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Sample records for encoded quantum communication

  1. Long distance quantum communication using continuous variable encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linshu; Albert, Victor; Michael, Marios; Muralidharan, Sreraman; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang

    Quantum communication enables faithful quantum state transfer between different parties and protocols for cryptographic purposes. However, quantum communication over long distances (>1000km) remains challenging due to optical channel attenuation. This calls for investigation on developing novel encoding schemes that correct photon loss errors efficiently. In this talk, we introduce the generalization of multi-component Schrödinger cat states and propose to encode quantum information in these cat states for ultrafast quantum repeaters. We detail the quantum error correction procedures at each repeater station and characterize the performance of this novel encoding scheme given practical imperfections, such as coupling loss. A comparison with other quantum error correcting codes for bosonic modes will be discussed.

  2. Spectral-temporal-polarization encoding of photons for multi-user secure quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkor, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We describe a Quantum Key Distribution protocol that combines temporal-, spectraland polarization-encoding of photons for secure communication over an interconnected network of users. Temporal encoding is used to identify a user's location or address on the network. Polarization encoding is used to generate private cryptographic key. Polarization encoded information is locally and randomly generated by users and exchanged only over a dedicated secure channel. Spectral encoding allows for the detection of eavesdropping and tampering by a malicious agent. Temporal-spectral signals sent from the network administrator (Alice) to a user are bright light source. On the other hand spectral-temporal signal from a network user (Bob) to the administrator (Alice) are single photons. Signals are sent across the network as ordered light pairs. The ordering format is randomly chosen and are revealed only at the time of key selection between the parties so that a secure one-time cryptographic pad can be generated

  3. Quantum Spread Spectrum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that spectral teleportation can coherently dilate the spectral probability amplitude of a single photon. In preserving the encoded quantum information, this variant of teleportation subsequently enables a form of quantum spread spectrum communication.

  4. Quantum repeater with continuous variable encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linshu; Albert, Victor V.; Michael, Marios; Muralidharan, Sreraman; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Quantum communication enables faithful quantum state transfer between different parties and protocols for cryptographic purposes. However, quantum communication over long distances (>1000km) remains challenging due to optical channel attenuation. This calls for investigation on developing novel encoding schemes that correct photon loss errors efficiently. In this talk, we introduce the generalization of multi-component Schrödinger cat states and propose to encode quantum information in these cat states for ultrafast quantum repeaters. We detail the quantum error correction procedures at each repeater station and characterize the performance of this novel encoding scheme given practical imperfections, such as coupling loss. A comparison with other quantum error correcting codes for bosonic modes will be discussed.

  5. Relativistic Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosler, Dominic

    In this Ph.D. thesis, I investigate the communication abilities of non-inertial observers and the precision to which they can measure parametrized states. I introduce relativistic quantum field theory with field quantisation, and the definition and transformations of mode functions in Minkowski, Schwarzschild and Rindler spaces. I introduce information theory by discussing the nature of information, defining the entropic information measures, and highlighting the differences between classical and quantum information. I review the field of relativistic quantum information. We investigate the communication abilities of an inertial observer to a relativistic observer hovering above a Schwarzschild black hole, using the Rindler approximation. We compare both classical communication and quantum entanglement generation of the state merging protocol, for both the single and dual rail encodings. We find that while classical communication remains finite right up to the horizon, the quantum entanglement generation tends to zero. We investigate the observers' abilities to precisely measure the parameter of a state that is communicated between Alice and Rob. This parameter was encoded to either the amplitudes of a single excitation state or the phase of a NOON state. With NOON states the dual rail encoding provided greater precision, which is different to the results for the other situations. The precision was maximum for a particular number of excitations in the NOON state. We calculated the bipartite communication for Alice-Rob and Alice-AntiRob beyond the single mode approximation. Rob and AntiRob are causally disconnected counter-accelerating observers. We found that Alice must choose in advance with whom, Rob or AntiRob she wants to create entanglement using a particular setup. She could communicate classically to both.

  6. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER =4.6 % for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μsat leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers.

  7. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-24

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER=4.6% for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μ_{sat} leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers. PMID:26252672

  8. Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Judy; Calder, Neil

    2007-11-01

    Few would dispute that the science of particle physics in the United States has reached a crossroads. Policies, decisions, and events of the coming decade will be critical in determining whether the United States continues to carry out a competitive program of leadership in this field of fundamental science. The field of particle physics has responded to this reality by fundamentally changing its model of communication from “business as usual” to a strategic and collaborative method that is clearly focused on achieving a healthy future for the science. Over the past half-dozen years, the particle physics community has gone from being an oft-cited example of how not to communicate effectively, to a frequently cited—and emulated—model for science communication. This review outlines the new approach toward communication in particle physics and then goes into detail about three case studies.

  9. Measurement-based quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwerger, M.; Briegel, H. J.; Dür, W.

    2016-03-01

    We review and discuss the potential of using measurement-based elements in quantum communication schemes, where certain tasks are realized with the help of entangled resource states that are processed by measurements. We consider long-range quantum communication based on the transmission of encoded quantum states, where encoding, decoding and syndrome readout are implemented using small-scale resource states. We also discuss entanglement-based schemes and consider measurement-based quantum repeaters. An important element in these schemes is entanglement purification, which can also be implemented in a measurement-based way. We analyze the influence of noise and imperfections in these schemes and show that measurement-based implementation allows for very large error thresholds of the order of 10 % noise per qubit and more. We show how to obtain optimal resource states for different tasks and discuss first experimental realizations of measurement-based quantum error correction using trapped ions and photons.

  10. Hierarchical quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chitra; Pathak, Anirban

    2013-08-01

    A general approach to study the hierarchical quantum information splitting (HQIS) is proposed and the same is used to systematically investigate the possibility of realizing HQIS using different classes of 4-qubit entangled states that are not connected by stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC). Explicit examples of HQIS using 4-qubit cluster state and 4-qubit |Ω> state are provided. Further, the proposed HQIS scheme is generalized to introduce two new aspects of hierarchical quantum communication. To be precise, schemes of probabilistic hierarchical quantum information splitting and hierarchical quantum secret sharing are obtained by modifying the proposed HQIS scheme. A number of practical situations where hierarchical quantum communication would be of use, are also presented.

  11. Strong connections between quantum encodings, nonlocality, and quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Jamie; Chailloux, André; Kerenidis, Iordanis

    2014-02-01

    Encoding information in quantum systems can offer surprising advantages but at the same time there are limitations that arise from the fact that measuring an observable may disturb the state of the quantum system. In our work, we provide an in-depth analysis of a simple question: What happens when we perform two measurements sequentially on the same quantum system? This question touches upon some fundamental properties of quantum mechanics, namely the uncertainty principle and the complementarity of quantum measurements. Our results have interesting consequences, for example, they can provide a simple proof of the optimal quantum strategy in the famous Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt game. Moreover, we show that the way information is encoded in quantum systems can provide a different perspective in understanding other fundamental aspects of quantum information, like nonlocality and quantum cryptography. We prove some strong equivalences between these notions and provide a number of applications in all areas.

  12. Quantum gloves: Quantum states that encode as much as possible chirality and nothing else

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, D.; Diosi, L.; Gisin, N.; Massar, S.; Popescu, S.

    2005-08-15

    Communicating a physical quantity cannot be done using information only - i.e., using abstract cbits and/or qubits. Rather one needs appropriate physical realizations of cbits and/or qubits. We illustrate this by considering the problem of communicating chirality. We discuss in detail the physical resources this necessitates and introduce the natural concept of quantum gloves - i.e., rotationally invariant quantum states that encode as much as possible the concept of chirality and nothing more.

  13. Noisy quantum phase communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Berihu; Trapani, Jacopo; Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2015-06-01

    We address quantum phase channels, i.e communication schemes where information is encoded in the phase-shift imposed to a given signal, and analyze their performances in the presence of phase diffusion. We evaluate mutual information for coherent and phase-coherent signals, and for both ideal and realistic phase receivers. We show that coherent signals offer better performances than phase-coherent ones, and that realistic phase channels are effective ones in the relevant regime of low energy and large alphabets.

  14. Interoperability in encoded quantum repeater networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Shota; Choi, Byung-Soo; Devitt, Simon; Suzuki, Shigeya; Van Meter, Rodney

    2016-04-01

    The future of quantum repeater networking will require interoperability between various error-correcting codes. A few specific code conversions and even a generalized method are known, however, no detailed analysis of these techniques in the context of quantum networking has been performed. In this paper we analyze a generalized procedure to create Bell pairs encoded heterogeneously between two separate codes used often in error-corrected quantum repeater network designs. We begin with a physical Bell pair and then encode each qubit in a different error-correcting code, using entanglement purification to increase the fidelity. We investigate three separate protocols for preparing the purified encoded Bell pair. We calculate the error probability of those schemes between the Steane [[7,1,3

  15. Quantum Information Theory for Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koashi, Masato

    This chapter gives a concise description of the fundamental concepts of quantum information and quantum communication, which is pertinent to the discussions in the subsequent chapters. Beginning with the basic set of rules that dictate quantum mechanics, the chapter explains the most general ways to describe quantum states, measurements, and state transformations. Convenient mathematical tools are also presented to provide an intuitive picture of a qubit, which is the simplest unit of quantum information. The chapter then elaborates on the distinction between quantum communication and classical communication, with emphasis on the role of quantum entanglement as a communication resource. Quantum teleportation and dense coding are then explained in the context of optimal resource conversions among quantum channels, classical channels, and entanglement.

  16. Quantum channel capacities: Multiparty communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demianowicz, Maciej; Horodecki, Paweł

    2006-10-01

    We analyze different aspects of multiparty communication over quantum memoryless channels and generalize some of the key results known from bipartite channels to the multiparty scenario. In particular, we introduce multiparty versions of subspace and entanglement transmission fidelities. We also provide alternative, local, versions of fidelities and show their equivalence to the global ones in context of capacity regions defined. An equivalence of two different capacity notions with respect to two types of fidelities is proven. In analogy to the bipartite case it is shown, via sufficiency of isometric encoding theorem, that additional classical forward side channel does not increase capacity region of any quantum channel with k senders and m receivers which represents a compact unit of general quantum networks theory. The result proves that recently provided capacity region of a multiple access channel [M. Horodecki , Nature 436, 673 (2005); J. Yard , e-print quant-ph/0501045], is optimal also in a scenario of an additional support of forward classical communication.

  17. Practical secure quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamanti, Eleni

    2015-05-01

    We review recent advances in the field of quantum cryptography, focusing in particular on practical implementations of two central protocols for quantum network applications, namely key distribution and coin flipping. The former allows two parties to share secret messages with information-theoretic security, even in the presence of a malicious eavesdropper in the communication channel, which is impossible with classical resources alone. The latter enables two distrustful parties to agree on a random bit, again with information-theoretic security, and with a cheating probability lower than the one that can be reached in a classical scenario. Our implementations rely on continuous-variable technology for quantum key distribution and on a plug and play discrete-variable system for coin flipping, and necessitate a rigorous security analysis adapted to the experimental schemes and their imperfections. In both cases, we demonstrate the protocols with provable security over record long distances in optical fibers and assess the performance of our systems as well as their limitations. The reported advances offer a powerful toolbox for practical applications of secure communications within future quantum networks.

  18. Minimized state complexity of quantum-encoded cryptic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Paul M.; Mahoney, John R.; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Crutchfield, James P.

    2016-05-01

    The predictive information required for proper trajectory sampling of a stochastic process can be more efficiently transmitted via a quantum channel than a classical one. This recent discovery allows quantum information processing to drastically reduce the memory necessary to simulate complex classical stochastic processes. It also points to a new perspective on the intrinsic complexity that nature must employ in generating the processes we observe. The quantum advantage increases with codeword length: the length of process sequences used in constructing the quantum communication scheme. In analogy with the classical complexity measure, statistical complexity, we use this reduced communication cost as an entropic measure of state complexity in the quantum representation. Previously difficult to compute, the quantum advantage is expressed here in closed form using spectral decomposition. This allows for efficient numerical computation of the quantum-reduced state complexity at all encoding lengths, including infinite. Additionally, it makes clear how finite-codeword reduction in state complexity is controlled by the classical process's cryptic order, and it allows asymptotic analysis of infinite-cryptic-order processes.

  19. Complete experimental toolbox for alignment-free quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Nagali, Eleonora; Walborn, Stephen P.; Aolita, Leandro; Slussarenko, Sergei; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-07-01

    Quantum communication employs the counter-intuitive features of quantum physics for tasks that are impossible in the classical world. It is crucial for testing the foundations of quantum theory and promises to revolutionize information and communication technologies. However, to execute even the simplest quantum transmission, one must establish, and maintain, a shared reference frame. This introduces a considerable overhead in resources, particularly if the parties are in motion or rotating relative to each other. Here we experimentally show how to circumvent this problem with the transmission of quantum information encoded in rotationally invariant states of single photons. By developing a complete toolbox for the efficient encoding and decoding of quantum information in such photonic qubits, we demonstrate the feasibility of alignment-free quantum key-distribution, and perform proof-of-principle demonstrations of alignment-free entanglement distribution and Bell-inequality violation. The scheme should find applications in fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and satellite-based quantum communication.

  20. Multiuser quantum communication networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Antoni; Kurzynski, Pawel; Grudka, Andrzej; Luczak, Tomasz; Gdala, Tomasz; Bednarska, Malgorzata

    2007-02-15

    We study a quantum state transfer between spins interacting with an arbitrary network of spins coupled by uniform XX interactions. It is shown that in such a system under fairly general conditions, we can expect a nearly perfect transfer of states. Then we analyze a generalization of this model to the case of many network users, where the sender can choose which party he wants to communicate with by appropriately tuning his local magnetic field. We also remark that a similar idea can be used to create an entanglement between several spins coupled to the network.

  1. Intersatellite quantum communication feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaello, Andrea; Dall'Arche, Alberto; Naletto, Giampiero; Villoresi, Paolo

    2011-08-01

    The shift in the Communication paradigm from the bit to the qubit is increasingly exploited in terrestrial long range links and networks, with strong potentials in secure communications, quantum computing and metrology. The space-to-ground quantum key distribution was also considered as feasible. A new different scenario for the quantum communications is that of the intersatellite link. In this study we focus on the extension of intersatellite communications into the quantum domain. The long distances involved and the fast relative motion are severe constraints, partially compensated by the absence of beam degradation due to the propagation in the atmosphere as well as the relatively low background noise level. We address the conception of the optical terminal and the predicted performances in the case of constellations of LEO and MEO satellite including the quantum communications and quantum teleportation.

  2. Quantum secure direct communication and deterministic secure quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gui-Lu; Deng, Fu-Guo; Wang, Chuan; Li, Xi-Han; Wen, Kai; Wang, Wan-Ying

    2007-07-01

    In this review article, we review the recent development of quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) and deterministic secure quantum communication (DSQC) which both are used to transmit secret message, including the criteria for QSDC, some interesting QSDC protocols, the DSQC protocols and QSDC network, etc. The difference between these two branches of quantum communication is that DSQC requires the two parties exchange at least one bit of classical information for reading out the message in each qubit, and QSDC does not. They are attractive because they are deterministic, in particular, the QSDC protocol is fully quantum mechanical. With sophisticated quantum technology in the future, the QSDC may become more and more popular. For ensuring the safety of QSDC with single photons and quantum information sharing of single qubit in a noisy channel, a quantum privacy amplification protocol has been proposed. It involves very simple CHC operations and reduces the information leakage to a negligible small level. Moreover, with the one-party quantum error correction, a relation has been established between classical linear codes and quantum one-party codes, hence it is convenient to transfer many good classical error correction codes to the quantum world. The one-party quantum error correction codes are especially designed for quantum dense coding and related QSDC protocols based on dense coding.

  3. Communication Capacity of Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Rallan, L.; Vedral, V.

    2000-12-01

    By considering quantum computation as a communication process, we relate its efficiency to its classical communication capacity. This formalism allows us to derive lower bounds on the complexity of search algorithms in the most general context. It enables us to link the mixedness of a quantum computer to its efficiency and also allows us to derive the critical level of mixedness beyond which there is no quantum advantage in computation.

  4. Minimal-memory realization of pearl-necklace encoders of general quantum convolutional codes

    SciTech Connect

    Houshmand, Monireh; Hosseini-Khayat, Saied

    2011-02-15

    Quantum convolutional codes, like their classical counterparts, promise to offer higher error correction performance than block codes of equivalent encoding complexity, and are expected to find important applications in reliable quantum communication where a continuous stream of qubits is transmitted. Grassl and Roetteler devised an algorithm to encode a quantum convolutional code with a ''pearl-necklace'' encoder. Despite their algorithm's theoretical significance as a neat way of representing quantum convolutional codes, it is not well suited to practical realization. In fact, there is no straightforward way to implement any given pearl-necklace structure. This paper closes the gap between theoretical representation and practical implementation. In our previous work, we presented an efficient algorithm to find a minimal-memory realization of a pearl-necklace encoder for Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) convolutional codes. This work is an extension of our previous work and presents an algorithm for turning a pearl-necklace encoder for a general (non-CSS) quantum convolutional code into a realizable quantum convolutional encoder. We show that a minimal-memory realization depends on the commutativity relations between the gate strings in the pearl-necklace encoder. We find a realization by means of a weighted graph which details the noncommutative paths through the pearl necklace. The weight of the longest path in this graph is equal to the minimal amount of memory needed to implement the encoder. The algorithm has a polynomial-time complexity in the number of gate strings in the pearl-necklace encoder.

  5. Network-Centric Quantum Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Single-photon quantum communications (QC) offers ``future-proof'' cryptographic security rooted in the laws of physics. Today's quantum-secured communications cannot be compromised by unanticipated future technological advances. But to date, QC has only existed in point-to-point instantiations that have limited ability to address the cyber security challenges of our increasingly networked world. In my talk I will describe a fundamentally new paradigm of network-centric quantum communications (NQC) that leverages the network to bring scalable, QC-based security to user groups that may have no direct user-to-user QC connectivity. With QC links only between each of N users and a trusted network node, NQC brings quantum security to N2 user pairs, and to multi-user groups. I will describe a novel integrated photonics quantum smartcard (``QKarD'') and its operation in a multi-node NQC test bed. The QKarDs are used to implement the quantum cryptographic protocols of quantum identification, quantum key distribution and quantum secret splitting. I will explain how these cryptographic primitives are used to provide key management for encryption, authentication, and non-repudiation for user-to-user communications. My talk will conclude with a description of a recent demonstration that QC can meet both the security and quality-of-service (latency) requirements for electric grid control commands and data. These requirements cannot be met simultaneously with present-day cryptography.

  6. Entanglement purification for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jian-Wei; Simon, Christoph; Brukner, Časlav; Zeilinger, Anton

    2001-04-01

    The distribution of entangled states between distant locations will be essential for the future large-scale realization of quantum communication schemes such as quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation. Because of unavoidable noise in the quantum communication channel, the entanglement between two particles is more and more degraded the further they propagate. Entanglement purification is thus essential to distil highly entangled states from less entangled ones. Existing general purification protocols are based on the quantum controlled-NOT (CNOT) or similar quantum logic operations, which are very difficult to implement experimentally. Present realizations of CNOT gates are much too imperfect to be useful for long-distance quantum communication. Here we present a scheme for the entanglement purification of general mixed entangled states, which achieves 50 per cent of the success probability of schemes based on the CNOT operation, but requires only simple linear optical elements. Because the perfection of such elements is very high, the local operations necessary for purification can be performed with the required precision. Our procedure is within the reach of current technology, and should significantly simplify the implementation of long-distance quantum communication.

  7. Entanglement purification for quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Pan, J W; Simon, C; Brukner, C; Zeilinger, A

    2001-04-26

    The distribution of entangled states between distant locations will be essential for the future large-scale realization of quantum communication schemes such as quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation. Because of unavoidable noise in the quantum communication channel, the entanglement between two particles is more and more degraded the further they propagate. Entanglement purification is thus essential to distil highly entangled states from less entangled ones. Existing general purification protocols are based on the quantum controlled-NOT (CNOT) or similar quantum logic operations, which are very difficult to implement experimentally. Present realizations of CNOT gates are much too imperfect to be useful for long-distance quantum communication. Here we present a scheme for the entanglement purification of general mixed entangled states, which achieves 50 per cent of the success probability of schemes based on the CNOT operation, but requires only simple linear optical elements. Because the perfection of such elements is very high, the local operations necessary for purification can be performed with the required precision. Our procedure is within the reach of current technology, and should significantly simplify the implementation of long-distance quantum communication. PMID:11323664

  8. A model of quantum communication device for quantum hashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we consider a model of quantum communications between classical computers aided with quantum processors, connected by a classical and a quantum channel. This type of communications implying both classical and quantum messages with moderate use of quantum processing is implicitly used in many quantum protocols, such as quantum key distribution or quantum digital signature. We show that using the model of a quantum processor on multiatomic ensembles in the common QED cavity we can speed up quantum hashing, which can be the basis of quantum digital signature and other communication protocols.

  9. Reliable quantum communication over a quantum relay channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo; Imre, Sandor

    2014-12-04

    We show that reliable quantum communication over an unreliable quantum relay channels is possible. The coding scheme combines the results on the superadditivity of quantum channels and the efficient quantum coding approaches.

  10. Quantum Discord as a Resource in Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhok, Vaibhav; Datta, Animesh

    2013-01-01

    As quantum technologies move from the issues of principle to those of practice, it is important to understand the limitations on attaining tangible quantum advantages. In the realm of quantum communication, quantum discord captures the damaging effects of a decoherent environment. This is a consequence of quantum discord quantifying the advantage of quantum coherence in quantum communication. This establishes quantum discord as a resource for quantum communication processes. We discuss this progress, which derives a quantitative relation between the yield of the fully quantum Slepian-Wolf (FQSW) protocol in the presence of noise and the quantum discord of the state involved. The significance of quantum discord in noisy versions of teleportation, super-dense coding, entanglement distillation and quantum state merging are discussed. These results lead to open questions regarding the tradeoff between quantum entanglement and discord in choosing the optimal quantum states for attaining palpable quantum advantages in noisy quantum protocols.

  11. Quantum Discord as a Resource in Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhok, Vaibhav; Datta, Animesh

    2012-06-01

    As quantum technologies move from the issues of principle to those of practice, it is important to understand the limitations on attaining tangible quantum advantages. In the realm of quantum communication, quantum discord captures the damaging effects of a decoherent environment. This is a consequence of quantum discord quantifying the advantage of quantum coherence in quantum communication. This establishes quantum discord as a resource for quantum communication processes. We discuss this progress, which derives a quantitative relation between the yield of the fully quantum Slepian-Wolf (FQSW) protocol in the presence of noise and the quantum discord of the state involved. The significance of quantum discord in noisy versions of teleportation, super-dense coding, entanglement distillation and quantum state merging are discussed. These results lead to open questions regarding the tradeoff between quantum entanglement and discord in choosing the optimal quantum states for attaining palpable quantum advantages in noisy quantum protocols.

  12. Entanglement enhances security in quantum communication

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz-Dobrzanski, Rafal; Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2009-07-15

    Secret sharing is a protocol in which a 'boss' wants to send a classical message secretly to two 'subordinates', such that none of the subordinates is able to know the message alone, while they can find it if they cooperate. Quantum mechanics is known to allow for such a possibility. We analyze tolerable quantum bit error rates in such secret sharing protocols in the physically relevant case when the eavesdropping is local with respect to the two channels of information transfer from the boss to the two subordinates. We find that using entangled encoding states is advantageous to legitimate users of the protocol. We therefore find that entanglement is useful for secure quantum communication. We also find that bound entangled states with positive partial transpose are not useful as a local eavesdropping resource. Moreover, we provide a criterion for security in secret sharing--a parallel of the Csiszar-Koerner criterion in single-receiver classical cryptography.

  13. Eavesdropping of quantum communication from a noninertial frame

    SciTech Connect

    Bradler, K.

    2007-02-15

    We introduce a relativistic version of the quantum encryption protocol by considering two inertial observers who wish to securely transmit quantum information encoded in a free scalar quantum field state forming Minkowski particles. In a nonrelativistic setting a certain amount of shared classical resources is necessary to perfectly encrypt the state. We show that in the case of a uniformly accelerated eavesdropper the communicating parties need to share (asymptotically in the limit of infinite acceleration) just half of the classical resources.

  14. Quantum direct communication with authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hwayean; Lim, Jongin; Yang, HyungJin

    2006-04-15

    We propose two quantum direct communication (QDC) protocols with user authentication. Users can identify each other by checking the correlation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states. Alice can directly send a secret message to Bob without any previously shared secret using the remaining GHZ states after authentication. Our second QDC protocol can be used even though there is no quantum link between Alice and Bob. The security of the transmitted message is guaranteed by properties of entanglement of GHZ states.

