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Sample records for encoding laminin-binding protein

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    SciTech Connect

    Linke, Christian; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N.

    2008-02-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  2. Identification of the N-acetylneuraminyllactose-specific laminin-binding protein of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Valkonen, K H; Wadström, T; Moran, A P

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of the gastroduodenal pathogen Helicobacter pylori with the glycoprotein laminin was investigated. Binding of 125I-radiolabelled laminin in a liquid-phase assay by both hemagglutinating and poorly hemagglutinating strains was rapid, saturable, specific, partially reversible, of high affinity, and insensitive to pH. Inhibition of laminin binding by fetuin, but not asialofetuin, and reduced bacterial binding to periodate- or sialidase-treated laminin indicated that glycosylation, particularly sialylation, was important for laminin binding by H. pylori. Inhibition experiments with monosaccharides, disaccharides, and trisaccharides showed that the strains bound to a region spanning a trisaccharide. In particular, inhibition and displacement studies showed that binding to the trisaccharide N-acetylneuraminyl-alpha(2-3)-lactose [NeuAc(2-3)Lac] was preferential to that to the NeuAc(2-6)Lac isomer. Complete inhibition of laminin binding by both hemagglutinating and poorly hemagglutinating strains was achieved only when isolated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used as an inhibitor in combination with heat or protease treatment of H. pylori cells, thereby confirming the involvement of both LPS and a protein adhesin in laminin binding. Further inhibition experiments indicated that the protein receptor, rather than LPS, on H. pylori bound NeuAc(2-3)Lac. By using a Western blotting procedure, a 25-kDa outer membrane protein was identified as mediating laminin binding by both hemagglutinating and poorly hemagglutinating H. pylori strains. The specificity of binding was confirmed by complete inhibition of laminin binding by the 25-kDa protein with NeuAc(2-3)Lac. The data collectively suggest that a 25-kDa outer membrane protein acts in a lectin-like manner with LPS to mediate attachment of H. pylori to laminin. PMID:9038297

  3. Expression and identification of a laminin-binding protein in Aspergillus fumigatus conidia.

    PubMed Central

    Tronchin, G; Esnault, K; Renier, G; Filmon, R; Chabasse, D; Bouchara, J P

    1997-01-01

    Adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus, the causative agent of human aspergillosis, to the extracellular matrix protein laminin has been previously demonstrated. This study investigated the expression of laminin receptors during swelling of conidia, a step leading to germination and subsequent colonization of tissues. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the laminin binding sites were distributed over the external rodlet layer of resting conidia. During swelling, the characteristic rodlet layer progressively disintegrated and conidia surrounded by a smooth cell wall layer appeared. Flow cytometry using fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated laminin demonstrated that expression of laminin receptors at the surface of conidia was swelling dependent. Resting conidia expressed high levels of laminin receptors on their surface. A gradual decrease of laminin binding was then observed as swelling occurred, reaching a minimum for 4-h-swollen conidia. This correlated with a loss of adherence of swollen conidia to laminin immobilized on microtiter plates. Trypsin pretreatment of conidia reduced laminin binding. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and ligand blotting with laminin identified in a cell wall extract a major 72-kDa cell wall glycoprotein which binds laminin. Thus, one of the initial events in the host colonization may be the recognition of basement membrane laminin by this 72-kDa cell wall surface component. PMID:8975886

  4. Induction of a putative laminin-binding protein of Streptococcus gordonii in human infective endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, P; Gleyzal, C; Guerret, S; Etienne, J; Grimaud, J A

    1992-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the virulence of Streptococcus strains in infective endocarditis might be due to the expression of binding sites for the extracellular matrix proteins of damaged valves. In this communication, we draw attention to one laminin-binding protein from a strain of Streptococcus gordonii isolated from a patient with human endocarditis. This 145-kDa protein was found on the cell wall of the bacterium. The level of expression of this binding protein might be regulated by the presence of extracellular matrix proteins: the protein was lacking after in vitro selection of laminin, collagen I, and fibronectin nonbinding variants, and it was recovered after growth of the variants when laminin or collagen I was added to the growth medium. It was also missing after 10 subcultures in minimal medium, indicating some positive control. Furthermore, the 145-kDa protein was recognized as a major antigen by sera from patients treated for streptococcal infective endocarditis, while sera from patients with valvulopathies gave only slight recognition, suggesting an increase of the expression of this protein during infective endocarditis. It was also shown that the 145-kDa protein carried a collagen I-like determinant detected with anti-human collagen I antibodies. Images PMID:1530927

  5. Scaffold-forming and Adhesive Contributions of Synthetic Laminin-binding Proteins to Basement Membrane Assembly.

    PubMed

    McKee, Karen K; Capizzi, Stephanie; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2009-03-27

    Laminins that possess three short arms contribute to basement membrane assembly by anchoring to cell surfaces, polymerizing, and binding to nidogen and collagen IV. Although laminins containing the alpha4 and alpha5 subunits are expressed in alpha2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy, they may be ineffective substitutes because they bind weakly to cell surfaces and/or because they lack the third arm needed for polymerization. We asked whether linker proteins engineered to bind to deficient laminins that provide such missing activities would promote basement membrane assembly in a Schwann cell model. A chimeric fusion protein (alphaLNNd) that adds a short arm terminus to laminin through the nidogen binding locus was generated and compared with the dystrophy-ameliorating protein miniagrin (mAgrin) that binds to the laminin coiled-coil dystroglycan and sulfatides. alphaLNNd was found to mediate laminin binding to collagen IV, to bind to galactosyl sulfatide, and to selectively convert alpha-short arm deletion-mutant laminins LmDeltaalphaLN and LmDeltaalphaLN-L4b into polymerizing laminins. This protein enabled polymerization-deficient laminin but not an adhesion-deficient laminin lacking LG domains (LmDeltaLG) to assemble an extracellular matrix on Schwann cell surfaces. mAgrin, on the other hand, enabled LmDeltaLG to form an extracellular matrix on cell surfaces without increasing accumulation of non-polymerizing laminins. These gain-of-function studies reveal distinct polymerization and anchorage contributions to basement membrane assembly in which the three different LN domains mediate the former, and the LG domains provide primary anchorage with secondary contributions from the alphaLN domain. These findings may be relevant for an understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of laminin deficiency states. PMID:19189961

  6. Inverse expression of two laminin binding proteins, 67LR and galectin-3, correlates with the invasive phenotype of trophoblastic tissue.

    PubMed

    van den Brûle, F A; Price, J; Sobel, M E; Lambotte, R; Castronovo, V

    1994-05-30

    Tumor invasion of host tissues and trophoblastic penetration of the endometrium share common biological features. Both processes involve the invasion of basement membranes, an event that is initiated by adhesion of cancer or trophoblast cells to basement membrane components and particularly to laminin. Adhesion to this latter glycoprotein is mediated through a variety of cell surface receptors. We have previously shown that the 67 kD Laminin Receptor (67LR) and a 31 kD Human Laminin Binding Protein, recently renamed galectin-3, are inversely modulated as the invasive phenotype of cancer cells progresses, with up regulation of the former, and down regulation of the latter, respectively. In this study, we examined the expression of these two proteins in 27 human trophoblastic specimens at different gestational ages using Northern and Western blot techniques. Expression of the 67LR increased from 7 weeks to a maximum at 12 weeks, when invasion is maximal, and then decreased. Expression of galectin-3 was inversely modulated by the gestational age, with a minimum expression at 12 weeks. Our data demonstrate that invasive trophoblast displays the same pattern of laminin binding proteins expression than invasive cancer cells, and further demonstrates that invasion of the extracellular matrix by trophoblast and cancer cells share common molecular mechanisms. PMID:8198600

  7. Characterization of the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis laminin-binding/histone-like protein (Lbp/Hlp) which reacts with sera from patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lefrançois, Louise H; Pujol, Céline; Bodier, Christelle C; Teixeira-Gomez, Ana Paula; Drobecq, Hervé; Rosso, Marie-Laure; Raze, Dominique; Dias, André Alves; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Chacon, Ofelia; Barletta, Raul G; Locht, Camille; Vidal Pessolani, Maria Cristina; Biet, Franck

    2011-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) causes a chronic enteric disease in ruminants, called paratuberculosis or Johne's disease. The current model proposes that after ingestion by the host, Map crosses the intestinal barrier via internalization by the M cells. Experimental observations suggest, however, that Map may also transcytose the intestinal wall via the enterocytes, but the mechanisms involved in this process remain poorly understood. Cytoadherence assays performed on epithelial cells with Map revealed that the addition of laminin to the cell culture increases adhesion. A Map protein was isolated by heparin-Sepharose chromatography and identified as a laminin-binding protein like. The gene encoding this protein named Lbp/Hlp was identified in the Map genome sequence at locus MAP3024 (annotated Hup B). The deduced Map Lbp/Hlp amino acid sequence reveals 80% identity with that reported for other mycobacteria. The C-terminal domain involved in adhesion is mainly composed of arginine and lysine residues modified by methylation. In vitro tests demonstrated that recombinant Lbp/Hlp binds laminin, heparin, collagen and epithelial cells. Interestingly, we found that this adhesin corresponds to the antigen described as the target of pANCA and serum antibodies of patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:21334452

  8. Force-induced globule-coil transition in laminin binding protein and its role for viral-cell membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Boris N; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Mikhaylov, Andrey G; Korneev, Denis V; Sekatskii, Sergey K; Karakouz, Tanya; Belavin, Pavel A; Netesova, Nina A; Protopopova, Elena V; Konovalova, Svetlana N; Dietler, Giovanni; Loktev, Valery B

    2014-12-01

    The specific interactions of the pairs laminin binding protein (LBP)-purified tick-borne encephalitis viral surface protein E and certain recombinant fragments of this protein, as well as West Nile viral surface protein E and certain recombinant fragments of that protein, are studied by combined methods of single-molecule dynamic force spectroscopy (SMDFS), enzyme immunoassay and optical surface waves-based biosensor measurements. The experiments were performed at neutral pH (7.4) and acid pH (5.3) conditions. The data obtained confirm the role of LBP as a cell receptor for two typical viral species of the Flavivirus genus. A comparison of these data with similar data obtained for another cell receptor of this family, namely human αVβ3 integrin, reveals that both these receptors are very important. Studying the specific interaction between the cell receptors in question and specially prepared monoclonal antibodies against them, we could show that both interaction sites involved in the process of virus-cell interaction remain intact at pH 5.3. At the same time, for these acid conditions characteristic for an endosome during flavivirus-cell membrane fusion, SMDFS data reveal the existence of a force-induced (effective already for forces as small as 30-70 pN) sharp globule-coil transition for LBP and LBP-fragments of protein E complexes. We argue that this conformational transformation, being an analog of abrupt first-order phase transition and having similarity with the famous Rayleigh hydrodynamic instability, might be indispensable for the flavivirus-cell membrane fusion process. PMID:25319621

  9. High Throughput Screening for Compounds That Alter Muscle Cell Glycosylation Identifies New Role for N-Glycans in Regulating Sarcolemmal Protein Abundance and Laminin Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Paula V.; Pang, Mabel; Marshall, Jamie L.; Kung, Raymond; Nelson, Stanley F.; Stalnaker, Stephanie H.; Wells, Lance; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.; Baum, Linda G.

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked disorder characterized by loss of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that connects the actin cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle cells to extracellular matrix. Dystrophin binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the transmembrane glycoprotein β-dystroglycan (β-DG), which associates with cell surface α-dystroglycan (α-DG) that binds laminin in the extracellular matrix. β-DG can also associate with utrophin, and this differential association correlates with specific glycosylation changes on α-DG. Genetic modification of α-DG glycosylation can promote utrophin binding and rescue dystrophic phenotypes in mouse dystrophy models. We used high throughput screening with the plant lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) to identify compounds that altered muscle cell surface glycosylation, with the goal of finding compounds that increase abundance of α-DG and associated sarcolemmal glycoproteins, increase utrophin usage, and increase laminin binding. We identified one compound, lobeline, from the Prestwick library of Food and Drug Administration-approved compounds that fulfilled these criteria, increasing WFA binding to C2C12 cells and to primary muscle cells from wild type and mdx mice. WFA binding and enhancement by lobeline required complex N-glycans but not O-mannose glycans that bind laminin. However, inhibiting complex N-glycan processing reduced laminin binding to muscle cell glycoproteins, although O-mannosylation was intact. Glycan analysis demonstrated a general increase in N-glycans on lobeline-treated cells rather than specific alterations in cell surface glycosylation, consistent with increased abundance of multiple sarcolemmal glycoproteins. This demonstrates the feasibility of high throughput screening with plant lectins to identify compounds that alter muscle cell glycosylation and identifies a novel role for N-glycans in regulating muscle cell function. PMID:22570487

  10. Mapping the laminin-binding and adhesive domain of the cell surface-associated Hlp/LBP protein from Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Soares de Lima, Cristiana; Zulianello, Laurence; Marques, Maria Angela de Melo; Kim, Heejin; Portugal, Michelle Iespa; Antunes, Sérgio Luiz; Menozzi, Franco Dante; Ottenhoff, Tom Henricus Maria; Brennan, Patrick Joseph; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2005-07-01

    Binding of Mycobacterium leprae to and invasion of Schwann cells (SC) represent a crucial step that initiates nerve damage in leprosy. We and others have described that M. leprae colonization of the peripheral nerve system may be mediated in part by a surface-exposed histone-like protein (Hlp), characterized as a laminin-binding protein (LBP). Hlp/LBP has also been shown to play a role in the binding of mycobacteria to alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages. In the present study we report that M. leprae expresses Hlp/LBP protein during the course of human infection. Additionally, we analyzed the interaction of Hlp/LBP with the extracellular matrix and host cell surface. We show that Hlp/LBP, besides laminin, also binds heparin and heparan sulfate. Testing truncated recombinant Hlp molecules corresponding to the N-terminal (rHlp-N) and the C-terminal (rHlp-C) domains of the protein, we established that interaction of Hlp/LBP with laminin-2 and heparin is mainly mediated by the C-terminal domain of the protein. Moreover, the same domain was found to be involved in Hlp/LBP-mediating bacterial binding to human SC. Finally, evidence is shown suggesting that M. leprae produces a post-translationally modified Hlp/LBP containing methyllysine residues. Methylation of the lysine residues, however, seems not to affect the adhesive properties of Hlp/LBP. Taken together, our observations reinforce the involvement of Hlp/LBP as an adhesin in mycobacterial infections and define its highly positive C-terminal region as the major adhesive domain of this protein. PMID:15919224

  11. Borrelia burgdorferi BmpA Is a Laminin-Binding Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ashutosh; Brissette, Catherine A.; Bowman, Amy; Stevenson, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The Borrelia burgdorferi BmpA outer surface protein plays a significant role in mammalian infection by the Lyme disease spirochete and is an important antigen for the serodiagnosis of human infection. B. burgdorferi adheres to host extracellular matrix components, including laminin. The results of our studies indicate that BmpA and its three paralogous proteins, BmpB, BmpC, and BmpD, all bind to mammalian laminin. BmpA did not bind mammalian type I or type IV collagens or fibronectin. BmpA-directed antibodies significantly inhibited the adherence of live B. burgdorferi to laminin. The laminin-binding domain of BmpA was mapped to the carboxy-terminal 80 amino acids. Solubilized collagen inhibited BmpA-laminin binding, suggesting interactions through the collagen-binding domains of laminin. These results, together with previous data, indicate that BmpA and its paralogs are targets for the development of preventative and curative therapies for Lyme disease. PMID:19703983

  12. Sarcospan integration into laminin-binding adhesion complexes that ameliorate muscular dystrophy requires utrophin and α7 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Oh, Jennifer; Chou, Eric; Lee, Joy A.; Holmberg, Johan; Burkin, Dean J.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in loss of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex, a laminin receptor that connects the myofiber to its surrounding extracellular matrix. Utrophin, a dystrophin ortholog that is normally localized to the neuromuscular junction, is naturally upregulated in DMD muscle, which partially compensates for the loss of dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin causes broad sarcolemma localization of utrophin, restoration of laminin binding and amelioration of disease in the mdx mouse model of DMD. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of sarcospan, a dystrophin- and utrophin-binding protein, ameliorates mdx muscular dystrophy. Sarcospan boosts levels of utrophin to therapeutic levels at the sarcolemma, where attachment to laminin is restored. However, understanding the compensatory mechanism is complicated by concomitant upregulation of α7β1 integrin, which also binds laminin. Similar to the effects of utrophin, transgenic overexpression of α7 integrin prevents DMD disease in mice and is accompanied by increased abundance of utrophin around the extra-synaptic sarcolemma. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying sarcospan ‘rescue’ of muscular dystrophy, we created double-knockout mice to test the contributions of utrophin or α7 integrin. We show that sarcospan-mediated amelioration of muscular dystrophy in DMD mice is dependent on the presence of both utrophin and α7β1 integrin, even when they are individually expressed at therapeutic levels. Furthermore, we found that association of sarcospan into laminin-binding complexes is dependent on utrophin and α7β1 integrin. PMID:25504048

  13. Laminin-binding integrin gene copy number alterations in distinct epithelial-type cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harryman, William L; Pond, Erika; Singh, Parminder; Little, Andrew S; Eschbacher, Jennifer M; Nagle, Raymond B; Cress, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Background: The laminin-binding integrin (LBI) family are cell adhesion molecules that are essential for invasion and metastasis of human epithelial cancers and cell adhesion mediated drug resistance. We investigated whether copy number alteration (CNA) or mutations of a five-gene signature (ITGB4, ITGA3, LAMB3, PLEC, and SYNE3), representing essential genes for LBI adhesion, would correlate with patient outcomes within human epithelial-type tumor data sets currently available in an open access format. Methods: We investigated the relative alteration frequency of an LBI signature panel (integrin β4 (ITGB4), integrin α3 (ITGA3), laminin β3 chain (LAMB3), plectin (PLEC), and nesprin 3 (SYNE3)), independent of the epithelial cancer type, within publically available and published data using cBioPortal and Oncomine software. We rank ordered the results using a 20% alteration frequency cut-off and limited the analysis to studies containing at least 100 samples. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were analyzed to determine if alterations in the LBI signature correlated with patient survival. The Oncomine data mining tool was used to compare the heat map expression of the LBI signature without SYNE3 (as this was not included in the Oncomine database) to drug resistance patterns. Results: Twelve different cancer types, representing 5,647 samples, contained at least a 20% alteration frequency of the five-gene LBI signature. The frequency of alteration ranged from 38.3% to 19.8%. Within the LBI signature, PLEC was the most commonly altered followed by LAMB3, ITGB4, ITGA3, and SYNE3 across all twelve cancer types. Within cancer types, there was little overlap of the individual amplified genes from each sample, suggesting different specific amplicons may alter the LBI adhesion structures. Of the twelve cancer types, overall survival was altered by CNA presence in bladder urothelial carcinoma (p=0.0143*) and cervical squamous cell carcinoma and endocervical adenocarcinoma (p=0

  14. The SpeB virulence factor of Streptococcus pyogenes, a multifunctional secreted and cell surface molecule with strepadhesin, laminin-binding and cysteine protease activity.

    PubMed

    Hytönen, J; Haataja, S; Gerlach, D; Podbielski, A; Finne, J

    2001-01-01

    The interactions between pathogenic bacteria and the host need to be resolved at the molecular level in order to develop novel vaccines and drugs. We have previously identified strepadhesin, a novel glycoprotein-binding activity in Streptococcus pyogenes, which is regulated by Mga, a regulator of streptococcal virulence factors. We have now identified the protein responsible for the strepadhesin activity and find that (i) strepadhesin activity is carried by SpeB, streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin with cysteine protease activity; (ii) SpeB carries laminin-binding activity of the bacteria; and (iii) SpeB is not only a secreted molecule but also occurs unexpectedly tightly bound to the bacterial cell surface. Thus, in contrast to the previous view of SpeB as mainly an extracellular protease, it is also present as a streptococcal surface molecule with binding activity to laminin and other glycoproteins. PMID:11136470

  15. Residual laminin-binding activity and enhanced dystroglycan glycosylation by LARGE in novel model mice to dystroglycanopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kanagawa, Motoi; Nishimoto, Akemi; Chiyonobu, Tomohiro; Takeda, Satoshi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Wang, Fan; Fujikake, Nobuhiro; Taniguchi, Mariko; Lu, Zhongpeng; Tachikawa, Masaji; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Tajima, Youichi; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Endo, Tamao; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Campbell, Kevin P.; Toda, Tatsushi

    2009-01-01

    Hypoglycosylation and reduced laminin-binding activity of α-dystroglycan are common characteristics of dystroglycanopathy, which is a group of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), caused by a mutation in the fukutin gene, is a severe form of dystroglycanopathy. A retrotransposal insertion in fukutin is seen in almost all cases of FCMD. To better understand the molecular pathogenesis of dystroglycanopathies and to explore therapeutic strategies, we generated knock-in mice carrying the retrotransposal insertion in the mouse fukutin ortholog. Knock-in mice exhibited hypoglycosylated α-dystroglycan; however, no signs of muscular dystrophy were observed. More sensitive methods detected minor levels of intact α-dystroglycan, and solid-phase assays determined laminin binding levels to be ∼50% of normal. In contrast, intact α-dystroglycan is undetectable in the dystrophic Largemyd mouse, and laminin-binding activity is markedly reduced. These data indicate that a small amount of intact α-dystroglycan is sufficient to maintain muscle cell integrity in knock-in mice, suggesting that the treatment of dystroglycanopathies might not require the full recovery of glycosylation. To examine whether glycosylation defects can be restored in vivo, we performed mouse gene transfer experiments. Transfer of fukutin into knock-in mice restored glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. In addition, transfer of LARGE produced laminin-binding forms of α-dystroglycan in both knock-in mice and the POMGnT1 mutant mouse, which is another model of dystroglycanopathy. Overall, these data suggest that even partial restoration of α-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin-binding activity by replacing or augmenting glycosylation-related genes might effectively deter dystroglycanopathy progression and thus provide therapeutic benefits. PMID:19017726

  16. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  17. Functional regeneration of the transected recurrent laryngeal nerve using a collagen scaffold loaded with laminin and laminin-binding BDNF and GDNF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Chen, Xinwei; Xu, Jiafeng; Li, Yu; Dong, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury remains a challenge due to the lack of effective treatments. In this study, we established a new drug delivery system consisting of a tube of Heal-All Oral Cavity Repair Membrane loaded with laminin and neurotrophic factors and tested its ability to promote functional recovery following RLN injury. We created recombinant fusion proteins consisting of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) fused to laminin-binding domains (LBDs) in order to prevent neurotrophin diffusion. LBD-BDNF, LBD-GDNF, and laminin were injected into a collagen tube that was fitted to the ends of the transected RLN in rats. Functional recovery was assessed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after injury. Although vocal fold movement was not restored until 12 weeks after injury, animals treated with the collagen tube loaded with laminin, LBD-BDNF and LBD-GDNF showed improved recovery in vocalisation, arytenoid cartilage angles, compound muscle action potentials and regenerated fibre area compared to animals treated by autologous nerve grafting (p < 0.05). These results demonstrate the drug delivery system induced nerve regeneration following RLN transection that was superior to that induced by autologus nerve grafting. It may have potential applications in nerve regeneration of RLN transection injury. PMID:27558932

  18. Functional regeneration of the transected recurrent laryngeal nerve using a collagen scaffold loaded with laminin and laminin-binding BDNF and GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxin; Yuan, Junjie; Chen, Xinwei; Xu, Jiafeng; Li, Yu; Dong, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury remains a challenge due to the lack of effective treatments. In this study, we established a new drug delivery system consisting of a tube of Heal-All Oral Cavity Repair Membrane loaded with laminin and neurotrophic factors and tested its ability to promote functional recovery following RLN injury. We created recombinant fusion proteins consisting of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) fused to laminin-binding domains (LBDs) in order to prevent neurotrophin diffusion. LBD-BDNF, LBD-GDNF, and laminin were injected into a collagen tube that was fitted to the ends of the transected RLN in rats. Functional recovery was assessed 4, 8, and 12 weeks after injury. Although vocal fold movement was not restored until 12 weeks after injury, animals treated with the collagen tube loaded with laminin, LBD-BDNF and LBD-GDNF showed improved recovery in vocalisation, arytenoid cartilage angles, compound muscle action potentials and regenerated fibre area compared to animals treated by autologous nerve grafting (p < 0.05). These results demonstrate the drug delivery system induced nerve regeneration following RLN transection that was superior to that induced by autologus nerve grafting. It may have potential applications in nerve regeneration of RLN transection injury. PMID:27558932

  19. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  20. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.D.; Scott-Craig, J.S.

    1999-10-26

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is presented. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with vectors and seeds from the plants.

  1. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  2. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  3. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  4. Schwann Cells Increase Prostate and Pancreatic Tumor Cell Invasion Using Laminin Binding A6 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Sroka, Isis C.; Chopra, Harsharon; Das, Lipsa; Gard, Jaime M.C.; Nagle, Raymond B.; Cress, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Human pancreatic and prostate cancers metastasize along nerve axons during perineural invasion. The extracellular matrix laminin class of proteins is an abundant component of both myelinated and non-myelinated nerves. Analysis of human pancreatic and prostate tissue revealed both perineural and endoneural invasion with Schwann cells surrounded or disrupted by tumor, respectively. Tumor and nerve cell co-culture conditions were used to determine if myelinating or non-myelinating Schwann cell (S16 and S16Y, respectively) phenotype was equally likely to promote integrin-dependent cancer cell invasion and migration on laminin. Conditioned medium from S16 cells increased tumor cell (DU145, PC3, and CFPAC1) invasion into laminin approximately 1.3–2.0 fold compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) treated cells. Integrin function (e.g., ITGA6p formation) increased up to 1.5 fold in prostate (DU145, PC3, RWPE-1) and pancreatic (CFPAC1) cells, and invasion was dependent on ITGA6p formation and ITGB1 as determined by function-blocking antibodies. In contrast, conditioned medium isolated from S16Y cells (non-myelinating phenotype) decreased constitutive levels of ITGA6p in the tumor cells by 50% compared to untreated cells and decreased ITGA6p formation 3.0 fold compared to S16 treated cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis revealed loss of ITGA6p formation as reversible and independent of overall loss of ITGA6 expression. These results suggest that the myelinating phenotype of Schwann cells within the tumor microenvironment increased integrin-dependent tumor invasion on laminin. PMID:26239765

  5. The use of laminin modified linear ordered collagen scaffolds loaded with laminin-binding ciliary neurotrophic factor for sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiani; Sun, Changkai; Zhao, Hui; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Bing; Gao, Jian; Zheng, Tiezheng; Wu, Wei; Wu, Shuang; Wang, Jingyu; Dai, Jianwu

    2011-06-01

    Nerve conduit provides a promising strategy for nerve injury repair in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). However, simply bridging the transected nerve with an empty conduit is hard to satisfy functional recovery. The regenerated axons may disperse during regeneration in the empty lumen, limiting the functional recovery. Our previous work had reported that linear ordered collagen scaffold (LOCS) could be used as a nerve guidance material. Here we cross-linked LOCS fibers with laminin which was a major component of the extracellular matrix in nervous system. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) plays a critical role in peripheral nerve regeneration. But the lack of efficient CNTF delivery approach limits its clinical applications. To retain CNTF on the scaffold, a laminin binding domain (LBD) was fused to the N-terminal of CNTF. Compared with NAT-CNTF, LBD-CNTF exhibited specific laminin-binding ability and comparable neurotrophic bioactivity. We combined LBD-CNTF with the laminin modified LOCS fibers to construct a double-functional bio-scaffold. The functional scaffold was filled in silicon conduit and tested in the rat sciatic nerve transection model. Results showed that this functional biomaterial could guide the axon growth, retain more CNTF on the scaffolds and enhance the nerve regeneration as well as functional recovery. PMID:21397941

  6. Selection for genes encoding secreted proteins and receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, R D; Gu, Q; Goddard, A; Rosenthal, A

    1996-01-01

    Extracellular proteins play an essential role in the formation, differentiation, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Despite that, the systematic identification of genes encoding these proteins has not been possible. We describe here a highly efficient method to isolate genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins by using a single-step selection in yeast. Application of this method, termed signal peptide selection, to various tissues yielded 559 clones that appear to encode known or novel extracellular proteins. These include members of the transforming growth factor and epidermal growth factor protein families, endocrine hormones, tyrosine kinase receptors, serine/threonine kinase receptors, seven transmembrane receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, plasma proteins, and ion channels. The eventual identification of most, or all, extracellular signaling molecules will advance our understanding of fundamental biological processes and our ability to intervene in disease states. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8692953

  7. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  8. Proteins encoded near the adenovirus late messenger RNA leader segments

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.B.; Anderson, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Small fragments of adenovirus 2 DNA cloned into the single-strand phage M13 were used to select adenoviral messenger RNAs transcribed from the R-strand between map positions 16 and 30. Cell-free translation of these mRNAs produced proteins of 13.5K, 13.6K, and 11.5K, respectively encoded between the first and second segments of the tripartite major late leader, within the ''i''-leader segment, and immediately preceding the third leader segment. Partial sequence analysis of the 13.6K protein is consistent with the hypothesis that it is encoded within the i-leader segment.

  9. Evolutionary relationship of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins across grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genome studies were done across taxa to provide a basic understanding of genome evolution regarding nuclear genes encoding for mitochondrial proteins and their conservation in grass species. Two different mitochondria-related gene sets, one from rice and another from Arabidopsis, were us...

  10. On the Encoding of Proteins for Disordered Regions Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Julien; Maes, Francis; Wehenkel, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Disordered regions, i.e., regions of proteins that do not adopt a stable three-dimensional structure, have been shown to play various and critical roles in many biological processes. Predicting and understanding their formation is therefore a key sub-problem of protein structure and function inference. A wide range of machine learning approaches have been developed to automatically predict disordered regions of proteins. One key factor of the success of these methods is the way in which protein information is encoded into features. Recently, we have proposed a systematic methodology to study the relevance of various feature encodings in the context of disulfide connectivity pattern prediction. In the present paper, we adapt this methodology to the problem of predicting disordered regions and assess it on proteins from the 10th CASP competition, as well as on a very large subset of proteins extracted from PDB. Our results, obtained with ensembles of extremely randomized trees, highlight a novel feature function encoding the proximity of residues according to their accessibility to the solvent, which is playing the second most important role in the prediction of disordered regions, just after evolutionary information. Furthermore, even though our approach treats each residue independently, our results are very competitive in terms of accuracy with respect to the state-of-the-art. A web-application is available at http://m24.giga.ulg.ac.be:81/x3Disorder. PMID:24358161

  11. On the encoding of proteins for disordered regions prediction.

    PubMed

    Becker, Julien; Maes, Francis; Wehenkel, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Disordered regions, i.e., regions of proteins that do not adopt a stable three-dimensional structure, have been shown to play various and critical roles in many biological processes. Predicting and understanding their formation is therefore a key sub-problem of protein structure and function inference. A wide range of machine learning approaches have been developed to automatically predict disordered regions of proteins. One key factor of the success of these methods is the way in which protein information is encoded into features. Recently, we have proposed a systematic methodology to study the relevance of various feature encodings in the context of disulfide connectivity pattern prediction. In the present paper, we adapt this methodology to the problem of predicting disordered regions and assess it on proteins from the 10th CASP competition, as well as on a very large subset of proteins extracted from PDB. Our results, obtained with ensembles of extremely randomized trees, highlight a novel feature function encoding the proximity of residues according to their accessibility to the solvent, which is playing the second most important role in the prediction of disordered regions, just after evolutionary information. Furthermore, even though our approach treats each residue independently, our results are very competitive in terms of accuracy with respect to the state-of-the-art. A web-application is available at http://m24.giga.ulg.ac.be:81/x3Disorder. PMID:24358161

  12. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Erin R; Howe, Christopher J; Nisbet, R Ellen R

    2016-02-01

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events. PMID:26798115

  13. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Erin R.; Howe, Christopher J.; Nisbet, R. Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron–sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events. PMID:26798115

  14. Biosensor studies of collagen and laminin binding with immobilized Escherichia coli O157:H7 and inhibition with naturally occurring food additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Marjorie B.

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks were mostly due to consumption of undercooked contaminated beef which resulted in severe illness and several fatalities. Recalls of contaminated meat are costly for the meat industry. Our research attempts to understand the mechanisms of bacterial adhesion on animal carcass in order to eliminate or reduce pathogens in foods. We have reported the interactions of immobilized E. coli O157:H7 cells with extracellular matrix (ECM) components using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor (BIAcore). These studies showed that immobilized bacterial cells allowed the study of real-time binding interactions of bacterial surface with the ECM compounds, collagen I, laminin and fibronectin. Collagen I and laminin bound to the E. coli sensor surface with dissociation and association rates ranging from 106 to 109. Binding of collagen I and laminin mixture resulted in synergistic binding signals. An inhibition model was derived using collagen-laminin as the ligand which binds with E. coli sensor. A select group of naturally occurring food additives was evaluated by determining their effectivity in inhibiting the collagen-laminin binding to the bacterial sensor. Bound collagen-laminin was detached from the E. coli sensor surface with the aid of an organic acid. The biosensor results were verified with cell aggregation assays which were observed with optical and electron microscopes. These biosensor studies provided understanding of bacterial adhesion to connective tissue macromolecules. It also provided a model system for the rapid assessment of potential inhibitors that can be used in carcass treatment to inhibit or reduce bacterial contamination.

  15. Neutron-encoded protein quantification by peptide carbamylation.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Arne; Merrill, Anna E; Hebert, Alexander S; Westphall, Michael S; Keller, Mark P; Attie, Alan D; Coon, Joshua J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a chemical tag for duplex proteome quantification using neutron encoding (NeuCode). The method utilizes the straightforward, efficient, and inexpensive carbamylation reaction. We demonstrate the utility of NeuCode carbamylation by accurately measuring quantitative ratios from tagged yeast lysates mixed in known ratios and by applying this method to quantify differential protein expression in mice fed a either control or high-fat diet. PMID:24178922

  16. Neutron-encoded protein quantification by peptide carbamylation

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Arne; Merrill, Anna E.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Keller, Mark P.; Attie, Alan D.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a chemical tag for duplex proteome quantification using neutron encoding (NeuCode). The method utilizes the straightforward, efficient, and inexpensive carbamylation reaction. We demonstrate the utility of NeuCode carbamylation by accurately measuring quantitative ratios from tagged yeast lysates mixed in known ratios and by applying this method to quantify differential protein expression in mice fed a either control or high-fat diet. PMID:24178922

  17. Neutron-Encoded Protein Quantification by Peptide Carbamylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Arne; Merrill, Anna E.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Keller, Mark P.; Attie, Alan D.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a chemical tag for duplex proteome quantification using neutron encoding (NeuCode). The method utilizes the straightforward, efficient, and inexpensive carbamylation reaction. We demonstrate the utility of NeuCode carbamylation by accurately measuring quantitative ratios from tagged yeast lysates mixed in known ratios and by applying this method to quantify differential protein expression in mice fed a either control or high-fat diet.

  18. Transport of nuclear-encoded proteins into secondarily evolved plastids.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Franziska; Bozarth, Andrew; Sommer, Maik S; Zauner, Stefan; Przyborski, Jude M; Maier, Uwe-G

    2007-09-01

    Many algal groups evolved by engulfment and intracellular reduction of a eukaryotic phototroph within a heterotrophic cell. Via this process, so-called secondary plastids evolved, surrounded by three or four membranes. In these organisms most of the genetic material encoding plastid functions is localized in the cell nucleus, with the result that many proteins have to pass three, four, or even five membranes to reach their final destination within the plastid. In this article, we review recent models and findings that help to explain important cellular mechanisms involved in the complex process of protein transport into secondary plastids. PMID:17696773

  19. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: A macroarray study

    PubMed Central

    FUTYMA, KONRAD; MIOTŁA, PAWEŁ; RÓŻYŃSKA, KRYSTYNA; ZDUNEK, MAŁGORZATA; SEMCZUK, ANDRZEJ; RECHBERGER, TOMASZ; WOJCIEROWSKI, JACEK

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs. PMID:25231141

  20. Genetically encoded sensors of protein hydrodynamics and molecular proximity

    PubMed Central

    Hoepker, Alexander C.; Wang, Ariel; Le Marois, Alix; Suhling, Klaus; Yan, Yuling; Marriott, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    The specialized light organ of the ponyfish supports the growth of the bioluminescent symbiont Photobacterium leiognathi. The bioluminescence of P. leiognathi is generated within a heteromeric protein complex composed of the bacterial luciferase and a 20-kDa lumazine binding protein (LUMP), which serves as a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor protein, emitting a cyan-colored fluorescence with an unusually long excited state lifetime of 13.6 ns. The long fluorescence lifetime and small mass of LUMP are exploited for the design of highly optimized encoded sensors for quantitative fluorescence anisotropy (FA) measurements of protein hydrodynamics. In particular, large differences in the FA values of the free and target-bound states of LUMP fusions appended with capture sequences of up to 20 kDa are used in quantitative FA imaging and analysis of target proteins. For example, a fusion protein composed of LUMP and a 5-kDa G protein binding domain is used as an FA sensor to quantify the binding of the GTP-bound cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) (21 kDa) in solution and within Escherichia coli. Additionally, the long fluorescence lifetime and the surface-bound fluorescent cofactor 6,7-dimethyl-8- (1′-dimethyl-ribityl) lumazine in LUMP are utilized in the design of highly optimized FRET probes that use Venus as an acceptor probe. The efficiency of FRET in a zero-length LUMP-Venus fusion is 62% compared to ∼31% in a related CFP-Venus fusion. The improved FRET efficiency obtained by using LUMP as a donor probe is used in the design of a FRET-optimized genetically encoded LUMP-Venus substrate for thrombin. PMID:25931526

  1. Adenovirus type 2 encoded early 11 kDa protein

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, S.V.K.N.; Kapoor, Q.S.

    1986-05-01

    Several adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) encoded early proteins have been identified in viral infected human KB cells. These proteins are of great interest as they play key roles in cell transformation, viral DNA synthesis and gene expression. They have partially purified an AD2 encoded early polypeptide of an apparent molecular weight of 11 kilodaltons from the nuclei of viral infected cells labelled with /sup 35/S-methionine. After DNA removal from the nuclear extracts, the polypeptide was isolated using DEAE-Sephacel anion exchange and Biogel P-10 gel filtration columns. This simple two step procedure yielded several fold purification of the polypeptide. Antisera raised in mice against an Ad2 transformed rat cell line 8617 was found to immunoprecipitate the 11 kDa polypeptide from the nuclear extract of Ad2 infected KB cells. After relating this protein to an open reading frame of an Ad2 early gene block by matching the amino acid sequences to the nucleotide sequences of early genes, they plan to functionally characterize this protein by using monoclonal antibodies in in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  2. Kinetoplast DNA-encoded ribosomal protein S12

    PubMed Central

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, which are encoded by the kinetoplast genome, and more than 150 proteins encoded in the nucleus and imported from the cytoplasm. However, a single ribosomal protein RPS12 is encoded by the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) in all trypanosomatid species examined. As typical for these organisms, the gene itself is cryptic and its transcript undergoes an extensive U-insertion/deletion editing. An evolutionary trend to reduce or eliminate RNA editing could be traced with other cryptogenes, but the invariably pan-edited RPS12 cryptogene is apparently spared. Here we inquired whether editing of RPS12 mRNA is essential for mitochondrial translation. By RNAi-mediated knockdowns of RNA editing complexes and inducible knock-in of a key editing enzyme in procyclic parasites, we could reversibly downregulate production of edited RPS12 mRNA and, by inference, synthesis of this protein. While inhibition of editing decreased edited mRNA levels, the translation of edited (Cyb) and unedited (COI) mRNAs was blocked. Furthermore, the population of SSU-related 45S complexes declined upon inactivation of editing and so did the amount of mRNA-bound ribosomes. In bloodstream parasites, which lack active electron transport chain but still require translation of ATP synthase subunit 6 mRNA (A6), both edited RPS12 and A6 mRNAs were detected in translation complexes. Collectively, our results indicate that a single ribosomal protein gene retained by the kinetoplast mitochondrion serves as a possible functional link between editing and translation processes and provide the rationale for the evolutionary conservation of RPS12 pan-editing. PMID:24270388

  3. (Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein)

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1985-12-18

    We have isolated and characterized a gene which encodes the alpha prime subunit of beta conglycinin. This gene was fully sequenced by DNA sequence analysis and a report of that work was prepared and submitted for publication in early November 1985. This represented the culmination of several years of research effort by several scientists. A preprint of that work is attached to this report and has been offered by Dr. J.J. Doyle, Dr. Mary A. Schuler and Dr. Jerry Slighton, as well as myself. This paper is a comparison of the alpha prime subunit gene with a similar gene from phaseolus vulgaris, the common garden bean. In this paper we compare the sequences that are 5' of the gene, and which would represent the transcriptional promoter, as well as the sequences within the structural region of the gene. The sequence paper also compares the amino acid sequence of these two genes with that of other genes from Phaseolus, peas and from soybeans. On the basis of this comparison, we predict evolutionary trends within the multigene families which encode these proteins in the various plants, as well as to look at the protein itself to try to predict regions of the protein that might have functional significance. All of this work was done on a prior DOE-BER grant and has simply been reported here for the first time.

  4. Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70, a molecular chaperone for proteins encoded by mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mt-Hsp70) has been shown to play an important role in facilitating import into, as well as folding and assembly of nuclear-encoded proteins in the mitochondrial matrix. Here, we describe a role for mt-Hsp70 in chaperoning proteins encoded by mitochondrial DNA and synthesized within mitochondria. The availability of mt-Hsp70 function influences the pattern of proteins synthesized in mitochondria of yeast both in vivo and in vitro. In particular, we show that mt-Hsp70 acts in maintaining the var1 protein, the only mitochondrially encoded subunit of mitochondrial ribosomes, in an assembly competent state, especially under heat stress conditions. Furthermore, mt-Hsp70 helps to facilitate assembly of mitochondrially encoded subunits of the ATP synthase complex. By interacting with the ATP-ase 9 oligomer, mt-Hsp70 promotes assembly of ATP-ase 6, and thereby protects the latter protein from proteolytic degradation. Thus mt-Hsp70 by acting as a chaperone for proteins encoded by the mitochondrial DNA, has a critical role in the assembly of supra- molecular complexes. PMID:7962074

  5. Bioinformatics Annotation of Human Y Chromosome-Encoded Protein Pathways and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-09-01

    We performed a comprehensive analysis of human Y chromosome-encoded proteins, their pathways, and their interactions using bioinformatics tools. From the NCBI annotation release 107 of human genome, we retrieved a total of 66 proteins encoded on Y chromosome. Most of the retrieved proteins were also matched with the proteins listed in the core databases of the Human Proteome Project including neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and the Human Protein Atlas. When we examined the pathways of human Y-encoded proteins through KEGG database and Pathway Studio software, many of proteins fall into the categories related to cell signaling pathways. Using the STRING program, we found a total of 49 human Y-encoded proteins showing strong/medium interaction with each other. While using the Pathway studio software, we found that a total of 16 proteins interact with other chromosome-encoded proteins. In particular, the SRY protein interacted with 17 proteins encoded on other chromosomes. Additionally, we aligned the sequences of human Y-encoded proteins with the sequences of chimpanzee and mouse Y-encoded proteins using the NCBI BLAST program. This analysis resulted in a significant number of orthologous proteins between human, chimpanzee, and mouse. Collectively, our findings provide the scientific community with additional information on the human Y chromosome-encoded proteins. PMID:26279084

  6. A new heterogeneous family of telomerically encoded Cryptosporidium proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Maha; Hunter, Paul R; McDonald, Vincent; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M; Tyler, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is predominantly caused by two closely related species of protozoan parasites the zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum and anthroponotic Cryptosporidium hominis which diverge phenotypically in respect to host range and virulence. Using comparative genomics we identified two genes displaying overt heterogeneity between species. Although initial work suggested both were species specific, Cops-1 for C. parvum and Chos-1 for C. hominis, subsequent study identified an abridged ortholog of Cops-1 in C. hominis. Cops-1 and Chos-1 showed limited, but significant, similarity to each other and share common features: (i) telomeric location: Cops-1 is the last gene on chromosome 2, whilst Chos-1 is the first gene on chromosome 5, (ii) encode circa 50-kDa secreted proteins with isoelectric points above 10, (iii) are serine rich, and (iv) contain internal nucleotide repeats. Importantly, Cops-1 sequence contains specific SNPs with good discriminatory power useful epidemiologically. C. parvum-infected patient sera recognized a 50-kDa protein in antigen preparations of C. parvum but not C. hominis, consistent with Cops-1 being antigenic for patients. Interestingly, anti-Cops-1 monoclonal antibody (9E1) stained oocyst content and sporozoite surface of C. parvum only. This study provides a new example of protozoan telomeres as rapidly evolving contingency loci encoding putative virulence factors. PMID:23467513

  7. Expression cloning of genes encoding human peroxisomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Spathaky, J.M.; Tate, A.W.; Cox, T.M.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous metabolic disorders associated with diverse peroxisomal defects have been identified but their molecular characterization has been hampered by difficulties associated with the purification of proteins from this fragile organelle. We have utilized antibodies directed against the C-terminal tripeptide peroxisomal targeting signal to detect hitherto unknown peroxisomal proteins in tissue fractions and to isolate genes encoding peroxisonal proteins from human expression libraries. We immunized rabbits with a peptide conjugate encompassing the C-terminal nine amino acids of rat peroxisomal acyl CoA oxidase. Immunoprecipitation assays using radio-labelled peptide showed that the antibody specifically recognizes the terminal SKL motif as well as C-terminal SHL and SRL but not SHL at an internal position. Affinity-purified antibody was used to probe Western blots of crude and peroxisome-enriched monkey liver preparations and detected 8-10 proteins specifically in the peroxisome fractions. 100 positive clones were identified on screening a human liver cDNA expression library in {lambda}-gt11. Sequence analysis has confirmed the identity of cDNA clones for human acyl CoA oxidase and epoxide hydrolase. Four clones show no sequence identity and their putative role in the human peroxisome is being explored.

  8. Identification of three transforming proteins encoded by cottontail rabbit papillomavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, C; Harry, J; Lin, Y L; Wettstein, F O

    1992-01-01

    Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) provides an animal model for human papillomaviruses associated with a high risk of cancer development. So far, nothing is known about the transforming functions of CRPV genes because of the lack of an assay system. We have recently developed two systems to assay for CRPV transforming functions. One is based on the finding that transformation of NIH 3T3 cells by CRPV is considerably increased by deleting sequences in open reading frame L2. The second one is based on the use of a cottontail rabbit skin epithelial cell line, sf1Ep (C. Meyers and F. O. Wettstein, Virology 181:637-646, 1991). Mutations were introduced which abolished expression of the full-length E6 protein (LE6), the short E6 protein (SE6) initiated at the second ATG of E6, the E7 protein, or the E5 protein. Mutations affecting LE6 or E7, but not SE6, reduced transformation of NIH 3T3 and sf1Ep cells. Transformed NIH 3T3 cell lines with mutations in LE6 and E7 did not grow in soft agar, while those with mutations in SE6 and E5 grew with a reduced efficiency. The cell lines with mutations in LE6, SE6, or E7 still did induce tumors in nude mice. These mutations, however, abolished the ability to induce papillomas in rabbits. When expressed individually with a retroviral vector, LE6, SE6, or E7, but not E5, conferred anchorage-independent growth. The level of viral protein expression in these cell lines was generally low, and a comparison of the abundance of virus-specific mRNA showed that cell lines contained 20 to 50 times less mRNA than a cottontail rabbit papilloma. These data demonstrate that CRPV encodes at least three transforming proteins. Images PMID:1310771

  9. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  10. Genetically encoded force sensors for measuring mechanical forces in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    There are three sources of free energy for cells: chemical potential, electrical potential and mechanical potential. There is little known about the last one since there have not been simple ways to measure stress in proteins in cells. we have now developed genetically encoded force sensors to assess the stress in fibrous proteins in living cells. These FReT based fluorescence sensors can be read out at video rates and provide real time maps of the stress distribution in cells, tissues and animals. The sensors can be inserted into specific proteins and in general do not disturb the normal function or anatomy. The original sensors used mutant GFPs linked by elastic linkers. These sensors provide a linear output with applied stress but the response is linear in strain. To improve contrast and dynamic range we have now developed a new class of sensors that are smaller making them less invasive, and have much higher intrinsic sensitivity since force modulates the angle between the donor and acceptor much more than the distance between them. Known as cpstFRET, the probe shows improved biocompatibility, wider dynamic range and higher sensitivity. PMID:21966553

  11. Hepatitis E virus ORF1 encoded non structural protein-host protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Nishant Kumar; Lole, Kavita S

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus ORF1 encoded non-structural polyprotein (nsP) consist of multiple domains, namely: Methyltransferase, Y-domain, Protease, X-domain, Helicase and RNA dependent RNA polymerase. We have attempted to identify human liver cell proteins that are interacting with HEV ORF1 encoded functional domains by using Y2H screening. A total of 155 protein-protein interactions between HEV-ORF1 and human proteins were identified. Comparative analysis of the HEV-ORF1-Human interaction network with reconstructed human interactome showed that the cellular proteins interacting with HEV-ORF1 are central and interconnected. Enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology and cellular pathways showed that the viral proteins preferentially interacted with the proteins of metabolism and energy generation along with host immune response and ubiquitin proteasomal pathways. The mTOR and focal adhesion pathways were also targeted by the virus. These interactions suggest that HEV probably utilizes important proteins in carbohydrate metabolism, energy generation and iron homoeostasis in the host cells during its establishment. PMID:26689634

  12. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Pardo Garcia, Alan; Schmid, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them. PMID:26501285

  13. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level.

