehyde inactivation. Especially ether split formaldehyde product showed low recovery and least stability over a period of five months. PMID:26959983

  1. Mucosal immune response in broilers following vaccination with inactivated influenza and recombinant Bacillus subtilis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucosal and systemic immunity were observed in broilers vaccinated with mannosylated chitosan adjuvated (MCA) inactivated A/Turkey/Virginia/158512/2002 (H7N2) and administered with and without recombinant Bacillus subtilis to elicit heterologous influenza strain protection. Previously, mucosal immu...

  2. Seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine protects against 1918 Spanish influenza virus in ferrets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influenza H1N1 pandemic of 1918 was one of the worst medical disasters in human history. Recent studies have demonstrated that the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of the 1918 virus and 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus, the latter now a component of the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV),...

  3. Electron-beam-inactivated vaccine against Salmonella enteritidis colonization in molting hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron Beam (eBeam) ionization technology has a variety of applications in modern society. The underlying hypothesis was that electron beam (eBeam) inactivated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) cells can serve as a vaccine to control Salmonella colonization and Salmonella shedding in c...

  4. Studies on an inactivated vaccine against rabies virus in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Monaco, F; Franchi, P M; Lelli, R

    2006-01-01

    An inactivated vaccine against rabies virus was prepared from the attenuated ATCC PV-12 viral rabbit Pasteur strain. The virus was grown on Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK21) cells, and the supernatant was purified by filtration and inactivated with beta-propriolactone. The inactivated product was checked according to the NHI and European Pharmacopoeia methods. Part of the product was then lyophilised and the other part was adjuvanted with Al(OH)3. Both parts were used to vaccinate and boost groups of horses, cattle and sheep at different intervals. Their immunogenicity was compared with a similar commercial product. Blood samples were collected on a regular basis and the antibody titre was determined by the Fluorescence Antibody Virus Neutralisation (FAVN) test. No significant differences were found between species after both inoculations even though the immune response increased in intensity and duration after the booster dose in all the animals tested and was stronger and lasted longer with the adjuvanted aliquot. PMID:16878481

  5. Assessment of reduced vaccine dose on efficacy of an inactivated avian influenza vaccine against an H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) vaccines have emerged to be a viable emergency tool for use in a comprehensive strategy for dealing with high pathogenicity (HP) AI in developed countries. However, the available doses of inactivated AI vaccine are limited to national vaccine banks and inventory stocks of some ...

  6. Influenza: the virus and prophylaxis with inactivated influenza vaccine in "at risk" groups, including COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Arnt-Ove; Cox, Rebecca Jane; Haaheim, Lars Reinhardt

    2007-01-01

    Influenza is a major respiratory pathogen, which exerts a huge human and economic toll on society. Influenza is a vaccine preventable disease, however, the vaccine strains must be annually updated due to the continuous antigenic changes in the virus. Inactivated influenza vaccines have been used for over 50 years and have an excellent safety record. Annual vaccination is therefore recommended for all individuals with serious medical conditions, like COPD, and protects the vaccinee against influenza illness and also against hospitalization and death. In COPD patients, influenza infection can lead to exacerbations resulting in reduced quality of life, hospitalization and death in the most severe cases. Although there is only limited literature on the use of influenza vaccination solely in COPD patients, there is clearly enough evidence to recommend annual vaccination in this group. This review will focus on influenza virus and prophylaxis with inactivated influenza vaccines in COPD patients and other "at risk" groups to reduce morbidity, save lives, and reduce health care costs. PMID:18229561

  7. A controlled field trial of the effectiveness of acetone-dried and inactivated and heat-phenol-inactivated typhoid vaccines in Yugoslavia*

    PubMed Central

    1964-01-01

    In 1954-60 a Yugoslav Typhoid Commission showed in the first controlled field trial of typhoid vaccines, carried out in Osijek, Yugoslavia, that heat-phenol-inactivated typhoid vaccine gave a relatively high and long-lasting immunity. However, this liquid vaccine preparation was unstable and laboratory potency tests were inconclusive, and it was therefore decided that stable, dried, heat-killed, phenol-preserved vaccine be tested together with an acetone-inactivated and -dried vaccine in controlled field trials, supported in part by the World Health Organization, in Yugoslavia and British Guiana. This is report on the controlled trials organized in two Yugoslav towns, Bitola and Priština. Three comparable groups were formed by random allocation of vaccines among 45 497 volunteers in the two towns. In each town one group received heat-phenol vaccine, the second group acetone-dried vaccine and the third (control) group tetanus toxoid. Two doses were given four weeks apart in the spring of 1960 and the vaccinated persons were followed up for 2 1/2 years. The effectiveness of the vaccines was measured by comparing typhoid morbidity rates in the three groups. It was found during an outbreak of typhoid fever in Priština two years after primary vaccination that both the acetone-dried and the heat-phenol vaccines were effective, the former being superior. PMID:14196811

  8. Efficacy of three inactivated vaccines against challenge with HPAI H5N1 Vietnam/05 viruses in ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of inactivated vaccines containing a European isolate (A/turkey/England/73, H5N2 Chinese commercial vaccine), an American isolate (A/chicken/Hidalgo/94, H5N2 Mexican commercial vaccine), or a recombinant virus (RE-1, H5N1 recombinant Chinese vac...

  9. [Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases by vaccines].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M

    1997-04-01

    Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases are surveyed. Patients of poliomyelitis has recently been drastically reduced by world-wide administrating live vaccines. In view of rare incidence of paralysis after giving live vaccine, adoption of inactivated vaccine has recently been reconsidered. A live varicella vaccine was developed and has been world-wide used for normal and high-risk children. Incidence of zoster in vaccinated acute leukemic children is several times higher in those who with rash after vaccination as compared with those without rash, and as no or few rash appears after vaccination of normal children, it is expected that vaccination of normal children would lead to reduction of zoster after their aging. Measles encephalitis has rapidly been reduced by world-wide use of live vaccines. Mouse-brain derived vaccine against Japanese encephalitis(JE) has been used in Asian countries. Development of tissue-culture derived JE vaccine is under way. PMID:9103901

  10. A sensitive in vitro assay for the detection of residual viable rabies virus in inactivated rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Hitomi; Kakiuchi, Satsuki; Kurane, Ichiro; Saijo, Masayuki; Lim, Chang-Kweng

    2014-01-01

    Rabies is a viral disease transmitted through bites from rabid animals and can be prevented by vaccines. Clinically used rabies vaccines are prepared from inactivated rabies viruses grown in cell cultures or embryonated eggs. In Japan and across the world, tests that confirm complete inactivation, such as the in vivo suckling mouse assay, in which suckling mice are intracerebrally inoculated with vaccine products, are required for quality control. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based immunofluorescence assay that does not require mice for testing rabies vaccine inactivation for human use. The sensitivity of this cell-based in vitro assay was 5.7 times that of the in vivo suckling mouse assay, with a detection limit of one focus forming units per ml of test sample. This newly developed in vitro assay may replace the established in vivo suckling mouse assay for confirming viral vaccine inactivation. PMID:24321529

  11. Evaluation of adaptive immune responses and heterologous protection induced by inactivated bluetongue virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Breard, Emmanuel; Belbis, Guillaume; Viarouge, Cyril; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Haegeman, Andy; De Clercq, Kris; Hudelet, Pascal; Hamers, Claude; Moreau, Francis; Lilin, Thomas; Durand, Benoit; Mertens, Peter; Vitour, Damien; Sailleau, Corinne; Zientara, Stéphan

    2015-01-15

    Eradication of bluetongue virus is possible, as has been shown in several European countries. New serotypes have emerged, however, for which there are no specific commercial vaccines. This study addressed whether heterologous vaccines would help protect against 2 serotypes. Thirty-seven sheep were randomly allocated to 7 groups of 5 or 6 animals. Four groups were vaccinated with commercial vaccines against BTV strains 2, 4, and 9. A fifth positive control group was given a vaccine against BTV-8. The other 2 groups were unvaccinated controls. Sheep were then challenged by subcutaneous injection of either BTV-16 (2 groups) or BTV-8 (5 groups). Taken together, 24/25 sheep from the 4 experimental groups developed detectable antibodies against the vaccinated viruses. Furthermore, sheep that received heterologous vaccines showed significantly reduced viraemia and clinical scores for BTV-16 when compared to unvaccinated controls. Reductions in clinical signs and viraemia among heterologously vaccinated sheep were not as common after challenge with BTV-8. This study shows that heterologous protection can occur, but that it is difficult to predict if partial or complete protection will be achieved following inactivated-BTV vaccination. PMID:25500308

  12. Immunogenicity of a cell culture-derived inactivated vaccine against a common virulent isolate of grass carp reovirus.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Weiwei; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yingying; Zhao, Changchen; Li, Yingying; Shi, Chunbin; Wu, Shuqin; Song, Xinjian; Huang, Qiwen; Li, Shoujun

    2016-07-01

    Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) hemorrhagic disease, caused by grass carp reovirus (GCRV), is emerging as a serious problem in grass carp aquaculture. There is no available antiviral therapy and vaccination is the primary method of disease control. In the present study, the immunological effects and protective efficacy of an inactivated HuNan1307 vaccine in grass carp were evaluated. The GCRV isolate HuNan1307 was produced by replication onto the grass carp PSF cell line, and inactivated with 1% β-propiolactone for 60 h at 4 °C. Grass carp were injected with inactivated GCRV vaccine, followed by challenge with the isolate HuNan1307. The results showed that the minimum dosage of the inactivated vaccine was 10(5.5) TCID50/0.2 mL to induce immune protection. All grass carp immunized with the inactivated vaccine produced a high titer of serum antibodies and GCRV-specific neutralizing antibody. Moreover, the inactivated vaccine injection increased the expression of 6 immune-related genes in the spleen and head kidney, which indicated that a immune response was induced by the HuNan1307 vaccine. In addition, grass carp immunized with the inactivated vaccine showed a survival rate above 80% after the viral challenge, equal to that of grass carp immunized with a commercial attenuated vaccine, and the protection lasted at least for one year. The data in this study suggested that the inactivated HuNan1307 vaccine may represent an efficient method to induce immunity against GCRV infection and the induced disease in grass carp. PMID:27142935

  13. Systemic and local immune response in pigs intradermally and intramuscularly injected with inactivated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martelli, P; Saleri, R; Cavalli, V; De Angelis, E; Ferrari, L; Benetti, M; Ferrarini, G; Merialdi, G; Borghetti, P

    2014-01-31

    The systemic and respiratory local immune response induced by the intradermal administration of a commercial inactivated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae whole-cell vaccine (Porcilis(®) MHYO ID ONCE - MSD AH) in comparison with two commercial vaccines administered via the intramuscular route and a negative control (adjuvant only) was investigated. Forty conventional M. hyopneumoniae-free pigs were randomly assigned to four groups (ten animals each): Group A=intradermal administration of the test vaccine by using the needle-less IDAL(®) vaccinator at a dose of 0.2 ml; Group B=intramuscular administration of a commercially available vaccine (vaccine B); Group C=intramuscular administration of the adjuvant only (2 ml of X-solve adjuvant); Group D=intramuscular administration of a commercially available vaccine (vaccine D). Pigs were vaccinated at 28 days of age. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples were collected at vaccination (blood only), 4 and 8 weeks post-vaccination. Serum and BAL fluid were tested for the presence of antibodies by ELISA test. Peripheral blood monomorphonuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated to quantify the number of IFN-γ secreting cells by ELISpot. Moreover, cytokine gene expression from the BAL fluid was performed. Total antibodies against M. hyopneumoniae and specific IgG were detected in serum of intradermally and intramuscularly (vaccine B only) vaccinated pigs at 4 and 8 weeks post-vaccination. M. hyopneumoniae specific IgA were detected in BAL fluid from vaccinated animals (Groups A and B) but not from controls and animals vaccinated with the bacterin D (p<0.05). Significantly higher gene expression of IL-10 was observed in the BAL fluid at week 8 post-vaccination in the intradermally vaccinated pigs (p<0.05). The results support that the intradermal administration of an adjuvanted bacterin induces both systemic and mucosal immune responses. Moreover, the intramuscularly administered commercial vaccines each had a different

  14. Study of the Integrated Immune Response Induced by an Inactivated EV71 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingjing; Zhao, Hongling; Jiang, Li; Che, Yanchun; Shi, Haijin; Li, Rongcheng; Mo, Zhaojun; Huang, Teng; Liang, Zhenglun; Mao, Qunying; Wang, Lichun; Dong, Chenghong; Liao, Yun; Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Pu, Jing; Yue, Lei; Zhou, Zhenxin; Li, Qihan

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a major causative agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD), causes outbreaks among children in the Asia-Pacific region. A vaccine is urgently needed. Based on successful pre-clinical work, phase I and II clinical trials of an inactivated EV71 vaccine, which included the participants of 288 and 660 respectively, have been conducted. In the present study, the immune response and the correlated modulation of gene expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 30 infants (6 to 11 months) immunized with this vaccine or placebo and consented to join this study in the phase II clinical trial were analyzed. The results showed significantly greater neutralizing antibody and specific T cell responses in vaccine group after two inoculations on days 0 and 28. Additionally, more than 600 functional genes that were up- or down-regulated in PBMCs were identified by the microarray assay, and these genes included 68 genes associated with the immune response in vaccine group. These results emphasize the gene expression profile of the immune system in response to an inactivated EV71 vaccine in humans and confirmed that such an immune response was generated as the result of the positive mobilization of the immune system. Furthermore, the immune response was not accompanied by the development of a remarkable inflammatory response. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01391494 and NCT01512706. PMID:23372725

  15. Efficacy of a piglet-specific commercial inactivated vaccine against Porcine circovirus type 2 in clinical field trials

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kiwon; Seo, Hwi Won; Oh, Yeonsu; Park, Changhoon; Kang, Ikjae; Jang, Hyun; Chae, Chanhee

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of a piglet-specific inactivated Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccine was evaluated with clinical field trials, as recommended by the Republic of Korea’s Animal, Plant & Fisheries Quarantine & Inspection Agency. Three farms were selected on the basis of their history of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. On each farm 60, 1-week-old pigs were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups: vaccination at 1 and 3 wk of age or no vaccination. The 2-dose schedule of vaccination with inactivated PCV2 vaccine improved the average daily weight gain from birth to 16 wk of age, the PCV2 load in the blood, and the frequency and severity of lymph node lesions. Inactivated PCV2 vaccine seems to be very effective in controlling PCV2 infection under field conditions. PMID:24101803

  16. Viral Aetiology of Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance Cases, before and after Vaccine Policy Change from Oral Polio Vaccine to Inactivated Polio Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Saraswathy Subramaniam, T. S.; Apandi, Mohd Apandi; Jahis, Rohani; Samsudin, Mohd Samsul; Saat, Zainah

    2014-01-01

    Since 1992, surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases was introduced in Malaysia along with the establishment of the National Poliovirus Laboratory at the Institute for Medical Research. In 2008, the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, approved a vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine (IPV). Eight states started using IPV in the Expanded Immunization Programme, followed by the remaining states in January 2010. The objective of this study was to determine the viral aetiology of AFP cases below 15 years of age, before and after vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine. One hundred and seventy-nine enteroviruses were isolated from the 3394 stool specimens investigated between 1992 and December 2012. Fifty-six out of 107 virus isolates were polioviruses and the remaining were non-polio enteroviruses. Since 2009 after the sequential introduction of IPV in the childhood immunization programme, no Sabin polioviruses were isolated from AFP cases. In 2012, the laboratory AFP surveillance was supplemented with environmental surveillance with sewage sampling. Thirteen Sabin polioviruses were also isolated from sewage in the same year, but no vaccine-derived poliovirus was detected during this period. PMID:24772175

  17. [Specific activity of an UV-inactivated antirabies vaccine made from brain tissue administered in a shortened schedule].