  15. Secure direct communication with a quantum one-time pad

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Fuguo; Long Guilu

    2004-05-01

    Quantum secure direct communication is the direct communication of secret messages without first producing a shared secret key. It may be used in some urgent circumstances. Here we propose a quantum secure direct communication protocol using single photons. The protocol uses batches of single photons prepared randomly in one of four different states. These single photons serve as a one-time pad which is used directly to encode the secret messages in one communication process. We also show that it is unconditionally secure. The protocol is feasible with present-day technique.

  16. On the error analysis of quantum repeaters with encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epping, Michael; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2016-03-01

    Losses of optical signals scale exponentially with the distance. Quantum repeaters are devices that tackle these losses in quantum communication by splitting the total distance into shorter parts. Today two types of quantum repeaters are subject of research in the field of quantum information: Those that use two-way communication and those that only use one-way communication. Here we explain the details of the performance analysis for repeaters of the second type. Furthermore we compare the two different schemes. Finally we show how the performance analysis generalizes to large-scale quantum networks.

  17. Quantum communication with coherent states and linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrazola, Juan Miguel; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a general mapping for encoding quantum communication protocols involving pure states of multiple qubits, unitary transformations, and projective measurements into another set of protocols that employ a coherent state of light in a linear combination of optical modes, linear-optics transformations, and measurements with single-photon threshold detectors. This provides a general framework for transforming protocols in quantum communication into a form in which they can be implemented with current technology. We explore the similarity between properties of the original qubit protocols and the coherent-state protocols obtained from the mapping and make use of the mapping to construct additional protocols in the context of quantum communication complexity and quantum digital signatures. Our results have the potential of bringing a wide class of quantum communication protocols closer to their experimental demonstration.

  18. Source encoding for orbiter communications links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using data compression to improve link efficiency as an alternative to increased transmitter power, reducing receiver noise figures, increasing antenna gain through more stringent orbiter attitude constraints, etc. is studied. A method of encoding digital data is developed which permits low band-width encoding as well as a unique system of adaptive run length encoding. The effectiveness of these techniques for the air-to-ground link and for the bandwidth-limited ground-to-ground data link used for the orbiter downlink data is evaluated. Results are presented.

  19. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communications system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the digital communication system for the direct communication links from ground to space shuttle and the links involving the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS). Three main tasks were performed:(1) Channel encoding/decoding parameter optimization for forward and reverse TDRS links,(2)integration of command encoding/decoding and channel encoding/decoding; and (3) modulation coding interface study. The general communication environment is presented to provide the necessary background for the tasks and to provide an understanding of the implications of the results of the studies.

  20. Complete experimental toolbox for alignment-free quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarrino, Fabio

    2013-03-01

    Quantum communication employs the counter-intuitive features of quantum physics for tasks that are impossible in the classical world. It is crucial for testing the foundations of quantum theory and promises to revolutionize information and communication technologies. However, to execute even the simplest quantum transmission, one must establish, and maintain, a shared reference frame. This introduces a considerable overhead in resources, particularly if the parties are in motion or rotating relative to each other. We experimentally show how to circumvent this problem with the transmission of quantum information encoded in rotationally invariant states of single photons. Our approach exploits multiple degrees of freedom of single photons. In particular, the polarization and transverse spatial modes stand out for this purpose. Just as the circular polarization states are eigenstates of the spin angular momentum of light, the helical-wavefront Laguerre-Gaussian modes are eigenmodes of its orbital angular momentum (OAM). We implement photonic qubit invariant under rotation around the optical axis by combining the polarization with OAM properties. By developing a complete toolbox for the efficient encoding and decoding of quantum information in such photonic qubits, we demonstrate the feasibility of alignment-free quantum key-distribution, and perform proof-of-principle demonstrations of alignment-free entanglement distribution and Bell-inequality violation. The core of our toolbox is a liquid crystal device, named ``q-plate,'' that maps polarization-encoded qubits into qubits encoded in hybrid polarization-OAM states of the same photon that are invariant under arbitrary rotations around the propagation direction, and vice versa. The scheme should find applications in fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and satellite-based quantum communication. We will discuss the potential applications of this scheme to real quantum communication network. European project

  1. Integrated Devices for Quantum Information with Polarization Encoded Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansoni, Linda

    Quantum information deals with the information processing tasks that can be accomplished by using the laws of quantum mechanics. Its aim is to develop suitable strategies in particular for quantum computation and quantum communication, but also for quantum metrology and quantum simulation. In this chap. 1 briefly provide an introduction to the wide range of topics concerning quantum information and recall some basic theoretical elements, to which I will refer in this thesis.

  2. Metrology for industrial quantum communications: the MIQC project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastello, M. L.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Sinclair, A. G.; Kück, S.; Chunnilall, C. J.; Porrovecchio, G.; Smid, M.; Manoocheri, F.; Ikonen, E.; Kubarsepp, T.; Stucki, D.; Hong, K. S.; Kim, S. K.; Tosi, A.; Brida, G.; Meda, A.; Piacentini, F.; Traina, P.; Natsheh, A. Al; Cheung, J. Y.; Müller, I.; Klein, R.; Vaigu, A.

    2014-12-01

    The ‘Metrology for Industrial Quantum Communication Technologies’ project (MIQC) is a metrology framework that fosters development and market take-up of quantum communication technologies and is aimed at achieving maximum impact for the European industry in this area. MIQC is focused on quantum key distribution (QKD) technologies, the most advanced quantum-based technology towards practical application. QKD is a way of sending cryptographic keys with absolute security. It does this by exploiting the ability to encode in a photon's degree of freedom specific quantum states that are noticeably disturbed if an eavesdropper trying to decode it is present in the communication channel. The MIQC project has started the development of independent measurement standards and definitions for the optical components of QKD system, since one of the perceived barriers to QKD market success is the lack of standardization and quality assurance.

  3. Secure communications using quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.

    1997-08-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as {open_quotes}key{close_quotes} material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon states to generate shared key material over multi-kilometer optical fiber paths and over line-of-sight links. In both cases, key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. In our optical fiber experiment we have performed quantum key distribution over 24-km of underground optical fiber using single-photon interference states, demonstrating that secure, real-time key generation over {open_quotes}open{close_quotes} multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links is possible. We have also constructed a quantum key distribution system for free-space, line-of-sight transmission using single-photon polarization states, which is currently undergoing laboratory testing. 7 figs.

  4. Abstract Algebra, Projective Geometry and Time Encoding of Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planat, Michel; Saniga, Metod

    2005-10-01

    Algebraic geometrical concepts are playing an increasing role in quantum applications such as coding, cryptography, tomography and computing. We point out here the prominent role played by Galois fields viewed as cyclotomic extensions of the integers modulo a prime characteristic p. They can be used to generate efficient cyclic encoding, for transmitting secrete quantum keys, for quantum state recovery and for error correction in quantum computing. Finite projective planes and their generalization are the geometric counterpart to cyclotomic concepts, their coordinatization involves Galois fields, and they have been used repetitively for enciphering and coding. Finally, the characters over Galois fields are fundamental for generating complete sets of mutually unbiased bases, a generic concept of quantum information processing and quantum entanglement. Gauss sums over Galois fields ensure minimum uncertainty under such protocols. Some Galois rings which are cyclotomic extensions of the integers modulo 4 are also becoming fashionable for their role in time encoding and mutual unbiasedness.

  5. Quantum authencryption: one-step authenticated quantum secure direct communications for off-line communicants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Luo, Yi-Ping; Yang, Chun-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Han

    2014-04-01

    This work proposes a new direction in quantum cryptography called quantum authencryption. Quantum authencryption (QA), a new term to distinguish from authenticated quantum secure direct communications, is used to describe the technique of combining quantum encryption and quantum authentication into one process for off-line communicants. QA provides a new way of quantum communications without the presence of a receiver on line, and thus makes many applications depending on secure one-way quantum communications, such as quantum E-mail systems, possible. An example protocol using single photons and one-way hash functions is presented to realize the requirements on QA.

  6. Secure communications using quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard J.; Buttler, William T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Luther, Gabriel G.; Morgan, George L.; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, C. Glen; Simmons, Charles M.

    1997-07-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as `key' material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenburg's uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal single-photon states to generate shared key material over multi-kilometer optical fiber paths and over line-of-sight links. In both cases, key material is built up using the transmission of a single- photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. In our optical fiber experiment we have performed quantum key distribution over 24-km of underground optical fiber using single-photon interference states, demonstrating that secure, real-time key generation over `open' multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links is possible.

  7. Multiplexed Sequence Encoding: A Framework for DNA Communication.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Bijan; Carr, Peter A; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic DNA has great propensity for efficiently and stably storing non-biological information. With DNA writing and reading technologies rapidly advancing, new applications for synthetic DNA are emerging in data storage and communication. Traditionally, DNA communication has focused on the encoding and transfer of complete sets of information. Here, we explore the use of DNA for the communication of short messages that are fragmented across multiple distinct DNA molecules. We identified three pivotal points in a communication-data encoding, data transfer & data extraction-and developed novel tools to enable communication via molecules of DNA. To address data encoding, we designed DNA-based individualized keyboards (iKeys) to convert plaintext into DNA, while reducing the occurrence of DNA homopolymers to improve synthesis and sequencing processes. To address data transfer, we implemented a secret-sharing system-Multiplexed Sequence Encoding (MuSE)-that conceals messages between multiple distinct DNA molecules, requiring a combination key to reveal messages. To address data extraction, we achieved the first instance of chromatogram patterning through multiplexed sequencing, thereby enabling a new method for data extraction. We envision these approaches will enable more widespread communication of information via DNA. PMID:27050646

  8. Satellite-Based Quantum Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J; Nordholt, Jane E; McCabe, Kevin P; Newell, Raymond T; Peterson, Charles G

    2010-09-20

    Single-photon quantum communications (QC) offers the attractive feature of 'future proof', forward security rooted in the laws of quantum physics. Ground based quantum key distribution (QKD) experiments in optical fiber have attained transmission ranges in excess of 200km, but for larger distances we proposed a methodology for satellite-based QC. Over the past decade we have devised solutions to the technical challenges to satellite-to-ground QC, and we now have a clear concept for how space-based QC could be performed and potentially utilized within a trusted QKD network architecture. Functioning as a trusted QKD node, a QC satellite ('QC-sat') could deliver secret keys to the key stores of ground-based trusted QKD network nodes, to each of which multiple users are connected by optical fiber or free-space QC. A QC-sat could thereby extend quantum-secured connectivity to geographically disjoint domains, separated by continental or inter-continental distances. In this paper we describe our system concept that makes QC feasible with low-earth orbit (LEO) QC-sats (200-km-2,000-km altitude orbits), and the results of link modeling of expected performance. Using the architecture that we have developed, LEO satellite-to-ground QKD will be feasible with secret bit yields of several hundred 256-bit AES keys per contact. With multiple ground sites separated by {approx} 100km, mitigation of cloudiness over any single ground site would be possible, potentially allowing multiple contact opportunities each day. The essential next step is an experimental QC-sat. A number of LEO-platforms would be suitable, ranging from a dedicated, three-axis stabilized small satellite, to a secondary experiment on an imaging satellite. to the ISS. With one or more QC-sats, low-latency quantum-secured communications could then be provided to ground-based users on a global scale. Air-to-ground QC would also be possible.

  9. Multiplexed Sequence Encoding: A Framework for DNA Communication

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Bijan; Carr, Peter A.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic DNA has great propensity for efficiently and stably storing non-biological information. With DNA writing and reading technologies rapidly advancing, new applications for synthetic DNA are emerging in data storage and communication. Traditionally, DNA communication has focused on the encoding and transfer of complete sets of information. Here, we explore the use of DNA for the communication of short messages that are fragmented across multiple distinct DNA molecules. We identified three pivotal points in a communication—data encoding, data transfer & data extraction—and developed novel tools to enable communication via molecules of DNA. To address data encoding, we designed DNA-based individualized keyboards (iKeys) to convert plaintext into DNA, while reducing the occurrence of DNA homopolymers to improve synthesis and sequencing processes. To address data transfer, we implemented a secret-sharing system—Multiplexed Sequence Encoding (MuSE)—that conceals messages between multiple distinct DNA molecules, requiring a combination key to reveal messages. To address data extraction, we achieved the first instance of chromatogram patterning through multiplexed sequencing, thereby enabling a new method for data extraction. We envision these approaches will enable more widespread communication of information via DNA. PMID:27050646

  10. Recent advances on integrated quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orieux, Adeline; Diamanti, Eleni

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the use of integrated technologies for applications in the field of quantum information processing and communications has made great progress. The resulting devices feature valuable characteristics such as scalability, reproducibility, low cost and interconnectivity, and have the potential to revolutionize our computation and communication practices in the future, much in the way that electronic integrated circuits have drastically transformed our information processing capacities since the last century. Among the multiple applications of integrated quantum technologies, this review will focus on typical components of quantum communication systems and on overall integrated system operation characteristics. We are interested in particular in the use of photonic integration platforms for developing devices necessary in quantum communications, including sources, detectors and both passive and active optical elements. We also illustrate the challenges associated with performing quantum communications on chip, by using the case study of quantum key distribution—the most advanced application of quantum information science. We conclude with promising perspectives in this field.

  11. Multiparty controlled quantum secure direct communication based on quantum search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Shih-Hung; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a new controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC) protocol using the quantum search algorithm as the encoding function is proposed. The proposed protocol is based on the multi-particle Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entangled state and the one-step quantum transmission strategy. Due to the one-step transmission of qubits, the proposed protocol can be easily extended to a multi-controller environment, and is also free from the Trojan horse attacks. The analysis shows that the use of quantum search algorithm in the construction of CQSDC appears very promising.

  12. Spatially encoded multiple-quantum excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridge, Clark D.; Borvayeh, Leila; Walls, Jamie D.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we present a simple method to spatially encode the transition frequencies of nuclear spin transitions and to read out these frequencies within a single scan. The experiment works by combining pulsed field gradients with an excitation sequence that selectively excites spin transitions within certain sample regions. After the initial excitation, imaging the resulting widehat{z}-magnetization is used to determine the locations where the excitations occurred, from which the corresponding transition frequencies are determined. Simple experimental demonstrations of this technique on one- and two-spin systems are presented.

  13. Entanglement enhances security in quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkowicz-Dobrzański, Rafał; Sen(de), Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2009-07-01

    Secret sharing is a protocol in which a “boss” wants to send a classical message secretly to two “subordinates,” such that none of the subordinates is able to know the message alone, while they can find it if they cooperate. Quantum mechanics is known to allow for such a possibility. We analyze tolerable quantum bit error rates in such secret sharing protocols in the physically relevant case when the eavesdropping is local with respect to the two channels of information transfer from the boss to the two subordinates. We find that using entangled encoding states is advantageous to legitimate users of the protocol. We therefore find that entanglement is useful for secure quantum communication. We also find that bound entangled states with positive partial transpose are not useful as a local eavesdropping resource. Moreover, we provide a criterion for security in secret sharing—a parallel of the Csiszár-Körner criterion in single-receiver classical cryptography.

  14. Atmospheric continuous-variable quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, B.; Peuntinger, C.; Killoran, N.; Khan, I.; Wittmann, C.; Marquardt, Ch; Leuchs, G.

    2014-11-01

    We present a quantum communication experiment conducted over a point-to-point free-space link of 1.6 km in urban conditions. We study atmospheric influences on the capability of the link to act as a continuous-variable (CV) quantum channel. Continuous polarization states (that contain the signal encoding as well as a local oscillator (LO) in the same spatial mode) are prepared and sent over the link in a polarization multiplexed setting. Both signal and LO undergo the same atmospheric fluctuations. These are intrinsically auto-compensated which removes detrimental influences on the interferometric visibility. At the receiver, we measure the Q-function and interpret the data using the framework of effective entanglement (EE). We compare different state amplitudes and alphabets (two-state and four-state) and determine their optimal working points with respect to the distributed EE. Based on the high entanglement transmission rates achieved, our system indicates the high potential of atmospheric links in the field of CV quantum key distribution.

  15. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannous, C.; Langlois, J.

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  16. Software-defined Quantum Communication Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Sadlier, Ronald J

    2013-01-01

    We show how to extend the paradigm of software-defined communication to include quantum communication systems. We introduce the decomposition of a quantum communication terminal into layers separating the concerns of the hardware, software, and middleware. We provide detailed descriptions of how each component operates and we include results of an implementation of the super-dense coding protocol. We argue that the versatility of software-defined quantum communication test beds can be useful for exploring new regimes in communication and rapidly prototyping new systems.

  17. Novel systems and methods for quantum communication, quantum computation, and quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, Alexey Vyacheslavovich

    Precise control over quantum systems can enable the realization of fascinating applications such as powerful computers, secure communication devices, and simulators that can elucidate the physics of complex condensed matter systems. However, the fragility of quantum effects makes it very difficult to harness the power of quantum mechanics. In this thesis, we present novel systems and tools for gaining fundamental insights into the complex quantum world and for bringing practical applications of quantum mechanics closer to reality. We first optimize and show equivalence between a wide range of techniques for storage of photons in atomic ensembles. We describe experiments demonstrating the potential of our optimization algorithms for quantum communication and computation applications. Next, we combine the technique of photon storage with strong atom-atom interactions to propose a robust protocol for implementing the two-qubit photonic phase gate, which is an important ingredient in many quantum computation and communication tasks. In contrast to photon storage, many quantum computation and simulation applications require individual addressing of closely-spaced atoms, ions, quantum dots, or solid state defects. To meet this requirement, we propose a method for coherent optical far-field manipulation of quantum systems with a resolution that is not limited by the wavelength of radiation. While alkali atoms are currently the system of choice for photon storage and many other applications, we develop new methods for quantum information processing and quantum simulation with ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in optical lattices. We show how multiple qubits can be encoded in individual alkaline-earth atoms and harnessed for quantum computing and precision measurements applications. We also demonstrate that alkaline-earth atoms can be used to simulate highly symmetric systems exhibiting spin-orbital interactions and capable of providing valuable insights into strongly

  18. Ultrafast and fault-tolerant quantum communication across long distances.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D; Jiang, Liang

    2014-06-27

    Quantum repeaters (QRs) provide a way of enabling long distance quantum communication by establishing entangled qubits between remote locations. In this Letter, we investigate a new approach to QRs in which quantum information can be faithfully transmitted via a noisy channel without the use of long distance teleportation, thus eliminating the need to establish remote entangled links. Our approach makes use of small encoding blocks to fault-tolerantly correct both operational and photon loss errors. We describe a way to optimize the resource requirement for these QRs with the aim of the generation of a secure key. Numerical calculations indicate that the number of quantum memory bits at each repeater station required for the generation of one secure key has favorable polylogarithmic scaling with the distance across which the communication is desired. PMID:25014798

  19. Quantum communication with an accelerated partner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, T. G.; Ralph, T. C.; Walk, N.

    2013-01-01

    An unsolved problem in relativistic quantum information research is how to model efficient, directional quantum communication between localized parties in a fully quantum field-theoretical framework. We propose a tractable approach to this problem based on calculating expectation values of localized field observables in the Heisenberg picture. We illustrate our approach by analyzing, and obtaining approximate analytical solutions to, the problem of communicating coherent states between an inertial sender, Alice, and an accelerated receiver, Rob. We use these results to determine the efficiency with which continuous variable quantum key distribution could be carried out over such a communication channel.

  20. Long distance quantum communication using quantum error correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingrich, R. M.; Lee, H.; Dowling, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a quantum error correction scheme that can increase the effective absorption length of the communication channel. This device can play the role of a quantum transponder when placed in series, or a cyclic quantum memory when inserted in an optical loop.

  1. Quantum-dots-encoded-microbeads based molecularly imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixi; Liu, Le; He, Yonghong; He, Qinghua; Ma, Hui

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots encoded microbeads have various advantages such as large surface area, superb optical properties and the ability of multiplexing. Molecularly imprinted polymer that can mimic the natural recognition entities has high affinity and selectivity for the specific analyte. Here, the concept of utilizing the quantum dots encoded microbeads as the supporting material and the polydopamine as the functional monomer to form the core-shell molecular imprinted polymer was proposed for the first time. The resulted imprinted polymer can provide various merits: polymerization can complete in aqueous environment; fabrication procedure is facile and universal; the obvious economic advantage; the thickness of the imprinting layer is highly controllable; polydopamine coating can improve the biocompatibility of the quantum dot encoded microbeads. The rabbit IgG binding and flow cytometer experiment result showed the distinct advantages of this strategy: cost-saving, facile and fast preparation procedure. Most importantly, the ability for the multichannel detection, which makes the imprinted polydopamine modified encoded-beads very attractive in protein pre-concentration, recognition, separation and biosensing. PMID:26520251

  2. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D; Jiang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥ 1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances. PMID:26876670

  3. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-02-01

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances.

  4. Optimal architectures for long distance quantum communication

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Sreraman; Li, Linshu; Kim, Jungsang; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous progress of quantum cryptography, efficient quantum communication over long distances (≥1000 km) remains an outstanding challenge due to fiber attenuation and operation errors accumulated over the entire communication distance. Quantum repeaters (QRs), as a promising approach, can overcome both photon loss and operation errors, and hence significantly speedup the communication rate. Depending on the methods used to correct loss and operation errors, all the proposed QR schemes can be classified into three categories (generations). Here we present the first systematic comparison of three generations of quantum repeaters by evaluating the cost of both temporal and physical resources, and identify the optimized quantum repeater architecture for a given set of experimental parameters for use in quantum key distribution. Our work provides a roadmap for the experimental realizations of highly efficient quantum networks over transcontinental distances. PMID:26876670

  5. Multiparty-controlled quantum secure direct communication

    SciTech Connect

    Xiu, X.-M. Dong, L.; Gao, Y.-J.; Chi, F.

    2007-12-15

    A theoretical scheme of a multiparty-controlled quantum secure direct communication is proposed. The supervisor prepares a communication network with Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs and auxiliary particles. After passing a security test of the communication network, a supervisor tells the users the network is secure and they can communicate. If the controllers allow the communicators to communicate, the controllers should perform measurements and inform the communicators of the outcomes. The communicators then begin to communicate after they perform a security test of the quantum channel and verify that it is secure. The recipient can decrypt the secret message in a classical message from the sender depending on the protocol. Any two users in the network can communicate through the above processes under the control of the supervisor and the controllers.

  6. Secure communication via quantum illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Zhang, Zheshen; Wong, Franco N. C.

    2014-10-01

    In the quantum illumination protocol for secure communication, Alice prepares entangled signal and idler beams via spontaneous parametric downconversion. She sends the signal beam to Bob, while retaining the idler. Bob imposes message modulation on the beam he receives from Alice, amplifies it, and sends it back to her. Alice then decodes Bob's information by making a joint quantum measurement on the light she has retained and the light she has received from him. The basic performance analysis for this protocol—which demonstrates its immunity to passive eavesdropping, in which Eve can only listen to Alice and Bob's transmissions—is reviewed, along with the results of its first proof-of-principle experiment. Further analysis is then presented, showing that secure data rates in excess of 1 Gbps may be possible over 20-km-long fiber links with technology that is available or under development. Finally, an initial scheme for thwarting active eavesdropping, in which Eve injects her own light into Bob's terminal, is proposed and analyzed.

  7. Secure quantum communication using classical correlated channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, D.; de Almeida, N. G.; Villas-Boas, C. J.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a secure protocol to send quantum information from one part to another without a quantum channel. In our protocol, which resembles quantum teleportation, a sender (Alice) and a receiver (Bob) share classical correlated states instead of EPR ones, with Alice performing measurements in two different bases and then communicating her results to Bob through a classical channel. Our secure quantum communication protocol requires the same amount of classical bits as the standard quantum teleportation protocol. In our scheme, as in the usual quantum teleportation protocol, once the classical channel is established in a secure way, a spy (Eve) will never be able to recover the information of the unknown quantum state, even if she is aware of Alice's measurement results. Security, advantages, and limitations of our protocol are discussed and compared with the standard quantum teleportation protocol.

  8. Recent progress of quantum communication in China (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    Quantum communication, based on the quantum physics, can provide information theoretical security. Building a global quantum network is one ultimate goal for the research of quantum information. Here, this talk will review the progress for quantum communication in China, including quantum key distribution over metropolitan area with untrustful relay, field test of quantum entanglement swapping over metropolitan network, the 2000 km quantum key distribution main trunk line, and satellite based quantum communication.