  14. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level. PMID:26390327

  15. Sequence heuristics to encode phase behaviour in intrinsically disordered protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Proteins and synthetic polymers that undergo aqueous phase transitions mediate self-assembly in nature and in man-made material systems. Yet little is known about how the phase behaviour of a protein is encoded in its amino acid sequence. Here, by synthesizing intrinsically disordered, repeat proteins to test motifs that we hypothesized would encode phase behaviour, we show that the proteins can be designed to exhibit tunable lower or upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) transitions in physiological solutions. We also show that mutation of key residues at the repeat level abolishes phase behaviour or encodes an orthogonal transition. Furthermore, we provide heuristics to identify, at the proteome level, proteins that might exhibit phase behaviour and to design novel protein polymers consisting of biologically active peptide repeats that exhibit LCST or UCST transitions. These findings set the foundation for the prediction and encoding of phase behaviour at the sequence level. PMID:26390327

  16. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  17. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Nirasawa, S; Nakaya, K; Kurihara, Y

    1995-08-19

    A cDNA clone encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin (MIR), was isolated and sequenced. The encoded precursor to MIR was composed of 220 amino acid (aa) residues, including a possible signal sequence of 29 aa. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA encoding MIR was already expressed in fruits of Richadella dulcifica at 3 weeks after pollination and was present specifically in the pulp. PMID:7665074

  18. Experimental strategies for cloning or identifying genes encoding DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Carey, Michael F; Peterson, Craig L; Smale, Stephen T

    2012-02-01

    This article describes experimental strategies for cloning or identifying genes encoding DNA-binding proteins. DNA-binding proteins are most commonly identified by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) or DNase I footprinting. To identify the gene encoding a protein detected by EMSA or DNase footprinting, the protein often needs to be purified and its sequence analyzed, as described here. Other methods are also available which do not resort to protein purification, including the one-hybrid screen, in vitro expression library screen, and mammalian expression cloning. These methods are outlined, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:22301659

  19. (Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported on research directed toward introducing a gene (Gmg 17.1) encoding the ..cap alpha..'-subunit of ..beta..-conglycinin, a soybean seed protein, into petunia plants using gene transfer mechanisms. (ACR)

  20. A genetically encoded aldehyde for rapid protein labelling.

    PubMed

    Tuley, Alfred; Lee, Yan-Jiun; Wu, Bo; Wang, Zhiyong U; Liu, Wenshe R

    2014-07-18

    Using a mutant pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-tRNA(Pyl)(CUA) pair, 3-formyl-phenylalanine is genetically incorporated into proteins at amber mutation sites in Escherichia coli. This non-canonical amino acid readily reacts with hydroxylamine dyes, leading to rapid and site-selective protein labelling. PMID:24756176

  1. Isotope-Encoded Carboxyl Group Footprinting for Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Conformational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    We report an isotope-encoding method coupled with carboxyl-group footprinting to monitor protein conformational changes. The carboxyl groups of aspartic/glutamic acids and of the C-terminus of proteins can serve as reporters for protein conformational changes when labeled with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) mediated by carbodiimide. In the new development, isotope-encoded "heavy" and "light" GEE are used to label separately the two states of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) from cyanobacteria. Two samples are mixed (1:1 ratio) and analyzed by a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The differences in labeling extent between the two states are represented by the ratio of the "heavy" and "light" peptides, providing information about protein conformational changes. Combining isotope-encoded MS quantitative analysis and carboxyl-group footprinting reduces the time of MS analysis and improves the sensitivity of GEE and other footprinting.

  2. Isotope-Encoded Carboxyl Group Footprinting for Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Conformational Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Blankenship, Robert E; Gross, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    We report an isotope-encoding method coupled with carboxyl-group footprinting to monitor protein conformational changes. The carboxyl groups of aspartic/glutamic acids and of the C-terminus of proteins can serve as reporters for protein conformational changes when labeled with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) mediated by carbodiimide. In the new development, isotope-encoded "heavy" and "light" GEE are used to label separately the two states of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) from cyanobacteria. Two samples are mixed (1:1 ratio) and analyzed by a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The differences in labeling extent between the two states are represented by the ratio of the "heavy" and "light" peptides, providing information about protein conformational changes. Combining isotope-encoded MS quantitative analysis and carboxyl-group footprinting reduces the time of MS analysis and improves the sensitivity of GEE and other footprinting. PMID:26384685

  3. SurfaceomeDB: a cancer-orientated database for genes encoding cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jorge Estefano Santana; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; de Almeida, Renan Valieris Bueno; da Cunha, Julia Pinheiro Chagas; Ohara, Daniel Takatori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Old, Lloyd J; de Souza, Sandro José

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface proteins (CSPs) are excellent targets for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic reagents, and it is estimated that 10-20% of all genes in the human genome encode CSPs. In an effort to integrate all data publicly available for genes encoding cell surface proteins, a database (SurfaceomeDB) was developed. SurfaceomeDB is a gene-centered portal containing different types of information, including annotation for gene expression, protein domains, somatic mutations in cancer, and protein-protein interactions for all human genes encoding CSPs. SurfaceomeDB was implemented as an integrative and relational database in a user-friendly web interface, where users can search for gene name, gene annotation, or keywords. There is also a streamlined graphical representation of all data provided and links to the most important data repositories and databases, such as NCBI, UCSC Genome Browser, and EBI. PMID:23390370

  4. Multifractals, encoded walks and the ergodicity of protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewey, T G; Strait, B J

    1996-01-01

    A variety of statistical methods have been developed to explore correlations in protein and nucleic acid sequences. Such correlations have important implications for the evolution and stability of these macromolecules. Recently, a number of fractal analyses of sequence data have been developed. These analyses have considerable appeal as they are extremely sensitive to long range correlations and to hierarchical structures. One such analysis decodes sequence information into a random walk and the statistics of the resulting random walk is investigated. Anomalous scaling of such walks has been interpreted as indicative of a fractal structure. Alternatively, a generalized box counting analysis of decoded sequences can be used to establish multifractal properties. In this work, the connection between these two seemingly disparate approaches is established. This connection is exploited to investigate correlations in protein sequences. An ensemble consisting of a comprehensive data set of representative protein sequences is analyzed to establish the ergodicity of protein sequences. The implications of this ergodicity for information theoretical approaches to protein structure prediction is explored. PMID:9390234

  5. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  6. Relating sequence encoded information to form and function of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul K.; Ruff, Kiersten M.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) showcase the importance of conformational plasticity and heterogeneity in protein function. We summarize recent advances that connect information encoded in IDP sequences to their conformational properties and functions. We focus on insights obtained through a combination of atomistic simulations and biophysical measurements that are synthesized into a coherent framework using polymer physics theories. PMID:25863585

  7. The virally encoded killer proteins from Ustilago maydis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several strains of Ustilago maydis, a causal agent of corn smut disease, exhibit a 'killer' phenotype that is due to persistent infection by double-stranded RNA Totiviruses. These viruses produce potent killer proteins that are secreted by the host. This is a rare example of virus/host symbiosis in ...

  8. Identification of Two Laminin-Binding Fimbriae, the Type 1 Fimbria of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and the G Fimbria of Escherichia coli, as Plasminogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, Maini; Saarela, Sirkku; Lähteenmäki, Kaarina; Hynönen, Ulla; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita; Rhen, Mikael; Korhonen, Timo K.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains carrying recombinant plasmids encoding either the type 1 fimbria of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or the G fimbria of E. coli exhibited binding of human 125I-Glu-plasminogen and enhanced the tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Purified type 1 or G fimbriae similarly bound plasminogen and enhanced its activation. The binding of plasminogen did not involve the characteristic carbohydrate-binding property of the fimbriae but was inhibited at low concentrations by the lysine analog ɛ-aminocaproic acid. Because these fimbrial types bind to laminin of basement membranes (M. Kukkonen et al., Mol. Microbiol. 7:229–237, 1993; S. Saarela et al., Infect. Immun. 64:2857–2860, 1996), the results demonstrate a structural unity in the creation and targeting of bacterium-bound proteolytic plasmin activity to basement membranes. PMID:9746604

  9. Chimeric proteins define variable and essential regions of Ha-ras-encoded protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, D.G.; Ricketts, M.; Levinson, A.D.; Goeddel, D.V.

    1988-02-01

    The biological role of amino acid differences between the human 21-kDa Ha-ras protein (p21) and the human 23-kDa R-ras protein (p23) was investigated by engineering mutant Ha-ras p21 molecules containing divergent amino acid sequences from R-ras p23. Variant amino acids from R-ras p23 regions 1-30, 52-57, 67-78, 1-30 and 67-78 together, and 112-124 were substituted for the corresponding Ha-ras p21 amino acid regions 1-4, 26-31, 41-52, 1-4 and 41-52 together, and 86-98, respectively. Rat fibroblasts transfected with genes encoding these position-12 valine-substituted chimeric Ha-ras proteins displayed the same properties of morphological transformation and anchorage-independent growth as Ha-ras T24 oncogene-transformed fibroblasts. However, substitution of variant amino acids from the 80 C-terminal residues (amino acids 138-218) of R-ras p23 for the corresponding p21 amino acids (residues 112-189) inactivated the transforming activity of position-12 valine-substituted p21. The converse substitution of Ha-ras p21 C-terminal residues into R-ras p23 did not result in transformation by position-38 valine-substituted p232. These data are discussed in terms of the structure of ras proteins and the nature of interactions determining the specificity of effector function.

  10. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  11. Synthesis of Non-linear Protein Dimers through a Genetically Encoded Thiol-ene Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Kolbus, Jessica; Chou, Chungjung; Liu, Jihe; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific incorporation of bioorthogonal unnatural amino acids into proteins provides a useful tool for the installation of specific functionalities that will allow for the labeling of proteins with virtually any probe. We demonstrate the genetic encoding of a set of alkene lysines using the orthogonal PylRS/PylTCUA pair in Escherichia coli. The installed double bond functionality was then applied in a photoinitiated thiol-ene reaction of the protein with a fluorescent thiol-bearing probe, as well as a cysteine residue of a second protein, showing the applicability of this approach in the formation of heterogeneous non-linear fused proteins. PMID:25181502

  12. Nucleic acid encoding DS-CAM proteins and products related thereto

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, Julie R.

    2005-11-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there are provided Down Syndrome-Cell Adhesion Molecule (DS-CAM) proteins. Nucleic acid sequences encoding such proteins and assays employing same are also disclosed. The invention DS-CAM proteins can be employed in a variety of ways, for example, for the production of anti-DS-CAM antibodies thereto, in therapeutic compositions and methods employing such proteins and/or antibodies. DS-CAM proteins are also useful in bioassays to identify agonists and antagonists thereto.

  13. Learning from Bacteriophages - Advantages and Limitations of Phage and Phage-Encoded Protein Applications

    PubMed Central

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grażyna; Maciejewska, Barbara; Delattre, Anne-Sophie; Lavigne, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of bacteria resistance to most of the currently available antibiotics has become a critical therapeutic problem. The bacteria causing both hospital and community-acquired infections are most often multidrug resistant. In view of the alarming level of antibiotic resistance between bacterial species and difficulties with treatment, alternative or supportive antibacterial cure has to be developed. The presented review focuses on the major characteristics of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins affecting their usefulness as antimicrobial agents. We discuss several issues such as mode of action, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, resistance and manufacturing aspects of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins application. PMID:23305359

  14. IQCJ-SCHIP1, a novel fusion transcript encoding a calmodulin-binding IQ motif protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kwasnicka-Crawford, Dorota A. . E-mail: dakc@yorku.ca; Carson, Andrew R.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2006-12-01

    The existence of transcripts that span two adjacent, independent genes is considered rare in the human genome. This study characterizes a novel human fusion gene named IQCJ-SCHIP1. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is the longest isoform of a complex transcriptional unit that bridges two separate genes that encode distinct proteins, IQCJ, a novel IQ motif containing protein and SCHIP1, a schwannomin interacting protein that has been previously shown to interact with the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) protein. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is located on the chromosome 3q25 and comprises a 1692-bp transcript encompassing 11 exons spanning 828 kb of the genomic DNA. We show that IQCJ-SCHIP1 mRNA is highly expressed in the brain. Protein encoded by the IQCJ-SCHIP1 gene was localized to cytoplasm and actin-rich regions and in differentiated PC12 cells was also seen in neurite extensions.

  15. Genetically Encoding an Electrophilic Amino Acid for Protein Stapling and Covalent Binding to Native Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Covalent bonds can be generated within and between proteins by an unnatural amino acid (Uaa) reacting with a natural residue through proximity-enabled bioreactivity. Until now, Uaas have been developed to react mainly with cysteine in proteins. Here we genetically encoded an electrophilic Uaa capable of reacting with histidine and lysine, thereby expanding the diversity of target proteins and the scope of the proximity-enabled protein cross-linking technology. In addition to efficient cross-linking of proteins inter- and intramolecularly, this Uaa permits direct stapling of a protein α-helix in a recombinant manner and covalent binding of native membrane receptors in live cells. The target diversity, recombinant stapling, and covalent targeting of endogenous proteins enabled by this versatile Uaa should prove valuable in developing novel research tools, biological diagnostics, and therapeutics by exploiting covalent protein linkages for specificity, irreversibility, and stability. PMID:25010185

  16. Genetically encoded protein photocrosslinker with a transferable mass spectrometry-identifiable label

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Song, Haiping; He, Dan; Zhang, Shuai; Dai, Shizhong; Lin, Shixian; Meng, Rong; Wang, Chu; Chen, Peng R.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling photocrosslinking reagents with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions in living systems, but it still suffers from high rates of false-positive identifications as well as the lack of information on interaction interface due to the challenges in deciphering crosslinking peptides. Here we develop a genetically encoded photo-affinity unnatural amino acid that introduces a mass spectrometry-identifiable label (MS-label) to the captured prey proteins after photocrosslinking and prey–bait separation. This strategy, termed IMAPP (In-situ cleavage and MS-label transfer After Protein Photocrosslinking), enables direct identification of photo-captured substrate peptides that are difficult to uncover by conventional genetically encoded photocrosslinkers. Taking advantage of the MS-label, the IMAPP strategy significantly enhances the confidence for identifying protein–protein interactions and enables simultaneous mapping of the binding interface under living conditions. PMID:27460181

  17. Orf-I and Orf-II-Encoded Proteins in HTLV-1 Infection and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Dustin; Fenizia, Claudio; Gold, Heather; de Castro-Amarante, Maria Fernanda; Buchmann, Cody; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A.; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-01-01

    The 3′ end of the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type-1 (HTLV-1) genome contains four overlapping open reading frames (ORF) that encode regulatory proteins. Here, we review current knowledge of HTLV-1 orf-I and orf-II protein products. Singly spliced mRNA from orf-I encodes p12, which can be proteolytically cleaved to generate p8, while differential splicing of mRNA from orf-II results in production of p13 and p30. These proteins have been demonstrated to modulate transcription, apoptosis, host cell activation and proliferation, virus infectivity and transmission, and host immune responses. Though these proteins are not essential for virus replication in vitro, p8, p12, p13, and p30 have an important role in the establishment and maintenance of HTLV-1 infection in vivo. PMID:21994758

  18. Storable N-Phenylcarbamate Palladacycles for Rapid Functionalization of An Alkyne-Encoded Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Lim, Reyna K. V.; Ramil, Carlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the synthesis of storable N-phenyl-carbamate palladacycles that showed robust reactivity in the cross-coupling reaction with an alkyne-encoded protein with second-order rate constantapproaching 19 770 ± 930 M−1 s−1. PMID:25140915

  19. Role of Soybean mosaic virus-encoded proteins in seed and aphid transmission in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is seed and aphid transmitted and can cause significant reductions in yield and seed quality in soybean, Glycine max. The roles in seed and aphid transmission of selected SMV-encoded proteins were investigated by constructing chimeric recombinants between SMV 413 (efficien...

  20. Post-anthesis Fertilizer Influences Expression of Genes Encoding Allergenic Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Omega-gliadins comprise between 5-10% of the wheat flour protein and have been implicated in food allergies. In particular, omega-gliadins encoded by the 1B chromosome have been associated with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphalaxis (WDEIA) and urticaria. Because the omega-gliadins consist alm...

  1. Isolation and analysis of a cDNA clone encoding an S. guttatum alternataive oxidase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, D.M.; McIntosh, L. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )

    1990-05-01

    Antibodies that recognize the 35, 36, and 37 kilodalton (kDa) alternative oxidase proteins were used to isolate a cDNA proteins were used to isolate a cDNA clone of a nuclearly encoded protein of Sauromatum guttatum. The amino acid sequence deduced from clone pAOSG81 revealed a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 44 kDa, while a 42 kDa protein is immunoprecipitated from in vitro translation products made using S. guttatum poly A+ RNA. The protein contains a 60-65 amino acid transit peptide which is predicted to form amphiphilic helices. We have also identified regions of the mature 42 kDa protein which are likely to be membrane associated. Clone pAOSG81 is being used to screen a genomic library. The genomic clone encoding the 42 kDa protein will be used to investigate the salicylic-acid-controlled transcriptional regulation of the S. guttatum alternative oxidase proteins.

  2. Genetically encoded norbornene directs site-specific cellular protein labelling via a rapid bioorthogonal reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kathrin; Davis, Lloyd; Torres-Kolbus, Jessica; Chou, Chungjung; Deiters, Alexander; Chin, Jason W.

    2012-04-01

    The site-specific incorporation of bioorthogonal groups via genetic code expansion provides a powerful general strategy for site-specifically labelling proteins with any probe. However, the slow reactivity of the bioorthogonal functional groups that can be encoded genetically limits the utility of this strategy. We demonstrate the genetic encoding of a norbornene amino acid using the pyrrolysyl tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. We developed a series of tetrazine-based probes that exhibit ‘turn-on’ fluorescence on their rapid reaction with norbornenes. We demonstrate that the labelling of an encoded norbornene is specific with respect to the entire soluble E. coli proteome and thousands of times faster than established encodable bioorthogonal reactions. We show explicitly the advantages of this approach over state-of-the-art bioorthogonal reactions for protein labelling in vitro and on mammalian cells, and demonstrate the rapid bioorthogonal site-specific labelling of a protein on the mammalian cell surface.

  3. Multiple proteins encoded within the urease gene complex of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Walz, S E; Wray, S K; Hull, S I; Hull, R A

    1988-03-01

    Chromosomal DNA fragments from a uropathogenic isolate of Proteus mirabilis were inserted into the cosmid vector pHC79 to construct a genomic library in Escherichia coli HB101. A urease-positive recombinant cosmid, designated pSKW1, was recovered. Sequential recombinant manipulation of pSKW1 yielded a 10.2-kilobase plasmid, designated pSKW4, which encoded three urease isozymes with electrophoretic mobilities identical to those of the donor P. mirabilis strain. Plasmid pSKW4 gene sequences encode seven proteins designated 68K (apparent molecular weight, of 68,000), 28K, 25K, 22.5K, 18.5K, 7.5K, and 5.2K within the limits of the urease gene complex. Insertion mutations in genes encoding the 68K, 28K, 25K, 22.5K, 7.5K, and 5.2K proteins resulted in complete or partial (22.5K) loss of urease activity. There was no reduction in urease activity when the gene encoding the 18.5K protein was inactivated. PMID:2830226

  4. Bacteriophage-encoded cochaperonins can substitute for Escherichia coli’s essential GroES protein

    PubMed Central

    Keppel, France; Rychner, Monique; Georgopoulos, Costa

    2002-01-01

    The Escherichia coli chaperonin machine is composed of two members, GroEL and GroES. The GroEL chaperonin can bind 10–15% of E. coli’s unfolded proteins in one of its central cavities and help them fold in cooperation with the GroES cochaperonin. Both proteins are absolutely essential for bacterial growth. Several large, lytic bacteriophages, such as T4 and RB49, use the host-encoded GroEL in conjunction with their own bacteriophage-encoded cochaperonin for the correct assembly of their major capsid protein, suggesting a cochaperonin specificity for the in vivo folding of certain substrates. Here, we demonstrate that, when the cochaperonin of either bacteriophage T4 (Gp31) or RB49 (CocO) is expressed in E. coli, the otherwise essential groES gene can be deleted. Thus, it appears that, despite very little sequence identity with groES, the bacteriophage-encoded Gp31 and CocO proteins are capable of replacing GroES in the folding of E. coli’s essential, housekeeping proteins. PMID:12189177

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to individual tyrosine-phosphorylated protein substrates of oncogene-encoded tyrosine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, S.B.; Reynolds, A.B.; Vines, R.R.; Parsons, J.T. )

    1990-05-01

    Cellular transformation by oncogenic retroviruses encoding protein tyrosine kinases coincides with the tyrosine-specific phosphorylation of multiple protein substrates. Previous studies have shown that tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein of 120 kDa, p120, correlated with src transformation in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Additionally, the authors previously identified two phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins, p130 and p110, that formed stable complexes with activated variants of pp60{sup src}, the src-encoded tyrosine kinase. To study transformation-relevant tyrosine kinase substrates, they have generated monoclonal antibodies to individual tyrosine phosphoproteins, including p130, p120, p110, and five additional phosphoproteins (p210, p125, p118, p85, and p185/p64). These antibodies detected several of the same tyrosine phosphoproteins in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by avian retroviruses Y73 and CT10, encoding the yes and crk oncogenes, respectively. Protein substrates in mouse, rat, hamster, and human cells overexpressing activated variants of chicken pp60{sup src} were also detected by several of the monoclonal antibodies.

  6. Reduction of a 4q35-encoded nuclear envelope protein in muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, Cecilia; Guan, Tinglu; Figlewicz, Denise A.; Hays, Arthur P.; Worman, Howard J.; Gerace, Larry; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2009-11-13

    Muscular dystrophy and peripheral neuropathy have been linked to mutations in genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unresolved. Nuclear envelope protein p19A is a protein of unknown function encoded by a gene at chromosome 4q35. p19A levels are significantly reduced in human muscle as cells differentiate from myoblasts to myotubes; however, its levels are not similarly reduced in all differentiation systems tested. Because 4q35 has been linked to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and some adjacent genes are reportedly misregulated in the disorder, levels of p19A were analyzed in muscle samples from patients with FSHD. Although p19A was increased in most cases, an absolute correlation was not observed. Nonetheless, p19A downregulation in normal muscle differentiation suggests that in the cases where its gene is inappropriately re-activated it could affect muscle differentiation and contribute to disease pathology.

  7. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  8. African swine fever virus encodes a serine protein kinase which is packaged into virions.

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, S A; Banham, A H; Vydelingum, S; Dixon, L K; Smith, G L

    1993-01-01

    Nucleotide sequencing of the SalI j region of the virulent Malawi (LIL20/1) strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV) identified an open reading frame (ORF), designated j9L, with extensive similarity to the family of protein kinases. This ORF encodes a 35.1-kDa protein of 299 amino acids which shares 24.6% amino acid identity with the human pim-1 proto-oncogene and 21.0% identity with the vaccinia virus B1R-encoded protein kinase. The ASFV ORF contains the motifs characteristic of serine-threonine protein kinases, with the exception of the presumed ATP-binding site, which is poorly conserved. The ORF was expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme phosphorylated a calf thymus histone protein on serine residues in vitro. An antibody raised to an amino-terminal peptide of the ASFV protein kinase was reactive with the recombinant protein in Western immunoblot analyses and was used to demonstrate the presence of the protein kinase in ASF virions. Images PMID:8331722

  9. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of peb4A encoding an antigenic protein in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Burucoa, C; Frémaux, C; Pei, Z; Tummuru, M; Blaser, M J; Cenatiempo, Y; Fauchère, J L

    1995-01-01

    The 29-kDa protein PEB4, a major antigen of Campylobacter jejuni, is present in all C. jejuni strains tested and elicits an antibody response in infected patients. By screening a lambda gt11 library of chromosomal DNA fragments of C. jejuni strain 81-176 in Escherichia coli Y1090 cells with antibody raised against purified PEB4, a recombinant phage with a 2-kb insert expressing an immunoreactive protein of 29 kDa was isolated. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the insert contains two complete open reading frames ORF-A and ORF-B. ORF-A (peb4A) encodes a 273-residue protein with a calculated molecular mass of 30,460 daltons. The deduced amino acid sequence, composition and pl of the recombinant mature protein are similar to those determined for purified PEB4. The first 21 residues resemble a signal peptide. Gene bank searches indicated 33.7% identity with protein export protein PrsA of Bacillus subtilis and 23.8% identity with protease maturation protein precursor PrtM of Lactococcus lactis. PCR experiments indicate that peb4A is highly conserved among C. jejuni strains. ORF-B begins 2 bp after the last codon of peb4A and encodes a putative protein of 353 residues with 63.4% identity with E. coli fructose 1,6-biphosphate aldolase. The sequence arrangement suggests that these two genes form an operon. PMID:8525063

  10. Open reading frame 2 of porcine circovirus type 2 encodes a major capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Nawagitgul, P; Morozov, I; Bolin, S R; Harms, P A; Sorden, S D; Paul, P S

    2000-09-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2), a single-stranded DNA virus associated with post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome of swine, has two potential open reading frames, ORF1 and ORF2, greater than 600 nucleotides in length. ORF1 is predicted to encode a replication-associated protein (Rep) essential for replication of viral DNA, while ORF2 contains a conserved basic amino acid sequence at the N terminus resembling that of the major structural protein of chicken anaemia virus. Thus far, the structural protein(s) of PCV2 have not been identified. In this study, a viral structural protein of 30 kDa was identified in purified PCV2 particles. ORF2 of PCV2 was cloned into a baculovirus expression vector and the gene product was expressed in insect cells. The expressed ORF2 gene product had a molecular mass of 30 kDa, similar to that detected in purified virus particles. The recombinant ORF2 protein self-assembled to form capsid-like particles when viewed by electron microscopy. Antibodies against the ORF2 protein were detected in samples of sera obtained from pigs as early as 3 weeks after experimental infection with PCV2. These results show that the major structural protein of PCV2 is encoded by ORF2 and has a molecular mass of 30 kDa. PMID:10950986

  11. Newly identified RNAs of raspberry leaf blotch virus encoding a related group of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuwen; McGavin, Wendy; Cock, Peter J A; Schnettler, Esther; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping; MacFarlane, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    Members of the genus Emaravirus, including Raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV), are enveloped plant viruses with segmented genomes of negative-strand RNA, although the complete genome complement for any of these viruses is not yet clear. Currently, wheat mosaic virus has the largest emaravirus genome comprising eight RNAs. Previously, we identified five genomic RNAs for RLBV; here, we identify a further three RNAs (RNA6-8). RNA6-8 encode proteins that have clear homologies to one another, but not to any other emaravirus proteins. The proteins self-interacted in yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) experiments, and the P8 protein interacted with the virus nucleocapsid protein (P3) using BiFC. Expression of two of the proteins (P6 and P7) using potato virus X led to an increase in virus titre and symptom severity, suggesting that these proteins may play a role in RLBV pathogenicity; however, using two different tests, RNA silencing suppression activity was not detected for any of the RLBV proteins encoded by RNA2-8. PMID:26358478

  12. Francisella novicida Pathogenicity Island Encoded Proteins Were Secreted during Infection of Macrophage-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Rebekah F.; Hueffer, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens and other organisms have evolved mechanisms to exploit host cells for their life cycles. Virulence genes of some intracellular bacteria responsible for these mechanisms are located in pathogenicity islands, such as secretion systems that secrete effector proteins. The Francisella pathogenicity island is required for phagosomal escape, intracellular replication, evasion of host immune responses, virulence, and encodes a type 6 secretion system. We hypothesize that some Francisella novicida pathogenicity island proteins are secreted during infection of host cells. To test this hypothesis, expression plasmids for all Francisella novicida FPI-encoded proteins with C-terminal and N-terminal epitope FLAG tags were developed. These plasmids expressed their respective epitope FLAG-tagged proteins at their predicted molecular weights. J774 murine macrophage-like cells were infected with Francisella novicida containing these plasmids. The FPI proteins expressed from these plasmids successfully restored the intramacrophage growth phenotype in mutants of the respective genes that were deficient for intramacrophage growth. Using these expression plasmids, the localization of the Francisella pathogenicity island proteins were examined via immuno-fluorescence microscopy within infected macrophage-like cells. Several Francisella pathogenicity island encoded proteins (IglABCDEFGHIJ, PdpACE, DotU and VgrG) were detected extracellularly and they were co-localized with the bacteria, while PdpBD and Anmk were not detected and thus remained inside bacteria. Proteins that were co-localized with bacteria had different patterns of localization. The localization of IglC was dependent on the type 6 secretion system. This suggests that some Francisella pathogenicity island proteins were secreted while others remain within the bacterium during infection of host cells as structural components of the secretion system and were necessary for secretion. PMID:25158041

  13. Francisella novicida pathogenicity island encoded proteins were secreted during infection of macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Hare, Rebekah F; Hueffer, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens and other organisms have evolved mechanisms to exploit host cells for their life cycles. Virulence genes of some intracellular bacteria responsible for these mechanisms are located in pathogenicity islands, such as secretion systems that secrete effector proteins. The Francisella pathogenicity island is required for phagosomal escape, intracellular replication, evasion of host immune responses, virulence, and encodes a type 6 secretion system. We hypothesize that some Francisella novicida pathogenicity island proteins are secreted during infection of host cells. To test this hypothesis, expression plasmids for all Francisella novicida FPI-encoded proteins with C-terminal and N-terminal epitope FLAG tags were developed. These plasmids expressed their respective epitope FLAG-tagged proteins at their predicted molecular weights. J774 murine macrophage-like cells were infected with Francisella novicida containing these plasmids. The FPI proteins expressed from these plasmids successfully restored the intramacrophage growth phenotype in mutants of the respective genes that were deficient for intramacrophage growth. Using these expression plasmids, the localization of the Francisella pathogenicity island proteins were examined via immuno-fluorescence microscopy within infected macrophage-like cells. Several Francisella pathogenicity island encoded proteins (IglABCDEFGHIJ, PdpACE, DotU and VgrG) were detected extracellularly and they were co-localized with the bacteria, while PdpBD and Anmk were not detected and thus remained inside bacteria. Proteins that were co-localized with bacteria had different patterns of localization. The localization of IglC was dependent on the type 6 secretion system. This suggests that some Francisella pathogenicity island proteins were secreted while others remain within the bacterium during infection of host cells as structural components of the secretion system and were necessary for secretion. PMID:25158041

  14. A Betabaculovirus-Encoded gp64 Homolog Codes for a Functional Envelope Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M. P.; Melo, Fernando L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Wolff, José L. C.

    2015-01-01

    The GP64 envelope fusion protein is a hallmark of group I alphabaculoviruses. However, the Diatraea saccharalis granulovirus genome sequence revealed the first betabaculovirus species harboring a gp64 homolog (disa118). In this work, we have shown that this homolog encodes a functional envelope fusion protein and could enable the infection and fusogenic abilities of a gp64-null prototype baculovirus. Therefore, GP64 may complement or may be in the process of replacing F protein activity in this virus lineage. PMID:26537678

  15. A Betabaculovirus-Encoded gp64 Homolog Codes for a Functional Envelope Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M P; Melo, Fernando L; Clem, Rollie J; Wolff, José L C; Ribeiro, Bergmann M

    2016-02-01

    The GP64 envelope fusion protein is a hallmark of group I alphabaculoviruses. However, the Diatraea saccharalis granulovirus genome sequence revealed the first betabaculovirus species harboring a gp64 homolog (disa118). In this work, we have shown that this homolog encodes a functional envelope fusion protein and could enable the infection and fusogenic abilities of a gp64-null prototype baculovirus. Therefore, GP64 may complement or may be in the process of replacing F protein activity in this virus lineage. PMID:26537678

  16. Precursor protein of Alzheimer's disease A4 amyloid is encoded by 16 exons

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaire, H.G.; Kang, J.; Mueller-Hill, B. ); Salbaum, J.M.; Multhaup, G.; Beyreuther, K. ); Bayney, R.M.; Unterbeck, A. )

    1989-01-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the cerebral deposition of fibrillar aggregates of the amyloid A4 protein. Complementary DNA's coding for the precursor of the amyloid A4 protein have been described. In order to identify the structure of the precursor gene relevant clones from several human genomic libraries were isolated. Sequence analysis of the various clones revealed 16 exons to encode the 695 residue precursor protein (PreA4{sub 695}) of Alzheimer's disease amyloid A4 protein. The DNA sequence coding for the amyloid A4 protein is interrupted by an intron. This finding supports the idea that amyloid A4 protein arises by incomplete proteolysis of a larger precursor, and not by aberrant splicing.

  17. The Arabidopsis genome encodes structurally and functionally diverse HMGB-type proteins.

    PubMed

    Grasser, Marion; Lentz, Anne; Lichota, Jacek; Merkle, Thomas; Grasser, Klaus D

    2006-05-01

    The high mobility group (HMG) proteins of the HMGB family are chromatin-associated proteins that act as architectural factors in nucleoprotein structures, which regulate DNA-dependent processes including transcription and recombination. In addition to the previously identified HMGB1-HMGB6 proteins, the Arabidopsis genome encodes at least two other candidate family members (encoded by the loci At2g34450 and At5g23405) having the typical overall structure of a central domain displaying sequence similarity to HMG-box DNA binding domains, which is flanked by basic N-terminal and acidic C-terminal regions. Subcellular localisation experiments demonstrate that the At2g34450 protein is a nuclear protein, whereas the At5g23405 protein is found mainly in the cytoplasm. In line with this finding, At5g23405 displays specific interaction with the nuclear export receptor AtXPO1a. According to CD measurements, the HMG-box domains of both proteins have an alpha-helical structure. The HMG-box domain of At2g34450 interacts with linear DNA and binds structure-specifically to DNA minicircles, whereas the HMG-box domain of At5g23405 does not interact with DNA at all. In ligation experiments with short DNA fragments, the At2g34450 HMG-box domain can facilitate the formation of linear oligomers, but it does not promote the formation of DNA minicircles. Therefore, the At2g34450 protein shares several features with HMGB proteins, whereas the At5g23405 protein has different characteristics. Despite the presence of a region with similarity to the nucleosome-binding domain typical of HMGN proteins, At2g34450 does not bind nucleosome particles. In summary, our data demonstrate (i) that plant HMGB-type proteins are functionally variable and (ii) that it is difficult to predict HMG-box function solely based on sequence similarity. PMID:16563436

  18. Cloning and characterization of human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, J.; Norman, D.K.; Beckmann, R.J.; Long, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor was isolated from two cDNA libraries by two different techniques. Based upon the frequency of positive clones, the abundance of mRNA for protein S is approx. = 0.01%. Blot hybridization of electrophoretically fractionated poly(A)/sup +/ RNA revealed a major mRNA approx. = 4 kilobases long and two minor forms of approx. = 3.1 and approx. = 2.6 kilobases. One of the cDNA clones contains a segment encoding a 676 amino acid protein S precursor, as well as 108 and 1132 nucleotides of 5' and 3' noncoding sequence, respectively, plus a poly(A) region at the 3' end. The cDNAs are adenosine plus thymidine-rich (60%) except for the 5' noncoding region, where 78% of the nucleotides are guanosine or cytosine. The protein precursor consists of a 41 amino acid leader peptide followed by 635 amino acids corresponding to mature protein S. Comparison of the mature protein region with homologous vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins shows that it is composed of the following domains: an amino-terminal ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid-rich region of 37 amino acids; a 36 amino acid linker region rich in hydroxy amino acids; four epidermal growth factor-like segments, each approx. = 45 amino acids long; and a 387 amino acid carboxyl-terminal domain of unrecognized structure and unknown function.

  19. Genetically encoded multispectral labeling of proteins with polyfluorophores on a DNA backbone.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Wang, Shenliang; Kool, Eric T

    2013-04-24

    Genetically encoded methods for protein conjugation are of high importance as biological tools. Here we describe the development of a new class of dyes for genetically encoded tagging that add new capabilities for protein reporting and detection via HaloTag methodology. Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are short DNA-like oligomers in which the natural nucleic acid bases are replaced by interacting fluorescent chromophores, yielding a broad range of emission colors using a single excitation wavelength. We describe the development of an alkyl halide dehalogenase-compatible chloroalkane linker phosphoramidite derivative that enables the rapid automated synthesis of many possible dyes for protein conjugation. Experiments to test the enzymatic self-conjugation of nine different DNA-like dyes to proteins with HaloTag domains in vitro were performed, and the data confirmed the rapid and efficient covalent labeling of the proteins. Notably, a number of the ODF dyes were found to increase in brightness or change color upon protein conjugation. Tests in mammalian cellular settings revealed that the dyes are functional in multiple cellular contexts, both on the cell surface and within the cytoplasm, allowing protein localization to be imaged in live cells by epifluorescence and laser confocal microscopy. PMID:23590213

  20. Compensation for differences in gene copy number among yeast ribosomal proteins is encoded within their promoters

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, Danny; Sharon, Eilon; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Lubling, Yaniv; Shipony, Zohar; Raveh-Sadka, Tali; Keren, Leeat; Levo, Michal; Weinberger, Adina; Segal, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Coordinate regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes is key for controlling cell growth. In yeast, it is unclear how this regulation achieves the required equimolar amounts of the different RP components, given that some RP genes exist in duplicate copies, while others have only one copy. Here, we tested whether the solution to this challenge is partly encoded within the DNA sequence of the RP promoters, by fusing 110 different RP promoters to a fluorescent gene reporter, allowing us to robustly detect differences in their promoter activities that are as small as ∼10%. We found that single-copy RP promoters have significantly higher activities, suggesting that proper RP stoichiometry is indeed partly encoded within the RP promoters. Notably, we also partially uncovered how this regulation is encoded by finding that RP promoters with higher activity have more nucleosome-disfavoring sequences and characteristic spatial organizations of these sequences and of binding sites for key RP regulators. Mutations in these elements result in a significant decrease of RP promoter activity. Thus, our results suggest that intrinsic (DNA-dependent) nucleosome organization may be a key mechanism by which genomes encode biologically meaningful promoter activities. Our approach can readily be applied to uncover how transcriptional programs of other promoters are encoded. PMID:22009988

  1. Virulence Plasmid of Rhodococcus equi Contains Inducible Gene Family Encoding Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Barbara A.; Prescott, John F.; Palmer, Guy H.; Takai, Shinji; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Alperin, Debra C.; Hines, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals. This facultative intracellular pathogen produces similar lesions in immunocompromised humans, particularly in AIDS patients. Virulent strains of R. equi bear a large plasmid that is required for intracellular survival within macrophages and for virulence in foals and mice. Only two plasmid-encoded proteins have been described previously; a 15- to 17-kDa surface protein designated virulence-associated protein A (VapA) and an antigenically related 20-kDa protein (herein designated VapB). These two proteins are not expressed by the same R. equi isolate. We describe here the substantial similarity between VapA and VapB. Moreover, we identify three additional genes carried on the virulence plasmid, vapC, -D, and -E, that are tandemly arranged downstream of vapA. These new genes are members of a gene family and encode proteins that are approximately 50% homologous to VapA, VapB, and each other. vapC, -D, and -E are found only in R. equi strains that express VapA and are highly conserved in VapA-positive isolates from both horses and humans. VapC, -D, and -E are secreted proteins coordinately regulated by temperature with VapA; the proteins are expressed when R. equi is cultured at 37°C but not at 30°C, a finding that is compatible with a role in virulence. As secreted proteins, VapC, -D, and -E may represent targets for the prevention of rhodococcal pneumonia. An immunologic study using VapA-specific antibodies and recombinant Vap proteins revealed no evidence of cross-reactivity despite extensive sequence similarity over the carboxy terminus of all four proteins. PMID:11159951

  2. The KUP gene, located on human chromosome 14, encodes a protein with two distant zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Chardin, P; Courtois, G; Mattei, M G; Gisselbrecht, S

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a human cDNA (kup), encoding a new protein with two distantly spaced zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. This gene is highly conserved in mammals and is expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells and testis. Its expression was not higher in the various transformed cells tested than in the normal corresponding tissues. The kup gene is located in region q23-q24 of the long arm of human chromosome 14. The kup protein is 433 a.a. long, has a M.W. close to 50 kD and binds to DNA. Although the structure of the kup protein is unusual, the isolated fingers resemble closely those of the Krüppel family, suggesting that this protein is also a transcription factor. The precise function and DNA motif recognized by the kup protein remain to be determined. Images PMID:2027750

  3. Neurally expressed Drosophila genes encoding homologs of the NSF and SNAP secretory proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, R W; Pallanck, L; Ganetzky, B

    1994-01-01

    Several lines of investigation have now converged to indicate that the neurotransmitter release apparatus is formed by assembly of cytosolic proteins with proteins of the synaptic vesicle and presynaptic terminal membranes. We are undertaking a genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the functions of two types of cytosolic proteins thought to function in this complex: N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) and the soluble NSF attachment proteins (SNAPs). We have identified Drosophila homologs of the vertebrate and yeast NSF and SNAP genes. Both Drosophila genes encode polypeptides that closely resemble their vertebrate counterparts and are expressed in the nervous system; neither appears to be in a family of closely related Drosophila genes. These results indicate that the Drosophila NSF and SNAP genes are excellent candidates for mutational analysis of neurotransmitter release. Images PMID:8202553

  4. Cloning and expression analysis of a prion protein encoding gene in guppy ( Poecilia reticulata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Suihan; Wei, Qiwei; Yang, Guanpin; Wang, Dengqiang; Zou, Guiwei; Chen, Daqing

    2008-11-01

    The full length cDNA of a prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of guppy ( Poecilia reticulata) and the corresponding genomic DNA were cloned. The cDNA was 2245 bp in length and contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 1545 bp encoding a protein of 515 amino acids, which held all typical structural characteristics of the functional PrP. The cloned genomic DNA fragment corresponding to the cDNA was 3720 bp in length, consisting of 2 introns and 2 exons. The 5' untranslated region of cDNA originated from the 2 exons, while the ORF originated from the second exon. Although the gene was transcribed in diverse tissues including brain, eye, liver, intestine, muscle and tail, its transcript was most abundant in the brain. In addition, the transcription of the gene was enhanced by 5 salinity, implying that it was associated with the response of guppy to saline stress.

  5. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits. PMID:27189918

  6. Cloning and expression of prion protein encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Sun, Xiuqin; Zhang, Jinxing; Zan, Jindong

    2008-02-01

    The prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) was cloned. It was not interrupted by an intron. This gene has two promoters in its 5' upstream, indicating that its transcription may be intensive, and should have an important function. It was expressed in all 14 tissues tested, demonstrating that it is a house-keeping gene. Its expression in digestion and reproduction systems implies that the possible prions of fish may transfer horizontally.

  7. Dissecting Protein Function: An Efficient Protocol for Identifying Separation-of-Function Mutations That Encode Structurally Stable Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Johnathan W.; Rao, Timsi; Mandell, Edward K.; Wuttke, Deborah S.; Lundblad, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Mutations that confer the loss of a single biochemical property (separation-of-function mutations) can often uncover a previously unknown role for a protein in a particular biological process. However, most mutations are identified based on loss-of-function phenotypes, which cannot differentiate between separation-of-function alleles vs. mutations that encode unstable/unfolded proteins. An alternative approach is to use overexpression dominant-negative (ODN) phenotypes to identify mutant proteins that disrupt function in an otherwise wild-type strain when overexpressed. This is based on the assumption that such mutant proteins retain an overall structure that is comparable to that of the wild-type protein and are able to compete with the endogenous protein (Herskowitz 1987). To test this, the in vivo phenotypes of mutations in the Est3 telomerase subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared with the in vitro secondary structure of these mutant proteins as analyzed by circular-dichroism spectroscopy, which demonstrates that ODN is a more sensitive assessment of protein stability than the commonly used method of monitoring protein levels from extracts. Reverse mutagenesis of EST3, which targeted different categories of amino acids, also showed that mutating highly conserved charged residues to the oppositely charged amino acid had an increased likelihood of generating a severely defective est3− mutation, which nevertheless encoded a structurally stable protein. These results suggest that charge-swap mutagenesis directed at a limited subset of highly conserved charged residues, combined with ODN screening to eliminate partially unfolded proteins, may provide a widely applicable and efficient strategy for generating separation-of-function mutations. PMID:23307900

  8. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  10. Pheromone binding proteins of Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are encoded at a single locus.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, R D; Sirey, T M; Rassam, M; Greenwood, D R

    2002-11-01

    The light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera) uses a blend of (E)-11-tetradecenyl acetate and (E,E)-9,11-tetradecadienyl acetate as its sex pheromone. Odorant binding proteins, abundant in the antennae of male and female E. postvittana, were separated by native PAGE to reveal four major proteins with distinct mobilities. Microsequencing of their N-terminal residues showed that two were general odorant binding proteins (GOBPs) while two were pheromone binding proteins (PBPs). Full length cDNAs encoding these proteins were amplified using a combination of PCR and RACE-PCR. Sequence of the GOBPs revealed two genes (EposGOBP1, EposGOBP2), similar to orthologues in other species of Lepidoptera. Eleven cDNAs of the PBP gene were amplified, cloned and sequenced revealing two major phylogenetic clusters of PBP sequences differing by six amino acid substitutions. The position of the six amino acid differences on the protein was predicted by mapping onto the three-dimensional structure of PBP of Bombyx mori. All six substitutions were predicted to fall on the outside of the protein away from the inner pheromone binding pocket. One substitution does fall close to the putative dimerisation region of the protein (Ser63Thr). Expression of three of the cDNAs in a baculovirus expression system revealed that one class encodes an electrophoretically slow form (EposPBP1-12) while the other encodes a fast form (EposPBP1-2, EposPBP1-3). A native Western of these expressed proteins compared with antennal protein extracts demonstrated that PBP is also expressed in female antennae and that PBP may be present as a dimer as well as a monomer in E. postvittana. The fast and slow forms of EposPBP1 are allelic. Westerns on single antennal pair protein extracts and allele-specific PCR from genomic DNA both show a segregating pattern of inheritance in laboratory and wild populations. Radio labelled (E)-11-tetradecenyl acetate binds to both fast and slow PBP forms in

  11. Subcellular localization and immunological detection of proteins encoded by the vir locus of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Stibitz, S; Yang, M S

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the central regulatory locus vir of Bordetella pertussis predicts that three gene products, BvgA, BvgB, and BvgC, are encoded. Features of the predicted primary structures of these proteins and their homology to other two-component systems suggest that BvgA is located in the cytoplasm, BvgB is located in the periplasm, and BvgC spans the inner membrane. We have used gene fusions to the phoA and lacZ genes of Escherichia coli to investigate the subcellular localization and membrane topology of these proteins. PhoA fusion proteins were also purified and used to raise antibodies that allowed visualization of the vir-encoded polypeptides by Western immunoblotting. Our results have largely confirmed the predictions of the DNA sequence, with the exception that BvgB and BvgC were found to constitute one larger protein that was homologous to the sensor class of two-component systems. We propose that this protein be named BvgS (for sensor) and that its gene be named bvgS. Images PMID:2066330

  12. The Arabidopsis HUELLENLOS Gene, Which Is Essential for Normal Ovule Development, Encodes a Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Debra J.; Baker, Shawn C.; Meister, Robert J.; Broadhvest, Jean; Schneitz, Kay; Gasser, Charles S.