    PubMed

    Morogova, V M; Magazov, R Sh; Gil'dina, S S; Latypova, R G; Shafeeva, R S

    1982-04-01

    The results obtained in the study of the specific potency of rabies vaccine prepared from sheep brain tissue and inactivated by UV irradiation indicate that, even in the presence of the lowest immunogenicity index (0.5), 5-6 injections of the vaccine, made not daily, but at interval of 3 and 7 days, induced the production of antibodies in the titers not lower than those resulting from 14-20 daily injections of the same vaccine or Fermi vaccine. The preparation inactivated by UV irradiation should be introduced for therapy according to the shortened immunization schedule with intervals, taking into account the immunogenicity index. PMID:7080770

  18. Recombinant chimeric Japanese encephalitis virus/tick-borne encephalitis virus is attenuated and protective in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Jiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Li, Shi-Hua; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Hui; Xu, Yan-Peng; Ma, Jie; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-02-12

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) represents one of the most dangerous human pathogens circulating in Europe and East Asia. No effective treatment for TBEV infection currently exists, and vaccination is the primary preventive measure. Although several inactivated vaccines have been licensed, the development of novel vaccines against TBEV remains a high priority in disease-endemic countries. In the present study, a live chimeric recombinant TBEV (ChinTBEV) was created by substituting the major structural genes of TBEV for the corresponding regions of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) live vaccine strain SA14-14-2. The resulting chimera had a small-plaque phenotype, replicated efficiently in both mammalian and mosquito cells. The preliminary data from in vitro passaging indicated the potential for stability of ChinTBEV. ChinTBEV also exhibited significantly attenuated neuroinvasiveness in mice upon either intraperitoneal or subcutaneous inoculation in comparison with its parental TBEV. Importantly, a single immunisation with ChinTBEV elicited TBEV-specific IgG and neutralising antibody responses in a dose-dependent manner, providing significant protection against lethal TBEV challenge in mice. Taken together, the results of this proof-of-concept study indicate that ChinTBEV can be further developed as a potential vaccine candidate against TBEV infection. Moreover, the construction of this type of flavivirus chimera using a JEV vaccine strain as the genetic backbone represents a universal vaccine approach. PMID:24394443

  19. Effect of Osmotic Pressure on the Stability of Whole Inactivated Influenza Vaccine for Coating on Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo-Jick; Song, Jae-Min; Bondy, Brian J.; Compans, Richard W.; Kang, Sang-Moo; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Enveloped virus vaccines can be damaged by high osmotic strength solutions, such as those used to protect the vaccine antigen during drying, which contain high concentrations of sugars. We therefore studied shrinkage and activity loss of whole inactivated influenza virus in hyperosmotic solutions and used those findings to improve vaccine coating of microneedle patches for influenza vaccination. Using stopped-flow light scattering analysis, we found that the virus underwent an initial shrinkage on the order of 10% by volume within 5 s upon exposure to a hyperosmotic stress difference of 217 milliosmolarity. During this shrinkage, the virus envelope had very low osmotic water permeability (1 – 6×10−4 cm s–1) and high Arrhenius activation energy (Ea = 15.0 kcal mol–1), indicating that the water molecules diffused through the viral lipid membranes. After a quasi-stable state of approximately 20 s to 2 min, depending on the species and hypertonic osmotic strength difference of disaccharides, there was a second phase of viral shrinkage. At the highest osmotic strengths, this led to an undulating light scattering profile that appeared to be related to perturbation of the viral envelope resulting in loss of virus activity, as determined by in vitro hemagglutination measurements and in vivo immunogenicity studies in mice. Addition of carboxymethyl cellulose effectively prevented vaccine activity loss in vitro and in vivo, believed to be due to increasing the viscosity of concentrated sugar solution and thereby reducing osmotic stress during coating of microneedles. These results suggest that hyperosmotic solutions can cause biphasic shrinkage of whole inactivated influenza virus which can damage vaccine activity at high osmotic strength and that addition of a viscosity enhancer to the vaccine coating solution can prevent osmotically driven damage and thereby enable preparation of stable microneedle coating formulations for vaccination. PMID:26230936

  20. High resolution identity testing of inactivated poliovirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Edward T.; Minor, Philip D.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Definitive identification of poliovirus strains in vaccines is essential for quality control, particularly where multiple wild-type and Sabin strains are produced in the same facility. Sequence-based identification provides the ultimate in identity testing and would offer several advantages over serological methods. Methods We employed random RT-PCR and high throughput sequencing to recover full-length genome sequences from monovalent and trivalent poliovirus vaccine products at various stages of the manufacturing process. Results All expected strains were detected in previously characterised products and the method permitted identification of strains comprising as little as 0.1% of sequence reads. Highly similar Mahoney and Sabin 1 strains were readily discriminated on the basis of specific variant positions. Analysis of a product known to contain incorrect strains demonstrated that the method correctly identified the contaminants. Conclusion Random RT-PCR and shotgun sequencing provided high resolution identification of vaccine components. In addition to the recovery of full-length genome sequences, the method could also be easily adapted to the characterisation of minor variant frequencies and distinction of closely related products on the basis of distinguishing consensus and low frequency polymorphisms. PMID:26049003

  1. Frequency of medically attended events following rapid revaccination with trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mark A; Crane, Brad; Mullooly, John P; Naleway, Allison L

    2010-11-16

    In 2008, potential temperature compromise of one lot of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) led to the revaccination of 13,210 Kaiser Permanente Northwest members within 28 days of receipt of their initial TIV dose. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to determine if these individuals experienced a higher rate of medically attended events (MAE) than those receiving only one TIV dose. We found no increase in MAE among those rapidly revaccinated (odds ratio 1.08; 95% confidence interval 0.80, 1.45), which may reassure individuals of the safety of revaccination with TIV should it be necessary, thereby leading to increased compliance with influenza vaccination recommendations. PMID:20875495

  2. Improved immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus inactivated vaccine following DNA vaccination using Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the development of DNA vaccines using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) genes from AF2240 Newcastle disease virus strain, namely pIRES/HN, pIRES/F and pIRES-F/HN. Transient expression analysis of the constructs in Vero cells revealed the successful expression of gene inserts in vitro. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that single vaccination with the constructed plasmid DNA (pDNA) followed by a boost with inactivated vaccine induced a significant difference in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody levels (p < 0.05) elicited by either pIRES/F, pIRES/F+ pIRES/HN or pIRES-F/HN at one week after the booster in specific pathogen free chickens when compared with the inactivated vaccine alone. Taken together, these results indicated that recombinant pDNA could be used to increase the efficacy of the inactivated vaccine immunization procedure. PMID:27051336

  3. Bivalent vaccine platform based on Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) elicits neutralizing antibodies against JEV and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Saga, Ryohei; Fujimoto, Akira; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Matsuda, Mami; Hasegawa, Makoto; Watashi, Koichi; Aizaki, Hideki; Nakamura, Noriko; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Konishi, Eiji; Kato, Takanobu; Kohara, Michinori; Takeyama, Haruko; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryosuke

    2016-01-01

    Directly acting antivirals recently have become available for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but there is no prophylactic vaccine for HCV. In the present study, we took advantage of the properties of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) to develop antigens for use in a HCV vaccine. Notably, the surface-exposed JEV envelope protein is tolerant of inserted foreign epitopes, permitting display of novel antigens. We identified 3 positions that permitted insertion of the HCV E2 neutralization epitope recognized by HCV1 antibody. JEV subviral particles (SVP) containing HCV-neutralization epitope (SVP-E2) were purified from culture supernatant by gel chromatography. Sera from mice immunized with SVP-E2 inhibited infection by JEV and by trans-complemented HCV particles (HCVtcp) derived from multi-genotypic viruses, whereas sera from mice immunized with synthetic E2 peptides did not show any neutralizing activity. Furthermore, sera from mice immunized with SVP-E2 neutralized HCVtcp with N415K escape mutation in E2. As with the SVP-E2 epitope-displaying particles, JEV SVPs with HCV E1 epitope also elicited neutralizing antibodies against HCV. Thus, this novel platform harboring foreign epitopes on the surface of the particle may facilitate the development of a bivalent vaccine against JEV and other pathogens. PMID:27345289

  4. Bivalent vaccine platform based on Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) elicits neutralizing antibodies against JEV and hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Ryohei; Fujimoto, Akira; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Matsuda, Mami; Hasegawa, Makoto; Watashi, Koichi; Aizaki, Hideki; Nakamura, Noriko; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Konishi, Eiji; Kato, Takanobu; Kohara, Michinori; Takeyama, Haruko; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryosuke

    2016-01-01

    Directly acting antivirals recently have become available for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but there is no prophylactic vaccine for HCV. In the present study, we took advantage of the properties of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) to develop antigens for use in a HCV vaccine. Notably, the surface-exposed JEV envelope protein is tolerant of inserted foreign epitopes, permitting display of novel antigens. We identified 3 positions that permitted insertion of the HCV E2 neutralization epitope recognized by HCV1 antibody. JEV subviral particles (SVP) containing HCV-neutralization epitope (SVP-E2) were purified from culture supernatant by gel chromatography. Sera from mice immunized with SVP-E2 inhibited infection by JEV and by trans-complemented HCV particles (HCVtcp) derived from multi-genotypic viruses, whereas sera from mice immunized with synthetic E2 peptides did not show any neutralizing activity. Furthermore, sera from mice immunized with SVP-E2 neutralized HCVtcp with N415K escape mutation in E2. As with the SVP-E2 epitope-displaying particles, JEV SVPs with HCV E1 epitope also elicited neutralizing antibodies against HCV. Thus, this novel platform harboring foreign epitopes on the surface of the particle may facilitate the development of a bivalent vaccine against JEV and other pathogens. PMID:27345289

  5. A Mechanistic Study on the Destabilization of Whole Inactivated Influenza Virus Vaccine in Gastric Environment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo-Jick; Ebersbacher, Charles F.; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo; Montemagno, Carlo D.

    2013-01-01

    Oral immunization using whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine promises an efficient vaccination strategy. While oral vaccination was hampered by harsh gastric environment, a systematic understanding about vaccine destabilization mechanisms was not performed. Here, we investigated the separate and combined effects of temperature, retention time, pH, and osmotic stress on the stability of influenza vaccine by monitoring the time-dependent morphological change using stopped-flow light scattering. When exposed to osmotic stress, clustering of vaccine particles was enhanced in an acidic medium (pH 2.0) at ≥25°C. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies showed that hyper-osmotic stress at pH 2.0 and 37°C caused a considerable increase in conformational change of antigenic proteins compared to that in acidic iso-osmotic medium. A structural integrity of membrane was destroyed upon exposure to hyper-osmotic stress, leading to irreversible morphological change, as observed by undulation in stopped-flow light scattering intensity and transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with these analyses, hemagglutination activity decreased more significantly with an increasing magnitude of hyper-osmotic stress than in the presence of the hypo- and iso-osmotic stresses. This study shows that the magnitude and direction of the osmotic gradient has a substantial impact on the stability of orally administrated influenza vaccine. PMID:23776657

  6. Immunogenicity of an Electron Beam Inactivated Rhodococcus equi Vaccine in Neonatal Foals

    PubMed Central

    Bordin, Angela I.; Pillai, Suresh D.; Brake, Courtney; Bagley, Kaytee B.; Bourquin, Jessica R.; Coleman, Michelle; Oliveira, Fabiano N.; Mwangi, Waithaka; McMurray, David N.; Love, Charles C.; Felippe, Maria Julia B.; Cohen, Noah D.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen of foals that causes severe pneumonia. To date, there is no licensed vaccine effective against R. equi pneumonia of foals. The objectives of our study were to develop an electron beam (eBeam) inactivated vaccine against R. equi and evaluate its immunogenicity. A dose of eBeam irradiation that inactivated replication of R. equi while maintaining outer cell wall integrity was identified. Enteral administration of eBeam inactivated R. equi increased interferon-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi and generated naso-pharyngeal R. equi-specific IgA in newborn foals. Our results indicate that eBeam irradiated R. equi administered enterally produce cell-mediated and upper respiratory mucosal immune responses, in the face of passively transferred maternal antibodies, similar to those produced in response to enteral administration of live organisms (a strategy which previously has been documented to protect foals against intrabronchial infection with virulent R. equi). No evidence of adverse effects was noted among vaccinated foals. PMID:25153708

  7. Immunogenicity of an electron beam inactivated Rhodococcus equi vaccine in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bordin, Angela I; Pillai, Suresh D; Brake, Courtney; Bagley, Kaytee B; Bourquin, Jessica R; Coleman, Michelle; Oliveira, Fabiano N; Mwangi, Waithaka; McMurray, David N; Love, Charles C; Felippe, Maria Julia B; Cohen, Noah D

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen of foals that causes severe pneumonia. To date, there is no licensed vaccine effective against R. equi pneumonia of foals. The objectives of our study were to develop an electron beam (eBeam) inactivated vaccine against R. equi and evaluate its immunogenicity. A dose of eBeam irradiation that inactivated replication of R. equi while maintaining outer cell wall integrity was identified. Enteral administration of eBeam inactivated R. equi increased interferon-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi and generated naso-pharyngeal R. equi-specific IgA in newborn foals. Our results indicate that eBeam irradiated R. equi administered enterally produce cell-mediated and upper respiratory mucosal immune responses, in the face of passively transferred maternal antibodies, similar to those produced in response to enteral administration of live organisms (a strategy which previously has been documented to protect foals against intrabronchial infection with virulent R. equi). No evidence of adverse effects was noted among vaccinated foals. PMID:25153708

  8. Control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in laying hens by inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Mesquita, Aline Lopes; de Paiva, Jaqueline Boldrin; Zotesso, Fábio; Berchieri Júnior, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the agents that is responsible for outbreaks of human foodborne salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis and is generally associated with the consumption of poultry products. Inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis cell vaccine is one of the available methods to control Salmonella Enteritidis in breeders and laying hens, however results in terms of efficacy vary. This vaccine has never been tested in Brazil, therefore, the present work was carried out to assess three commercial inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines allowed in Brazil. Four hundred white light variety commercial laying hens were obtained at one-day-of age. At eight weeks old, the birds were divided into four groups with one hundred animals each. Birds from three groups (V1, V2 and V3) received different intramuscular vaccines, followed by a booster dose at 16 weeks of age. Birds from another group (CG) were not vaccinated. When the laying hens were 20, 25 and 31 weeks old, 13 from each group were transferred to another room and were challenged by inoculating 2 mL neat culture of Salmonella Enteritidis. On the second day after each challenge, the caecal contents, spleen, liver and ovary of three birds from each group were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Twice a week a cloacal swab of each bird was taken and all eggs laid were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. After four consecutive negative cloacal swabs in all the groups, the birds were sacrificed so as to examine the liver, caecal contents and ovaries. Overall, the inactivated vaccine used in group V3 reduced Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces and eggs. A very small amount of Salmonella was found in the spleen, liver, ovary and caeca of the birds in the four groups during the whole experiment. In general, inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines was able to decrease the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in the birds and in the eggs as well. Nevertheless, they must

  9. Immune responses elicited to a live-attenuated influenza virus vaccine compared to a traditional whole-inactivated virus vaccine for pandemic H1N1in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States there are currently two influenza vaccine platforms approved for use in humans - conventional inactivated virus and live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV). One of the major challenges for influenza vaccination is designing a platform that provides cross-protection across strains...

  10. Potency testing of inactivated rabies vaccines using a serological method.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, E; Krämer, B; Schildger, H; Duchow, K

    2012-01-01

    Batch potency testing of rabies vaccines could be done by challenge, measurement of serum response or antigen quantification. Here, we show the development of a serological test that was successfully validated for use in batch release. The serological test is based on serum neutralization (SNT). The correlation to the NIH challenge was demonstrated by batches passing respectively failing equivalently in the NIH and SNT. The SNT provides information on immunogenicity and exhibits several advantages to the NIH: 1) SNT uses many fewer animals for batch release. 2) SNT allows quantitative information on the individual serum response, in contrast to the "dead"/"alive" interpretation of the NIH. 3) SNT is quicker than the NIH and needs fewer working hours. 4) SNT avoids the highly disturbing intra-cerebral injection and suffering from rabies for mice and spares the staff the emotional stress of massively harming animals. PMID:22888591

  11. Evaluating the effectiveness of an inactivated vaccine from Anaplasma marginale derived from tick cell culture.

    PubMed

    Lasmar, Pedro Veloso Facury; Carvalho, Antônio Último de; Facury Filho, Elias Jorge; Bastos, Camila Valgas; Ribeiro, Múcio Flávio Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    The protective efficacy of an inactivated vaccine from Anaplasma marginale that was cultured in tick cells (IDE8) for use against bovine anaplasmosis was evaluated. Five calves (Group 1) were inoculated subcutaneously, at 21-day intervals, with three doses of vaccine containing 3 × 10(9) A. marginale initial bodies. Five control calves received saline solution alone (Group 2). Thirty-two days after the final inoculation, all the calves were challenged with approximately 3 × 10(5) erythrocytes infected with A. marginale high-virulence isolate (UFMG2). The Group 1 calves seroconverted 14 days after the second dose of vaccine. After the challenge, all the animals showed patent rickettsemia. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the Group 1 and 2 calves during the incubation period, patency period or convalescence period. All the animals required treatment to prevent death. The results suggest that the inactivated vaccine from A. marginale produced in IDE8 induced seroconversion in calves, but was not effective for preventing anaplasmosis induced by the UFMG2 isolate under the conditions of this experiment. PMID:22832750