  9. Long-distance quantum communication over noisy networks without long-time quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, Paweł; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Łodyga, Justyna; Pankowski, Łukasz; PrzysieŻna, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The problem of sharing entanglement over large distances is crucial for implementations of quantum cryptography. A possible scheme for long-distance entanglement sharing and quantum communication exploits networks whose nodes share Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs. In Perseguers et al. [Phys. Rev. A 78, 062324 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.062324] the authors put forward an important isomorphism between storing quantum information in a dimension D and transmission of quantum information in a D +1 -dimensional network. We show that it is possible to obtain long-distance entanglement in a noisy two-dimensional (2D) network, even when taking into account that encoding and decoding of a state is exposed to an error. For 3D networks we propose a simple encoding and decoding scheme based solely on syndrome measurements on 2D Kitaev topological quantum memory. Our procedure constitutes an alternative scheme of state injection that can be used for universal quantum computation on 2D Kitaev code. It is shown that the encoding scheme is equivalent to teleporting the state, from a specific node into a whole two-dimensional network, through some virtual EPR pair existing within the rest of network qubits. We present an analytic lower bound on fidelity of the encoding and decoding procedure, using as our main tool a modified metric on space-time lattice, deviating from a taxicab metric at the first and the last time slices.

  10. Quantum Communication Experiments Over Optical Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takesue, Hiroki

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is expected to be the first application of quantum information to be realized as a practical system. In the last decade, research on QKD made significant progress both in concept and technology. In this chapter, we review the progress of technologies designed to realize high-speed and long-distance quantum communication over optical fiber, focusing on the results obtained by NTT. The first section describes a roadmap towards scalable quantum communications, which is composed of three phases. The second section reviews our effort to realize phase 1 quantum communication systems, namely point-to-point QKD systems based on the differential phase shift QKD (DPS-QKD) protocol. The third section describes entanglement generation and application in the telecom band, which are the key technologies for realizing phase 2 and 3 systems. The final section provides a summary and describes the future outlook.

  11. Software-defined Quantum Communication Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Sadlier, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    Quantum communication systems harness modern physics through state-of-the-art optical engineering to provide revolutionary capabilities. An important concern for quantum communication engineering is designing and prototyping these systems to prototype proposed capabilities. We apply the paradigm of software-defined communica- tion for engineering quantum communication systems to facilitate rapid prototyping and prototype comparisons. We detail how to decompose quantum communication terminals into functional layers defining hardware, software, and middleware concerns, and we describe how each layer behaves. Using the super-dense coding protocol as a test case, we describe implementations of both the transmitter and receiver, and we present results from numerical simulations of the behavior. We find that while the theoretical benefits of super dense coding are maintained, there is a classical overhead associated with the full implementation.

  12. Data detection algorithms for multiplexed quantum dot encoding.

    PubMed

    Goss, Kelly C; Messier, Geoff G; Potter, Mike E

    2012-02-27

    A group of quantum dots can be designed to have a unique spectral emission by varying the size of the quantum dots (wavelength) and number of quantum dots (intensity). This technique has been previously proposed for biological tags and object identification. The potential of this system lies in the ability to have a large number of distinguishable wavelengths and intensity levels. This paper presents a communications system model for MxQDs including the interference between neighbouring QD colours and detector noise. An analytical model of the signal-to-noise ratio of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) spectrometer is presented and confirmed with experimental results. We then apply a communications system perspective and propose data detection algorithms that increase the readability of the quantum dots tags. It is demonstrated that multiplexed quantum dot barcodes can be read with 99.7% accuracy using the proposed data detection algorithms in a system with 6 colours and 6 intensity values resulting in 46,655 unique spectral codes. PMID:22418382

  13. The Holy Grail of quantum optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2014-12-01

    Optical parametric amplifiers together with phase-shifters and beamsplitters have certainly been the most studied objects in the field of quantum optics. Despite such an intensive study, optical parametric amplifiers still keep secrets from us. We will show how they hold the answer to one of the oldest problems in quantum communication theory, namely the calculation of the optimal communication rate of optical channels.

  14. The Holy Grail of quantum optical communication

    SciTech Connect

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2014-12-04

    Optical parametric amplifiers together with phase-shifters and beamsplitters have certainly been the most studied objects in the field of quantum optics. Despite such an intensive study, optical parametric amplifiers still keep secrets from us. We will show how they hold the answer to one of the oldest problems in quantum communication theory, namely the calculation of the optimal communication rate of optical channels.

  15. Entanglement-Based Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-03-01

    Quantum entanglement, to Erwin Schroedinger the essential feature of quantum mechanics, has become a central resource in various quantum communication protocols including quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation. From a fundamental point of view what is exploited in these experiments is the very fact which led Schroedinger to his statement namely that in entangled states joint properties of the entangled systems may be well defined while the individual subsystems may carry no information at all. In entanglement-based quantum cryptography it leads to the most elegant possible solution of the classic key distribution problem. It implies that the key comes into existence at spatially distant location at the same time and does not need to be transported. A number recent developments include for example highly efficient, robust and stable sources of entangled photons with a broad bandwidth of desired features. Also, entanglement-based quantum cryptography is successfully joining other methods in the work towards demonstrating quantum key distribution networks. Along that line recently decoy-state quantum cryptography over a distance of 144 km between two Canary Islands was demonstrated successfully. Such experiments also open up the possibility of quantum communication on a really large scale using LEO satellites. Another important possible future branch of quantum communication involves quantum repeaters in order to cover larger distances with entangled states. Recently the connection of two fully independent lasers in an entanglement swapping experiment did demonstrate that the timing control of such systems on a femtosecond time scale is possible. A related development includes recent demonstrations of all-optical one-way quantum computation schemes with the extremely short cycle time of only 100 nanoseconds.

  16. High-fidelity linear optical quantum computing with polarization encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Spedalieri, Federico M.; Lee, Hwang; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-15

    We show that the KLM scheme [Knill, Laflamme, and Milburn, Nature 409, 46 (2001)] can be implemented using polarization encoding, thus reducing the number of path modes required by half. One of the main advantages of this new implementation is that it naturally incorporates a loss detection mechanism that makes the probability of a gate introducing a non-detected error, when non-ideal detectors are considered, dependent only on the detector dark-count rate and independent of its efficiency. Since very low dark-count rate detectors are currently available, a high-fidelity gate (probability of error of order 10{sup -6} conditional on the gate being successful) can be implemented using polarization encoding. The detector efficiency determines the overall success probability of the gate but does not affect its fidelity. This can be applied to the efficient construction of optical cluster states with very high fidelity for quantum computing.

  17. Quantum communication with macroscopically bright nonclassical states.

    PubMed

    Usenko, Vladyslav C; Ruppert, Laszlo; Filip, Radim

    2015-11-30

    We analyze homodyne detection of macroscopically bright multimode nonclassical states of light and propose their application in quantum communication. We observe that the homodyne detection is sensitive to a mode-matching of the bright light to the highly intense local oscillator. Unmatched bright modes of light result in additional noise which technically limits detection of Gaussian entanglement at macroscopic level. When the mode-matching is sufficient, we show that multimode quantum key distribution with bright beams is feasible. It finally merges the quantum communication with classical optical technology of visible beams of light. PMID:26698776

  18. Nonperturbative approach to relativistic quantum communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landulfo, André G. S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the transmission of both classical and quantum information between two arbitrary observers in globally hyperbolic spacetimes using a quantum field as a communication channel. The field is supposed to be in some arbitrary quasifree state and no choice of representation of its canonical commutation relations is made. Both sender and receiver possess some localized two-level quantum system with which they can interact with the quantum field to prepare the input and receive the output of the channel, respectively. The interaction between the two-level systems and the quantum field is such that one can trace out the field degrees of freedom exactly and thus obtain the quantum channel in a nonperturbative way. We end the paper determining the unassisted as well as the entanglement-assisted classical and quantum channel capacities.

  19. Nonlocal Quantum Information Transfer Without Superluminal Signalling and Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walleczek, Jan; Grössing, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    It is a frequent assumption that—via superluminal information transfers—superluminal signals capable of enabling communication are necessarily exchanged in any quantum theory that posits hidden superluminal influences. However, does the presence of hidden superluminal influences automatically imply superluminal signalling and communication? The non-signalling theorem mediates the apparent conflict between quantum mechanics and the theory of special relativity. However, as a `no-go' theorem there exist two opposing interpretations of the non-signalling constraint: foundational and operational. Concerning Bell's theorem, we argue that Bell employed both interpretations, and that he finally adopted the operational position which is associated often with ontological quantum theory, e.g., de Broglie-Bohm theory. This position we refer to as "effective non-signalling". By contrast, associated with orthodox quantum mechanics is the foundational position referred to here as "axiomatic non-signalling". In search of a decisive communication-theoretic criterion for differentiating between "axiomatic" and "effective" non-signalling, we employ the operational framework offered by Shannon's mathematical theory of communication, whereby we distinguish between Shannon signals and non-Shannon signals. We find that an effective non-signalling theorem represents two sub-theorems: (1) Non-transfer-control (NTC) theorem, and (2) Non-signification-control (NSC) theorem. Employing NTC and NSC theorems, we report that effective, instead of axiomatic, non-signalling is entirely sufficient for prohibiting nonlocal communication. Effective non-signalling prevents the instantaneous, i.e., superluminal, transfer of message-encoded information through the controlled use—by a sender-receiver pair —of informationally-correlated detection events, e.g., in EPR-type experiments. An effective non-signalling theorem allows for nonlocal quantum information transfer yet—at the same time

  20. Communication: Quantum mechanics without wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, Jeremy; Poirier, Bill

    2012-01-21

    We present a self-contained formulation of spin-free non-relativistic quantum mechanics that makes no use of wavefunctions or complex amplitudes of any kind. Quantum states are represented as ensembles of real-valued quantum trajectories, obtained by extremizing an action and satisfying energy conservation. The theory applies for arbitrary configuration spaces and system dimensionalities. Various beneficial ramifications--theoretical, computational, and interpretational--are discussed.

  1. An exactly solvable model for quantum communications.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graeme; Smolin, John A

    2013-12-12

    Information theory establishes the ultimate limits on performance for noisy communication systems. Accurate models of physical communication devices must include quantum effects, but these typically make the theory intractable. As a result, communication capacities--the maximum possible rates of data transmission--are not known, even for transmission between two users connected by an electromagnetic waveguide with Gaussian noise. Here we present an exactly solvable model of communication with a fully quantum electromagnetic field. This gives explicit expressions for all point-to-point capacities of noisy quantum channels, with implications for quantum key distribution and fibre-optic communications. We also develop a theory of quantum communication networks by solving some rudimentary models including broadcast and multiple-access channels. We compare the predictions of our model with the orthodox Gaussian model and in all cases find agreement to within a few bits. At high signal-to-noise ratios, our simple model captures the relevant physics while remaining amenable to exact solution. PMID:24240277

  2. A Novel Quantum Covert Channel Protocol Based on Any Quantum Secure Direct Communication Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shu-Jiang; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-05-01

    By analyzing the basic properties of unitary transformations used in a quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol, we show the main idea why a covert channel can be established within any QSDC channel which employs unitary transformations to encode information. On the basis of the fact that the unitary transformations used in a QSDC protocol are secret and independent, a novel quantum covert channel protocol is proposed to transfer secret messages with unconditional security. The performance, including the imperceptibility, capacity and security of the proposed protocol are analyzed in detail.

  3. Graphene-based qubits in quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. Y.; Lue, N.-Y.

    2012-07-01

    We explore the potential application of graphene-based qubits in photonic quantum communications. In particular, the valley pair qubit in double quantum dots of gapped graphene is investigated as a quantum memory in the implementation of quantum repeaters. For the application envisioned here, our work extends the recent study of the qubit [Wu , arXiv:1104.0443; Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.84.195463 84, 195463 (2011)] to the case where the qubit is placed in an in-plane magnetic field configuration. It develops, for the configuration, a method of qubit manipulation, based on a unique ac electric field-induced, valley-orbit interaction-derived mechanism in gapped graphene. It also studies the optical response of graphene quantum dots in the configuration, in terms of valley excitation with respect to photonic polarization, and illustrates faithful photon ↔ valley quantum state transfers. This work suggests the interesting prospect of an all-graphene approach for the solid state components of a quantum network, e.g., quantum computers and quantum memories in communications.

  4. Repeated quantum error correction on a continuously encoded qubit by real-time feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, J.; Kalb, N.; Rol, M. A.; Hensen, B.; Blok, M. S.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Hanson, R.; Taminiau, T. H.

    2016-05-01

    Reliable quantum information processing in the face of errors is a major fundamental and technological challenge. Quantum error correction protects quantum states by encoding a logical quantum bit (qubit) in multiple physical qubits. To be compatible with universal fault-tolerant computations, it is essential that states remain encoded at all times and that errors are actively corrected. Here we demonstrate such active error correction on a continuously protected logical qubit using a diamond quantum processor. We encode the logical qubit in three long-lived nuclear spins, repeatedly detect phase errors by non-destructive measurements, and apply corrections by real-time feedback. The actively error-corrected qubit is robust against errors and encoded quantum superposition states are preserved beyond the natural dephasing time of the best physical qubit in the encoding. These results establish a powerful platform to investigate error correction under different types of noise and mark an important step towards fault-tolerant quantum information processing.

  5. Controlled Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Yao-Hsin; Lin, Yu-Ting; Zeng, Guo-Jyun; Lin, Fang-Jhu; Chen, Chi-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel protocol for controlled bidirectional quantum secure communication based on a nonlocal swap gate scheme. Our proposed protocol would be applied to a system in which a controller (supervisor/Charlie) controls the bidirectional communication with quantum information or secret messages between legitimate users (Alice and Bob). In this system, the legitimate users must obtain permission from the controller in order to exchange their respective quantum information or secret messages simultaneously; the controller is unable to obtain any quantum information or secret messages from the decoding process. Moreover, the presence of the controller also avoids the problem of one legitimate user receiving the quantum information or secret message before the other, and then refusing to help the other user decode the quantum information or secret message. Our proposed protocol is aimed at protecting against external and participant attacks on such a system, and the cost of transmitting quantum bits using our protocol is less than that achieved in other studies. Based on the nonlocal swap gate scheme, the legitimate users exchange their quantum information or secret messages without transmission in a public channel, thus protecting against eavesdroppers stealing the secret messages. PMID:25006596

  6. Enhanced quantum communication via optical refocusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Pirandola, Stefano; Mancini, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth

    2011-07-01

    We consider the problem of quantum communication mediated by a passive optical refocusing system. The model captures the basic features of all those situations in which a signal is either refocused by a repeater for long-distance communication, or it is focused on a detector prior to the information decoding process. Introducing a general method for linear passive optical systems, we determine the conditions under which optical refocusing implies information transmission gain. Although the finite aperture of the repeater may cause loss of information, we show that the presence of the refocusing system can substantially enhance the rate of reliable communication with respect to the free-space propagation. We explicitly address the transferring of classical messages over the quantum channel, but the results can be easily extended to include the case of transferring quantum messages as well.

  7. Secure quantum private information retrieval using phase-encoded queries

    SciTech Connect

    Olejnik, Lukasz

    2011-08-15

    We propose a quantum solution to the classical private information retrieval (PIR) problem, which allows one to query a database in a private manner. The protocol offers privacy thresholds and allows the user to obtain information from a database in a way that offers the potential adversary, in this model the database owner, no possibility of deterministically establishing the query contents. This protocol may also be viewed as a solution to the symmetrically private information retrieval problem in that it can offer database security (inability for a querying user to steal its contents). Compared to classical solutions, the protocol offers substantial improvement in terms of communication complexity. In comparison with the recent quantum private queries [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 230502 (2008)] protocol, it is more efficient in terms of communication complexity and the number of rounds, while offering a clear privacy parameter. We discuss the security of the protocol and analyze its strengths and conclude that using this technique makes it challenging to obtain the unconditional (in the information-theoretic sense) privacy degree; nevertheless, in addition to being simple, the protocol still offers a privacy level. The oracle used in the protocol is inspired both by the classical computational PIR solutions as well as the Deutsch-Jozsa oracle.

  8. Secure quantum private information retrieval using phase-encoded queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejnik, Lukasz

    2011-08-01

    We propose a quantum solution to the classical private information retrieval (PIR) problem, which allows one to query a database in a private manner. The protocol offers privacy thresholds and allows the user to obtain information from a database in a way that offers the potential adversary, in this model the database owner, no possibility of deterministically establishing the query contents. This protocol may also be viewed as a solution to the symmetrically private information retrieval problem in that it can offer database security (inability for a querying user to steal its contents). Compared to classical solutions, the protocol offers substantial improvement in terms of communication complexity. In comparison with the recent quantum private queries [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.230502 100, 230502 (2008)] protocol, it is more efficient in terms of communication complexity and the number of rounds, while offering a clear privacy parameter. We discuss the security of the protocol and analyze its strengths and conclude that using this technique makes it challenging to obtain the unconditional (in the information-theoretic sense) privacy degree; nevertheless, in addition to being simple, the protocol still offers a privacy level. The oracle used in the protocol is inspired both by the classical computational PIR solutions as well as the Deutsch-Jozsa oracle.

  9. Two-photon interference at telecom wavelengths for time-bin-encoded single photons from quantum-dot spin qubits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Leo; Natarajan, Chandra M; Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Langrock, Carsten; Pelc, Jason S; Tanner, Michael G; Abe, Eisuke; Maier, Sebastian; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Hadfield, Robert H; Fejer, Martin M; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Practical quantum communication between remote quantum memories rely on single photons at telecom wavelengths. Although spin-photon entanglement has been demonstrated in atomic and solid-state qubit systems, the produced single photons at short wavelengths and with polarization encoding are not suitable for long-distance communication, because they suffer from high propagation loss and depolarization in optical fibres. Establishing entanglement between remote quantum nodes would further require the photons generated from separate nodes to be indistinguishable. Here, we report the observation of correlations between a quantum-dot spin and a telecom single photon across a 2-km fibre channel based on time-bin encoding and background-free frequency downconversion. The downconverted photon at telecom wavelengths exhibits two-photon interference with another photon from an independent source, achieving a mean wavepacket overlap of greater than 0.89 despite their original wavelength mismatch (900 and 911 nm). The quantum-networking operations that we demonstrate will enable practical communication between solid-state spin qubits across long distances. PMID:26597223

  10. Two-photon interference at telecom wavelengths for time-bin-encoded single photons from quantum-dot spin qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Leo; Natarajan, Chandra M.; Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Langrock, Carsten; Pelc, Jason S.; Tanner, Michael G.; Abe, Eisuke; Maier, Sebastian; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Hadfield, Robert H.; Fejer, Martin M.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Practical quantum communication between remote quantum memories rely on single photons at telecom wavelengths. Although spin-photon entanglement has been demonstrated in atomic and solid-state qubit systems, the produced single photons at short wavelengths and with polarization encoding are not suitable for long-distance communication, because they suffer from high propagation loss and depolarization in optical fibres. Establishing entanglement between remote quantum nodes would further require the photons generated from separate nodes to be indistinguishable. Here, we report the observation of correlations between a quantum-dot spin and a telecom single photon across a 2-km fibre channel based on time-bin encoding and background-free frequency downconversion. The downconverted photon at telecom wavelengths exhibits two-photon interference with another photon from an independent source, achieving a mean wavepacket overlap of greater than 0.89 despite their original wavelength mismatch (900 and 911 nm). The quantum-networking operations that we demonstrate will enable practical communication between solid-state spin qubits across long distances.

  11. Two-photon interference at telecom wavelengths for time-bin-encoded single photons from quantum-dot spin qubits

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Leo; Natarajan, Chandra M.; Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Langrock, Carsten; Pelc, Jason S.; Tanner, Michael G.; Abe, Eisuke; Maier, Sebastian; Schneider, Christian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Hadfield, Robert H.; Fejer, Martin M.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Practical quantum communication between remote quantum memories rely on single photons at telecom wavelengths. Although spin-photon entanglement has been demonstrated in atomic and solid-state qubit systems, the produced single photons at short wavelengths and with polarization encoding are not suitable for long-distance communication, because they suffer from high propagation loss and depolarization in optical fibres. Establishing entanglement between remote quantum nodes would further require the photons generated from separate nodes to be indistinguishable. Here, we report the observation of correlations between a quantum-dot spin and a telecom single photon across a 2-km fibre channel based on time-bin encoding and background-free frequency downconversion. The downconverted photon at telecom wavelengths exhibits two-photon interference with another photon from an independent source, achieving a mean wavepacket overlap of greater than 0.89 despite their original wavelength mismatch (900 and 911 nm). The quantum-networking operations that we demonstrate will enable practical communication between solid-state spin qubits across long distances. PMID:26597223

  12. Multiparty Controlled Deterministic Secure Quantum Communication Through Entanglement Swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Li; Xiu, Xiao-Ming; Gao, Ya-Jun; Chi, Feng

    A three-party controlled deterministic secure quantum communication scheme through entanglement swapping is proposed firstly. In the scheme, the sender needs to prepare a class of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states which are used as quantum channel. The two communicators may securely communicate under the control of the controller if the quantum channel is safe. The roles of the sender, the receiver, and the controller can be exchanged owing to the symmetry of the quantum channel. Different from other controlled quantum secure communication schemes, the scheme needs lesser additional classical information for transferring secret information. Finally, it is generalized to a multiparty controlled deterministic secure quantum communication scheme.

  13. Classical communication cost of quantum steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainz, Ana Belén; Aolita, Leandro; Brunner, Nicolas; Gallego, Rodrigo; Skrzypczyk, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Quantum steering is observed when performing appropriate local measurements on an entangled state. Here we discuss the possibility of simulating classically this effect, using classical communication instead of entanglement. We show that infinite communication is necessary for exactly simulating steering for any pure entangled state, as well as for a class of mixed entangled states. Moreover, we discuss the communication cost of steering for general entangled states, as well as approximate simulation. Our findings reveal striking differences between Bell nonlocality and steering and provide a natural way of measuring the strength of the latter.

  14. Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Christopher

    2010-05-26

    The advent of bottom-up atomic manipulation heralded a new horizon for attainable information density, as it allowed a bit of information to be represented by a single atom. The discrete spacing between atoms in condensed matter has thus set a rigid limit on the maximum possible information density. While modern technologies are still far from this scale, all theoretical downscaling of devices terminates at this spatial limit. Here, however, we break this barrier with electronic quantum encoding scaled to subatomic densities. We use atomic manipulation to first construct open nanostructures - 'molecular holograms' - which in turn concentrate information into a medium free of lattice constraints: the quantum states of a two-dimensional degenerate Fermi gas of electrons. The information embedded in the holograms is transcoded at even smaller length scales into an atomically uniform area of a copper surface, where it is densely projected into both two spatial degrees of freedom and a third holographic dimension mapped to energy. In analogy to optical volume holography, this requires precise amplitude and phase engineering of electron wavefunctions to assemble pages of information volumetrically. This data is read out by mapping the energy-resolved electron density of states with a scanning tunnelling microscope. As the projection and readout are both extremely near-field, and because we use native quantum states rather than an external beam, we are not limited by lensing or collimation and can create electronically projected objects with features as small as {approx}0.3 nm. These techniques reach unprecedented densities exceeding 20 bits/nm{sup 2} and place tens of bits into a single fermionic state.

  15. Industrial application for global quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, A.; Petruccione, F.

    2012-09-01

    In the last decade the quantum communication community has witnessed great advances in photonic quantum cryptography technology with the research, development and commercialization of automated Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) devices. These first generation devices are however bottlenecked by the achievable spatial coverage. This is due to the intrinsic absorption of the quantum particle into the communication medium. As QKD is of paramount importance in the future ICT landscape, various innovative solutions have been developed and tested to expand the spatial coverage of these networks such as the Quantum City initiative in Durban, South Africa. To expand this further into a global QKD-secured network, recent efforts have focussed on high-altitude free-space techniques through the use of satellites. This couples the QKD-secured Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs) with secured ground-tosatellite links as access points to a global network. Such a solution, however, has critical limitations that reduce its commercial feasibility. As parallel step to the development of satellitebased global QKD networks, we investigate the use of the commercial aircrafts' network as secure transport mechanisms in a global QKD network. This QKD-secured global network will provide a robust infrastructure to create, distribute and manage encryption keys between the MANs of the participating cities.

  16. Quantum secure direct communication based on supervised teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Liu, Yu

    2008-03-01

    We present a quantum secure direct communication(QSDC) scheme as an extension for a proposed supervised secure entanglement sharing protocol. Starting with a quick review on the supervised entanglement sharing protocol - the "Wuhan" protocol [Y. Li, et al., quant-ph/0709.1449 (2007)], we primarily focus on its further extend using for a QSDC task, in which the communication attendant Alice encodes the secret message directly onto a sequence of 2-level particles which then can be faithfully teleported to Bob using the shared maximal entanglement states obtained by the previous "Wuhan" protocol. We also evaluate the security of the QSDC scheme, where an individual self-attack performed by Alice and Bob - the out of control attack is introduced and the robustness of our scheme on the OCA is documented.