    2001-01-01

    The HUELLENLOS (HLL) gene participates in patterning and growth of the Arabidopsis ovule. We have isolated the HLL gene and shown that it encodes a protein homologous to the L14 proteins of eubacterial ribosomes. The Arabidopsis genome also includes a highly similar gene, HUELLENLOS PARALOG (HLP), and genes for both cytosolic (L23) and chloroplast ribosome L14 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis shows that HLL and HLP differ significantly from these other two classes of such proteins. HLL and HLP fusions to green fluorescent protein were localized to mitochondria. Ectopic expression of HLP complemented the hll mutant, indicating that HLP and HLL share redundant functions. We conclude that HLL and HLP encode L14 subunits of mitochondrial ribosomes. HLL mRNA was at significantly higher levels than HLP mRNA in pistils, with the opposite pattern in leaves. This differential expression can explain the confinement of effects of hll mutations to gynoecia and ovules. Our elucidation of the nature of HLL shows that metabolic defects can have specific effects on developmental patterning. PMID:11752383

  13. Cloning of a complementary DNA encoding an 80 kilodalton nuclear cap binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, N; Ohno, M; Kangawa, K; Tokoro, Y; Shimura, Y

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that the monomethylated cap structure plays important roles in nuclear events. The cap structure has been implicated in the enhancement of pre-mRNA splicing. More recently, this structure has also been suggested to facilitate RNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. We have previously identified and purified an 80kD Nuclear Cap Binding Protein (NCBP) from a HeLa cell nuclear extract, which could possibly mediate these nuclear activities. In this report, we describe cloning of complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding NCBP. The partial protein sequences of NCBP were determined, and the full-length cDNA of NCBP was isolated from HeLa cDNA libraries. This cDNA encoded an open reading frame of 790 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 91,734 daltons, which contained most of the determined protein sequences. However, the protein sequence had no significant homology to any known proteins. Transfection experiments demonstrated that the epitope-tagged NCBP, transiently expressed in HeLa cells, was localized exclusively in the nucleoplasm. Similar experiments using a truncated NCBP cDNA indicated that this nuclear localization activity is conferred by the N-terminal 70 amino-acid region. Images PMID:7937105

  14. Genes encoding FAD-binding proteins in Volvariella volvacea exhibit differential expression in homokaryons and heterokaryons.

    PubMed

    Meng, Li; Yan, Junjie; Xie, Baogui; Li, Yu; Chen, Bingzhi; Liu, Shuyan; Li, Dan; Yang, Zhiyun; Zeng, Xiancheng; Deng, Youjin; Jiang, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding proteins play a vital role in energy transfer and utilization during fungal growth and mycelia aggregation. We sequenced the genome of Volvariella volvacea, an economically important edible fungus, and discovered 41 genes encoding FAD-binding proteins. Gene expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of four distinctly differentially expressed genes in heterokaryotic strain H1521 were higher than in homokaryotic strains PYd15 and PYd21 combined. These observations were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results suggest that the differential expression of FAD-binding proteins may be important in revealing the distinction between homokaryons and heterokaryons on the basis of FAD-binding protein functionality. PMID:23570970

  15. Cloning and characterization of the nucleoredoxin gene that encodes a novel nuclear protein related to thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Kato, Keizo; Minoguchi, Shigeru

    1997-02-01

    In a yeast artificial chromosome contig close to the nude locus on mouse chromosome 11, we identified a novel gene, nucleoredoxin, that encodes a protein with similarity to the active site of thioredoxins. Nucleoredoxin is conserved between mammalian species, and two homologous genes were found in Caenorhabditis elegans. The nucleoredoxin transcripts are expressed in all adult tissues examined, but restricted to the nervous system and the limb buds in Day 10.5-11.5 embryos. The nucleoredoxin protein is predominantly localized in the nucleus of cells transfected with the nucleoredoxin expression construct. Since the bacterially expressed protein of nucleoredoxin showed oxidoreductase activity of the insulin disulfide bonds with kinetics similar to that of thioredoxin, it may be a redox regulator of the nuclear proteins, such as transcription factors. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Localization microscopy using noncovalent fluorogen activation by genetically encoded fluorogen activating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Suvrajit; Huang, Fang; Szent-Gyorgyi, Chris; Lidke, Diane S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Bruchez, Marcel P.

    2014-01-01

    The noncovalent equilibrium activation of a fluorogenic malachite green dye and its cognate fluorogen activating protein has been exploited to produce a sparse labeling distribution of densely tagged genetically encoded proteins, enabling single molecule detection and superresolution imaging in fixed and living cells. These sparse labeling conditions are achieved by control of the dye concentration in the milieu, and do not require any photoswitching or photoactivation. The labeling is achieved using physiological buffers and cellular media, and does not require additives or switching buffer to obtain superresolution images. We evaluate superresolution properties and images obtained from a selected fluorogen activating protein clone fused to actin, and show that the photon counts per object fall between those typically reported for fluorescent proteins and switching dye-pairs, resulting in 10-30 nm localization precision per object. This labeling strategy complements existing approaches, and may simplify multicolor labeling of cellular structures. PMID:24194371

  17. A genetically encoded alkyne directs palladium-mediated protein labeling on live mammalian cell surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Ramil, Carlo P; Lim, Reyna K V; Lin, Qing

    2015-02-20

    The merging of site-specific incorporation of small bioorthogonal functional groups into proteins via amber codon suppression with bioorthogonal chemistry has created exciting opportunities to extend the power of organic reactions to living systems. Here we show that a new alkyne amino acid can be site-selectively incorporated into mammalian proteins via a known orthogonal pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair and directs an unprecedented, palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction-driven protein labeling on live mammalian cell surface. A comparison study with the alkyne-encoded proteins in vitro indicated that this terminal alkyne is better suited for the palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction than the copper-catalyzed click chemistry. PMID:25347611

  18. A fully genetically-encoded protein architecture for optical control of peptide ligand concentration

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Daniel; Tillberg, Paul W.; Chen, Fei; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are amongst the most important proteins in biology - regulating the activity of excitable cells and changing in diseases. Ideally it would be possible to actuate endogenous ion channels, in a temporally precise and reversible fashion, and without requiring chemical co-factors. Here we present a modular protein architecture for fully genetically encoded, light-modulated control of ligands that modulate ion channels of a targeted cell. Our reagent, which we call a lumitoxin, combines a photoswitch and an ion channel-blocking peptide toxin. Illumination causes the photoswitch to unfold, lowering the toxin’s local concentration near the cell surface, and enabling the ion channel to function. We explore lumitoxin modularity by showing operation with peptide toxins that target different voltage-dependent K+ channels. The lumitoxin architecture may represent a new kind of modular protein engineering strategy for designing light-activated proteins, and thus may enable development of novel tools for modulating cellular physiology. PMID:24407101

  19. A fully genetically encoded protein architecture for optical control of peptide ligand concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Daniel; Tillberg, Paul W.; Chen, Fei; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are among the most important proteins in biology, regulating the activity of excitable cells and changing in diseases. Ideally it would be possible to actuate endogenous ion channels, in a temporally precise and reversible manner, and without requiring chemical cofactors. Here we present a modular protein architecture for fully genetically encoded, light-modulated control of ligands that modulate ion channels of a targeted cell. Our reagent, which we call a lumitoxin, combines a photoswitch and an ion channel-blocking peptide toxin. Illumination causes the photoswitch to unfold, lowering the toxin's local concentration near the cell surface, and enabling the ion channel to function. We explore lumitoxin modularity by showing operation with peptide toxins that target different voltage-dependent K+ channels. The lumitoxin architecture may represent a new kind of modular protein-engineering strategy for designing light-activated proteins, and thus may enable development of novel tools for modulating cellular physiology.

  20. A fully genetically encoded protein architecture for optical control of peptide ligand concentration.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Daniel; Tillberg, Paul W; Chen, Fei; Boyden, Edward S

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are among the most important proteins in biology, regulating the activity of excitable cells and changing in diseases. Ideally it would be possible to actuate endogenous ion channels, in a temporally precise and reversible manner, and without requiring chemical cofactors. Here we present a modular protein architecture for fully genetically encoded, light-modulated control of ligands that modulate ion channels of a targeted cell. Our reagent, which we call a lumitoxin, combines a photoswitch and an ion channel-blocking peptide toxin. Illumination causes the photoswitch to unfold, lowering the toxin's local concentration near the cell surface, and enabling the ion channel to function. We explore lumitoxin modularity by showing operation with peptide toxins that target different voltage-dependent K(+) channels. The lumitoxin architecture may represent a new kind of modular protein-engineering strategy for designing light-activated proteins, and thus may enable development of novel tools for modulating cellular physiology. PMID:24407101

  1. Generation of a panel of antibodies against proteins encoded on human chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Down syndrome (DS) is caused by trisomy of all or part of chromosome 21. To further understanding of DS we are working with a mouse model, the Tc1 mouse, which carries most of human chromosome 21 in addition to the normal mouse chromosome complement. This mouse is a model for human DS and recapitulates many of the features of the human syndrome such as specific heart defects, and cerebellar neuronal loss. The Tc1 mouse is mosaic for the human chromosome such that not all cells in the model carry it. Thus to help our investigations we aimed to develop a method to identify cells that carry human chromosome 21 in the Tc1 mouse. To this end, we have generated a panel of antibodies raised against proteins encoded by genes on human chromosome 21 that are known to be expressed in the adult brain of Tc1 mice Results We attempted to generate human specific antibodies against proteins encoded by human chromosome 21. We selected proteins that are expressed in the adult brain of Tc1 mice and contain regions of moderate/low homology with the mouse ortholog. We produced antibodies to seven human chromosome 21 encoded proteins. Of these, we successfully generated three antibodies that preferentially recognise human compared with mouse SOD1 and RRP1 proteins on western blots. However, these antibodies did not specifically label cells which carry a freely segregating copy of Hsa21 in the brains of our Tc1 mouse model of DS. Conclusions Although we have successfully isolated new antibodies to SOD1 and RRP1 for use on western blots, in our hands these antibodies have not been successfully used for immunohistochemistry studies. These antibodies are freely available to other researchers. Our data high-light the technical difficulty of producing species-specific antibodies for both western blotting and immunohistochemistry. PMID:20727138

  2. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus).

    PubMed

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D; Holland, Linda Z; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians. PMID:27311567

  3. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-06-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians.

  4. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians. PMID:27311567

  5. Divergence of genes encoding non-specific lipid transfer proteins in the poaceae family.

    PubMed

    Jang, Cheol Seong; Jung, Jae Hyeong; Yim, Won Cheol; Lee, Byung-Moo; Seo, Yong Weon; Kim, Wook

    2007-10-31

    The genes encoding non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), members of a small multigene family, show a complex pattern of expressional regulation, suggesting that some diversification may have resulted from changes in their expression after duplication. In this study, the evolution of nsLTP genes within the Poaceae family was characterized via a survey of the pseudogenes and unigenes encoding the nsLTP in rice pseudomolecules and the NCBI unigene database. nsLTP-rich regions were detected in the distal portions of rice chromosomes 11 and 12; these may have resulted from the most recent large segmental duplication in the rice genome. Two independent tandem duplications were shown to occur within the nsLTP-rich regions of rice. The genomic distribution of the nsLTP genes in the rice genome differs from that in wheat. This may be attributed to gene migration, chromosomal rearrangement, and/or differential gene loss. The genomic distribution pattern of nsLTP genes in the Poaceae family points to the existence of some differences among cereal nsLTP genes, all of which diverged from an ancient gene. The unigenes encoding nsLTPs in each cereal species are clustered into five groups. The somewhat different distribution of nsLTP-encoding EST clones between the groups across cereal species imply that independent duplication(s) followed by subfunctionalization (and/or neofunctionalization) of the nsLTP gene family in each species occurred during speciation. PMID:17978574

  6. The herpes simplex virus 1 protein kinase encoded by the US3 gene mediates posttranslational modification of the phosphoprotein encoded by the UL34 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Purves, F C; Spector, D; Roizman, B

    1991-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that a herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) open reading frame, US3, encodes a novel protein kinase and have characterized the cognate amino acid sequence which is phosphorylated by this enzyme. This report identifies an apparently essential viral phosphoprotein whose posttranslational processing involves the viral protein kinase. Analyses of viral proteins phosphorylated in the course of productive infection revealed a phosphoprotein whose mobility was viral protein kinase and serotype dependent. Thus, the corresponding HSV-1 and HSV-2 phosphoproteins differ in their electrophoretic mobilities, and the phosphoprotein specified by the HSV-1 mutant deleted in US3 (R7041) differs from that of the corresponding HSV-1 and HSV-2 proteins. Analyses of HSV-1 x HSV-2 recombinants mapped the phosphoprotein between 0.42 and 0.47 map units on the prototype HSV-1 DNA map. Within this region, the UL34 open reading frame was predicted to encode a protein of appropriate molecular weight which would also contain the consensus target site for phosphorylation by the viral protein kinase as previously defined with synthetic peptides. Replacement of the native UL34 gene with a UL34 gene tagged with a 17-amino-acid epitope from the alpha 4 protein identified this gene as encoding the phosphoprotein. Finally, mutagenesis of the predicted phosphorylation site on UL34 in the viral genome, and specifically the substitution of threonine or serine with alanine in the product of the UL34 gene, yielded phosphoproteins whose electrophoretic mobilities could not be differentiated from that of the US3- mutant. We conclude that the posttranslational processing of the UL34 gene product to its wild-type phenotype requires the participation of the viral protein kinase. While the viral protein kinase is not essential for viral replication in cells in culture, the UL34 gene product itself may not be dispensable. Images PMID:1656069

  7. Ectromelia virus encodes an anti-apoptotic protein that regulates cell death.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ninad; Taylor, John; Quilty, Douglas; Barry, Michele

    2015-01-15

    Apoptosis serves as a powerful defense against damaged or pathogen-infected cells. Since apoptosis is an effective defense against viral infection, many viruses including poxviruses, encode proteins to prevent or delay apoptosis. Here we show that ectromelia virus, the causative agent of mousepox encodes an anti-apoptotic protein EVM025. Here we demonstrate that expression of functional EVM025 is crucial to prevent apoptosis triggered by virus infection and staurosporine. We demonstrate that the expression of EVM025 prevents the conformational activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bak and Bax, allowing the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity upon infection with ECTV. Additionally, EVM025 interacted with intracellular Bak. We were able to demonstrate that EVM025 ability to inhibit Bax activation is a function of its ability to inhibit the activity of an upstream BH3 only protein Bim. Collectively, our data indicates that EVM025 inhibits apoptosis by sequestering Bak and inhibiting the activity of Bak and Bax. PMID:25462348

  8. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.K.; McWilliams, M.J.; Lapis, P.; Lautenberger, J.A.; Schweinfest, C.W.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-11-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, the authors have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is >95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published finding indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains.

  9. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D K; McWilliams, M J; Lapis, P; Lautenberger, J A; Schweinfest, C W; Papas, T S

    1988-01-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, we have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is greater than 95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published findings indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains. PMID:2847145

  10. RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein containing a tract of 13 consecutive aspartates

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, P.; Weber, S.; Prakash, L.

    1985-01-01

    The RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for postreplication repair of UV-damaged DNA, for induced mutagenesis, and for sporulation. The authors have mapped the transcripts and determined the nucleotide sequence of the cloned RAD6 gene. The RAD6 gene encodes two transcripts of 0.98 and 0.86 kilobases which differ only in their 3' termini. The transcribed region contains an open reading frame of 516 nucleotides. The rad6-1 and rad6-3 mutant alleles, which the authors have cloned and sequenced, introduce amber and ochre nonsense mutations, respectively into the open reading frame, proving that it encodes the RAD6 protein. The RAD6 protein predicted by the nucleotide sequence is 172 amino acids long, has a molecular weight of 19,704, and contains 23.3% acidic and 11.6% basic residues. Its most striking feature is the highly acidic carboxyl terminus: 20 of the 23 terminal amino acids are acidic, including 13 consecutive aspartates. RAD6 protein thus resembles high mobility group proteins HMG-1 and HMG-2, which each contain a carboxyl-proximal tract of acidic amino acids. 48 references, 6 figures.

  11. Interaction between the human cytomegalovirus‑encoded UL142 and cellular Snapin proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Qi, Ying; Ma, Yanping; He, Rong; Sun, Zhengrong; Huang, Yujing; Ji, Yaohua; Ruan, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can cause severe illness in immunocompromised and immunodeficient individuals. As a novel HCMV‑encoded major histocompatibility complex class I‑related molecule, the UL142‑encoded protein (pUL142) is capable of suppressing natural killer (NK) cell recognition in the course of infection. However, no host factors that directly interact with HCMV pUL142 have been reported so far. In order to understand the interactions between HCMV pUL142 and host proteins, the current study used yeast two‑hybrid screening, a GST pull‑down assay and an immunofluorescence assay. A host protein, the SNARE‑associated protein Snapin, was identified to directly interact and colocalize with HCMV pUL142 in transfected human embryonic kidney‑293 cells. Snapin is abundantly expressed in the majority of cells and mediates the release of neurotransmitters through vesicular transport in the nervous system and vesicle fusion in non‑neuronal cells. It is hypothesized that HCMV pUL142 may have an impact on the neurotransmitter release process and viral dissemination via interaction with Snapin. PMID:25369979

  12. Changes in cellular microRNA expression induced by porcine circovirus type 2-encoded proteins.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jae-Sang; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Choi, Chang-Yong; Lee, Jun-Seong; Na, Dokyun; Chun, Taehoon; Lee, Young Sik

    2015-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, which leads to serious economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. While the molecular basis of PCV2 replication and pathogenicity remains elusive, it is increasingly apparent that the microRNA (miRNA) pathway plays a key role in controlling virus-host interactions, in addition to a wide range of cellular processes. Here, we employed Solexa deep sequencing technology to determine which cellular miRNAs were differentially regulated after expression of each of three PCV2-encoded open reading frames (ORFs) in porcine kidney epithelial (PK15) cells. We identified 51 ORF1-regulated miRNAs, 74 ORF2-regulated miRNAs, and 32 ORF3-regulated miRNAs that differed in abundance compared to the control. Gene ontology analysis of the putative targets of these miRNAs identified transcriptional regulation as the most significantly enriched biological process, while KEGG pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment for several pathways including MAPK signaling, which is activated during PCV2 infection. Among the potential target genes of ORF-regulated miRNAs, two genes encoding proteins that are known to interact with PCV2-encoded proteins, zinc finger protein 265 (ZNF265) and regulator of G protein signaling 16 (RGS16), were selected for further analysis. We provide evidence that ZNF265 and RGS16 are direct targets of miR-139-5p and let-7e, respectively, which are both down-regulated by ORF2. Our data will initiate further studies to elucidate the roles of ORF-regulated cellular miRNAs in PCV2-host interactions. PMID:25885539

  13. Sequence and regulation of a gene encoding a human 89-kilodalton heat shock protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, E.; Brandon, S.E.; Weber, L.A.; Lloyd, D.

    1989-06-01

    Vertebrate cells synthesize two forms of the 82- to 90-kilodalton heat shock protein that are encoded by distinct gene families. In HeLa cells, both proteins (hsp89/alpha/ and hspio/beta/) are abundant under normal growth conditions and are synthesized at increased rates in response to heat stress. Only the larger form, hsp89/alpha/, is induced by the adenovirus E1A gene product. The authors have isolated a human hsp89/alpha/ gene that shows complete sequence identity with heat- and E1A-inducible cDNA used as a hybridization probe. The 5'-flanking region contained overlapping and inverted consensus heat shock control elements that can confer heat-inducible expression n a /beta/-globin reporter gene. The gene contained 10 intervening sequences. The first intron was located adjacent to the translation start codon, an arrangement also found in the Drosophila hsp82 gene. The spliced mRNA sequence contained a single open reading frame encoding an 84,564-dalton polypeptide showing high homology with the hsp82 to hsp90 proteins of other organisms. The deduced hsp89/alpha/ protein sequence differed from the human hsp89/beta/ sequence reported elsewhere in at least 99 out of the 732 amino acids. Transcription of the hsp89/alpha/ gene was induced by serum during normal cell growth, but expression did not appear to be restricted to a particular stage of the cell cycles. hsp89/alpha/ mRNA was considerably more stable than the mRNA encoding hsp70, which can account for the higher constitutive rate of hsp89 synthesis in unstressed cells.

  14. sar1, a gene from Schizosaccharomyces pombe encoding a protein that regulates ras1.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Boguski, M; Riggs, M; Rodgers, L; Wigler, M

    1991-01-01

    Proper ras1 function is required for normal sexual function in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We have found a gene in S. pombe, sar1, that encodes a product capable of regulating ras1 function. sar1 is a member of an expanding family of RAS GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) that includes mammalian GAP, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae IRA proteins, and the product of the human neurofibromatosis locus, NF1 sar1, like these other proteins, can complement the loss of IRA function in S. cerevisiae. Computer analysis shows that the highest degree of sequence conservation is restricted to a very small number of diagnostic residues represented by the motif Phe-Leu-Arg-X-X-X-Pro-Ala-X-X-X-Pro. We find no evidence that sar1 is required for the effector function of ras1. Images PMID:1883874

  15. The yeast SNF3 gene encodes a glucose transporter homologous to the mammalian protein.

    PubMed Central

    Celenza, J L; Marshall-Carlson, L; Carlson, M

    1988-01-01

    The SNF3 gene is required for high-affinity glucose transport in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has also been implicated in control of gene expression by glucose repression. We report here the nucleotide sequence of the cloned SNF3 gene. The predicted amino acid sequence shows that SNF3 encodes a 97-kilodalton protein that is homologous to mammalian glucose transporters and has 12 putative membrane-spanning regions. We also show that a functional SNF3-lacZ gene-fusion product cofractionates with membrane proteins and is localized to the cell surface, as judged by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Expression of the fusion protein is regulated by glucose repression. Images PMID:3281163

  16. Identification of two proteins encoded by com, a competence control locus of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, M S; Morrison, D A

    1988-01-01

    The com locus, which controls competence for genetic transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae, was analyzed by construction of a series of subclones, insertion mutations, and deletions of the cloned DNA in Escherichia coli. In vitro transcription-translation of these com plasmids revealed two neighboring genes, comA and comB, encoding proteins of 77,000 and 49,000 daltons, respectively. Their map positions and orientations were determined. Insertions in either gene eliminated the corresponding protein and had no effect on the other. In addition, a 15,000-dalton com protein was tentatively identified, although the exact location of this gene remains to be determined. Features of the DNA adjacent to the com locus are also described. Images PMID:3384803

  17. Three abundant germ line-specific transcripts in Volvox carteri encode photosynthetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Choi, G; Przybylska, M; Straus, D

    1996-09-01

    Volvox carteri is a multicellular eukaryotic green alga composed of about 2000 cells of only two differentiated types: somatic and germ line. To understand how embryonic cells are assigned either to somatic or germ line fates, we are investigating the regulation of transcripts that are abundant in only one cell type. Here we report the identity of three transcripts that are coordinately expressed at high levels in germ line cells but not in somatic cells. Surprisingly, all three transcripts encode photosynthetic chloroplast proteins (light-harvesting complex protein, oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 3, and ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase) that are transcribed from nuclear genes. We discuss why these mRNAs might be required at high levels in germ line cells and present a hypothesis, suggested by our results, on the evolution of cell specialization in the Volvocales. PMID:8781179

  18. A FUSCA gene of Arabidopsis encodes a novel protein essential for plant development.

    PubMed Central

    Castle, L A; Meinke, D W

    1994-01-01

    Arabidopsis fusca mutants display striking purple coloration due to anthocyanin accumulation in their cotyledons. We describe six recessive fusca mutants isolated from Agrobacterium-transformed Arabidopsis families. These mutants first become defective during embryogenesis and exhibit limited seedling development. Double mutant constructs revealed that developmental defects were not simply a consequence of anthocyanin accumulation. fusca seedlings showed altered responses to several environmental and endogenous factors. Allelism tests established that three fusca loci are represented by mutants previously described as defective in light-regulated responses. To study the molecular basis of the fusca phenotype, we cloned the FUS6 gene. FUS6 encodes a novel protein that is hydrophilic, alpha-helical, and contains potential protein kinase C phosphorylation sites. The FUSCA proteins appear to act in a network of signal transduction pathways critical for plant development. PMID:8130643

  19. Ectromelia virus encodes a family of Ankyrin/F-box proteins that regulate NFκB

    SciTech Connect

    Burles, Kristin Buuren, Nicholas van; Barry, Michele

    2014-11-15

    A notable feature of poxviruses is their ability to inhibit the antiviral response, including the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway. NFκB is a transcription factor that is sequestered in the cytoplasm until cell stimulation, and relies on the SCF (Skp1, culllin-1, F-box) ubiquitin ligase to target its inhibitor, IκBα, for degradation. IκBα is recruited to the SCF by the F-box domain-containing protein βTrCP. Here, we show that ectromelia virus, the causative agent of mousepox, encodes four F-box-containing proteins, EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165, all of which contain Ankyrin (Ank) domains. The Ank/F-box proteins inhibit NFκB nuclear translocation, and this inhibition is dependent on the F-box domain. We also demonstrate that EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165 prevent IκBα degradation, suggesting that they target the SCF. This study identifies a new mechanism by which ectromelia virus inhibits NFκB. - Highlights: • Ectromelia virus encodes four Ank/F-box proteins, EVM002, EVM005, EVM154 and EVM165. • The Ank/F-box proteins inhibit NFκB nuclear translocation, dependent on the F-box. • The Ank/F-box proteins prevent IκBα degradation, suggesting they target the SCF. • Deletion of a single Ank/F-box gene from ECTV does not prevent viral NFκB inhibition. • This study identifies a new mechanism by which ectromelia virus inhibits NFκB.

  20. Alternative splicing of the mRNA encoding the human cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inazu, Akihiro; Quinet, E.M.; Suke Wang; Brown, M.L.; Stevenson, S.; Barr, M.L.; Moulin, P.; Tall, A.R. )

    1992-03-03

    The plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is known to facilitate the transfer of lipids between plasma lipoproteins. The human CETP gene is a complex locus encompassing 16 exons. The CETP mRNA is found in liver and small intestine as well as in a variety of peripheral tissues. While the CETP cDNA from human adipose tissue was being cloned, a variant CETP cDNA was discovered which excluded the complete sequence encoded by exon 9, but which was otherwise identical to the full-length CETP cDNA, suggesting modification of the CETP gene transcript by an alternative RNA splicing mechanism. RNase protection analysis of tissue RNA confirmed the presence of exon 9 deleted transcripts and showed that they represented a variable proportion of the total CETP mRNA in various human tissues including adipose tissue (25%), liver (33%), and spleen (46%). Transient expression of the exon 9 deleted cDNA in COS cells or stable expression in CHO cells showed that the protein encoded by the alternatively spliced transcript was inactive in neutral lipid transfer, smaller, and poorly secreted compared to the protein derived from the full-length cDNA. Endo H digestion suggested that the inactive, cell-associated protein was present within the endoplasmic reticulum. The experiments show that the expression of the human CETP gene is modified by alternative splicing of the ninth exon, in a tissue-specific fashion. The function of alternative splicing is unknown but could serve to produce a protein with a function other than plasma neutral lipid transfer, or as an on-off switch to regulate the local concentration of biologically active protein.

  1. Genome segment 6 of Antheraea mylitta cypovirus encodes a structural protein with ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chavali, Venkata R.M.; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Ghorai, Suvankar; Roy, Sobhan; Das, Amit K.; Ghosh, Ananta K.

    2008-07-20

    The genome segment 6 (S6) of the 11 double stranded RNA genomes from Antheraea mylitta cypovirus was converted into cDNA, cloned and sequenced. S6 consisted of 1944 nucleotides with an ORF of 607 amino acids and could encode a protein of 68 kDa, termed P68. Motif scan and molecular docking analysis of P68 showed the presence of two cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) domains and ATP binding sites. The ORF of AmCPV S6 was expressed in E. coli as His-tag fusion protein and polyclonal antibody was raised. Immunoblot analysis of virus infected gut cells and purified polyhedra using raised anti-p68 polyclonal antibody showed that S6 encodes a viral structural protein. Fluorescence and ATPase assay of soluble P68 produced in Sf-9 cells via baculovirus expression system showed its ability to bind and cleave ATP. These results suggest that P68 may bind viral RNA through CBS domains and help in replication and transcription through ATP binding and hydrolysis.

  2. Characterization and Expression of Genes Encoding Three Small Heat Shock Proteins in Sesamia inferens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Lu, Ming-Xing; Tang, Xiao-Tian; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The pink stem borer, Sesamia inferens (Walker), is a major pest of rice and is endemic in China and other parts of Asia. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) encompass a diverse, widespread class of stress proteins that have not been characterized in S. inferens. In the present study, we isolated and characterized three S. inferens genes that encode members of the α-crystallin/sHSP family, namely, Sihsp21.4, Sihsp20.6, and Sihsp19.6. The three cDNAs encoded proteins of 187, 183 and 174 amino acids with calculated molecular weights of 21.4, 20.6 and 19.6 kDa, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three genes showed strong similarity to sHSPs identified in other lepidopteran insects. Sihsp21.4 contained an intron, but Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 lacked introns. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that Sihsp21.4 was most strongly expressed in S. inferens heads; Whereas expression of Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 was highest in eggs. The three S. inferens sHSP genes were up-regulated during low temperature stress. In summary, our results show that S. inferens sHSP genes have distinct regulatory roles in the physiology of S. inferens. PMID:25514417

  3. Prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype with encoded three-dimensional protein structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance has become a severe challenge for treatment of HIV infections. Mutations accumulate in the HIV genome and make certain drugs ineffective. Prediction of resistance from genotype data is a valuable guide in choice of drugs for effective therapy. Results In order to improve the computational prediction of resistance from genotype data we have developed a unified encoding of the protein sequence and three-dimensional protein structure of the drug target for classification and regression analysis. The method was tested on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. Our graph based sequence-structure approach gives high accuracy with a new sparse dictionary classification method, as well as support vector machine and artificial neural networks classifiers. Cross-validated regression analysis with the sparse dictionary gave excellent correlation between predicted and observed resistance. Conclusion The approach of encoding the protein structure and sequence as a 210-dimensional vector, based on Delaunay triangulation, has promise as an accurate method for predicting resistance from sequence for drugs inhibiting HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. PMID:25081370

  4. Boymaw, overexpressed in brains with major psychiatric disorders, may encode a small protein to inhibit mitochondrial function and protein translation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Baohu; Kim, Minjung; Higa, Kerin K; Zhou, Xianjin

    2015-06-01

    The t(1,11) chromosome translocation co-segregates with major psychiatric disorders in a large Scottish family. The translocation disrupts the DISC1and Boymaw (DISC1FP1) genes on chromosomes 1 and 11, respectively. After translocation, two fusion genes are generated. Our recent studies found that the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein is localized in mitochondria and inhibits oxidoreductase activity, rRNA expression, and protein translation. Mice carrying the DISC1-Boymaw fusion genes display intermediate behavioral phenotypes related to major psychiatric disorders. Here, we report that the Boymaw gene may encode a small protein predominantly localized in mitochondria. The Boymaw protein inhibits oxidoreductase activity, rRNA expression, and protein translation in the same way as the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein. Interestingly, Boymaw expression is up-regulated by different stressors at RNA and/or protein translational levels. In addition, we found that Boymaw RNA expression is significantly increased in the postmortem brains of patients with major psychiatric disorders. Our studies therefore suggest that the Boymaw gene could potentially be a susceptibility gene for major psychiatric disorders in both the Scottish t(1,11) family and the general population of patients. PMID:25943690

  5. An Apicoplast Localized Ubiquitylation System Is Required for the Import of Nuclear-encoded Plastid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ponts, Nadia; van Dooren, Giel G.; Prudhomme, Jacques; Brooks, Carrie F.; Rodrigues, Elisadra M.; Tan, John C.; Ferdig, Michael T.; Striepen, Boris; Le Roch, Karine G.

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for numerous important human diseases including toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, and most importantly malaria. There is a constant need for new antimalarials, and one of most keenly pursued drug targets is an ancient algal endosymbiont, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is essential for parasite survival, and several aspects of its metabolism and maintenance have been validated as targets of anti-parasitic drug treatment. Most apicoplast proteins are nuclear encoded and have to be imported into the organelle. Recently, a protein translocon typically required for endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD) has been proposed to act in apicoplast protein import. Here, we show ubiquitylation to be a conserved and essential component of this process. We identify apicoplast localized ubiquitin activating, conjugating and ligating enzymes in Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum and observe biochemical activity by in vitro reconstitution. Using conditional gene ablation and complementation analysis we link this activity to apicoplast protein import and parasite survival. Our studies suggest ubiquitylation to be a mechanistic requirement of apicoplast protein import independent to the proteasomal degradation pathway. PMID:23785288

  6. The A alpha mating locus of Schizophyllum commune encodes two dissimilar multiallelic homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stankis, M M; Specht, C A; Yang, H; Giasson, L; Ullrich, R C; Novotny, C P

    1992-01-01

    The A alpha mating locus is one of four multiallelic loci that govern sexual development in the basidiomycete fungus Schizophyllum commune. We have determined the nucleotide sequence encoding three A alpha mating types, A alpha 1, A alpha 3, and A alpha 4. We have found that the locus for A alpha 3 and A alpha 4 consists of two genes: Y and Z. The locus for A alpha 1 encodes only one gene, Y. The Z polypeptides encoded by different alleles exhibit 42% identity. The Y polypeptides exhibit 49-54% identity. The finding that the deduced Z and Y polypeptides have homeodomain motifs suggests that these polypeptides may be DNA-binding regulatory proteins that control the expression of developmental genes. The deduced Z polypeptide also has acidic regions that might be functionally analogous to the acidic regions in yeast GAL4 and GCN4 that activate transcription. The Y polypeptide has a serine-rich region and a basic region that shows some identity to the lysine-rich region of H1 histones. PMID:1353886

  7. PCF11 encodes a third protein component of yeast cleavage and polyadenylation factor I.

    PubMed Central

    Amrani, N; Minet, M; Wyers, F; Dufour, M E; Aggerbeck, L P; Lacroute, F

    1997-01-01

    Cleavage and polyadenylation factor I (CF I) is one of four factors required in vitro for yeast pre-mRNA 3'-end processing. Two protein components of this factor, encoded by genes RNA14 and RNA15, have already been identified. We describe here another gene, PCF11 (for protein 1 of CF I), that genetically interacts with RNA14 and RNA15 and which presumably codes for a third protein component of CF I. This gene was isolated in a two-hybrid screening designed to identify proteins interacting with Rna14 and Rna15. PCF11 is an essential gene encoding for a protein of 626 amino acids having an apparent molecular mass of 70 kDa. Thermosensitive mutations in PCF11 are synergistically lethal with thermosensitive alleles of RNA14 and RNA15. The Pcf11-2 thermosensitive strain shows a shortening of the poly(A) tails and a strong decrease in the steady-state level of actin transcripts after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature as do the thermosensitive alleles of RNA14 and RNA15. Extracts from the pcf11-1 and pcf11-2 thermosensitive strains and the wild-type strain, when Pcf11 is neutralized by specific antibodies, are deficient in cleavage and polyadenylation. Moreover, fractions obtained by anion-exchange chromatography of extracts from the wild-type strain contain both Pcf11 and Rna15 in the same fractions, as shown by immunoblotting with a Pcf11-specific antibody. PMID:9032237

  8. Homolog detection using global sequence properties suggests an alternate view of structural encoding in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scheraga, Harold A.; Rackovsky, S.

    2014-01-01

    We show that a Fourier-based sequence distance function is able to identify structural homologs of target sequences with high accuracy. It is shown that Fourier distances correlate very strongly with independently determined structural distances between molecules, a property of the method that is not attainable using conventional representations. It is further shown that the ability of the Fourier approach to identify protein folds is statistically far in excess of random expectation. It is then shown that, in actual searches for structural homologs of selected target sequences, the Fourier approach gives excellent results. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the global information detected by the Fourier representation is an essential feature of structure encoding in protein sequences and a key to structural homology detection. PMID:24706836

  9. Modulation of cellular signaling by herpesvirus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Munnik, Sabrina M.; Smit, Martine J.; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesviruses (HHVs) are widespread infectious pathogens that have been associated with proliferative and inflammatory diseases. During viral evolution, HHVs have pirated genes encoding viral G protein-coupled receptors (vGPCRs), which are expressed on infected host cells. These vGPCRs show highest homology to human chemokine receptors, which play a key role in the immune system. Importantly, vGPCRs have acquired unique properties such as constitutive activity and the ability to bind a broad range of human chemokines. This allows vGPCRs to hijack human proteins and modulate cellular signaling for the benefit of the virus, ultimately resulting in immune evasion and viral dissemination to establish a widespread and lifelong infection. Knowledge on the mechanisms by which herpesviruses reprogram cellular signaling might provide insight in the contribution of vGPCRs to viral survival and herpesvirus-associated pathologies. PMID:25805993

  10. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells.

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; García Pérez, José Luis; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells. PMID:26244523

  11. Expression of Ndufb11 encoding the neuronal protein 15.6 during neurite outgrowth and development.

    PubMed

    Gurok, Ulf; Bork, Kaya; Nuber, Ulrike; Spörle, Ralf; Nöhring, Sabine; Horstkorte, Rüdiger

    2007-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth (e.g. axonal or dendrite outgrowth) of neurons is necessary for the development and functioning of the central nervous system. It is well accepted that the differentiation of neurons and neurite outgrowth involve alterations in gene expression. Furthermore, mitochondria play a role in different aspects of neurite outgrowth. Here we show that the expression of Ndufb11, a gene encoding the mitochondrial protein NP15.6 is decreased in the course of neuronal differentiation. NP15.6 is homologous to the bovine protein ESSS, a component of the mitochondrial complex 1. The homologous human NDUFB11 gene is localized to Xp11.3-Xp11.23, a region associated with neurogenetic disorders. The down-regulation of NP15.6 correlates with neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells induced by nerve growth factor. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression of Ndufb11 in the embryonic and adult mouse. PMID:16962385

  12. Genetic variability in the sable (Martes zibellina L.) with respect to genes encoding blood proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kashtanov, S.N.; Kazakova, T.I.

    1995-02-01

    Electrophoresis of blood proteins was used to determine, for the first time, the level of genetic variability of certain loci in the sable (Martes zibellina L., Mustelidae). Variation of 23 blood proteins encoded by 25 genes was analyzed. Polymorphism was revealed in six genes. The level of heterozygosity was estimated at 0.069; the proportion of polymorphic loci was 24%. Data on the history of the sable population maintained at the farm, on geographical distribution of natural sable populations, and on the number of animals selected for reproduction in captivity is presented. The great number of animals studies and the extensive range of natural sable populations, on the basis of which the population maintained in captivity was obtained, suggest that the results of this work can be used for estimating the variability of the gene pool of sable as a species. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Ring Separation Highlights the Protein-Folding Mechanism Used by the Phage EL-Encoded Chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Sudheer K; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Morgan, David Gene; Sherman, Michael B; He, Lilin; Georgopoulos, Costa; Sernova, Natalia V; Kurochkina, Lidia P; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Bernal, Ricardo A

    2016-04-01

    Chaperonins are ubiquitous, ATP-dependent protein-folding molecular machines that are essential for all forms of life. Bacteriophage φEL encodes its own chaperonin to presumably fold exceedingly large viral proteins via profoundly different nucleotide-binding conformations. Our structural investigations indicate that ATP likely binds to both rings simultaneously and that a misfolded substrate acts as the trigger for ATP hydrolysis. More importantly, the φEL complex dissociates into two single rings resulting from an evolutionarily altered residue in the highly conserved ATP-binding pocket. Conformational changes also more than double the volume of the single-ring internal chamber such that larger viral proteins are accommodated. This is illustrated by the fact that φEL is capable of folding β-galactosidase, a 116-kDa protein. Collectively, the architecture and protein-folding mechanism of the φEL chaperonin are significantly different from those observed in group I and II chaperonins. PMID:26996960

  14. Cloning a cDNA encoding an alternatively spliced protein of BRCA2-associated factor 35.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chiang; McCarty, Ida M; Balazs, Louisa; Li, Yi; Steiner, Mitchell S

    2002-07-01

    Inheritance of mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, predisposes humans to breast and ovarian cancers. Inherited mutations in the BRCA2 gene are also known to cause susceptibility to prostate cancer. BRCA2 protein exists in a large multi-protein complex from which a novel structural DNA binding protein BRCA2-associated factor 35 (BRAF35) has been isolated. We have cloned a novel cDNA encoding an alternatively spliced protein of BRAF35, designated as BRAF25. BRAF25 transcript is present in various human cells. We have precisely mapped the BRAF25 cDNA sequence to the genomic chromosome 19 sequence. Analysis of the predicted sequence of BRAF25 identified a protein of 215 amino acids. BRAF25 contains a truncated high mobility group domain, a kinesin-like coiled-coil domain and multiple Src homology 2 (SH2) motifs. Western blot analysis using antibodies specific for BRAF25 revealed the presence of BRAF25 in human prostate cancer cells. PMID:12083779

  15. Early auxin-induced genes encode short-lived nuclear proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abel, S; Oeller, P W; Theologis, A

    1994-01-01

    The plant growth hormone indoleacetic acid (IAA) transcriptionally activates gene expression in plants. Some of the genes whose expression is induced by IAA encode a family of proteins in pea (PS-IAA4 and PS-IAA6) and Arabidopsis (IAA1 and IAA2) that contain putative nuclear localization signals that direct a beta-glucuronidase reporter protein into the nucleus. Pulse-chase and immunoprecipitation experiments have defined the t1/2 of the PS-IAA4 and PS-IAA6 proteins to be 8 and 6 min, respectively. Their most prominent feature is the presence of a beta alpha alpha motif similar to the beta-sheet DNA-binding domain found in prokaryotic repressors of the Arc family. Based on these data, we suggest that plant tissues express short-lived nuclear proteins as a primary response to IAA. We propose that these proteins act as activators or repressors of genes responsible for mediating the various auxin responses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8278386

  16. RNF38 encodes a nuclear ubiquitin protein ligase that modifies p53

    SciTech Connect

    Sheren, Jamie E.; Kassenbrock, C. Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •RNF38 is shown to be a nuclear protein with a bipartite nuclear localization signal. •RNF38 protein is purified and shown to have ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity. •We show that RNF38 binds p53 and can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro. •Overexpression of RNF38 increases p53 ubiquitination in HEK293T cells. •Overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells alters p53 localization. -- Abstract: The RNF38 gene encodes a RING finger protein of unknown function. Here we demonstrate that RNF38 is a functional ubiquitin protein ligase (E3). We show that RNF38 isoform 1 is localized to the nucleus by a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS). We confirm that RNF38 is a binding partner of p53 and demonstrate that RNF38 can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells results in relocalization of p53 to discrete foci associated with PML nuclear bodies. These results suggest RNF38 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that may play a role in regulating p53.

  17. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of bacteriophage BF23 late genes 24 and 25 encoding tail proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, S; Kaneko, T; Ishimaru, H; Moriwaki, H; Mizobuchi, K

    1994-01-01

    Two bacteriophage BF23 late genes, genes 24 and 25, were isolated on a 7.4-kb PstI fragment from the phage DNA, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Gene 24 encodes a minor tail protein with the expected M(r) of 34,309, and gene 25 located 4 bp upstream of gene 24 encodes a major tail protein with the expected M(r) of 50,329. When total cellular RNA isolated from either phage-infected cells or cells bearing the cloned genes was analyzed by the primer extension method using the primers specific to either gene 25 or gene 24, we identified a possible late gene promoter, designated P25, in the 5'-flanking region of gene 25. This promoter was similar in structure to Escherichia coli promoters for sigma 70. Studies of the translational gene 25- and gene 24-lacZ fusions in the cloned gene system revealed that the promoter P25 was responsible for the expression of both genes 25 and 24 even in the absence of the regulatory genes which were absolutely required for late gene expression in the normal phage-infected cells. These results indicate that the two genes constitute an operon under the control of P25 and that the regulatory gene products of BF23 do not participate directly in specifying the late gene promoter. Images PMID:7961500

  18. Yeast RAD14 and human xeroderma pigmentosum group A DNA-repair genes encode homologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Bankmann, M; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1992-02-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a human autosomal recessive disorder, is characterized by extreme sensitivity to sunlight and high incidence of skin cancers. XP cells are defective in the incision step of excision repair of DNA damaged by ultraviolet light. Cell fusion studies have defined seven XP complementation groups, XP-A to XP-G. Similar genetic complexity of excision repair is observed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in any one of five yeast genes, RAD1, RAD2, RAD3, RAD4, and RAD10, cause a total defect in incision and an extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light. Here we report the characterization of the yeast RAD14 gene. The available rad14 point mutant is only moderately ultraviolet-sensitive, and it performs a substantial amount of incision of damaged DNA. Our studies with the rad14 deletion (delta) mutation indicate an absolute requirement of RAD14 in incision. RAD14 encodes a highly hydrophilic protein of 247 amino acids containing zinc-finger motifs, and it is similar to the protein encoded by the human XPAC gene that complements XP group A cell lines. PMID:1741034

  19. Protein Phosphatase 1 β Paralogs Encode the Zebrafish Myosin Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, Vaishali; Nguyen, Michael J.; Carr, Brandon W.; Zheng, Dale C.; Rosales, Joseph B.; Rosales, Joshua B.; Weiser, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The myosin phosphatase is a highly conserved regulator of actomyosin contractility. Zebrafish has emerged as an ideal model system to study the in vivo role of myosin phosphatase in controlling cell contractility, cell movement and epithelial biology. Most work in zebrafish has focused on the regulatory subunit of the myosin phosphatase called Mypt1. In this work, we examined the critical role of Protein Phosphatase 1, PP1, the catalytic subunit of the myosin phosphatase. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed that in zebrafish two paralogous genes encoding PP1β, called ppp1cba and ppp1cbb, are both broadly expressed during early development. Furthermore, we found that both gene products interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase complex. In addition, expression of this complex results in dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain and large scale rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Morpholino knock-down of ppp1cba and ppp1cbb results in severe defects in morphogenetic cell movements during gastrulation through loss of myosin phosphatase function. Conclusions/Significance Our work demonstrates that zebrafish have two genes encoding PP1β, both of which can interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase. In addition, both genes are required for convergence and extension during gastrulation and correct dosage of the protein products is required. PMID:24040418

  20. Transcription of genes encoding iron and heme acquisition proteins of Haemophilus influenzae during acute otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Whitby, P W; Sim, K E; Morton, D J; Patel, J A; Stull, T L

    1997-01-01

    Unencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae is the second most common etiologic agent of otitis media in children. H. influenzae requires heme for aerobic growth in vitro and is able to utilize hemoglobin and complexes of heme-hemopexin, heme-albumin, and hemoglobin-haptoglobin and ferritransferrin as sources of iron and heme in vitro. Several of the acquisition mechanisms have been characterized and been shown to be heme repressible in vitro. However, little is known about the expression of heme and/or iron acquisition mechanisms during infections in the middle ear. This study was performed to determine if the genes encoding heme and iron acquisition proteins are transcribed during in vivo growth and to compare these findings with those for samples grown in vitro. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) was used to analyze total RNA fractions derived from in vitro- and in vivo-grown H. influenzae. Genes encoding the transferrin-binding proteins TbpA and TbpB, the 100-kDa hemopexin-binding protein HxuA, and the hemoglobin-binding protein HgpA were transcribed during otitis media. Twelve middle ear fluid samples were analyzed by blind RT-PCR to determine the transcriptional status of these genes in H. influenzae during otitis media. Five isolates had transcripts corresponding to tbpA, tbpB, and hxuA. The presence of hgpA transcripts was variable, depending on the presence of hgpA in the genome of the H. influenzae isolate. Samples without H. influenzae gene transcripts contained other etiologic agents commonly causing otitis media. These data demonstrate that H. influenzae iron and/or heme acquisition genes are transcribed during otitis media and suggest that the microenvironment during acute otitis media starves H. influenzae of heme. PMID:9353052

  1. Genetically Encoded Molecular Tension Probe for Tracing Protein-Protein Interactions in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Nishihara, Ryo; Citterio, Daniel; Suzuki, Koji

    2016-02-17

    Optical imaging of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) facilitates comprehensive elucidation of intracellular molecular events. We demonstrate an optical measure for visualizing molecular tension triggered by any PPI in mammalian cells. Twenty-three kinds of candidate designs were fabricated, in which a full-length artificial luciferase (ALuc) was sandwiched between two model proteins of interest, e.g., FKBP and FRB. One of the designs greatly enhanced the bioluminescence in response to varying concentrations of rapamycin. It is confirmed with negative controls that the elevated bioluminescence is solely motivated from the molecular tension. The probe design was further modified toward eliminating the C-terminal end of ALuc and was found to improve signal-to-background ratios, named "a combinational probe". The utilities were elucidated with detailed substrate selectivity, bioluminescence imaging of live cells, and different PPI models. This study expands capabilities of luciferases as a tool for analyses of molecular dynamics and cell signaling in living subjects. PMID:26322739

  2. Lytic Myophage Abp53 Encodes Several Proteins Similar to Those Encoded by Host Acinetobacter baumannii and Phage phiKO2 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Ni; Tseng, Tsai-Tien; Lin, Juey-Wen; Fu, Yung-Chieh; Weng, Shu-Fen; Tseng, Yi-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. The emergence of multiple-drug-resistant A. baumannii isolates has increased in recent years. Directed toward phage therapy, a lytic phage of A. baumannii, designated Abp53, was isolated from a sputum sample in this study. Abp53 has an isometric head and a contractile tail with tail fibers (belonging to Myoviridae), a latent period of about 10 min, and a burst size of approximately 150 PFU per infected cell. Abp53 could completely lyse 27% of the A. baumannii isolates tested, which were all multiple drug resistant, but not other bacteria. Mg2+ enhanced the adsorption and productivity of, and host lysis by, Abp53. Twenty Abp53 virion proteins were visualized in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with a 47-kDa protein being the predicted major capsid protein. Abp53 has a double-stranded DNA genome of 95 kb. Sequence analyses of a 10-kb region revealed 8 open reading frames. Five of the encoded proteins, including 3 tail components and 2 hypothetical proteins, were similar to proteins encoded by A. baumannii strain ACICU. ORF1176 (one of the tail components, 1,176 amino acids [aa]), which is also similar to tail protein gp21 of Klebsiella phage phiKO2, contained repeated domains similar to those within the ACICU_02717 protein of A. baumannii ACICU and gp21. These findings suggest a common ancestry and horizontal gene transfer during evolution. As phages can expand the host range by domain duplication in tail fiber proteins, repeated domains in ORF1176 might have a similar significance in Abp53. PMID:21821767

  3. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  4. An essential yeast gene with homology to the exonuclease-encoding XRN1/KEM1 gene also encodes a protein with exoribonuclease activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kenna, M.; Douglas, M.G. ); Stevens, A. ); McCammon, M. )

    1993-01-01

    This is a study of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant from Saccharomyces cerevisiae which was obtained in a screen for mutants reduced in the synthesis of binding of a hybrid protein which competes for the transport of protein precursors into mitochondria. Examination of this mutant lead to the characterization of a gene with significant primary sequence homology to a previously identified gene, XRN1 or KEM1. Often called XRN1/KEM1, it encodes a protein of 175kDa which appears to have a multitude of properties, including involvement in recombination, RNA processing and turnover, involvement in recombination, RNA processing and turnover, microtubule function, karyogamy and DNA replication. The related gene describes further characterization of the HKE1/RAT1 gene and an hkal mutant and shows that p116 is a protein having 5[prime]-->3[prime] exoribonuclease activity, a major activity of the product of the related XRN1/KEM1 gene.