  12. Fractional-Dose Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine Immunization Campaign - Telangana State, India, June 2016.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Sunil; Verma, Harish; Bhatnagar, Pankaj; Haldar, Pradeep; Satapathy, Asish; Kumar, K N Arun; Horton, Jennifer; Estivariz, Concepcion F; Anand, Abhijeet; Sutter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Wild poliovirus type 2 was declared eradicated in September 2015 (1). In April 2016, India, switched from use of trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV; containing types 1, 2, and 3 polio vaccine viruses), to bivalent OPV (bOPV; containing types 1 and 3), as part of a globally synchronized initiative to withdraw Sabin poliovirus type 2 vaccine. Concurrently, inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) was introduced into India's routine immunization program to maintain an immunity base that would mitigate the number of paralytic cases in the event of epidemic transmission of poliovirus type 2 (2,3). After cessation of use of type 2 Sabin vaccine, any reported isolation of vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (VDPV2) would be treated as a public health emergency and might need outbreak response with monovalent type 2 oral vaccine, IPV, or both (4). In response to identification of a VDPV2 isolate from a sewage sample collected in the southern state of Telangana in May 2016, India conducted a mass vaccination campaign in June 2016 using an intradermal fractional dose (0.1 ml) of IPV (fIPV). Because of a global IPV supply shortage, fIPV, which uses one fifth of regular intramuscular (IM) dose administered intradermally, has been recommended as a response strategy for VDPV2 (5). Clinical trials have demonstrated that fIPV is highly immunogenic (6,7). During the 6-day campaign, 311,064 children aged 6 weeks-3 years were vaccinated, achieving an estimated coverage of 94%. With appropriate preparation, an emergency fIPV response can be promptly and successfully implemented. Lessons learned from this campaign can be applied to successful implementation of future outbreak responses using fIPV. PMID:27559683

  13. A novel dengue virus serotype 1 vaccine candidate based on Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiqiang; Li, Zhushi; Lin, Hua; Wang, Wei; Yang, Jian; Liu, Lina; Zeng, Xianwu; Wu, Yonglin; Yu, Yongxin; Li, Yuhua

    2016-06-01

    To develop a potential dengue vaccine candidate, a full-length cDNA clone of a novel chimeric virus was constructed using recombinant DNA technology, with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone, with its premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes substituted by their counterparts from dengue virus type 1 (DENV1). The chimeric virus (JEV/DENV1) was successfully recovered from primary hamster kidney (PHK) cells by transfection with the in vitro transcription products of JEV/DENV1 cDNA and was identified by complete genome sequencing and immunofluorescent staining. No neuroinvasiveness of this chimeric virus was observed in mice inoculated by the subcutaneous route (s.c.) or by the intraperitoneal route (i.p.), while some neurovirulence was displayed in mice that were inoculated directly by the intracerebral route (i.c.). The chimeric virus was able to stimulate high-titer production of antibodies against DENV1 and provided protection against lethal challenge with neuroadapted dengue virus in mice. These results suggest that the chimeric virus is a promising dengue vaccine candidate. PMID:26976137

  14. Dynamics of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Transmission among Pigs in Northwest Bangladesh and the Potential Impact of Pig Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salah Uddin; Salje, Henrik; Hannan, A.; Islam, Md. Atiqul; Bhuyan, A. A. Mamun; Islam, Md. Ariful; Rahman, M. Ziaur; Nahar, Nazmun; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Luby, Stephen P.; Gurley, Emily S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus infection can cause severe disease in humans, resulting in death or permanent neurologic deficits among survivors. Studies indicate that the incidence of JE is high in northwestern Bangladesh. Pigs are amplifying hosts for JE virus (JEV) and a potentially important source of virus in the environment. The objectives of this study were to describe the transmission dynamics of JEV among pigs in northwestern Bangladesh and estimate the potential impact of vaccination to reduce incidence among pigs. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a comprehensive census of pigs in three JE endemic districts and tested a sample of them for evidence of previous JEV infection. We built a compartmental model to describe JEV transmission dynamics in this region and to estimate the potential impact of pig vaccination. We identified 11,364 pigs in the study area. Previous JEV infection was identified in 30% of pigs with no spatial differences in the proportion of pigs that were seropositive across the study area. We estimated that JEV infects 20% of susceptible pigs each year and the basic reproductive number among pigs was 1.2. The model suggest that vaccinating 50% of pigs each year resulted in an estimated 82% reduction in annual incidence in pigs. Conclusions/Significance The widespread distribution of historic JEV infection in pigs suggests they may play an important role in virus transmission in this area. Future studies are required to understand the contribution of pig infections to JE risk in humans and the potential impact of pig vaccination on human disease. PMID:25255286

  15. New Generation of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccines for Universal Immunization After Eradication of Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Chumakov, Konstantin; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2008-01-01

    Twenty years of global polio eradication efforts may soon eliminate wild-type poliovirus transmission. However, new information about poliovirus learned during this campaign, as well as the political realities of a modern world demand that universal immunity against poliomyelitis be maintained even after wild poliovirus is eradicated. Although two excellent vaccines have proven highly effective in the past, neither the live nor current inactivated products are optimal for use in the post-eradication setting. Therefore, concerted efforts are urgently needed to develop a new generation of vaccine that is risk-free and affordable and can be produced on a global scale. Here we discuss the desired properties and ways to create a new polio vaccine. PMID:18990066

  16. National choices related to inactivated poliovirus vaccine, innovation and the endgame of global polio eradication.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2014-02-01

    Achieving the goal of a world free of poliomyelitis still requires significant effort. Although polio immunization represents a mature area, the polio endgame will require new tools and strategies, particularly as national and global health leaders coordinate the cessation of all three serotypes of oral poliovirus vaccine and increasingly adopt inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV). Poliovirus epidemiology and the global options for managing polioviruses continue to evolve, along with our understanding and appreciation of the resources needed and the risks that require management. Based on insights from modeling, we offer some perspective on the current status of plans and opportunities to achieve and maintain a world free of wild polioviruses and to successfully implement oral poliovirus vaccine cessation. IPV costs and potential wastage will represent an important consideration for national policy makers. Innovations may reduce future IPV costs, but the world urgently needs lower-cost IPV options. PMID:24308581

  17. Vaccination of travelers: how far have we come and where are we going?

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin H; Hill, David R; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2011-11-01

    Vaccine recommendations are a prominent part of health preparations before international travel. We review progress made in the past decade regarding vaccines used primarily by persons traveling from high-income countries to low- and middle-income countries. The combined hepatitis A-B vaccine, the recently licensed Vero cell-derived Japanese encephalitis vaccine and conjugated quadrivalent meningococcal vaccines are discussed. This article provides updates on yellow fever vaccine-associated visceral and neurologic adverse events, indications for influenza vaccine in travelers, the rapid immunization schedule for tick-borne encephalitis vaccine, schedules for postexposure rabies prophylaxis, and new insights about oral cholera vaccines following the outbreak in Haiti. The future should bring vaccines for serogroup B Neiserria meningitidis, dengue and malaria, as well as an inactivated yellow fever vaccine. PMID:22043959

  18. Short-Fragment DNA Residue from Vaccine Purification Processes Promotes Immune Response to the New Inactivated EV71 Vaccine by Upregulating TLR9 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jie; Gao, Fan; Lin, Hui-Juan; Mao, Qun-Ying; Chen, Pan; Wu, Xing; Yao, Xin; Kong, Wei; Liang, Zheng-Lun

    2016-01-01

    To reduce potential oncogenic long genomic DNA in vaccines, nuclease treatment has been applied in the purification processes. However, this action increased the residue of short-fragment DNA and its effect on vaccine potency was still elusive. In this study, we found residual sf-DNA in an inactivated EV71 vaccine could enhance humoral immune response in mice. Ag stimulation in vitro and vaccine injection in vivo revealed that TLR9 transcription level was elevated, indicating that sf-DNA could activate TLR9. These new findings will help us to understand the molecular mechanism induced by vero-cell culture-derived vaccines. PMID:27082865

  19. Short-Fragment DNA Residue from Vaccine Purification Processes Promotes Immune Response to the New Inactivated EV71 Vaccine by Upregulating TLR9 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jie; Gao, Fan; Lin, Hui-Juan; Mao, Qun-Ying; Chen, Pan; Wu, Xing; Yao, Xin; Kong, Wei; Liang, Zheng-Lun

    2016-01-01

    To reduce potential oncogenic long genomic DNA in vaccines, nuclease treatment has been applied in the purification processes. However, this action increased the residue of short-fragment DNA and its effect on vaccine potency was still elusive. In this study, we found residual sf-DNA in an inactivated EV71 vaccine could enhance humoral immune response in mice. Ag stimulation in vitro and vaccine injection in vivo revealed that TLR9 transcription level was elevated, indicating that sf-DNA could activate TLR9. These new findings will help us to understand the molecular mechanism induced by vero-cell culture-derived vaccines. PMID:27082865

  20. Adjuvant potential of resiquimod with inactivated Newcastle disease vaccine and its mechanism of action in chicken.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Swati; Ramakrishnan, Saravanan; Annamalai, Arunsaravanakumar; Sharma, Bal Krishan; Malik, Hina; Saravanan, B C; Jain, Lata; Saxena, Meeta; Kumar, Ajay; Krishnaswamy, Narayanan

    2015-08-26

    Resiquimod (R-848), an imidazoquinoline compound, is a potent synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonist. Although the solitary adjuvant potential of R-848 is well established in mammals, such reports are not available in avian species hitherto. Hence, the adjuvant potential of R-848 was tested in SPF chicken in this study. Two week old chicks were divided into four groups (10 birds/group) viz., control (A), inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine prepared from velogenic strain (B), commercial oil adjuvanted inactivated NDV vaccine prepared from lentogenic strain (C) and inactivated NDV vaccine prepared from velogenic strain with R-848 (D). Booster was given two weeks post primary vaccination. Humoral immune response was assessed by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and ELISA while the cellular immune response was quantified by lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) and flow cytometry post-vaccination. Entire experiment was repeated twice to check the reproducibility. Highest HI titre was observed in group D at post booster weeks 1 and 2 that corresponds to mean log2 HI titre of 6.4 ± 0.16 and 6.8 ± 0.13, respectively. The response was significantly higher than that of group B or C (P<0.01). LTT stimulation index (P ≤ 0.01) as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in flow cytometry (P<0.05) were significantly high and maximum in group D. Group D conferred complete protection against virulent NDV challenge, while it was only 80% in group B and C. To understand the effects of R-848, the kinetics of immune response genes in spleen were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR after R-848 administration (50 μg/bird, i.m. route). Resiquimod significantly up-regulated the expression of IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, iNOS and MHC-II genes (P<0.01). In conclusion, the study demonstrated the adjuvant potential of R-848 when co-administered with inactivated NDV vaccine in SPF chicken which is likely due to the up-regulation of immune response genes

  1. Evaluation of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine in Canadians 40 years of age or more.

    PubMed Central

    Scheifele, D W; Bjornson, G J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the side effects and immune responses after three serial doses of a new inactivated hepatitis A vaccine in people 40 years of age or more. DESIGN: Open, noncomparative trial. SETTING: A hospital, a regional laboratory and public health units in British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS: A volunteer sample of 64 healthy adults aged 40 to 61 years who were seronegative for hepatitis A virus (HAV). All were staff or associates of the health facilities. Exclusion criteria included elevated serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferase levels, a history of liver disease and recent travel to areas of high risk for HAV infection. INTERVENTION: A formalin-inactivated, alum-adsorbed vaccine containing 720 ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) units of antigen from HAV strain HM175 per 1.0-mL dose was injected intramuscularly into the delgoid area. The second and third doses were given 1 and 6 months later respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A detailed diary of any adverse effects for 3 days after each dose. HAV antibody levels in blood samples taken before and 30 days after each dose. RESULTS: All subjects completed the planned series of vaccinations and blood tests; symptom diaries were returned after 190 (99%) of 192 vaccinations. Local symptoms, most often soreness, were reported after 46% of the vaccinations but were mild and usually resolved within 24 hours. A temperature of more than 38.0 degrees C was never reported. Seroconversion occurred in all cases after the two primary doses, and the subjects were still seropositive at 6 months. After the booster dose the geometric mean titre was 2380 mIU/mL, all values being 200 mIU/mL or greater. CONCLUSION: In healthy adults 40 years of age or more the HAV vaccine was well tolerated and highly immunogenic. Final antibody levels were much higher than reported in people passively immunized against HAV with immune serum globulin. PMID:8431816

  2. Effects of Three Types of Inactivation Agents on the Antibody Response and Immune Protection of Inactivated IHNV Vaccine in Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lijie; Kang, Haiyan; Duan, Kexin; Guo, Mengting; Lian, Gaihong; Wu, Yang; Li, Yijing; Gao, Shuai; Jiang, Yanping; Yin, Jiyuan; Liu, Min

    2016-09-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infects salmonid fish, resulting in high mortality and serious economic losses to salmonid aquaculture. Therefore, an effective IHNV vaccine is urgently needed. To select an inactivation agent for the preparation of an effective IHNV vaccine, rainbow trout were immunized with mineral oil emulsions of IHNV vaccines inactivated by formaldehyde, binary ethylenimine (BEI), or β-propiolactone (BPL). The fish were challenged 8 weeks after vaccination, and their IgM antibody response and relative percent survival (RPS) were evaluated. The results show that formaldehyde, BEI, and BPL abolished IHNV HLJ-09 infectivity within 24, 48, and 24 h at final concentrations of 0.2%, 0.02%, and 0.01%, respectively. The mean levels of specific IgM, both in serum and mucus (collected from the skin surface and gills), for the three immunized groups (from high to low) ranked as follows: the BPL group, BEI group, and formaldehyde group. From weeks 5 to 9, the mean log2 serum titers of IgM in the BPL group were significantly higher compared with those of the other groups (p < 0.05) during the 9 weeks of observation after vaccination (immunized at weeks 0 and6). Mucus OD490 values of the BPL group were significantly higher compared with those of the other groups (p < 0.05) when reaching their peak at weeks 5 and 8, but the difference between the formaldehyde and BEI groups was not significant (p > 0.05). The BPL-inactivated whole-virus vaccine had the greatest protective effect on the rainbow trout after challenge by an intraperitoneal injection of live IHNV, with an RPS rate of 91.67%, which was significantly higher compared with the BEI (83.33%) and formaldehyde (79.17%) groups. These results indicate that the BPL-inactivated IHNV oil-adjuvant vaccine was more effective than the formaldehyde- or BEI-inactivated vaccines. The results of this study provide an important foundation for further studies on inactivated IHNV vaccines

  3. Experimental Infection of Aedes sollicitans and Aedes taeniorhynchus with Two Chimeric Sindbis/Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Nicole C.; Watts, Douglas M.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2008-01-01

    Two chimeric vaccine candidates for Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) were developed by inserting the structural protein genes of either a North American (NA) or South American (SA) EEEV into a Sindbis virus (SINV) backbone. To assess the effect of chimerization on mosquito infectivity, experimental infections of two potential North American bridge vectors of EEEV, Aedes sollicitans and Ae. taeniorhynchus, were attempted. Both species were susceptible to oral infection with all viruses after ingestion of high titer blood meals of ca. 7.0 log10 plaque-forming units/mL. Dissemination rates for SIN/NAEEEV (0 of 56) and SIN/SAEEEV (1 of 54) were low in Ae. taeniorhynchus and no evidence of transmission potential was observed. In contrast, the chimeras disseminated more efficiently in Ae. sollicitans (19 of 68 and 13 of 57, respectively) and were occasionally detected in the saliva of this species. These results indicate that chimerization of the vaccine candidates reduces infectivity. However, its impact on dissemination and potential transmission is mosquito species-specific. PMID:18187790

  4. A Phase 1 clinical trial of a DNA vaccine for Venezuelan equine encephalitis delivered by intramuscular or intradermal electroporation.

    PubMed

    Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Ellefsen, Barry; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2016-06-30

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a mosquito-borne alphavirus, causes periodic epizootics in equines and is a recognized biological defense threat for humans. There are currently no FDA-licensed vaccines against VEEV. We developed a candidate DNA vaccine expressing the E3-E2-6K-E1 genes of VEEV (pWRG/VEE) and performed a Phase 1 clinical study to assess the vaccine's safety, reactogenicity, tolerability, and immunogenicity when administered by intramuscular (IM) or intradermal (ID) electroporation (EP) using the Ichor Medical Systems TriGrid™ Delivery System. Subjects in IM-EP groups received 0.5mg (N=8) or 2.0mg (N=9) of pWRG/VEE or a saline placebo (N=4) in a 1.0ml injection. Subjects in ID-EP groups received 0.08mg (N=8) or 0.3mg (N=8) of DNA or a saline placebo (N=4) in a 0.15ml injection. Subjects were monitored for a total period of 360 days. No vaccine- or device-related serious adverse events were reported. Based on the results of a subject questionnaire, the IM- and ID-EP procedures were both considered to be generally acceptable for prophylactic vaccine administration, with the acute tolerability of ID EP delivery judged to be greater than that of IM-EP delivery. All subjects (100%) in the high and low dose IM-EP groups developed detectable VEEV-neutralizing antibodies after two or three administrations of pWRG/VEE, respectively. VEEV-neutralizing antibody responses were detected in seven of eight subjects (87.5%) in the high dose and five of eight subjects (62.5%) in the low dose ID-EP groups after three vaccine administrations. There was a correlation between the DNA dose and the magnitude of the resulting VEEV-neutralizing antibody responses for both IM and ID EP delivery. These results indicate that pWRG/VEE delivered by either IM- or ID-EP is safe, tolerable, and immunogenic in humans at the evaluated dose levels. Clinicaltrials.gov registry number NCT01984983. PMID:27206386

  5. PapMV nanoparticles improve mucosal immune responses to the trivalent inactivated flu vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trivalent inactivated flu vaccines (TIV) are currently the best means to prevent influenza infections. However, the protection provided by TIV is partial (about 50%) and it is needed to improve the efficacy of protection. Since the respiratory tract is the main site of influenza replications, a vaccine that triggers mucosal immunity in this region can potentially improve protection against this disease. Recently, PapMV nanoparticles used as an adjuvant in a formulation with TIV administered by the subcutaneous route have shown improving the immune response directed to the TIV and protection against an influenza challenge. Findings In the present study, we showed that intranasal instillation with a formulation containing TIV and PapMV nanoparticles significantly increase the amount of IgG, IgG2a and IgA in lungs of vaccinated mice as compared to mice that received TIV only. Instillation with the adjuvanted formulation leads to a more robust protection against an influenza infection with a strain that is lethal to mice vaccinated with the TIV. Conclusions We demonstrate for the first time that PapMV nanoparticles are an effective and potent mucosal adjuvant for vaccination. PMID:24885884

  6. Transcutaneous delivery and thermostability of a dry trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine patch

    PubMed Central

    Frolov, Vladimir G.; Seid, Robert C.; Odutayo, Olabisi; Al‐Khalili, Mohammad; Yu, Jianmei; Frolova, Olga Y.; Vu, Hong; Butler, Barbara A.; Look, Jee Loon; Ellingsworth, Larry R.; Glenn, Gregory M.