  17. A Multiparty Controlled Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication and Authentication Protocol Based on EPR Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yan; Zhang, Shi-Bin; Yan, Li-Li; Sheng, Zhi-Wei

    2013-06-01

    A multiparty controlled bidirectional quantum secure direct communication and authentication protocol is proposed based on EPR pair and entanglement swapping. The legitimate identities of communicating parties are encoded to Bell states which act as a detection sequence. Secret messages are transmitted by using the classical XOR operation, which serves as a one-time-pad. No photon with secret information transmits in the quantum channel. Compared with the protocols proposed by Wang et al. [Acta Phys. Sin. 56 (2007) 673; Opt. Commun. 266 (2006) 732], the protocol in this study implements bidirectional communication and authentication, which defends most attacks including the ‘man-in-the-middle’ attack efficiently.

  18. Coherent communication with continuous quantum variables

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, Mark M.; Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2007-06-15

    The coherent bit (cobit) channel is a resource intermediate between classical and quantum communication. It produces coherent versions of teleportation and superdense coding. We extend the cobit channel to continuous variables by providing a definition of the coherent nat (conat) channel. We construct several coherent protocols that use both a position-quadrature and a momentum-quadrature conat channel with finite squeezing. Finally, we show that the quality of squeezing diminishes through successive compositions of coherent teleportation and superdense coding.

  19. Multiple channel secure communication using chaotic system encoding

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    fA new method to encrypt signals using chaotic systems has been developed that offers benefits over conventional chaotic encryption methods. The method simultaneously encodes multiple plaintext streams using a chaotic system; a key is required to extract the plaintext from the chaotic cipertext. A working prototype demonstrates feasibility of the method by simultaneously encoding and decoding multiple audio signals using electrical circuits.

  20. Discord as a quantum resource for bi-partite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Helen M.; Gu, Mile; Assad, Syed M.; Symul, Thomas; Modi, Kavan; Ralph, Timothy C.; Vedral, Vlatko; Lam, Ping Koy

    2014-12-01

    Coherent interactions that generate negligible entanglement can still exhibit unique quantum behaviour. This observation has motivated a search beyond entanglement for a complete description of all quantum correlations. Quantum discord is a promising candidate. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that under certain measurement constraints, discord between bipartite systems can be consumed to encode information that can only be accessed by coherent quantum interactions. The inability to access this information by any other means allows us to use discord to directly quantify this `quantum advantage'.

  1. Time-reversal-symmetric single-photon wave packets for free-space quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, N; Alber, G; Agarwal, G S; Leuchs, G

    2015-05-01

    Readout and retrieval processes are proposed for efficient, high-fidelity quantum state transfer between a matter qubit, encoded in the level structure of a single atom or ion, and a photonic qubit, encoded in a time-reversal-symmetric single-photon wave packet. They are based on controlling spontaneous photon emission and absorption of a matter qubit on demand in free space by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. As these processes do not involve mode selection by high-finesse cavities or photon transport through optical fibers, they offer interesting perspectives as basic building blocks for free-space quantum-communication protocols. PMID:25978231

  2. Time-Reversal-Symmetric Single-Photon Wave Packets for Free-Space Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautmann, N.; Alber, G.; Agarwal, G. S.; Leuchs, G.

    2015-05-01

    Readout and retrieval processes are proposed for efficient, high-fidelity quantum state transfer between a matter qubit, encoded in the level structure of a single atom or ion, and a photonic qubit, encoded in a time-reversal-symmetric single-photon wave packet. They are based on controlling spontaneous photon emission and absorption of a matter qubit on demand in free space by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. As these processes do not involve mode selection by high-finesse cavities or photon transport through optical fibers, they offer interesting perspectives as basic building blocks for free-space quantum-communication protocols.

  3. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  4. Quantum Limits of Space-to-Ground Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.; Dolinar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum limiting factors contributed by the transmitter, the optical channel, and the receiver of a space-to-ground optical communications link are described. Approaches to move toward the ultimate quantum limit are discussed.

  5. Heralded photon amplification for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, C. I.; Bruno, N.; Sangouard, N.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.; Thew, R. T.

    2012-08-01

    Heralded noiseless amplification based on single-photon sources and linear optics is ideally suited for long-distance quantum communication tasks based on discrete variables. We experimentally demonstrate such an amplifier, operating at telecommunication wavelengths. Coherent amplification is performed with a gain of G=1.98±0.20 for a state with a maximum expected gain G=2. We also demonstrate that there is no need for a stable phase reference between the initial signal state and the local auxiliary photons used by the amplifier. We discuss these results in the context of experimental device-independent quantum key distribution based on heralded qubit amplification, and we highlight several key challenges for its realization.

  6. Repeated quantum error correction on a continuously encoded qubit by real-time feedback.

    PubMed

    Cramer, J; Kalb, N; Rol, M A; Hensen, B; Blok, M S; Markham, M; Twitchen, D J; Hanson, R; Taminiau, T H

    2016-01-01

    Reliable quantum information processing in the face of errors is a major fundamental and technological challenge. Quantum error correction protects quantum states by encoding a logical quantum bit (qubit) in multiple physical qubits. To be compatible with universal fault-tolerant computations, it is essential that states remain encoded at all times and that errors are actively corrected. Here we demonstrate such active error correction on a continuously protected logical qubit using a diamond quantum processor. We encode the logical qubit in three long-lived nuclear spins, repeatedly detect phase errors by non-destructive measurements, and apply corrections by real-time feedback. The actively error-corrected qubit is robust against errors and encoded quantum superposition states are preserved beyond the natural dephasing time of the best physical qubit in the encoding. These results establish a powerful platform to investigate error correction under different types of noise and mark an important step towards fault-tolerant quantum information processing. PMID:27146630

  7. Repeated quantum error correction on a continuously encoded qubit by real-time feedback

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, J.; Kalb, N.; Rol, M. A.; Hensen, B.; Blok, M. S.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Hanson, R.; Taminiau, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable quantum information processing in the face of errors is a major fundamental and technological challenge. Quantum error correction protects quantum states by encoding a logical quantum bit (qubit) in multiple physical qubits. To be compatible with universal fault-tolerant computations, it is essential that states remain encoded at all times and that errors are actively corrected. Here we demonstrate such active error correction on a continuously protected logical qubit using a diamond quantum processor. We encode the logical qubit in three long-lived nuclear spins, repeatedly detect phase errors by non-destructive measurements, and apply corrections by real-time feedback. The actively error-corrected qubit is robust against errors and encoded quantum superposition states are preserved beyond the natural dephasing time of the best physical qubit in the encoding. These results establish a powerful platform to investigate error correction under different types of noise and mark an important step towards fault-tolerant quantum information processing. PMID:27146630

  8. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communication system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.; Udalov, S.

    1974-01-01

    This study investigated the configuration and integration of a wideband communication system with a Ku-band rendezvous radar system. The goal of the study was to provide as much commonality between the two systems as possible. The antenna design was described with the only change being the requirement for dual polarization (linear for the radar system and circular for the communication system).

  9. Orthogonal-state-based deterministic secure quantum communication without actual transmission of the message qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chitra; Pathak, Anirban

    2014-09-01

    Recently, an orthogonal-state-based protocol of direct quantum communication without actual transmission of particles is proposed by Salih et al. (Phys Rev Lett 110:170502, 2013) using chained quantum Zeno effect. The counterfactual condition (claim) of Salih et al. is weakened here to the extent that transmission of particles is allowed, but transmission of the message qubits (the qubits on which the secret information is encoded) is not allowed. Remaining within this weaker (non-counterfactual) condition, an orthogonal-state-based protocol of deterministic secure quantum communication is proposed using entanglement swapping, where actual transmission of the message qubits is not required. Further, it is shown that there exists a large class of quantum states that can be used to implement the proposed protocol. The security of the proposed protocol originates from monogamy of entanglement. As the protocol can be implemented without using conjugate coding, its security is independent of non-commutativity.

  10. Repeated quantum error correction by real-time feedback on continuously encoded qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Julia; Kalb, Norbert; Rol, M. Adriaan; Hensen, Bas; Blok, Machiel S.; Markham, Matthew; Twitchen, Daniel J.; Hanson, Ronald; Taminiau, Tim H.

    Because quantum information is extremely fragile, large-scale quantum information processing requires constant error correction. To be compatible with universal fault-tolerant computations, it is essential that quantum states remain encoded at all times and that errors are actively corrected. I will present such active quantum error correction in a hybrid quantum system based on the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond. We encode a logical qubit in three long-lived nuclear spins, detect errors by multiple non-destructive measurements using the optically active NV electron spin and correct them by real-time feedback. By combining these new capabilities with recent advances in spin control, multiple cycles of error correction can be performed within the dephasing time. We investigate both coherent and incoherent errors and show that the error-corrected logical qubit can indeed store quantum states longer than the best spin used in the encoding. Furthermore, I will present our latest results on increasing the number of qubits in the encoding, required for quantum error correction for both phase- and bit-flip.

  11. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communication system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alem, W. K.; Huth, G. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    The particular Ku-band carrier, PN despreading, and symbol synchronization strategies, which were selected for implementation in the Ku-band transponder aboard the orbiter, were assessed and evaluated from a systems performance viewpoint, verifying that system specifications were met. A study was performed of the design and implementation of tracking techniques which are suitable for incorporation into the Orbiter Ku-band communication system. Emphasis was placed on maximizing tracking accuracy and communication system flexibility while minimizing cost, weight, and system complexity of Orbiter and ground systems hardware. The payload communication study assessed the design and performance of the forward link and return link bent-pipe relay modes for attached and detached payloads. As part of this study, a design for a forward link bent-pipe was proposed which employs a residual carrier but which is tracked by the existing Costas loop.

  12. Quantum issues in optical communication. [noise reduction in signal reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Various approaches to the problem of controlling quantum noise, the dominant noise in an optical communications system, are discussed. It is shown that, no matter which way the problem is approached, there always remain uncertainties. These uncertainties exist because, to date, only very few communication problems have been solved in their full quantum form.

  13. Quantum communication complexity advantage implies violation of a Bell inequality.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Harry; Czekaj, Łukasz; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Markiewicz, Marcin; Speelman, Florian; Strelchuk, Sergii

    2016-03-22

    We obtain a general connection between a large quantum advantage in communication complexity and Bell nonlocality. We show that given any protocol offering a sufficiently large quantum advantage in communication complexity, there exists a way of obtaining measurement statistics that violate some Bell inequality. Our main tool is port-based teleportation. If the gap between quantum and classical communication complexity can grow arbitrarily large, the ratio of the quantum value to the classical value of the Bell quantity becomes unbounded with the increase in the number of inputs and outputs. PMID:26957600

  14. Quantum communication complexity advantage implies violation of a Bell inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhrman, Harry; Czekaj, Łukasz; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Markiewicz, Marcin; Speelman, Florian; Strelchuk, Sergii

    2016-03-01

    We obtain a general connection between a large quantum advantage in communication complexity and Bell nonlocality. We show that given any protocol offering a sufficiently large quantum advantage in communication complexity, there exists a way of obtaining measurement statistics that violate some Bell inequality. Our main tool is port-based teleportation. If the gap between quantum and classical communication complexity can grow arbitrarily large, the ratio of the quantum value to the classical value of the Bell quantity becomes unbounded with the increase in the number of inputs and outputs.

  15. Multiplexed communication over a high-speed quantum channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heurs, M.; Webb, J. G.; Dunlop, A. E.; Harb, C. C.; Ralph, T. C.; Huntington, E. H.

    2010-03-01

    In quantum information systems it is of particular interest to consider the best way in which to use the nonclassical resources consumed by that system. Quantum communication protocols are integral to quantum information systems and are among the most promising near-term applications of quantum information science. Here we show that a multiplexed, digital quantum communications system supported by a comb of vacuum squeezing has a greater channel capacity per photon than a source of broadband squeezing with the same analog band width. We report on the time-resolved, simultaneous observation of the first dozen teeth in a 2.4-GHz comb of vacuum squeezing produced by a subthreshold optical parametric oscillator, as required for such a quantum communications channel. We also demonstrate multiplexed communication on that channel.

  16. Multiplexed communication over a high-speed quantum channel

    SciTech Connect

    Heurs, M.; Webb, J. G.; Dunlop, A. E.; Harb, C. C.; Huntington, E. H.; Ralph, T. C.

    2010-03-15

    In quantum information systems it is of particular interest to consider the best way in which to use the nonclassical resources consumed by that system. Quantum communication protocols are integral to quantum information systems and are among the most promising near-term applications of quantum information science. Here we show that a multiplexed, digital quantum communications system supported by a comb of vacuum squeezing has a greater channel capacity per photon than a source of broadband squeezing with the same analog band width. We report on the time-resolved, simultaneous observation of the first dozen teeth in a 2.4-GHz comb of vacuum squeezing produced by a subthreshold optical parametric oscillator, as required for such a quantum communications channel. We also demonstrate multiplexed communication on that channel.

  17. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communication system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.; Trumpis, B. D.; Udalov, S.

    1975-01-01

    Various aspects of space shuttle communication systems were studied. The following major areas were investigated: burst error correction for shuttle command channels; performance optimization and design considerations for Costas receivers with and without bandpass limiting; experimental techniques for measuring low level spectral components of microwave signals; and potential modulation and coding techniques for the Ku-band return link. Results are presented.

  18. Quantum Communication for the Ultimate Capacity and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Masahide; Fujiwara, Mikio; Takeoka, Masahiro

    Quantum info-communication technologies (Q-ICT) will be able to realize quantum communication which attains higher capacity than that of conventional optical communications, and the unconditionally secure communication, known as quantum key distribution (QKD), that cannot be broken by any future technologies. In this article we first review a brief history of Q-ICT, and introduce basic notions and results so far. We then present our recent results on these two technologies, addressing current limitations of the known schemes, and finally discuss future perspectives, especially a challenge to merge the merits of the two.

  19. Efficient Controlled Quantum Secure Direct Communication Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Siddharth; Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-03-01

    We study controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC), a cryptographic scheme where a sender can send a secret bit-string to an intended recipient, without any secure classical channel, who can obtain the complete bit-string only with the permission of a controller. We report an efficient protocol to realize CQSDC using Cluster state and then go on to construct a (2-3)-CQSDC using Brown state, where a coalition of any two of the three controllers is required to retrieve the complete message. We argue both protocols to be unconditionally secure and analyze the efficiency of the protocols to show it to outperform the existing schemes while maintaining the same security specifications.

  20. Efficient Controlled Quantum Secure Direct Communication Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Siddharth; Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-07-01

    We study controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC), a cryptographic scheme where a sender can send a secret bit-string to an intended recipient, without any secure classical channel, who can obtain the complete bit-string only with the permission of a controller. We report an efficient protocol to realize CQSDC using Cluster state and then go on to construct a (2-3)-CQSDC using Brown state, where a coalition of any two of the three controllers is required to retrieve the complete message. We argue both protocols to be unconditionally secure and analyze the efficiency of the protocols to show it to outperform the existing schemes while maintaining the same security specifications.

  1. Two-step quantum direct communication protocol using the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pair block

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Fuguo; Liu Xiaoshu; Long Guilu

    2003-10-01

    A protocol for quantum secure direct communication using blocks of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs is proposed. A set of ordered N EPR pairs is used as a data block for sending secret message directly. The ordered N EPR set is divided into two particle sequences, a checking sequence and a message-coding sequence. After transmitting the checking sequence, the two parties of communication check eavesdropping by measuring a fraction of particles randomly chosen, with random choice of two sets of measuring bases. After insuring the security of the quantum channel, the sender Alice encodes the secret message directly on the message-coding sequence and sends them to Bob. By combining the checking and message-coding sequences together, Bob is able to read out the encoded messages directly. The scheme is secure because an eavesdropper cannot get both sequences simultaneously. We also discuss issues in a noisy channel.

  2. Discord as a quantum resource for bi-partite communication

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzanowski, Helen M.; Assad, Syed M.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy; Gu, Mile; Modi, Kavan; Vedral, Vlatko; Ralph, Timothy C.

    2014-12-04

    Coherent interactions that generate negligible entanglement can still exhibit unique quantum behaviour. This observation has motivated a search beyond entanglement for a complete description of all quantum correlations. Quantum discord is a promising candidate. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that under certain measurement constraints, discord between bipartite systems can be consumed to encode information that can only be accessed by coherent quantum interactions. The inability to access this information by any other means allows us to use discord to directly quantify this ‘quantum advantage’.

  3. Robust Timing Synchronization for Aviation Communications, and Efficient Modulation and Coding Study for Quantum Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Fugin

    2003-01-01

    One half of Professor Xiong's effort will investigate robust timing synchronization schemes for dynamically varying characteristics of aviation communication channels. The other half of his time will focus on efficient modulation and coding study for the emerging quantum communications.

  4. Fault-tolerant Remote Quantum Entanglement Establishment for Secure Quantum Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chia-Wei; Lin, Jason

    2016-02-01

    This work presents a strategy for constructing long-distance quantum communications among a number of remote users through collective-noise channel. With the assistance of semi-honest quantum certificate authorities (QCAs), the remote users can share a secret key through fault-tolerant entanglement swapping. The proposed protocol is feasible for large-scale distributed quantum networks with numerous users. Each pair of communicating parties only needs to establish the quantum channels and the classical authenticated channels with his/her local QCA. Thus, it enables any user to communicate freely without point-to-point pre-establishing any communication channels, which is efficient and feasible for practical environments.

  5. Fault-tolerant Remote Quantum Entanglement Establishment for Secure Quantum Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chia-Wei; Lin, Jason

    2016-07-01

    This work presents a strategy for constructing long-distance quantum communications among a number of remote users through collective-noise channel. With the assistance of semi-honest quantum certificate authorities (QCAs), the remote users can share a secret key through fault-tolerant entanglement swapping. The proposed protocol is feasible for large-scale distributed quantum networks with numerous users. Each pair of communicating parties only needs to establish the quantum channels and the classical authenticated channels with his/her local QCA. Thus, it enables any user to communicate freely without point-to-point pre-establishing any communication channels, which is efficient and feasible for practical environments.

  6. Step-by-step magic state encoding for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Hayato

    2014-01-01

    Quantum error correction allows one to make quantum computers fault-tolerant against unavoidable errors due to decoherence and imperfect physical gate operations. However, the fault-tolerant quantum computation requires impractically large computational resources for useful applications. This is a current major obstacle to the realization of a quantum computer. In particular, magic state distillation, which is a standard approach to universality, consumes the most resources in fault-tolerant quantum computation. For the resource problem, here we propose step-by-step magic state encoding for concatenated quantum codes, where magic states are encoded step by step from the physical level to the logical one. To manage errors during the encoding, we carefully use error detection. Since the sizes of intermediate codes are small, it is expected that the resource overheads will become lower than previous approaches based on the distillation at the logical level. Our simulation results suggest that the resource requirements for a logical magic state will become comparable to those for a single logical controlled-NOT gate. Thus, the present method opens a new possibility for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation. PMID:25511387

  7. Step-by-step magic state encoding for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hayato

    2014-12-01

    Quantum error correction allows one to make quantum computers fault-tolerant against unavoidable errors due to decoherence and imperfect physical gate operations. However, the fault-tolerant quantum computation requires impractically large computational resources for useful applications. This is a current major obstacle to the realization of a quantum computer. In particular, magic state distillation, which is a standard approach to universality, consumes the most resources in fault-tolerant quantum computation. For the resource problem, here we propose step-by-step magic state encoding for concatenated quantum codes, where magic states are encoded step by step from the physical level to the logical one. To manage errors during the encoding, we carefully use error detection. Since the sizes of intermediate codes are small, it is expected that the resource overheads will become lower than previous approaches based on the distillation at the logical level. Our simulation results suggest that the resource requirements for a logical magic state will become comparable to those for a single logical controlled-NOT gate. Thus, the present method opens a new possibility for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  8. Satellite quantum communication towards GEO distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Dequal, Daniele; Tomasin, M.; Schiavon, M.; Vedovato, F.; Bacco, Davide; Gaiarin, Simone; Bianco, Giuseppe; Luceri, Vincenza; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    We report on several experiments of single photon transmission from space to ground realized at the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory (MLRO) of the Italian Space Agency in Matera (Italy). We simulated a source of coherent pulses attenuated to the single photon level by exploiting laser ranging satellites equipped with corner-cube retroreflectors (CCRs). By such technique we report QC with qubits encoded in polarization from low-Earth-orbit (LEO) at distance up to 2500km from the ground station, achieving a low quantum bit error ratio (QBER) for different satellites. The same technique is exploited to demonstrate single photon exchange with a medium-Earth-orbit (MEO) satellite, Lageos-2 at more than 7000 km of distance from the MLRO station. In both experiments the temporal jitter of the received counts is of the order of 1.2ns FWHM due to the intrinsic jitter of the single photon detectors. In order to improve the discrimination of signal from the background and reaching distances corresponding to GEO satellites, we improved the detection scheme by using fast single photon detectors with 40 ps FWHM jitter. We report improved single photon detection jitter from Beacon-C and Ajisai, obtaining 340 ps FWHM in the best case.

  9. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communication system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udalov, S.; Huth, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    The analysis of the forward link signal structure for the shuttle orbiter Ku-band communication system was carried out, based on the assumptions of a 3.03 Mcps PN code. It is shown that acquisition requirements for the forward link can be met at the acquisition threshold C/N0 sub 0 value of about 60 dB-Hz, which corresponds to a bit error rate (BER) of about 0.001. It is also shown that the tracking threshold for the forward link is at about 57 dB-Hz. The analysis of the bent pipe concept for the orbiter was carried out, along with the comparative analysis of the empirical data. The complexity of the analytical approach warrants further investigation to reconcile the empirical and theoretical results. Techniques for incorporating a text and graphics capability into the forward link data stream are considered and a baseline configuration is described.

  10. Efficient Quantum Secure Direct Communication Using the Orbital Angular Momentum of Single Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Zhuo-Ru; Jin, Guang-Sheng; Wang, Tie-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) is to transmit information directly through quantum channels without generating secret keys. The efficiencies of QSDC rely on the capacity of qubits. Exploiting orbital angular momentum of single photons, we proposed a high-capacity one-time pad QSDC protocol. The information is encoded on the Hermite-Gauss mode and transmitted directly on the Laguerre-Gauss mode of the photon pluses. The proposed system provides a high coding space, and the proposed protocol is robust against collective-dephasing channel noise.

  11. Transfer and teleportation of quantum states encoded in decoherence-free subspace

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Hua; Deng Zhijao; Zhang Xiaolong; Feng Mang

    2007-11-15

    Quantum state transfer and teleportation, with qubits encoded in internal states of atoms in cavities, among spatially separated nodes of a quantum network in a decoherence-free subspace are proposed, based on a cavity-assisted interaction with single-photon pulses. We show in detail the implementation of a logic-qubit Hadamard gate and a two-logic-qubit conditional gate, and discuss the experimental feasibility of our scheme.

  12. Quantum communication through a spin ring with twisted boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Jin, B.-Q.; Korepin, V. E.

    2005-08-01

    We investigate quantum communication between the sites of a spin ring with twisted boundary conditions. Such boundary conditions can be achieved by a magnetic flux through the ring. We find that a nonzero twist can improve communication through finite odd-numbered rings and enable high-fidelity multiparty quantum communication through spin rings (working near perfectly for rings of five and seven spins). We show that in certain cases, the twist results in the complete blockage of quantum-information flow to a certain site of the ring. This effect can be exploited to interface and entangle a flux qubit and a spin qubit without embedding the latter in a magnetic field.

  13. Distributed wireless quantum communication networks with partially entangled pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xu-Tao; Zhang, Zai-Chen; Xu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Wireless quantum communication networks transfer quantum state by teleportation. Existing research focuses on maximal entangled pairs. In this paper, we analyse the distributed wireless quantum communication networks with partially entangled pairs. A quantum routing scheme with multi-hop teleportation is proposed. With the proposed scheme, is not necessary for the quantum path to be consistent with the classical path. The quantum path and its associated classical path are established in a distributed way. Direct multi-hop teleportation is conducted on the selected path to transfer a quantum state from the source to the destination. Based on the feature of multi-hop teleportation using partially entangled pairs, if the node number of the quantum path is even, the destination node will add another teleportation at itself. We simulated the performance of distributed wireless quantum communication networks with a partially entangled state. The probability of transferring the quantum state successfully is statistically analyzed. Our work shows that multi-hop teleportation on distributed wireless quantum networks with partially entangled pairs is feasible.