  5. The Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS Gene Encodes Two Secreted Proteins Required for Genetic Transformation of Plants▿

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Larry D.; Lee, Lan-Ying; McNett, Henry; Gelvin, Stanton B.; Ream, Walt

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are related pathogens that cause crown gall and hairy root diseases, which result from integration and expression of bacterial genes in the plant genome. Single-stranded DNA (T strands) and virulence proteins are translocated into plant cells by a type IV secretion system. VirD2 nicks a specific DNA sequence, attaches to the 5′ end, and pilots the DNA into plant cells. A. tumefaciens translocates single-stranded DNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells where it likely binds T strands and may aid in targeting them into the nucleus. Although some A. rhizogenes strains lack VirE2, they transfer T strands efficiently due to the GALLS gene, which complements an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation. Unlike VirE2, full-length GALLS (GALLS-FL) contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. GALLS-FL and VirE2 contain nuclear localization signals (NLS) and secretion signals. Mutations in any of these domains abolish the ability of the GALLS gene to substitute for virE2. Here, we show that the GALLS gene encodes two proteins from one open reading frame: GALLS-FL and a protein comprised of the C-terminal domain, which initiates at an internal in-frame start codon. On some hosts, both GALLS proteins were required to substitute for VirE2. GALLS-FL tagged with yellow fluorescent protein localized to the nucleus of tobacco cells in an NLS-dependent manner. In plant cells, the GALLS proteins interacted with themselves, VirD2, and each other. VirD2 interacted with GALLS-FL and localized inside the nucleus, where its predicted helicase activity may pull T strands into the nucleus. PMID:18952790

  6. Chimeras taking shape: potential functions of proteins encoded by chimeric RNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Lacroix, Vincent; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Levin, Yishai; Gabashvili, Alexandra; Prilusky, Jaime; Del Pozo, Angela; Tress, Michael; Johnson, Rory; Guigo, Roderic; Valencia, Alfonso

    2012-07-01

    Chimeric RNAs comprise exons from two or more different genes and have the potential to encode novel proteins that alter cellular phenotypes. To date, numerous putative chimeric transcripts have been identified among the ESTs isolated from several organisms and using high throughput RNA sequencing. The few corresponding protein products that have been characterized mostly result from chromosomal translocations and are associated with cancer. Here, we systematically establish that some of the putative chimeric transcripts are genuinely expressed in human cells. Using high throughput RNA sequencing, mass spectrometry experimental data, and functional annotation, we studied 7424 putative human chimeric RNAs. We confirmed the expression of 175 chimeric RNAs in 16 human tissues, with an abundance varying from 0.06 to 17 RPKM (Reads Per Kilobase per Million mapped reads). We show that these chimeric RNAs are significantly more tissue-specific than non-chimeric transcripts. Moreover, we present evidence that chimeras tend to incorporate highly expressed genes. Despite the low expression level of most chimeric RNAs, we show that 12 novel chimeras are translated into proteins detectable in multiple shotgun mass spectrometry experiments. Furthermore, we confirm the expression of three novel chimeric proteins using targeted mass spectrometry. Finally, based on our functional annotation of exon organization and preserved domains, we discuss the potential features of chimeric proteins with illustrative examples and suggest that chimeras significantly exploit signal peptides and transmembrane domains, which can alter the cellular localization of cognate proteins. Taken together, these findings establish that some chimeric RNAs are translated into potentially functional proteins in humans. PMID:22588898

  7. Solution Structure of Ribosomal Protein L40E, a Unique C4 Zinc Finger Protein Encoded by Archaeon Sulfolobus Solfataricus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bin; Lukin, Jonathan A.; Yee, Adelinda; Lemak, Alexander; Semesi, Anthony; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2008-01-31

    The ribosomal protein L40E from archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus is a component of the 50S ribosomal subunit. L40E is a 56-residue, highly basic protein that contains a C4 zinc finger motif, CRKC_X10_CRRC. Homologs are found in both archaea and eukaryotes but are not present in bacteria. Eukaryotic genomes encode L40E as a ubiquitin-fusion protein. L40E was absent from the crystal structure of euryarchaeota 50S ribosomal subunit. Here we report the three-dimensional solution structure of L40E by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of L40E is a three-stranded b-sheet with a simple b2b1b3 topology. There are two unique characteristics revealed by the structure. First, a large and ordered b2–b3 loop twists to pack across the one side of the protein. L40E contains a buried polar cluster comprising Lys19, Lys20, Cys22, Asn29, and Cys36. Second, the surface of L40E is almost entirely positively charged. Ten conserved basic residues are positioned on the two sides of the surface. It is likely that binding of zinc is essential in stabilizing the tertiary structure of L40E to act as a scaffold to create a broad positively charged surface for RNA and/or protein recognition. A portion of this work was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Facility, a DOE national scientific user facility.

  8. The dyf-3 gene encodes a novel protein required for sensory cilium formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Toh, Yoshihiro; Ohshima, Yasumi; Koga, Makoto

    2005-02-25

    Ciliated neurons in animals are important for the reception of environmental stimuli. To understand the mechanism of cilium morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we analyzed dyf-3 mutants that are defective in uptake of a fluorescent dye and abnormal in sensory cilium structure. Expression of green fluorescent protein in sensory neurons of a dyf-3 mutant revealed that the mutant has stunted cilia and abnormal posterior projections in some sensory neurons. The dyf-3 gene encodes three proteins with different N-terminals. The largest DYF-3 protein has 404 amino acid residues that are 38% identical with those of a predicted human protein of unknown function. Expression of a functional dyf-3Colon, two colonsgfp fusion gene is detected in 26 chemosensory neurons, including six IL2 neurons, eight pairs of amphid neurons (ASE, ADF, ASG, ASH, ASI, ASJ, ASK and ADL) and two pairs of phasmid neurons (PHA and PHB). Expression of a dyf-3 cDNA in specific neurons of dyf-3 animals indicated that dyf-3 acts cell-autonomously for fluorescent dye uptake. Reduction of dyf-3Colon, two colonsgfp expression in a daf-19 mutant suggests that dyf-3 expression is regulated by DAF-19 transcription factor, and DYF-3 may be involved in the intraflagellar transport system. PMID:15713455

  9. Cancer cells express aberrant DNMT3B transcripts encoding truncated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ostler, KR; Davis, EM; Payne, SL; Gosalia, BB; Expósito-Céspedes, J; Le Beau, MM; Godley, LA

    2008-01-01

    Cancer cells display an altered distribution of DNA methylation relative to normal cells. Certain tumor suppressor gene promoters are hypermethylated and transcriptionally inactivated, whereas repetitive DNA is hypomethylated and transcriptionally active. Little is understood about how the abnormal DNA methylation patterns of cancer cells are established and maintained. Here, we identify over 20 DNMT3B transcripts from many cancer cell lines and primary acute leukemia cells that contain aberrant splicing at the 5′ end of the gene, encoding truncated proteins lacking the C-terminal catalytic domain. Many of these aberrant transcripts retain intron sequences. Although the aberrant transcripts represent a minority of the DNMT3B transcripts present, Western blot analysis demonstrates truncated DNMT3B isoforms in the nuclear protein extracts of cancer cells. To test if expression of a truncated DNMT3B protein could alter the DNA methylation patterns within cells, we expressed DNMT3B7, the most frequently expressed aberrant transcript, in 293 cells. DNMT3B7-expressing 293 cells have altered gene expression as identified by microarray analysis. Some of these changes in gene expression correlate with altered DNA methylation of corresponding CpG islands. These results suggest that truncated DNMT3B proteins could play a role in the abnormal distribution of DNA methylation found in cancer cells. PMID:17353906

  10. Characterization of KfrA proteins encoded by a plasmid of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T

    PubMed Central

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Mon, Hiroaki; Mori, Kazuki; Mitsudome, Takumi; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Tashiro, Kousuke; Asano, Shin-ichiro; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa

    2015-01-01

    A scaffold obtained from whole-genome shotgun sequencing of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T shares partial homology with plasmids found in other strains of P. popilliae. PCR and sequencing for gap enclosure indicated that the scaffold originated from a 15,929-bp circular DNA. The restriction patterns of a plasmid isolated from P. popilliae ATCC 14706T were identical to those expected from the sequence; thus, this circular DNA was identified as a plasmid of ATCC 14706T and designated pPOP15.9. The plasmid encodes 17 putative open reading frames. Orfs 1, 5, 7, 8, and 9 are homologous to Orfs 11, 12, 15, 16, and 17, respectively. Orf1 and Orf11 are annotated as replication initiation proteins. Orf8 and Orf16 are homologs of KfrA, a plasmid-stabilizing protein in Gram-negative bacteria. Recombinant Orf8 and Orf16 proteins were assessed for the properties of KfrA. Indeed, they formed multimers and bound to inverted repeat sequences in upstream regions of both orf8 and orf16. A phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences of Orf8, Orf16 and Kfr proteins did not correlate with species lineage. PMID:25853059

  11. Homology probing: identification of cDNA clones encoding members of the protein-serine kinase family

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Mixed /sup 32/P-labeled oligonucleotide probes were used to screen a HeLa cDNA library for clones encoding amino acid contiguities whose conservation is characteristic of the protein-serine kinase family. Eighty thousand clones were screened, from which 19 were identified as showing strong hybridization to two distinct probes. Four clones were chosen for characterization by partial DNA sequence analysis and 3 of these were found to encode amino acid sequences typical of protein-serine kinases. One deduced amino acid sequence shares 72% identify with rabbit skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase ..gamma..-subunit, while another is closely related to the yeast protein-serine kinases CDC2 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and CDC28 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This screening approach should have applications in the identification of clones encoding previously unknown or poorly characterized members of other protein families.

  12. The hmc operon of Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough encodes a potential transmembrane redox protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M; Pollock, W B; Reij, M W; Keon, R G; Fu, R; Voordouw, G

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the hmc operon from Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough indicated the presence of eight open reading frames, encoding proteins Orf1 to Orf6, Rrf1, and Rrf2. Orf1 is the periplasmic, high-molecular-weight cytochrome (Hmc) containing 16 c-type hemes and described before (W. B. R. Pollock, M. Loutfi, M. Bruschi, B. J. Rapp-Giles, J. D. Wall, and G. Voordouw, J. Bacteriol. 173:220-228, 1991). Orf2 is a transmembrane redox protein with four iron-sulfur clusters, as indicated by its similarity to DmsB from Escherichia coli. Orf3, Orf4, and Orf5 are all highly hydrophobic, integral membrane proteins with similarities to subunits of NADH dehydrogenase or cytochrome c reductase. Orf6 is a cytoplasmic redox protein containing two iron-sulfur clusters, as indicated by its similarity to the ferredoxin domain of [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio species. Rrf1 belongs to the family of response regulator proteins, while the function of Rrf2 cannot be derived from the gene sequence. The expression of individual genes in E. coli with the T7 system confirmed the open reading frames for Orf2, Orf6, and Rrf1. Deletion of 0.4 kb upstream from orf1 abolished the expression of Hmc in D. desulfuricans G200, indicating this region to contain the hmc operon promoter. The expression of two truncated hmc genes in D. desulfuricans G200 resulted in stable periplasmic c-type cytochromes, confirming the domain structure of Hmc. We propose that Hmc and Orf2 to Orf6 form a transmembrane protein complex that allows electron flow from the periplasmic hydrogenases to the cytoplasmic enzymes that catalyze the reduction of sulfate. The domain structure of Hmc may be required to allow interaction with multiple hydrogenases. Images PMID:8335628

  13. Albino Leaf1 That Encodes the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Responsible for Chloroplast Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zemin; Tan, Jianjie; Shi, Zhenying; Xie, Qingjun; Xing, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Qiaoling; Zhu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-06-01

    Chloroplast, the photosynthetic organelle in plants, plays a crucial role in plant development and growth through manipulating the capacity of photosynthesis. However, the regulatory mechanism of chloroplast development still remains elusive. Here, we characterized a mutant with defective chloroplasts in rice (Oryza sativa), termed albino leaf1 (al1), which exhibits a distinct albino phenotype in leaves, eventually leading to al1 seedling lethality. Electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that the number of thylakoids was reduced and the structure of thylakoids was disrupted in the al1 mutant during rice development, which eventually led to the breakdown of chloroplast. Molecular cloning revealed that AL1 encodes the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein (RAP) in rice. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rap mutants indicated that the AL1 protein is a functional RAP. Further analysis illustrated that three transcript variants were present in the AL1 gene, and the altered splices occurred at the 3' untranslated region of the AL1 transcript. In addition, our results also indicate that disruption of the AL1 gene results in an altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes. Consistently, proteomic analysis demonstrated that the abundance of photosynthesis-associated proteins is altered significantly, as is that of a group of metabolism-associated proteins. More specifically, we found that the loss of AL1 resulted in altered abundances of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RAP likely also regulates the homeostasis of ribosomal proteins in rice in addition to the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, we propose that AL1, particularly the AL1a and AL1c isoforms, plays an essential role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:27208287

  14. TOM1, an Arabidopsis gene required for efficient multiplication of a tobamovirus, encodes a putative transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, T; Ohta, T; Takahashi, M; Meshi, T; Schmidt, R; Dean, C; Naito, S; Ishikawa, M

    2000-08-29

    Host-encoded factors play an important role in virus multiplication, acting in concert with virus-encoded factors. However, information regarding the host factors involved in this process is limited. Here we report the map-based cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene, TOM1, which is necessary for the efficient multiplication of tobamoviruses, positive-strand RNA viruses infecting a wide variety of plants. The TOM1 mRNA is suggested to encode a 291-aa polypeptide that is predicted to be a multipass transmembrane protein. The Sos recruitment assay supported the hypothesis that TOM1 is associated with membranes, and in addition, that TOM1 interacts with the helicase domain of tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins. Taken into account that the tobamovirus replication complex is associated with membranes, we propose that TOM1 participates in the in vivo formation of the replication complex by serving as a membrane anchor. PMID:10944200

  15. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Benjamin P.; Robertson, David L.; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity. PMID:25538735

  16. Comparative sequence analysis of double stranded RNA binding protein encoding gene of parapoxviruses from Indian camels.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, G; Swami, Shelesh Kumar; Dahiya, Shyam Singh; Sivakumar, G; Tuteja, F C; Narnaware, S D; Mehta, S C; Singh, Raghvendar; Patil, N V

    2014-03-01

    The dsRNA binding protein (RBP) encoding gene of parapoxviruses (PPVs) from the Dromedary camels, inhabitating different geographical region of Rajasthan, India were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using the primers of pseudocowpoxvirus (PCPV) from Finnish reindeer and cloned into pGEM-T for sequence analysis. Analysis of RBP encoding gene revealed that PPV DNA from Bikaner shared 98.3% and 76.6% sequence identity at the amino acid level, with Pali and Udaipur PPV DNA, respectively. Reference strains of Bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and PCPV (reindeer PCPV and human PCPV) shared 52.8% and 86.9% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner, respectively. But different strains of orf virus (ORFV) from different geographical areas of the world shared 69.5-71.7% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner. These findings indicate that the camel PPVs described are closely related to bovine PPV (PCPV) in comparison to caprine and ovine PPV (ORFV). PMID:25685494

  17. Cloning of apg-2 encoding a novel member of heat shock protein 110 family.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Y; Kimura, T; Kishishita, M; Noda, Y; Fujita, J

    1997-04-11

    Chinese hamster heat shock protein 110-encoding gene (hsp110), mouse apg-1 and human hsp70RY are structurally related genes, with the first two encoding about 110-kDa HSPs [Yoon et al. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 15725-15733; Kaneko et al. (1997) J. Biol. Chem., in press; Fathallah et al. (1993) J. Immunol. 151, 810-813]. Using apg-1 cDNA as a probe, we isolated a novel cDNA, apg-2 from a mouse testis cDNA library, which was highly homologous to human hsp70RY. However, the predicted amino acid (aa) sequence of APG-2 was longer (841 aa) than that of HSP70RY (701 aa) and comparable to those of HSP110 and APG-1. Northern blot analysis revealed that the expression of apg-2 transcripts was ubiquitous in various mouse tissues, and most abundant in the testis and ovary. While induction of hsp70 transcripts was observed in mouse TAMA26 Sertoli cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts on temperature shift from 37 degrees C to 42 degrees C (traditional heat shock) or from 32 degrees C to 39 degrees C, apg-2 transcripts were not induced under either condition. These results suggest that apg-2 is an isoform of mouse homolog of hsp70RY, but that it belongs to the hsp110 family instead of hsp70 family, and that it plays a role under non-stress conditions. PMID:9161406

  18. Rice ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1, encoding an F-box protein, regulates meristem fate.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kyoko; Ito, Momoyo; Nagasawa, Nobuhiro; Kyozuka, Junko; Nagato, Yasuo

    2007-09-01

    Inflorescence architecture is one of the most important agronomical traits. Characterization of rice aberrant panicle organization 1 (apo1) mutants revealed that APO1 positively controls spikelet number by suppressing the precocious conversion of inflorescence meristems to spikelet meristems. In addition, APO1 is associated with the regulation of the plastchron, floral organ identity, and floral determinacy. Phenotypic analyses of apo1 and floral homeotic double mutants demonstrate that APO1 positively regulates class-C floral homeotic genes, but not class-B genes. Molecular studies revealed that APO1 encodes an F-box protein, an ortholog of Arabidopsis UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGAN (UFO), which is a positive regulator of class-B genes. Overexpression of APO1 caused an increase in inflorescence branches and spikelets. As the mutant inflorescences and flowers differed considerably between apo1 and ufo, the functions of APO1 and UFO appear to have diverged during evolution. PMID:17666027

  19. Ring finger protein 10 is a novel synaptonuclear messenger encoding activation of NMDA receptors in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, Margarita C; Guzzetti, Francesca; Karpova, Anna; Lim, Dmitry; Mitro, Nico; Musardo, Stefano; Mellone, Manuela; Marcello, Elena; Stanic, Jennifer; Samaddar, Tanmoy; Burguière, Adeline; Caldarelli, Antonio; Genazzani, Armando A; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Kreutz, Michael R; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Luca, Monica Di

    2016-01-01

    Synapses and nuclei are connected by bidirectional communication mechanisms that enable information transfer encoded by macromolecules. Here, we identified RNF10 as a novel synaptonuclear protein messenger. RNF10 is activated by calcium signals at the postsynaptic compartment and elicits discrete changes at the transcriptional level. RNF10 is enriched at the excitatory synapse where it associates with the GluN2A subunit of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Activation of synaptic GluN2A-containing NMDARs and induction of long term potentiation (LTP) lead to the translocation of RNF10 from dendritic segments and dendritic spines to the nucleus. In particular, we provide evidence for importin-dependent long-distance transport from synapto-dendritic compartments to the nucleus. Notably, RNF10 silencing prevents the maintenance of LTP as well as LTP-dependent structural modifications of dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12430.001 PMID:26977767

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster developmental gene g1 encodes a variant zinc-finger-motif protein.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, M L; Côté, S

    1993-03-30

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the mechanisms involved in the pattern formation of complex internal organs are still largely unknown. However, the identity of the molecular determinants that control the development of these specific tissues is emerging from the combined use of genetic and molecular approaches. We have cloned a gene that is expressed in the mesoderm, one of the fundamental embryonic germ layers which gives rise to internal structures, such as the musculature. Here, we describe the molecular characterization of this gene, designated as g1. The nucleotide (nt) sequence of its cDNA shows an open reading frame of 852 nt, which encodes a 32-kDa protein with two putative zinc fingers, and a serine/glutamine/proline-rich region. These features indicate a functional role for g1, which remains to be elucidated, in regulating gene expression during mesoderm formation. PMID:8462875

  1. mus304 encodes a novel DNA damage checkpoint protein required during Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Michael H.; Sekelsky, Jeff J.; Tsang, Garson; Hawley, R. Scott; Rubin, Gerald M.

    2000-01-01

    Checkpoints block cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells exposed to DNA damaging agents. We show that several Drosophila homologs of checkpoint genes, mei-41, grapes, and 14-3-3ε, regulate a DNA damage checkpoint in the developing eye. We have used this assay to show that the mutagen-sensitive gene mus304 is also required for this checkpoint. mus304 encodes a novel coiled-coil domain protein, which is targeted to the cytoplasm. Similar to mei-41, mus304 is required for chromosome break repair and for genomic stability. mus304 animals also exhibit three developmental defects, abnormal bristle morphology, decreased meiotic recombination, and arrested embryonic development. We suggest that these phenotypes reflect distinct developmental consequences of a single underlying checkpoint defect. Similar mechanisms may account for the puzzling array of symptoms observed in humans with mutations in the ATM tumor suppressor gene. PMID:10733527

  2. Identification of pTiC58 plasmid-encoded proteins for virulence in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Hagiya, M; Close, T J; Tait, R C; Kado, C I

    1985-01-01

    Analyses were made of the host-dependent-variation (hdv) locus of the virulence (vir) region of the pTiC58 plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The hdv locus is comprised of at least four genes that encode polypeptides of 13, 15, 29, and 28 kDa. Insertion of transposon Tn5 in the first gene abolishes the expression of all four genes in vitro and in vivo. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the hdv locus revealed four open reading frames tandemly arranged with spacer sequences having no promoter-like sequences and lacking the ability to bind A. tumefaciens RNA polymerase. These studies suggest that the hdv locus is comprised of at least four genes arranged in an operon in the vir region. The protein products of these genes are likely to function in some aspect of the host-range determination of A. tumefaciens. Images PMID:2986128

  3. Ectromelia virus encodes a family of Ankyrin/F-box proteins that regulate NFκB.

    PubMed

    Burles, Kristin; van Buuren, Nicholas; Barry, Michele

    2014-11-01

    A notable feature of poxviruses is their ability to inhibit the antiviral response, including the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway. NFκB is a transcription factor that is sequestered in the cytoplasm until cell stimulation, and relies on the SCF (Skp1, culllin-1, F-box) ubiquitin ligase to target its inhibitor, IκBα, for degradation. IκBα is recruited to the SCF by the F-box domain-containing protein βTrCP. Here, we show that ectromelia virus, the causative agent of mousepox, encodes four F-box-containing proteins, EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165, all of which contain Ankyrin (Ank) domains. The Ank/F-box proteins inhibit NFκB nuclear translocation, and this inhibition is dependent on the F-box domain. We also demonstrate that EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165 prevent IκBα degradation, suggesting that they target the SCF. This study identifies a new mechanism by which ectromelia virus inhibits NFκB. PMID:25240225

  4. KOJAK encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein required for root hair cell morphogenesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Favery, Bruno; Ryan, Eoin; Foreman, Julia; Linstead, Paul; Boudonck, Kurt; Steer, Martin; Shaw, Peter; Dolan, Liam

    2001-01-01

    The cell wall is an important determinant of plant cell form. Here we define a class of Arabidopsis root hair mutants with defective cell walls. Plants homozygous for kojak (kjk) mutations initiate root hairs that rupture at their tip soon after initiation. The KJK gene was isolated by positional cloning, and its identity was confirmed by the molecular complementation of the Kjk− phenotype and the sequence of three kjk mutant alleles. KOJAK encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein, AtCSLD3. KOJAK/AtCSLD3 is the first member of this subfamily of proteins to be shown to have a function in cell growth. Subcellular localization of the KOJAK/AtCSLD3 protein using a GFP fusion shows that KOJAK/AtCSLD3 is located on the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating that KOJAK/AtCSLD3 is required for the synthesis of a noncellulosic wall polysaccharide. Consistent with the cell specific defect in the roots of kjk mutants, KOJAK/AtCSDL3 is preferentially expressed in hair cells of the epidermis. The Kjk− phenotype and the pattern of KOJAK/AtCSLD3 expression suggest that this gene acts early in the process of root hair outgrowth. These results suggest that KOJAK/AtCSLD3 is involved in the biosynthesis of β-glucan-containing polysaccharides that are required during root hair elongation. PMID:11156607

  5. Cloning and functional expression of a complementary DNA encoding a mammalian nucleoside transport protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Q Q; Yao, S Y; Ritzel, M W; Paterson, A R; Cass, C E; Young, J D

    1994-07-01

    Expression screening in Xenopus oocytes was used to isolate a cDNA from rat jejunal epithelium encoding a Na(+)-dependent nucleoside transport protein (named cNT1). The cDNA sequence of cNT1 predicts a protein of 648 amino acids (relative molecular mass 71,000) with 14 potential transmembrane domains. Data base searches indicate significant sequence similarity to the NUPC proton/nucleoside symporter of Escherichia coli. There is no sequence similarity between cNT1 and proteins of mammalian origin. Functionally, cNT1 exhibited the transport characteristics of the nucleoside transport system cit (selective for pyrimidine nucleosides and adenosine) and accepted both 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC) as permeants (Km = 0.49 and 0.51 mM, respectively). The demonstration of transport of AZT by cNT1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes provides the first direct evidence that AZT enters cells by transporter-mediated processes, as well as by passive diffusion. Consistent with the tissue distribution of system cit transport activity, transcripts for cNT1 were detected in kidney as well as jejunum. cNT1 therefore belongs to a potential new gene family and may be involved in the intestinal absorption and renal handling of pyrimidine nucleoside analogs used to treat acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:8027026

  6. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; et al

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 outmore » of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.« less

  7. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; Ling, Chang-Chun; Klassen, John S.; Noren, Christopher J.; Mahal, Lara K.; Woods, Robert J.; Coates, Leighton; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 out of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a gene encoding an ethylene responsive factor protein from Ceratoides arborescens.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jie; Wang, Xuemin; Wang, Kang; Wang, Zan; Gao, Hongwen

    2012-02-01

    Ethylene responsive factor (ERF) proteins play important roles in plant growth and development and regulate biotic and abiotic stress responses. In this study, a full length mRNA encoding a novel ERF-type transcription factor namely Ceratoides arborescens ERF protein (CeERF) was isolated from C. arborescens. The deduced amino acid of CeERF had a conserved APETALA2/ERF (AP2/ERF) domain which specifically binds to cis-acting elements GCC box. Under normal conditions, the expression level of CeERF was highest in leaves and lowest in roots. CeERF expression was induced by 20% PEG in a time-dependent pattern and peaked at 8 h. CeERF also acts in salt- and hormones-induced stresses. Transient expression analysis in onion epidermal cells indicated that CeERF protein localized to nucleus. Overexpression of CeERF in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in higher tolerance to abiotic stresses than in control plants. These results suggested that CeERF might play a role in abiotic stress signal transduction and that overexpression of CeERF might serve as a feasible approach to enhance resistance in forage, even crop. PMID:21603850

  9. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. PMID:25916847

  10. Characterization of Durham virus, a novel rhabdovirus that encodes both a C and SH protein

    PubMed Central

    Allison, A. B.; Palacios, G.; Rosa, A. Travassos da; Popov, V. L.; Lu, L.; Xiao, S. Y.; DeToy, K.; Briese, T.; Lipkin, W. Ian; Keel, M. K.; Stallknecht, D. E.; Bishop, G. R.; Tesh, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    The family Rhabdoviridae is a diverse group of non-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses that are distributed worldwide and infect a wide range of hosts including vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. Of the 114 currently recognized vertebrate rhabdoviruses, relatively few have been well characterized at both the antigenic and genetic level; hence, the phylogenetic relationships between many of the vertebrate rhabdoviruses remain unknown. The present report describes a novel rhabdovirus isolated from the brain of a moribund American coot (Fulica americana) that exhibited neurological signs when found in Durham County, North Carolina, in 2005. Antigenic characterization of the virus revealed that it was serologically unrelated to 68 other known vertebrate rhabdoviruses. Genomic sequencing of the virus indicated that it shared the highest identity to Tupaia rhabdovirus (TUPV), and as only previously observed in TUPV, the genome encoded a putative C protein in an overlapping open reading frame (ORF) of the phosphoprotein gene and a small hydrophobic protein located in a novel ORF between the matrix and glycoprotein genes. Phylogenetic analysis of partial amino acid sequences of the nucleoprotein and polymerase proteins indicated that, in addition to TUPV, the virus was most closely related to avian and small mammal rhabdoviruses from Africa and North America. In this report, we present the morphological, pathological, antigenic, and genetic characterization of the new virus, tentatively named Durham virus (DURV), and discuss its potential evolutionary relationship to other vertebrate rhabdoviruses. PMID:20863863

  11. Direct control of type IIA topoisomerase activity by a chromosomally encoded regulatory protein

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Seychelle M.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Hershey, David M.; Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Sengupta, Sugopa; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Berger, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Precise control of supercoiling homeostasis is critical to DNA-dependent processes such as gene expression, replication, and damage response. Topoisomerases are central regulators of DNA supercoiling commonly thought to act independently in the recognition and modulation of chromosome superstructure; however, recent evidence has indicated that cells tightly regulate topoisomerase activity to support chromosome dynamics, transcriptional response, and replicative events. How topoisomerase control is executed and linked to the internal status of a cell is poorly understood. To investigate these connections, we determined the structure of Escherichia coli gyrase, a type IIA topoisomerase bound to YacG, a recently identified chromosomally encoded inhibitor protein. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that YacG is frequently associated with coenzyme A (CoA) production enzymes, linking the protein to metabolism and stress. The structure, along with supporting solution studies, shows that YacG represses gyrase by sterically occluding the principal DNA-binding site of the enzyme. Unexpectedly, YacG acts by both engaging two spatially segregated regions associated with small-molecule inhibitor interactions (fluoroquinolone antibiotics and the newly reported antagonist GSK299423) and remodeling the gyrase holoenzyme into an inactive, ATP-trapped configuration. This study establishes a new mechanism for the protein-based control of topoisomerases, an approach that may be used to alter supercoiling levels for responding to changes in cellular state. PMID:24990966

  12. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. PMID:25916847

  13. spn-F encodes a novel protein that affects oocyte patterning and bristle morphology in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Abdu, Uri; Bar, Dikla; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2006-04-01

    The anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes of the Drosophila embryo are established during oogenesis through the activities of Gurken (Grk), a Tgfalpha-like protein, and the Epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr). spn-F mutant females produce ventralized eggs similar to the phenotype produced by mutations in the grk-Egfr pathway. We found that the ventralization of the eggshell in spn-F mutants is due to defects in the localization and translation of grk mRNA during mid-oogenesis. Analysis of the microtubule network revealed defects in the organization of the microtubules around the oocyte nucleus. In addition, spn-F mutants have defective bristles. We cloned spn-F and found that it encodes a novel coiled-coil protein that localizes to the minus end of microtubules in the oocyte, and this localization requires the microtubule network and a Dynein heavy chain gene. We also show that Spn-F interacts directly with the Dynein light chain Ddlc-1. Our results show that we have identified a novel protein that affects oocyte axis determination and the organization of microtubules during Drosophila oogenesis. PMID:16540510

  14. Monoclonal antibody against a putative myristoylated membrane protein encoded by grouper iridovirus 59L gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Yu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter; Liou, Chian-Jiun; Lai, Yu-Shen

    2015-04-01

    Groupers (Epinephelus spp.) are economically important fish species worldwide, and ranaviruses are major viral pathogens causing heavy economic losses in grouper aquaculture. In this study, the 59L gene of grouper iridovirus (GIV-59L) was cloned and characterized. This gene is 1521 bp and encodes a protein of 506 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 53.9 kDa. Interestingly, GIV-59L and its homologs are found in all genera of the family Iridoviridae. A mouse monoclonal antibody specific for the C-terminal domain (amino acid positions 254-506) of the GIV-59L protein, GIV-59L(760-1518)-MAb-21, was produced and proved to be well suited for use in a number of GIV immunoassays. RT-PCR, Western blotting, and cycloheximide and cytosine arabinoside drug inhibition analyses indicated that GIV-59L is a viral late gene in GIV-infected grouper kidney cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that GIV-59L protein mainly accumulates in the cytoplasm of infected cells and is finally packed into a whole virus particle. The GIV-59L(760-1518)-MAb-21 characterized in this study could have widespread application in GIV immunodiagnostics and other research on GIV. In addition, the results presented here offer important insights into the pathogenesis of GIV. PMID:25850399

  15. A Member of the Notch Group of Interacting Loci, Deltex Encodes a Cytoplasmic Basic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Busseau, I.; Diederich, R. J.; Xu, T.; Artavanis-Tsakonas, S.

    1994-01-01

    Prior genetic studies have suggested a functional relationship between the product of the deltex gene and those of three of the so-called ``neurogenic'' loci, Notch, Delta and mastermind. To gain further insight into this relationship, we have proceeded with a molecular characterization of deltex. We report that deltex encodes a maternally and zygotically expressed transcript that conceptually translates to a basic protein of novel sequence. Immunolocalization of the protein reveals an apparently ubiquitous distribution in embryonic and imaginal tissues. Because our detection methods also reveal a very low level of protein accumulation within the cytoplasm of cells, we have used transgenic flies to confirm this observation by ectopically expressing deltex under the control of a heat shock gene promoter. The resulting overexpression rescues deltex mutant defects but does not produce any obvious phenotypic abnormalities in otherwise wild-type flies. Finally, we examine genetically several Supressor of deltex mutations for evidence of functional integration with deltex and other neurogenic genes. We demonstrate that in addition to suppressing all adult morphological defects of deltex alleles, these suppressors also are capable of suppressing most synergistic effects involving deltex and Notch, Delta and mastermind. PMID:8150285

  16. Systematic and searchable classification of cytochrome P450 proteins encoded by fungal and oomycete genomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 proteins (CYPs) play diverse and pivotal roles in fungal metabolism and adaptation to specific ecological niches. Fungal genomes encode extremely variable “CYPomes” ranging from one to more than 300 CYPs. Despite the rapid growth of sequenced fungal and oomycete genomes and the resulting influx of predicted CYPs, the vast majority of CYPs remain functionally uncharacterized. To facilitate the curation and functional and evolutionary studies of CYPs, we previously developed Fungal Cytochrome P450 Database (FCPD), which included CYPs from 70 fungal and oomycete species. Here we present a new version of FCPD (1.2) with more data and an improved classification scheme. Results The new database contains 22,940 CYPs from 213 species divided into 2,579 clusters and 115 clans. By optimizing the clustering pipeline, we were able to uncover 36 novel clans and to assign 153 orphan CYP families to specific clans. To augment their functional annotation, CYP clusters were mapped to David Nelson’s P450 databases, which archive a total of 12,500 manually curated CYPs. Additionally, over 150 clusters were functionally classified based on sequence similarity to experimentally characterized CYPs. Comparative analysis of fungal and oomycete CYPomes revealed cases of both extreme expansion and contraction. The most dramatic expansions in fungi were observed in clans CYP58 and CYP68 (Pezizomycotina), clans CYP5150 and CYP63 (Agaricomycotina), and family CYP509 (Mucoromycotina). Although much of the extraordinary diversity of the pan-fungal CYPome can be attributed to gene duplication and adaptive divergence, our analysis also suggests a few potential horizontal gene transfer events. Updated families and clans can be accessed through the new version of the FCPD database. Conclusions FCPD version 1.2 provides a systematic and searchable catalogue of 9,550 fungal CYP sequences (292 families) encoded by 108 fungal species and 147 CYP sequences (9 families

  17. Mechanistic Studies of the Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Protein Voltage Probe ArcLight

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhou; Jin, Lei; Chen, Fuyi; Loturco, Joseph J.; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Bondar, Alexey; Lazar, Josef; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    ArcLight, a genetically encoded fluorescent protein voltage probe with a large ΔF/ΔV, is a fusion between the voltage sensing domain of the Ciona instestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase and super ecliptic pHluorin carrying a single mutation (A227D in the fluorescent protein). Without this mutation the probe produces only a very small change in fluorescence in response to voltage deflections (∼1%). The large signal afforded by this mutation allows optical detection of action potentials and sub-threshold electrical events in single-trials in vitro and in vivo. However, it is unclear how this single mutation produces a probe with such a large modulation of its fluorescence output with changes in membrane potential. In this study, we identified which residues in super ecliptic pHluorin (vs eGFP) are critical for the ArcLight response, as a similarly constructed probe based on eGFP also exhibits large response amplitude if it carries these critical residues. We found that D147 is responsible for determining the pH sensitivity of the fluorescent protein used in these probes but by itself does not result in a voltage probe with a large signal. We also provide evidence that the voltage dependent signal of ArcLight is not simply sensing environmental pH changes. A two-photon polarization microscopy study showed that ArcLight's response to changes in membrane potential includes a reorientation of the super ecliptic pHluorin. We also explored different changes including modification of linker length, deletion of non-essential amino acids in the super ecliptic pHluorin, adding a farnesylation site, using tandem fluorescent proteins and other pH sensitive fluorescent proteins. PMID:25419571

  18. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  19. Flower-enhanced expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial respiratory protein is associated with changes in mitochondrion number.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Struck, F; Matzinger, D F; Levings, C S

    1994-01-01

    The mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein is an obligatory component of the respiratory electron transport chain that is encoded by a single-copy gene in mammals and fungi. In contrast, this protein is encoded by a small gene family in dicotyledonous tobacco and monocotyledonous maize. We cloned four cDNAs from tobacco that encode the mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein. These clones, along with a previously isolated cDNA, represent five independent members of the gene family that can be divided into three subfamilies. All of these genes were derived from the two progenitor species and were expressed in amphidiploid tobacco. The proteins encoded by these five genes are probably functional because they all contain the universally conserved hexyl peptides necessary for the 2Fe-2S cluster formation. The expression of the Rieske protein gene family is differentially regulated; a 6- to 11-fold higher level of steady state transcripts was found in flowers than in leaves, stems, and roots. Members of at least two subfamilies were preferentially expressed in flowers, indicating that they share a common cis-regulatory element(s), which can respond to a flower-specific signal(s). Although approximately 10 times more transcripts occurred in flowers than in leaves, flower and leaf mitochondria contained a similar amount of the Rieske protein. Flowers, however, contained seven times more Rieske proteins than leaves. These results indicated an increase in mitochondrion number in flowers. High-energy demands during anther development might bring about an increase in mitochondrion numbers in flowers and the flower-enhanced expression of the Rieske protein gene family. Our results suggested that nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory proteins could sense and respond to changes in energy metabolism and/or changes in mitochondrion numbers. PMID:8180500

  20. Genes encoding novel secreted and transmembrane proteins are temporally and spatially regulated during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga, Alejandro; Hödar, Christian; Hanna, Patricia; Ibáñez, Freddy; Moreno, Pablo; Pulgar, Rodrigo; Pastenes, Luis; González, Mauricio; Cambiazo, Verónica

    2009-01-01

    Background Morphogenetic events that shape the Drosophila melanogaster embryo are tightly controlled by a genetic program in which specific sets of genes are up-regulated. We used a suppressive subtractive hybridization procedure to identify a group of developmentally regulated genes during early stages of D. melanogaster embryogenesis. We studied the spatiotemporal activity of these genes in five different intervals covering 12 stages of embryogenesis. Results Microarrays were constructed to confirm induction of expression and to determine the temporal profile of isolated subtracted cDNAs during embryo development. We identified a set of 118 genes whose expression levels increased significantly in at least one developmental interval compared with a reference interval. Of these genes, 53% had a phenotype and/or molecular function reported in the literature, whereas 47% were essentially uncharacterized. Clustering analysis revealed demarcated transcript groups with maximum gene activity at distinct developmental intervals. In situ hybridization assays were carried out on 23 uncharacterized genes, 15 of which proved to have spatiotemporally restricted expression patterns. Among these 15 uncharacterized genes, 13 were found to encode putative secreted and transmembrane proteins. For three of them we validated our protein sequence predictions by expressing their cDNAs in Drosophila S2R+ cells and analyzed the subcellular distribution of recombinant proteins. We then focused on the functional characterization of the gene CG6234. Inhibition of CG6234 by RNA interference resulted in morphological defects in embryos, suggesting the involvement of this gene in germ band retraction. Conclusion Our data have yielded a list of developmentally regulated D. melanogaster genes and their expression profiles during embryogenesis and provide new information on the spatiotemporal expression patterns of several uncharacterized genes. In particular, we recovered a substantial number of

  1. Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma cruzi: molecular characterization of genes encoding putative calcium-binding proteins, highly conserved in trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Porcel, B M; Bontempi, E J; Henriksson, J; Rydåker, M; Aslund, L; Segura, E L; Pettersson, U; Ruiz, A M

    1996-12-01

    Genes encoding a 29-kDa flagellar calcium-binding protein (F29) in Trypanosoma cruzi, strongly homologous to EF-hand calcium-binding protein-encoding genes previously reported in this parasite, were isolated by immunoscreening. F29 is encoded by a number of very similar genes, highly conserved among different T. cruzi isolates. The genes are located on a pair of homologous chromosomes, arranged in one or two clusters of tandem repeats. PCR amplification of Trypanosoma rangeli genomic DNA, using primers derived from the T. cruzi F29 sequence made it possible to isolate the homologous gene in T. rangeli, encoding a 23-kDa protein called TrCaBP. Gene sequence comparisons showed homology to EF-hand calcium-binding proteins from T. cruzi (82.8%), Trypanosoma brucei brucei (60.2%), and Entamoeba histolytica (28.4%). Northern blot analysis revealed that the TrCaBP gene is expressed in T. rangeli as a polyadenylated transcript. The TrCaBP-encoding genes are present in at least 20 copies per cell, organized in tandem arrays, on large T. rangeli chromosomes in some isolates and on two smaller ones in others. This gene, however, seems to be absent from Leishmania. PMID:8948328

  2. ERCC4 (XPF) encodes a human nucleotide excision repair protein with eukaryotic recombination homologs.

    PubMed

    Brookman, K W; Lamerdin, J E; Thelen, M P; Hwang, M; Reardon, J T; Sancar, A; Zhou, Z Q; Walter, C A; Parris, C N; Thompson, L H

    1996-11-01

    ERCC4 is an essential human gene in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which is responsible for removing UV-C photoproducts and bulky adducts from DNA. Among the NER genes, ERCC4 and ERCC1 are also uniquely involved in removing DNA interstrand cross-linking damage. The ERCC1-ERCC4 heterodimer, like the homologous Rad10-Rad1 complex, was recently found to possess an endonucleolytic activity that incises on the 5' side of damage. The ERCC4 gene, assigned to chromosome 16p13.1-p13.2, was previously isolated by using a chromosome 16 cosmid library. It corrects the defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutants of NER complementation group 4 and is implicated in complementation group F of the human disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. We describe the ERCC4 gene structure and functional cDNA sequence encoding a 916-amino-acid protein (104 kDa), which has substantial homology with the eukaryotic DNA repair and recombination proteins MEI-9 (Drosophila melanogaster), Rad16 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and Rad1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). ERCC4 cDNA efficiently corrected mutants in rodent NER complementation groups 4 and 11, showing the equivalence of these groups, and ERCC4 protein levels were reduced in mutants of both groups. In cells of an XP-F patient, the ERCC4 protein level was reduced to less than 5%, consistent with XPF being the ERCC4 gene. The considerable identity (40%) between ERCC4 and MEI-9 suggests a possible involvement of ERCC4 in meiosis. In baboon tissues, ERCC4 was expressed weakly and was not significantly higher in testis than in nonmeiotic tissues. PMID:8887684

  3. Rational design of an efficient, genetically encodable, protein-encased singlet oxygen photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Westberg, Michael; Holmegaard, Lotte; Pimenta, Frederico M; Etzerodt, Michael; Ogilby, Peter R

    2015-02-01

    Singlet oxygen, O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)), plays a key role in many processes of cell signaling. Limitations in mechanistic studies of such processes are generally associated with the difficulty of controlling the amount and location of O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) production in or on a cell. As such, there is great need for a system that (a) selectively produces O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) in appreciable and accurately quantifiable yields and (b) can be localized in a specific place at the suborganelle level. A genetically encodable, protein-encased photosensitizer is one way to achieve this goal. Through a systematic and rational approach involving mutations to a LOV2 protein that binds the chromophore flavin mononucleotide (FMN), we have developed a promising photosensitizer that overcomes many of the problems that affect related systems currently in use. Specifically, by decreasing the extent of hydrogen bonding between FMN and a specific amino acid residue in the local protein environment, we decrease the susceptibility of FMN to undesired photoinitiated electron-transfer reactions that kinetically compete with O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) production. As a consequence, our protein-encased FMN system produces O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) with the uniquely large quantum efficiency of 0.25 ± 0.03. We have also quantified other key photophysical parameters that characterize this sensitizer system, including unprecedented H(2)O/D(2)O solvent isotope effects on the O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) formation kinetics and yields. As such, our results facilitate future systematic developments in this field. PMID:25575190

  4. ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ Proteins Orthologous with pSymA-Encoded Proteins of Sinorhizobium meliloti: Hypothetical Roles in Plant Host Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kuykendall, L. David; Shao, Jonathan Y.; Hartung, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 1021, a nitrogen-fixing, root-nodulating bacterial microsymbiont of alfalfa, has a 3.5 Mbp circular chromosome and two megaplasmids including 1.3 Mbp pSymA carrying nonessential ‘accessory’ genes for nitrogen fixation (nif), nodulation and host specificity (nod). A related bacterium, psyllid-vectored ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,’ is an obligate phytopathogen with a reduced genome that was previously analyzed for genes orthologous to genes on the S. meliloti circular chromosome. In general, proteins encoded by pSymA genes are more similar in sequence alignment to those encoded by S. meliloti chromosomal orthologs than to orthologous proteins encoded by genes carried on the ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ genome. Only two ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ proteins were identified as having orthologous proteins encoded on pSymA but not also encoded on the chromosome of S. meliloti. These two orthologous gene pairs encode a Na+/K+ antiporter (shared with intracellular pathogens of the family Bartonellacea) and a Co++, Zn++ and Cd++ cation efflux protein that is shared with the phytopathogen Agrobacterium. Another shared protein, a redox-regulated K+ efflux pump may regulate cytoplasmic pH and homeostasis. The pSymA and ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ orthologs of the latter protein are more highly similar in amino acid alignment compared with the alignment of the pSymA-encoded protein with its S. meliloti chromosomal homolog. About 182 pSymA encoded proteins have sequence similarity (≤E-10) with ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ proteins, often present as multiple orthologs of single ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ proteins. These proteins are involved with amino acid uptake, cell surface structure, chaperonins, electron transport, export of bioactive molecules, cellular homeostasis, regulation of gene expression, signal transduction and synthesis of amino acids and metabolic cofactors. The presence of multiple orthologs defies

  5. Genes Encoding Cher-TPR Fusion Proteins Are Predominantly Found in Gene Clusters Encoding Chemosensory Pathways with Alternative Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Alfonso, Carlos; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF). CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was found to be

  6. A mutation in PNPT1, encoding mitochondrial-RNA-import protein PNPase, causes hereditary hearing loss.

    PubMed

    von Ameln, Simon; Wang, Geng; Boulouiz, Redouane; Rutherford, Mark A; Smith, Geoffrey M; Li, Yun; Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Stiller, Barbara; Volk, Alexander E; Borck, Guntram; Hong, Jason S; Goodyear, Richard J; Abidi, Omar; Nürnberg, Peter; Hofmann, Kay; Richardson, Guy P; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Moser, Tobias; Wollnik, Bernd; Koehler, Carla M; Teitell, Michael A; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Kubisch, Christian

    2012-11-01

    A subset of nuclear-encoded RNAs has to be imported into mitochondria for the proper replication and transcription of the mitochondrial genome and, hence, for proper mitochondrial function. Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase or PNPT1) is one of the very few components known to be involved in this poorly characterized process in mammals. At the organismal level, however, the effect of PNPase dysfunction and impaired mitochondrial RNA import are unknown. By positional cloning, we identified a homozygous PNPT1 missense mutation (c.1424A>G predicting the protein substitution p.Glu475Gly) of a highly conserved PNPase residue within the second RNase-PH domain in a family affected by autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment. In vitro analyses in bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells showed that the identified mutation results in a hypofunctional protein leading to disturbed PNPase trimerization and impaired mitochondrial RNA import. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong PNPase staining in the murine cochlea, including the sensory hair cells and the auditory ganglion neurons. In summary, we show that a component of the mitochondrial RNA-import machinery is specifically required for auditory function. PMID:23084290

  7. Hypoxia-inducible genes encoding small EF-hand proteins in rice and tomato.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Chie; Minami, Ikuko; Oda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Rice has evolved metabolic and morphological adaptations to low-oxygen stress to grow in submerged paddy fields. To characterize the molecular components that mediate the response to hypoxia in rice, we identified low-oxygen stress early response genes by microarray analysis. Among the highly responsive genes, five genes, OsHREF1 to OsHREF5, shared strong homology. They encoded small proteins harboring two EF-hands, typical Ca(2+)-binding motifs. Homologous genes were found in many land plants, including SlHREF in tomato, which is also strongly induced by hypoxia. SlHREF induction was detected in both roots and shoots of tomato plants under hypoxia. With the exception of OsHREF5, OsHREF expression was unaffected by drought, salinity, cold, or osmotic stress. Fluorescent signals of green fluorescent protein-fused OsHREFs were detected in the cytosol and nucleus. Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of intracellular Ca(2+) release, repressed induction of OsHREF1-4 under hypoxia. The HREFs may be related to the Ca(2+) response to hypoxia. PMID:21150100

  8. uninflatable encodes a novel ectodermal apical surface protein required for tracheal inflation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Ward, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    The tracheal system of Drosophila melanogaster has proven to be an excellent model system for studying the development of branched tubular organs. Mechanisms regulating the patterning and initial maturation of the tracheal system have been largely worked out, yet important questions remain regarding how the mature tubes inflate with air at the end of embryogenesis, and how the tracheal system grows in response to the oxygen needs of a developing larva that increases nearly 1000-fold in volume over a four day period. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of uninflatable (uif), a gene that encodes a large transmembrane protein containing carbohydrate binding and cell signaling motifs in its extracellular domain. Uif is highly conserved in insect species, but does not appear to have a true ortholog in vertebrate species. uif is expressed zygotically beginning in stage 5 embryos, and Uif protein localizes to the apical plasma membrane in all ectodermally derived epithelia, most notably in the tracheal system. uif mutant animals show defects in tracheal inflation at the end of embryogenesis, and die primarily as larvae. Tracheal tubes in mutant larvae are often crushed or twisted, although tracheal patterning and maturation appear normal during embryogenesis. uif mutants larvae also show defects in tracheal growth and molting of their tracheal cuticle. PMID:19818339

  9. Developmental expression of tobacco pistil-specific genes encoding novel extensin-like proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M H; Pezzotti, M; Seurinck, J; Mariani, C

    1992-01-01

    We have sought to identify pistil-specific genes that can be used as molecular markers to study pistil development. For this purpose, a cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA extracted from tobacco stigmas and styles at different developmental stages. Differential screening of this library led to the isolation of cDNA clones that correspond to genes preferentially or specifically expressed in the pistil. Seven of these cDNA clones encode proteins containing repetitions of the pentapeptide Ser-Pro4, which is a typical motif found in extensins. Unlike extensin genes, the extensin-like genes described here are not induced under stress conditions. RNA gel blot hybridizations demonstrated the organ-specific expression of the extensin-like genes and their temporal regulation during pistil development. After pollination, the transcript levels of the pistil-specific extensin-like genes change relative to levels in unpollinated pistils. In situ hybridization experiments showed that at least one of these pistil-specific genes is specifically expressed in cells of the transmitting tissue. The possible roles of the extensin-like proteins in pistils are discussed. PMID:1392607

  10. tassel-less1 encodes a boron channel protein required for inflorescence development in maize.