    2008-01-01

    A patch containing a trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) was prepared in a dried, stabilized formulation for transcutaneous delivery. When used in a guinea pig immunogenicity model, the dry patch was as effective as a wet TIV patch in inducing serum anti‐influenza IgG antibodies. When the dry TIV patch was administered with LT as an adjuvant, a robust immune response was obtained that was comparable with or better than an injected TIV vaccine. When stored sealed in a nitrogen‐purged foil, the dry TIV patch was stable for 12 months, as measured by HA content, under both refrigerated and room temperature conditions. Moreover, the immunological potency of the vaccine product was not affected by long‐term storage. The dry TIV patch was also thermostable against three cycles of alternating low‐to‐high temperatures of −20/25 and −20/40°C, and under short‐term temperature stress conditions. These studies indicate that the dry TIV patch product can tolerate unexpected environmental stresses that may be encountered during shipping and distribution. Because of its effectiveness in vaccine delivery and its superior thermostable characteristics, the dry TIV patch represents a major advance for needle‐free influenza vaccination. PMID:19453472

  7. Vaxtracker: Active on-line surveillance for adverse events following inactivated influenza vaccine in children.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Patrick; Moberley, Sarah; Dalton, Craig; Stephenson, Jody; Elvidge, Elissa; Butler, Michelle; Durrheim, David N

    2014-09-22

    Vaxtracker is a web based survey for active post marketing surveillance of Adverse Events Following Immunisation. It is designed to efficiently monitor vaccine safety of new vaccines by early signal detection of serious adverse events. The Vaxtracker system automates contact with the parents or carers of immunised children by email and/or sms message to their smart phone. A hyperlink on the email and text messages links to a web based survey exploring adverse events following the immunisation. The Vaxtracker concept was developed during 2011 (n=21), and piloted during the 2012 (n=200) and 2013 (n=477) influenza seasons for children receiving inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in the Hunter New England Local Health District, New South Wales, Australia. Survey results were reviewed by surveillance staff to detect any safety signals and compare adverse event frequencies among the different influenza vaccines administered. In 2012, 57% (n=113) of the 200 participants responded to the online survey and 61% (290/477) in 2013. Vaxtracker appears to be an effective method for actively monitoring adverse events following influenza vaccination in children. PMID:25077424

  8. Evaluation of enteric-coated tablets as a whole cell inactivated vaccine candidate against Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Sonsire; Año, Gemma; Castaño, Jorge; Pino, Yadira; Uribarri, Evangelina; Riverón, Luis A; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Falero, Gustavo; Pérez, José L; Infante, Juan F; García, Luis G; Solís, Rosa L; Sierra, Gustavo; Talavera, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    A vaccine candidate against cholera was developed in the form of oral tablets to avoid difficulties during application exhibited by current whole cell inactivated cholera vaccines. In this study, enteric-coated tablets were used to improve the protection of the active compound from gastric acidity. Tablets containing heat-killed whole cells of Vibrio cholerae strain C7258 as the active pharmaceutical compound was enteric-coated with the polymer Kollicoat(®) MAE-100P, which protected them efficiently from acidity when a disintegration test was carried out. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibition test and Western blot assay revealed the presence of V. cholerae antigens as LPS, mannose-sensitive haemagglutinin (MSHA) and outer membrane protein U (Omp U) in enteric-coated tablets. Immunogenicity studies (ELISA and vibriocidal test) carried out by intraduodenal administration in rabbits showed that the coating process of tablets did not affect the immunogenicity of V. cholerae-inactivated cells. In addition, no differences were observed in the immune response elicited by enteric-coated or uncoated tablets, particularly because the animal model and immunization route used did not allow discriminating between acid resistances of both tablets formulations in vivo. Clinical studies with volunteers will be required to elucidate this aspect, but the results suggest the possibility of using enteric-coated tablets as a final pharmaceutical product for a cholera vaccine. PMID:23492079

  9. Safety and effectiveness of the new inactivated hepatitis A virus vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Furesz, J; Scheifele, D W; Palkonyay, L

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the evidence concerning the safety and effectiveness of the inactivated hepatitis A virus vaccine recently licensed for use in Canada. DATA SOURCES: The main source of information were papers presented at the International Symposium on Active Immunization against Hepatitis A, held in Vienna, Austria, Jan. 27-29, 1992. The bibliographies of these papers were searched for additional references. Recent articles describing the new vaccine and the epidemiologic aspects of infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) were also reviewed. STUDY SELECTION: Peer-reviewed reports of trials approved by a government regulatory agency on the safety, immunogenic properties and efficacy of the vaccine. DATA EXTRACTION: The authors assembled key reports on adverse reactions, protection from disease and serologic assessment of immune response in vaccine recipients; data from these reports were tabulated and analysed. RESULTS OF DATA SYNTHESIS: The new vaccine contains the HM175 strain of HAV, which is adapted to grow in tissue culture. The virus is purified, inactivated with the use of formaldehyde and adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide. The recommended dose for adults is 720 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) units in a 1.0-mL dose and for children 360 ELISA units in a 0.5-mL dose, injected intramuscularly. The usual schedule is three serial doses, the second given 1 month and the third 6 to 12 months after the initial dose. Reported side effects are infrequent and minor. In healthy persons who have received two doses, the seroconversion rate is almost 100%. Protective efficacy after two doses is estimated to be 94%. However, the persistence of protective antibodies has been studied only over the short term (3 years). CONCLUSIONS: The new HAV vaccine is safe, effective and best suited to pre-exposure prophylaxis in people with an increased risk of infection for an extended period, such as travellers to areas where the disease is endemic. Further studies are

  10. A study on the immune response of sheep to foot and mouth disease virus vaccine type 'O' prepared with different inactivants and adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Nair, S P; Sen, A K

    1992-10-01

    Foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) type 'O' was inactivated either with formaldehyde or binaryethyleneimine (BEI). Vaccines were prepared with inactivated virus incorporating aluminum hydroxide gel or mineral oil as an adjuvant. The antibody response in sheep was monitored by serum neutralization and ELISA test for a period of six months. Significant difference in antibody response was not observed between vaccines inactivated with formaldehyde or BEI. On the other hand significant difference in the antibody response was noticed between alhydrogel and oil vaccines. The high titer of antibodies stimulated by oil adjuvant vaccines persisted longer than those of alhydrogel vaccines within the period of study. PMID:1364024

  11. Peracetic Acid Treatment Generates Potent Inactivated Oral Vaccines from a Broad Range of Culturable Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Kathrin; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Toska, Albulena; Diard, Médéric; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Slack, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Our mucosal surfaces are the main sites of non-vector-borne pathogen entry, as well as the main interface with our commensal microbiota. We are still only beginning to understand how mucosal adaptive immunity interacts with commensal and pathogenic microbes to influence factors such as infectivity, phenotypic diversity, and within-host evolution. This is in part due to difficulties in generating specific mucosal adaptive immune responses without disrupting the mucosal microbial ecosystem itself. Here, we present a very simple tool to generate inactivated mucosal vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacteria. Oral gavage of 1010 peracetic acid-inactivated bacteria induces high-titer-specific intestinal IgA in the absence of any measurable inflammation or species invasion. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this technique is sufficient to provide fully protective immunity in the murine model of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis, even in the face of severe innate immune deficiency. PMID:26904024

  12. Peracetic Acid Treatment Generates Potent Inactivated Oral Vaccines from a Broad Range of Culturable Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Moor, Kathrin; Wotzka, Sandra Y; Toska, Albulena; Diard, Médéric; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Slack, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Our mucosal surfaces are the main sites of non-vector-borne pathogen entry, as well as the main interface with our commensal microbiota. We are still only beginning to understand how mucosal adaptive immunity interacts with commensal and pathogenic microbes to influence factors such as infectivity, phenotypic diversity, and within-host evolution. This is in part due to difficulties in generating specific mucosal adaptive immune responses without disrupting the mucosal microbial ecosystem itself. Here, we present a very simple tool to generate inactivated mucosal vaccines from a broad range of culturable bacteria. Oral gavage of 10(10) peracetic acid-inactivated bacteria induces high-titer-specific intestinal IgA in the absence of any measurable inflammation or species invasion. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this technique is sufficient to provide fully protective immunity in the murine model of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellosis, even in the face of severe innate immune deficiency. PMID:26904024

  13. Leucine-Rich Glioma Inactivated-1 and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Autoimmune Encephalitis Associated with Ischemic Stroke: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    McGinley, Marisa; Morales-Vidal, Sarkis; Ruland, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is associated with a wide variety of antibodies and clinical presentations. Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies are a cause of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis characterized by memory impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures. We present a case of VGKC encephalitis likely preceding an ischemic stroke. Reports of autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke are rare. Several hypotheses linking these two disease processes are proposed. PMID:27242653

  14. Levels of humoral antibodies induced by different inactivated vaccines correlate with egg production in commercial layers challenged with virulent Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the relationship between humoral antibodies from homologous and heterologous vaccines and egg production, twenty-two week-old commercial layers previously vaccinated with four live B1 vaccines were boosted with two different inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines, a virulent ...

  15. Further characterization of the immune response in mice to inactivated and live rabies vaccines expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Papaneri, Amy B; Wirblich, Christoph; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B; Schnell, Matthias J; Blaney, Joseph E

    2012-09-21

    We have previously developed (a) replication-competent, (b) replication-deficient, and (c) chemically inactivated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP) that induce humoral immunity against each virus and confer protection from both lethal RABV and mouse-adapted EBOV challenge in mice. Here, we expand our investigation of the immunogenic properties of these bivalent vaccines in mice. Both live and killed vaccines induced primary EBOV GP-specific T-cells and a robust recall response as measured by interferon-γ ELISPOT assay. In addition to cellular immunity, an effective filovirus vaccine will likely require a multivalent humoral immune response against multiple virus species. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrated that inactivated RV-GP could be formulated with another inactivated RABV vaccine expressing the nontoxic fragment of botulinum neurotoxin A heavy chain (HC50) without a reduction in immunity to each component. Finally, we demonstrated that humoral immunity to GP could be induced by immunization of mice with inactivated RV-GP in the presence of pre-existing immunity to RABV. The ability of these novel vaccines to induce strong humoral and cellular immunity indicates that they should be further evaluated in additional animal models of infection. PMID:22884661

  16. Further characterization of the immune response in mice to inactivated and live rabies vaccines expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Papaneri, Amy B.; Wirblich, Christoph; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Blaney, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously developed (a) replication-competent, (b) replication-deficient, and (c) chemically inactivated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing ebolavirus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP) that induce humoral immunity against each virus and confer protection from both lethal RABV and mouse-adapted EBOV challenge in mice. Here, we expand our investigation of the immunogenic properties of these bivalent vaccines in mice. Both live and killed vaccines induced primary EBOV GP-specific T-cells and a robust recall response as measured by interferon-γ ELISPOT assay. In addition to cellular immunity, an effective filovirus vaccine will likely require a multivalent humoral immune response against multiple virus species. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrated that inactivated RV-GP could be formulated with another inactivated RABV vaccine expressing the nontoxic fragment of botulinum neurotoxin A heavy chain (HC50) without a reduction in immunity to each component. Finally, we demonstrated that humoral immunity to GP could be induced by immunization of mice with inactivated RV-GP in the presence of pre-existing immunity to RABV. The ability of these novel vaccines to induce strong humoral and cellular immunity indicates that they should be further evaluated in additional animal models of infection. PMID:22884661

  17. A new recombinant hybrid polypeptide and its immunologic adjuvant activity for inactivated infectious bursal disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-hong; Zhu, Feng; Wu, Hao-chen; Shen, Ping-ping

    2014-07-01

    Both bursin (Lys-His-Gly-NH2) and Gagnon's peptides (Lys-Asn-Pro-Tyr) can induce B-cell differentiation. However, it is unclear whether a recombinant hybrid polypeptide consisting of a tandem array of 14 copies of bursin and two copies of Gagnon's peptide can induce the proliferative activity of lymphocytes. Here, this recombinant hybrid polypeptide was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by SDS-PAGE. Various assays showed that it not only promoted B-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro but also increased the titers of antibodies directed against infectious bursal disease virus fourfold in the sera of chickens vaccinated with the inactivated infectious bursal disease virus vaccine. The recombinant hybrid polypeptide also reduced the pathological lesions in the bursa of Fabricius caused by infectious bursal disease virus BC6/85. Our results show that this recombinant hybrid polypeptide may be a promising immune adjuvant. PMID:24652544

  18. Nanoemulsion W805EC improves immune responses upon intranasal delivery of an inactivated pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Das, Subash C; Hatta, Masato; Wilker, Peter R; Myc, Andrzej; Hamouda, Tarek; Neumann, Gabrielle; Baker, James R; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2012-11-01

    Currently available influenza vaccines provide suboptimal protection. In order to improve the quality of protective immune responses elicited following vaccination, we developed an oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NE)-based adjuvant for an intranasally-delivered inactivated influenza vaccine. Using a prime-boost vaccination regimen, we show that intranasal vaccines containing the W(80)5EC NE elicited higher titers of serum hemagglutination inhibiting (HAI) antibody and influenza-specific IgG and IgA titers compared to vaccines that did not contain the NE. Similarly, vaccines containing the W(80)5EC NE resulted in higher influenza-specific IgA levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and nasal wash when compared to vaccines formulated without NE. The higher antibody titers in mice immunized with the NE-containing vaccines correlated with reduced viral loads in the lungs and nasal turbinates following a high dose viral challenge. Mice immunized with vaccines containing the W(80)5EC NE also showed a reduction in body weight loss following challenge compared to mice immunized with equivalent vaccines produced without NE. Taken together, our results show that the W(80)5EC NE substantially improves the magnitude of protective influenza-specific antibody responses and is a promising mucosal adjuvant for influenza vaccines and vaccines against other mucosal pathogens. PMID:22989689

  19. Next Generation Inactivated Polio Vaccine Manufacturing to Support Post Polio-Eradication Biosafety Goals

    PubMed Central

    Thomassen, Yvonne E.; van ’t Oever, Aart G.; van Oijen, Monique G. C. T.; Wijffels, René H.; van der Pol, Leo A.; Bakker, Wilfried A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide efforts to eradicate polio caused a tipping point in polio vaccination strategies. A switch from the oral polio vaccine, which can cause circulating and virulent vaccine derived polioviruses, to inactivated polio vaccines (IPV) is scheduled. Moreover, a manufacturing process, using attenuated virus strains instead of wild-type polioviruses, is demanded to enhance worldwide production of IPV, especially in low- and middle income countries. Therefore, development of an IPV from attenuated (Sabin) poliovirus strains (sIPV) was pursued. Starting from the current IPV production process based on wild type Salk strains, adaptations, such as lower virus cultivation temperature, were implemented. sIPV was produced at industrial scale followed by formulation of both plain and aluminium adjuvanted sIPV. The final products met the quality criteria, were immunogenic in rats, showed no toxicity in rabbits and could be released for testing in the clinic. Concluding, sIPV was developed to manufacturing scale. The technology can be transferred worldwide to support post polio-eradication biosafety goals. PMID:24349497

  20. [Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and TBE-vaccination in Austria: Update 2014].