  14. Novel Multiparty Controlled Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication Based on Continuous-variable States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhen-Bo; Gong, Li-Hua; Wen, Ru-Hong

    2016-03-01

    A novel multiparty controlled bidirectional quantum secure direct communication protocol combining continuous-variable states with qubit block transmission is proposed. Two legitimate communication parties encode their own secret information into entangled optical modes with translation operations, and the secret information of each counterpart can only be recovered under the permission of all controllers. Due to continuous-variable states and block transmission strategy, the proposed protocol is easy to realize with perfect qubit efficiency. Security analyses show that the proposed protocol is free from common attacks, including the man-in-the-middle attack.

  15. Quantum Sensing and Communications Being Developed for Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John D.; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2005-01-01

    An interdisciplinary quantum communications and sensing research effort for application in microdevices has been underway at the NASA Glenn Research Center since 2000. Researchers in Glenn's Instrumentation and Controls, Communications Technology, and Propulsion and Turbomachinery Divisions have been working together to study and develop techniques that utilize quantum effects for sensing and communications. The emerging technology provides an innovative way to communicate faster and farther using less power and to sense, measure, and image environmental properties in ways that are not possible with existing technology.

  16. Secure satellite communication using multi-photon tolerant quantum communication protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darunkar, Bhagyashri; Punekar, Nikhil; Verma, Pramode K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes and analyzes the potential of a multi-photon tolerant quantum communication protocol to secure satellite communication. For securing satellite communication, quantum cryptography is the only known unconditionally secure method. A number of recent experiments have shown feasibility of satellite-aided global quantum key distribution (QKD) using different methods such as: Use of entangled photon pairs, decoy state methods, and entanglement swapping. The use of single photon in these methods restricts the distance and speed over which quantum cryptography can be applied. Contemporary quantum cryptography protocols like the BB84 and its variants suffer from the limitation of reaching the distances of only Low Earth Orbit (LEO) at the data rates of few kilobits per second. This makes it impossible to develop a general satellite-based secure global communication network using the existing protocols. The method proposed in this paper allows secure communication at the heights of the Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) and Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites. The benefits of the proposed method are two-fold: First it enables the realization of a secure global communication network based on satellites and second it provides unconditional security for satellite networks at GEO heights. The multi-photon approach discussed in this paper ameliorates the distance and speed issues associated with quantum cryptography through the use of contemporary laser communication (lasercom) devices. This approach can be seen as a step ahead towards global quantum communication.

  17. Heralded quantum repeater for a quantum communication network based on quantum dots embedded in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jian; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a heralded quantum repeater protocol based on the general interface between the circularly polarized photon and the quantum dot embedded in a double-sided optical microcavity. Our effective time-bin encoding on photons results in the deterministic faithful entanglement distribution with one optical fiber for the transmission of each photon in our protocol, not two or more. Our efficient parity-check detector implemented with only one input-output process of a single photon as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics makes the entanglement channel extension and entanglement purification in quantum repeater far more efficient than others, and it has the potential application in fault-tolerant quantum computation as well. Meanwhile, the deviation from a collective-noise channel leads to some phase-flip errors on the nonlocal electron spins shared by the parties and these errors can be depressed by our simplified entanglement purification process. Finally, we discuss the performance of our proposal, concluding that it is feasible with current technology.

  18. Quantum Authencryption with Two-Photon Entangled States for Off-Line Communicants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tian-Yu

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a quantum authencryption protocol is proposed by using the two-photon entangled states as the quantum resource. Two communicants Alice and Bob share two private keys in advance, which determine the generation of two-photon entangled states. The sender Alice sends the two-photon entangled state sequence encoded with her classical bits to the receiver Bob in the manner of one-step quantum transmission. Upon receiving the encoded quantum state sequence, Bob decodes out Alice's classical bits with the two-photon joint measurements and authenticates the integrity of Alice's secret with the help of one-way hash function. The proposed protocol only uses the one-step quantum transmission and needs neither a public discussion nor a trusted third party. As a result, the proposed protocol can be adapted to the case where the receiver is off-line, such as the quantum E-mail systems. Moreover, the proposed protocol provides the message authentication to one bit level with the help of one-way hash function and has an information-theoretical efficiency equal to 100 %.

  19. Authenticated semi-quantum direct communication protocols using Bell states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi-Ping; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2016-02-01

    This study presents the first two authenticated semi-quantum direct communication protocols without using any classical channel. By pre-sharing a master secret key between two communicants, a sender with advanced quantum devices can transmit a secret message to a receiver who can only perform classical operations without any information leakage. The receiver is then capable of verifying the message up to the single-qubit level, i.e., a one-qubit modification of the transmitted quantum sequence can be detected with a probability close to 1. Moreover, the proposed protocols are resistant to several well-known attacks.

  20. GENERAL: Efficient quantum secure communication with a publicly known key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Yan; Li, Xi-Han; Deng, Fu-Guo; Zhou, Hong-Yu

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a simple way for an eavesdropper to eavesdrop freely the secret message in the experimental realization of quantum communication protocol proposed by Beige et al (2002 Acta Phys. Pol. A 101 357). Moreover, it introduces an efficient quantum secure communication protocol based on a publicly known key with decoy photons and two biased bases by modifying the original protocol. The total efficiency of this new protocol is double that of the original one. With a low noise quantum channel, this protocol can be used for transmitting a secret message. At present, this protocol is good for generating a private key efficiently.

  1. Quantum communication in the presence of a horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Daiqin; Ralph, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    Based on homodyne detection, we discuss how the presence of an event horizon affects quantum communication between an inertial partner, Alice, and a uniformly accelerated partner, Rob. We show that there exists a low frequency cutoff for Rob's homodyne detector that maximizes the signal to noise ratio and it approximately corresponds to the Unruh frequency. In addition, the low frequency cutoff which minimizes the conditional variance between Alice's input state and Rob's output state is also approximately equal to the Unruh frequency. Thus the Unruh frequency provides a natural low frequency cutoff in order to optimize quantum communication of both classical and quantum information between Alice and Rob.

  2. Quantum data locking for high-rate private communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

    2015-03-01

    We show that, if the accessible information is used as a security quantifier, quantum channels with a certain symmetry can convey private messages at a tremendously high rate, as high as less than one bit below the rate of non-private classical communication. This result is obtained by exploiting the quantum data locking effect. The price to pay to achieve such a high private communication rate is that accessible information security is in general not composable. However, composable security holds against an eavesdropper who is forced to measure her share of the quantum system within a finite time after she gets it.

  3. Doubly infinite separation of quantum information and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Wen; Perry, Christopher; Zhu, Yechao; Koh, Dax Enshan; Aaronson, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We prove the existence of (one-way) communication tasks with a subconstant versus superconstant asymptotic gap, which we call "doubly infinite," between their quantum information and communication complexities. We do so by studying the exclusion game [C. Perry et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 030504 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.030504] for which there exist instances where the quantum information complexity tends to zero as the size of the input n increases. By showing that the quantum communication complexity of these games scales at least logarithmically in n , we obtain our result. We further show that the established lower bounds and gaps still hold even if we allow a small probability of error. However in this case, the n -qubit quantum message of the zero-error strategy can be compressed polynomially.

  4. Quantum error correction assisted by two-way noisy communication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Yu, Sixia; Fan, Heng; Oh, C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-shared non-local entanglement dramatically simplifies and improves the performance of quantum error correction via entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes (EAQECCs). However, even considering the noise in quantum communication only, the non-local sharing of a perfectly entangled pair is technically impossible unless additional resources are consumed, such as entanglement distillation, which actually compromises the efficiency of the codes. Here we propose an error-correcting protocol assisted by two-way noisy communication that is more easily realisable: all quantum communication is subjected to general noise and all entanglement is created locally without additional resources consumed. In our protocol the pre-shared noisy entangled pairs are purified simultaneously by the decoding process. For demonstration, we first present an easier implementation of the well-known EAQECC [[4, 1, 3; 1

  5. Quantum error correction assisted by two-way noisy communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Yu, Sixia; Fan, Heng; Oh, C. H.

    2014-11-01

    Pre-shared non-local entanglement dramatically simplifies and improves the performance of quantum error correction via entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes (EAQECCs). However, even considering the noise in quantum communication only, the non-local sharing of a perfectly entangled pair is technically impossible unless additional resources are consumed, such as entanglement distillation, which actually compromises the efficiency of the codes. Here we propose an error-correcting protocol assisted by two-way noisy communication that is more easily realisable: all quantum communication is subjected to general noise and all entanglement is created locally without additional resources consumed. In our protocol the pre-shared noisy entangled pairs are purified simultaneously by the decoding process. For demonstration, we first present an easier implementation of the well-known EAQECC [[4, 1, 3; 1

  6. Quantum error correction assisted by two-way noisy communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Yu, Sixia; Fan, Heng; Oh, C H

    2014-01-01

    Pre-shared non-local entanglement dramatically simplifies and improves the performance of quantum error correction via entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes (EAQECCs). However, even considering the noise in quantum communication only, the non-local sharing of a perfectly entangled pair is technically impossible unless additional resources are consumed, such as entanglement distillation, which actually compromises the efficiency of the codes. Here we propose an error-correcting protocol assisted by two-way noisy communication that is more easily realisable: all quantum communication is subjected to general noise and all entanglement is created locally without additional resources consumed. In our protocol the pre-shared noisy entangled pairs are purified simultaneously by the decoding process. For demonstration, we first present an easier implementation of the well-known EAQECC [[4, 1, 3; 1

  7. Quantum key distribution using qudits that each encode one bit of raw key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    All known qudit-based prepare-and-measure quantum key distribution (PMQKD) schemes are more error resilient than their qubit-based counterparts. Their high error resiliency comes partly from the careful encoding of multiple bits of signals used to generate the raw key in each transmitted qudit so that the same eavesdropping attempt causes a higher bit error rate (BER) in the raw key. Here I show that highly-error-tolerant PMQKD schemes can be constructed simply by encoding one bit of classical information in each transmitted qudit in the form (|i > ±|j >) /√{2 } , where |i > 's form an orthonormal basis of the 2n-dimensional Hilbert space. Moreover, I prove that these schemes can tolerate up to the theoretical maximum of a 50% BER for n ≥2 provided the raw key is generated under a certain technical condition, making them extremely-error-tolerant PMQKD schemes involving the transmission of unentangled finite-dimensional qudits. This shows the potential of processing quantum information using lower-dimensional quantum signals encoded in a higher-dimensional quantum state.

  8. Towards scalable quantum communication using atomic ensembles and light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Mikhail

    2002-03-01

    One of the challenges in experimental quantum information science involves reliable transport (communication) of quantum bits over long distances under realistic conditions involving decoherence and noise. Photons are the fastest and simplest carriers of quantum information since they interact weakly with environment, but they are difficult to localize and store. It appears that an ideal solution would be to store and process quantum information in matter (i.e. nodes of quantum memory), and to communicate between these nodes using photons. In this talk we discuss how quantum optical techniques can be used to accomplish this goal using atomic ensembles and light as tools. In particular, we describe a fast and robust mechanism for quantum state transfer between light fields and atoms. This is achieved by adiabatically reducing the group velocity of propagating light to zero, thereby ``trapping'' the photon states in atomic ensembles. We describe the basic principles of this technique as well as our recent experimental progress toward realization of these ideas. We then describe how these techniques can be used to implement scalable technique for long-distance quantum communication in realistic noisy channels.

  9. Optimal approach to quantum communication using dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Taylor, Jacob M; Khaneja, Navin; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2007-10-30

    Reliable preparation of entanglement between distant systems is an outstanding problem in quantum information science and quantum communication. In practice, this has to be accomplished by noisy channels (such as optical fibers) that generally result in exponential attenuation of quantum signals at large distances. A special class of quantum error correction protocols, quantum repeater protocols, can be used to overcome such losses. In this work, we introduce a method for systematically optimizing existing protocols and developing more efficient protocols. Our approach makes use of a dynamic programming-based searching algorithm, the complexity of which scales only polynomially with the communication distance, letting us efficiently determine near-optimal solutions. We find significant improvements in both the speed and the final-state fidelity for preparing long-distance entangled states. PMID:17959783

  10. Encoding quantum information in a stabilized manifold of a superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzard, S.; Leghtas, Z.; Mundhada, S. O.; Axline, C.; Reagor, M.; Chou, K.; Blumoff, J.; Sliwa, K. M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.

    In a superconducting Josephson circuit architecture, we activate a multi-photon process between two modes by applying microwave drives at specific frequencies. This creates a pairwise exchange of photons between a high-Q cavity and the environment. The resulting open dynamical system develops a two-dimensional quasi-energy ground state manifold. Can we encode, protect and manipulate quantum information in this manifold? We experimentally investigate the convergence and escape rates in and out of this confined subspace. Finally, using quantum Zeno dynamics, we aim to perform gates which maintain the state in the protected manifold at all times. Work supported by: ARO, ONR, AFOSR and YINQE.

  11. Single-photon-interference communication equivalent to Bell-state-basis cryptographic quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kaoru; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2000-11-01

    We propose a single-photon interferometer which provides cryptographic quantum communication equivalent to that obtained using a pair of polarization entangled photon twins as a carrier [Phys. Rev. A 60, 157 (1999)]. Instead of manipulating and measuring the internal states of entangled photon twins, cryptographic quantum communication is possible by manipulating a single photon in an extended interferometer. The use of the single-photon interferometer offers significant experimental advantages compared to our previous approach.

  12. Deterministic Secure Quantum Communication and Authentication Protocol based on Extended GHZ-W State and Quantum One-time Pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Li, Jian; Li, Lei-Lei; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    A deterministic secure quantum communication and authentication protocol based on extended GHZ-W state and quantum one-time pad is proposed. In the protocol, state |φ -> is used as the carrier. One photon of |φ -> state is sent to Alice, and Alice obtains a random key by measuring photons with bases determined by ID. The information of bases is secret to others except Alice and Bob. Extended GHZ-W states are used as decoy photons, the positions of which in information sequence are encoded with identity string ID of the legal user, and the eavesdropping detection rate reaches 81%. The eavesdropping detection based on extended GHZ-W state combines with authentication and the secret ID ensures the security of the protocol.

  13. Deterministic Secure Quantum Communication and Authentication Protocol based on Extended GHZ-W State and Quantum One-time Pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Li, Jian; Li, Lei-Lei; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Tao

    2016-08-01

    A deterministic secure quantum communication and authentication protocol based on extended GHZ-W state and quantum one-time pad is proposed. In the protocol, state | φ -> is used as the carrier. One photon of | φ -> state is sent to Alice, and Alice obtains a random key by measuring photons with bases determined by ID. The information of bases is secret to others except Alice and Bob. Extended GHZ-W states are used as decoy photons, the positions of which in information sequence are encoded with identity string ID of the legal user, and the eavesdropping detection rate reaches 81%. The eavesdropping detection based on extended GHZ-W state combines with authentication and the secret ID ensures the security of the protocol.

  14. Error filtration and entanglement purification for quantum communication

    SciTech Connect

    Gisin, N.; Linden, N.; Massar, S.; Popescu, S.

    2005-07-15

    The key realization that led to the emergence of the new field of quantum information processing is that quantum mechanics, the theory that describes microscopic particles, allows the processing of information in fundamentally new ways. But just as in classical information processing, errors occur in quantum information processing, and these have to be corrected. A fundamental breakthrough was the realization that quantum error correction is in fact possible. However, most work so far has not been concerned with technological feasibility, but rather with proving that quantum error correction is possible in principle. Here we describe a method for filtering out errors and entanglement purification which is particularly suitable for quantum communication. Our method is conceptually new, and, crucially, it is easy to implement in a wide variety of physical systems with present-day technology and should therefore be of wide applicability.

  15. A universal quantum information processor for scalable quantum communication and networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xihua; Xue, Bolin; Zhang, Junxiang; Zhu, Shiyao

    2014-01-01

    Entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum networks. How to conveniently and efficiently realize the generation, distribution, storage, retrieval, and control of multipartite entanglement is the basic requirement for realistic quantum information processing. Here, we present a theoretical proposal to efficiently and conveniently achieve a universal quantum information processor (QIP) via atomic coherence in an atomic ensemble. The atomic coherence, produced through electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the Λ-type configuration, acts as the QIP and has full functions of quantum beam splitter, quantum frequency converter, quantum entangler, and quantum repeater. By employing EIT-based nondegenerate four-wave mixing processes, the generation, exchange, distribution, and manipulation of light-light, atom-light, and atom-atom multipartite entanglement can be efficiently and flexibly achieved in a deterministic way with only coherent light fields. This method greatly facilitates the operations in quantum information processing, and holds promising applications in realistic scalable quantum communication and quantum networks. PMID:25316514

  16. Quantum ratchets for quantum communication with optical superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Romero-Isart, Oriol; Garcia-Ripoll, Juan Jose

    2007-11-15

    We propose to use a quantum ratchet to transport quantum information in a chain of atoms trapped in an optical superlattice. The quantum ratchet is created by a continuous modulation of the optical superlattice which is periodic in time and in space. Though there is zero average force acting on the atoms, we show that indeed the ratchet effect permits atoms on even and odd sites to move along opposite directions. By loading the optical lattice with two-level bosonic atoms, this scheme permits us to perfectly transport a qubit or entangled state imprinted in one or more atoms to any desired position in the lattice. From the quantum computation point of view, the transport is achieved by a smooth concatenation of perfect swap gates. We analyze setups with noninteracting and interacting particles and in the latter case we use the tools of optimal control to design optimal modulations. We also discuss the feasibility of this method in current experiments.

  17. Memory assisted free space quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordaan, Bertus; Namazi, Mehdi; Goham, Connor; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo; Figueroa, Eden

    2016-05-01

    A quantum memory assisted node between different quantum channels has the capability to modify and synchronize its output, allowing for easy connectivity, and advanced cryptography protocols. We present the experimental progress towards the storage of single photon level pulses carrying random polarization qubits into a dual rail room temperature quantum memory (RTQM) after ~ 20m of free space propagation. The RTQM coherently stores the input pulses through electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of a warm 87 Rb vapor and filters the output by polarization elements and temperature-controlled etalon resonators. This allows the characterization of error rates for each polarization basis and the testing of the synchronization ability of the quantum memory. This work presents a steppingstone towards quantum key distribution and quantum repeater networks. The work was supported by the US-Navy Office of Naval Research, Grant Number N00141410801 and the Simons Foundation, Grant Number SBF241180.B. J. acknowledges financial assistance of the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa.

  18. Communication theory of quantum systems. Ph.D. Thesis, 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, H. P. H.

    1971-01-01

    Communication theory problems incorporating quantum effects for optical-frequency applications are discussed. Under suitable conditions, a unique quantum channel model corresponding to a given classical space-time varying linear random channel is established. A procedure is described by which a proper density-operator representation applicable to any receiver configuration can be constructed directly from the channel output field. Some examples illustrating the application of our methods to the development of optical quantum channel representations are given. Optimizations of communication system performance under different criteria are considered. In particular, certain necessary and sufficient conditions on the optimal detector in M-ary quantum signal detection are derived. Some examples are presented. Parameter estimation and channel capacity are discussed briefly.

  19. Long-distance measurement-device-independent multiparty quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yao; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Teng-Yun; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2015-03-01

    The Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entanglement, originally introduced to uncover the extreme violation of local realism against quantum mechanics, is an important resource for multiparty quantum communication tasks. But the low intensity and fragility of the GHZ entanglement source in current conditions have made the practical applications of these multiparty tasks an experimental challenge. Here we propose a feasible scheme for practically distributing the postselected GHZ entanglement over a distance of more than 100 km for experimentally accessible parameter regimes. Combining the decoy-state and measurement-device-independent protocols for quantum key distribution, we anticipate that our proposal suggests an important avenue for practical multiparty quantum communication. PMID:25793788

  20. A 14 × 14 μm(2) footprint polarization-encoded quantum controlled-NOT gate based on hybrid waveguide.

    PubMed

    Wang, S M; Cheng, Q Q; Gong, Y X; Xu, P; Sun, C; Li, L; Li, T; Zhu, S N

    2016-01-01

    Photonic quantum information processing system has been widely used in communication, metrology and lithography. The recent emphasis on the miniaturized photonic platform is thus motivated by the urgent need for realizing large-scale information processing and computing. Although the integrated quantum logic gates and quantum algorithms based on path encoding have been successfully demonstrated, the technology for handling another commonly used polarization-encoded qubits has yet to be fully developed. Here, we show the implementation of a polarization-dependent beam-splitter in the hybrid waveguide system. With precisely design, the polarization-encoded controlled-NOT gate can be implemented using only single such polarization-dependent beam-splitter with the significant size reduction of the overall device footprint to 14 × 14 μm(2). The experimental demonstration of the highly integrated controlled-NOT gate sets the stage to develop large-scale quantum information processing system. Our hybrid design also establishes the new capabilities in controlling the polarization modes in integrated photonic circuits. PMID:27142992

  1. A 14 × 14 μm2 footprint polarization-encoded quantum controlled-NOT gate based on hybrid waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. M.; Cheng, Q. Q.; Gong, Y. X.; Xu, P.; Sun, C.; Li, L.; Li, T.; Zhu, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    Photonic quantum information processing system has been widely used in communication, metrology and lithography. The recent emphasis on the miniaturized photonic platform is thus motivated by the urgent need for realizing large-scale information processing and computing. Although the integrated quantum logic gates and quantum algorithms based on path encoding have been successfully demonstrated, the technology for handling another commonly used polarization-encoded qubits has yet to be fully developed. Here, we show the implementation of a polarization-dependent beam-splitter in the hybrid waveguide system. With precisely design, the polarization-encoded controlled-NOT gate can be implemented using only single such polarization-dependent beam-splitter with the significant size reduction of the overall device footprint to 14 × 14 μm2. The experimental demonstration of the highly integrated controlled-NOT gate sets the stage to develop large-scale quantum information processing system. Our hybrid design also establishes the new capabilities in controlling the polarization modes in integrated photonic circuits.

  2. A 14 × 14 μm2 footprint polarization-encoded quantum controlled-NOT gate based on hybrid waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. M.; Cheng, Q. Q.; Gong, Y. X.; Xu, P.; Sun, C.; Li, L.; Li, T.; Zhu, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Photonic quantum information processing system has been widely used in communication, metrology and lithography. The recent emphasis on the miniaturized photonic platform is thus motivated by the urgent need for realizing large-scale information processing and computing. Although the integrated quantum logic gates and quantum algorithms based on path encoding have been successfully demonstrated, the technology for handling another commonly used polarization-encoded qubits has yet to be fully developed. Here, we show the implementation of a polarization-dependent beam-splitter in the hybrid waveguide system. With precisely design, the polarization-encoded controlled-NOT gate can be implemented using only single such polarization-dependent beam-splitter with the significant size reduction of the overall device footprint to 14 × 14 μm2. The experimental demonstration of the highly integrated controlled-NOT gate sets the stage to develop large-scale quantum information processing system. Our hybrid design also establishes the new capabilities in controlling the polarization modes in integrated photonic circuits. PMID:27142992

  3. Simple algorithm for computing the communication complexity of quantum communication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Montina, A.; Wolf, S.

    2016-04-01

    A two-party quantum communication process with classical inputs and outcomes can be simulated by replacing the quantum channel with a classical one. The minimal amount of classical communication required to reproduce the statistics of the quantum process is called its communication complexity. In the case of many instances simulated in parallel, the minimal communication cost per instance is called the asymptotic communication complexity. Previously, we reduced the computation of the asymptotic communication complexity to a convex minimization problem. In most cases, the objective function does not have an explicit analytic form, as the function is defined as the maximum over an infinite set of convex functions. Therefore, the overall problem takes the form of a minimax problem and cannot directly be solved by standard optimization methods. In this paper, we introduce a simple algorithm to compute the asymptotic communication complexity. For some special cases with an analytic objective function one can employ available convex-optimization libraries. In the tested cases our method turned out to be notably faster. Finally, using our method we obtain 1.238 bits as a lower bound on the asymptotic communication complexity of a noiseless quantum channel with the capacity of 1 qubit. This improves the previous bound of 1.208 bits.

  4. Experimental demonstration of quantum digital signatures using phase-encoded coherent states of light

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Patrick J.; Collins, Robert J.; Dunjko, Vedran; Andersson, Erika; Jeffers, John; Buller, Gerald S.