    PubMed

    Leonard, April; Holloway, Beth; Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary; Yu, GongXin; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Meeley, Robert; Llaca, Victor; Butler, Karlene; Stefani, Tony; Jaqueth, Jennifer; Li, Bailin

    2014-06-01

    tassel-less1 (tls1) is a classical maize (Zea mays) inflorescence mutant. Homozygous mutant plants have no tassels or very small tassels, and ear development is also impaired. Using a positional cloning approach, ZmNIP3;1 (a NOD26-like intrinsic protein) was identified as the candidate gene for tls1. The ZmNIP3;1 gene is completely deleted in the tls1 mutant genome. Two Mutator-insertional TUSC alleles of ZmNIP3;1 exhibited tls1-like phenotypes, and allelism tests confirmed that the tls1 gene encodes ZmNIP3;1. Transgenic plants with an RNA interference (RNAi) construct to down-regulate ZmNIP3;1 also showed tls1-like phenotypes, further demonstrating that TLS1 is ZmNIP3;1. Sequence analysis suggests that ZmNIP3;1 is a boron channel protein. Foliar application of boron could rescue the tls1 phenotypes and restore the normal tassel and ear development. Gene expression analysis indicated that in comparison with that of the wild type or tls1 plants treated with boron, the transition from the vegetative to reproductive phase or the development of the floral meristem is impaired in the shoot apical meristem of the tls1 mutant plants. It is concluded that the tls1 mutant phenotypes are caused by impaired boron transport, and boron is essential for inflorescence development in maize. PMID:24685595

  11. Comprehensive Analysis of Transport Proteins Encoded Within the Genome of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Barabote, Ravi D.; Rendulic, Snjezana; Schuster, Stephan C.; Saier, Milton H.

    2012-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a bacterial parasite with an unusual lifestyle. It grows and reproduces in the periplasm of a host prey bacterium. The complete genome sequence of B. bacteriovorus has recently been reported. We have reanalyzed the transport proteins encoded within the B. bacteriovorus genome according to the current content of the transporter classification database (TCDB). A comprehensive analysis is given on the types and numbers of transport systems that B. bacteriovorus has. In this regard, the potential protein secretory capabilities of at least 4 types of inner membrane secretion systems and 5 types for outer membrane secretion are described. Surprisingly, B. bacteriovorus has a disproportionate percentage of cytoplasmic membrane channels and outer membrane porins. It has far more TonB/ExbBD-type systems and MotAB-type systems for energizing outer membrane transport and motility than does E. coli. Analysis of probable substrate specificities of its transporters provides clues to its metabolic preferences. Interesting examples of gene fusions and of potentially overlapping genes were also noted. Our analyses provide a comprehensive, detailed appreciation of the transport capabilities of B. bacteriovorus. They should serve as a guide for functional experimental analyses. PMID:17706914

  12. A Gene Mutated in Nephronophthisis and Retinitis Pigmentosa Encodes a Novel Protein, Nephroretinin, Conserved in Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Edgar; Hoefele, Julia; Ruf, Rainer; Mueller, Adelheid M.; Hiller, Karl S.; Wolf, Matthias T. F.; Schuermann, Maria J.; Becker, Achim; Birkenhäger, Ralf; Sudbrak, Ralf; Hennies, Hans C.; Nürnberg, Peter; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2002-01-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) comprises a group of autosomal recessive cystic kidney diseases, which constitute the most frequent genetic cause for end-stage renal failure in children and young adults. The most prominent histologic feature of NPHP consists of development of renal fibrosis, which, in chronic renal failure of any origin, represents the pathogenic event correlated most strongly to loss of renal function. Four gene loci for NPHP have been mapped to chromosomes 2q13 (NPHP1), 9q22 (NPHP2), 3q22 (NPHP3), and 1p36 (NPHP4). At all four loci, linkage has also been demonstrated in families with the association of NPHP and retinitis pigmentosa, known as “Senior-Løken syndrome” (SLS). Identification of the gene for NPHP type 1 had revealed nephrocystin as a novel docking protein, providing new insights into mechanisms of cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling. We here report identification of the gene (NPHP4) causing NPHP type 4, by use of high-resolution haplotype analysis and by demonstration of nine likely loss-of-function mutations in six affected families. NPHP4 encodes a novel protein, nephroretinin, that is conserved in evolution—for example, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition, we demonstrate two loss-of-function mutations of NPHP4 in patients from two families with SLS. Thus, we have identified a novel gene with critical roles in renal tissue architecture and ophthalmic function. PMID:12205563

  13. TANG1, Encoding a Symplekin_C Domain-Contained Protein, Influences Sugar Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leiying; Shang, Li; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Limin; Xia, Yan; Smith, Caroline; Bevan, Michael W; Li, Yunhai; Jing, Hai-Chun

    2015-07-01

    Sugars not only serve as energy and cellular carbon skeleton but also function as signaling molecules regulating growth and development in plants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in sugar signaling pathways will provide more information for improving plant growth and development. Here, we describe a sugar-hypersensitive recessive mutant, tang1. Light-grown tang1 mutants have short roots and increased starch and anthocyanin contents when grown on high-sugar concentration medium. Dark-grown tang1 plants exhibit sugar-hypersensitive hypocotyl elongation and enhanced dark development. The tang1 mutants also show an enhanced response to abscisic acid but reduced response to ethylene. Thus, tang1 displays a range of alterations in sugar signaling-related responses. The TANG1 gene was isolated by a map-based cloning approach and encodes a previously uncharacterized unique protein with a predicted Symplekin tight-junction protein C terminus. Expression analysis indicates that TANG1 is ubiquitously expressed at moderate levels in different organs and throughout the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) life cycle; however, its expression is not affected by high-sugar treatment. Genetic analysis shows that PRL1 and TANG1 have additive effects on sugar-related responses. Furthermore, the mutation of TANG1 does not affect the expression of genes involved in known sugar signaling pathways. Taken together, these results suggest that TANG1, a unique gene, plays an important role in sugar responses in Arabidopsis. PMID:26002908

  14. The protein encoded by the rolB plant oncogene hydrolyses indole glucosides.

    PubMed Central

    Estruch, J J; Schell, J; Spena, A

    1991-01-01

    The rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes, whose expression stimulates the formation of roots by transformed plant tissues and other growth alterations in transgenic plants, codes for a beta-glucosidase able to hydrolyse indole-beta-glucosides. Indeed, we show that extracts of bacteria and/or plant tissue expressing the rolB protein hydrolyse indoxyl-beta-glucoside (plant indican). Because of the structural similarity between indoxyl-beta-glucoside and indole-3-acetyl-beta-glucoside (IAA-beta-glucoside), we propose that the physiological and developmental alterations in transgenic plants expressing the rolB gene could be the result of an increased intracellular auxin activity caused by the release of active auxins from inactive beta-glucosides. Thus two of the oncogenes carried by the T-DNA of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium rhizogenes (rolB and rolC) perturb plant growth and development by coding for beta-glucosidases with distinct specificities. Whereas the rolC beta-glucosidase releases cytokinins from their glucoside conjugates, the rolB encoded protein hydrolyses indole-beta-glucosides. The combined action of these two genes therefore is expected to modulate the intracellular concentration of two of the main growth factors active in plants. Images PMID:1915286

  15. Genomics and Physiology of a Marine Flavobacterium Encoding a Proteorhodopsin and a Xanthorhodopsin-Like Protein

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Tomasch, Jürgen; Martin, Madeleine; Jarek, Michael; González, José M.; Spring, Stefan; Rohlfs, Meike; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Cypionka, Heribert; Göker, Markus; Fiebig, Anne; Klein, Johannes; Goesmann, Alexander; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) photoheterotrophy in the marine flavobacterium Dokdonia sp. PRO95 has previously been investigated, showing no growth stimulation in the light at intermediate carbon concentrations. Here we report the genome sequence of strain PRO95 and compare it to two other PR encoding Dokdonia genomes: that of strain 4H-3-7-5 which shows the most similar genome, and that of strain MED134 which grows better in the light under oligotrophic conditions. Our genome analysis revealed that the PRO95 genome as well as the 4H-3-7-5 genome encode a protein related to xanthorhodopsins. The genomic environment and phylogenetic distribution of this gene suggest that it may have frequently been recruited by lateral gene transfer. Expression analyses by RT-PCR and direct mRNA-sequencing showed that both rhodopsins and the complete β-carotene pathway necessary for retinal production are transcribed in PRO95. Proton translocation measurements showed enhanced proton pump activity in response to light, supporting that one or both rhodopsins are functional. Genomic information and carbon source respiration data were used to develop a defined cultivation medium for PRO95, but reproducible growth always required small amounts of yeast extract. Although PRO95 contains and expresses two rhodopsin genes, light did not stimulate its growth as determined by cell numbers in a nutrient poor seawater medium that mimics its natural environment, confirming previous experiments at intermediate carbon concentrations. Starvation or stress conditions might be needed to observe the physiological effect of light induced energy acquisition. PMID:23526944

  16. Genomics and physiology of a marine flavobacterium encoding a proteorhodopsin and a xanthorhodopsin-like protein.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Tomasch, Jürgen; Martin, Madeleine; Jarek, Michael; González, José M; Spring, Stefan; Rohlfs, Meike; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Cypionka, Heribert; Göker, Markus; Fiebig, Anne; Klein, Johannes; Goesmann, Alexander; Fuhrman, Jed A; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) photoheterotrophy in the marine flavobacterium Dokdonia sp. PRO95 has previously been investigated, showing no growth stimulation in the light at intermediate carbon concentrations. Here we report the genome sequence of strain PRO95 and compare it to two other PR encoding Dokdonia genomes: that of strain 4H-3-7-5 which shows the most similar genome, and that of strain MED134 which grows better in the light under oligotrophic conditions. Our genome analysis revealed that the PRO95 genome as well as the 4H-3-7-5 genome encode a protein related to xanthorhodopsins. The genomic environment and phylogenetic distribution of this gene suggest that it may have frequently been recruited by lateral gene transfer. Expression analyses by RT-PCR and direct mRNA-sequencing showed that both rhodopsins and the complete β-carotene pathway necessary for retinal production are transcribed in PRO95. Proton translocation measurements showed enhanced proton pump activity in response to light, supporting that one or both rhodopsins are functional. Genomic information and carbon source respiration data were used to develop a defined cultivation medium for PRO95, but reproducible growth always required small amounts of yeast extract. Although PRO95 contains and expresses two rhodopsin genes, light did not stimulate its growth as determined by cell numbers in a nutrient poor seawater medium that mimics its natural environment, confirming previous experiments at intermediate carbon concentrations. Starvation or stress conditions might be needed to observe the physiological effect of light induced energy acquisition. PMID:23526944

  17. Non-human lnc-DC orthologs encode Wdnm1-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Johannes M.; Ballingall, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent publication in Science, Wang et al. found a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) expressed in human dendritic cells (DC), which they designated lnc-DC. Based on lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) experiments in human and murine systems, they concluded that lnc-DC is important in differentiation of monocytes into DC. However, Wang et al. did not mention that their so-called “mouse lnc-DC ortholog” gene was already designated “ Wdnm1-like” and is known to encode a small secreted protein.  We found that incapacitation of the Wdnm1-like open reading frame (ORF) is very rare among mammals, with all investigated primates except for hominids having an intact ORF. The null-hypothesis by Wang et al. therefore should have been that the human lnc-DC transcript might only represent a non-functional relatively young evolutionary remnant of a protein coding locus.  Whether this null-hypothesis can be rejected by the experimental data presented by Wang et al. depends in part on the possible off-target (immunogenic or otherwise) effects of their RNAi procedures, which were not exhaustive in regard to the number of analyzed RNAi sequences and control sequences.  If, however, the conclusions by Wang et al. on their human model are correct, and they may be, current knowledge regarding the Wdnm1-like locus suggests an intriguing combination of different functions mediated by transcript and protein in the maturation of several cell types at some point in evolution. We feel that the article by Wang et al. tends to be misleading without the discussion presented here. PMID:25309733

  18. Identification of a Gene in Staphylococcus xylosus Encoding a Novel Glucose Uptake Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fiegler, Heike; Bassias, Joannis; Jankovic, Ivana; Brückner, Reinhold

    1999-01-01

    By transposon Tn917 mutagenesis, two mutants of Staphylococcus xylosus were isolated that showed higher levels of β-galactosidase activity in the presence of glucose than the wild type. Both transposons integrated in a gene, designated glcU, encoding a protein involved in glucose uptake in S. xylosus, which is followed by a glucose dehydrogenase gene (gdh). Glucose-mediated repression of β-galactosidase, α-glucosidase, and β-glucuronidase activities was partially relieved in the mutant strains, while repression by sucrose or fructose remained as strong as in the wild type. In addition to the pleiotropic regulatory effect, integration of the transposons into glcU reduced glucose dehydrogenase activity, suggesting cotranscription of glcU and gdh. Insertional inactivation of the gdh gene and deletion of the glcU gene without affecting gdh expression showed that loss of GlcU function is exclusively responsible for the regulatory defect. Reduced glucose repression is most likely the consequence of impaired glucose uptake in the glcU mutant strains. With cloned glcU, an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in glucose transport could grow with glucose as sole carbon source, provided a functional glucose kinase was present. Therefore, glucose is internalized by glcU in nonphosphorylated form. A gene from Bacillus subtilis, ycxE, that is homologous to glcU, could substitute for glcU in the E. coli glucose growth experiments and restored glucose repression in the S. xylosus glcU mutants. Three more proteins with high levels of similarity to GlcU and YcxE are currently in the databases. It appears that these proteins constitute a novel family whose members are involved in bacterial transport processes. GlcU and YcxE are the first examples whose specificity, glucose, has been determined. PMID:10438764

  19. The fatty acid desaturase 3 gene encodes for different FADS3 protein isoforms in mammalian tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pédrono, Frédérique; Blanchard, Hélène; Kloareg, Maela; D'andréa, Sabine; Daval, Stéphanie; Rioux, Vincent; Legrand, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In 2000, Marquardt et al. (A. Marquardt, H. Stöhr, K. White, and B. H. F. Weber. 2000. cDNA cloning, genomic structure, and chromosomal localization of three members of the human fatty acid desaturase family. Genomics. 66: 176–183.) described the genomic structure of the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) cluster in humans. This cluster includes the FADS1 and FADS2 genes encoding, respectively, for the Δ5- and Δ6-desaturases involved in polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. A third gene, named FADS3, has recently been identified but no functional role has yet been attributed to the putative FADS3 protein. In this study, we investigated the FADS3 occurrence in rat tissues by using two specific polyclonal antibodies directed against the N-terminal and C-terminal ends of rat FADS3. Our results showed three potential protein isoforms of FADS3 (75 kDa, 51 kDa, and 37 kDa) present in a tissue-dependent manner. The occurrence of these FADS3 isoforms did not depend on the mRNA level determined by real-time PCR. In parallel, mouse tissues were also tested and showed the same three FADS3 isoforms but with a different tissue distribution. Finally, we reported the existence of FADS3 in human cells and tissues but different new isoforms were identified. To conclude, we showed in this study that FADS3 does exist under multiple protein isoforms depending on the mammalian tissues. These results will help further investigations to determine the physiological function of FADS3. PMID:19752397

  20. Genes Encoding the PR-4 Protein Wheatwin Are Developmentally Regulated in Wheat Grains and Respond to High Temperatures During Grainfill

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequences encoding three wheatwins, including a novel protein not identified previously, were found among expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from grains from the US bread wheat Butte 86 and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to detect transcripts specific for...

  1. Both Homo and Heterodimers of Marek's Disease Virus Encoded Meq Protein Contribute to Transformation of Lymphocytes in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) elicits T-cell lymphomas in chickens. The MDV genome encodes an oncoprotein, Meq, with similarity to the Jun/Fos family of proteins. Similar to Jun, the leucine zipper region of Meq allows the formation of homo- and heterodimers. We have previously shown that Meq homodime...

  2. Influence of energy supply on expression of genes encoding for lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in growing beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty crossbred beef steers were used to determine the effects metabolizable energy (ME) intake and of site and complexity of carbohydrate (CHO) infusion on expression of genes encoding lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in subcutaneous (SC), mesenteric (MES) and omental (OM) adipose. Treatm...

  3. Red-shifted fluorescent proteins mPlum and mRaspberry and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Tsien, Roger Y.; Wang, Lei

    2008-07-01

    Methods using somatic hypermutation (SHM) for producing polypeptide and nucleic acid variants, and nucleic acids encoding such polypeptide variants are disclosed. Such variants may have desired properties. Also disclosed are novel polypeptides, such as improved fluorescent proteins, produced by the novel methods, and nucleic acids, vectors, and host cells comprising such vectors.

  4. Expression of the Immediate-Early Gene-Encoded Protein Egr-1 ("zif268") during in Vitro Classical Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokin, Maxim; Keifer, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the immediate-early genes (IEGs) has been shown to be induced by activity-dependent synaptic plasticity or behavioral training and is thought to play an important role in long-term memory. In the present study, we examined the induction and expression of the IEG-encoded protein Egr-1 during an in vitro neural correlate of eyeblink…

  5. Identification and characterization of a multigene family encoding germin-like proteins in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germin-like proteins (GLPs) play diversified roles in plant development and defense response. Here, we identified 36 ESTs encoding GLPs from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). After assembly, these ESTs were integrated into eight unigenes, named AhGLP1 to AhGLP8, of which, three (AhGLP1-3) were comprised...

  6. Cloning and expression analysis of mouse Cclp1, a new gene encoding a coiled-coil-like protein.

    PubMed

    Noben-Trauth, K; Naggert, J K; Nishina, P M

    1997-05-30

    Here we describe the nucleotide sequence and expression pattern of a novel gene termed Coiled-coil-like protein 1 (Cclp1). A 2646bp open reading frame encodes a 882 amino acid protein with a predicted coiled-coil domain at the amino terminus. Cclp1 is expressed in a variety of adult tissues and during different stages of embryogenesis. The broad expression pattern suggests a general cellular function of CCLP1. PMID:9199242

  7. Translational Control of Host Gene Expression by a Cys-Motif Protein Encoded in a Bracovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunseong; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is a strategy that various viruses use to manipulate their hosts to suppress acute antiviral response. Polydnaviruses, a group of insect double-stranded DNA viruses symbiotic to some endoparasitoid wasps, are divided into two genera: ichnovirus (IV) and bracovirus (BV). In IV, some Cys-motif genes are known as host translation-inhibitory factors (HTIF). The genome of endoparasitoid wasp Cotesia plutellae contains a Cys-motif gene (Cp-TSP13) homologous to an HTIF known as teratocyte-secretory protein 14 (TSP14) of Microplitis croceipes. Cp-TSP13 consists of 129 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 13.987 kDa and pI value of 7.928. Genomic DNA region encoding its open reading frame has three introns. Cp-TSP13 possesses six conserved cysteine residues as other Cys-motif genes functioning as HTIF. Cp-TSP13 was expressed in Plutella xylostella larvae parasitized by C. plutellae. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) was purified and injected into non-parasitized P. xylostella that expressed Cp-TSP13. Cp-TSP13 was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector and used to infect Sf9 cells to transiently express Cp-TSP13. The synthesized Cp-TSP13 protein was detected in culture broth. An overlaying experiment showed that the purified Cp-TSP13 entered hemocytes. It was localized in the cytosol. Recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly inhibited protein synthesis of secretory proteins when it was added to in vitro cultured fat body. In addition, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 directly inhibited the translation of fat body mRNAs in in vitro translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Moreover, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly suppressed cellular immune responses by inhibiting hemocyte-spreading behavior. It also exhibited significant insecticidal activities by both injection and feeding routes. These results indicate that Cp-TSP13 is a viral HTIF. PMID:27598941

  8. Nuclear factor-κB regulates the expression of multiple genes encoding liver transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshisundaram; Suchy, Frederick J

    2016-04-15

    In this study we identified the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on the expression of genes encoding multiple liver transport proteins. Well-conserved NF-κB binding sites were found in the promoters of farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-target genes. An electromobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated the specific interaction between the NF-κB p65 protein and a (32)P-labeled BSEP NF-κB response element (NF-κBE). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis confirmed binding of NF-κB p65 to the BSEP locus but not the FXRE in vitro. NF-κB p65 overexpression in Huh-7 cells markedly repressed FXR/RXR transactivation of the BSEP, ABCG5/G8, MRP2, and FXR promoters, which was totally reversed by expression of the IκBα super-repressor. NF-κB interacted directly with FXR on coimmunoprecipitation, suggesting another level for the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on FXR-target genes. In vivo ChIP analysis with liver nuclei obtained from mice after 3 days of common bile duct ligation (BDL) or 6 h post-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection showed a markedly increased recruitment of NF-κB p65 to the Bsep promoter compared with controls. There was also increased recruitment of the corepressor silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC)3 and HDAC2 to the NF-κB sites. We also found that NF-κB p65 was recruited to NF-κB binding sites in the promoters of organic solute transporter, OSTα and OSTβ, and unexpectedly activated rather than repressed gene expression. In mouse liver after BDL NF-κB recruitment to Ostα and Ostβ promoters was associated with increased binding of the potent coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 to the NF-κBE and depletion of CBP/p300 at the FXR element. Overall, these studies demonstrate a novel role for NF-κB in adaptation to obstructive and LPS-induced cholestasis acting through recruitment to specific NF-κB binding sites in

  9. Systematic Global Analysis of Genes Encoding Protein Phosphatases in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K.; Dolan, Stephen K.; Fernanda dos Reis, Thaila; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Alowni, Raneem; Jones, Gary W.; Doyle, Sean; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo H.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that causes several invasive and noninvasive diseases named aspergillosis. This disease is generally regarded as multifactorial, considering that several pathogenicity determinants are present during the establishment of this illness. It is necessary to obtain an increased knowledge of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes. Protein phosphatases are essential to several signal transduction pathways. We identified 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit-encoding genes in A. fumigatus, of which we were able to construct 24 viable deletion mutants. The role of nine phosphatase mutants in the HOG (high osmolarity glycerol response) pathway was evaluated by measuring phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. We were also able to identify 11 phosphatases involved in iron assimilation, six that are related to gliotoxin resistance, and three implicated in gliotoxin production. These results present the creation of a fundamental resource for the study of signaling in A. fumigatus and its implications in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in this important pathogen. PMID:25943523

  10. Leafy head2, which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein, regulates shoot development of rice.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guo Sheng; Hu, Xing Ming; Jiao, Yong Qing; Yu, Yan Chun; Chu, Cheng Cai; Li, Jia Yang; Qian, Qian; Wang, Yong Hong

    2006-03-01

    During vegetative development, higher plants continuously form new leaves in regular spatial and temporal patterns. Mutants with abnormal leaf developmental patterns not only provide a great insight into understanding the regulatory mechanism of plant architecture, but also enrich the ways to its modification by which crop yield could be improved. Here, we reported the characterization of the rice leafy-head2 (lhd2) mutant that exhibits shortened plastochron, dwarfism, reduced tiller number, and failure of phase transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. Anatomical and histological study revealed that the rapid emergence of leaves in lhd2 was resulted from the rapid initiation of leaf primordia whereas the reduced tiller number was a consequence of the suppression of the tiller bud outgrowth. The molecular and genetic analysis showed that LHD2 encodes a putative RNA binding protein with 67% similarity to maize TE1. Comparison of genome-scale expression profiles between wild-type and lhd2 plants suggested that LHD2 may regulate rice shoot development through KNOX and hormone-related genes. The similar phenotypes caused by LHD2 mutation and the conserved expression pattern of LHD2 indicated a conserved mechanism in controlling the temporal leaf initiation in grass. PMID:16541125

  11. Multiplexed visualization of dynamic signaling networks using genetically encoded fluorescent protein-based biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Depry, Charlene; Mehta, Sohum; Zhang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Cells rely on a complex, interconnected network of signaling pathways to sense and interpret changes in their extracellular environment. The development of genetically encoded fluorescent protein (FP)-based biosensors has made it possible for researchers to directly observe and characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics of these intracellular signaling pathways in living cells. However, detailed information regarding the precise temporal and spatial relationships between intersecting pathways is often lost when individual signaling events are monitored in isolation. As the development of biosensor technology continues to advance, it is becoming increasingly feasible to image multiple FP-based biosensors concurrently, permitting greater insights into the intricate coordination of intracellular signaling networks by enabling parallel monitoring of distinct signaling events within the same cell. In this review, we discuss several strategies for multiplexed imaging of FP-based biosensors, while also underscoring some of the challenges associated with these techniques and highlighting additional avenues that could lead to further improvements in parallel monitoring of intracellular signaling events. PMID:23138230

  12. Systematic Global Analysis of Genes Encoding Protein Phosphatases in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K; Dolan, Stephen K; Fernanda Dos Reis, Thaila; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Alves de Castro, Patrícia; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Alowni, Raneem; Jones, Gary W; Doyle, Sean; Brown, Neil Andrew; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2015-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that causes several invasive and noninvasive diseases named aspergillosis. This disease is generally regarded as multifactorial, considering that several pathogenicity determinants are present during the establishment of this illness. It is necessary to obtain an increased knowledge of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes. Protein phosphatases are essential to several signal transduction pathways. We identified 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit-encoding genes in A. fumigatus, of which we were able to construct 24 viable deletion mutants. The role of nine phosphatase mutants in the HOG (high osmolarity glycerol response) pathway was evaluated by measuring phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. We were also able to identify 11 phosphatases involved in iron assimilation, six that are related to gliotoxin resistance, and three implicated in gliotoxin production. These results present the creation of a fundamental resource for the study of signaling in A. fumigatus and its implications in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in this important pathogen. PMID:25943523

  13. Relationships between protein-encoding gene abundance and corresponding process are commonly assumed yet rarely observed.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Jennifer D; Hall, Edward K; Lennon, Jay T; Evans, Sarah E; Waldrop, Mark P; Cotner, James B; Nemergut, Diana R; Graham, Emily B; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2015-08-01

    For any enzyme-catalyzed reaction to occur, the corresponding protein-encoding genes and transcripts are necessary prerequisites. Thus, a positive relationship between the abundance of gene or transcripts and corresponding process rates is often assumed. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationships between gene and/or transcript abundances and corresponding process rates. We identified 415 studies that quantified the abundance of genes or transcripts for enzymes involved in carbon or nitrogen cycling. However, in only 59 of these manuscripts did the authors report both gene or transcript abundance and rates of the appropriate process. We found that within studies there was a significant but weak positive relationship between gene abundance and the corresponding process. Correlations were not strengthened by accounting for habitat type, differences among genes or reaction products versus reactants, suggesting that other ecological and methodological factors may affect the strength of this relationship. Our findings highlight the need for fundamental research on the factors that control transcription, translation and enzyme function in natural systems to better link genomic and transcriptomic data to ecosystem processes. PMID:25535936

  14. Enhancement of initial equivalency for protein structure alignment based on encoded local structures.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kenneth; Wang, Jui-Chih; Chen, Cheng-Wei; Chuang, Cheng-Long; Tsai, Kun-Nan; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Most alignment algorithms find an initial equivalent residue pair followed by an iterative optimization process to explore better near-optimal alignments in the surrounding solution space of the initial alignment. It plays a decisive role in determining the alignment quality since a poor initial alignment may make the final alignment trapped in an undesirable local optimum even with an iterative optimization. We proposed a vector-based alignment algorithm with a new initial alignment approach accounting for local structure features called MIRAGE-align. The new idea is to enhance the quality of the initial alignment based on encoded local structural alphabets to identify the protein structure pair whose sequence identity falls in or below twilight zone. The statistical analysis of alignment quality based on Match Index (MI) and computation time demonstrated that MIRAGE-align algorithm outperformed four previously published algorithms, i.e., the residue-based algorithm (CE), the vector-based algorithm (SSM), TM-align, and Fr-TM-align. MIRAGE-align yields a better estimate of initial solution to enhance the quality of initial alignment and enable the employment of a non-iterative optimization process to achieve a better alignment. PMID:22717522

  15. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Julian; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Langlois, Mélanie; May, Patrick; Huneau, Clément; Becker, Felicitas; Muhle, Hiltrud; Suls, Arvid; Lemke, Johannes R; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Thiele, Holger; Konrad, Kathryn; Kawalia, Amit; Toliat, Mohammad R; Sander, Thomas; Rüschendorf, Franz; Caliebe, Almuth; Nagel, Inga; Kohl, Bernard; Kecskés, Angela; Jacmin, Maxime; Hardies, Katia; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Riesch, Erik; Dorn, Thomas; Brilstra, Eva H; Baulac, Stephanie; Møller, Rikke S; Hjalgrim, Helle; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehman-Horn, Frank; Roach, Jared C; Glusman, Gustavo; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David J; Martin, Benoit; de Witte, Peter A M; Biskup, Saskia; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Balling, Rudi; Nürnberg, Peter; Crawford, Alexander D; Esguerra, Camila V; Weber, Yvonne G; Lerche, Holger

    2014-12-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children and have a strong genetic component. Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding syntaxin-1B, that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations and a de novo microdeletion encompassing STX1B were then identified in 449 familial or sporadic cases. Video and local field potential analyses of zebrafish larvae with antisense knockdown of stx1b showed seizure-like behavior and epileptiform discharges that were highly sensitive to increased temperature. Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes. PMID:25362483

  16. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Jiwon; Saier, Milton H.

    2012-01-01

    The co-emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial strains and the HIV pandemic has made tuberculosis a leading public health threat. The causative agent is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu), a facultative intracellular parasite. Mycobacterium leprae (Mle), a related organism that causes leprosy, is an obligate intracellular parasite. Given that different transporters are required for bacterial growth and persistence under a variety of growth conditions, we conducted comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of these two organisms. A minimal set of genes required for intracellular and extracellular life were identified. Drug efflux systems utilizing primary active transport mechanisms have been preferentially retained in Mle and still others preferentially lost. Transporters associated with environmental adaptation found in Mtu were mostly lost in Mle. These findings provide starting points for experimental studies that may elucidate the dependencies of pathogenesis on transport for these two pathogenic mycobacteria. They also lead to suggestions regarding transporters that function in intra- versus extra-cellular growth. PMID:22179038

  17. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  18. Relationships between protein-encoding gene abundance and corresponding process are commonly assumed yet rarely observed

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Jennifer D; Hall, Edward K; Lennon, Jay T; Evans, Sarah E; Waldrop, Mark P; Cotner, James B; Nemergut, Diana R; Graham, Emily B; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    For any enzyme-catalyzed reaction to occur, the corresponding protein-encoding genes and transcripts are necessary prerequisites. Thus, a positive relationship between the abundance of gene or transcripts and corresponding process rates is often assumed. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationships between gene and/or transcript abundances and corresponding process rates. We identified 415 studies that quantified the abundance of genes or transcripts for enzymes involved in carbon or nitrogen cycling. However, in only 59 of these manuscripts did the authors report both gene or transcript abundance and rates of the appropriate process. We found that within studies there was a significant but weak positive relationship between gene abundance and the corresponding process. Correlations were not strengthened by accounting for habitat type, differences among genes or reaction products versus reactants, suggesting that other ecological and methodological factors may affect the strength of this relationship. Our findings highlight the need for fundamental research on the factors that control transcription, translation and enzyme function in natural systems to better link genomic and transcriptomic data to ecosystem processes. PMID:25535936

  19. Mutations in OTOGL, Encoding the Inner Ear Protein Otogelin-like, Cause Moderate Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Yariz, Kemal O.; Duman, Duygu; Seco, Celia Zazo; Dallman, Julia; Huang, Mingqian; Peters, Theo A.; Sirmaci, Asli; Lu, Na; Schraders, Margit; Skromne, Isaac; Oostrik, Jaap; Diaz-Horta, Oscar; Young, Juan I.; Tokgoz-Yilmaz, Suna; Konukseven, Ozlem; Shahin, Hashem; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Kanaan, Moien; Oonk, Anne M.M.; Edwards, Yvonne J.K.; Li, Huawei; Atalay, Semra; Blanton, Susan; DeSmidt, Alexandra A.; Liu, Xue-Zhong; Pennings, Ronald J.E.; Lu, Zhongmin; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Kremer, Hannie; Tekin, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Here we present OTOGL mutations, a homozygous one base pair deletion (c.1430 delT) causing a frameshift (p.Val477Glufs∗25) in a large consanguineous family and two compound heterozygous mutations, c.547C>T (p.Arg183∗) and c.5238+5G>A, in a nonconsanguineous family with moderate nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. OTOGL maps to the DFNB84 locus at 12q21.31 and encodes otogelin-like, which has structural similarities to the epithelial-secreted mucin protein family. We demonstrate that Otogl is expressed in the inner ear of vertebrates with a transcription level that is high in embryonic, lower in neonatal, and much lower in adult stages. Otogelin-like is localized to the acellular membranes of the cochlea and the vestibular system and to a variety of inner ear cells located underneath these membranes. Knocking down of otogl with morpholinos in zebrafish leads to sensorineural hearing loss and anatomical changes in the inner ear, supporting that otogelin-like is essential for normal inner ear function. We propose that OTOGL mutations affect the production and/or function of acellular structures of the inner ear, which ultimately leads to sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:23122586

  20. Identification and analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae copper homeostasis gene encoding a homeodomain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, S A; Tamai, K T; Kosman, D J; Thiele, D J

    1994-01-01

    Yeast metallothionein, encoded by the CUP1 gene, and its copper-dependent transcriptional activator ACE1 play a key role in mediating copper resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant of a yeast strain in which CUP1 and ACE1 were deleted, we isolated a gene, designated CUP9, which permits yeast cells to grow at high concentrations of environmental copper, most notably when lactate is the sole carbon source. Disruption of CUP9, which is located on chromosome XVI, caused a loss of copper resistance in strains which possessed CUP1 and ACE1, as well as in the cup1 ace1 deletion strain. Measurement of intracellular copper levels of the wild-type and cup9-1 mutant demonstrated that total intracellular copper concentrations were unaffected by CUP9. CUP9 mRNA levels were, however, down regulated by copper when yeast cells were grown with glucose but not with lactate or glycerol-ethanol as the sole carbon source. This down regulation was independent of the copper metalloregulatory transcription factor ACE1. The DNA sequence of CUP9 predicts an open reading frame of 306 amino acids in which a 55-amino-acid sequence showed 47% identity with the homeobox domain of the human proto-oncogene PBX1, suggesting that CUP9 is a DNA-binding protein which regulates the expression of important copper homeostatic genes. Images PMID:7969120

  1. The HTLV-1-encoded protein HBZ directly inhibits the acetyl transferase activity of p300/CBP

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Torsten; Wright, Diana G.; Polakowski, Nicholas; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Lemasson, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The homologous cellular coactivators p300 and CBP contain intrinsic lysine acetyl transferase (termed HAT) activity. This activity is responsible for acetylation of several sites on the histones as well as modification of transcription factors. In a previous study, we found that HBZ, encoded by the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), binds to multiple domains of p300/CBP, including the HAT domain. In this study, we found that HBZ inhibits the HAT activity of p300/CBP through the bZIP domain of the viral protein. This effect correlated with a reduction of H3K18 acetylation, a specific target of p300/CBP, in cells expressing HBZ. Interestingly, lower levels of H3K18 acetylation were detected in HTLV-1 infected cells compared to non-infected cells. The inhibitory effect of HBZ was not limited to histones, as HBZ also inhibited acetylation of the NF-κB subunit, p65, and the tumor suppressor, p53. Recent studies reported that mutations in the HAT domain of p300/CBP that cause a defect in acetylation are found in certain types of leukemia. These observations suggest that inhibition of the HAT activity by HBZ is important for the development of adult T-cell leukemia associated with HTLV-1 infection. PMID:22434882

  2. Heterogenic expression of genes encoding secreted proteins at the periphery of Aspergillus niger colonies.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Arman; de Bekker, Charissa; Ossin, Adam; Ohm, Robin A; de Vries, Ronald P; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-01-01

    Colonization of a substrate by fungi starts with the invasion of exploring hyphae. These hyphae secrete enzymes that degrade the organic material into small molecules that can be taken up by the fungus to serve as nutrients. We previously showed that only part of the exploring hyphae of Aspergillus niger highly express the glucoamylase gene glaA. This was an unexpected finding since all exploring hyphae are exposed to the same environmental conditions. Using GFP as a reporter, we here demonstrate that the acid amylase gene aamA, the α-glucuronidase gene aguA, and the feruloyl esterase gene faeA of A. niger are also subject to heterogenic expression within the exploring mycelium. Coexpression studies using GFP and dTomato as reporters showed that hyphae that highly express one of these genes also highly express the other genes encoding secreted proteins. Moreover, these hyphae also highly express the amylolytic regulatory gene amyR, and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene gpdA. In situ hybridization demonstrated that the high expressers are characterized by a high 18S rRNA content. Taken together, it is concluded that two subpopulations of hyphae can be distinguished within the exploring mycelium of A. niger. The experimental data indicate that these subpopulations differ in their transcriptional and translational activity. PMID:20722697

  3. A human papilloma virus type 11 transcript encoding an E1--E4 protein.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, M; Hirochika, R; Broker, T R; Chow, L T

    1987-08-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) associated with a genital wart (condyloma acuminatum) was determined to be type 11. The majority of the viral DNA molecules were monomeric circles present in the cells at high copy number, as demonstrated by one- and two-dimensional agarose gell electrophoretic separation followed by Southern blot analysis. A cDNA library in phage lambda gt11 was constructed from poly(A)-selected mRNA recovered from the tissue. Recombinant clones corresponding to the most abundant 1.2-kb viral mRNA species detected by Northern blot hybridization and by electron microscopic analysis of R loops were isolated and their nucleotide sequence was determined. Comparison to the prototype HPV-11 DNA sequence revealed that this message consisted of two exons. The promotor-proximal exon spanned nucleotides 716 through 847 and the distal exon included nucleotides 3325 through 4390 or 4392. The mRNAs were alternatively polyadenylated after either of these latter two sites, in both cases following a G and preceding a U residue. Fourteen or sixteen bases upstream from the poly(A) was the hexanucleotide AGUAAA, which apparently serves as the signal for cleavage and polyadenylation of the nascent message. The splice donor and acceptor sites conformed to the usual /GU. . .AG/pattern. The exons joined open reading frame (ORF) E1, which contributed the initiation codon and four additional triplets, to ORF E4, which specified 85 amino acids to encode a protein of 10,022 Da. The cDNA also contained the ORFs E5a and E5b toward the 3' end. The complete sequence of the cDNA revealed three single-base changes from the prototype HPV-11, two resulting in altered amino acids in E4. Neither affects the coding potential of the overlapping E2 ORF. The function of the E1--E4 protein is unknown. PMID:2887066

  4. Expression of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded proteins in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fåhraeus, R; Fu, H L; Ernberg, I; Finke, J; Rowe, M; Klein, G; Falk, K; Nilsson, E; Yadav, M; Busson, P

    1988-09-15

    Expression of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded nuclear antigens (EBNA 1 to 6) and membrane-associated protein (LMP) was investigated by immunoblotting in 83 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) biopsies and 25 other tumor and normal tissue specimens from the head and neck region. Fifty-eight of the 83 NPC biopsies were large enough to yield parallel data on virus DNA and viral expression. All 16 cases of clinically diagnosed and histologically confirmed NPCs from North Africa contained EBV DNA and expressed EBNA-1. Of 31 clinically diagnosed NPCs from China, 29 contained EBV DNA and 25 of these expressed EBNA-1. One control tissue biopsy from the oropharynx of NPC patients contained EBV DNA, but none expressed EBNA-1. The latent membrane protein (LMP) was detected in 22/31 of the Chinese and in 10/16 of the North African NPC biopsies. None of the NPC biopsies or control tissues expressed detectable amounts of EBNA 2 or any of the other 4 nuclear antigens which are invariably expressed in EBV-transformed B cells. A smaller number of tumors from Malaysia and East Africa exhibited a similar pattern of expression. EBV was rescued from a nude-mouse-passaged North African NPC tumor by co-cultivation of the tumor cells with umbilical cord blood lymphocytes. The tumor expressed EBNA 1 and LMP, but not EBNA 2 or the other 4 EBNAs. The resulting LCLs expressed all 6 nuclear antigens, EBNA 1 to 6 and LMP. Our data suggest that expression of the EBV genome is regulated in a tissue-specific fashion. PMID:2843473

  5. Diverse circular replication-associated protein encoding viruses circulating in invertebrates within a lake ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Dayaram, Anisha; Galatowitsch, Mark L; Argüello-Astorga, Gerardo R; van Bysterveldt, Katherine; Kraberger, Simona; Stainton, Daisy; Harding, Jon S; Roumagnac, Philippe; Martin, Darren P; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-04-01

    Over the last five years next-generation sequencing has become a cost effective and efficient method for identifying known and unknown microorganisms. Access to this technique has dramatically changed the field of virology, enabling a wide range of environmental viral metagenome studies to be undertaken of organisms and environmental samples from polar to tropical regions. These studies have led to the discovery of hundreds of highly divergent single stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus-like sequences encoding replication-associated proteins. Yet, few studies have explored how viruses might be shared in an ecosystem through feeding relationships. Here we identify 169 circular molecules (160 CRESS DNA molecules, nine circular molecules) recovered from a New Zealand freshwater lake, that we have tentatively classified into 51 putatively novel species and five previously described species (DflaCV-3, -5, -6, -8, -10). The CRESS DNA viruses identified in this study were recovered from molluscs (Echyridella menzeisii, Musculium novaezelandiae, Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Physella acuta) and insect larvae (Procordulia grayi, Xanthocnemis zealandica, and Chironomus zealandicus) collected from Lake Sarah, as well as from the lake water and benthic sediments. Extensive diversity was observed across most CRESS DNA molecules recovered. The putative capsid protein of one viral species was found to be most similar to those of members of the Tombusviridae family, thus expanding the number of known RNA-DNA hybrid viruses in nature. We noted a strong association between the CRESS DNA viruses and circular molecules identified in the water and browser organisms (C. zealandicus, P. antipodarum and P. acuta), and between water sediments and undefended prey species (C. zealandicus). However, we were unable to find any significant correlation of viral assemblages to the potential feeding relationships of the host aquatic invertebrates. PMID:26873065

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis efpA encodes an efflux protein of the QacA transporter family.

    PubMed Central

    Doran, J L; Pang, Y; Mdluli, K E; Moran, A J; Victor, T C; Stokes, R W; Mahenthiralingam, E; Kreiswirth, B N; Butt, J L; Baron, G S; Treit, J D; Kerr, V J; Van Helden, P D; Roberts, M C; Nano, F E

    1997-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv efpA gene encodes a putative efflux protein, EfpA, of 55,670 Da. The deduced EfpA protein was similar in secondary structure to Pur8, MmrA, TcmA, LfrA, EmrB, and other members of the QacA transporter family (QacA TF) which mediate antibiotic and chemical resistance in bacteria and yeast. The predicted EfpA sequence possessed all transporter motifs characteristic of the QacA TF, including those associated with proton-antiport function and the motif considered to be specific to exporters. The 1,590-bp efpA open reading frame was G+C rich (65%), whereas the 40-bp region immediately upstream had an A+T bias (35% G+C). Reverse transcriptase-PCR assays indicated that efpA was expressed in vitro and in situ. Putative promoter sequences were partially overlapped by the A+T-rich region and by a region capable of forming alternative secondary structures indicative of transcriptional regulation in analogous systems. PCR single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis demonstrated that these upstream flanking sequences and the 231-bp, 5' coding region are highly conserved among both drug-sensitive and multiply-drug-resistant isolates of M. tuberculosis. The efpA gene was present in the slow-growing human pathogens M. tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium bovis and in the opportunistic human pathogens Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellular. However, efpA was not present in 17 other opportunistically pathogenic or nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. PMID:9008277

  7. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end of the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.