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula; Böhm, Gabriela

    2015-07-01

    TBE is a public health problem well under control in Austria because of a mass vaccination programme. There have been 50-100 registered cases per year for many years, the vaccination rate of the population is currently 85 %. Special attention has to be given to the "older" generation 40 plus as this is the segment of the population where the majority of cases are observed annually. In comparison of the counties, Tyrol and Upper Austria finished first and second after a long time when Styria and Carynthia had observed most of the cases. For TBE applies the same as for Tetanus, namely the principle of disease control or disease elimination: The virus cannot be eliminated and vaccination provides individual protection. The both available TBE vaccines have proven to be very effective with an effectivity of 96-99 %, also when given irregular vaccinations the protection rate is still very high (>90 %). More than 4000 prevented cases between 2000 and 2011 prove this impressively. PMID:26055812

  1. Immunogenicity and tolerability of inactivated flu vaccine in high risk and healthy children.

    PubMed

    Avila Aguero, María Luisa; Soriano-Fallas, Alejandra; Umaña-Sauma, María de los Angeles; Ulloa-Gutierrez, Rolando; Arnoux, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    We conducted this open study to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of the inactivated influenza vaccine, Imovax Gripe in 154 children between 6 and 36 months of age at high risk of influenza-related complications, and in a reference group of 64 healthy children. The study was conducted over two flu seasons, in which the vaccine contained the same A strains but different B strains. The results for the A/H3N2 and A/H1N1 strains from the two flu seasons were pooled, but those for the B strains were not. Anti-hemagglutinin (HA) antibody titers were determined before, and one month after each vaccination, and safety was evaluated based on diary card reporting any adverse event observed, either included or not in the list of "solicited events". Within each group of vaccines, the seroconversion rates, seroprotection rates, and ratio of post- to prevaccination geometric mean titers (GMTR) for the A/H3N2 and the A/H1N1 strains fulfilled all requirements of the criteria of the European Union Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP). The immune responses in high-risk and in healthy children were similar, and consistent with those observed in previous studies conducted in healthy children. The vaccine was equally well tolerated by all study groups. Reactogenicity was low and similar in both high-risk and healthy children. Overall from 9.5% to 15.4% of at-risk children and 12% of healthy children reported a solicited local reaction; 23.0 to 28.8% of high-risk and 25.3% of healthy children reported a solicited systemic reaction. The study results provide support for vaccination of children at high-risk of influenza related complications. PMID:17891930

  2. [A case of smoldering anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) antibody-associated limbic encephalitis with faciobrachial dystonic seizure].

    PubMed

    Nakaoku, Yuriko; Maki, Takakuni; Kanazawa, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Riki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2013-01-01

    We report a 59-year-old right-handed woman with smoldering leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (LE) following faciobrachial dystonic seizures. During 8 months before her admission, she developed partial seizures manifesting very brief and very frequent dystonia in her right hand sometimes with oral automatism and loss of awareness. In addition, she showed psychiatric disturbances such as emotionally labile condition and personality changes. On admission, neuropsychological examination revealed short-term memory impairment. During electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring, ictal EEG showed rhythmic delta waves and interictal EEG showed intermittent irregular slow waves at the bilateral frontotemporal area. Brain MRI demonstrated high T2/FLAIR signal changes in the left amygdala expanding into the left hippocampus. FDG-PET showed hypermetabolism in the left amygdala, hippocampus and the bilateral basal ganglia. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was unremarkable. There were no signs of malignant tumor detected on systemic examination. LGI1 antibody was positive in the serum and the cerebrospinal fluid and the clinical diagnosis of LGI1 antibody-associated LE was confirmed. Her symptoms and the abnormalities in the brain MRI/FDG-PET showed immediate improvement after anti-epileptic and steroid therapy. PMID:24097318

  3. Influence of adjuvant and antigen dose on protection induced by an inactivated whole vaccine against Neospora caninum infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Montejo, Silvia; Collantes-Fernández, Esther; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Rodríguez-Bertos, Antonio; Prenafeta, Antoni; Gomez-Bautista, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis M

    2011-02-10

    In this study, the protection afforded by a Neospora caninum inactivated vaccine formulated with three different adjuvants (water-in-oil emulsion, aluminum hydroxide with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and aluminum hydroxide with ginseng extract) and three different parasite doses (10(5), 5 × 10(5) or 10(6) inactivated whole tachyzoites) was evaluated using a mouse model. Mice were immunized subcutaneously twice at three-week intervals with inactivated Nc-Spain 1H tachyzoites and challenged by intraperitoneal inoculation with 10(6) live Nc-1 tachyzoites. The efficacy of the immunization was evaluated in non-pregnant BALB/c mice on days 1 and 5 (acute infection phase) and days 14 and 30 (chronic infection phase) post-challenge. The results showed the ability of water-in-oil emulsion combined with inactivated 5 × 10(5) tachyzoites to induce protection against neosporosis during the chronic stage, limiting parasite multiplication in the brain. Aluminum hydroxide-ginseng extract and inactivated tachyzoites reduced the number of parasites circulating in the blood during acute phase but failed to limit the establishment of chronic infection. On the other hand, a dose-effect was observed in groups vaccinated with aluminum hydroxide-ginseng extract in which the lesion severity increased as the inactivated tachyzoite dose. This study demonstrates that efficacy can significantly vary depending on the adjuvant, the dose of antigen and the phase of N. caninum infection in which the vaccine is tested. PMID:21067865

  4. The compatibility of inactivated-Enterovirus 71 vaccination with Coxsackievirus A16 and Poliovirus immunizations in humans and animals

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Qunying; Wang, Yiping; Shao, Jie; Ying, Zhifang; Gao, Fan; Yao, Xin; Li, Changgui; Ye, Qiang; Xu, Miao; Li, Rongcheng; Zhu, Fengcai; Liang, Zhenglun

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the key pathogen for Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD) and can result in severe neurological complications and death among young children. Three inactivated-EV71 vaccines have gone through phase III clinical trials and have demonstrated good safety and efficacy. These vaccines will benefit young children under the threat of severe HFMD. However, the potential immunization-related compatibility for different enterovirus vaccines remains unclear, making it hard to include the EV71 vaccine in Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI). Here, we measured the neutralizing antibodies (NTAbs) against EV71, Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and Poliovirus from infants enrolled in those EV71 vaccine clinical trials. The results indicated that the levels of NTAb GMTs for EV71 increased significantly in all 3 vaccine groups (high, middle and low dosages, respectively) post-vaccination. Seroconversion ratios and Geometric mean fold increase were significantly higher in the vaccine groups (≥7/9 and 8.9~228.1) than in the placebo group (≤1/10 and 0.8~1.7, P < 0.05). But no similar NTAb response trends were found in CA16 and 3 types of Poliovirus. The decrease of 3 types of Poliovirus NTAb GMTs and an increase of CA16 GMTs post-EV71-vaccination were found in vaccine and placebo groups. Further animal study on CA16 and poliovirus vaccine co-immunization or pre-immunization with EV71 vaccine in mice indicated that there was no NTAb cross-activity between EV71 and CA16/Poliovirus. Our research showed that inactivated-EV71 vaccine has good specific-neutralizing capacity and can be included in EPI. PMID:25715318

  5. Induction of Heterosubtypic Cross-Protection against Influenza by a Whole Inactivated Virus Vaccine: The Role of Viral Membrane Fusion Activity

    PubMed Central

    Budimir, Natalija; Huckriede, Anke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Boon, Louis; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Wilschut, Jan; de Haan, Aalzen

    2012-01-01

    Background The inability of seasonal influenza vaccines to effectively protect against infection with antigenically drifted viruses or newly emerging pandemic viruses underlines the need for development of cross-reactive influenza vaccines that induce immunity against a variety of virus subtypes. Therefore, potential cross-protective vaccines, e.g., whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccine, that can target conserved internal antigens such as the nucleoprotein (NP) and/or matrix protein (M1) need to be explored. Methodology/Principal Findings In the current study we show that a WIV vaccine, through induction of cross-protective cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), protects mice from heterosubtypic infection. This protection was abrogated after depletion of CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice, indicating that CTLs were the primary mediators of protection. Previously, we have shown that different procedures used for virus inactivation influence optimal activation of CTLs by WIV, most likely by affecting the membrane fusion properties of the virus. Specifically, inactivation with formalin (FA) severely compromises fusion activity of the virus, while inactivation with β-propiolactone (BPL) preserves fusion activity. Here, we demonstrate that vaccination of mice with BPL-inactivated H5N1 WIV vaccine induces solid protection from lethal heterosubtypic H1N1 challenge. By contrast, vaccination with FA-inactivated WIV, while preventing death after lethal challenge, failed to protect against development of disease and severe body weight loss. Vaccination with BPL-inactivated WIV, compared to FA-inactivated WIV, induced higher levels of specific CD8+ T cells in blood, spleen and lungs, and a higher production of granzyme B in the lungs upon H1N1 virus challenge. Conclusion/Significance The results underline the potential use of WIV as a cross-protective influenza vaccine candidate. However, careful choice of the virus inactivation procedure is important to retain membrane fusion activity

  6. [Antigenic activity and the reactogenicity of UV ray-inactivated antirabies vaccine from the brain of sheep].

    PubMed

    Morogova, V M; Latypova, R G; Gil'dina, S S; Pospeeva, N A; Pogrebniak, E M

    1979-06-01

    Tests in volunteers showed that the reactogenicity of rabies vaccine prepared from sheep brain and inactivated with ultraviolet rays was not greater than the reactogenicity of Fermi vaccine. At the same time it was found to have a higher activity when injected both in the form of 5% suspension (in full and decreased doses) and with brain tissue content as low as 2.5%. PMID:380240

  7. The potential adjuvanticity of quaternized chitosan hydrogel based microparticles for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus inactivated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Qi; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yu-Xia; Wu, Ya-Jun; Jia, Pei-Yuan; Shan, Jun-Jie; Wu, Jie; Ma, Guang-Hui; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Infectious diseases possess a big threat to the livestock industry worldwide. Currently, inactivated veterinary vaccines have attracted much attention to prevent infection due to their safer profile compared to live attenuated vaccine. However, its intrinsic poor immunogenicity demands the incorporation of an adjuvant. Mineral oil based adjuvant (Montanide™ ISA206) was usually used to potentiate the efficacy of veterinary vaccines. However, ISA206 could not induce robust cellular immune responses, which was very important in controlling virus replication and clearing the infected cells. Moreover, mineral oil would result in severe side effects. To improve both the humoral and cellular immune responses of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) inactivated vaccine, we developed pH-sensitive and size-controllable quaternized chitosan hydrogel microparticles (Gel MPs) without using chemical cross linking agent. Gel MPs, ionic cross-linked with glycerophosphate (GP), were biocompatible and could efficiently adsorb the inactivated PRRSV vaccine with a loading capacity of 579.05μg/mg. After intramuscular immunization in mice, results suggested that Gel MPs elicited significantly higher cell-mediated immune responses and comparable humoral immune responses compared to ISA 206. Regarding the biocompatibility, safety and effectiveness, Gel MPs would be a promising candidate to enhance the efficacy of veterinary vaccine. PMID:27449471

  8. Immunogenicity and safety of a trivalent inactivated 2010-2011 influenza vaccine in Taiwan infants aged 6-12 months.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kao-Pin; Hsu, Yu-Lung; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsueh; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Yen, Ting-Yu; Wei, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Hung-Chih; Chen, An-Chyi; Chow, Julie Chi; Huang, Li-Min

    2014-05-01

    This prospective study aimed to investigate the immune responses and safety of an influenza vaccine in vaccine-naïve infants aged 6-12 months, and was conducted from November 2010 to May 2011. Fifty-nine infants aged 6-12 months received two doses of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine 4 weeks apart. Hemagglutination inhibition titers were measured 4 weeks after the two doses of study vaccine. Based on the assumption that a hemagglutination inhibition titer of 1:40 or greater against the antigen would be protective in adults, two doses of the study vaccine generated a protective immune response of 63.2% against influenza A(H1N1), 82.5% against influenza A(H3N2) and 38.6% against influenza B viruses in infants aged 6-12 months. The geometric mean fold rises against influenza type A and B viruses also met the European Medicines Agency criteria for flu vaccines. The solicited events within 7 days after vaccination were mild in intensity. No deaths or adverse events such as optic neuritis, cranial neuropathy, and brachial neuropathy or Guillain-Barre syndrome were reported. Two doses of inactivated influenza vaccine were well tolerated and induced a protective immune response against influenza in infants aged 6-12 months. PMID:24625341

  9. Immunopotentiators Improve the Efficacy of Oil-Emulsion-Inactivated Avian Influenza Vaccine in Chickens, Ducks and Geese.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jihu; Wu, Peipei; Zhang, Xuehua; Feng, Lei; Dong, Bin; Chu, Xuan; Liu, Xiufan; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Yuan; Ma, Huailiang; Hou, Jibo; Tang, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    Combination of CVCVA5 adjuvant and commercial avian influenza (AI) vaccine has been previously demonstrated to provide good protection against different AI viruses in chickens. In this study, we further investigated the protective immunity of CVCVA5-adjuvanted oil-emulsion inactivated AI vaccine in chickens, ducks and geese. Compared to the commercial H5 inactivated vaccine, the H5-CVCVA5 vaccine induced significantly higher titers of hemaglutinin inhibitory antibodies in three lines of broiler chickens and ducks, elongated the antibody persistence periods in geese, elevated the levels of cross serum neutralization antibody against different clade and subclade H5 AI viruses in chicken embryos. High levels of mucosal antibody were detected in chickens injected with the H5 or H9-CVCA5 vaccine. Furthermore, cellular immune response was markedly improved in terms of increasing the serum levels of cytokine interferon-γ and interleukine 4, promoting proliferation of splenocytes and upregulating cytotoxicity activity in both H5- and H9-CVCVA5 vaccinated chickens. Together, these results provide evidence that AI vaccines supplemented with CVCVA5 adjuvant is a promising approach for overcoming the limitation of vaccine strain specificity of protection. PMID:27232188

  10. Immunogenicity and Safety of an Inactivated Trivalent Split Influenza Virus Vaccine in Young Children with Recurrent Wheezing

    PubMed Central

    Bae, E. Young; Choi, Ui Yoon; Kwon, Hyo Jin; Jeong, Dae Chul; Rhim, Jung Woo; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Lee, Kyung Il

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus vaccination is recommended for children, but so far, active vaccination has not been achieved because most parents lack knowledge of vaccine safety and many doctors are reluctant to administer vaccine due to concerns that steroids might alter immunogenicity. The aim of this study was to compare the immunogenicity and safety of inactivated trivalent split influenza virus vaccine between children with recurrent wheezing and healthy children of the same age group. Sixty-eight healthy children and 62 children with recurrent wheezing took part in this study. Seroconversion rates, seroprotection rates, geometric mean titers (GMTs), and geometric mean titer ratios (GMTRs) were measured by a hemagglutination inhibition assay for the assessment of immunogenicity. Solicited and unsolicited local and systemic adverse events were measured for the assessment of safety. Regarding immunogenicity, the seroconversion and seroprotection rates showed no difference overall between healthy children and children with recurrent wheezing. Also, no difference was observed between steroid-treated and nontreated groups with recurrent wheezing. Generally, the GMTs after vaccination were higher in the one-dose vaccination groups for healthy children and children with recurrent wheezing, but the GMTRs revealed different results according to strain in the two groups. Regarding safety, solicited local and systemic adverse events showed no differences between healthy children and children with recurrent wheezing. This study demonstrates that inactivated split influenza virus vaccine is able to induce protective immune responses in healthy children, as observed in previous studies, as well as in children with recurrent wheezing who require frequent steroid treatment. PMID:23536692

  11. Immunopotentiators Improve the Efficacy of Oil-Emulsion-Inactivated Avian Influenza Vaccine in Chickens, Ducks and Geese

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuehua; Feng, Lei; Dong, Bin; Chu, Xuan; Liu, Xiufan; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Yuan; Ma, Huailiang; Hou, Jibo; Tang, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    Combination of CVCVA5 adjuvant and commercial avian influenza (AI) vaccine has been previously demonstrated to provide good protection against different AI viruses in chickens. In this study, we further investigated the protective immunity of CVCVA5-adjuvanted oil-emulsion inactivated AI vaccine in chickens, ducks and geese. Compared to the commercial H5 inactivated vaccine, the H5-CVCVA5 vaccine induced significantly higher titers of hemaglutinin inhibitory antibodies in three lines of broiler chickens and ducks, elongated the antibody persistence periods in geese, elevated the levels of cross serum neutralization antibody against different clade and subclade H5 AI viruses in chicken embryos. High levels of mucosal antibody were detected in chickens injected with the H5 or H9-CVCA5 vaccine. Furthermore, cellular immune response was markedly improved in terms of increasing the serum levels of cytokine interferon-γ and interleukine 4, promoting proliferation of splenocytes and upregulating cytotoxicity activity in both H5- and H9-CVCVA5 vaccinated chickens. Together, these results provide evidence that AI vaccines supplemented with CVCVA5 adjuvant is a promising approach for overcoming the limitation of vaccine strain specificity of protection. PMID:27232188