    2012-01-01

    Digital signatures are frequently used in data transfer to prevent impersonation, repudiation and message tampering. Currently used classical digital signature schemes rely on public key encryption techniques, where the complexity of so-called ‘one-way' mathematical functions is used to provide security over sufficiently long timescales. No mathematical proofs are known for the long-term security of such techniques. Quantum digital signatures offer a means of sending a message, which cannot be forged or repudiated, with security verified by information-theoretical limits and quantum mechanics. Here we demonstrate an experimental system, which distributes quantum signatures from one sender to two receivers and enables message sending ensured against forging and repudiation. Additionally, we analyse the security of the system in some typical scenarios. Our system is based on the interference of phase-encoded coherent states of light and our implementation utilizes polarization-maintaining optical fibre and photons with a wavelength of 850 nm. PMID:23132024

  5. Communication: Fully coherent quantum state hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Craig C.

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, we describe a new and fully coherent stochastic surface hopping method for simulating mixed quantum-classical systems. We illustrate the approach on the simple but unforgiving problem of quantum evolution of a two-state quantum system in the limit of unperturbed pure state dynamics and for dissipative evolution in the presence of both stationary and nonstationary random environments. We formulate our approach in the Liouville representation and describe the density matrix elements by ensembles of trajectories. Population dynamics are represented by stochastic surface hops for trajectories representing diagonal density matrix elements. These are combined with an unconventional coherent stochastic hopping algorithm for trajectories representing off-diagonal quantum coherences. The latter generalizes the binary (0,1) “probability” of a trajectory to be associated with a given state to allow integers that can be negative or greater than unity in magnitude. Unlike existing surface hopping methods, the dynamics of the ensembles are fully entangled, correctly capturing the coherent and nonlocal structure of quantum mechanics.

  6. Communication: Fully coherent quantum state hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Craig C.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a new and fully coherent stochastic surface hopping method for simulating mixed quantum-classical systems. We illustrate the approach on the simple but unforgiving problem of quantum evolution of a two-state quantum system in the limit of unperturbed pure state dynamics and for dissipative evolution in the presence of both stationary and nonstationary random environments. We formulate our approach in the Liouville representation and describe the density matrix elements by ensembles of trajectories. Population dynamics are represented by stochastic surface hops for trajectories representing diagonal density matrix elements. These are combined with an unconventional coherent stochastic hopping algorithm for trajectories representing off-diagonal quantum coherences. The latter generalizes the binary (0,1) "probability" of a trajectory to be associated with a given state to allow integers that can be negative or greater than unity in magnitude. Unlike existing surface hopping methods, the dynamics of the ensembles are fully entangled, correctly capturing the coherent and nonlocal structure of quantum mechanics.

  7. Experimental characterization of Gaussian quantum-communication channels

    SciTech Connect

    Di Guglielmo, James; Hage, Boris; Franzen, Alexander; Schnabel, Roman; Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2007-07-15

    We present a full experimental characterization of continuous-variable quantum-communication channels established by shared entanglement together with local operations and classical communication. The resulting teleportation channel was fully characterized by measuring all elements of the covariance matrix of the shared two-mode squeezed Gaussian state. From the experimental data we determined the lower bound to the quantum channel capacity, the teleportation fidelity of coherent states, and the logarithmic negativity and purity of the shared state. Additionally, a positive secret key rate was obtained for two of the established channels.

  8. Intrinsic quantum correlations of weak coherent states for quantum communication

    SciTech Connect

    Sua Yongmeng; Scanlon, Erin; Beaulieu, Travis; Bollen, Viktor; Lee, Kim Fook

    2011-03-15

    Intrinsic quantum correlations of weak coherent states are observed between two parties through a novel detection scheme, which can be used as a supplement to the existence decoy-state Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol and the differential phase-shift quantum key distribution (DPS-QKD) protocol. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we generate bipartite correlations of weak coherent states using weak local oscillator fields in two spatially separated balanced homodyne detections. We employ a nonlinearity of postmeasurement method to obtain the bipartite correlations from two single-field interferences at individual homodyne measurements. This scheme is then used to demonstrate bits correlations between two parties over a distance of 10 km through a transmission fiber. We believe that the scheme can add another physical layer of security to these protocols for quantum key distribution.

  9. Quantum-secure covert communication on bosonic channels.

    PubMed

    Bash, Boulat A; Gheorghe, Andrei H; Patel, Monika; Habif, Jonathan L; Goeckel, Dennis; Towsley, Don; Guha, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Computational encryption, information-theoretic secrecy and quantum cryptography offer progressively stronger security against unauthorized decoding of messages contained in communication transmissions. However, these approaches do not ensure stealth--that the mere presence of message-bearing transmissions be undetectable. We characterize the ultimate limit of how much data can be reliably and covertly communicated over the lossy thermal-noise bosonic channel (which models various practical communication channels). We show that whenever there is some channel noise that cannot in principle be controlled by an otherwise arbitrarily powerful adversary--for example, thermal noise from blackbody radiation--the number of reliably transmissible covert bits is at most proportional to the square root of the number of orthogonal modes (the time-bandwidth product) available in the transmission interval. We demonstrate this in a proof-of-principle experiment. Our result paves the way to realizing communications that are kept covert from an all-powerful quantum adversary. PMID:26478089

  10. Quantum-secure covert communication on bosonic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, Boulat A.; Gheorghe, Andrei H.; Patel, Monika; Habif, Jonathan L.; Goeckel, Dennis; Towsley, Don; Guha, Saikat

    2015-10-01

    Computational encryption, information-theoretic secrecy and quantum cryptography offer progressively stronger security against unauthorized decoding of messages contained in communication transmissions. However, these approaches do not ensure stealth--that the mere presence of message-bearing transmissions be undetectable. We characterize the ultimate limit of how much data can be reliably and covertly communicated over the lossy thermal-noise bosonic channel (which models various practical communication channels). We show that whenever there is some channel noise that cannot in principle be controlled by an otherwise arbitrarily powerful adversary--for example, thermal noise from blackbody radiation--the number of reliably transmissible covert bits is at most proportional to the square root of the number of orthogonal modes (the time-bandwidth product) available in the transmission interval. We demonstrate this in a proof-of-principle experiment. Our result paves the way to realizing communications that are kept covert from an all-powerful quantum adversary.

  11. Quantum-secure covert communication on bosonic channels

    PubMed Central

    Bash, Boulat A.; Gheorghe, Andrei H.; Patel, Monika; Habif, Jonathan L.; Goeckel, Dennis; Towsley, Don; Guha, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Computational encryption, information-theoretic secrecy and quantum cryptography offer progressively stronger security against unauthorized decoding of messages contained in communication transmissions. However, these approaches do not ensure stealth—that the mere presence of message-bearing transmissions be undetectable. We characterize the ultimate limit of how much data can be reliably and covertly communicated over the lossy thermal-noise bosonic channel (which models various practical communication channels). We show that whenever there is some channel noise that cannot in principle be controlled by an otherwise arbitrarily powerful adversary—for example, thermal noise from blackbody radiation—the number of reliably transmissible covert bits is at most proportional to the square root of the number of orthogonal modes (the time-bandwidth product) available in the transmission interval. We demonstrate this in a proof-of-principle experiment. Our result paves the way to realizing communications that are kept covert from an all-powerful quantum adversary. PMID:26478089

  12. Continuous-variable measurement-device-independent multipartite quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yadong; Zhou, Jian; Gong, Xinbao; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; He, Guangqiang

    2016-02-01

    A continuous-variable measurement-device-independent multiparty quantum communication protocol is investigated in this paper. Utilizing the distributed continuous-variable Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state, this protocol can implement both quantum cryptographic conference and quantum secret sharing. We analyze the security of the protocol against both the entangling cloner attack and the coherent attack. The entangling cloner attack is a practical individual attack, and the coherent attack is the optimal attack Eve can implement. Simulation results show that the coherent attack can greatly reduce the secret key rate. Different kinds of entangled attacks are compared and we finally discuss the optimal coherent attacks.

  13. Natural Mode Entanglement as a Resource for Quantum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, Libby; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-11-13

    Natural particle-number entanglement resides between spatial modes in coherent ultracold atomic gases. However, operations on the modes are restricted by a superselection rule that forbids coherent superpositions of different particle numbers. This seemingly prevents mode entanglement being used as a resource for quantum communication. In this Letter, we demonstrate that mode entanglement of a single massive particle can be used for dense coding and quantum teleportation despite the superselection rule. In particular, we provide schemes where the dense coding linear photonic channel capacity is reached without a shared reservoir and where the full quantum channel capacity is achieved if both parties share a coherent particle reservoir.

  14. Quantum Teamwork for Unconditional Multiparty Communication with Gaussian States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Adesso, Gerardo; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate the capability of continuous variable Gaussian states to communicate multipartite quantum information. A quantum teamwork protocol is presented according to which an arbitrary possibly entangled multimode state can be faithfully teleported between two teams each comprising many cooperative users. We prove that N-mode Gaussian weighted graph states exist for arbitrary N that enable unconditional quantum teamwork implementations for any arrangement of the teams. These perfect continuous variable maximally multipartite entangled resources are typical among pure Gaussian states and are unaffected by the entanglement frustration occurring in multiqubit states.

  15. Bidirectional controlled quantum teleportation and secure direct communication using five-qubit entangled state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan-hua; Li, Xiao-lan; Sang, Ming-huang; Nie, Yi-you; Wang, Zi-sheng

    2013-12-01

    A scheme is presented to implement bidirectional controlled quantum teleportation (QT) by using a five-qubit entangled state as a quantum channel, where Alice may transmit an arbitrary single qubit state called qubit A to Bob and at the same time, Bob may also transmit an arbitrary single qubit state called qubit B to Alice via the control of the supervisor Charlie. Based on our channel, we explicitly show how the bidirectional controlled QT protocol works. By using this bidirectional controlled teleportation, espcially, a bidirectional controlled quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol, i.e., the so-called controlled quantum dialogue, is further investigated. Under the situation of insuring the security of the quantum channel, Alice (Bob) encodes a secret message directly on a sequence of qubit states and transmits them to Bob (Alice) supervised by Charlie. Especially, the qubits carrying the secret message do not need to be transmitted in quantum channel. At last, we show this QSDC scheme may be determinate and secure.

  16. Comment on: Supervisory Asymmetric Deterministic Secure Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Shih-Hung; Tsai, Chia-Wei; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, Xiu et al. (Optics Communications 284:2065-2069, 2011) proposed several applications based on a new secure four-site distribution scheme using χ-type entangled states. This paper points out that one of these applications, namely, supervisory asymmetric deterministic secure quantum communication, is subject to an information leakage problem, in which the receiver can extract two bits of a three-bit secret message without the supervisor's permission. An enhanced protocol is proposed to resolve this problem.

  17. Free-space optical communications using encoding of data on different orbital-angular-momentum modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, Asher J.; Ren, Yongxiong; Xie, Guodong; Li, Long; Cao, Yinwen; Zhao, Zhe; Liao, Peicheng; Wang, Zhe; Yan, Yan; Ahmed, Nisar; Liu, Cong; Tur, Moshe; Willner, Alan E.

    2016-03-01

    Free-space optical communications can play a significant role in line-of-sight links. In general, data can be encoded on the amplitude, phase, or temporal position of the optical wave. Importantly, there are environments for which ever-more information is desired for a given amount of optical energy. This can be accomplished if there are more degrees-of-freedom that the wave can occupy to provide higher energy efficiency for a given capacity (i.e., bits/photon). Traditionally, free-space optical links have used only a single beam, such that there was little opportunity for a wave to occupy more than one spatial location, thereby not allowing the spatial domain to be used for data encoding. Recently, space- and mode-multiplexing has been demonstrated to simultaneously transmit multiple data-carrying free-space beams. Each spatially overlapping mode was orthogonal to other modes and carried a unique amount of orbital-angular-momentum (OAM). In this paper, we consider that OAM modes could be a data-encoding domain, such that a beam could uniquely occupy one of many modes, i.e., 4 modes would provide 4 possible states and double the bits of information for the same amount of energy. In the past, such OAM-based encoding was shown at kHz data rates. We will present the architecture and experimental results for OAM-based data encoding for a free-space 1.55-μm data link under different system parameters. Key features of the results include: (a) encoding on several modes is accomplished using a fast switch, and (b) low bit-error-rates are achieved at >Gbit/s, which is orders-of-magnitude faster than previous results.

  18. Phase encoding schemes for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with basis-dependent flaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Qi, Bing

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we study the unconditional security of the so-called measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDIQKD) with the basis-dependent flaw in the context of phase encoding schemes. We propose two schemes for the phase encoding: The first one employs a phase locking technique with the use of non-phase-randomized coherent pulses, and the second one uses conversion of standard Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) phase encoding pulses into polarization modes. We prove the unconditional security of these schemes and we also simulate the key generation rate based on simple device models that accommodate imperfections. Our simulation results show the feasibility of these schemes with current technologies and highlight the importance of the state preparation with good fidelity between the density matrices in the two bases. Since the basis-dependent flaw is a problem not only for MDIQKD but also for standard quantum key distribution (QKD), our work highlights the importance of an accurate signal source in practical QKD systems.

  19. Localization and its consequences for quantum walk algorithms and quantum communication

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, J. P.; Linden, N.; Matthews, J. C. F.; Winter, A.

    2007-07-15

    The exponential speedup of quantum walks on certain graphs, relative to classical particles diffusing on the same graph, is a striking observation. It has suggested the possibility of new fast quantum algorithms. We point out here that quantum mechanics can also lead, through the phenomenon of localization, to exponential suppression of motion on these graphs (even in the absence of decoherence). In fact, for physical embodiments of graphs, this will be the generic behavior. It also has implications for proposals for using spin networks, including spin chains, as quantum communication channels.

  20. Quantum secure direct communication against the collective noise with polarization-entangled Bell states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Li; Wang, Jun-Xi; Li, Qing-Yang; Shen, Hong-Zhi; Dong, Hai-Kuan; Xiu, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yuan-Peng; Gao, Ya-Jun

    2015-12-01

    We propose a quantum secure direct communication protocol via a collective noise channel, exploiting polarization-entangled Bell states and the nondemolition parity analysis based on weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities. The participant Bob, who will receive the secret information, sends one of two photons in a polarization-entangled Bell state exploiting the transmission circuit against the collective noise to the participant Alice, who will send the secret information, by the means of photon block transmission. If the first security check employing the nondemolition parity analysis is passed, the task of securely distributing the quantum channel is fulfilled. Encoding secret information on the photons sent from Bob by performing single-photon unitary transformation operations, Alice resends these photons to Bob through the transmission circuit against the collective noise. Exploiting the nondemolition parity analysis to distinguish Bell states, Bob can obtain the secret information from Alice after the second security check is passed, and the resulting Bell states can be applied to other tasks of quantum information processing. Under the condition of the secure quantum channel being confirmed, the photons that are utilized in the role of the security check can be applied to the function of secure direct communication, thus enhancing the efficiency of transmitting secret information and saving a lot of resources.

  1. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Graphene based quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. G.; Hu, H.; Pan, Y.; Mao, J. H.; Gao, M.; Guo, H. M.; Du, S. X.; Greber, T.; Gao, H.-J.

    2010-08-01

    Laterally localized electronic states are identified on a single layer of graphene on ruthenium by low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The individual states are separated by 3 nm and comprise regions of about 90 carbon atoms. This constitutes a highly regular quantum dot-array with molecular precision. It is evidenced by quantum well resonances (QWRs) with energies that relate to the corrugation of the graphene layer. The dI/dV conductance spectra are modeled by a layer height dependent potential-well with a delta-function potential that describes the barrier for electron penetration into graphene. The resulting QWRs are strongest and lowest in energy on the isolated 'hill' regions with a diameter of 2 nm, where the graphene is decoupled from the surface.

  2. Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication in Trapped Ion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yeqin; Gao, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    We propose a feasible scheme for implementing quantum secure direct communication in trapped ion systems. According to the results measured by the sender, the receiver can obtain different secret messages in a deterministic way. Our scheme is insensitive to both the initial vibrational state and heating. The probability of the success in our scheme is 1.0.

  3. Quantum Communication in the Ion-Trapped System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiong

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical scheme of quantum communication is proposed in the context of ion-trapped systems. According to the results, the receiver can obtain different secret messages in a deterministic way. Our scheme is insensitive to both the initial vibrational state and heating. The probability of the success in our scheme is 1.0.

  4. Measurement-based noiseless linear amplification for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Helen M.; Walk, Nathan; Assad, Syed M.; Janousek, Jiri; Hosseini, Sara; Ralph, Timothy C.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy

    2014-04-01

    Entanglement distillation is an indispensable ingredient in extended quantum communication networks. Distillation protocols are necessarily non-deterministic and require advanced experimental techniques such as noiseless amplification. Recently, it was shown that the benefits of noiseless amplification could be extracted by performing a post-selective filtering of the measurement record to improve the performance of quantum key distribution. We apply this protocol to entanglement degraded by transmission loss of up to the equivalent of 100 km of optical fibre. We measure an effective entangled resource stronger than that achievable by even a maximally entangled resource passively transmitted through the same channel. We also provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of secret key extraction from an otherwise insecure regime. The measurement-based noiseless linear amplifier offers two advantages over its physical counterpart: ease of implementation and near-optimal probability of success. It should provide an effective and versatile tool for a broad class of entanglement-based quantum communication protocols.

  5. Quantum Sensing and Communications Being Developed for Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Seibert, Marc A.

    2003-01-01

    An interdisciplinary quantum communications and sensing research effort has been underway at the NASA Glenn Research Center since the summer of 2000. Researchers in the Communications Technology, Instrumentation and Controls, and Propulsion and Turbomachinery Divisions have been working together to study and develop techniques that use the principle of quantum entanglement (QE). This work is supported principally by the Nanotechnology Base R&T program at Glenn. As applied to communications and sensing, QE is an emerging technology that holds promise as a new and innovative way to communicate faster and farther, and to sense, measure, and image environmental properties in ways that are not possible with existing technology. Quantum entangled photons are "inseparable" as described by a wave function formalism. For two entangled photons, the term "inseparable" means that one cannot describe one photon without completely describing the other. This inseparability gives rise to what appears as "spooky," or nonintuitive, behavior because of the quantum nature of the process. For example, two entangled photons of lower energy can be created simultaneously from a single photon of higher energy in a process called spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Our research is focused on the use of polarization-entangled photons generated by passing a high-energy (blue) photon through a nonlinear beta barium borate crystal to generate two red photons that have orthogonal, but entangled, polarization states. Although the actual polarization state of any one photon is not known until it is measured, the act of measuring the polarization of one photon completely determines the polarization state of its twin because of entanglement. This unique relationship between the photons provides extra information about the system. For example, entanglement makes it easy to distinguish entangled photons from other photons impinging on a detector. For many other applications, ranging from quantum

  6. Design the RS(255,239) encoder and interleaving in the space laser communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Yue; Tong, Shou-feng

    2013-08-01

    Space laser communication is researched by more and more countries. Space laser communication deserves to be researched. We can acquire higher transmission speed and better transmission quality between satellite and satellite, satellite and earth by setting up laser link. But in the space laser communication system,the reliability is under influences of many factors of atmosphere,detector noise, optical platform jitter and other factors. The intensity of the signal which is attenuated because of the long transmission distance is demanded to have higher intensity to acquire low BER. The channel code technology can enhance the anti-interference ability of the system. The theory of channel coding technology is that some redundancies is added to information codes. So it can make use of the checkout polynomial to correct errors at the sink port. It help the system to get low BER rate and coding gain. Reed-Solomon (RS) code is one of the channel code, and it is one kind of multi-ary BCH code, and it can correct both burst errors and random errors, and it is widely used in the error-control schemes. The new method of the RS encoder and interleaving based on the FPGA is proposed, aiming at satisfying the needs of the widely-used error control technology in the space laser communication field. An improved method for Finite Galois Field multiplier of encoding is proposed, and it is suitable for FPGA implementation. Comparison of the XOR gates cost between the optimization and original, the number of XOR gates is lessen more than 40% .Then give a new structure of interleaving by using the FPGA. By controlling the in-data stream and out-data stream of encoder, the asynchronous process of the whole frame is accomplished, while by using multi-level pipeline, the real-time transfer of the data is achieved. By controlling the read-address and write-address of the block RAM, the interleaving operation of the arbitrary depth is synchronously implemented. Compared with the normal

  7. Free-space quantum cryptography with quantum and telecom communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Klaus, Werner; Kunimori, Hiroo; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide

    2008-07-01

    Quantum cryptography is a new technique that uses the laws of physics to transmit information securely. In such systems, the vehicle to transfer quantum information is a single photon. However, the transmission distance is limited by the absorption of photons in an optical fiber in which the maximum demonstrated range is about 100 km. Free-space quantum cryptography between a ground station and a satellite is a way of sending the quantum information further distances than that with optical fibers since there is no birefringence effect in the atmosphere. At the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), the laser communication demonstration between the NICT optical ground station and a low earth orbit satellite was successfully conducted in 2006. For such space communication links, free-space quantum cryptography is considered to be an important application in the future. We have developed a prototype system for free-space quantum cryptography using a weak coherent light and a telecom communication channel. The preliminary results are presented.

  8. Towards communication-efficient quantum oblivious key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panduranga Rao, M. V.; Jakobi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Symmetrically private information retrieval, a fundamental problem in the field of secure multiparty computation, is defined as follows: A database D of N bits held by Bob is queried by a user Alice who is interested in the bit Db in such a way that (1) Alice learns Db and only Db and (2) Bob does not learn anything about Alice's choice b. While solutions to this problem in the classical domain rely largely on unproven computational complexity theoretic assumptions, it is also known that perfect solutions that guarantee both database and user privacy are impossible in the quantum domain. Jakobi [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.83.022301 83, 022301 (2011)] proposed a protocol for oblivious transfer using well-known quantum key device (QKD) techniques to establish an oblivious key to solve this problem. Their solution provided a good degree of database and user privacy (using physical principles like the impossibility of perfectly distinguishing nonorthogonal quantum states and the impossibility of superluminal communication) while being loss-resistant and implementable with commercial QKD devices (due to the use of the Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 protocol). However, their quantum oblivious key distribution (QOKD) protocol requires a communication complexity of O(NlogN). Since modern databases can be extremely large, it is important to reduce this communication as much as possible. In this paper, we first suggest a modification of their protocol wherein the number of qubits that need to be exchanged is reduced to O(N). A subsequent generalization reduces the quantum communication complexity even further in such a way that only a few hundred qubits are needed to be transferred even for very large databases.

  9. Quantum communication using a multiqubit entangled channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Shohini; Hamel, Angele

    2015-12-01

    We describe a protocol in which two senders each teleport a qubit to a receiver using a multiqubit entangled state. The multiqubit channel used for teleportation is genuinely 4-qubit entangled and is not equivalent to a product of maximally entangled Bell pairs under local unitary operations. We discuss a scenario in which both senders must participate for the qubits to be successfully teleported. Such an all-or-nothing scheme cannot be implemented with standard two-qubit entangled Bell pairs and can be useful for different communication and computing tasks.

  10. Quantum communication using a multiqubit entangled channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ghose, Shohini; Hamel, Angele

    2015-12-31

    We describe a protocol in which two senders each teleport a qubit to a receiver using a multiqubit entangled state. The multiqubit channel used for teleportation is genuinely 4-qubit entangled and is not equivalent to a product of maximally entangled Bell pairs under local unitary operations. We discuss a scenario in which both senders must participate for the qubits to be successfully teleported. Such an all-or-nothing scheme cannot be implemented with standard two-qubit entangled Bell pairs and can be useful for different communication and computing tasks.

  11. Partitioned-Interval Quantum Optical Communications Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The proposed quantum receiver in this innovation partitions each binary signal interval into two unequal segments: a short "pre-measurement" segment in the beginning of the symbol interval used to make an initial guess with better probability than 50/50 guessing, and a much longer segment used to make the high-sensitivity signal detection via field-cancellation and photon-counting detection. It was found that by assigning as little as 10% of the total signal energy to the pre-measurement segment, the initial 50/50 guess can be improved to about 70/30, using the best available measurements such as classical coherent or "optimized Kennedy" detection.

  12. An Online Banking System Based on Quantum Cryptography Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ri-gui; Li, Wei; Huan, Tian-tian; Shen, Chen-yi; Li, Hai-sheng

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an online banking system has been built. Based on quantum cryptography communication, this system is proved unconditional secure. Two sets of GHZ states are applied, which can ensure the safety of purchase and payment, respectively. In another word, three trading participants in each triplet state group form an interdependent and interactive relationship. In the meantime, trading authorization and blind signature is introduced by means of controllable quantum teleportation. Thus, an effective monitor is practiced on the premise that the privacy of trading partners is guaranteed. If there is a dispute or deceptive behavior, the system will find out the deceiver immediately according to the relationship mentioned above.