  8. Site-specific chemical modification of recombinant proteins produced in mammalian cells by using the genetically encoded aldehyde tag.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Shui, Wenqing; Carlson, Brian L; Hu, Nancy; Rabuka, David; Lee, Julia; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2009-03-01

    The properties of therapeutic proteins can be enhanced by chemical modification. Methods for site-specific protein conjugation are critical to such efforts. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant proteins expressed in mammalian cells can be site-specifically modified by using a genetically encoded aldehyde tag. We introduced the peptide sequence recognized by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE), which can be as short as 6 residues, into heterologous proteins expressed in mammalian cells. Cotranslational modification of the proteins by FGE produced products bearing a unique aldehyde group. Proteins bearing this "aldehyde tag" were chemically modified by selective reaction with hydrazide- or aminooxy-functionalized reagents. We applied the technique to site-specific modification of monoclonal antibodies, the fastest growing class of biopharmaceuticals, as well as membrane-associated and cytosolic proteins expressed in mammalian cells. PMID:19202059

  9. Ribosomal protein L10 is encoded in the mitochondrial genome of many land plants and green algae

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genomes of plants generally encode 30-40 identified protein-coding genes and a large number of lineage-specific ORFs. The lack of wide conservation for most ORFs suggests they are unlikely to be functional. However, an ORF, termed orf-bryo1, was recently found to be conserved among bryophytes suggesting that it might indeed encode a functional mitochondrial protein. Results From a broad survey of land plants, we have found that the orf-bryo1 gene is also conserved in the mitochondria of vascular plants and charophycean green algae. This gene is actively transcribed and RNA edited in many flowering plants. Comparative sequence analysis and distribution of editing suggests that it encodes ribosomal protein L10 of the large subunit of the ribosome. In several lineages, such as crucifers and grasses, where the rpl10 gene has been lost from the mitochondrion, we suggest that a copy of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast-derived rpl10 gene may serve as a functional replacement. Conclusion Despite the fact that there are now over 20 mitochondrial genome sequences for land plants and green algae, this gene has remained unidentified and largely undetected until now because of the unlikely coincidence that most of the earlier sequences were from the few lineages that lack the intact gene. These results illustrate the power of comparative sequencing to identify novel genomic features. PMID:19917118

  10. Identification and characterization of the gltK gene encoding a membrane-associated glucose transport protein of pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Adewoye, L O; Worobec, E A

    2000-08-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprB gene encodes the carbohydrate-selective OprB porin, which translocates substrate molecules across the outer membrane to the periplasmic glucose-binding protein. We identified and cloned two open reading frames (ORFs) flanking the oprB gene but are not in operonic arrangement with the oprB gene. The downstream ORF encodes a putative polypeptide homologous to members of a family of transcriptional repressors, whereas the oprB gene is preceded by an ORF encoding a putative product, which exhibits strong homology to several carbohydrate transport ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. The genomic copy of the upstream ORF was mutagenized by homologous recombination. Analysis of the deletion mutant in comparison with the wild type revealed a significant reduction in [14C] glucose transport activity in the mutant strain, suggesting that this ORF likely encodes the inner membrane component of the glucose ABC transporter. It is thus designated gltK gene to reflect its homology to the Pseudomona fluorescens mtlK and its involvement in the high-affinity glucose transport system. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the P. aeruginosa gltK gene product is a member of the MalK subfamily of ABC proteins. PMID:10940570

  11. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    PubMed

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function. PMID:15755682

  12. Cyanobacterial flv4-2 Operon-Encoded Proteins Optimize Light Harvesting and Charge Separation in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Chukhutsina, Volha; Bersanini, Luca; Aro, Eva-Mari; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) complexes drive the water-splitting reaction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. However, too much light can damage and disrupt PSII. In cyanobacteria, the flv4-2 operon encodes three proteins (Flv2, Flv4, and Sll0218), which safeguard PSII activity under air-level CO2 and in high light conditions. However, the exact mechanism of action of these proteins has not been clarified yet. We demonstrate that the PSII electron transfer properties are influenced by the flv4-2 operon-encoded proteins. Accelerated secondary charge separation kinetics was observed upon expression/overexpression of the flv4-2 operon. This is likely induced by docking of the Flv2/Flv4 heterodimer in the vicinity of the QB pocket of PSII, which, in turn, increases the QB redox potential and consequently stabilizes forward electron transfer. The alternative electron transfer route constituted by Flv2/Flv4 sequesters electrons from QB(-) guaranteeing the dissipation of excess excitation energy in PSII under stressful conditions. In addition, we demonstrate that in the absence of the flv4-2 operon-encoded proteins, about 20% of the phycobilisome antenna becomes detached from the reaction centers, thus decreasing light harvesting. Phycobilisome detachment is a consequence of a decreased relative content of PSII dimers, a feature observed in the absence of the Sll0218 protein. PMID:25704162

  13. Motif analysis unveils the possible co-regulation of chloroplast genes and nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Ding, Jun; Daniell, Henry; Hu, Haiyan; Li, Xiaoman

    2012-09-01

    Chloroplasts play critical roles in land plant cells. Despite their importance and the availability of at least 200 sequenced chloroplast genomes, the number of known DNA regulatory sequences in chloroplast genomes are limited. In this paper, we designed computational methods to systematically study putative DNA regulatory sequences in intergenic regions near chloroplast genes in seven plant species and in promoter sequences of nuclear genes in Arabidopsis and rice. We found that -35/-10 elements alone cannot explain the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes. We also concluded that there are unlikely motifs shared by intergenic sequences of most of chloroplast genes, indicating that these genes are regulated differently. Finally and surprisingly, we found five conserved motifs, each of which occurs in no more than six chloroplast intergenic sequences, are significantly shared by promoters of nuclear-genes encoding chloroplast proteins. By integrating information from gene function annotation, protein subcellular localization analyses, protein-protein interaction data, and gene expression data, we further showed support of the functionality of these conserved motifs. Our study implies the existence of unknown nuclear-encoded transcription factors that regulate both chloroplast genes and nuclear genes encoding chloroplast protein, which sheds light on the understanding of the transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes. PMID:22733202

  14. Plasminogen activator/coagulase gene of Yersinia pestis is responsible for degradation of plasmid-encoded outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sodeinde, O A; Sample, A K; Brubaker, R R; Goguen, J D

    1988-01-01

    The related family of virulence plasmids found in the three major pathogens of the genus Yersinia all have the ability to encode a set of outer membrane proteins. In Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis, these proteins are major constituents of the outer membrane when their synthesis is fully induced. In contrast, they have been difficult to detect in Y. pestis. It has recently been established that Y. pestis does synthesize these proteins, but that they are rapidly degraded due to some activity determined by the 9.5-kilobase plasmid commonly found in Y. pestis strains. We show that mutations in the pla gene of this plasmid, which encodes both the plasminogen activator and coagulase activities, blocked this degradation. A cloned 1.4-kilobase DNA fragment carrying pla was also sufficient to cause degradation in the absence of the 9.5-kilobase plasmid. Images PMID:2843471

  15. The Fungus Tremella mesenterica Encodes the Longest Metallothionein Currently Known: Gene, Protein and Metal Binding Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiyu; Calatayud, Sara; Palacios, Òscar; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Sílvia

    2016-01-01

    Fungal Cu-thioneins, and among them, the paradigmatic Neurospora crassa metallothionein (MT) (26 residues), were once considered as the shortest MTs -the ubiquitous, versatile metal-binding proteins- among all organisms, and thus representatives of their primeval forms. Nowadays, fungal MTs of diverse lengths and sequence features are known, following the huge heterogeneity of the Kingdom of Fungi. At the opposite end of N. crassa MT, the recently reported Cryptococcus neoformans CnMT1 and CnMT2 (122 and 186 aa) constitute the longest reported fungal MTs, having been identified as virulence factors of this pathogen. CnMTs are high-capacity Cu-thioneins that appear to be built by tandem amplification of a basic unit, a 7-Cys segment homologous to N. crassa MT. Here, we report the in silico, in vivo and in vitro study of a still longer fungal MT, belonging to Tremella mesenterica (TmMT), a saprophytic ascomycete. The TmMT gene has 10 exons, and it yields a 779-bp mature transcript that encodes a 257 residue-long protein. This MT is also built by repeated fragments, but of variable number of Cys: six units of the 7-Cys building blocks-CXCX3CSCPPGXCXCAXCP-, two fragments of six Cys, plus three Cys at the N-terminus. TmMT metal binding abilities have been analyzed through the spectrophotometric and spectrometric characterization of its recombinant Zn-, Cd- and Cu-complexes. Results allow it to be unambiguous classified as a Cu-thionein, also of extraordinary coordinating capacity. According to this feature, when the TmMT cDNA is expressed in MT-devoid yeast cells, it is capable of restoring a high Cu tolerance level. Since it is not obvious that T. mesenterica shares the same physiological needs for a high capacity Cu-binding protein with C. neoformans, the existence of this peculiar MT might be better explained on the basis of a possible role in Cu-handling for the Cu-enzymes responsible in lignin degradation pathways. PMID:26882011

  16. The pim-1 oncogene encodes two related protein-serine/threonine kinases by alternative initiation at AUG and CUG.

    PubMed Central

    Saris, C J; Domen, J; Berns, A

    1991-01-01

    The pim-1 gene is frequently found activated by proviral insertion in murine T cell lymphomas. Overexpression of pim-1 in lymphoid cells by transgenesis formally proved its oncogenic potential. The pim-1 cDNA sequence predicts that both murine and human pim-1 encode a 34 kd protein with homology to protein kinases. In this study, we show that the murine pim-1 gene encodes a 44 kd protein in addition to the predicted 34 kd protein. The 44 kd protein is an amino-terminal extension of the 34 kd protein and is synthesized by alternative translation initiation at an upstream CUG codon. Contrary to previous findings by others, we provide evidence that both murine and human pim-1 gene products are protein-serine/threonine kinases. Murine 44 kd and 34 kd pim-1 proteins exhibit comparable in vitro kinase activity and are both mainly cytoplasmic, but they differ in in vivo association state and half-life. Images PMID:1825810

  17. Identification of a melanosomal membrane protein encoded by the pink-eyed dilution (type II oculocutaneous albinism) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rosemblat, S; Durham-Pierre, D; Gardner, J M; Nakatsu, Y; Brilliant, M H; Orlow, S J

    1994-01-01

    The pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in the mouse is critical to melanogenesis; mutations in the homologous locus in humans, P, are a cause of type II oculocutaneous albinism. Although a cDNA encoded by the p gene has recently been identified, nothing is known about the protein product of this gene. To characterize the protein encoded by the p gene, we performed immunoblot analysis of extracts of melanocytes cultured from wild-type mice with an antiserum from rabbits immunized with a peptide corresponding to amino acids 285-298 of the predicted protein product of the murine p gene. This antiserum recognized a 110-kDa protein. The protein was absent from extracts of melanocytes cultured from mice with two mutations (pcp and p) in which transcripts of the p gene are absent or greatly reduced. Introduction of the cDNA for the p gene into pcp melanocytes by electroporation resulted in expression of the 3.3-kb mRNA and the 110-kDa protein. Upon subcellular fractionation of cultured melanocytes, the 110-kDa protein was found to be present in melanosomes but absent from the vesicular fraction; phase separation performed with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 confirmed the predicted hydrophobic nature of the protein. These results demonstrate that the p gene encodes a 110-kDa integral melanosomal membrane protein and establish a framework by which mutations at this locus, which diminish pigmentation, can be analyzed at the cellular and biochemical levels. Images PMID:7991586

  18. Y3IP1, a Nucleus-Encoded Thylakoid Protein, Cooperates with the Plastid-Encoded Ycf3 Protein in Photosystem I Assembly of Tobacco and Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Albus, Christin A.; Ruf, Stephanie; Schöttler, Mark Aurel; Lein, Wolfgang; Kehr, Julia; Bock, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The intricate assembly of photosystem I (PSI), a large multiprotein complex in the thylakoid membrane, depends on auxiliary protein factors. One of the essential assembly factors for PSI is encoded by ycf3 (hypothetical chloroplast reading frame number 3) in the chloroplast genome of algae and higher plants. To identify novel factors involved in PSI assembly, we constructed an epitope-tagged version of ycf3 from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and introduced it into the tobacco chloroplast genome by genetic transformation. Immunoaffinity purification of Ycf3 complexes from the transplastomic plants identified a novel nucleus-encoded thylakoid protein, Y3IP1 (for Ycf3-interacting protein 1), that specifically interacts with the Ycf3 protein. Subsequent reverse genetics analysis of Y3IP1 function in tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that knockdown of Y3IP1 leads to a specific deficiency in PSI but does not result in loss of Ycf3. Our data indicate that Y3IP1 represents a novel factor for PSI biogenesis that cooperates with the plastid genome-encoded Ycf3 in the assembly of stable PSI units in the thylakoid membrane. PMID:20807881

  19. SCS1, a multicopy suppressor of hsp60-ts mutant alleles, does not encode a mitochondrially targeted protein.

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Y; Hallberg, R L

    1995-01-01

    We identified and isolated a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene which, when overexpressed, suppressed the temperature-sensitive phenotype of cells expressing a mutant allele of the gene encoding the mitochondrial chaperonin, Hsp60. This gene, SCS1 (suppressor of chaperonin sixty-1), encodes a 757-amino-acid protein of as yet unknown function which, nonetheless, has human, rice, and Caenorhabditis elegans homologs with high degrees (ca. 60%) of amino acid sequence identity. SCS1 is not an essential gene, but SCS1-null strains do not grow above 37 degrees C and show some growth-related defects at 30 degrees C as well. This gene is expressed at both 30 and 38 degrees C, producing little or no differences in mRNA levels at these two temperatures. Overexpression of SCS1 could not complement an HSP60-null allele, indicating that suppression was not due to the bypassing of Hsp60 activity. Of 10 other hsp60-ts alleles tested, five could also be suppressed by SCS1 overexpression. There were no common mutant phenotypes of the strains expressing these alleles that give any clue as to why they were suppressible while others were not. An epitope (influenza virus hemagglutinin)-tagged form of SCS1 in single copy complemented an SCS1-null allele. The Scs1-hemagglutinin protein was found to be at comparable levels and in similar multiply modified forms in cells growing at both 30 and 38 degrees C. Surprisingly, when localized either by cell fractionation procedures or by immunocytochemistry, these proteins were found not in mitochondria but in the cytosol. The overexpression of SCS1 had significant effects on the cellular levels of mRNAs encoding the proteins Cpn10 and Mgel, two other mitochondrial protein cochaperones, but not on mRNAs encoding a number of other mitochondrial or cytosolic proteins analyzed. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:7565713

  20. Analysis of a cDNA encoding the major vault protein from the electric ray Discopyge ommata.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, C; Zimmermann, H; Volknandt, W

    1997-03-25

    The major vault protein is the predominant constituent of vaults ubiquitous large cytosolic ribonucleoprotein particles. A cDNA clone encoding the 100-kDa major vault protein (MVP100) was isolated from an electric lobe library of Discopyge ommata. The complete nucleotide sequence was determined. Northern blot analysis revealed a 2.8-kb transcript with a high expression in neural tissue. Southern blot analysis indicates that the electric ray MVP100 is a single copy-gene with at least two introns. The primary structure of major vault proteins characterized in slime mold, ray, rat and human is evolutionary highly conserved. PMID:9099863

  1. The Bean pod mottle virus RNA2-encoded 58-kilodalton protein P58 is required in cis for RNA2 accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) is a bipartite, positive sense (+) RNA plant virus in the Secoviridae family. Its RNA1 encodes proteins required for genome replication, whereas RNA2 primarily encodes proteins needed for virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement. However, the function of a 58 kilo-dalto...

  2. Identification and Expression Profiles of Six Transcripts Encoding Carboxylesterase Protein in Vitis flexuosa Infected with Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Zaherul; Yun, Hae Keun

    2016-08-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogen attacks via several mechanisms, including hypersensitive cell death. Recognition of pathogen attack by the plant resistance gene triggers expression of carboxylesterase genes associated with hypersensitive response. We identified six transcripts of carboxylesterase genes, Vitis flexuosa carboxylesterase 5585 (VfCXE5585), VfCXE12827, VfCXE13132, VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674, which showed different expression patterns upon transcriptome analysis of V. flexuosa inoculated with Elsinoe ampelina. The lengths of genes ranged from 1,098 to 1,629 bp, and their encoded proteins consisted of 309 to 335 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed hydrolase like domains in all six transcripts and contained two conserved motifs, GXSXG of serine hydrolase characteristics and HGGGF related to the carboxylesterase family. The deduced amino acid sequence also contained a potential catalytic triad consisted of serine, aspartic acid and histidine. Of the six transcripts, VfCXE12827 showed upregulated expression against E. ampelina at all time points. Three genes (VfCXE5585, VfCXE12827, and VfCXE13132) showed upregulation, while others (VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674) were down regulated in grapevines infected with Botrytis cinerea. All transcripts showed upregulated expression against Rhizobium vitis at early and later time points except VfCXE12827, and were downregulated for up to 48 hours post inoculation (hpi) after upregulation at 1 hpi in response to R. vitis infection. All tested genes showed high and differential expression in response to pathogens, indicating that they all may play a role in defense pathways during pathogen infection in grapevines. PMID:27493610

  3. Overproduction of lactimidomycin by cross-overexpression of genes encoding Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Dong; Yan, Yijun; Pan, Guohui; Xiang, Wensheng; Shen, Ben

    2016-03-01

    The glutarimide-containing polyketides represent a fascinating class of natural products that exhibit a multitude of biological activities. We have recently cloned and sequenced the biosynthetic gene clusters for three members of the glutarimide-containing polyketides-iso-migrastatin (iso-MGS) from Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993, lactimidomycin (LTM) from Streptomyces amphibiosporus ATCC 53964, and cycloheximide (CHX) from Streptomyces sp. YIM56141. Comparative analysis of the three clusters identified mgsA and chxA, from the mgs and chx gene clusters, respectively, that were predicted to encode the PimR-like Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins (SARPs) but failed to reveal any regulatory gene from the ltm gene cluster. Overexpression of mgsA or chxA in S. platensis NRRL 18993, Streptomyces sp. YIM56141 or SB11024, and a recombinant strain of Streptomyces coelicolor M145 carrying the intact mgs gene cluster has no significant effect on iso-MGS or CHX production, suggesting that MgsA or ChxA regulation may not be rate-limiting for iso-MGS and CHX production in these producers. In contrast, overexpression of mgsA or chxA in S. amphibiosporus ATCC 53964 resulted in a significant increase in LTM production, with LTM titer reaching 106 mg/L, which is five-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain. These results support MgsA and ChxA as members of the SARP family of positive regulators for the iso-MGS and CHX biosynthetic machinery and demonstrate the feasibility to improve glutarimide-containing polyketide production in Streptomyces strains by exploiting common regulators. PMID:26552797

  4. Mutations in NEBL encoding the cardiac Z-disk protein nebulette are associated with various cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tomasov, Pavol; Villard, Eric; Faludi, Reka; Melacini, Paola; Lossie, Janine; Lohmann, Nadine; Richard, Pascale; De Bortoli, Marzia; Angelini, Annalisa; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Sperling, Silke R.; Simor, Tamás; Veselka, Josef; Özcelik, Cemil; Charron, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transgenic mice overexpressing mutated NEBL, encoding the cardiac-specific Z-disk protein nebulette, develop severe cardiac phenotypes. Since cardiomyopathies are commonly familial and because mutations in a single gene may result in variable phenotypes, we tested the hypothesis that NEBL mutations are associated with cardiomyopathy. Material and methods We analyzed 389 patients, including cohorts of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC). The 28 coding exons of the NEBL gene were sequenced. Further bioinformatic analysis was used to distinguish variants. Results In total, we identified six very rare heterozygous missense mutations in NEBL in 7 different patients (frequency 1.8%) in highly conserved codons. The mutations were not detectable in 320 Caucasian sex-matched unrelated individuals without cardiomyopathy and 192 Caucasian sex-matched blood donors without heart disease. Known cardiomyopathy genes were excluded in these patients. The mutations p.H171R and p.I652L were found in 2 HCM patients. Further, p.Q581R and p.S747L were detected in 2 DCM patients, while the mutation p.A175T was identified independently in two unrelated patients with DCM. One LVNC patient carried the mutation p.P916L. All HCM and DCM related mutations were located in the nebulin-like repeats, domains responsible for actin binding. Interestingly, the mutation associated with LVNC was located in the C-terminal serine-rich linker region. Conclusions Our data suggest that NEBL mutations may cause various cardiomyopathies. We herein describe the first NEBL mutations in HCM and LVNC. Our findings underline the notion that the cardiomyopathies are true allelic diseases. PMID:27186169

  5. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter; Huston, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment. PMID:26810036

  6. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Ritsu; Kallen, C.B.; Babalola, G.O.; Rennert, H.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Billheimer, J.T. )

    1991-01-15

    The authors report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). The 1.3-kilobase (kb) cDNA contains an open reading frame which encompasses a 143-amino acid sequence which is 89% identical to the rat SCP{sub 2} amino acid sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the polypeptide reveals a 20-residue amino-terminal leader sequence in front of the mature polypeptide, which contains a carboxyl-terminal tripeptide (Ala-Lys-Leu) related to the peroxisome targeting sequence. The expressed cDNA in COS-7 cells yields a 15.3-kDa polypeptide and increased amounts of a 13.2-kDa polypeptide, both reacting with a specific rabbit antiserum to rat liver SCP{sub 2}. The cDNA insert hybridizes with 3.2- and 1.8-kb mRNA species in human liver poly(A){sup +} RNA. In human fibroblasts and placenta the 1.8-kb mRNA was most abundant. Southern blot analysis suggests either that there are multiple copies of the SCP{sub 2} gene in the human genome or that the SCP{sub 2} gene is very large. Coexpression of the SCP{sub 2} cDNA with expression vectors for cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme and adrenodoxin resulted in a 2.5-fold enhancement of progestin synthesis over that obtained with expression of the steroidogenic enzyme system alone. These findings are concordant with the notion that SCP{sub 2} plays a role in regulating steroidogenesis, among other possible functions.

  7. Identification and Expression Profiles of Six Transcripts Encoding Carboxylesterase Protein in Vitis flexuosa Infected with Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Zaherul; Yun, Hae Keun

    2016-01-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogen attacks via several mechanisms, including hypersensitive cell death. Recognition of pathogen attack by the plant resistance gene triggers expression of carboxylesterase genes associated with hypersensitive response. We identified six transcripts of carboxylesterase genes, Vitis flexuosa carboxylesterase 5585 (VfCXE5585), VfCXE12827, VfCXE13132, VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674, which showed different expression patterns upon transcriptome analysis of V. flexuosa inoculated with Elsinoe ampelina. The lengths of genes ranged from 1,098 to 1,629 bp, and their encoded proteins consisted of 309 to 335 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed hydrolase like domains in all six transcripts and contained two conserved motifs, GXSXG of serine hydrolase characteristics and HGGGF related to the carboxylesterase family. The deduced amino acid sequence also contained a potential catalytic triad consisted of serine, aspartic acid and histidine. Of the six transcripts, VfCXE12827 showed upregulated expression against E. ampelina at all time points. Three genes (VfCXE5585, VfCXE12827, and VfCXE13132) showed upregulation, while others (VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674) were down regulated in grapevines infected with Botrytis cinerea. All transcripts showed upregulated expression against Rhizobium vitis at early and later time points except VfCXE12827, and were downregulated for up to 48 hours post inoculation (hpi) after upregulation at 1 hpi in response to R. vitis infection. All tested genes showed high and differential expression in response to pathogens, indicating that they all may play a role in defense pathways during pathogen infection in grapevines. PMID:27493610

  8. Exon Skipping in the RET Gene Encodes Novel Isoforms That Differentially Regulate RET Protein Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Gabreski, Nicole A; Vaghasia, Janki K; Novakova, Silvia S; McDonald, Neil Q; Pierchala, Brian A

    2016-07-29

    Rearranged during transfection (RET), a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs), plays a crucial role in the development and function of the nervous system and additionally is required for kidney development and spermatogenesis. RET encodes a transmembrane receptor that is 20 exons long and produces two known protein isoforms differing in C-terminal amino acid composition, referred to as RET9 and RET51. Studies of human pheochromocytomas identified two additional novel transcripts involving the skipping of exon 3 or exons 3, 4, and 5 and are referred to as RET(Δ) (E3) and RET(Δ) (E345), respectively. Here we report the presence of Ret(Δ) (E3) and Ret(Δ) (E345) in zebrafish, mice, and rats and show that these transcripts are dynamically expressed throughout development of the CNS, peripheral nervous system, and kidneys. We further explore the biochemical properties of these isoforms, demonstrating that, like full-length RET, RET(ΔE3) and RET(ΔE345) are trafficked to the cell surface, interact with all four GFRα co-receptors, and have the ability to heterodimerize with full-length RET. Signaling experiments indicate that RET(ΔE3) is phosphorylated in a similar manner to full-length RET. RET(ΔE345), in contrast, displays higher baseline autophosphorylation, specifically on the catalytic tyrosine, Tyr(905), and also on one of the most important signaling residues, Tyr(1062) These data provide the first evidence for a physiologic role of these isoforms in RET pathway function. PMID:27226544

  9. HPP1: A transmembrane protein-encoding gene commonly methylated in colorectal polyps and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Young, Joanne; Biden, Kelli G.; Simms, Lisa A.; Huggard, Phillip; Karamatic, Rozemary; Eyre, Helen J.; Sutherland, Grant R.; Herath, Nirmitha; Barker, Melissa; Anderson, Gregory J.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Ramm, Grant A.; Jass, Jeremy R.; Leggett, Barbara A.

    2001-01-01

    Adenomas are the precursors of most colorectal cancers. Hyperplastic polyps have been linked to the subset of colorectal cancers showing DNA microsatellite instability, but little is known of their underlying genetic etiology. Using a strategy that isolates differentially methylated sequences from hyperplastic polyps and normal mucosa, we identified a 370-bp sequence containing the 5′ untranslated region and the first exon of a gene that we have called HPP1. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to isolate HPP1 from normal mucosa. Using reverse transcription–PCR, HPP1 was expressed in 28 of 30 (93%) normal colonic samples but in only seven of 30 (23%) colorectal cancers (P < 0.001). The 5′ region of HPP1 included a CpG island containing 49 CpG sites, of which 96% were found to be methylated by bisulfite sequencing of DNA from colonic tumor samples. By COBRA analysis, methylation was detected in six of nine (66%) adenomas, 17 of 27 (63%) hyperplastic polyps, and 46 of 55 (84%) colorectal cancers. There was an inverse relationship between methylation level and mRNA expression in cancers (r = −0.67; P < 0.001), and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment restored HPP1 expression in two colorectal cancer cell lines. In situ hybridization of HPP1 indicated that expression occurs in epithelial and stromal elements in normal mucosa but is silenced in both cell types in early colonic neoplasia. HPP1 is predicted to encode a transmembrane protein containing follistatin and epidermal growth factor-like domains. Silencing of HPP1 by methylation may increase the probability of neoplastic transformation. PMID:11120884

  10. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05 %. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21 %) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF< 1 % and 22 with MAF≥ 1 %). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  11. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew L.; Norman, Jane E.; Morgan, Neil V.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Daly, Martina E.; Simpson, Michael A.; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70% had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05%. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21%) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF<1% and 22 with MAF≥1%). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  12. Deletion of potD, encoding a putative spermidine-binding protein, results in a complex phenotype in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Abdelhady, Hany; Tompkins, Nicholas P; Carson, Kaitlyn R; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-07-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). We previously observed that the polyamine spermidine, produced by host cells or added exogenously, enhances the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. To study this enhancing effect and determine whether polyamines are used as nutrients, we deleted potD from L. pneumophila strain JR32. The gene potD encodes a spermidine-binding protein that in other bacteria is essential for the function of the PotABCD polyamine transporter. Deletion of potD did not affect L. pneumophila growth in vitro in the presence or absence of spermidine and putrescine, suggesting that PotD plays a redundant or no role in polyamine uptake. However, deletion of potD resulted in a puzzlingly complex phenotype that included defects in L. pneumophila's ability to form filaments, tolerate Na(+), associate with macrophages and amoeba, recruit host vesicles to the LCV, and initiate intracellular growth. Moreover, the ΔpotD mutant was completely unable to grow in L929 cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of spermidine synthesis. These complex and disparate effects suggest that the L. pneumophila potD encodes either: (i) a multifunctional protein, (ii) a protein that interacts with, or regulates a, multifunctional protein, or (iii) a protein that contributes (directly or indirectly) to a regulatory network. Protein function studies with the L. pneumophila PotD protein are thus warranted. PMID:24928741

  13. Comparative genomics of the family Vibrionaceae reveals the wide distribution of genes encoding virulence-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Species of the family Vibrionaceae are ubiquitous in marine environments. Several of these species are important pathogens of humans and marine species. Evidence indicates that genetic exchange plays an important role in the emergence of new pathogenic strains within this family. Data from the sequenced genomes of strains in this family could show how the genes encoded by all these strains, known as the pangenome, are distributed. Information about the core, accessory and panproteome of this family can show how, for example, genes encoding virulence-associated proteins are distributed and help us understand how virulence emerges. Results We deduced the complete set of orthologs for eleven strains from this family. The core proteome consists of 1,882 orthologous groups, which is 28% of the 6,629 orthologous groups in this family. There were 4,411 accessory orthologous groups (i.e., proteins that occurred in from 2 to 10 proteomes) and 5,584 unique proteins (encoded once on only one of the eleven genomes). Proteins that have been associated with virulence in V. cholerae were widely distributed across the eleven genomes, but the majority was found only on the genomes of the two V. cholerae strains examined. Conclusions The proteomes are reflective of the differing evolutionary trajectories followed by different strains to similar phenotypes. The composition of the proteomes supports the notion that genetic exchange among species of the Vibrionaceae is widespread and that this exchange aids these species in adapting to their environments. PMID:20537180

  14. Successful Interference with Cellular Immune Responses to Immunogenic Proteins Encoded by Recombinant Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Sarukhan, Adelaida; Camugli, Sabine; Gjata, Bernard; von Boehmer, Harald; Danos, Olivier; Jooss, Karin

    2001-01-01

    Vectors derived from the adeno-associated virus (AAV) have been successfully used for the long-term expression of therapeutic genes in animal models and patients. One of the major advantages of these vectors is the absence of deleterious immune responses following gene transfer. However, AAV vectors, when used in vaccination studies, can result in efficient humoral and cellular responses against the transgene product. It is therefore important to understand the factors which influence the establishment of these immune responses in order to design safe and efficient procedures for AAV-based gene therapies. We have compared T-cell activation against a strongly immunogenic protein, the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is synthesized in skeletal muscle following gene transfer with an adenovirus (Ad) or an AAV vector. In both cases, cellular immune responses resulted in the elimination of transduced muscle fibers within 4 weeks. However, the kinetics of CD4+ T-cell activation were markedly delayed when AAV vectors were used. Upon recombinant Ad (rAd) gene transfer, T cells were activated both by direct transduction of dendritic cells and by cross-presentation of the transgene product, while upon rAAV gene transfer T cells were only activated by the latter mechanism. These results suggested that activation of the immune system by the transgene product following rAAV-mediated gene transfer might be easier to control than that following rAd-mediated gene transfer. Therefore, we tested protocols aimed at interfering with either antigen presentation by blocking the CD40/CD40L pathway or with the T-cell response by inducing transgene-specific tolerance. Long-term expression of the AAV-HA was achieved in both cases, whereas immune responses against Ad-HA could not be prevented. These data clearly underline the importance of understanding the mechanisms by which vector-encoded proteins are recognized by the immune system in order to specifically interfere with them and

  15. The omp2 gene locus of Brucella abortus encodes two homologous outer membrane proteins with properties characteristic of bacterial porins.

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, H; Ficht, T A

    1993-01-01

    In Brucella abortus, a gene encoding a major cell envelope protein, omp2, is duplicated within a short segment of the large chromosomal DNA. Although both genes contain open reading frames, encoding proteins of high identity, expression from only one, omp2b, has been detected in laboratory-grown B. abortus. In the present study, we wished to determine whether omp2b encodes the previously studied Brucella porin and to characterize the omp2a gene product. Experiments were performed with Escherichia coli transformants expressing either omp2a or omp2b. Our results indicated that both gene products localized to the outer membrane of E. coli. Initial rates of transport of [14C]maltose and growth rates in the presence of maltodextrins of defined size indicated an increased hydrophilic permeability of transformants expressing omp2a. These cells were also shown to grow on maltotetraose, a molecule with a molecular mass of 667 Da. Activity consistent with the formation of pores could not be demonstrated in transformants expressing omp2b. However, Omp2b formed oligomers resistant to heat denaturation up to 70 degrees C in sodium dodecyl sulfate buffer, a property characteristic of bacterial porins. Overall, these results suggest that the omp2a gene product has pore-forming activity and that the omp2b gene encodes the previously characterized Brucella porin. Images PMID:7689540

  16. Identification of the gene encoding the 65-kilodalton DNA-binding protein of herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Parris, D.S. Institute of Virology, Glasgow ); Cross, A.; Orr, A.; Frame, M.C.; Murphy, M.; McGeoch, D.J.; Marsden, H.S. ); Haarr, L. )

    1988-03-01

    Hybrid arrest of in vitro translation was used to localize the region of the herpes simplex virus type 1 genome encoding the 65-kilodalton DNA-binding protein (65K{sub DBP}) to between genome coordinates 0.592 and 0.649. Knowledge of the DNA sequence of this region allowed us to identify three open reading frames as likely candidates for the gene encoding 65K{sub DBP}. Two independent approaches were used to determine which of these three open reading frames encoded the protein. For the first approach a monoclonal antibody, MAb 6898, which reacted specifically with 65K{sub DBP}, was isolated. This antibody was used, with the techniques of hybrid arrest of in vitro translation and in vitro translation of selected mRNA, to identify the gene encoding 65K{sub DBP}. The second approach involved preparation of antisera directed against oligopeptides corresponding to regions of the predicted amino acid sequence of this gene. These antisera reacted specifically with 65K{sub DBP}, thus confirming the gene assignment.

  17. Yarrowia lipolytica Cells Mutant for the PEX24 Gene Encoding a Peroxisomal Membrane Peroxin Mislocalize Peroxisomal Proteins and Accumulate Membrane Structures Containing Both Peroxisomal Matrix and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Yuen Yi C.; Rachubinski, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Peroxins are proteins required for peroxisome assembly and are encoded by the PEX genes. Functional complementation of the oleic acid–nonutilizing strain mut1-1 of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has identified the novel gene, PEX24. PEX24 encodes Pex24p, a protein of 550 amino acids (61,100 Da). Pex24p is an integral membrane protein of peroxisomes that exhibits high sequence homology to two hypothetical proteins encoded by the open reading frames YHR150W and YDR479C of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Pex24p is detectable in wild-type cells grown in glucose-containing medium, and its levels are significantly increased by incubation of cells in oleic acid–containing medium, the metabolism of which requires intact peroxisomes. pex24 mutants are compromised in the targeting of both matrix and membrane proteins to peroxisomes. Although pex24 mutants fail to assemble functional peroxisomes, they do harbor membrane structures that contain subsets of peroxisomal proteins. PMID:12181338

  18. Property-based sequence representations do not adequately encode local protein folding information.

    PubMed

    Solis, A D; Rackovsky, S

    2007-06-01

    We examine the informatic characteristics of amino acid representations based on physical properties. We demonstrate that sequences rewritten using contracted alphabets based on physical properties do not encode local folding information well. The best four-character alphabet can only encode approximately 57% of the maximum possible amount of structural information. This result suggests that property-based representations that operate on a local length scale are not likely to be useful in homology searches and fold-recognition exercises. PMID:17387739

  19. Genetically Encoded Spy Peptide Fusion System to Detect Plasma Membrane-Localized Proteins In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bedbrook, Claire N; Kato, Mihoko; Ravindra Kumar, Sripriya; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Nath, Ravi D; Sun, Fei; Sternberg, Paul W; Arnold, Frances H; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2015-08-20

    Membrane proteins are the main gatekeepers of cellular state, especially in neurons, serving either to maintain homeostasis or instruct response to synaptic input or other external signals. Visualization of membrane protein localization and trafficking in live cells facilitates understanding the molecular basis of cellular dynamics. We describe here a method for specifically labeling the plasma membrane-localized fraction of heterologous membrane protein expression using channelrhodopsins as a case study. We show that the genetically encoded, covalent binding SpyTag and SpyCatcher pair from the Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein FbaB can selectively label membrane-localized proteins in living cells in culture and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. The SpyTag/SpyCatcher covalent labeling method is highly specific, modular, and stable in living cells. We have used the binding pair to develop a channelrhodopsin membrane localization assay that is amenable to high-throughput screening for opsin discovery and engineering. PMID:26211362

  20. Protection of Mice from Fatal Measles Encephalitis by Vaccination with Vaccinia Virus Recombinants Encoding Either the Hemagglutinin or the Fusion Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillien, Robert; Spehner, Daniele; Kirn, Andre; Giraudon, Pascale; Buckland, Robin; Wild, Fabian; Lecocq, Jean-Pierre

    1988-02-01

    Vaccinia virus recombinants encoding the hemagglutinin or fusion protein of measles virus have been constructed. Infection of cell cultures with the recombinants led to the synthesis of authentic measles proteins as judged by their electrophoretic mobility, recognition by antibodies, glycosylation, proteolytic cleavage, and presentation on the cell surface. Mice vaccinated with a single dose of the recombinant encoding the hemagglutinin protein developed antibodies capable of both inhibiting hemagglutination activity and neutralizing measles virus, whereas animals vaccinated with the recombinant encoding the fusion protein developed measles neutralizing antibodies. Mice vaccinated with either of the recombinants resisted a normally lethal intracerebral inoculation of a cell-associated measles virus subacute sclerosing panencephalitis strain.

  1. Environmental regulation of virulence in group A streptococci: transcription of the gene encoding M protein is stimulated by carbon dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Caparon, M G; Geist, R T; Perez-Casal, J; Scott, J R

    1992-01-01

    We have found that different atmospheres can have significant effects on the transcription of emm, the gene that encodes M protein, the major virulence factor of the group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes). Expression of emm was monitored by constructing a transcriptional fusion of the promoter for emm6.1 from S. pyogenes JRS4 to a promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Transcription, as measured by determining chloramphenicol acetyltransferase specific activity, was stimulated by as much as 25-fold by increased carbon dioxide tension. Expression was greater in the latter stages of growth and was not affected by growth at 30 instead of 37 degrees C. Insertional inactivation of mry, a gene encoding a positive regulator of emm6.1, reduced chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity below the detectable level. We conclude that expression of emm is influenced by environmental factors and that the level of carbon dioxide is one signal that may influence expression of M protein during infection. Images PMID:1512202

  2. Varicella-zoster virus open reading frame 4 encodes an immediate-early protein with posttranscriptional regulatory properties.

    PubMed Central

    Defechereux, P; Debrus, S; Baudoux, L; Rentier, B; Piette, J

    1997-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) encodes four putative immediate-early proteins based on sequence homology with herpes simplex virus type 1: the products of ORF4, -61, -62, and -63. Until now, only two VZV proteins have been described as being truly expressed with immediate-early kinetics (IE62 and IE63). The ORF4-encoded protein can stimulate gene expression either alone or in synergy with the major regulatory protein IE62. Making use of a sequential combination of transcription and protein synthesis inhibitors (actinomycin D and cycloheximide, respectively), we demonstrated the immediate-early nature of the ORF4 gene product, which can thus be named IE4. The fact that IE4 is expressed with kinetics similar to that of IE62 further underlines the possible cooperation between these two VZV proteins in gene expression. Analysis of the IE4-mediated autologous or heterologous viral gene expression at the mRNA levels clearly indicated that IE4 may have several mechanisms of action. Activation of the two VZV genes tested could occur partly by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since increases in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) mRNA levels do not account for the stimulation of CAT activity. On the other hand, stimulation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat- or the cytomegalovirus promoter-associated CAT activity is correlated with an increase in the corresponding CAT mRNA. PMID:9261438

  3. Protein sequences insight into heavy metal tolerance in Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 encoded by plasmid pESA3.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Kajsik, Michal; Forsythe, Stephen; Pandey, Paras Nath

    2015-12-01

    The recently annotated genome of the bacterium Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 suggests that the organism has the ability to bind heavy metals. This study demonstrates heavy metal tolerance in C. sakazakii, in which proteins with the heavy metal interaction were recognized by computational and experimental study. As the result, approximately one-fourth of proteins encoded on the plasmid pESA3 are proposed to have potential interaction with heavy metals. Interaction between heavy metals and predicted proteins was further corroborated using protein crystal structures from protein data bank database and comparison of metal-binding ligands. In addition, a phylogenetic study was undertaken for the toxic heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury, which generated relatedness clustering for lead, cadmium and arsenic. Laboratory studies confirmed the organism's tolerance to tellurite, copper and silver. These experimental and computational study data extend our understanding of the genes encoding for proteins of this important neonatal pathogen and provide further insights into the genotypes associated with features that can contribute to its persistence in the environment. The information will be of value for future environmental protection from heavy toxic metals. PMID:26384977

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator protein GCaMP2

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez Guilbe, María M.; Alfaro Malavé, Elisa C.; Akerboom, Jasper; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2008-07-01

    The genetically encoded fluorescent calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. Fluorescent proteins and their engineered variants have played an important role in the study of biology. The genetically encoded calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 comprises a circularly permuted fluorescent protein coupled to the calcium-binding protein calmodulin and a calmodulin target peptide, M13, derived from the intracellular calmodulin target myosin light-chain kinase and has been used to image calcium transients in vivo. To aid rational efforts to engineer improved variants of GCaMP2, this protein was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.1, b = 47.1, c = 68.8 Å, β = 100.5° and one GCaMP2 molecule in the asymmetric unit. The structure was phased by molecular replacement and refinement is currently under way.

  5. Expression of genes encoding cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum HSP90 proteins in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Luciana; Georg, Raphaela C; Fietto, Luciano G; Gomes, Suely L

    2008-03-31

    HSP90 proteins are important molecular chaperones involved in multiple cellular processes. This work reports the characterization of cDNAs encoding two distinct HSP90 proteins (named HSP90A and HSP90B) from the chytridiomycete Blastocladiella emersonii. Deduced amino acid sequences of HSP90A and HSP90B exhibit signatures of the cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) HSP90 proteins, respectively. A genomic clone encoding HSP90A was also characterized indicating the presence of a single intron of 184 bp interrupting the coding region, located near the amino-terminus of the protein. Expression of both HSP90A and HSP90B genes increases significantly during heat shock at 38 degrees C, with highest induction ratios observed in cells stressed during germination of the fungus. Changes in the amount of HSP90A transcript were also evaluated during B. emersonii life cycle at physiological temperature (27 degrees C), and its levels were found to increase both during germination and sporulation of the fungus. HSP90A protein levels were analyzed during B. emersonii life cycle and significant changes were observed only during sporulation. Furthermore, during heat stress a large increase in the amount of HSP90A protein was observed. Induction of HSP90A and HSP90B genes during heat stress indicates the importance of both genes in the response to high temperature in B. emersonii. PMID:18281163

  6. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts. PMID:26210077

  7. Identification of genes encoding zinc finger proteins, non-histone chromosomal HMG protein homologue, and a putative GTP phosphohydrolase in the genome of Chilo iridescent virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, P; Hug, M; Handermann, M; Janssen, W; Koonin, E V; Delius, H; Darai, C

    1994-01-01

    Five RNA transcripts of about 1.2 to 1.7 kilobases were mapped to a part of the genome of insect iridescent virus type 6 (Chilo iridescent virus; CIV) between genome coordinates 0.832 and 0.856 within the EcoRI DNA fragment F. The nucleotide sequence of this particular region (5702 base pairs) of the CIV genome was determined. The DNA sequence contains a number of perfect direct, inverted, and palindromic repeats including three clusters of tandemly organized repetitive DNA elements located between the nucleotide positions 1534 to 1566, 3720 to 3780, and 4350 to 4450. Eight long open reading frames (ORFs; EF1 to 8) were detected in the sequenced region of the CIV genome. ORF EF1 encodes a putative protein of 221 amino acid residues (aa) that is closely related to eukaryotic nonhistone chromosomal proteins of the high mobility group (HMG) superfamily. Virus encoded homologues of HMG proteins have not been reported so far. The EF2 gene product (145 aa) contains a specific zinc finger motif and belongs to a distinct group of identified and putative zinc finger proteins including a second putative protein (239 aa) of CIV encoded in the EcoRI DNA fragment Y (1984 bp; 0.381 to 0.391 viral map units). The product of EF6 (127 aa) is related to D250 ORF product of African swine fever virus (ASFV) and belongs to the recently described protein family sharing a highly conserved sequence motif with bacterial antimutator GTP phosphohydrolase MutT. Thus the sequenced region of the CIV genome encodes three putative proteins which may be directly involved in the replication and/or transcription of the viral DNA. Images PMID:8121799

  8. Identification and characterization of the herpes simplex virus type 1 virion protein encoded by the UL35 open reading frame.

    PubMed

    McNabb, D S; Courtney, R J

    1992-05-01

    The UL35 open reading frame (ORF) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has been predicted from DNA sequence analysis to encode a small polypeptide with a molecular weight of 12,095. We have investigated the protein product of the UL35 ORF by using a trpE-UL35 gene fusion to produce a corresponding fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The TrpE-UL35 chimeric protein was subsequently isolated and used as a source of immunogen for the production of rabbit polyclonal antiserum directed against the UL35 gene product. The TrpE-UL35 antiserum was found to recognize a 12-kDa protein which was specifically present in HSV-1-infected cells. By utilizing the TrpE-UL35 antiserum, the kinetics of synthesis of the UL35 gene product was examined, and these studies indicate that UL35 is expressed as a gamma 2 (true late) gene. The 12-kDa protein recognized by the TrpE-UL35 antiserum was associated with purified HSV-1 virions and type A and B capsids, suggesting that the UL35 ORF may encode the 12-kDa capsid protein variably designated p12, NC7, or VP26. To confirm this assignment, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting studies were performed to demonstrate that the TrpE-UL35 antiserum reacts with the same polypeptide as an antiserum directed against the purified p12 capsid protein (anti-NC7) (G.H. Cohen, M. Ponce de Leon, H. Diggelmann, W.C. Lawrence, S.K. Vernon, and R.J. Eisenberg, J. Virol. 34:521-531, 1980). Furthermore, the anti-NC7 serum was also found to react with the TrpE-UL35 chimeric protein isolated from E. coli, providing additional evidence that the UL35 gene encodes p12. On the basis of these studies, we conclude that UL35 represents a true late gene which encodes the 12-kDa capsid protein of HSV-1. PMID:1313892

  9. Human proviral mRNAs down regulated in choriocarcinoma encode a zinc finger protein related to Krüppel.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, N; Shimotohno, K; VanLeeuwen, D; Cohen, M

    1990-01-01

    RNA transcripts of the HERV-R (ERV3) human provirus that are abundant in placenta but absent in choriocarcinoma contain nonproviral genomic sequences at their 3' ends. We report here the isolation of cDNA clones of these genomic sequences. The transcripts encode a Krüppel-related zinc finger protein consisting of a unique leader region and more than 12 28-amino-acid finger motifs. Images PMID:2115127

  10. A virus-encoded potassium ion channel is a structural protein in the chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 virion.