  12. Japanese encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Nabeshima, T; Buerano, C C

    2015-08-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an inflammation of the central nervous system in humans and animals, specifically horses and cattle. The disease, which can sometimes be fatal, is caused by the flavivirus Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), of which there are five genotypes (genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5). The transmission cycle of the virus involves pigs and wild birds as virus amplifiers and mosquitoes as vectors for transferring the virus between amplifying hosts and to dead- end hosts, i.e. humans, horses and cattle. In horses and cattle the disease is usually asymptomatic, but when clinical signs do occur they include fever, decreased appetite, frothing at the mouth, rigidity of the legs and recumbency, and neurological signs, such as convulsive fits, circling, marked depression and disordered consciousness. In pigs, it can cause abortion and stillbirths. At present, the virus is detected in a wide area covering eastern and southern Asia, Indonesia, northern Australia, Papua New Guinea and Pakistan. JEV RNA has also been detected in Italy, first in dead birds in 1997 and 2000 and then in mosquitoes in 2010. Genotype shift, i.e. a change of genotype from genotype 3 to genotype 1, has occurred in some countries, namely Japan, South Korea, Chinese Taipei and Vietnam. Laboratory methods are available for confirming the causative agent of the disease. There are control measures to prevent or minimise infection and, among them, vaccination is one of the most important and one which should be adopted in endemic and epidemic areas. PMID:26601447

  13. New Strains Intended for the Production of Inactivated Polio Vaccine at Low-Containment After Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Knowlson, Sarah; Burlison, John; Giles, Elaine; Fox, Helen; Macadam, Andrew J.; Minor, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Poliomyelitis has nearly been eradicated through the efforts of the World Health Organization’s Global Eradication Initiative raising questions on containment of the virus after it has been eliminated in the wild. Most manufacture of inactivated polio vaccines currently requires the growth of large amounts of highly virulent poliovirus, and release from a production facility after eradication could be disastrous; WHO have therefore recommended the use of the attenuated Sabin strains for production as a safer option although it is recognised that they can revert to a transmissible paralytic form. We have exploited the understanding of the molecular virology of the Sabin vaccine strains to design viruses that are extremely genetically stable and hyperattenuated. The viruses are based on the type 3 Sabin vaccine strain and have been genetically modified in domain V of the 5’ non-coding region by changing base pairs to produce a cassette into which capsid regions of other serotypes have been introduced. The viruses give satisfactory yields of antigenically and immunogenically correct viruses in culture, are without measurable neurovirulence and fail to infect non-human primates under conditions where the Sabin strains will do so. PMID:26720150

  14. Isatis indigotica root polysaccharides as adjuvants for an inactivated rabies virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijiao; Zheng, Xuexing; Cheng, Nan; Gai, Weiwei; Xue, Xianghong; Wang, Yuxia; Gao, Yuwei; Shan, Junjie; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvants can enhance vaccine immunogenicity and induce long-term enhancement of immune responses. Thus, adjuvants are important for vaccine research. Polysaccharides isolated from select Chinese herbs have been demonstrated to possess various beneficial functions and excellent adjuvant abilities. In the present study, the polysaccharides IIP-A-1 and IIP-2 were isolated from Isatis indigotica root and compared with the common vaccine adjuvant aluminum hydroxide via intramuscular co-administration of inactivated rabies virus rCVS-11-G into mice. Blood was collected to determine virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers and B and T lymphocyte activation status. Inguinal lymph node samples were collected and used to measure B lymphocyte proliferation. Splenocytes were isolated, from which antigen-specific cellular immune responses were detected via ELISpot, ELISA and intracellular cytokine staining. The results revealed that both types of polysaccharides induce more rapid changes and higher VNA titers than aluminum hydroxide. Flow cytometry assays revealed that the polysaccharides activated more B lymphocytes in the lymph nodes and more B and T lymphocytes in the blood than aluminum hydroxide. Antigen-specific cellular immune responses showed that IIP-2 strongly induced T lymphocyte proliferation in the spleen and high levels of cytokine secretion from splenocytes, whereas aluminum hydroxide induced proliferation in only a small number of lymphocytes and the secretion of only small quantities of cytokines. Collectively, these data suggest that the polysaccharide IIP-2 exhibits excellent adjuvant activity and can enhance both cellular and humoral immunity. PMID:26875535

  15. Tick-borne encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gritsun, T S; Lashkevich, V A; Gould, E A

    2003-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is one of the most dangerous human infections occurring in Europe and many parts of Asia. The etiological agent Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), is a member of the virus genus Flavivirus, of the family Flaviviridae. TBEV is believed to cause at least 11,000 human cases of encephalitis in Russia and about 3000 cases in the rest of Europe annually. Related viruses within the same group, Louping ill virus (LIV), Langat virus (LGTV) and Powassan virus (POWV), also cause human encephalitis but rarely on an epidemic scale. Three other viruses within the same group, Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV), Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV) and Alkhurma virus (ALKV), are closely related to the TBEV complex viruses and tend to cause fatal hemorrhagic fevers rather than encephalitis. This review describes the clinical manifestations associated with TBEV infections, the main molecular-biological properties of these viruses, and the different factors that define the incidence and severity of disease. The role of ticks and their local hosts in the emergence of new virus variants with different pathogenic characteristics is also discussed. This review also contains a brief history of vaccination against TBE including trials with live attenuated vaccine and modern tendencies in developing of vaccine virus strains. PMID:12615309

  16. Thermostabilization of inactivated polio vaccine in PLGA-based microspheres for pulsatile release.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Stephany Y; Guarecuco, Rohiverth; McHugh, Kevin J; Rose, Sviatlana; Rosenberg, Evan M; Zeng, Yingying; Langer, Robert; Jaklenec, Ana

    2016-07-10

    Vaccines are a critical clinical tool in preventing illness and death due to infectious diseases and are regularly administered to children and adults across the globe. In order to obtain full protection from many vaccines, an individual needs to receive multiple doses over the course of months. However, vaccine administration in developing countries is limited by the difficulty in consistently delivering a second or third dose, and some vaccines, including the inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), must be injected more than once for efficacy. In addition, IPV does not remain stable over time at elevated temperatures, such as those it would encounter over time in the body if it were to be injected as a single-administration vaccine. In this manuscript, we describe microspheres composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) that can encapsulate IPV along with stabilizing excipients and release immunogenic IPV over the course of several weeks. Additionally, pH-sensitive, cationic dopants such as Eudragit E polymer caused clinically relevant amounts of stable IPV release upon degradation of the PLGA matrix. Specifically, IPV was released in two separate bursts, mimicking the delivery of two boluses approximately one month apart. In one of our top formulations, 1.4, 1.1, and 1.2 doses of the IPV serotype 1, 2, and 3, respectively, were released within the first few days from 50mg of particles. During the delayed, second burst, 0.5, 0.8, and 0.6 doses of each serotype, respectively, were released; thus, 50mg of these particles released approximately two clinical doses spaced a month apart. Immunization of rats with the leading microsphere formulation showed more robust and long-lasting humoral immune response compared to a single bolus injection and was statistically non-inferior from two bolus injections spaced 1 month apart. By minimizing the number of administrations of a vaccine, such as IPV, this technology can serve as a tool to aid in the eradication of polio and

  17. Development of a small animal peripheral challenge model of Japanese encephalitis virus using interferon deficient AG129 mice and the SA14-14-2 vaccine virus strain.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Delorey, Mark J; Blair, Carol D; Roehrig, John T

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the most common cause of viral encephalitis in Asia, and it is increasingly a global public health concern due to its recent geographic expansion. While commercial vaccines are available and used in some endemic countries, JEV continues to be a public health problem, with 50,000 cases reported annually. Research with virulent JEV in mouse models to develop new methods of prevention and treatment is restricted to BSL-3 containment facilities, confining these studies to investigators with access to these facilities. We have developed an adult small animal peripheral challenge model using interferon-deficient AG129 mice and the JEV live-attenuated vaccine SA14-14-2, thus requiring only BSL-2 containment. A low dose of virus (10PFU/0.1ml) induced 100% morbidity in infected mice. Increased body temperatures measured by implantable temperature transponders correlated with an increase in infectious virus and viral RNA in serum, spleen and brain as well as an increase in pro-inflammatory markers measured by a 58-biomarker multi-analyte profile (MAP) constructed during the course of infection. In the future, the MAP measurements can be used as a baseline for comparison in order to better assess the inhibition of disease progression by other prophylactic and therapeutic agents. The use of the AG129/JEV SA14-14-2 animal model makes vaccine and therapeutic studies feasible for laboratories with limited biocontainment facilities. PMID:24252694

  18. A step forward in the quality control testing of inactivated rabies vaccines - extensive evaluation of European vaccines by using alternative methods to the in vivo potency tests.

    PubMed

    Servat, Alexandre; Kempff, Sébastien; Brogat, Valère; Litaize, Estelle; Schereffer, Jean-Luc; Cliquet, Florence

    2015-03-01

    The mouse challenge test still remains the reference method for the potency determination of human and animal inactivated rabies vaccines, and it is still widely used throughout the world. This test suffers from many disadvantages - it is expensive and time consuming, uses a large number of mice, causes significant animal distress, and suffers from high variability. Recently, the European Pharmacopoeia has recognised the use of a serological potency assay (SPA) as an alternative method to the challenge test. This new test is based on the determination of rabies neutralising antibody titres in vaccinated mice, by using the modified Rapid Fluorescent Focus Inhibition Test (mRFFIT). With the objective of adopting this new method for the batch release of inactivated rabies vaccines, we evaluated its performance on a large collection of rabies vaccines currently assessed in our laboratory. The Fluorescent Antibody Virus Neutralisation test (FAVNt) was used in parallel with the mRFFIT, and the results were compared to the mouse challenge test. Our results demonstrate that the SPA is capable of estimating the potency of vaccines formulated with a potency margin well above the minimum of 1IU/dose. For low potency vaccines, this new method demonstrated some limitations, due to the recurrent invalidation of the assay. We have also demonstrated the superior sensitivity of the FAVNt when compared to the mRFFIT, and the importance of minimising the risk of detecting non-responders in vaccinated mice. PMID:25802995

  19. Extrapolating theoretical efficacy of inactivated influenza A/H5N1 virus vaccine from human immunogenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Leora R; Matrajt, Laura; Elizabeth Halloran, M; Keitel, Wendy A; Longini, Ira M

    2016-07-19

    Influenza A virus subtype H5N1 has been a public health concern for almost 20years due to its potential ability to become transmissible among humans. Phase I and II clinical trials have assessed safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of inactivated influenza A/H5N1 virus vaccines. A shortage of vaccine is likely to occur during the first months of a pandemic. Hence, determining whether to give one dose to more people or two doses to fewer people to best protect the population is essential. We use hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titers as an immune correlate for avian influenza vaccines. Using an established relationship to obtain a theoretical vaccine efficacy from immunogenicity data from thirteen arms of six phase I and phase II clinical trials of inactivated influenza A/H5N1 virus vaccines, we assessed: (1) the proportion of theoretical vaccine efficacy achieved after a single dose (defined as primary response level), and (2) whether theoretical efficacy increases after a second dose, with and without adjuvant. Participants receiving vaccine with AS03 adjuvant had higher primary response levels (range: 0.48-0.57) compared to participants receiving vaccine with MF59 adjuvant (range: 0.32-0.47), with no observed trends in primary response levels by antigen dosage. After the first and second doses, vaccine with AS03 at dosage levels 3.75, 7.5 and 15mcg had the highest estimated theoretical vaccine efficacy: Dose (1) 45% (95% CI: 36-57%), 53% (95% CI: 42-63%) and 55% (95% CI: 44-64%), respectively and Dose (2) 93% (95% CI: 89-96%), 97% (95% CI: 95-98%) and 97% (95% CI: 96-100%), respectively. On average, the estimated theoretical vaccine efficacy of lower dose adjuvanted vaccines (AS03 and MF59) was 17% higher than that of higher dose unadjuvanted vaccines, suggesting that including an adjuvant is dose-sparing. These data indicate adjuvanted inactivated influenza A/H5N1 virus vaccine produces high theoretical efficacy after two doses to protect individuals

  20. Co-adjuvant effects of plant polysaccharide and propolis on chickens inoculated with Bordetella avium inactivated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya; Wei, Kai; Yang, Shifa; Li, Bing; Zhang, Yongbing; Zhu, Fujie; Wang, Di; Chi, Shanshan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2015-01-01

    Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), propolis (PP) and aloe polysaccharide (AP), used as adjuvants, have been proven to possess immunity-enhancing functions. However, their collaborative immunomodulatory effects are largely unknown. To determine which combination can induce the best effects, the three adjuvants were separately or conjointly added into Bordetella avium inactivated vaccines to investigate their co-adjuvant effects on vaccinated chickens. We found that, among all six adjuvant-treated vaccine inoculated groups (TPPPS, PP, AP, TPPPS-PP, PP-AP and TPPPS-AP), the chickens inoculated with TPPPS, PP or TPPPS-PP adjuvant vaccines showed significantly higher levels of antibody titre, cytokine, lymphocyte transformation and peripheral blood T-lymphocyte count than those of non-adjuvant vaccine inoculated groups (P < 0.05), indicating the good immune-enhancing effects of TPPPS and PP. The TPPPS-PP group showed the highest levels of antibody titres and interleukin-2 (IL-2) at 14-28 days post the first inoculation (dpi), lymphocyte transformation rates (LTRs) at 14-35 dpi, CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts at 14-42 dpi, and CD8(+) T-lymphocyte counts at 28 dpi. The results revealed that B. avium inactivated vaccine used conjointly with TPPPS and PP induced the strongest humoral and cellular immune responses. Thus, there was a synergistic effect between TPPPS and PP on enhancing immunity, which suggests that they can be used as a novel adjuvant formulation for the development of poultry vaccines. PMID:25989924

  1. Influenza: the virus and prophylaxis with inactivated influenza vaccine in “at risk” groups, including COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Hovden, Arnt-Ove; Cox, Rebecca Jane; Haaheim, Lars Reinhardt

    2007-01-01

    Influenza is a major respiratory pathogen, which exerts a huge human and economic toll on society. Influenza is a vaccine preventable disease, however, the vaccine strains must be annually updated due to the continuous antigenic changes in the virus. Inactivated influenza vaccines have been used for over 50 years and have an excellent safety record. Annual vaccination is therefore recommended for all individuals with serious medical conditions, like COPD, and protects the vaccinee against influenza illness and also against hospitalization and death. In COPD patients, influenza infection can lead to exacerbations resulting in reduced quality of life, hospitalization and death in the most severe cases. Although there is only limited literature on the use of influenza vaccination solely in COPD patients, there is clearly enough evidence to recommend annual vaccination in this group. This review will focus on influenza virus and prophylaxis with inactivated influenza vaccines in COPD patients and other “at risk” groups to reduce morbidity, save lives, and reduce health care costs. PMID:18229561

  2. Production in Vero cells of an inactivated rabies vaccine from strain FRV/K for animal and human use.

    PubMed

    el-Karamany, R M

    1987-08-01

    A new concentrated and purified rabies vaccine was produced in Vero cells. Two rabies virus strains, the fixed rabies virus Pasteur (FRV) and Pittman Moore (PM) were adapted to Vero cells by 20 cycles of alternating passages in the brain of weaning mice. Intracerebral (i.c.) inoculation of weaning mice was followed then by 17 and 20 serial passages in Vero cells of RFV and PM strains, respectively. The adapted strains designated as FRV/K and PM/K gave titres of 10(6) +/- 1.5 log (LD50/ml for i.c. inoculated mice) in several harvests taken from one infected cell culture. Pooled harvests were concentrated 20-fold by ultrafiltration and were tested as animal vaccine after inactivation with beta-propiolactone (BPL). Another vaccine preparation destined for human use, in addition to concentration and inactivation, was also purified by gel filtration. Control tests revealed that the antigenic content of different strain FRV/K harvests was very high in comparison with that of strain PM/K and the reference tissue culture vaccine (RIV, Netherland). In sheep the antibody response induced by the FRV/K strain was very high; serum neutralizing index (NI) higher than 4 was reached 40 days after the second vaccine dose, whereas the vaccine preparation from strain PM/K gave NI of 2.3 and the reference vaccine NI of 3.8, respectively. Safety tests in rabbits and guinea pigs showed neither pyrogenicity nor toxicity. PMID:2892381

  3. Divergent immune responses and disease outcomes in piglets immunized with inactivated and attenuated H3N2 swine influenza vaccines in the presence of maternally-derived antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) can occur in pigs immunized with whole-inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine and subsequently infected with an antigenically divergent virus of the same HA subtype. Live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines administered intranasally h...

  4. Divergent immune responses and disease outcomes in piglets immunized with inactivated and attenuated H3N2 swine influenza vaccines in the presence of maternally-derived antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) can occur in pigs given whole-inactivated virus (WIV) influenza vaccine upon infection with an antigenically divergent virus. VAERD was first characterized with H1 viruses, and later described in pigs vaccinated with H3N2 WIV and challenged wit...

  5. Mucosal vaccination with formalin-inactivated avian metapneumovirus Subtype C reduces clinical signs of disease but enhances local pathology of turkeys following challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were performed to determine if mucosal vaccination with inactivated avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) subtype C protected turkey poults from clinical disease and virus replication following mucosal challenge. Although decreases in clinical disease were observed in vaccinated groups, the vaccine...