  13. Quantum Communication between Atomic Ensembles Using Coherent Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lu-Ming; Cirac, J. I.; Zoller, P.; Polzik, E. S.

    2000-12-01

    Protocols for quantum communication between massive particles, such as atoms, are usually based on making use of nonclassical light, and/or superhigh finesse optical cavities are normally needed to enhance interaction between atoms and photons. We demonstrate a remarkable result: by using only coherent light, entanglement can be generated between distant free space atomic ensembles, and an unknown quantum state can thus be teleported from one to another. Neither nonclassical light nor cavities are needed in the scheme, which greatly simplifies its experimental implementation.

  14. Quantum dots encoded Au coated polystyrene bead arranged micro-channel for multiplex arrays.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Wang, Zhan; Yang, Runyu; Zou, Linling; Zhou, Zhen; Mi, Tie; Shi, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a promising micro-channel multiplex immunoassay method based on the quantum dots encoded beads which requires micro-volume sample. Briefly, Au nanoparticles coated polystyrene (PS) beads were prepared and Quantum dots (QDs) were employed to encode 4 types of the PS beads by different emission wavelength QDs and various intensities. Different coding types of the beads were immobilized with different antibodies on the surface and BSA was used to block the unsatisfied sites. The antibody linked beads were then arranged in the 150 µm diameter optical capillary where the specific reactions took place before the detections. Results showed that the antibody on the Au coated surface maintains the bioactivity for the immunoreactions. Using this system, the fluorescent intensity was linear with analyte concentration in the range of 1×10(-7)-1×10(-5) mg/mL (RSD<5%, 4 repeats) and the lower detection limit reached 5×10(-8) mg/mL. It was proved to be a promising approach for the future miniaturization analytical devices. PMID:26695326

  15. Fast quantum communication in linear networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Kurt; Wu, Rebing; Wang, Xiaoting; Ashhab, Sahel; Chen, Qi-Ming; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-05-01

    Here we consider the speed at which quantum information can be transferred between the nodes of a linear network. Because such nodes are linear oscillators, this speed is also important in the cooling and state preparation of mechanical oscillators, as well as in frequency conversion. We show that if there is no restriction on the size of the linear coupling between two oscillators, then there exist control protocols that will swap their respective states with high fidelity within a time much shorter than a single oscillation period. Standard gradient search methods fail to find these fast protocols. We were able to do so by augmenting standard search methods with a path-tracing technique, demonstrating that this technique has remarkable power to solve time-optimal control problems, as well as confirming the highly challenging nature of these problems. As a further demonstration of the power of path tracing, first introduced by Moore Tibbets et al. (Phys. Rev. A, 86 (2012) 062309), we apply it to the generation of entanglement in a linear network.

  16. Communication Tasks with Infinite Quantum-Classical Separation.

    PubMed

    Perry, Christopher; Jain, Rahul; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2015-07-17

    Quantum resources can be more powerful than classical resources-a quantum computer can solve certain problems exponentially faster than a classical computer, and computing a function of two parties' inputs can be done with exponentially less communication with quantum messages than with classical ones. Here we consider a task between two players, Alice and Bob where quantum resources are infinitely more powerful than their classical counterpart. Alice is given a string of length n, and Bob's task is to exclude certain combinations of bits that Alice might have. If Alice must send classical messages, then she must reveal nearly n bits of information to Bob, but if she is allowed to send quantum bits, the amount of information she must reveal goes to zero with increasing n. Next, we consider a version of the task where the parties may have access to entanglement. With this assistance, Alice only needs to send a constant number of bits, while without entanglement, the number of bits Alice must send grows linearly with n. The task is related to the Pusey-Barrett-Rudolph theorem which arises in the context of the foundations of quantum theory. PMID:26230777

  17. Acoustic communication in crocodilians: information encoding and species specificity of juvenile calls.

    PubMed

    Vergne, Amélie L; Aubin, Thierry; Martin, Samuel; Mathevon, Nicolas

    2012-11-01

    In the Crocodylia order, all species are known for their ability to produce sounds in several communication contexts. Though recent experimental studies have brought evidence of the important biological role of young crocodilian calls, especially at hatching time, the juvenile vocal repertoire still needs to be clarified in order to describe thoroughly the crocodilian acoustic communication channel. The goal of this study is to investigate the acoustic features (structure and information coding) in the contact call of juveniles from three different species (Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus, Black caiman, Melanosuchus niger and Spectacled caiman, Caiman crocodilus). We have shown that even though substantial structural differences exist between the calls of different species, they do not seem relevant for crocodilians. Indeed, juveniles and adults from the species studied use a similar and non-species-specific way of encoding information, which relies on frequency modulation parameters. Interestingly, using conditioning experiments, we demonstrated that this tolerance in responses to signals of different acoustic structures was unlikely to be related to a lack of discriminatory abilities. This result reinforced the idea that crocodilians have developed adaptations to use sounds efficiently for communication needs. PMID:22820991

  18. Communication at the quantum speed limit along a spin chain

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Michael; Montangero, Simone; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Calarco, Tommaso

    2010-08-15

    Spin chains have long been considered as candidates for quantum channels to facilitate quantum communication. We consider the transfer of a single excitation along a spin-1/2 chain governed by Heisenberg-type interactions. We build on the work of Balachandran and Gong [V. Balachandran and J. Gong, Phys. Rev. A 77, 012303 (2008)] and show that by applying optimal control to an external parabolic magnetic field, one can drastically increase the propagation rate by two orders of magnitude. In particular, we show that the theoretical maximum propagation rate can be reached, where the propagation of the excitation takes the form of a dispersed wave. We conclude that optimal control is not only a useful tool for experimental application, but also for theoretical inquiry into the physical limits and dynamics of many-body quantum systems.

  19. Experimental bit commitment based on quantum communication and special relativity.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, T; Kaniewski, J; Bussières, F; Houlmann, R; Tomamichel, M; Kent, A; Gisin, N; Wehner, S; Zbinden, H

    2013-11-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which Bob wishes to commit a secret bit to Alice. Perfectly secure bit commitment between two mistrustful parties is impossible through asynchronous exchange of quantum information. Perfect security is however possible when Alice and Bob split into several agents exchanging classical and quantum information at times and locations suitably chosen to satisfy specific relativistic constraints. Here we report on an implementation of a bit commitment protocol using quantum communication and special relativity. Our protocol is based on [A. Kent, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 130501 (2012)] and has the advantage that it is practically feasible with arbitrary large separations between the agents in order to maximize the commitment time. By positioning agents in Geneva and Singapore, we obtain a commitment time of 15 ms. A security analysis considering experimental imperfections and finite statistics is presented. PMID:24237497

  20. Communication system technology for demonstration of BB84 quantum key distribution in optical aircraft downlinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Florian; Nauerth, Sebastian; Fuchs, Christian; Horwath, Joachim; Rau, Markus; Weinfurter, Harald

    2012-10-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD), either fiber based or free-space, allows for provably secure key distribution solely based on the laws of quantum mechanics. Feasibility of QKD systems in aircraft-ground links was demonstrated with a successful key exchange. Experiment flights were undertaken during night time at the site of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. The aircraft was a Dornier 228 equipped with a laser communication terminal, originally designed for optical data downlinks with intensity modulation and direct detection. The counter terminal on ground was an optical ground station with a 40 cm Cassegrain type receiver telescope. Alice and Bob, as the transmitter and receiver systems usually are called in QKD, were integrated in the flight and ground terminals, respectively. A second laser source with 1550 nm wavelength was used to transmit a 100 MHz signal for synchronization of the two partners. The so called BB84 protocol, here implemented with faint polarization encoded pulses at 850nm wavelength, was applied as key generation scheme. Within two flights, measurements of the QKD and communication channel could be obtained with link distance of 20 km. After link acquisition, the tracking systems in the aircraft and on ground were able to keep lock of the narrow QKD beam. Emphasis of this paper is put on presentation of the link technology, i.e. link design and modifications of the communication terminals. First analysis of link attenuation, performance of the QKD system and scintillation of the sync signal is also addressed.

  1. Quantum mechanics and faster-than-light communication Methodological considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardi, G. C.; Weber, T.

    1983-11-01

    A critical analysis is made of proposals for faster-than-light communications schemes based on quantum mechanics concepts. The point of view taken is that no reduction in one physical system can have an instantaneous effect on another, isolated system. It is shown that the philosophical contradictions exposed by the Einstein-Podolsky Rosen can be directly transferred to an interpretation of physical events. Attention is directed toward the possibility of a photon, propagating in one direction with either circular or plane polarization, entering a nonselective laser tube. The photon originally emerged from a quantum decay process which yielded two photons traveling in opposite directions. The photon in the laser gain tube precipitates a beam which is polarized as the initiating photon. A first observer can then determine the polarization observed by a second observer (with the laser) before the signal arrives. It is concluded that the FLASH argument of Herbert (1982) therefore assumes a violation of quantum mechanical laws in order to use quantum mechanics to prove that faster-than-light communication is possible.

  2. Quantum cryptography for secure free-space communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard J.; Buttler, William T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Lamoreaux, Steve K.; Luther, Gabriel G.; Morgan, George L.; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, C. Glen

    1999-04-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as 'key' material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is a new technique for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenberg's uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). We have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non- orthogonal photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. We have developed and tested a free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system over an outdoor optical path of approximately 1 km at Los Alamos National Laboratory under nighttime conditions. Results show that free-space QKD can provide secure real-time key distribution between parties who have a need to communicate secretly. Finally, we examine the feasibility of surface to satellite QKD.

  3. Quantum cryptography for secure free-space communications

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Buttler, W.T.; Kwiat, P.G.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Nordholt, J.E.; Peterson, C.G.

    1999-03-01

    The secure distribution of the secret random bit sequences known as key material, is an essential precursor to their use for the encryption and decryption of confidential communications. Quantum cryptography is a new technique for secure key distribution with single-photon transmissions: Heisenberg`s uncertainty principle ensures that an adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection (eavesdropping raises the key error rate above a threshold value). The authors have developed experimental quantum cryptography systems based on the transmission of non-orthogonal photon polarization states to generate shared key material over line-of-sight optical links. Key material is built up using the transmission of a single-photon per bit of an initial secret random sequence. A quantum-mechanically random subset of this sequence is identified, becoming the key material after a data reconciliation stage with the sender. The authors have developed and tested a free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) system over an outdoor optical path of {approximately}1 km at Los Alamos National Laboratory under nighttime conditions. Results show that free-space QKD can provide secure real-time key distribution between parties who have a need to communicate secretly. Finally, they examine the feasibility of surface to satellite QKD.

  4. Experimental multiplexing of quantum key distribution with classical optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liu-Jun; Chen, Luo-Kan; Ju, Lei; Xu, Mu-Lan; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Kai; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Chen, Teng-Yun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the realization of quantum key distribution (QKD) when combined with classical optical communication, and synchronous signals within a single optical fiber. In the experiment, the classical communication sources use Fabry-Pérot (FP) lasers, which are implemented extensively in optical access networks. To perform QKD, multistage band-stop filtering techniques are developed, and a wavelength-division multiplexing scheme is designed for the multi-longitudinal-mode FP lasers. We have managed to maintain sufficient isolation among the quantum channel, the synchronous channel and the classical channels to guarantee good QKD performance. Finally, the quantum bit error rate remains below a level of 2% across the entire practical application range. The proposed multiplexing scheme can ensure low classical light loss, and enables QKD over fiber lengths of up to 45 km simultaneously when the fibers are populated with bidirectional FP laser communications. Our demonstration paves the way for application of QKD to current optical access networks, where FP lasers are widely used by the end users.

  5. Experimental multiplexing of quantum key distribution with classical optical communication

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liu-Jun; Chen, Luo-Kan; Ju, Lei; Xu, Mu-Lan; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Kai; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Chen, Teng-Yun Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-02-23

    We demonstrate the realization of quantum key distribution (QKD) when combined with classical optical communication, and synchronous signals within a single optical fiber. In the experiment, the classical communication sources use Fabry-Pérot (FP) lasers, which are implemented extensively in optical access networks. To perform QKD, multistage band-stop filtering techniques are developed, and a wavelength-division multiplexing scheme is designed for the multi-longitudinal-mode FP lasers. We have managed to maintain sufficient isolation among the quantum channel, the synchronous channel and the classical channels to guarantee good QKD performance. Finally, the quantum bit error rate remains below a level of 2% across the entire practical application range. The proposed multiplexing scheme can ensure low classical light loss, and enables QKD over fiber lengths of up to 45 km simultaneously when the fibers are populated with bidirectional FP laser communications. Our demonstration paves the way for application of QKD to current optical access networks, where FP lasers are widely used by the end users.

  6. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Reversible arithmetic logic unit for quantum arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkedal Thomsen, Michael; Glück, Robert; Axelsen, Holger Bock

    2010-09-01

    This communication presents the complete design of a reversible arithmetic logic unit (ALU) that can be part of a programmable reversible computing device such as a quantum computer. The presented ALU is garbage free and uses reversible updates to combine the standard reversible arithmetic and logical operations in one unit. Combined with a suitable control unit, the ALU permits the construction of an r-Turing complete computing device. The garbage-free ALU developed in this communication requires only 6n elementary reversible gates for five basic arithmetic-logical operations on two n-bit operands and does not use ancillae. This remarkable low resource consumption was achieved by generalizing the V-shape design first introduced for quantum ripple-carry adders and nesting multiple V-shapes in a novel integrated design. This communication shows that the realization of an efficient reversible ALU for a programmable computing device is possible and that the V-shape design is a very versatile approach to the design of quantum networks.

  7. On the photonic implementation of universal quantum gates, bell states preparation circuit and quantum LDPC encoders and decoders based on directional couplers and HNLF.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2010-04-12

    The Bell states preparation circuit is a basic circuit required in quantum teleportation. We describe how to implement it in all-fiber technology. The basic building blocks for its implementation are directional couplers and highly nonlinear optical fiber (HNLF). Because the quantum information processing is based on delicate superposition states, it is sensitive to quantum errors. In order to enable fault-tolerant quantum computing the use of quantum error correction is unavoidable. We show how to implement in all-fiber technology encoders and decoders for sparse-graph quantum codes, and provide an illustrative example to demonstrate this implementation. We also show that arbitrary set of universal quantum gates can be implemented based on directional couplers and HNLFs. PMID:20588656

  8. Design and analysis of communication protocols for quantum repeater networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Cody; Kim, Danny; Rakher, Matthew T.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Ladd, Thaddeus D.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze how the performance of a quantum-repeater network depends on the protocol employed to distribute entanglement, and we find that the choice of repeater-to-repeater link protocol has a profound impact on entanglement-distribution rate as a function of hardware parameters. We develop numerical simulations of quantum networks using different protocols, where the repeater hardware is modeled in terms of key performance parameters, such as photon generation rate and collection efficiency. These parameters are motivated by recent experimental demonstrations in quantum dots, trapped ions, and nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. We find that a quantum-dot repeater with the newest protocol (‘MidpointSource’) delivers the highest entanglement-distribution rate for typical cases where there is low probability of establishing entanglement per transmission, and in some cases the rate is orders of magnitude higher than other schemes. Our simulation tools can be used to evaluate communication protocols as part of designing a large-scale quantum network.

  9. Novel Quantum Virtual Private Network Scheme for PON via Quantum Secure Direct Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Li-Hua; Liu, Ye; Zhou, Nan-Run

    2013-09-01

    Two quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocols with quantum identification (QI) based on passive optical network (PON) architecture are proposed. One QSDC protocol can be implemented between two different optical network units just with simple configurations of PON by optical line terminal when they are in the same virtual private network after optical line terminal performing QI to the optical network units in the given PON architecture. The other QSDC protocol is also implemented between any two legitimated users in the virtual private network but with considerable reduction of workload of the optical line terminal. The security analysis shows that the proposed QSDC schemes with quantum identification are unconditionally secure and allow the legitimate users to exchange their secret information efficiently and to realize a quantum virtual private network in the PON networks ultimately.

  10. An Immune Quantum Communication Model for Dephasing Noise Using Four-Qubit Cluster State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-jin; Li, Dong-fen; Qin, Zhi-guang

    2016-01-01

    Quantum secure communication of dephasing in the presence of noise is a hot spot in research in the field of quantum secure communication. Quantum steganography aims is to transfer secret information in public quantum channel. But because effect of annealing phase noise, quantum states which is need to transfer easily delayed or changed. So, quantum steganography is very meaning apply to transmit secret information covertly in quantum noisy channels. The article introduced dephasing noise impact on the physics of quantum state, through the theoretical research, construct the logic of quantum states to back the phase noise immunity, and construct the decoherence free subspace, It can guarantees fidelity secret information exchange through quantum communication model in a noisy environment.

  11. Decoding of quantum dots encoded microbeads using a hyperspectral fluorescence imaging method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixi; Liu, Le; He, Yonghong; Zhu, Liang; Ma, Hui

    2015-05-19

    We presented a decoding method of quantum dots encoded microbeads with its fluorescence spectra using line scan hyperspectral fluorescence imaging (HFI) method. A HFI method was developed to attain both the spectra of fluorescence signal and the spatial information of the encoded microbeads. A decoding scheme was adopted to decode the spectra of multicolor microbeads acquired by the HFI system. Comparison experiments between the HFI system and the flow cytometer were conducted. The results showed that the HFI system has higher spectrum resolution; thus, more channels in spectral dimension can be used. The HFI system detection and decoding experiment with the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) immobilized multicolor beads was done, and the result showed the efficiency of the HFI system. Surface modification of the microbeads by use of the polydopamine was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy and ssDNA immobilization was characterized by the laser confocal microscope. These results indicate that the designed HFI system can be applied to practical biological and medical applications. PMID:25902043

  12. Long-distance quantum communication with neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Razavi, Mohsen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2006-04-15

    The architecture proposed by Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) for long-distance quantum communication with atomic ensembles is analyzed. Its fidelity and throughput in entanglement distribution, entanglement swapping, and quantum teleportation is derived within a framework that accounts for multiple excitations in the ensembles as well as loss and asymmetries in the channel. The DLCZ performance metrics that are obtained are compared to the corresponding results for the trapped-atom quantum communication architecture that has been proposed by a team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Northwestern University (MIT and NU). Both systems are found to be capable of high-fidelity entanglement distribution. However, the DLCZ scheme only provides conditional teleportation and repeater operation, whereas the MIT-NU architecture affords full Bell-state measurements on its trapped atoms. Moreover, it is shown that achieving unity conditional fidelity in DLCZ teleportation and repeater operation requires ideal photon-number resolving detectors. The maximum conditional fidelities for DLCZ teleportation and repeater operation that can be realized with nonresolving detectors are 1/2 and 2/3, respectively.

  13. Reliable video communication over lossy packet networks using multiple state encoding and path diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, John G.

    2000-12-01

    Video communication over lossy packet networks such as the Internet is hampered by limited bandwidth and packet loss. This paper presents a system for providing reliable video communication over these networks, where the system is composed of two subsystems: (1) multiple state video encoder/decoder and (2) a path diversity transmission system. Multiple state video coding combats the problem of error propagation at the decoder by coding the video into multiple independently decodable streams, each with its own prediction process and state. If one stream is lost the other streams can still be decoded to produce usable video, and furthermore, the correctly received streams provide bidirectional (previous and future) information that enables improved state recovery for the corrupted stream. This video coder is a form of multiple description coding (MDC), and its novelty lies in its use of information from the multiple streams to perform state recovery at the decoder. The path diversity transmission system explicitly sends different subsets of packets over different paths, as opposed to the default scenarios where the packets proceed along a single path, thereby enabling the end- to-end video application to effectively see an average path behavior. We refer to this as path diversity. Generally, seeing this average path behavior provides better performance than seeing the behavior of any individual random path. For example, the probability that all of the multiple paths are simultaneously congested is much less than the probability that a single path is congested. The resulting path diversity provides the multiple state video decoder with an appropriate virtual channel to assist in recovering from lost packets, and can also simplify system design, e.g. FEC design. We propose two architectures for achieving path diversity, and examine the effectiveness of path diversity in communicating video over a lossy packet network.

  14. Dynamic (2, 3) Threshold Quantum Secret Sharing of Secure Direct Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hong; Orgun, A. Mehmet; Xiao, Jing-Hua; Pieprzyk, Josef; Xue, Li-Yin

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we show that a (2, 3) discrete variable threshold quantum secret sharing scheme of secure direct communication can be achieved based on recurrence using the same devices as in BB84. The scheme is devised by first placing the shares of smaller secret pieces into the shares of the largest secret piece, converting the shares of the largest secret piece into corresponding quantum state sequences, inserting nonorthogonal state particles into the quantum state sequences with the purpose of detecting eavesdropping, and finally sending the new quantum state sequences to the three participants respectively. Consequently, every particle can on average carry up to 1.5-bit messages due to the use of recurrence. The control codes are randomly prepared using the way to generate fountain codes with pre-shared source codes between Alice and Bob, making three participants can detect eavesdropping by themselves without sending classical messages to Alice. Due to the flexible encoding, our scheme is also dynamic, which means that it allows the participants to join and leave freely. Supported in part by an International Macquarie University Research Excellence Scholarship (iMQRES), Australian Research Council Grant DP0987734. This work is also supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) under Grant No. 2010CB923200, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under No. 61377067, Fund of State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China, National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61202362, 61262057, 61472433, and China Postdoctora Science Foundation under Grant No. 2013M542560

  15. 76 FR 56244 - Dialpoint Communications Corp., Pacel Corp., Quantum Group, Inc. (The), and Tradequest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Dialpoint Communications Corp., Pacel Corp., Quantum Group, Inc. (The), and Tradequest... accurate information concerning the securities of Quantum Group, Inc. (The) because it has not filed...

  16. Probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Luo, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    This work proposes a probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue (PAQD) based on Bell states with the following notable features. (1) In our proposed scheme, the dialogue is encoded in a probabilistic way, i.e., the same messages can be encoded into different quantum states, whereas in the state-of-the-art authenticated quantum dialogue (AQD), the dialogue is encoded in a deterministic way; (2) the pre-shared secret key between two communicants can be reused without any security loophole; (3) each dialogue in the proposed PAQD can be exchanged within only one-step quantum communication and one-step classical communication. However, in the state-of-the-art AQD protocols, both communicants have to run a QKD protocol for each dialogue and each dialogue requires multiple quantum as well as classical communicational steps; (4) nevertheless, the proposed scheme can resist the man-in-the-middle attack, the modification attack, and even other well-known attacks.

  17. Disappearance and revival of squeezing in quantum communication with squeezed state over a noisy channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaowei; Hao, Shuhong; Tian, Caixing; Su, Xiaolong; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2016-02-01

    Squeezed state can increase the signal-to-noise ratio in quantum communication and quantum measurement. However, losses and noises existing in real communication channels will reduce or even totally destroy the squeezing. The phenomenon of disappearance of the squeezing will result in the failure of quantum communication. In this letter, we present the experimental demonstrations on the disappearance and revival of the squeezing in quantum communication with squeezed state. The experimental results show that the squeezed light is robust (squeezing never disappears) in a pure lossy but noiseless channel. While in a noisy channel, the excess noise will lead to the disappearance of the squeezing, and the squeezing can be revived by the use of a correlated noisy channel (non-Markovian environment). The channel capacity of quantum communication is increased after the squeezing is revived. The presented results provide useful technical references for quantum communication with squeezed light.

  18. Complete hyperentangled-Bell-state analysis for quantum communication

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Yubo; Deng Fuguo; Long Guilu

    2010-09-15

    It is impossible to unambiguously distinguish the four Bell states in polarization, resorting to linear optical elements only. Recently, the hyperentangled Bell state, the simultaneous entanglement in more than one degree of freedom, has been used to assist in the complete Bell-state analysis of the four Bell states. However, if the additional degree of freedom is qubitlike, one can only distinguish 7 from the group of 16 states. Here we present a way to distinguish the hyperentangled Bell states completely with the help of cross-Kerr nonlinearity. Also, we discuss its application in the quantum teleportation of a particle in an unknown state in two different degrees of freedom and in the entanglement swapping of hyperentangled states. These applications will increase the channel capacity of long-distance quantum communication.

  19. Reply to 'Comment on 'Secure direct communication with a quantum one-time-pad''

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Fuguo; Long Guilu

    2005-07-15

    We reply to the preceding comment which focused on whether there exists a quantum privacy amplification technique for purifying the unknown single-photon states transmitted. In this Reply, we will show that quantum privacy amplification is principally possible, and a specific scheme for direct communication protocol based on single photons has been constructed and will be published elsewhere. Then the secure direct quantum communication is secure against the attack strategy in the preceding comment by using quantum privacy amplification directly.