    PubMed

    Romani, Giulia; Piotrowski, Adrianna; Hillmer, Stefan; Gurnon, James; Van Etten, James L; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Hertel, Brigitte

    2013-11-01

    Most chloroviruses encode small K(+) channels, which are functional in electrophysiological assays. The experimental finding that initial steps in viral infection exhibit the same sensitivity to channel inhibitors as the viral K(+) channels has led to the hypothesis that the channels are structural proteins located in the internal membrane of the virus particles. This hypothesis was questioned recently because proteomic studies failed to detect the channel protein in virions of the prototype chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1). Here, we used a mAb raised against the functional K(+) channel from chlorovirus MA-1D to search for the viral K(+) channel in the virus particle. The results showed that the antibody was specific and bound to the tetrameric channel on the extracellular side. The antibody reacted in a virus-specific manner with protein extracts from chloroviruses that encoded channels similar to that from MA-1D. There was no cross-reactivity with chloroviruses that encoded more diverse channels or with a chlorovirus that lacked a K(+) channel gene. Together with electron microscopic imaging, which revealed labelling of individual virus particles with the channel antibody, these results establish that the viral particles contain an active K(+) channel, presumably located in the lipid membrane that surrounds the DNA in the mature virions. PMID:23918407

  11. Identification of Nuclear Genes Encoding Chloroplast-Localized Proteins Required for Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Nicole; Lloyd, Johnny; Sweeney, Colleen; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Meinke, David

    2011-01-01

    We describe here the diversity of chloroplast proteins required for embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Interfering with certain chloroplast functions has long been known to result in embryo lethality. What has not been reported before is a comprehensive screen for embryo-defective (emb) mutants altered in chloroplast proteins. From a collection of transposon and T-DNA insertion lines at the RIKEN chloroplast function database (http://rarge.psc.riken.jp/chloroplast/) that initially appeared to lack homozygotes and segregate for defective seeds, we identified 23 additional examples of EMB genes that likely encode chloroplast-localized proteins. Fourteen gene identities were confirmed with allelism tests involving duplicate mutant alleles. We then queried journal publications and the SeedGenes database (www.seedgenes.org) to establish a comprehensive dataset of 381 nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins of Arabidopsis associated with embryo-defective (119 genes), plant pigment (121 genes), gametophyte (three genes), and alternate (138 genes) phenotypes. Loci were ranked based on the level of certainty that the gene responsible for the phenotype had been identified and the protein product localized to chloroplasts. Embryo development is frequently arrested when amino acid, vitamin, or nucleotide biosynthesis is disrupted but proceeds when photosynthesis is compromised and when levels of chlorophyll, carotenoids, or terpenoids are reduced. Chloroplast translation is also required for embryo development, with genes encoding chloroplast ribosomal and pentatricopeptide repeat proteins well represented among EMB datasets. The chloroplast accD locus, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, is essential in Arabidopsis but not in Brassica napus or maize (Zea mays), where duplicated nuclear genes compensate for its absence or loss of function. PMID:21139083

  12. Effects of Actin-Like Proteins Encoded by Two Bacillus pumilus Phages on Unstable Lysogeny, Revealed by Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yihui; Peng, Qin; Wu, Dandan; Kou, Zheng; Wu, Yan; Liu, Pengming

    2014-01-01

    We characterized two newly isolated myoviruses, Bp8p-C and Bp8p-T, infecting the ginger rhizome rot disease pathogen Bacillus pumilus GR8. The plaque of Bp8p-T exhibited a clear center with a turbid rim, suggesting that Bp8p-T could transform into latent phage. Lysogeny assays showed that both the two phages could form latent states, while Bp8p-T could form latent phage at a higher frequency and stability than Bp8p-C. The genomes of Bp8p-C and Bp8p-T were 151,417 and 151,419 bp, respectively; both encoded 212 putative proteins, and only differed by three nucleotides. Moreover, owing to this difference, Bp8p-C encoded a truncated, putative actin-like plasmid segregation protein Gp27-C. Functional analysis of protein Gp27 showed that Gp27-T encoded by Bp8p-T exhibited higher ATPase activity and assembly ability than Gp27-C. The results indicate that the difference in Gp27 affected the phage lysogenic ability. Structural proteome analysis of Bp8p-C virion resulted in the identification of 14 structural proteins, among which a pectin lyase-like protein, a putative poly-gamma-glutamate hydrolase, and three proteins with unknown function, were firstly identified as components of the phage virion. Both phages exhibited specific lytic ability to the host strain GR8. Bp8p-C showed better control effect on the pathogen in ginger rhizome slices than Bp8p-T, suggesting that Bp8p-C has a potential application in bio-control of ginger rhizome rot disease. PMID:25344242

  13. Molecular characterization and evolution of the SPRR family of keratinocyte differentiation markers encoding small proline-rich proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.; Fijneman, R.; Wiegant, J.; Van De Putte, P.; Backendorf, C. ); Van Kessel, A.D. )

    1993-06-01

    SPRR genes (formerly SPR) encode a novel class of polypeptides (small proline rich proteins) that are strongly induced during differentiation of human epidermal keratinocytes in vitro and in vivo. Recently the authors found that the N- and C-terminal domains of these proteins show strong sequence homology to loricrin and involucrin, suggesting that SPRR proteins constitute a new class of cornified envelope precursor proteins. Here they show that SPRR proteins are encoded by closely related members of a gene family, consisting of two genes for SPRR1, approximately seven genes for SPRR2, and a single gene for SPRR3. All SPRR genes are closely linked within a 300-kb DNA segment on human chromosome 1 band q21-q22, a region where the related loricrin and involucrin genes have also been mapped. The most characteristic feature of the SPRR gene family resides in the structure of the central segments of the encoded polypeptides that are built up from tandemly repeated units of either eight (SPRR1 and SPRR3) or nine (SPRR2) amino acids with the general consensus *K*PEP**. Sequencing data of the different members, together with their clustered chromosomal organization, strongly suggest that this gene family has evolved from a single progenitor gene by multiple intra- and intergenic duplications. Analysis of the different SPRR subfamilies reveals a gene-specific bias to either intra- or intergenic duplication. The authors propose that a process of homogenization has acted on the different members of one subfamily, whereas the different subfamilies appear to have diverged from each other, at the levels of both protein structure and gene regulation. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tab.

  14. Effects of actin-like proteins encoded by two Bacillus pumilus phages on unstable lysogeny, revealed by genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yihui; Peng, Qin; Wu, Dandan; Kou, Zheng; Wu, Yan; Liu, Pengming; Gao, Meiying

    2015-01-01

    We characterized two newly isolated myoviruses, Bp8p-C and Bp8p-T, infecting the ginger rhizome rot disease pathogen Bacillus pumilus GR8. The plaque of Bp8p-T exhibited a clear center with a turbid rim, suggesting that Bp8p-T could transform into latent phage. Lysogeny assays showed that both the two phages could form latent states, while Bp8p-T could form latent phage at a higher frequency and stability than Bp8p-C. The genomes of Bp8p-C and Bp8p-T were 151,417 and 151,419 bp, respectively; both encoded 212 putative proteins, and only differed by three nucleotides. Moreover, owing to this difference, Bp8p-C encoded a truncated, putative actin-like plasmid segregation protein Gp27-C. Functional analysis of protein Gp27 showed that Gp27-T encoded by Bp8p-T exhibited higher ATPase activity and assembly ability than Gp27-C. The results indicate that the difference in Gp27 affected the phage lysogenic ability. Structural proteome analysis of Bp8p-C virion resulted in the identification of 14 structural proteins, among which a pectin lyase-like protein, a putative poly-gamma-glutamate hydrolase, and three proteins with unknown function, were firstly identified as components of the phage virion. Both phages exhibited specific lytic ability to the host strain GR8. Bp8p-C showed better control effect on the pathogen in ginger rhizome slices than Bp8p-T, suggesting that Bp8p-C has a potential application in bio-control of ginger rhizome rot disease. PMID:25344242

  15. Evidence that Synthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondrially Encoded Ribosomal Protein Var1p May Be Membrane Localized

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Alessandro; Mason, Thomas L.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    The 5′-untranslated leaders of mitochondrial mRNAs appear to localize translation within the organelle. VAR1 is the only yeast mitochondrial gene encoding a major soluble protein. A chimeric mRNA bearing the VAR1 untranslated regions and the coding sequence for pre-Cox2p appears to be translated at the inner membrane surface. We propose that translation of the ribosomal protein Var1p is also likely to occur in close proximity to the inner membrane. PMID:12796311

  16. Identification of a mouse brain cDNA that encodes a protein related to the Alzheimer disease-associated amyloid beta protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Wasco, W; Bupp, K; Magendantz, M; Gusella, J F; Tanzi, R E; Solomon, F

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA from a mouse brain library that encodes a protein whose predicted amino acid sequence is 42% identical and 64% similar to that of the amyloid beta protein precursor (APP). This 653-amino acid protein, which we have termed the amyloid precursor-like protein (APLP), appears to be similar to APP in overall structure as well as amino acid sequence. The amino acid homologies are concentrated within three distinct regions of the two proteins where the identities are 47%, 54%, and 56%. The APLP cDNA hybridizes to two messages of approximately 2.4 and 1.6 kilobases that are present in mouse brain and neuroblastoma cells. Polyclonal antibodies raised against a peptide derived from the C terminus of APLP stain the cytoplasm in a pattern reminiscent of Golgi staining. In addition to APP, APLP also displays significant homology to the Drosophila APP-like protein APPL and a rat testes APP-like protein. These data indicate that the APP gene is a member of a strongly conserved gene family. Studies aimed at determining the functions of the proteins encoded by this gene family should provide valuable clues to their potential role in Alzheimer disease neuropathology. Images PMID:1279693

  17. Genetically Encoded Optochemical Probes for Simultaneous Fluorescence Reporting and Light Activation of Protein Function with Two-Photon Excitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The site-specific incorporation of three new coumarin lysine analogues into proteins was achieved in bacterial and mammalian cells using an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase system. The genetically encoded coumarin lysines were successfully applied as fluorescent cellular probes for protein localization and for the optical activation of protein function. As a proof-of-principle, photoregulation of firefly luciferase was achieved in live cells by caging a key lysine residue, and excellent OFF to ON light-switching ratios were observed. Furthermore, two-photon and single-photon optochemical control of EGFP maturation was demonstrated, enabling the use of different, potentially orthogonal excitation wavelengths (365, 405, and 760 nm) for the sequential activation of protein function in live cells. These results demonstrate that coumarin lysines are a new and valuable class of optical probes that can be used for the investigation and regulation of protein structure, dynamics, function, and localization in live cells. The small size of coumarin, the site-specific incorporation, the application as both a light-activated caging group and as a fluorescent probe, and the broad range of excitation wavelengths are advantageous over other genetically encoded photocontrol systems and provide a precise and multifunctional tool for cellular biology. PMID:25341086

  18. MAP1272c Encodes an NlpC/P60 Protein, an Antigen Detected in Cattle with Johne's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lingle, Cari K.; Stabel, Judith R.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Garcia, Brandon L.; Raeber, Alex J.; Schacher, Pascal; Kapur, Vivek; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-01-01

    The protein encoded by MAP1272c has been shown to be an antigen of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that contains an NlpC/P60 superfamily domain found in lipoproteins or integral membrane proteins. Proteins containing this domain have diverse enzymatic functions that include peptidases, amidases, and acetyltransferases. The NlpC protein was examined in comparison to over 100 recombinant proteins and showed the strongest antigenicity when analyzed with sera from cattle with Johne's disease. To further localize the immunogenicity of NlpC, recombinant proteins representing defined regions were expressed and evaluated with sera from cattle with Johne's disease. The region from amino acids 74 to 279 was shown to be the most immunogenic. This fragment was also evaluated against a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two monoclonal antibodies were produced in mice immunized with the full-length protein, and each recognized a distinct epitope. These antibodies cross-reacted with proteins from other mycobacterial species and demonstrated variable sizes of the proteins expressed from these subspecies. Both antibodies were further analyzed, and their interaction with MAP1272c and MAP1204 was characterized by a solution-based, luminescent binding assay. These tools provide additional means to study a strong antigen of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:22593240

  19. The Drosophila suppressor of sable gene encodes a polypeptide with regions similar to those of RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Voelker, R A; Gibson, W; Graves, J P; Sterling, J F; Eisenberg, M T

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster suppressor of sable [su(s)] gene has been determined. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences indicates that an approximately 7,860-nucleotide primary transcript is processed into an approximately 5-kb message, expressed during all stages of the life cycle, that contains an open reading frame capable of encoding a 1,322-amino-acid protein of approximately 150 kDa. The putative protein contains an RNA recognition motif-like region and a highly charged arginine-, lysine-, serine-, aspartic or glutamic acid-rich region that is similar to a region contained in several RNA-processing proteins. In vitro translation of in vitro-transcribed RNA from a complete cDNA yields a product whose size agrees with the size predicted by the open reading frame. Antisera against su(s) fusion proteins recognize the in vitro-translated protein and detect a protein of identical size in the nuclear fractions from tissue culture cells and embryos. The protein is also present in smaller amounts in cytoplasmic fractions of embryos. That the su(s) protein has regions similar in structure to RNA-processing protein is consistent with its known role in affecting the transcript levels of those alleles that it suppresses. Images PMID:1703632

  20. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Citovsky, V.; Knorr, D.; Zambryski, P. )

    1991-03-15

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 35S RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. The authors propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex.

  1. Identification of an essential Caulobacter crescentus gene encoding a member of the Obg family of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Maddock, J; Bhatt, A; Koch, M; Skidmore, J

    1997-01-01

    We have identified an essential Caulobacter crescentus gene (cgtA) that encodes a member of a recently identified subfamily of GTPases (the Obg family) conserved from Bacteria to Archaea to humans. This evolutionary conservation between distantly related species suggests that this family of GTP-binding proteins possesses a fundamental, yet unknown, cellular role. In this report, we describe the isolation and sequence of the cgtA gene. The predicted CgtA protein displays striking similarity to the Obg family of small, monomeric GTP-binding proteins, both in the conserved guanine nucleotide-binding domains and throughout the N-terminal glycine-rich domain that is found in many members of the Obg family. Disruption of the cgtA gene was lethal, demonstrating that this gene is essential for cell growth. Immunoblot analysis revealed that CgtA protein levels remained constant throughout the C. crescentus cell cycle. PMID:9335292

  2. Toward Understanding the Functional Role of Ss-riok-1, a RIO Protein Kinase-Encoding Gene of Strongyloides stercoralis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wang; Lok, James B.; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D.; Gasser, Robin B.; Fang, Fang; Lei, Wei-Qiang; Fang, Rui; Zhou, Yan-Qin; Zhao, Jun-Long; Hu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Background Some studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammals have shown that RIO protein kinases (RIOKs) are involved in ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle progression and development. However, there is a paucity of information on their functions in parasitic nematodes. We aimed to investigate the function of RIOK-1 encoding gene from Strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode parasitizing humans and dogs. Methodology/Principal Findings The RIOK-1 protein-encoding gene Ss-riok-1 was characterized from S. stercoralis. The full-length cDNA, gDNA and putative promoter region of Ss-riok-1 were isolated and sequenced. The cDNA comprises 1,828 bp, including a 377 bp 5′-UTR, a 17 bp 3′-UTR and a 1,434 bp ORF encoding a protein of 477 amino acids containing a RIOK-1 signature motif. The genomic sequence of the Ss-riok-1 coding region is 1,636 bp in length and has three exons and two introns. The putative promoter region comprises 4,280 bp and contains conserved promoter elements, including four CAAT boxes, 12 GATA boxes, eight E-boxes (CANNTG) and 38 TATA boxes. The Ss-riok-1 gene is transcribed throughout all developmental stages with the highest transcript abundance in the infective third-stage larva (iL3). Recombinant Ss-RIOK-1 is an active kinase, capable of both phosphorylation and auto-phosphorylation. Patterns of transcriptional reporter expression in transgenic S. stercoralis larvae indicated that Ss-RIOK-1 is expressed in neurons of the head, body and tail as well as in pharynx and hypodermis. Conclusions/Significance The characterization of the molecular and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the encoding gene provide first clues as to functions of RIOKs in the biological processes of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25101874

  3. Gene cloning and characterization of the protein encoded by the Neospora caninum bradyzoite-specific antigen gene BAG1.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Narabu, S; Yanai, Y; Hatano, Y; Ito, A; Imai, S; Ike, K

    2013-06-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexan parasite that causes repeated abortion and stillbirth in cattle. The aim of this study was to clone the gene encoding the N. caninum orthologue (NcBAG1) of the Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoite-specific protein TgBAG1 and characterize its expression pattern in the parasite. Isolation of the full-length 684-bp gene revealed that it shared 78.3% sequence similarity with TgBAG1. NcBAG1 encodes a predicted protein of 227 amino acids with 80.3% similarity to TgBAG1. A putative signal peptide sequence and an invariant GVL motif characteristic of small heat-shock proteins were identified in the predicted N. caninum amino acid sequence. We expressed the NcBAG1 gene as a recombinant glutathione S-transferase fusion protein (rNcBAG1) in Escherichia coli and used the purified 60 kDa protein to obtain a monoclonal antibody (Mab). rNcBAG1 reacted to Mabs specific for NcBAG1 and TgBAG1. No reaction between the NcBAG1 Mab and N. caninum tachyzoites was observed. Although the predicted molecular mass of NcBAG1 is 25 kDa, Western blot analysis of parasite lysates using the NcBAG1 Mab revealed a cross-reactive protein of approximately 30 kDa. Additionally, immunofluorescence assays using the tachyzoite-specific Mab for NcSAG1 and the bradyzoite-specific Mab for TgBAG1 or NcSAG4 revealed NcBAG1-specific expression in bradyzoites in cultures exposed to sodium nitroprusside, a reagent that increases the frequency of bradyzoites. Interestingly, the NcBAG1 protein was identified in the cytoplasm of the bradyzoite-stage parasites. This preliminary analysis of the NcBAG1 gene will assist investigations into the role of this protein in N. caninum . PMID:23245337

  4. Biosynthesis and properties of the adenovirus 2 L1-encoded 52,000- and 55,000-Mr proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus type 2 L1 region, which is located at 30.7 to 39.2 map units on the viral genome, is transcribed from the major late promoter during both early and late stages of virus replication, and a 52,000-Mr (52K) protein-55K protein doublet has been translated in vitro on L1-specific RNA. To investigate the biosynthesis and properties of the L1 52K and 55K proteins, we prepared antibody against a synthetic peptide encoded near the predicted N terminus. As determined by immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis, the antipeptide antibody recognized major 52K and 55K proteins synthesized in adenovirus type 2-infected cells that appeared to be identical to the 52K-55K doublet translated in vitro. The immunoprecipitated 52K and 55K proteins were very closely related, as shown by a peptide map analysis. Both L1 proteins were phosphorylated, and they were phosphorylated at similar sites. No precursor-product relationship was detected between the 52K and 55K proteins by a pulse-chase analysis. Biosynthesis of the L1 52K and 55K proteins began about 6 to 7 h postinfection, after biosynthesis of the early region 1A and early region 1B 19K (175R) T antigens, and reached a maximum rate at about 15 h; the maximum rate was maintained until at least 25 h postinfection. At all times, the 55K protein appeared to be synthesized at a severalfold-higher level than the 52K protein. Both proteins were quite stable and accumulated until late times after infection. Viral DNA replication was not essential for formation of the L1 proteins. Thus, the L1 52K-55K gene appears to be regulated in a manner different from the classical early and late viral genes but similar to the protein encoded by the i-leader (Symington et al., J. Virol. 57:849-856, 1986). The L1 proteins were detected in the cell nucleus by immunofluorescence microscopy with antipeptide antibody and were found to be primarily associated with the nuclear membrane by an immunoblot analysis of subcellular fractions

  5. Identification of a human cDNA encoding a protein that is structurally and functionally related to the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Matviw, Yu, G.; Young, D. )

    1992-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe are associated with related proteins named CAP. In S. cerevisiae, CAP is required for cellular responses mediated by the RAS/cyclic AMP pathway. Both yeast CAPs appear to be bifunctional proteins: The N-terminal domains are required for the proper function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains results in morphological and nutritional defects that appear to be unrelated to the cAMP pathways. Expression of either yeast CAP in the heterologous yeast suppresses phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of the endogenous CAP but does not suppress loss of the N-terminal domain. On the basis of the homology between the two yeast CAP proteins, we have designed degenerate oligonucleotides that we used to detect, by the polymerase chain reaction method, a human cDNA fragment encoding a CAP-related peptide. Using the polymerase chain reaction fragment as a probe, we isolated a human cDNA clone encoding a 475-amino-acid protein that is homologous to the yeast CAP proteins. Expressions of the human CAP protein in S. cerevisiae suppresses the phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of CAP but does not suppress phenotypes associated with loss of the N-terminal domain. Thus, CAP proteins have been structurally and, to some extent, functionally conserved in evolution between yeasts and mammals. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2015-07-14

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. dbHT-Trans: An Efficient Tool for Filtering the Protein-Encoding Transcripts Assembled by RNA-Seq According to Search for Homologous Proteins.

    PubMed

    Deng, Feilong; Chen, Shi-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In RNA-Seq studies, there are still many challenges for reliably assembling transcripts. Both genome-guided and de novo methods always produce too many false transcripts because of known and unknown factors. Therefore, the postassembly quality filtering is necessary before performing downstream analyses. Here, we present an automatic and efficient tool of dbHT-Trans for filtering the protein-encoding transcripts assembled by RNA-Seq. For each candidate transcript, we first deduced all potential open reading frames and translated them into amino acid sequences. By searching against the reference protein database, a transcript would be predicted a false one when it has no homologous sequence. Using this method, it is expected to filter out the falsely assembled transcripts of protein-encoding genes. Application of dbHT-Trans to the annotated transcriptome of mouse revealed that the sensitivity was almost 90% for recalling protein-encoding transcripts. After this quality filtering, the numbers of assembled genes became more consistent between Cufflinks and Trinity tools. To significantly decrease the data storage, we transformed all intermediate data into descriptive metadata and stored by the MySQL database, which will be utilized by downstream analyses in a real-time style. The source codes, example data, and manual of dbHT-Trans are freely available on the GitHub repository. PMID:26484655

  10. Augmented DNA-binding activity of p53 protein encoded by a carboxyl-terminal alternatively spliced mRNA is blocked by p53 protein encoded by the regularly spliced form.

    PubMed Central

    Wolkowicz, R; Peled, A; Elkind, N B; Rotter, V

    1995-01-01

    DNA-binding activity of the wild-type p53 is central to its function in vivo. However, recombinant or in vitro translated wild-type p53 proteins, unless modified, are poor DNA binders. The fact that the in vitro produced protein gains DNA-binding activity upon modification at the C terminus raises the possibility that similar mechanisms may exist in the cell. Data presented here show that a C-terminal alternatively spliced wild-type p53 (ASp53) mRNA expressed by bacteria or transcribed in vitro codes for a p53 protein that efficiently binds DNA. Our results support the conclusion that the augmented DNA binding activity of an ASp53 protein is probably due to attenuation of the negative effect residing at the C terminus of the wild-type p53 protein encoded by the regularly spliced mRNA (RSp53) rather than acquisition of additional functionality by the alternatively spliced C' terminus. In addition, we found that ASp53 forms a complex with the non-DNA-binding RSp53, which in turn blocks the DNA-binding activity of ASp53. Interaction between these two wild-type p53 proteins may underline a mechanism that controls the activity of the wild-type p53 protein in the cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7624329

  11. Genome organisation and expression profiling of ABC protein-encoding genes in Heterobasidion annosum s.l. complex.

    PubMed

    Baral, Bikash; Kovalchuk, Andriy; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2016-03-01

    Members of Heterobasidion annosum species complex are widely regarded as the most destructive fungal pathogens of conifer trees in the boreal and temperate zones of Northern hemisphere. To invade and colonise their host trees, Heterobasidion fungi must overcome components of host chemical defence, including terpenoid oleoresin and phenolic compounds. ABC transporters may play an important role in this process participating in the export of toxic host metabolites and maintaining their intracellular concentration below the critical level. We have identified and phylogenetically classified Heterobasidion genes encoding ABC transporters and closely related ABC proteins. The number of ABC proteins in the Heterobasidion genome is one of the lowest among analysed species of Agaricomycotina. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have analysed transcriptional response of Heterobasidion ABC transporter-encoding genes to monoterpenes as well as their expression profile during growth on pine wood in comparison to the growth on defined media. Several ABC transporters were up-regulated during growth on pine wood. The ABC-transporter encoding gene ABCG1.1 was induced both during growth of H. annosum on pine wood and upon exposure to monoterpenes. Our experimental data demonstrate the differential responses of Heterobasidion ABC genes to growth conditions and chemical stressors. The presented results suggest a potential role of Heterobasidion ABC-G transporters in the resistance to the components of conifer chemical defence. PMID:26895866

  12. GRR1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for glucose repression and encodes a protein with leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Flick, J S; Johnston, M

    1991-01-01

    Growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose leads to repression of transcription of many genes required for alternative carbohydrate metabolism. The GRR1 gene appears to be of central importance to the glucose repression mechanism, because mutations in GRR1 result in a pleiotropic loss of glucose repression (R. Bailey and A. Woodword, Mol. Gen. Genet. 193:507-512, 1984). We have isolated the GRR1 gene and determined that null mutants are viable and display a number of growth defects in addition to the loss of glucose repression. Surprisingly, grr1 mutations convert SUC2, normally a glucose-repressed gene, into a glucose-induced gene. GRR1 encodes a protein of 1,151 amino acids that is expressed constitutively at low levels in yeast cells. GRR1 protein contains 12 tandem repeats of a sequence similar to leucine-rich motifs found in other proteins that may mediate protein-protein interactions. Indeed, cell fractionation studies are consistent with this view, suggesting that GRR1 protein is tightly associated with a particulate protein fraction in yeast extracts. The combined genetic and molecular data are consistent with the idea that GRR1 protein is a primary response element in the glucose repression pathway and is required for the generation or interpretation of the signal that induces glucose repression. Images PMID:1922034

  13. A candidate gene for developmental dyslexia encodes a nuclear tetratricopeptide repeat domain protein dynamically regulated in brain.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Mikko; Kaminen, Nina; Nopola-Hemmi, Jaana; Haltia, Tuomas; Myllyluoma, Birgitta; Lyytinen, Heikki; Muller, Kurt; Kaaranen, Minna; Lindsberg, Perttu J; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Kere, Juha

    2003-09-30

    Approximately 3-10% of people have specific difficulties in reading, despite adequate intelligence, education, and social environment. We report here the characterization of a gene, DYX1C1 near the DYX1 locus in chromosome 15q21, that is disrupted by a translocation t(2;15)(q11;q21) segregating coincidentally with dyslexia. Two sequence changes in DYX1C1, one involving the translation initiation sequence and an Elk-1 transcription factor binding site (-3G --> A) and a codon (1249G --> T), introducing a premature stop codon and truncating the predicted protein by 4 aa, associate alone and in combination with dyslexia. DYX1C1 encodes a 420-aa protein with three tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, thought to be protein interaction modules, but otherwise with no homology to known proteins. The mouse Dyx1c1 protein is 78% identical to the human protein, and the nonhuman primates differ at 0.5-1.4% of residues. DYX1C1 is expressed in several tissues, including the brain, and the protein resides in the nucleus. In human brain, DYX1C1 protein localizes to a fraction of cortical neurons and white matter glial cells. We conclude that DYX1C1 should be regarded as a candidate gene for developmental dyslexia. Detailed study of its function may open a path to understanding a complex process of development and maturation of the human brain. PMID:12954984

  14. The Complete Set of Genes Encoding Major Intrinsic Proteins in Arabidopsis Provides a Framework for a New Nomenclature for Major Intrinsic Proteins in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Urban; Karlsson, Maria; Johansson, Ingela; Gustavsson, Sofia; Sjövall, Sara; Fraysse, Laure; Weig, Alfons R.; Kjellbom, Per

    2001-01-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) facilitate the passive transport of small polar molecules across membranes. MIPs constitute a very old family of proteins and different forms have been found in all kinds of living organisms, including bacteria, fungi, animals, and plants. In the genomic sequence of Arabidopsis, we have identified 35 different MIP-encoding genes. Based on sequence similarity, these 35 proteins are divided into four different subfamilies: plasma membrane intrinsic proteins, tonoplast intrinsic proteins, NOD26-like intrinsic proteins also called NOD26-like MIPs, and the recently discovered small basic intrinsic proteins. In Arabidopsis, there are 13 plasma membrane intrinsic proteins, 10 tonoplast intrinsic proteins, nine NOD26-like intrinsic proteins, and three small basic intrinsic proteins. The gene structure in general is conserved within each subfamily, although there is a tendency to lose introns. Based on phylogenetic comparisons of maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis MIPs (AtMIPs), it is argued that the general intron patterns in the subfamilies were formed before the split of monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Although the gene structure is unique for each subfamily, there is a common pattern in how transmembrane helices are encoded on the exons in three of the subfamilies. The nomenclature for plant MIPs varies widely between different species but also between subfamilies in the same species. Based on the phylogeny of all AtMIPs, a new and more consistent nomenclature is proposed. The complete set of AtMIPs, together with the new nomenclature, will facilitate the isolation, classification, and labeling of plant MIPs from other species. PMID:11500536

  15. Generation of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 Proteins of Bluetongue Virus.

    PubMed

    Marín-López, Alejandro; Ortego, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) is employed widely as an experimental vaccine vector for its lack of replication in mammalian cells and high expression level of foreign/heterologous genes. Recombinant MVAs (rMVAs) are used as platforms for protein production as well as vectors to generate vaccines against a high number of infectious diseases and other pathologies. The portrait of the virus combines desirable elements such as high-level biological safety, the ability to activate appropriate innate immune mediators upon vaccination, and the capacity to deliver substantial amounts of heterologous antigens. Recombinant MVAs encoding proteins of bluetongue virus (BTV), an Orbivirus that infects domestic and wild ruminants transmitted by biting midges of the Culicoides species, are excellent vaccine candidates against this virus. In this chapter we describe the methods for the generation of rMVAs encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 proteins of bluetongue virus as a model example for orbiviruses. The protocols included cover the cloning of VP2, NS1, and VP7 BTV-4 genes in a transfer plasmid, the construction of recombinant MVAs, the titration of virus working stocks and the protein expression analysis by immunofluorescence and radiolabeling of rMVA infected cells as well as virus purification. PMID:26458834

  16. Sequence, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of mRNA encoding a human glucose transporter-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Hirofumi; Seino, Susumu; Imura, Hiroo; Seino, Yutaka; Eddy, R.L.; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Byers, M.G.; Shows, T.B.; Bell, G.I. )

    1988-08-01

    Recombinant DNA clones encoding a glucose transporter-like protein have been isolated from adult human liver and kidney cDNA libraries by cross-hybridization with the human HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter cDNA. Analysis of the sequence of this 524-amino acid glucose transporter-like protein indicates that is has 55.5% identity with the HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter as well as a similar structural organization. Studies of the tissue distribution of the mRNA coding for this glucose transporter-like protein in adult human tissues indicate that the highest amounts are present in liver with lower amounts in kidney and small intestine. The amounts of glucose transporter-like mRNA in other tissues, including colon, stomach, cerebrum, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, were below the level of sensitivity of our assay. The single-copy gene encoding this glucose transporter-like protein has been localized to the q26.1{yields}q26.3 region of chromosome 3.

  17. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C.; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-03-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based ‘adaptors/connectors’ with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties.

  18. Recombinant baculoviruses as vectors for identifying proteins encoded by intron-containing members of complex multigene families.

    PubMed Central

    Iatrou, K; Meidinger, R G; Goldsmith, M R

    1989-01-01

    Using a transfer vector derived from Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV), we have constructed recombinant baculoviruses that contain complete silk moth chorion chromosomal genes encoding high-cysteine proteins under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. Silk moth tissue culture cells infected with these recombinant viruses were found to contain abundant RNA sequences of sizes similar to those of the authentic chorion mRNAs. Chorion transcripts present in infected cells were initiated almost exclusively at the cap site of the polyhedrin start site. Primer extension and RNase protection experiments revealed that a considerable proportion of the resultant transcripts were spliced at the same sites as those utilized in follicular cells for the production of functional chorion mRNA. Electrophoretic analysis and immunoprecipitation of the proteins of host cells infected with the recombinant viruses revealed the presence of the corresponding chorion proteins. We conclude that baculovirus vectors can be used for expressing efficiently not only cDNAs or simple genes devoid of intervening sequences but also intron-containing chromosomal genes. Thus, recombinant baculoviruses offer a powerful alternative to hybrid-selected translation, particularly when the identification of proteins encoded by members of complex multigene families is required. Images PMID:2556701

  19. Cloning and characterization of CSP37, a novel gene encoding a putative membrane protein of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Sentandreu, M; Nieto, A; Iborra, A; Elorza, M V; Ponton, J; Fonzi, W A; Sentandreu, R

    1997-01-01

    In the course of an analysis of the functions and assembly of the cell wall of Candida albicans, we have cloned and characterized a gene, which we designated CSP37 (cell surface protein), encoding a 37-kDa polypeptide which is a membrane-associated protein. The gene was isolated by immunological screening of a DNA library constructed from mycelial cells with a polyclonal serum raised against cell walls of this morphology. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of a corresponding genomic DNA fragment revealed a single open reading frame which encodes a predicted protein of 321 amino acids with no significant homology to others in the databases. Disruption of the CSP37 gene by the method described by Fonzi and Irwin (Genetics 134:717-728, 1993) eliminated expression of the Csp37 protein. The mutant strains showed no apparent defect in cell viability, growth, or cell wall assembly but displayed attenuated virulence in systemic infections induced in mice and reduced the ability to adhere to polystyrene. PMID:9244249

  20. Characterization of the light-regulated operon encoding the phycoerythrin-associated linker proteins from the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon.

    PubMed Central

    Federspiel, N A; Grossman, A R

    1990-01-01

    Many biological processes in photosynthetic organisms can be regulated by light quantity or light quality or both. A unique example of the effect of specific wavelengths of light on the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus occurs in cyanobacteria that undergo complementary chromatic adaptation. These organisms alter the composition of their light-harvesting organelle, the phycobilisome, and exhibit distinct morphological features as a function of the wavelength of incident light. Fremyella diplosiphon, a filamentous cyanobacterium, responds to green light by activating transcription of the cpeBA operon, which encodes the pigmented light-harvesting component phycoerythrin. We have isolated and determined the complete nucleotide sequence of another operon, cpeCD, that encodes the linker proteins associated with phycoerythrin hexamers in the phycobilisome. The cpeCD operon is activated in green light and expressed as two major transcripts with the same 5' start site but differing 3' ends. Analysis of the kinetics of transcript accumulation in cultures of F. diplosiphon shifted from red light to green light and vice versa shows that the cpeBA and cpeCD operons are regulated coordinately. A common 17-base-pair sequence is found upstream of the transcription start sites of both operons. A comparison of the predicted amino acid sequences of the phycoerythrin-associated linker proteins CpeC and CpeD with sequences of other previously characterized rod linker proteins shows 49 invariant residues, most of which are in the amino-terminal half of the proteins. Images PMID:1694529

  1. Molecular protein adaptor with genetically encoded interaction sites guiding the hierarchical assembly of plasmonically active nanoparticle architectures.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Andreas; Huber, Matthias C; Cölfen, Helmut; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    The control over the defined assembly of nano-objects with nm-precision is important to create systems and materials with enhanced properties, for example, metamaterials. In nature, the precise assembly of inorganic nano-objects with unique features, for example, magnetosomes, is accomplished by efficient and reliable recognition schemes involving protein effectors. Here we present a molecular approach using protein-based 'adaptors/connectors' with genetically encoded interaction sites to guide the assembly and functionality of different plasmonically active gold nanoparticle architectures (AuNP). The interaction of the defined geometricaly shaped protein adaptors with the AuNP induces the self-assembly of nanoarchitectures ranging from AuNP encapsulation to one-dimensional chain-like structures, complex networks and stars. Synthetic biology and bionanotechnology are applied to co-translationally encode unnatural amino acids as additional site-specific modification sites to generate functionalized biohybrid nanoarchitectures. This protein adaptor-based nano-object assembly approach might be expanded to other inorganic nano-objects creating biohybrid materials with unique electronic, photonic, plasmonic and magnetic properties. PMID:25813537

  2. Early region 1B of adenovirus 2 encodes two coterminal proteins of 495 and 155 amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C W; Schmitt, R C; Smart, J E; Lewis, J B

    1984-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of tryptic peptides has identified the E1B-495R (E1b-57K) (early transcription region 1B of 495 amino acid residues, with an approximate molecular weight of 57,000) protein of adenovirus 2 as encoded by the 495 amino acid open reading frame located in the adenovirus 2 DNA sequence between nucleotides 2016 and 3500. Additional proteins of 16,000 Mr and 18,000 Mr that are related to the E1B-495R protein were identified by cell-free translation of hybridization-selected mRNA. Analysis of [35S]methionine-containing amino terminal tryptic peptides by thin-layer chromatography showed that the E1B-495R, E1B-18K, and E1B-16K proteins all begin at the same initiation codon. The E1B-495R protein from 293 cells also has the same initial tryptic peptide, acetyl-methionyl-glutamyl-arginine. Sequence analysis of E1B-18K tryptic peptides indicated that this protein also has the same carboxy terminus as the E1B-495R protein and that it is derived from an mRNA that is spliced to remove sequences between nucleotides 2250 and 3269, resulting in a protein product of 155 amino acid residues. Analysis of E1B-16K tryptic peptides has not yet revealed the carboxy terminal structure of this protein. Both the E1B-495R and the E1B-155R (E1B-18K) proteins, as well as the E1B-16K protein, were precipitated from cell-free translations and from extracts of infected cells by antiserum against an amino terminal nonapeptide common to these proteins. Images PMID:6323739

  3. STP1, a gene involved in pre-tRNA processing, encodes a nuclear protein containing zinc finger motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S S; Stanford, D R; Silvers, C D; Hopper, A K

    1992-01-01

    STP1 is an unessential yeast gene involved in the removal of intervening sequences from some, but not all, families of intervening sequence-containing pre-tRNAs. Previously, we proposed that STP1 might encode a product that generates pre-tRNA conformations efficiently recognized by tRNA-splicing endonuclease. To test the predictions of this model, we have undertaken a molecular analysis of the STP1 gene and its products. The STP1 locus is located on chromosome IV close to at least two other genes involved in RNA splicing: PRP3 and SPP41. The STP1 open reading frame (ORF) could encode a peptide of 64,827 Da; however, inspection of putative transcriptional and translational regulatory signals and mapping of the 5' ends of mRNA provide evidence that translation of the STP1 ORF usually initiates at a second AUG to generate a protein of 58,081 Da. The STP1 ORF contains three putative zinc fingers. The first of these closely resembles both the DNA transcription factor consensus and the Xenopus laevis p43 RNA-binding protein consensus. The third motif more closely resembles the fingers found in spliceosomal proteins. Employing antisera to the endogenous STP1 protein and to STP1-LacZ fusion proteins, we show that the STP1 protein is localized to nuclei. The presence of zinc finger motifs and the nuclear location of the STP1 protein support the model that this gene product is involved directly in pre-tRNA splicing. Images PMID:1588961

  4. Information for targeting to the chloroplastic inner envelope membrane is contained in the mature region of the maize Bt1-encoded protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.M.; Sullivan, T.D.; Keegstra, K.

    1992-09-15

    Based on the protein sequence deduced from a cDNA clone, it has been proposed that the maize Bt1 locus encodes an amyloplast membrane metabolite translocator protein. The present work provides further evidence for this hypothesis by showing that the gene product of Bt1 could be imported into chloroplasts in vitro and processed to lower molecular weight mature proteins. More importantly, the imported mature proteins were localized to the inner envelope membrane, where metabolite tranlocators are located in plastids. In addition, the location of information for targeting to the inner membrane was investigated by constructing and analyzing the import of chimeric precursor proteins. A chimeric protein with the transit peptide of the precursor to the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase fused to the mature region of the Bt1-encoded protein was targeted to the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. Moreover, a chimeric protein with the transit peptide of the Bt1-encoded protein fused to the mature protein of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein was targeted to the thylakoid. These results indicate that the transit peptide of the Bt1-encoded protein functions primarily as a stromal targeting sequence. The information for targeting to the chloroplastic inner envelope membrane is contained in the mature region of the protein.

  5. Identification and characterization of the herpes simplex virus type 1 protein encoded by the UL37 open reading frame.

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, L S; Pensiero, M N; Jenkins, F J

    1990-01-01

    The UL37 open reading frame of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA genome is located between map units 0.527 and 0.552. We have identified and characterized the UL37 protein product in HSV-1-infected cells. The presence of the UL37 protein was detected by using a polyclonal rabbit antiserum directed against an in vitro-translated product derived from an in vitro-transcribed UL37 mRNA. The UL37 open reading frame encodes for a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 120 kDa in HSV-1-infected cells; the protein's mass was assigned on the basis of its migration in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The UL37 protein is not present at detectable levels in purified HSV-1 virions, suggesting that it is not a structural protein. Analysis of time course experiments and experiments using DNA synthesis inhibitors demonstrated that the UL37 protein is expressed prior to the onset of viral DNA synthesis, reaching maximum levels late in infection, classifying it as a gamma 1 gene. Elution of HSV-1-infected cell proteins from single-stranded DNA agarose columns by using a linear KCl gradient demonstrated that the UL37 protein elutes from this matrix at a salt concentration similar to that observed for ICP8, the major HSV-1 DNA-binding protein. In addition, computer-assisted analysis revealed a potential ATP-binding domain in the predicted UL37 amino acid sequence. On the basis of the kinetics of appearance and DNA-binding properties, we hypothesize that UL37 represents a newly recognized HSV-1 DNA-binding protein that may be involved in late events in viral replication. Images PMID:2173782

  6. The Marek’s disease virus (MDV) protein encoded by the UL17 ortholog is essential for virus growth

    PubMed Central

    Chbab, Najat; Chabanne-Vautherot, Danièle; Francineau, Annick; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Denesvre, Caroline; Vautherot, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    Marek’s disease virus type 1 (MDV-1) shows a strict dependency on the direct cell-to-cell spread for its propagation in cell culture. As MDV-1 shows an impaired nuclear egress in cell culture, we wished to address the characterization of capsid/tegument genes which may intervene in the maturation of intranuclear capsids. Orthologs of UL17 are present in all herpesviruses and, in all reported case, were shown to be essential for viral growth, playing a role in capsid maturation and DNA packaging. As only HSV-1 and PrV UL17 proteins have been characterized so far, we wished to examine the role of MDV-1 pUL17 in virus replication. To analyze MDV-1 UL17 gene function, we created deletion mutants or point mutated the open reading frame (ORF) to interrupt its coding phase. We established that a functional ORF UL17 is indispensable for MDV-1 growth. We chose to characterize the virally encoded protein by tagging the 729 amino-acid long protein with a repeat of the HA peptide that was fused to its C-terminus. Protein pUL17 was identified in infected cell extracts as an 82 kDa protein which localized to the nucleus, colocalizing with VP5, the major capsid protein, and VP13/14, a major tegument protein. By using green fluorescent protein fusion and HA tagged proteins expressed under the cytomegalovirus IE gene enhancer/promoter (PCMV IE), we showed that MDV-1 pUL17 nuclear distribution in infected cells is not an intrinsic property. Although our results strongly suggest that another viral protein retains (or relocate) pUL17 to the nucleus, we report that none of the tegument protein tested so far were able to mediate pUL17 relocation to the nucleus. PMID:19284966

  7. Bioconjugation of therapeutic proteins and enzymes using the expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed striking progress in the development of bioorthogonal reactions that are strictly directed towards intended sites in biomolecules while avoiding interference by a number of physical and chemical factors in biological environment. Efforts to exploit bioorthogonal reactions in protein conjugation have led to the evolution of protein translational machineries and the expansion of genetic codes that systematically incorporate a range of non-natural amino acids containing bioorthogonal groups into recombinant proteins in a site-specific manner. Chemoselective conjugation of proteins has begun to find valuable applications to previously inaccessible problems. In this review, we describe bioorthogonal reactions useful for protein conjugation, and biosynthetic methods that produce proteins amenable to those reactions through an expanded genetic code. We then provide key examples in which novel protein conjugates, generated by the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and the chemoselective reactions, address unmet needs in protein therapeutics and enzyme engineering. PMID:26036278

  8. Proximity-enabled protein crosslinking through genetically encoding haloalkane unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zheng; Lacey, Vanessa K; Ren, Haiyan; Xu, Jing; Burban, David J; Jennings, Patricia A; Wang, Lei

    2014-02-17

    The selective generation of covalent bonds between and within proteins would provide new avenues for studying protein function and engineering proteins with new properties. New covalent bonds were genetically introduced into proteins by enabling an unnatural amino acid (Uaa) to selectively react with a proximal natural residue. This proximity-enabled bioreactivity was expanded to a series of haloalkane Uaas. Orthogonal tRNA/synthetase pairs were evolved to incorporate these Uaas, which only form a covalent thioether bond with cysteine when positioned in close proximity. By using the Uaa and cysteine, spontaneous covalent bond formation was demonstrated between an affibody and its substrate Z protein, thereby leading to irreversible binding, and within the affibody to increase its thermostability. This strategy of proximity-enabled protein crosslinking (PEPC) may be generally expanded to target different natural amino acids, thus providing diversity and flexibility in covalent bond formation for protein research and protein engineering. PMID:24449339

  9. Characterization of a myxoma virus-encoded serpin-like protein with activity against interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Petit, F; Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Fassy, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-01-01

    A genomic library of myxoma virus (MV) DNA, a leporipoxvirus that causes myxomatosis, was constructed and screened by in vitro transcription-translation. A clone was selected on the basis of its strong reactivity with MV antiserum. Analysis of the corresponding DNA sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed an open reading frame coding for a 34-kDa protein with strong homologies to members of the serpin superfamily. The gene encoding this new protein, called serp2, was localized on the MV genome. Interestingly, this gene is deleted in an attenuated strain. We constructed a baculovirus vector to produce recombinant Serp2 protein and raised specific antisera that allowed the characterization of Serp2 expression during the MV cycle. The biological relevance of this new serpin from MV was monitored, and it was shown that Serp2 could inhibit human interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme activity. PMID:8709205

  10. Development and validation of an ELISA using a protein encoded by ORF2 antigenic domain of porcine circovirus type 2

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The capsid protein (ORF2) is a major structural protein of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2). A simple and reliable diagnostic method based on ORF2 protein immunoreactivity would serve as a valuable diagnostic method for detecting serum antibodies to PCV2 and monitoring PCV infection. Here, we reported an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA) by using an antigenic domain (113-147AA) of ORF2-encoded antigen, expressed in E. coli, for diagnosis of PCV infection. Results The ELISA was performed on 288 serum samples collected from different porcine herds and compared with an indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA). In total, 262 of 288 samples were positive as indicated by both I-ELISA and IFA. The specificity and sensitivity of I-ELISA were 87.7% and 93.57%. Conclusions This ELISA is suitable for detection and discrimination of PCV2 infection in both SPF and farm antisera. PMID:20958981

  11. Isolation and molecular genetic characterization of the Bacillus subtilis gene (infB) encoding protein synthesis initiation factor 2.

    PubMed Central

    Shazand, K; Tucker, J; Chiang, R; Stansmore, K; Sperling-Petersen, H U; Grunberg-Manago, M; Rabinowitz, J C; Leighton, T

    1990-01-01

    Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of Bacillus subtilis cell extracts detected two proteins that cross-reacted with monospecific polyclonal antibody raised against Escherichia coli initiation factor 2 alpha (IF2 alpha). Subsequent Southern blot analysis of B. subtilis genomic DNA identified a 1.3-kilobase (kb) HindIII fragment which cross-hybridized with both E. coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus IF2 gene probes. This DNA was cloned from a size-selected B. subtilis plasmid library. The cloned HindIII fragment, which was shown by DNA sequence analysis to encode the N-terminal half of the B. subtilis IF2 protein and 0.2 kb of upstream flanking sequence, was utilized as a homologous probe to clone an overlapping 2.76-kb ClaI chromosomal fragment containing the entire IF2 structural gene. The HindIII fragment was also used as a probe to obtain overlapping clones from a lambda gt11 library which contained additional upstream and downstream flanking sequences. Sequence comparisons between the B. subtilis IF2 gene and the other bacterial homologs from E. coli, B. stearothermophilus, and Streptococcus faecium displayed extensive nucleic acid and protein sequence homologies. The B. subtilis infB gene encodes two proteins, IF2 alpha (78.6 kilodaltons) and IF2 beta (68.2 kilodaltons); both were expressed in B. subtilis and E. coli. These two proteins cross-reacted with antiserum to E. coli IF2 alpha and were able to complement in vivo an E. coli infB gene disruption. Four-factor recombination analysis positioned the infB gene at 145 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome, between the polC and spcB loci. This location is distinct from those of the other major ribosomal protein and rRNA gene clusters of B. subtilis. Images PMID:2110148

  12. Encoded novel forms of HSP70 or a cytolytic protein increase DNA vaccine potency

    PubMed Central

    Garrod, Tamsin; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Yu, Stanley; Gargett, Tessa; Gowans, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    In humans, DNA vaccines have failed to demonstrate the equivalent levels of immunogenicity that were shown in smaller animals. Previous studies have encoded adjuvants, predominantly cytokines, within these vaccines in an attempt to increase antigen-specific immune responses. However, these strategies have lacked breadth of innate immune activation and have led to disappointing results in clinical trials. Damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) have been identified as pattern recognition receptor (PRR) agonists. DAMPs can bind to a wide range of PRRs on dendritic cells (DCs) and thus our studies have aimed to utilize this characteristic to act as an adjuvant in a DNA vaccine approach. Specifically, HSP70 has been identified as a DAMP, but has been limited by its lack of accessibility to PRRs in and on DCs. Here, we discuss the promising results achieved with the inclusion of membrane-bound or secreted HSP70 into a DNA vaccine encoding HIV gag as the model immunogen. PMID:25483501

  13. deaD, a new Escherichia coli gene encoding a presumed ATP-dependent RNA helicase, can suppress a mutation in rpsB, the gene encoding ribosomal protein S2.