  6. Protection of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine against hospitalizations among pandemic influenza A (H1N1) cases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Orellano, P W; Reynoso, J I; Carlino, O; Uez, O

    2010-07-19

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effectiveness of 2009 seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccine in reducing hospitalizations due to the novel influenza A H1N1 virus among positive cases. Data collected from Argentina's national epidemiological surveillance system were analyzed. All patients had a clinical diagnosis and underwent positive serological tests for pandemic influenza A H1N1. Logistic regression was used to estimate vaccine effectiveness to prevent severe cases of the disease, measured as hospitalizations. The adjusted effectiveness of the vaccine was 50% (95% CI: 40-59%). Vaccination was significantly associated with hospitalizations in all age groups, and within groups that had and had not received antiviral treatment. These results suggest that seasonal influenza vaccine might have conferred partial protection against severe cases due to the novel pandemic influenza. PMID:20541580

  7. Evaluation of Immune Response Against Inactivated Avian Influenza (H9N2) Vaccine, by Using Chitosan Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Iraj; Ghadimipour, Rahim; Sadigh Eteghad, Saeed; Fathi Najafi, Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Majid; Godsian, Naser; Sefidi Heris, Yousef; Khalili, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Influenza A is a virus that affects a wide range of animals and also human beings. Avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H9N2 has the potential to create influenza pandemic and vaccination is a common solution for this problem. The vaccine, used for rapid intervention, should be safe to use and highly effective, after a single administration. Chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) have already been recommended as a new adjuvant for inactivated AIV H9N2 vaccine immunization. Objectives: This study aimed at the evaluation and better understanding of optimum concentration of CNP preparations and also, assessment of loading capacity of AIV into CNP, as an adjuvant in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. Materials and Methods: For measurement of vaccine-antibody response, different types of CNP were injected intramuscularly, in a single dose, to 21-day-old specific pathogen-free chickens. Chickens were monitored for the efficacy of the nanoparticles and, also, their immune response, during a follow up of 7 weeks, by using hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test. The CNP were prepared according to modified ionic gelation method and inactivated antigen was loaded in four hemagglutinin units (HAU) concentrations. Loading capacity of nanoparticles was determined by hemagglutination (HA) method. Inactivated A/H9N2 AIV was mixed with chitosan of low molecular weight. Results: The CNP did not cause any mortality or side effects, when chickens were administered the prepared vaccine. The results strongly showed that this novel vaccine significantly enhances the immunogenicity of inactivated AIV, comparing with ISA70 (SEPPIC, Puteaux, France) adjuvant that is used routinely in the Razi Serum and Vaccine Research and Production Institute, Karaj, Iran, to reduce ISA70’s side effects. Conclusions: The AIV loaded into CNP vaccines induce appropriate antibody titers, after a single immunization, while requiring a low dose of antigen. The CNP also represent an interesting new

  8. Rabies vaccination: comparison of neutralizing antibody responses after priming and boosting with different combinations of DNA, inactivated virus, or recombinant vaccinia virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lodmell, D L; Ewalt, L C

    2000-05-01

    Long-term levels of neutralizing antibody were evaluated in mice after a single immunization with experimental DNA or recombinant vaccinia virus (RVV) vaccines encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein (G), or the commercially available inactivated virus human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV). Anamnestic antibody titers were also evaluated after two booster immunizations with vaccines that were identical to or different from the priming vaccine. Five hundred and forty days (1.5 year) after a single immunization with any of the three vaccines, neutralizing antibody titers remained greater than the minimal acceptable human level of antibody titer (0.5 International Units (IU)/ml). In addition, either an HDCV or DNA booster elicited early and elevated anamnestic antibody responses in mice that had been primed with any of the three vaccines. In contrast, RVV boosters failed to elevate titers in mice that had been previously primed with RVV, and elicited slowly rising titers in mice that had been primed with either DNA or HDCV. Thus, a single vaccination with any of the three different vaccines elicited long-term levels of neutralizing antibody that exceeded 0.5 IU/ml. In contrast, different prime-booster vaccine combinations elicited anamnestic neutralizing antibody responses that increased quickly, increased slowly or failed to increase. PMID:10738096

  9. Characterization of genetically inactivated pertussis toxin mutants: candidates for a new vaccine against whooping cough.

    PubMed Central

    Nencioni, L; Pizza, M; Bugnoli, M; De Magistris, T; Di Tommaso, A; Giovannoni, F; Manetti, R; Marsili, I; Matteucci, G; Nucci, D

    1990-01-01

    the introduction of two amino acid substitutions within the enzymatically active subunit S1 of pertussis toxin (PT) abolishes its ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and toxicity on CHO cells (Pizza et al., Science 246:497-500, 1989). These genetically inactivated molecules are also devoid of other in vivo adverse reactions typical of PT, such as induction of leukocytosis, potentiation of anaphylaxis, stimulation of insulin secretion, and histamine sensitivity. However, the mutant PT molecules are indistinguishable from wild-type PT in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and maintain all the physical and chemical properties of PT, including affinity for toxin-neutralizing poly- and monoclonal antibodies. Either alone or stabilized with formaldehyde, PT mutants are able to induce high levels of neutralizing antibodies and to protect mice in a dose-dependent fashion against intracerebral challenge with virulent B. pertussis. These results clearly show that these genetically inactivated PT molecules are nontoxic but still immunogenic and justify their development as a component of a new, safer acellular vaccine against whooping cough. Images PMID:2323818

  10. The adjuvanticity of ophiopogon polysaccharide liposome against an inactivated porcine parvovirus vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunpeng; Ma, Xia; Hou, Weifeng; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Weimin; Ma, Lin; Song, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the adjuvant activity of ophiopogon polysaccharide liposome (OPL) was investigated. The effects of OPL on the splenic lymphocyte proliferation of mice were measured in vitro. The results showed that OPL could significantly promote lymphocyte proliferation singly or synergistically with PHA and LPS and that the effect was better than ophiopogon polysaccharide (OP) at most of concentrations. The adjuvant activities of OPL, OP and mineral oil were compared in BALB/c mice inoculated with inactivated PPV in vivo. The results showed that OPL could significantly enhance lymphocyte proliferation, increase the proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, improve the HI antibody titre and specific IgG response, and promote the production of cytokines, and the efficacy of OPL was significantly better than that of OP. In addition, OPL significantly improved the cellular immune response compared with oil adjuvant. These results suggested that OPL possess superior adjuvanticity and that a medium dose had the best efficacy. Therefore, OPL can be used as an effective immune adjuvant for an inactivated PPV vaccine. PMID:26529188

  11. The immunogenicity and protection effect of the BPL-inactivated CA16 vaccine in different animal systems

    PubMed Central

    Qi An, Wen; Guo Su, Zhi; Wen Pan, Ruo; Ping Yang, Bao; Chao Zhang, Yong; Shi, Liang; Li, Qing

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of a β-propiolactone (BPL)-inactivated coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) vaccine, using three immunogenicity evaluation and two animal challenge systems. A CA16 virus strain, named 419, was used as the production strain. Another CA16 strain, named 1131, was isolated and used as the challenge strain in intracerebral inoculation of neonatal mice for the calculation of median lethal dose (LD50). In the passive and maternal antibody-protection challenge systems, all results indicated that the vaccine could protect mouse pups from lethal challenge with the CA16 virus. In the immunogenicity systems, three types of animal (mouse, rat, and cynomolgus monkey), were immunized with the 419/CA16 vaccine. The dose–effect relationship and the antibody-generation routine were described. The CA16 vaccine induced a more potent serum antibody effect in rat than in mouse. The serum antibody titer was detectable more than 63 days after the initial vaccination. We also identified tools to evaluate the effect of the BPL-inactivated CA16 vaccine. PMID:24401488

  12. Comparison of serum hemagglutinin and neuraminidase inhibition antibodies after 2010-2011 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    Laguio-Vila, Maryrose R; Thompson, Mark G; Reynolds, Sue; Spencer, Sarah M; Gaglani, Manjusha; Naleway, Allison; Ball, Sarah; Bozeman, Sam; Baker, Steven; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Levine, Min; Katz, Jackie; Fry, Alicia M; Treanor, John J

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Most inactivated influenza vaccines contain purified and standardized hemagglutinin (HA) and residual neuraminidase (NA) antigens. Vaccine-associated HA antibody responses (hemagglutination inhibition [HAI]) are well described, but less is known about the immune response to the NA. Methods.  Serum of 1349 healthcare personnel (HCP) electing or declining the 2010-2011 trivalent-inactivated influenza vaccine ([IIV3], containing A/California/7/2009 p(H1N1), A/Perth/16/2009 [H3N2], B/Brisbane/60/2008 strains) were tested for NA-inhibiting (NAI) antibody by a modified lectin-based assay using pseudotyped N1 and N2 influenza A viruses with an irrelevant (H5) HA. Neuraminidase-inhibiting and HAI antibody titers were evaluated approximately 30 days after vaccination and end-of-season for those with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed influenza infection. Results.  In 916 HCP (68%) receiving IIV3, a 2-fold increase in N1 and N2 NAI antibody occurred in 63.7% and 47.3%, respectively. Smaller responses occurred in HCP age >50 years and those without prior 2009-2010 IIV3 nor monovalent A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccinations. Forty-four PCR-confirmed influenza infections were observed, primarily affecting those with lower pre-exposure HAI and NAI antibodies. Higher pre-NAI titers correlated with shorter duration of illness for A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections. Conclusions.  Trivalent-inactivated influenza vaccine is modestly immunogenic for N1 and N2 antigens in HCP. Vaccines eliciting robust NA immune responses may improve efficacy and reduce influenza-associated morbidity. PMID:25884004

  13. Inactivated pep27 mutant as an effective mucosal vaccine against a secondary lethal pneumococcal challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sang-Yoon; Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Briles, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A pep27 mutant may be able to elicit mucosal immunity against pneumococcal diseases, and could be employed as an inexpensive attenuated vaccine. However, this particular mutant contains an erythromycin-resistance marker. The purpose of the current study is to develop a markerless pep27 mutant and assess whether this inactivated mutant is able to induce mucosal immunity. Materials and Methods Mice were vaccinated intranasally with the inactivated markerless pep27 mutant every 2 weeks for a total of three times, after which time serum samples were analyzed for antibody titers. The mice were then challenged with a lethal D39 strain and their survival time was measured. The cross-reactivity of the antisera against pep27 was also compared to other mutant serotypes. Results Intranasal immunization of mice with the inactivated markerless pep27 mutant provides effective protection and rapidly cleared bacterial colonization in vivo. Moreover, antisera raised against the pep27 mutant may cross-react with several other serotype strains. Conclusion Intranasal immunization with the inactivated pep27 mutant may be able to provide mucosal immunity, and could represent an efficient mucosal vaccine. PMID:23596592

  14. IRES-driven Expression of the Capsid Protein of the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus TC-83 Vaccine Strain Increases Its Attenuation and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Guerbois, Mathilde; Volkova, Eugenia; Forrester, Naomi L.; Rossi, Shannan L.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    The live-attenuated TC-83 strain is the only licensed veterinary vaccine available to protect equids against Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and to protect humans indirectly by preventing equine amplification. However, TC-83 is reactogenic due to its reliance on only two attenuating point mutations and has infected mosquitoes following equine vaccination. To increase its stability and safety, a recombinant TC-83 was previously engineered by placing the expression of the viral structural proteins under the control of the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), which drives translation inefficiently in insect cells. However, this vaccine candidate was poorly immunogenic. Here we describe a second generation of the recombinant TC-83 in which the subgenomic promoter is maintained and only the capsid protein gene is translated from the IRES. This VEEV/IRES/C vaccine candidate did not infect mosquitoes, was stable in its attenuation phenotype after serial murine passages, and was more attenuated in newborn mice but still as protective as TC-83 against VEEV challenge. Thus, by using the IRES to modulate TC-83 capsid protein expression, we generated a vaccine candidate that combines efficient immunogenicity and efficacy with lower virulence and a reduced potential for spread in nature. PMID:23675542

  15. Evaluation of Extracellular Subviral Particles of Dengue Virus Type 2 and Japanese Encephalitis Virus Produced by Spodoptera frugiperda Cells for Use as Vaccine and Diagnostic Antigens ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Miwa; Konishi, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    New or improved vaccines against dengue virus types 1 to 4 (DENV1 to DENV4) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the causative agents of dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis (JE), respectively, are urgently required. The use of noninfectious subviral extracellular particles (EPs) is an inexpensive and safe strategy for the production of protein-based flavivirus vaccines. Although coexpression of premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins has been demonstrated to produce EPs in mammalian cells, low yields have hindered their commercial application. Therefore, we used an insect cell expression system with Spodoptera frugiperda-derived Sf9 cells to investigate high-level production of DENV2 and JEV EPs. Sf9 cells transfected with the prM and E genes of DENV2 or JEV secreted corresponding viral antigens in a particulate form that were biochemically and biophysically equivalent to the authentic antigens obtained from infected C6/36 mosquito cells. Additionally, equivalent neutralizing antibody titers were induced in mice immunized either with EPs produced by transfected Sf9 cells or with EPs produced by transfected mammalian cells, in the context of coimmunization with a DNA vaccine that expresses EPs. Furthermore, the results of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using an EP antigen derived from Sf9 cells correlated significantly with the results obtained by a neutralization test and an ELISA using an EP antigen derived from mammalian cells. Finally, Sf9 cells could produce 10- to 100-fold larger amounts of E antigen than mammalian cells. These results indicate the potential of Sf9 cells for high-level production of flavivirus protein vaccines and diagnostic antigens. PMID:20668137

  16. Efficacy of a formalin-inactivated vaccine against Streptococcus iniae infection in the farmed grouper Epinephelus coioides by intraperitoneal immunization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsing-Yen; Chen, Yan-Chun; Wang, Pei-Chi; Tsai, Ming-An; Yeh, Shih-Chun; Liang, Hong-Jen; Chen, Shih-Chu

    2014-12-01

    Vaccination is the most effective means of preventing infectious diseases; however, few vaccines are effective against Streptococcus iniae (S. iniae) in grouper. This work presents an efficacious and safe vaccine against S. iniae infections in the grouper Epinephelus coioides. The vaccine candidate was the S. iniae GSI-310 strain. The vaccination was administered by intraperitoneal injection, and consisted of formalin-inactivated antigens combined with an AS-F or ISA763A adjuvant. Peripheral blood samples were collected for RT-qPCR and phagocytosis and agglutination assays. Our results indicated that immunoglobulin M (igm) was maximally expressed in the two vaccinated groups at 3 months post-secondary vaccination (PSV). A significant upregulation of mRNA expression for interleukin-1β (il-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (tnf-α) was also observed in fish treated with antigens combined with ISA763A, which peaked at 3 months PSV. In fish treated with antigens combined with AS-F, il-1β and tnf-α expression peaked at 14 days post-primary vaccination (PPV). Phagocytic activity and index increased significantly in the two vaccinated groups. Furthermore, fish in the two vaccinated groups exhibited significantly elevated agglutination titers compared to fish in the control group, in which almost no agglutination reaction was detected. In the efficacy test, the vaccinated and control groupers were treated with S. iniae at 1, 3, and 6 months PSV. The relative percentage survival (RPS) values of antigens with AS-F and antigens with ISA763A were both 100% at 1 and 3 months PSV; at 6 months PSV, the RPS values for these groups were 100% and 97.7%, respectively. Furthermore, the level of protection observed in the field trial closely resembled that achieved on a laboratory scale. Therefore, the proposed vaccine mixed with AS-F or ISA763A improved immune responses and provided safe and long-lasting protection in farmed groupers. PMID:25192808

  17. Evaluation of protective efficacy of a novel inactivated Salmonella Pullorum ghost vaccine against virulent challenge in chickens.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rongxian; Geng, Shizhong; Jiao, Hongmei; Pan, Zhiming; Chen, Xiang; Jiao, Xinan

    2016-05-01

    Salmonella Gallinarum biovar Pullorum is the causative agent of pullorum disease in poultry, an acute systemic disease that results in a high mortality rate in young chickens. Vaccines have been considered in many developing countries where levels of infection are high and eradication is not a realistic option. An attenuated strain combined with protein E-mediated cell lysis was used to generate a safety enhanced Salmonella Pullorum ghost vaccine. Immune responses and protection induced by ghost vaccine in chickens were investigated following a prime-boost immunization administered via intramuscular and oral routes. Chickens from vaccinated groups showed significant increases in antigen-specific IgG, especially after booster immunization. Lymphocyte proliferation responses were also significantly increased in all immunized groups at 2-weeks post-final vaccination. The Salmonella Pullorum ghost vaccine provided satisfactory protection against virulent Salmonella Pullorum infection, as shown by the robust stimulation of both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses as well as the reduction in the number of bacterial recovered post-challenge. Moreover, the immune effects and survival rates indicated intramuscular injection is more efficient than oral vaccination. In conclusion, our results suggest that Salmonella Pullorum ghosts may be used as a safe and effective novel inactivated vaccine candidate to protect against virulent Salmonella Pullorum infection. PMID:27090623