  20. Quantum secret sharing via local operations and classical communication

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Gao, Fei; Wu, Xia; Qin, Su-Juan; Zuo, Hui-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the distinguishability of orthogonal multipartite entangled states in d-qudit system by restricted local operations and classical communication. According to these properties, we propose a standard (2, n)-threshold quantum secret sharing scheme (called LOCC-QSS scheme), which solves the open question in [Rahaman et al., Phys. Rev. A, 91, 022330 (2015)]. On the other hand, we find that all the existing (k, n)-threshold LOCC-QSS schemes are imperfect (or “ramp”), i.e., unauthorized groups can obtain some information about the shared secret. Furthermore, we present a (3, 4)-threshold LOCC-QSS scheme which is close to perfect. PMID:26586412

  1. Quantum Secure Direct Communication Based on Chaos with Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dazu; Chen, Zhigang; Guo, Ying; Lee, Moon Ho

    2007-12-01

    A quantum secure direct communication protocol based on chaos is proposed with authentication. It has an advantage over distributing the secret message directly and verifying the communicators’ identities with the assistance of a trusted center. To ensure the security of the secret message and the process of verification, the initial order of the travel particles is disturbed according to a chaotic sequence generated secretly via the general Arnold map. Security analysis demonstrates that the present scheme is secure against several attack strategies, such as the man-in-the-middle attack and Trojan horse attack.

  2. Efficient single-photon entanglement concentration for quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lan; Sheng, Yu-Bo

    2014-02-01

    We present two entanglement concentration protocols for single-photon entanglement. The first protocol is implemented with linear optics. With the help of the 50:50 beam splitter, variable beam splitter and an auxiliary photon, a less-entangled single-photon state can be concentrated into a maximally single-photon entangled state with some probability. The second protocol is implemented with the cross-Kerr nonlinearity. With the help of the cross-Kerr nonlinearity, the sophisticated single photon detector is not required. Moreover, the second protocol can be reused to get higher success probability. All these advantages may make the protocols useful in the long-distance quantum communication.

  3. Quantum secret sharing via local operations and classical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Gao, Fei; Wu, Xia; Qin, Su-Juan; Zuo, Hui-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the distinguishability of orthogonal multipartite entangled states in d-qudit system by restricted local operations and classical communication. According to these properties, we propose a standard (2, n)-threshold quantum secret sharing scheme (called LOCC-QSS scheme), which solves the open question in [Rahaman et al., Phys. Rev. A, 91, 022330 (2015)]. On the other hand, we find that all the existing (k, n)-threshold LOCC-QSS schemes are imperfect (or “ramp”), i.e., unauthorized groups can obtain some information about the shared secret. Furthermore, we present a (3, 4)-threshold LOCC-QSS scheme which is close to perfect.

  4. Quantum secret sharing via local operations and classical communication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Gao, Fei; Wu, Xia; Qin, Su-Juan; Zuo, Hui-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the distinguishability of orthogonal multipartite entangled states in d-qudit system by restricted local operations and classical communication. According to these properties, we propose a standard (2, n)-threshold quantum secret sharing scheme (called LOCC-QSS scheme), which solves the open question in [Rahaman et al., Phys. Rev. A, 91, 022330 (2015)]. On the other hand, we find that all the existing (k, n)-threshold LOCC-QSS schemes are imperfect (or "ramp"), i.e., unauthorized groups can obtain some information about the shared secret. Furthermore, we present a (3, 4)-threshold LOCC-QSS scheme which is close to perfect. PMID:26586412

  5. Security of direct communication quantum channel with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, Constantin V.

    2015-01-01

    In the direct communication quantum channels, the authorized recipient (Bob) and the non-authorized recipient (Eve) have different abilities for verification of received information. Bob can apply the feedback to commit the sender (Alice) to perform verification. Eve has to use for verification an indirect method based on the measurement of a set of incompatible observables enough for determination of the coding basis used by Alice. In the protocol of direct communication, regular modification of coding basis and masking it with an equilibrium in average information carrier density matrix prevents reconstruction of coding basis by the results of Eve’s measurements of an arbitrary set of observables. This provides unconditional security of the channel.

  6. Glenn Research Center quantum communicator receiver design and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hizlan, Murad; Lekki, John D.; Nguyen, Binh V.

    2009-10-01

    We investigate, design, and develop a prototype real-time synchronous receiver for the second-generation quantum communicator recently developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center. This communication system exploits the temporal coincidences between simultaneously fired low-power laser sources to communicate at power levels several orders of magnitude less than what is currently achievable through classical means, with the ultimate goal of creating ultra-low-power microsize optical communications and sensing devices. The proposed receiver uses a unique adaptation of the early-late gate method for symbol synchronization and a newly identified 31-bit synchronization word for frame synchronization. This receiver, implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), also provides a number of significant additional features over the existing non-real-time experimental receiver, such as real-time bit error rate (BER) statistics collection and display, and recovery and display of embedded textual information. It also exhibits an indefinite run time and statistics collection.

  7. Entanglement-based quantum communication secured by nonlocal dispersion cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Catherine; Zhang, Zheshen; Steinbrecher, Gregory R.; Zhou, Hongchao; Mower, Jacob; Zhong, Tian; Wang, Ligong; Hu, Xiaolong; Horansky, Robert D.; Verma, Varun B.; Lita, Adriana E.; Mirin, Richard P.; Marsili, Francesco; Shaw, Matthew D.; Nam, Sae Woo; Wornell, Gregory W.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Englund, Dirk

    2014-12-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) enables participants to exchange secret information over long distances with unconditional security. However, the performance of today's QKD systems is subject to hardware limitations, such as those of available nonclassical-light sources and single-photon detectors. By encoding photons in high-dimensional states, the rate of generating secure information under these technical constraints can be maximized. Here, we demonstrate a complete time-energy entanglement-based QKD system with proven security against the broad class of arbitrary collective attacks. The security of the system is based on nonlocal dispersion cancellation between two time-energy entangled photons. This resource-efficient QKD system is implemented at telecommunications wavelength, is suitable for optical fiber and free-space links, and is compatible with wavelength-division multiplexing.

  8. Information Trade-Offs for Optical Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Mark M.; Hayden, Patrick; Guha, Saikat

    2012-04-01

    Recent work has precisely characterized the achievable trade-offs between three key information processing tasks—classical communication (generation or consumption), quantum communication (generation or consumption), and shared entanglement (distribution or consumption), measured in bits, qubits, and ebits per channel use, respectively. Slices and corner points of this three-dimensional region reduce to well-known protocols for quantum channels. A trade-off coding technique can attain any point in the region and can outperform time sharing between the best-known protocols for accomplishing each information processing task by itself. Previously, the benefits of trade-off coding that had been found were too small to be of practical value (viz., for the dephasing and the universal cloning machine channels). In this Letter, we demonstrate that the associated performance gains are in fact remarkably high for several physically relevant bosonic channels that model free-space or fiber-optic links, thermal-noise channels, and amplifiers. We show that significant performance gains from trade-off coding also apply when trading photon-number resources between transmitting public and private classical information simultaneously over secret-key-assisted bosonic channels.

  9. Information trade-offs for optical quantum communication.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Mark M; Hayden, Patrick; Guha, Saikat

    2012-04-01

    Recent work has precisely characterized the achievable trade-offs between three key information processing tasks-classical communication (generation or consumption), quantum communication (generation or consumption), and shared entanglement (distribution or consumption), measured in bits, qubits, and ebits per channel use, respectively. Slices and corner points of this three-dimensional region reduce to well-known protocols for quantum channels. A trade-off coding technique can attain any point in the region and can outperform time sharing between the best-known protocols for accomplishing each information processing task by itself. Previously, the benefits of trade-off coding that had been found were too small to be of practical value (viz., for the dephasing and the universal cloning machine channels). In this Letter, we demonstrate that the associated performance gains are in fact remarkably high for several physically relevant bosonic channels that model free-space or fiber-optic links, thermal-noise channels, and amplifiers. We show that significant performance gains from trade-off coding also apply when trading photon-number resources between transmitting public and private classical information simultaneously over secret-key-assisted bosonic channels. PMID:22540777

  10. Quantum Secure Direct Communication in a noisy environment: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gui Lu

    Quantum communication holds promise for absolutely security in secret message transmission. Quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) is an important branch of the quantum communication in which secret messages are sent directly over a quantum channel with security[Phys. Rev. A 65 , 032302 (2002)]. QSDC offers higher security and is instantaneous in communication, and is a great improvement to the classical communication mode. It is also a powerful basic quantum communication primitive for constructing many other quantum communication tasks such as quantum bidding, quantum signature and quantum dialogue and so on. Since the first QSDC protocol proposed in 2000, it has become one of the extensive research focuses. In this talk, the basic ideas of QSDC will be reviewed, and major QSDC protocols will be described, such as the efficient-QSDC protocol, the two-step QSDC protocol, the one-time-pad QSDC protocol, the high-dimensional QSDC protocol and so on. Experimental progress is also developing steadily, and will also be reviewed. In particular, the quantum one-time-pad QSDC protocol has recently been successfully demonstrated experimentally[arXiv:1503.00451]. Work supported by China National Natural Science Foundation, the Ministry of Science and Technology of China.

  11. Characterization of measurements in quantum communication. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, V. W. S.

    1975-01-01

    A characterization of quantum measurements by operator valued measures is presented. The generalized measurements include simultaneous approximate measurement of noncommuting observables. This characterization is suitable for solving problems in quantum communication. Two realizations of such measurements are discussed. The first is by adjoining an apparatus to the system under observation and performing a measurement corresponding to a self-adjoint operator in the tensor-product Hilbert space of the system and apparatus spaces. The second realization is by performing, on the system alone, sequential measurements that correspond to self-adjoint operators, basing the choice of each measurement on the outcomes of previous measurements. Simultaneous generalized measurements are found to be equivalent to a single finer grain generalized measurement, and hence it is sufficient to consider the set of single measurements. An alternative characterization of generalized measurement is proposed. It is shown to be equivalent to the characterization by operator-values measures, but it is potentially more suitable for the treatment of estimation problems. Finally, a study of the interaction between the information-carrying system and a measurement apparatus provides clues for the physical realizations of abstractly characterized quantum measurements.

  12. Absorption-based quantum communication with NV centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfenberger, Burkhard; Kosaka, Hideo; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    2015-10-01

    We propose a scheme for performing an entanglement-swapping operation within a quantum communications hub (a Bell like measurement) using an NV-centre’s | +/- 1> ≤ftrightarrow | {A}2> optical transition. This is based on the heralded absorption of a photon resonant with that transition. The quantum efficiency of a single photon absorption is low but can be improved by placing the NV centre inside a micro cavity to boost the interaction time and further by recycling the leaked photon back into the cavity after flipping its phase and/or polarization. Throughout this process, the NV is repeatedly monitored via a QND measurement that heralds whether or not the photon absorption has succeeded. Upon success we know a destructive Bell measurement has occurred between that photon and NV centre. Given low losses and high per-pass absorption probability, this scheme should allow the total success probability to approach unity. With long electron spin coherence times possible at low temperatures, this component could be useful within a memory-based quantum repeater or relay.

  13. Experimental demonstration of polarization encoding quantum key distribution system based on intrinsically stable polarization-modulated units.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jindong; Qin, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Yinzhu; Wang, Xiaojing; Chen, Liwei; Zhao, Feng; Wei, Zhengjun; Zhang, Zhiming

    2016-04-18

    A proof-of-principle demonstration of a one-way polarization encoding quantum key distribution (QKD) system is demonstrated. This approach can automatically compensate for birefringence and phase drift. This is achieved by constructing intrinsically stable polarization-modulated units (PMUs) to perform the encoding and decoding, which can be used with four-state protocol, six-state protocol, and the measurement-device-independent (MDI) scheme. A polarization extinction ratio of about 30 dB was maintained for several hours over a 50 km optical fiber without any adjustments to our setup, which evidences its potential for use in practical applications. PMID:27137268

  14. Optical communication with two-photon coherent stages. I - Quantum-state propagation and quantum-noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, H. P.; Shapiro, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    To determine the ultimate performance limitations imposed by quantum effects, it is also essential to consider optimum quantum-state generation. Certain 'generalized' coherent states of the radiation field possess novel quantum noise characteristics that offer the potential for greatly improved optical communications. These states have been called two-photon coherent states because they can be generated, in principle, by stimulated two-photon processes. The use of two-photon coherent state (TCS) radiation in free-space optical communications is considered. A simple theory of quantum state propagation is developed. The theory provides the basis for representing the free-space channel in a quantum-mechanical form convenient for communication analysis. The new theory is applied to TCS radiation.

  15. A general method for selecting quantum channel for bidirectional controlled state teleportation and other schemes of controlled quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapliyal, Kishore; Verma, Amit; Pathak, Anirban

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a large number of protocols for bidirectional controlled state teleportation (BCST) have been proposed using n-qubit entangled states (nin {5,6,7}) as quantum channel. Here, we propose a general method of selecting multiqubit (n>4) quantum channels suitable for BCST and show that all the channels used in the existing protocols of BCST can be obtained using the proposed method. Further, it is shown that the quantum channels used in the existing protocols of BCST form only a negligibly small subset of the set of all the quantum channels that can be constructed using the proposed method to implement BCST. It is also noted that all these quantum channels are also suitable for controlled bidirectional remote state preparation. Following the same logic, methods for selecting quantum channels for other controlled quantum communication tasks, such as controlled bidirectional joint remote state preparation and controlled quantum dialogue, are also provided.

  16. Efficient bounds on quantum-communication rates via their reduced variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Marcin L.; Horodecki, Pawel

    2010-10-01

    We investigate one-way communication scenarios where Bob operating on his component can transfer some subsystem to the environment. We define reduced versions of quantum-communication rates and, further, prove upper bounds on a one-way quantum secret key, distillable entanglement, and quantum-channel capacity by means of their reduced versions. It is shown that in some cases they drastically improve their estimation.

  17. Efficient bounds on quantum-communication rates via their reduced variants

    SciTech Connect

    Nowakowski, Marcin L.; Horodecki, Pawel

    2010-10-15

    We investigate one-way communication scenarios where Bob operating on his component can transfer some subsystem to the environment. We define reduced versions of quantum-communication rates and, further, prove upper bounds on a one-way quantum secret key, distillable entanglement, and quantum-channel capacity by means of their reduced versions. It is shown that in some cases they drastically improve their estimation.

  18. Study of optimum methods of optical communication. [accounting for the effects of the turbulent atmosphere and quantum mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harger, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Abstracts are reported relating to the techniques used in the research concerning optical transmission of information. Communication through the turbulent atmosphere, quantum mechanics, and quantum communication theory are discussed along with the results.

  19. The braided single-stage protocol for quantum secure communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darunkar, Bhagyashri; Verma, Pramode K.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the concept and implementation of a Braided Single-stage Protocol for quantum secure communication. The braided single-stage protocol is a multi-photon tolerant secure protocol. This multi-photon tolerant protocol has been implemented in the laboratory using free-space optics technology. The proposed protocol capitalizes on strengths of the three-stage protocol and extends it with a new concept of braiding. This protocol overcomes the limitations associated with the three-stage protocol in the following ways: It uses the transmission channel only once as opposed to three times in the three-stage protocol, and it is invulnerable to man-in-the-middle attack. This paper also presents the error analysis resulting from the misalignment of the devices in the implementation. The experimental results validate the efficient use of transmission resources and improvement in the data transfer rate.

  20. Measurement-based noiseless linear amplification for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, H. M.; Walk, N.; Haw, J. Y.; Thearle, O.; Assad, S. M.; Janousek, J.; Hosseini, S.; Ralph, T. C.; Symul, T.; Lam, P. K.

    2014-11-01

    Entanglement distillation is an indispensable ingredient in extended quantum communication networks. Distillation protocols are necessarily non-deterministic and require non-trivial experimental techniques such as noiseless amplification. We show that noiseless amplification could be achieved by performing a post-selective filtering of measurement outcomes. We termed this protocol measurement-based noiseless linear amplification (MBNLA). We apply this protocol to entanglement that suffers transmission loss of up to the equivalent of 100km of optical fibre and show that it is capable of distilling entanglement to a level stronger than that achievable by transmitting a maximally entangled state through the same channel. We also provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of secret key extraction from an otherwise insecure regime via MBNLA. Compared to its physical counterpart, MBNLA not only is easier in term of implementation, but also allows one to achieve near optimal probability of success.

  1. Eavesdropping on quantum secure direct communication in quantum channels with arbitrarily low loss rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Quantum attacks that provide an undetectable eavesdropping of the ping-pong protocol operating over lossy quantum channels have already been demonstrated by Wójcik (Phys Rev Lett 90(15):157901, 2003) and Zhang et al. (Phys Lett A 333(12):46-50, 2004). These attacks provide a maximum information gain of 0.311 bits per protocol cycle as long as the induced loss rate remains acceptable. Otherwise, the skipping of some protocol cycles is advised to stay within an accepted loss limit. Such policy leads to a reduction in information gain proportional to the number of skipped cycles. The attack transformation parametrized by the induced loss ratio is proposed. It provides smaller reduction in information gain when the losses accepted by the communicating parties are too low to mount the most effective attack. Other properties of the attack remain the same.

  2. Generation of spectral-encoded signals in noncoherent optical communication systems based on acousto-optic multiwavelength filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proklov, V. V.; Byshevski-Konopko, O. A.; Filatov, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    New acousto-optical (AO) methods and devices necessary for the creation of noncoherent optical code division multiple access (O-CDMA) systems are considered. Based on an AO multiwavelength filter, an original device generating spectral-encoded signals for O-CDMA systems with optimum WDM has been created and studied. It is shown that modern AO technology is capable of surmounting difficulties that previously hindered the transition of optical communication systems to CDMA data transmission.

  3. Long-distance quantum communication with atomic ensembles and linear optics.

    PubMed

    Duan, L M; Lukin, M D; Cirac, J I; Zoller, P

    2001-11-22

    Quantum communication holds promise for absolutely secure transmission of secret messages and the faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photonic channels appear to be very attractive for the physical implementation of quantum communication. However, owing to losses and decoherence in the channel, the communication fidelity decreases exponentially with the channel length. Here we describe a scheme that allows the implementation of robust quantum communication over long lossy channels. The scheme involves laser manipulation of atomic ensembles, beam splitters, and single-photon detectors with moderate efficiencies, and is therefore compatible with current experimental technology. We show that the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel length, and hence the scheme should be operable over very long distances. PMID:11719796

  4. Long-distance quantum communication with atomic ensembles and linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, L.-M.; Lukin, M. D.; Cirac, J. I.; Zoller, P.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for absolutely secure transmission of secret messages and the faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photonic channels appear to be very attractive for the physical implementation of quantum communication. However, owing to losses and decoherence in the channel, the communication fidelity decreases exponentially with the channel length. Here we describe a scheme that allows the implementation of robust quantum communication over long lossy channels. The scheme involves laser manipulation of atomic ensembles, beam splitters, and single-photon detectors with moderate efficiencies, and is therefore compatible with current experimental technology. We show that the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel length, and hence the scheme should be operable over very long distances.

  5. Alternative exon 9-encoded relay domains affect more than one communication pathway in the Drosophila myosin head.

    PubMed

    Bloemink, Marieke J; Dambacher, Corey M; Knowles, Aileen F; Melkani, Girish C; Geeves, Michael A; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2009-06-19

    We investigated the biochemical and biophysical properties of one of the four alternative regions within the Drosophila myosin catalytic domain: the relay domain encoded by exon 9. This domain of the myosin head transmits conformational changes in the nucleotide-binding pocket to the converter domain, which is crucial to coupling catalytic activity with mechanical movement of the lever arm. To study the function of this region, we used chimeric myosins (IFI-9b and EMB-9a), which were generated by exchange of the exon 9-encoded domains between the native embryonic body wall (EMB) and indirect flight muscle isoforms (IFI). Kinetic measurements show that exchange of the exon 9-encoded region alters the kinetic properties of the myosin S1 head. This is reflected in reduced values for ATP-induced actomyosin dissociation rate constant (K(1)k(+2)) and ADP affinity (K(AD)), measured for the chimeric constructs IFI-9b and EMB-9a, compared to wild-type IFI and EMB values. Homology models indicate that, in addition to affecting the communication pathway between the nucleotide-binding pocket and the converter domain, exchange of the relay domains between IFI and EMB affects the communication pathway between the nucleotide-binding pocket and the actin-binding site in the lower 50-kDa domain (loop 2). These results suggest an important role of the relay domain in the regulation of actomyosin cross-bridge kinetics. PMID:19393244

  6. Integrated source and channel encoded digital communication system design study. [for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.

    1976-01-01

    The results of several studies Space Shuttle communication system are summarized. These tasks can be divided into the following categories: (1) phase multiplexing for two- and three-channel data transmission, (2) effects of phase noise on the performance of coherent communication links, (3) analysis of command system performance, (4) error correcting code tradeoffs, (5) signal detection and angular search procedure for the shuttle Ku-band communication system, and (6) false lock performance of Costas loop receivers.

  7. Practical long-distance quantum communication using concatenated entanglement swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalique, Aeysha; Tittel, Wolfgang; Sanders, Barry C.

    2013-08-01

    We construct a theory for long-distance quantum communication based on sharing entanglement through a linear chain of N elementary swapping segments of length L=Nl where l is the length of each elementary swap setup. Entanglement swapping is achieved by linear optics, photon counting, and postselection, and we include effects due to multiphoton sources, transmission loss, and detector inefficiencies and dark counts. Specifically we calculate the resultant four-mode state shared by the two parties at the two ends of the chain, and we derive the two-photon coincidence rate expected for this state and thereby the visibility of this long-range-entangled state. The expression is a nested sum with each sum extending from zero to infinite photons, and we solve the case N=2 exactly for the ideal case (zero dark counts, unit-efficiency detectors, and no transmission loss) and numerically for N=2 in the nonideal case with truncation at nmax=3 photons in each mode. For the general case, we show that the computational complexity for the numerical solution is nmax12N.

  8. Highly Efficient Long-Distance Quantum Communication: a Blueprint for Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linshu; Muralidharan, Sreraman; Kim, Jungsang; Lutkenhaus, Norbert; Lukin, Mikhail; Jiang, Liang

    2015-03-01

    Quantum repeaters provide a way for long distance quantum communication through optical fiber networks. Transmission losses and operation errors are two major challenges to the implementation of quantum repeaters. At each intermediate repeater station, transmission losses can be overcome using either heralded entanglement generation or quantum error correction, while operation errors can be corrected via entanglement purification or quantum error correction. Depending on the mechanisms used to correct loss and operation errors respectively, three generations of quantum repeaters have been proposed. We present a quantitative comparison of different quantum repeater schemes by evaluating the time- and qubit-resource consumed simultaneously. We can identify the most efficient scheme for given technological capabilities, which are characterized by fiber coupling efficiency, local gate fidelity, and local gate speed. Our work provides a roadmap for high-speed quantum networks across continental distances. Linshu and Sreraman contributed equally to this work.

  9. Three-party Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Single Photons in both Polarization and Spatial-mode Degrees of Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, LiLi; Ma, WenPing; Wang, MeiLing; Shen, DongSu

    2016-05-01

    We present an efficient three-party quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol with single photos in both polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The three legal parties' messages can be encoded on the polarization and the spatial-mode states of single photons independently with desired unitary operations. A party can obtain the other two parties' messages simultaneously through a quantum channel. Because no extra public information is transmitted in the classical channels, the drawback of information leakage or classical correlation does not exist in the proposed scheme. Moreover, the comprehensive security analysis shows that the presented QSDC network protocol can defend the outsider eavesdropper's several sorts of attacks. Compared with the single photons with only one degree of freedom, our protocol based on the single photons in two degrees of freedom has higher capacity. Since the preparation and the measurement of single photon quantum states in both the polarization and the spatial-mode degrees of freedom are available with current quantum techniques, the proposed protocol is practical.

  10. Secure multi-party communication with quantum key distribution managed by trusted authority

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Richard John; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Peterson, Charles Glen

    2015-01-06

    Techniques and tools for implementing protocols for secure multi-party communication after quantum key distribution ("QKD") are described herein. In example implementations, a trusted authority facilitates secure communication between multiple user devices. The trusted authority distributes different quantum keys by QKD under trust relationships with different users. The trusted authority determines combination keys using the quantum keys and makes the combination keys available for distribution (e.g., for non-secret distribution over a public channel). The combination keys facilitate secure communication between two user devices even in the absence of QKD between the two user devices. With the protocols, benefits of QKD are extended to multi-party communication scenarios. In addition, the protocols can retain benefit of QKD even when a trusted authority is offline or a large group seeks to establish secure communication within the group.