  18. Failure of an inactivated vaccine against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome to protect gilts against a heterologous challenge with PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Scortti, M; Prieto, C; Alvarez, E; Simarro, I; Castro, J M

    2007-12-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of an inactivated vaccine based on a European-type strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) against the reproductive form of the syndrome in breeding gilts, and any congenital disease in their piglets. Five gilts were vaccinated twice, following the manufacturer's instructions, before they were inseminated. Nine additional gilts remained unvaccinated and served as positive (five gilts) and negative (four gilts) controls. A European wild-type strain genetically divergent from the vaccine strain was used to challenge the five vaccinated and five unvaccinated positive control gilts at 90 days' gestation. The vaccination of the five seronegative gilts did not produce any clinical signs or adverse reactions. However, the vaccine failed to prevent the clinical signs associated with PRRSV infection, viraemia after the challenge and transplacental infection of their piglets. The reproductive performance of the vaccinated gilts was similar to that of the unvaccinated positive controls, and there were no statistically significant differences in most of the parameters tested. However, the preweaning mortality of the piglets born to the vaccinated gilts was significantly lower than that of the piglets born to the positive control gilts. PMID:18083979

  19. Reactogenicity and immunogenicity of an inactivated influenza vaccine administered by intramuscular or subcutaneous injection in elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian F; Barr, Ian; Hartel, Gunter; Pond, Dimity; Hampson, Alan W

    2006-03-20

    In many countries there is no clear recommendation regarding the preferred route of administration of inactivated influenza vaccines. In a randomised, observer blind study of 720 elderly subjects, a split, trivalent influenza vaccine was significantly more immunogenic for both A strains (H3N2 and H1N1, p = 0.0016 and 0.003, respectively) when given intramuscularly compared to subcutaneously. This difference was due entirely to a gender effect, with females in the intramuscular (IM) group having a significantly greater serological response than females in the subcutaneous (SC) group for both of these strains. Similar results were seen with local adverse effects. These data suggest that vaccination practices that ensure intramuscular injection are required for optimal administration of influenza vaccines in the elderly. PMID:16406171

  20. Effect of a phase I Coxiella burnetii inactivated vaccine on body temperature and milk yield in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Schulze, L S-Ch; Borchardt, S; Ouellet, V; Heuwieser, W

    2016-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii. The pathogen is prevalent in ruminants (goats, sheep, cows), which are the main sources of human infection. In the cattle industry around the world, animal (15 to 20%) and herd (38 to 72%) level prevalences of C. burnetii are high. Vaccination of ruminants against Q fever is considered important to prevent spreading of the disease and risk of infection in humans. However, published information on side effects of the Q fever vaccination under field conditions is limited for cows. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the phase I C. burnetii inactivated vaccine Coxevac on body temperature and milk yield in dairy cows. In 2 experiments, a total of 508 cows were randomly divided into 2 groups to determine the effect of first vaccination on body temperature and milk yield. The C. burnetii serostatus of all cows was tested before vaccination with an indirect ELISA. The first experiment took place in the teaching and research barn of the Clinic of Animal Reproduction at the Freie Universität Berlin. Temperature was measured vaginally in 10 cows in a crossover design. The second experiment was conducted on a commercial dairy farm. Milk yield of 498 cows was measured 1 wk before and 1 wk after vaccination. In a subset of 41 cows, temperature was measured rectally. In both experiments, body temperature increased significantly after vaccination (1.0 ± 0.9°C and 0.7 ± 0.8°C). A significant difference was also found in body temperature between vaccinated and control cows. Thirty percent of the vaccinated animals in experiment 1 showed reversible swelling at the injection site as a reaction to the vaccination. The results indicate that vaccination against Q fever causes a transient increase of body temperature that peaks in the first 12 to 24h and declines after that. In experiment 2, vaccinated cows (26.8 ± 0.39 kg/d) produced significantly less milk than did control cows (28.2 ± 0.44 kg

  1. Immunogenicity and Safety of an Inactivated Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Candidate: A Phase III Randomized Controlled Trial in Children

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Joanne M.; Carmona Martinez, Alfonso; Chatterjee, Archana; Halperin, Scott A.; McNeil, Shelly; Reisinger, Keith S.; Aggarwal, Naresh; Huang, Li-Min; Peng, Ching-Tien; Garcia-Sicilia, José; Salamanca de la Cueva, Ignacio; Cabañas, Fernando; Treviño-Garza, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Weber, Miguel Angel; de la O, Manuel; Chandrasekaran, Vijayalakshmi; Dewé, Walthère; Liu, Aixue; Innis, Bruce L.; Jain, Varsha K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mismatch between circulating influenza B viruses (Yamagata and Victoria lineages) and vaccine strains occurs frequently. Methods. In a randomized controlled trial, immunogenicity and safety of an inactivated quadrivalent influenza vaccine candidate (QIV) versus trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV)-Victoria(Vic) and TIV-Yamagata(Yam) in children 3–17 years of age was evaluated. In an open-label study arm, QIV only was assessed in children 6–35 months of age. Results. A total of 3094 children (932 QIV, 929 TIV-Vic, 932 TIV-Yam, and 301 QIV only) were vaccinated. QIV was noninferior to the TIVs for shared strains (A/H3N2 and A/H1N1) based on hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies 28 days after last vaccination, and superior for the unique B strains Victoria and Yamagata (geometric mean titer ratios 2.61, 3.78; seroconversion rate differences 33.96%, 44.63%). Among children in the randomized trial, adverse event rates were similar except for injection site pain (dose 1: 65.4% QIV, 54.6% TIV-Vic, 55.7% TIV-Yam). Conclusion. QIV elicited superior HI responses to the added B strains compared to TIV controls, potentially improving its effectiveness against influenza B. HI responses were similar between QIV and TIV controls for the shared strains. QIV had an acceptable safety profile relative to TIVs. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01198756. PMID:23847058

  2. The rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test is a suitable method for batch potency testing of inactivated rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Krämer, B; Schildger, H; Behrensdorf-Nicol, H A; Hanschmann, K M; Duchow, K

    2009-04-01

    The European Pharmacopoeia proposes two methods for potency determination of inactivated rabies vaccines for veterinary use: The first one is a classical mouse challenge test, which is imprecise, time-consuming, and causes severe distress to the test animals. Alternatively, the potency may be determined serologically by measuring the neutralizing antibody titers induced after vaccination of mice by using a rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Although this method is faster and less painful for the animals, it is not widely used yet, and only little data exist concerning the comparability of both methods. We have therefore performed a comparative study, in which we demonstrated a good correlation between the challenge test results and the mean titers determined by RFFIT. Furthermore, all vaccine batches failing the challenge test were also recognized as insufficient in the serological assay. This publication further describes the influence of different vaccine administration routes on the resulting antibody titers, and it proposes various modifications to the serological assay protocol which could improve its overall practicability. Finally, we recommend that the serological assay be used for the potency testing of inactivated rabies vaccines. PMID:19181541

  3. A multi-dose serological assay suitable to quantify the potency of inactivated rabies vaccines for veterinary use.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Beate; Kamphuis, Elisabeth; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Milne, Catherine; Daas, Arnold; Duchow, Karin

    2013-11-01

    The mouse vaccination-challenge test, which is the most widely used method for determining the potency of inactivated rabies vaccines, is imprecise, time-consuming, and causes severe distress to the test animals. An alternative single-dose serological method has been implemented in the European Pharmacopoeia Monograph 0451 to replace the mouse challenge test for batch release. This single-dose limit method provides semi-quantitative results, but is not suitable for quantifying potency. We have now extended this serological method to a multi-dose format which allows a quantification of vaccine potency. In studies including all rabies vaccine strains relevant for Europe, we found dose-dependency for all vaccines and standard preparations. We have demonstrated that the multi-dose serological approach provides reliable quantitative potency results and is more precise than the mouse vaccination-challenge test. We have shown that adjuvanted vaccines can be calibrated against non-adjuvanted material, and that reference material can be calibrated against the International Standard. The method is therefore capable of assigning potency with the additional advantage of requiring fewer animals and reducing distress. Once the applicability of the method has been further verified in a collaborative study, it can complement the single-dose assay and eventually eliminate the need for the mouse challenge test. PMID:24144483

  4. Protective efficacy of a high-growth reassortant swine H3N2 inactivated vaccine constructed by reverse genetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Ma, Ji-Hong; Yu, Hai; Yang, Fu-Ru; Huang, Meng; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Ze-Jun; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Novel reassortant H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SwIV) with the matrix gene from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus have been isolated in many countries as well as during outbreaks in multiple states in the United States, indicating that H3N2 SwIV might be a potential threat to public health. Since southern China is the world's largest producer of pigs, efficient vaccines should be developed to prevent pigs from acquiring H3N2 subtype SwIV infections, and thus limit the possibility of SwIV infection at agricultural fairs. In this study, a high-growth reassortant virus (GD/PR8) was generated by plasmid-based reverse genetics and tested as a candidate inactivated vaccine. The protective efficacy of this vaccine was evaluated in mice by challenging them with another H3N2 SwIV isolate [A/Swine/Heilongjiang/1/05 (H3N2) (HLJ/05)]. Prime and booster inoculation with GD/PR8 vaccine yielded high-titer serum hemagglutination inhibiting antibodies and IgG antibodies. Complete protection of mice against H3N2 SwIV was observed, with significantly reduced lung lesion and viral loads in vaccine-inoculated mice relative to mock-vaccinated controls. These results suggest that the GD/PR8 vaccine may serve as a promising candidate for rapid intervention of H3N2 SwIV outbreaks in China. PMID:24675833

  5. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Muller, David A; Pearson, Frances E; Fernando, Germain J P; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S; Corrie, Simon R; Crichton, Michael L; Wei, Jonathan C J; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Young, Paul R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  6. Characterization of the Immune Response Induced by a Commercially Available Inactivated Bluetongue Virus Serotype 1 Vaccine in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Diego, Ana Cristina; Sánchez-Cordón, Pedro José; de las Heras, Ana Isabel; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The protective immune response generated by a commercial monovalent inactivated vaccine against bluetongue virus serotype 1 (BTV1) was studied. Five sheep were vaccinated, boost-vaccinated, and then challenged against BTV1 ALG/2006. RT-PCR did not detect viremia at any time during the experiment. Except a temperature increase observed after the initial and boost vaccinations, no clinical signs or lesions were observed. A specific and protective antibody response checked by ELISA was induced after vaccination and boost vaccination. This specific antibody response was associated with a significant increase in B lymphocytes confirmed by flow cytometry, while significant increases were not observed in T lymphocyte subpopulations (CD4+, CD8+, and WC1+), CD25+ regulatory cells, or CD14+ monocytes. After challenge with BTV1, the antibody response was much higher than during the boost vaccination period, and it was associated with a significant increase in B lymphocytes, CD14+ monocytes, CD25+ regulatory cells, and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. PMID:22619592

  7. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Muller, David A.; Pearson, Frances E.; Fernando, Germain J.P.; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S.; Corrie, Simon R.; Crichton, Michael L.; Wei, Jonathan C.J.; Weldon, William C.; Oberste, M. Steven; Young, Paul R.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  8. Protection of horses from West Nile virus Lineage 2 challenge following immunization with a whole, inactivated WNV lineage 1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Richard A; Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Syvrud, Kevin; Thomas, Anne; Meinert, Todd R; Ludlow, Deborah R; Cook, Corey; Salt, Jeremy; Ons, Ellen

    2014-09-22

    Over the last years West Nile virus (WNV) lineage 2 has spread from the African to the European continent. This study was conducted to demonstrate efficacy of an inactivated, lineage 1-based, WNV vaccine (Equip WNV) against intrathecal challenge of horses with a recent isolate of lineage 2 WNV. Twenty horses, sero-negative for WNV, were enrolled and were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups: an unvaccinated control group (T01, n=10) and a group administered with Equip WNV (T02, n=10). Horses were vaccinated at Day 0 and 21 and were challenged at day 42 with WNV lineage 2, Nea Santa/Greece/2010. Personnel performing clinical observations were blinded to treatment allocation. Sixty percent of the controls had to be euthanized after challenge compared to none of the vaccinates. A significantly lower percentage of the vaccinated animals showed clinical disease (two different clinical observations present on the same day) on six different days of study and the percentage of days with clinical disease was significantly lower in the vaccinated group. A total of 80% of the non-vaccinated horses showed viremia while only one vaccinated animal was positive by virus isolation on a single occasion. Vaccinated animals started to develop antibodies against WNV lineage 2 from day 14 (2 weeks after the first vaccination) and at day 42 (the time of onset of immunity) they had all developed a strong antibody response. Histopathology scores for all unvaccinated animals ranged from mild to very severe in each of the tissues examined (cervical spinal cord, medulla and pons), whereas in vaccinated horses 8 of 10 animals had no lesions and 2 had minimal lesions in one tissue. In conclusion, Equip WNV significantly reduced the number of viremic horses, the duration and severity of clinical signs of disease and mortality following challenge with lineage 2 WNV. PMID:25131745

  9. Clinical evaluation for batch consistency of an inactivated enterovirus 71 vaccine in a large-scale phase 3 clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Juan; Meng, Fan-Yue; Mao, Qunying; Li, Jing-Xin; Wang, Hua; Liang, Zheng-Lun; Zhang, Yun-Tao; Gao, Fan; Chen, Qing-Hua; Hu, Yuemei; Ge, Zi-Jun; Yao, Xin; Guo, Hui-Jie; Zhu, Feng-Cai; Li, Xiu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The demonstration of batch-to-batch consistency to confirm the reliability of the manufacturing process has become a mandatory step in vaccine development. This is a post-hoc analysis aimed to provide more solid evidence on the immunogenicity and consistency of 3 consecutive batches of a novel inactivated enterovirus 71 (EV71) vaccine. In total 10 245 healthy Chinese children aged 6–35 months had been recruited and randomized to receive one of 3 batches of EV71 vaccine or placebo according to a two-dose immunization schedule in a phase 3 clinical trial. Blood samples were taken just before and 28 days after vaccinations for serological tests of EV71 neutralizing antibody (NTAb) titer from the subjects. Among them, 7263 (70.9%) subjects with seronegative EV71 NTAb at baseline and the data of serological tests post-vaccination available were included for the analysis. The results showed that EV71 vaccine elicited high geometric mean titers (GMTs) of 407.0 U/mL (95% CI, 373.5–443.6) for batch 1, 468.1 U/mL (95% CI, 432.2–507.0) for batch 2, and 520.6 U/mL (95% CI, 481.2–563.3) for batch 3. The two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the GMT ratios between each pair of vaccine batches were all within an interval of [0.67, 1.5]. Subjects who received EV71 vaccines demonstrated significant higher GMTs than those received placebos did (P < 0.001). In terms of incidence of both local and general adverse reactions, no differences were found among 3 vaccine batches and placebos. EV71 vaccine was highly immunogenic in children, and the 3 consecutive batches were well consistent. PMID:24633366

  10. Efficacy of an inactivated FeLV vaccine compared to a recombinant FeLV vaccine in minimum age cats following virulent FeLV challenge.

    PubMed

    Stuke, Kristin; King, Vickie; Southwick, Kendra; Stoeva, Mira I; Thomas, Anne; Winkler, M Teresa C

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of an inactivated feline leukemia virus (FeLV) vaccine (Versifel(®) FeLV, Zoetis.) compared to a recombinant FeLV vaccine (Purevax(®) FeLV, Merial Animal Health) in young cats, exposed under laboratory conditions to a highly virulent challenge model. The study was designed to be consistent with the general immunogenicity requirements of the European Pharmacopoeia 6.0 Monograph 01/2008:1321-Feline Leukaemia Vaccine (Inactivated) with the exception that commercial-strength vaccines were assessed. Fifty seronegative cats (8-9 weeks old) were vaccinated subcutaneously on two occasions, three weeks apart, with either placebo (treatment group T01), Versifel FeLV Vaccine (treatment group T02), or Purevax FeLV Vaccine (treatment group T03) according to the manufacturer's directions. Cats were challenged three weeks after the second vaccination with a virulent FeLV isolate (61E strain). Persistent FeLV antigenemia was determined from 3 to 15 weeks postchallenge. Bone marrow samples were tested for the presence of FeLV proviral DNA to determine FeLV latent infection. At week 15 after challenge with the virulent FeLV 61E strain, the Versifel FeLV Vaccine conferred 89.5% protection against FeLV persistent antigenemia and 94.7% protection against FeLV proviral DNA integration in bone marrow cells. In comparison, the Purevax FeLV Vaccine conferred 20% protection against FeLV persistent antigenemia and 35% protection against FeLV proviral DNA integration in bone marrow cells following challenge. The data from this study show that the Versifel FeLV Vaccine was efficacious in preventing both FeLV persistent p27 antigenemia and FeLV proviral DNA integration in bone marrow cells of cats challenged with this particular challenge model under laboratory conditions and provided better protection than Purevax FeLV in this experimental challenge model with highly virulent FeLV. PMID:24662705