    PubMed Central

    Toone, W M; Rudd, K E; Friesen, J D

    1991-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a new gene from Escherichia coli which encodes a 64-kDa protein. The inferred amino acid sequence of the protein shows remarkable similarity to eIF4A, a murine translation initiation factor that has an ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity and is a founding member of the D-E-A-D family of proteins (characterized by a conserved Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp motif). Our new gene, called deaD, was cloned as a gene dosage-dependent suppressor of temperature-sensitive mutations in rpsB, the gene encoding ribosomal protein S2. We suggest that the DeaD protein plays a hitherto unknown role in translation in E. coli. Images PMID:2045359

  14. The 3′-UTR mediates the cellular localization of an mRNA encoding a short plasma membrane protein

    PubMed Central

    Loya, Adi; Pnueli, Lilach; Yosefzon, Yahav; Wexler, Ydo; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal; Arava, Yoav

    2008-01-01

    Cotranslational synthesis of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum is preceded by targeting of the translating mRNA once a signal peptide emerges from the ribosome exit tunnel. Many mRNAs, however, are unlikely to be targeted by this process because they encode proteins that do not contain a signal peptide or because they are too short to be recognized by the signal recognition particle. Herein we tested the possible involvement of the 3′-UTR in the localization of an mRNA that encodes a very short Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein (Pmp1). We found by ribosome density mapping, sedimentation analysis, differential centrifugation, and fluorescent in situ hybridization that the 3′-UTR is essential for the association of the transcript with membrane compartments. Fusion of the 3′-UTR to heterologous open reading frames conferred on them a sedimentation and cellular localization pattern resembling that of PMP1. Mutation analysis revealed that a repeating UG-rich sequence within the 3′-UTR is important for membrane association. Taken together, our results reveal an essential role for elements within the 3′-UTR in the localization of an mRNA that is likely to be ignored by the standard signal-dependant mechanism. PMID:18492794

  15. A 38-kilobase pathogenicity island specific for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis encodes cell surface proteins expressed in the host.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, Janin; Strommenger, Birgit; Goethe, Ralph; Dohmann, Karen; Gerlach, Gerald-F; Stevenson, Karen; Li, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Qing; Kapur, Vivek; Bull, Tim J

    2004-03-01

    We have used representational difference analysis to identify a novel Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific ABC transporter operon (mpt), which comprises six open reading frames designated mptA to -F and is immediately preceded by two putative Fur boxes. Functional genomics revealed that the mpt operon is flanked on one end by a fep cluster encoding proteins involved in the uptake of Fe(3+) and on the other end by a sid cluster encoding non-ribosome-dependent heterocyclic siderophore synthases. Together these genes form a 38-kb M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific locus flanked by an insertion sequence similar to IS1110. Expression studies using Western blot analyses showed that MptC is present in the envelope fraction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The MptD protein was shown to be surface exposed, using a specific phage (fMptD) isolated from a phage-peptide library, by differential screening of Mycobacterium smegmatis transformants. The phage fMptD-derived peptide could be used in a peptide-mediated capture PCR with milk from infected dairy herds, thereby showing surface-exposed expression of the MptD protein in the host. Together, these data suggest that the 38-kb locus constitutes an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogenicity island. PMID:14977927

  16. Maedi-Visna Virus and Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus Genomes Encode a Vpr-Like but No Tat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Villet, Stéphanie; Bouzar, Baya Amel; Morin, Thierry; Verdier, Gérard; Legras, Catherine; Chebloune, Yahia

    2003-01-01

    A small open reading frame (ORF) in maedi-visna virus (MVV) and caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) was initially named “tat” by analogy with a similarly placed ORF in the primate lentiviruses. The encoded “Tat” protein was ascribed the function of up regulation of the viral transcription from the long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter, but we have recently reported that MVV and CAEV Tat proteins lack trans-activation function activity under physiological conditions (S. Villet, C. Faure, B. Bouzar, G. Verdien, Y. Chebloune, and C. Legras, Virology 307:317-327, 2003). In the present work, we show that MVV Tat localizes to the nucleus of transfected cells, probably through the action of a nuclear localization signal in its C-terminal portion. We also show that, unlike the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Tat protein, MVV Tat was not secreted into the medium by transfected human or caprine cells in the absence of cell lysis but that, like the primate accessory protein Vpr, MVV and CAEV Tat proteins were incorporated into viral particles. In addition, analysis of the primary protein structures showed that small-ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) Tat proteins are more similar to the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr protein than to HIV-1 Tat. We also demonstrate a functional similarity between the SRLV Tat proteins and the HIV-1 Vpr product in the induction of a specific G2 arrest of the cell cycle in MVV Tat-transfected cells, which increases the G2/G1 ratio 2.8-fold. Together, these data strongly suggest that the tat ORF in the SRLV genomes does not code for a regulatory transactivator of the LTR but, rather, for a Vpr-like accessory protein. PMID:12915575

  17. Organization and alternate splice products of the gene encoding nuclear inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (NIPP-1).

    PubMed

    Van Eynde, A; Pérez-Callejón, E; Schoenmakers, E; Jacquemin, M; Stalmans, W; Bollen, M

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (NIPP-1) is one of two major regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase-1 in mammalian nuclei. We report here the cloning and structural characterization of the human NIPP-1 genes, designated PPP1R8P and PPP1R8 in human gene nomenclature. PPP1R8P (1.2 kb) is a processed pseudogene and was localized by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1p33-32. PPP1R8 is an authentic NIPP-1 gene and was localized to chromosome 1p35. PPP1R8 (25.2 kb) is composed of seven exons and encodes four different transcripts, as determined from cDNA library screening, reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and/or EST (expressed sequence tag) database search analysis. NIPP-1alpha mRNA represents the major transcript in human tissues and various cell lines, and encodes a polypeptide of 351 residues that only differs from the previously cloned calf thymus NIPP-1 by a single residue. The other transcripts, termed NIPP-1beta, gamma and delta, are generated by alternative 5'-splice site usage, by exon skipping and/or by alternative polyadenylation. The NIPP-1beta/delta and NIPP-1gamma mRNAs are expected to encode fragments of NIPP-1alpha that differ from the latter by the absence of the first 142 and 224 residues, respectively. NIPP-1gamma corresponds to 'activator of RNA decay-1' (Ard-1) which, unlike NIPP-1alpha, displays in vitro and endoribonuclease activity and lacks an RVXF consensus motif for interaction with protein phosphatase-1. While the NIPP-1alpha/beta/delta-transcripts were found to be present in various human tissues, the NIPP-1gamma transcript could only be detected in human transformed B-lymphocytes. PMID:10103062

  18. Comparing the predicted and observed properties of proteins encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Link, A J; Robison, K; Church, G M

    1997-08-01

    Mining the emerging abundance of microbial genome sequences for hypotheses is an exciting prospect of "functional genomics". At the forefront of this effort, we compared the predictions of the complete Escherichia coli genomic sequence with the observed gene products by assessing 381 proteins for their mature N-termini, in vivo abundances, isoelectric points, molecular masses, and cellular locations. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and Edman sequencing were combined to sequence Coomassie-stained 2-DE spots representing the abundant proteins of wild-type E. coli K-12 strains. Greater than 90% of the abundant proteins in the E. coli proteome lie in a small isoelectric point and molecular mass window of 4-7 and 10-100 kDa, respectively. We identified several highly abundant proteins, YjbJ, YjbP, YggX, HdeA, and AhpC, which would not have been predicted from the genomic sequence alone. Of the 223 uniquely identified loci, 60% of the encoded proteins are proteolytically processed. As previously reported, the initiator methionine was efficiently cleaved when the penultimate amino acid was serine or alanine. In contrast, when the penultimate amino acid was threonine, glycine, or proline, cleavage was variable, and valine did not signal cleavage. Although signal peptide cleavage sites tended to follow predicted rules, the length of the putative signal sequence was occassionally greater than the consensus. For proteins predicted to be in the cytoplasm or inner membrane, the N-terminal amino acids were highly constrained compared to proteins localized to the periplasm or outer membrane. Although cytoplasmic proteins follow the N-end rule for protein stability, proteins in the periplasm or outer membrane do not follow this rule; several have N-terminal amino acids predicted to destabilize the proteins. Surprisingly, 18% of the identified 2-DE spots represent isoforms in which protein products of the same gene have different observed pI and M(r), suggesting they are

  19. Purification of an angiotensin II binding protein by using antibodies to a peptide encoded by angiotensin II complementary RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, T.S.; Dion, L.D.; Bost, K.L.; Oparil, S.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    The authors have generated a monospecific antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded by an RNA complementary to the mRNA for angiotensin II (AII) and determined whether this antibody recognizes the AII receptor. They demonstrate that the antibody competes specifically with /sup 125/I-labeled AII for the same binding site on rat adrenal membranes. Furthermore, they show this antibody inhibits the secretion of aldosterone from cultured rat adrenal cells, suggesting that the antibody recognizes the biologically relevant AII receptor. Finally, they demonstrate that antibody to the complementary peptide can be used to immunoaffinity-purify a protein of M/sub r/ 66,000 that specifically binds radiolabeled AII.

  20. BBS10 encodes a vertebrate-specific chaperonin-like protein and is a major BBS locus.

    PubMed

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Laurier, Virginie; Davis, Erica E; Muller, Jean; Rix, Suzanne; Badano, José L; Leitch, Carmen C; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Corbani, Sandra; Jalk, Nadine; Vicaire, Serge; Sarda, Pierre; Hamel, Christian; Lacombe, Didier; Holder, Muriel; Odent, Sylvie; Holder, Susan; Brooks, Alice S; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Silva, Eduardo D; Da Silva, Eduardo; Rossillion, Béatrice; Sigaudy, Sabine; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Lewis, Richard Alan; Leheup, Bruno; Verloes, Alain; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Mégarbané, André; Poch, Olivier; Bonneau, Dominique; Beales, Philip L; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Katsanis, Nicholas; Dollfus, Hélène

    2006-05-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy. Although nine BBS genes have been cloned, they explain only 40-50% of the total mutational load. Here we report a major new BBS locus, BBS10, that encodes a previously unknown, rapidly evolving vertebrate-specific chaperonin-like protein. We found BBS10 to be mutated in about 20% of an unselected cohort of families of various ethnic origins, including some families with mutations in other BBS genes, consistent with oligogenic inheritance. In zebrafish, mild suppression of bbs10 exacerbated the phenotypes of other bbs morphants. PMID:16582908

  1. [Cloning and functional analysis of SCTF-1 encoding a C2H2-type Zinc finger protein from soybean].

    PubMed

    Song, Bing; Wang, Pi-Wu; Fu, Yong-Ping; Fan, Xu-Hong; Xia, Hai-Feng; Gao, Wei; Hong, Yang; Wang, He; Zhang, Zhuo; Ma, Jian

    2012-06-01

    The zinc finger protein is one of the proteins with finger-like domain. Some of them are transcription factors which play important role in plant growth and plant resistance to abiotic stresses. In this paper, a novel C2H2-type zinc finger protein gene SCTF-1 (GenBank accession number JQ692081) was isolated from soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) This gene has a 699 bp ORF (open reading frame) with no intron and encodes a 24.9 kDa protein with 233 amino acids. Its isoelectric point (pI) is 8.33. The SCTF-1 protein contains two typical C2H2-type zinc finger domains. Both of them have highly conserved amino acid sequence-QALGGH which is a particular characteristic of plant. Transient expression of the GFP-SCTF-1 protein in onion epidermal cell showed that SCTF-1 was localized in cell nuclei. RT-PCR results showed that SCTF-1 gene was expressed with high levels in flowers and leaves in soybean, but low in roots and stems. The expression of SCTF-1 gene was strongly induced by low temperature in the soybean seedlings. Overexpression of SCTF-1 enhanced cold tolerance of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) compared to the control. PMID:22698747

  2. Argonaute quenching and global changes in Dicer homeostasis caused by a pathogen-encoded GW repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Jacinthe; Garcia, Damien; Pontier, Dominique; Ohnesorge, Stephanie; Yu, Agnes; Garcia, Shahinez; Braun, Laurence; Bergdoll, Marc; Hakimi, Mohamed Ali; Lagrange, Thierry; Voinnet, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    In plants and invertebrates, viral-derived siRNAs processed by the RNaseIII Dicer guide Argonaute (AGO) proteins as part of antiviral RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC). As a counterdefense, viruses produce suppressor proteins (VSRs) that inhibit the host silencing machinery, but their mechanisms of action and cellular targets remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the Turnip crinckle virus (TCV) capsid, the P38 protein, acts as a homodimer, or multiples thereof, to mimic host-encoded glycine/tryptophane (GW)-containing proteins normally required for RISC assembly/function in diverse organisms. The P38 GW residues bind directly and specifically to Arabidopsis AGO1, which, in addition to its role in endogenous microRNA-mediated silencing, is identified as a major effector of TCV-derived siRNAs. Point mutations in the P38 GW residues are sufficient to abolish TCV virulence, which is restored in Arabidopsis ago1 hypomorphic mutants, uncovering both physical and genetic interactions between the two proteins. We further show how AGO1 quenching by P38 profoundly impacts the cellular availability of the four Arabidopsis Dicers, uncovering an AGO1-dependent, homeostatic network that functionally connects these factors together. The likely widespread occurrence and expected consequences of GW protein mimicry on host silencing pathways are discussed in the context of innate and adaptive immunity in plants and metazoans. PMID:20439431

  3. Argonaute quenching and global changes in Dicer homeostasis caused by a pathogen-encoded GW repeat protein.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Jacinthe; Garcia, Damien; Pontier, Dominique; Ohnesorge, Stephanie; Yu, Agnes; Garcia, Shahinez; Braun, Laurence; Bergdoll, Marc; Hakimi, Mohamed Ali; Lagrange, Thierry; Voinnet, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    In plants and invertebrates, viral-derived siRNAs processed by the RNaseIII Dicer guide Argonaute (AGO) proteins as part of antiviral RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC). As a counterdefense, viruses produce suppressor proteins (VSRs) that inhibit the host silencing machinery, but their mechanisms of action and cellular targets remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the Turnip crinckle virus (TCV) capsid, the P38 protein, acts as a homodimer, or multiples thereof, to mimic host-encoded glycine/tryptophane (GW)-containing proteins normally required for RISC assembly/function in diverse organisms. The P38 GW residues bind directly and specifically to Arabidopsis AGO1, which, in addition to its role in endogenous microRNA-mediated silencing, is identified as a major effector of TCV-derived siRNAs. Point mutations in the P38 GW residues are sufficient to abolish TCV virulence, which is restored in Arabidopsis ago1 hypomorphic mutants, uncovering both physical and genetic interactions between the two proteins. We further show how AGO1 quenching by P38 profoundly impacts the cellular availability of the four Arabidopsis Dicers, uncovering an AGO1-dependent, homeostatic network that functionally connects these factors together. The likely widespread occurrence and expected consequences of GW protein mimicry on host silencing pathways are discussed in the context of innate and adaptive immunity in plants and metazoans. PMID:20439431

  4. NMR Structure of the hypothetical protein encoded by the YjbJ gene from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Liao, Jack; Wu, Bin; Yee, Adelinda; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Edwards, Aled M.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2002-06-01

    Here we describe the solution structure of YjbJ (gil418541) as part of a structural proteomics project on the feasibility of the high-throughput generation of samples from Escherichia coli for structural studies. YjbJ is a hypothetical protein from Escherichia coli protein of unknown function. It is conserved, showing significant sequence identity to four predicted prokaryotic proteins, also of unknown function (Figure 1A). These include gil16762921 from Salmonella enterica (S. typhi), gil17938413 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, gil16265654 from Sinorizhobium meliloti, and gil15599932 from Pseudomona aeruginosa. The structure of YjbJ reveals a new variation of a common motif (four-helix bundle) that could not be predicted from the protein sequence. Although the biochemical function is unknown, the existence of patterns of conserved residues on the protein surface suggest that the fold and function of all these proteins could be similar.

  5. Brassica rapa Has Three Genes That Encode Proteins Associated with Different Neutral Lipids in Plastids of Specific Tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Wu, Sherry S.H.; Ratnayake, Chandra; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2001-01-01

    Plastid lipid-associated protein (PAP), a predominant structural protein associated with carotenoids and other non-green neutral lipids in plastids, was shown to be encoded by a single nuclear gene in several species. Here we report three PAP genes in the diploid Brassica rapa; the three PAPs are associated with different lipids in specific tissues. Pap1 and Pap2 are more similar to each other (84% amino acid sequence identity) than to Pap3 (46% and 44%, respectively) in the encoded mature proteins. Pap1 transcript was most abundant in the maturing anthers (tapetum) and in lesser amounts in leaves, fruit coats, seeds, and sepals; Pap2 transcript was abundant only in the petals; and Pap3 transcript had a wide distribution, but at minimal levels in numerous organs. Immunoblotting after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that most organs had several nanograms of PAP1 or PAP2 per milligram of total protein, the highest amounts being in the anthers (10.9 μg mg−1 PAP1) and petals (6.6 μg mg−1 PAP2), and that they had much less PAP3 (<0.02 μg mg−1). In these organs PAP was localized in isolated plastid fractions. Plants were subjected to abiotic stresses; drought and ozone reduced the levels of the three Pap transcripts, whereas mechanical wounding and altering the light intensity enhanced their levels. We conclude that the PAP gene family consists of several members whose proteins are associated with different lipids and whose expressions are controlled by distinct mechanisms. Earlier reports of the expression of one Pap gene in various organs in a species need to be re-examined. PMID:11351096

  6. Genetic transformation of novel isolates of chicken Lactobacillus bearing probiotic features for expression of heterologous proteins: a tool to develop live oral vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Rodrigo M; Moreira, João Luiz S; Souza, Marcelo R; Fátima Horta, M; Teixeira, Santuza MR; Neumann, Elisabeth; Nicoli, Jacques R; Nunes, Álvaro C

    2006-01-01

    Background The use of lactic acid bacteria as vehicles to delivery antigens to immunize animals is a promising issue. When genetically modified, these bacteria can induce a specific local and systemic immune response against selected pathogens. Gastric acid and bile salts tolerance, production of antagonistic substances against pathogenic microorganisms, and adhesive ability to gut epithelium are other important characteristics that make these bacteria useful for oral immunization. Results Bacteria isolated on de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe medium (MRS) from different gastrointestinal portions of broiler chicks were evaluated for their resistance to artificial gastric acid and bile salts, production of hydrogen peroxide, and cell surface hydrophobicity. Thirty-eight isolates were first typed at species level by PCR amplification of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers using universal primers that anneal within 16S and 23S genes, followed by restriction digestion analyses of PCR amplicons (PCR-ARDRA). An expression cassette was assembled onto the pCR2.1-Topo vector by cloning the promoter, leader peptide, cell wall anchor and terminator sequences derived from the laminin binding S-layer protein gene of L. crispatus strain F5.7 (lbs gene). A sequence encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was inserted as reporter gene, and an erythromycin resistance gene was added as selective marker. All constructs were able to express GFP in the cloning host E. coli XL1-Blue and different Lactobacillus strains as verified by FACS and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Conclusion Lactobacillus isolated from gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens and selected for probiotic characteristics can be genetically modified by introducing an expression cassette into the lbs locus. The transformed bacteria expressed on its cell wall surface different fluorescent proteins used as reporters of promoter function. It is possible then that similar bacterial model expressing pathogen antigens can

  7. The putative cell cycle gene, enhancer of rudimentary, encodes a highly conserved protein found in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Gelsthorpe, M; Pulumati, M; McCallum, C; Dang-Vu, K; Tsubota, S I

    1997-02-28

    The enhancer of rudimentary gene, e(r), in Drosophila melanogaster encodes a protein, ER, whose function has been implicated in pyrimidine biosynthesis and the cell cycle (Wojcik et al. (1994) Genetics 138, 1163-1170). In order to identify conserved regions of the protein and potentially important functional domains, the e(r) gene was cloned and sequenced from two other insects (Drosophila virilis and Aedes aegypti) and three vertebrates (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Brachydanio rerio) and sequenced from a flowering plant (Arabidopsis thaliana). These sequences along with those of a nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) exhibit a high degree of identity. ER of Drosophila melanogaster is 76% identical to the three vertebrate proteins, 49% identical to the nematode protein, and 40% identical to the plant protein. There is high evolutionary conservation among the vertebrates. The mouse and human proteins are identical and differ from that of the zebrafish by a single conservative amino-acid change (valine for isoleucine). A dramatic sequence conservation is seen in the position of the hydrophobic amino acids. Of the 27 positions occupied by hydrophobic amino acids in ER of Drosophila melanogaster, 25 of the corresponding positions in the human protein, 23 of the positions in Caenorhabditis elegans, and 20 of the positions in Arabidopsis thaliana have hydrophobic amino acids. Most of these residues are present in three conserved amphipathic alpha-helices, which are proposed to function in protein-protein interactions. Two phosphorylation sites for casein kinase II (CKII) have also been conserved within the animal groups. Purified ER from Drosophila melanogaster is phosphorylated in vitro by CKII, arguing that these two sites are functional in vivo. A putative shift in the secondary structure of ER caused by the phosphorylation of these sites suggests that CKII may be regulating the activity of the ER in vivo. PMID:9074495

  8. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses. PMID:25309527

  9. MpAsr encodes an intrinsically unstructured protein and enhances osmotic tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin-Ran; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dong-Ru; Liu, Hai-yan; He, Yan-ming; Qi, Kang-biao; Wang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Fa

    2011-07-01

    Abscisic acid-, stress- and ripening (ASR) -induced proteins are plant-specific proteins whose expression is up-regulated under abiotic stresses or during fruit ripening. In this study, we characterized an ASR protein from plantain to explore its physiological roles under osmotic stress. The expression pattern of MpAsr gene shows that MpAsr gene changed little at the mRNA level, while the MpASR protein accumulates under osmotic treatment. Through bioinformatic-based predictions, circular dichroism spectrometry, and proteolysis and heat-stability assays, we determined that the MpASR protein is an intrinsically unstructured protein in solution. We demonstrated that the hydrophilic MpASR protein could protect L: -lactate dehydrogenase (L: -LDH) from cold-induced aggregation. Furthermore, heterologous expression of MpAsr in Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis enhanced the tolerance of transformants to osmotic stress. Transgenic 35S::MpAsr Arabidopsis seeds had a higher germination frequency than wild-type seeds under unfavorable conditions. At the physiological level, 35S::MpAsr Arabidopsis showed increased soluble sugars and decreased cell membrane damage under osmotic stress. Thus, our results suggest that the MpASR protein may act as an osmoprotectant and water-retaining molecule to help cell adjustment to water deficit caused by osmotic stress. PMID:21327389

  10. Poxviruses Encode a Reticulon-Like Protein that Promotes Membrane Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Karl J.; Bisht, Himani; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Hyun, Seong-In; Hansen, Bryan T.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Hinshaw, Jenny E.; Moss, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Poxviruses are enveloped DNA viruses that replicate within the cytoplasm. The first viral structures are crescents and spherical particles with a lipoprotein membrane bilayer thought to be derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We determined that A17, a conserved viral transmembrane protein essential for crescent formation, forms homo-oligomers and shares topological features with cellular reticulon-like proteins, which promote membrane curvature and contribute to the tubular structure of the ER. When the purified A17 protein was incorporated into liposomes, 25 nm diameter vesicles and tubules formed at low and high A17 concentrations, respectively. In addition, intracellular expression of A17, in the absence of other viral structural proteins, transformed the ER into aggregated 3-dimensional tubular networks. We suggest that A17 is a viral reticulon-like protein that contributes to curvature during biogenesis of the poxvirus membrane. PMID:26923595

  11. Genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors for live-cell visualization of protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Oldach, Laurel; Zhang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence-based, genetically encodable biosensors are widely used tools for real-time analysis of different biological process. Over the last few decades the number of available genetically encodable biosensors and the types of processes they can monitor has increased rapidly. In this review we aim to introduce the reader to general principles and best practices in biosensor development and highlight some of the ways in which biosensors can be used to illuminate outstanding questions of biological function. Specifically, we will focus on sensors developed for monitoring kinase activity and use them to illustrate some common considerations for biosensor design. We will describe several uses to which kinase and second-messenger biosensors have been put, and conclude with considerations for the use of biosensors once they are developed. Overall, as fluorescence-based biosensors continue to diversify and improve we expect them to continue to be widely used as reliable and fruitful tools for gaining deeper insights into cellular and organismal function. PMID:24485761

  12. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  13. Identification and characterization of a prawn white spot syndrome virus gene that encodes an envelope protein VP31

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Xie Xixian; Yang Feng . E-mail: mbiotech@public.xm.fj.cn

    2005-09-15

    Based on a combination of SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa (termed as VP31) was identified from purified shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) envelope fraction. The resulting amino acid (aa) sequence matched an open reading frame (WSV340) of the WSSV genome. This ORF contained 783 nucleotides (nt), encoding 261 aa. A fragment of WSV340 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein with a 6His-tag, and then specific antibody was raised. Western blot analysis and the immunoelectron microscope method (IEM) confirmed that VP31 was present exclusively in the viral envelope fraction. The neutralization experiment suggested that VP31 might play an important role in WSSV infectivity.

  14. Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus (ISAV) RNA Binding Protein Encoded by Segment 8 ORF2 and Its Interaction with ISAV and Intracellular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Christel M.; Markussen, Turhan; Thiede, Bernd; Rimstad, Espen

    2016-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus infecting salmonid fish. The virus is adapted to low temperature and has a replication optimum between 10–15 °C. In this study the subcellular localization and protein interactions for the protein encoded by the largest open reading frame of gene segment 8 (s8ORF2) were investigated. In ISAV infected cells the s8ORF2 protein was found mainly in the cytosol but a minor fraction of cells expressed the protein in the nucleus as well. Green fluorescent protein-tagged s8ORF2 did not leak out of the cell when the plasma membrane was permeabilized, suggesting interactions with intracellular structural components. The s8ORF2 protein exists both as monomer and homodimer, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments strongly suggests it binds to the ISAV fusion-, nucleo- and matrix proteins. Two versions of s8ORF2 were detected with apparent molecular weights of 24–26 and 35 kDa in lysates of infected cells. The 35 kDa type is an early viral protein while the smaller version appears during the later phases of infection. The 24–26 kDa type was also the predominant form in viral particles. The s8ORF2 protein has previously been shown to bind RNA and interfere with interferon induction and signaling. Here we found that a fraction of the s8ORF2 protein pool in infected cells is likely to be conjugated to the interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) and ubiquitin. Furthermore, several endogenous proteins pulled down by the s8ORF2 protein were identified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). PMID:26901217

  15. Complex Formation among Murine Cytomegalovirus US22 Proteins Encoded by Genes M139, M140, and M141

    PubMed Central

    Karabekian, Zaruhi; Hanson, Laura K.; Slater, Jacquelyn S.; Krishna, Neel K.; Bolin, Lisa L.; Kerry, Julie A.; Campbell, Ann E.

    2005-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) proteins encoded by US22 genes M139, M140, and M141 function, at least in part, to regulate replication of this virus in macrophages. Mutant MCMV having one or more of these genes deleted replicates poorly in macrophages in culture and in the macrophage-dense environment of the spleen. In this report, we demonstrate the existence of stable complexes formed by the products of all three of these US22 genes, as well as a complex composed of the products of M140 and M141. These complexes form in the absence of other viral proteins; however, the pM140/pM141 complex serves as a requisite binding partner for the M139 gene products. Products from all three genes colocalize to a perinuclear region of the cell juxtaposed to or within the cis-Golgi region but excluded from the trans-Golgi region. Interestingly, expression of pM141 redirects pM140 from its predominantly nuclear residence to the perinuclear, cytoplasmic locale where these US22 proteins apparently exist in complex. Thus, complexing of these nonessential, early MCMV proteins likely confers a function(s) independent of each individual protein and important for optimal replication of MCMV in its natural host. PMID:15731247

  16. Identification of cDNA clones encoding HMG 2, a major protein of the mexican axolotl hydrocortisone-sensitive thymocytes.

    PubMed

    de Guerra, A; Guillet, F; Charlemagne, J; Fellah, J S

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and analyzed cDNA clones encoding a major 26 kDa protein of the HMG1-2 family which is abundant in the cytoplasm and nucleus of axolotl hydrocortisone-sensitive thymocytes. The axolotl HMG2 protein is very similar to proteins belonging to the HMG1-2 family, from teleost fish to mammals. All the molecular features of the HMG1-2 proteins are conserved, including the high proportion of basic and aromatic residues, and the characteristic acidic C-terminus tail. The 3'-untranslated region of the HMG2 axolotl cDNA is also similar to the avian and mammalian HMG2 3'-UT sequences, suggesting that some selective events have acted at the DNA level to conserve this region, which could be important in the differential expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes. The axolotl HMG2 protein contains the two well conserved HMG boxes which are thought to be the DNA-binding domains of the molecule. Axolotl thymocytes and spleen cells contain almost identical amounts of HMG2 mRNAs but HMG2 polypeptide is undetectable in spleen cells using anti-26 kDa antibodies. The reason for the accumulation of HMG1-2 molecules in vertebrate hydrocortisone-sensitive thymocytes is discussed, as well as their possible role in apoptosis. PMID:8654668

  17. EARLY SENESCENCE1 Encodes a SCAR-LIKE PROTEIN2 That Affects Water Loss in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Yuchun; Yang, Yaolong; Xu, Jie; Li, Xiaojing; Leng, Yujia; Dai, Liping; Huang, Lichao; Shao, Guosheng; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Jiang; Guo, Longbiao; Pan, Jianwei; Zeng, Dali

    2015-01-01

    The global problem of drought threatens agricultural production and constrains the development of sustainable agricultural practices. In plants, excessive water loss causes drought stress and induces early senescence. In this study, we isolated a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant, designated as early senescence1 (es1), which exhibits early leaf senescence. The es1-1 leaves undergo water loss at the seedling stage (as reflected by whitening of the leaf margin and wilting) and display early senescence at the three-leaf stage. We used map-based cloning to identify ES1, which encodes a SCAR-LIKE PROTEIN2, a component of the suppressor of cAMP receptor/Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family verprolin-homologous complex involved in actin polymerization and function. The es1-1 mutants exhibited significantly higher stomatal density. This resulted in excessive water loss and accelerated water flow in es1-1, also enhancing the water absorption capacity of the roots and the water transport capacity of the stems as well as promoting the in vivo enrichment of metal ions cotransported with water. The expression of ES1 is higher in the leaves and leaf sheaths than in other tissues, consistent with its role in controlling water loss from leaves. GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN-ES1 fusion proteins were ubiquitously distributed in the cytoplasm of plant cells. Collectively, our data suggest that ES1 is important for regulating water loss in rice. PMID:26243619

  18. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors. PMID:27093436

  19. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors. PMID:27093436

  20. Isolation of a gene encoding a Chlamydia sp. strain TWAR protein that is recognized during infection of humans.

    PubMed

    Campbell, L A; Kuo, C C; Thissen, R W; Grayston, J T

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydia sp. strain TWAR is a unique Chlamydia sp. that causes acute respiratory disease. A gene bank consisting of TWAR isolate AR-39 DNA in pUC19 was screened with anti-AR-39 rabbit immune sera. Two positive clones were isolated that contained 7.3-kilobase (pLC1) and 14.9-kilobase (pLC2) plasmids. Restriction mapping and hybridization studies showed that both pLC1 and pLC2 contained a common 4.2-kilobase PstI fragment. Plasmids were used as templates of in vitro transcription-translation. All three plasmids had a novel protein product of ca. 75 kilodaltons not found in the vector alone. Western blots showed that this protein reacted with anti-TWAR rabbit immune sera and with human immune serum from an individual who had proven TWAR infection. Whole-cell lysates of TWAR demonstrated a protein having the same molecular weight and immunoreactivity as the recombinant gene product. This protein was also recognized by rabbit immune serum against Chlamydia psittaci or Chlamydia trachomatis. Southern hybridizations with the cloned fragment as a probe of digests of other Chlamydia spp. showed weakly hybridizing fragments. These results suggest that we have isolated a gene encoding a protein recognized during human TWAR infection that contains some sequences shared among Chlamydia spp. PMID:2909493

  1. A novel lily anther-specific gene encodes adhesin-like proteins associated with exine formation during anther development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Che; Yang, Cheng-Shou; Wang, Co-Shine

    2014-01-01

    The anther-specific gene LLA1271 isolated from lily (Lilium longiflorum Thunb.) anthers is novel and exists in two forms. The protein encoded by LLA1271 may represent an adhesin-like protein first found in higher plants. The protein contains a typical N-terminal signal peptide followed by a highly conserved repeat domain. The LLA1271 gene is temporally expressed at the phase of microspore development. RNA blot and RNA in situ hybridization analyses demonstrated that the gene was expressed both in the tapetum and in the microspore. The gene is endo- and exogenously induced by gibberellin. Studies with the gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor uniconazole and an inhibitor of ethylene activity, 2,5-norbornadien (NBD), revealed that LLA1271 is negatively regulated by ethylene, and a cross-talk of regulation between gibberellin and ethylene occurs in young anthers. The treatment with NBD caused the tapetum to become densely cytoplasmic and highly polarized, whereas uniconazole arrested tapetal development in a state close to that of a tapetum without treatment. The LLA1271 protein is heat stable and heterogeneous. An immunoblot of separated protein fractions of the anther revealed that the LLA1271 protein was detected in protein fraction of the microspore released from the cell wall by treatment with either 0.5% or 2% Triton X-100. Ectopic expression of LLA1271 resulted in impaired stamen and low pollen germination. Scanning electron microscopy of TAP::LLA1271 pollen showed distorted exine formation and patterning. The LLA1271 protein once synthesized in both the tapetum and microspore is secreted and deposited on the surface of microspores, moderately affecting exine formation and patterning. PMID:24591055

  2. Transcriptional and replicational activation functions in the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 protein are encoded by different structural determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Abroi, A; Kurg, R; Ustav, M

    1996-01-01

    A set of E2 proteins with mutations in the amino-terminal transactivation domain was made by a scheme called clustered charged-to-alanine scan. These mutant E2 proteins were tested for expression, stability, and compartmentalization in cells and for sequence-specific DNA binding, as well as in functional assays for transcriptional and replicational activation. We identified four groups of mutants. First, mutants K111A, K112A, and E176A were unable to activate replication and transcription because of oligomerization-induced retention of oligomers in the cytoplasm. Second, although fractions of the mutant proteins E74A and D143A/ R172C existed in the oligomeric form, they were localized in the nucleus. Certain fractions of these proteins existed as a dimer able to form a specific complex and activate replication; however, these proteins were inactive in transcriptional activation. Third, mutants R37A and D122A were localized in the nucleus, existed in the dimeric form, supported replication efficiently, and were severely crippled in transcriptional activation. The fourth group of mutants did not differ considerably from the wild-type protein. The activation of transcription by the wild type as well as mutant E2 proteins was dependent on the concentration of input E2 expression vector DNA and had a bell-like shape. We suggest that the reduction of transcriptional activation at higher E2 concentrations, the self-squelching activity, is caused by oligomerization of the E2 transactivator and is one of the mechanisms for the regulation of E2 activity. Our results also show that transcriptional and replicational activation activities are encoded by different determinants in the E2 protein. PMID:8709243

  3. Parasite-encoded Hsp40 proteins define novel mobile structures in the cytosol of the P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Külzer, Simone; Rug, Melanie; Brinkmann, Klaus; Cannon, Ping; Cowman, Alan; Lingelbach, Klaus; Blatch, Gregory L; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M

    2010-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is predicted to transport over 300 proteins to the cytosol of its chosen host cell, the mature human erythrocyte, including 19 members of the Hsp40 family. Here, we have generated transfectant lines expressing GFP- or HA-Strep-tagged versions of these proteins, and used these to investigate both localization and other properties of these Hsp40 co-chaperones. These fusion proteins labelled punctate structures within the infected erythrocyte, initially suggestive of a Maurer's clefts localization. Further experiments demonstrated that these structures were distinct from the Maurer's clefts in protein composition. Transmission electron microscopy verifies a non-cleft localization for HA-Strep-tagged versions of these proteins. We were not able to label these structures with BODIPY-ceramide, suggesting a lower size and/or different lipid composition compared with the Maurer's clefts. Solubility studies revealed that the Hsp40-GFP fusion proteins appear to be tightly associated with membranes, but could be released from the bilayer under conditions affecting membrane cholesterol content or organization, suggesting interaction with a binding partner localized to cholesterol-rich domains. These novel structures are highly mobile in the infected erythrocyte, but based on velocity calculations, can be distinguished from the 'highly mobile vesicles' previously described. Our study identifies a further extra-parasitic structure in the P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte, which we name 'J-dots' (as their defining characteristic so far is the content of J-proteins). We suggest that these J-dots are involved in trafficking of parasite-encoded proteins through the cytosol of the infected erythrocyte. PMID:20482550

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal heterotrimeric G protein-encoding genes and their expression during dimorphism in Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Valle-Maldonado, Marco Iván; Jácome-Galarza, Irvin Eduardo; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Martínez-Cadena, Guadalupe; Campos-García, Jesús; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha Isela; Reyes-De la Cruz, Homero; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Díaz-Pérez, César; Meza-Carmen, Víctor

    2015-12-01

    In fungi, heterotrimeric G proteins are key regulators of biological processes such as mating, virulence, morphology, among others. Mucor circinelloides is a model organism for many biological processes, and its genome contains the largest known repertoire of genes that encode putative heterotrimeric G protein subunits in the fungal kingdom: twelve Gα (McGpa1-12), three Gβ (McGpb1-3), and three Gγ (McGpg1-3). Phylogenetic analysis of fungal Gα showed that they are divided into four distinct groups as reported previously. Fungal Gβ and Gγ are also divided into four phylogenetic groups, and to our understanding this is the first report of a phylogenetic classification for fungal Gβ and Gγ subunits. Almost all genes that encode putative heterotrimeric G subunits in M. circinelloides are differentially expressed during dimorphic growth, except for McGpg1 (Gγ) that showed very low mRNA levels at all developmental stages. Moreover, several of the subunits are expressed in a similar pattern and at the same level, suggesting that they constitute discrete complexes. For example, McGpb3 (Gβ), and McGpg2 (Gγ), are co-expressed during mycelium growth, and McGpa1, McGpb2, and McGpg2, are co-expressed during yeast development. These findings provide the conceptual framework to study the biological role of these genes during M. circinelloides morphogenesis. PMID:26615741

  5. JM2, encoding a fork head–related protein, is mutated in X-linked autoimmunity–allergic disregulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chatila, Talal A.; Blaeser, Frank; Ho, Nga; Lederman, Howard M.; Voulgaropoulos, Constantine; Helms, Cindy; Bowcock, Anne M.

    2000-01-01

    X-linked autoimmunity–allergic disregulation syndrome (XLAAD) is an X-linked recessive immunological disorder characterized by multisystem autoimmunity, particularly early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus, associated with manifestations of severe atopy including eczema, food allergy, and eosinophilic inflammation. Consistent with the allergic phenotype, analysis of two kindreds with XLAAD revealed marked skewing of patient T lymphocytes toward the Th2 phenotype. Using a positional-candidate approach, we have identified in both kindreds mutations in JM2, a gene on Xp11.23 that encodes a fork head domain–containing protein. One point mutation at a splice junction site results in transcripts that encode a truncated protein lacking the fork head homology domain. The other mutation involves an in-frame, 3-bp deletion that is predicted to impair the function of a leucine zipper dimerization domain. Our results point to a critical role for JM2 in self tolerance and Th cell differentiation. This article may have been published online in advance of the print edition. The date of publication is available from the JCI website, http://www.jci.org. J. Clin. Invest. 106:R75–R81 (2000). PMID:11120765

  6. Two Chlamydomonas OPR proteins stabilize chloroplast mRNAs encoding small subunits of photosystem II and cytochrome b6 f.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Johnson, Xenie; Cavaiuolo, Marina; Bohne, Alexandra-Viola; Nickelsen, Joerg; Vallon, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In plants and algae, chloroplast gene expression is controlled by nucleus-encoded proteins that bind to mRNAs in a specific manner, stabilizing mRNAs or promoting their splicing, editing, or translation. Here, we present the characterization of two mRNA stabilization factors of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which both belong to the OctotricoPeptide Repeat (OPR) family. MCG1 is necessary to stabilize the petG mRNA, encoding a small subunit of the cytochrome b6 f complex, while MBI1 stabilizes the psbI mRNA, coding for a small subunit of photosystem II. In the mcg1 mutant, the small RNA footprint corresponding to the 5'-end of the petG transcript is reduced in abundance. In both cases, the absence of the small subunit perturbs assembly of the cognate complex. Whereas PetG is essential for formation of a functional cytochrome b6 f dimer, PsbI appears partly dispensable as a low level of PSII activity can still be measured in its absence. Thus, nuclear control of chloroplast gene expression is not only exerted on the major core subunits of the complexes, but also on small subunits with a single transmembrane helix. While OPR proteins have thus far been involved in translation or trans-splicing of plastid mRNAs, our results expand the potential roles of this repeat family to their stabilization. PMID:25898982

  7. Mutations in CSPP1, Encoding a Core Centrosomal Protein, Cause a Range of Ciliopathy Phenotypes in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Ranad; Shamseldin, Hanan E.; Loucks, Catrina M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Ansari, Shinu; Ibrahim Khalil, Mohamed; Al-Yacoub, Nadya; Davis, Erica E.; Mola, Natalie A.; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Herridge, Warren; Chudley, Albert E.; Chodirker, Bernard N.; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Majewski, Jacek; Katsanis, Nicholas; Poizat, Coralie; Johnson, Colin A.; Parboosingh, Jillian; Boycott, Kym M.; Innes, A. Micheil; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2014-01-01

    Ciliopathies are characterized by a pattern of multisystem involvement that is consistent with the developmental role of the primary cilium. Within this biological module, mutations in genes that encode components of the cilium and its anchoring structure, the basal body, are the major contributors to both disease causality and modification. However, despite rapid advances in this field, the majority of the genes that drive ciliopathies and the mechanisms that govern the pronounced phenotypic variability of this group of disorders remain poorly understood. Here, we show that mutations in CSPP1, which encodes a core centrosomal protein, are disease causing on the basis of the independent identification of two homozygous truncating mutations in three consanguineous families (one Arab and two Hutterite) affected by variable ciliopathy phenotypes ranging from Joubert syndrome to the more severe Meckel-Gruber syndrome with perinatal lethality and occipital encephalocele. Consistent with the recently described role of CSPP1 in ciliogenesis, we show that mutant fibroblasts from one affected individual have severely impaired ciliogenesis with concomitant defects in sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling. Our results expand the list of centrosomal proteins implicated in human ciliopathies. PMID:24360803

  8. Structural analysis of the genes encoding the molybdenum-iron protein of nitrogenase in the Parasponia rhizobium strain ANU289.

    PubMed Central

    Weinman, J J; Fellows, F F; Gresshoff, P M; Shine, J; Scott, K F

    1984-01-01

    The genes encoding the Molybdenum-Iron protein component of nitrogenase (nifD and nifK) have been identified and fully characterised in the Parasponia Rhizobium strain ANU289. The two genes are contiguous and are separated from the gene encoding the Fe-protein component of nitrogenase (nifH) by 21 kb of DNA. We present the entire DNA sequence of the nifD and nifK genes, thus completing the characterisation of the primary structure of the nitrogenase genes in this Rhizobium strain. Comparison of the sequence preceding the transcription initiation point of nifDK with that preceding nifH reveals a consensus promoter sequence 5'-PyTGGCAPyG-4 bp-TTGC(T/A)-10 bp-3'. This consensus promoter is found preceding nif genes in both fast-growing and slow-growing Rhizobium strains and shows a structural similarity to that preceding the coordinately-regulated nif operons in the asymbiotic organism Klebsiella pneumoniae. Images PMID:6095197

  9. Inactivation of the Neurospora Crassa Gene Encoding the Mitochondrial Protein Import Receptor Mom19 by the Technique of ``sheltered Rip''

    PubMed Central

    Harkness, TAA.; Metzenberg, R. L.; Schneider, H.; Lill, R.; Neupert, W.; Nargang, F. E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used a technique referred to as ``sheltered RIP'' (repeat induced point mutation) to create mutants of the mom-19 gene of Neurospora crassa, which encodes an import receptor for nuclear encoded mitochondrial precursor proteins. Sheltered RIP permits the isolation of a mutant gene in one nucleus, even if that gene is essential for the survival of the organism, by sheltering the nucleus carrying the mutant gene in a heterokaryon with an unaffected nucleus. Furthermore, the nucleus harboring the RIPed gene contains a selectable marker so that it is possible to shift nuclear ratios in the heterokaryons to a state in which the nucleus containing the RIPed gene predominates in cultures grown under selective conditions. This results in a condition where the target gene product should be present at very suboptimal levels and allows the study of the mutant phenotype. One allele of mom-19 generated by this method contains 44 transitions resulting in 18 amino acid substitutions. When the heterokaryon containing this allele was grown under conditions favoring the RIPed nucleus, no MOM19 protein was detectable in the mitochondria of the strain. Homokaryotic strains containing the RIPed allele exhibit a complex and extremely slow growth phenotype suggesting that the product of the mom-19 gene is important in N. crassa. PMID:8138148

  10. Immunogenicity of Eight Dormancy Regulon-Encoded Proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in DNA-Vaccinated and Tuberculosis-Infected Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Roupie, Virginie; Romano, Marta; Zhang, Lei; Korf, Hannelie; Lin, May Young; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Klein, Michèl R.; Huygen, Kris

    2007-01-01

    Hypoxia and low concentrations of nitric oxide have been reported to upregulate in vitro gene expression of 48 proteins of the dormancy (DosR) regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These proteins are thought to be essential for the survival of bacteria during persistence in vivo and are targeted by the immune system during latent infection in humans. Here we have analyzed the immunogenicity of eight DosR regulon-encoded antigens by plasmid DNA vaccination of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, i.e., Rv1733c, Rv1738, Rv2029c (pfkB), Rv2031c/hspX (acr), Rv2032 (acg), Rv2626c, Rv2627c, and Rv2628. Strong humoral and/or cellular Th1-type (interleukin-2 and gamma interferon) immune responses could be induced against all but one (Rv1738) of these antigens. The strongest Th1 responses were measured following vaccination with DNA encoding Rv2031c and Rv2626c. Using synthetic 20-mer overlapping peptides, 11 immunodominant, predicted major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted epitopes and one Kd-restricted T-cell epitope could be identified. BALB/c and (B6D2)F1 mice persistently infected with M. tuberculosis developed immune responses against Rv1733c, Rv2031c, and Rv2626c. These findings have implications for proof-of-concept studies in mice mimicking tuberculosis (TB) latency models and their extrapolation to humans for potential new vaccination strategies against TB. PMID:17145953

  11. Identification of genes encoding photoconvertible (Class I) water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins from Chenopodium ficifolium.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Abe, Eriko; Nakayama, Katsumi; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Photoconvertible water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins, called Class I WSCPs, have been detected in Chenopodiaceae, Amaranthaceae and Polygonaceae plant species. To date, Chenopodium album WSCP (CaWSCP) is the only cloned gene encoding a Class I WSCP. In this study, we identified two cDNAs encoding Chenopodium ficifolium Class I WSCPs, CfWSCP1, and CfWSCP2. Sequence analyses revealed that the open reading frames of CfWSCP1 and CfWSCP2 were 585 and 588 bp, respectively. Furthermore, both CfWSCPs contain cystein2 and cystein30, which are essential for the chlorophyll-binding ability of CaWSCP. Recombinant CfWSCP1 and CfWSCP2, expressed in Escherichia coli as hexa-histidine fusion proteins (CfWSCP1-His and CfWSCP2-His), formed inclusion bodies; however, we were able to solubilize these using a buffer containing 8 M urea and then refold them by dialysis. The refolded CfWSCP1-His and CfWSCP2-His could bind chlorophylls and exhibited photoconvertibility, confirming that the cloned CfWSCPs are further examples of Class I WSCPs. PMID:25333387

  12. msg1, a novel melanocyte-specific gene, encodes a nuclear protein and is associated with pigmentation.

    PubMed Central

    Shioda, T; Fenner, M H; Isselbacher, K J

    1996-01-01

    Messenger RNA transcripts of the highly pigmented murine melanoma B16-F1 cells were compared with those from their weakly pigmented derivative B16-F10 cells by differential display. A novel gene called msg1 (melanocyte-specific gene) was found to be expressed at high levels in B16-F1 cells but at low levels in B16-F10 cells. Expression of msg1 was undetectable in the amelanotic K1735 murine melanoma cells. The pigmented murine melanocyte cell line melan-a expressed msg1, as did pigmented primary cultures of murine and human melanocytes; however, seven amelanotic or very weakly pigmented human melanoma cell lines were negative. Transformation of murine melanocytes by transfection with v-Ha-ras or Ela was accompanied by depigmentation and led to complete loss of msg1 expression. The normal tissue distribution of msg1 mRNA transcripts in adult mice was confined to melanocytes and testis. Murine msg1 and human MSG1 genes encode a predicted protein of 27 kDa with 75% overall amino acid identity and 96% identity within the C-terminal acidic domain of 54 amino acids. This C-terminal domain was conserved with 76% amino acid identity in another protein product of a novel human gene, MRG1 (msg1-related gene), isolated from normal human melanocyte cDNA by 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends based on the homology to msg1. The msg1 protein was localized to the melanocyte nucleus by immunofluorescence cytochemistry. We conclude that msg1 encodes a nuclear protein, is melanocyte-specific, and appears to be lost in depigmented melanoma cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8901575

  13. Proteins Encoded in Genomic Regions Associated with Immune-Mediated Disease Physically Interact and Suggest Underlying Biology

    PubMed Central

    Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Lage, Kasper; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Tatar, Diana; Benita, Yair

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have defined over 150 genomic regions unequivocally containing variation predisposing to immune-mediated disease. Inferring disease biology from these observations, however, hinges on our ability to discover the molecular processes being perturbed by these risk variants. It has previously been observed that different genes harboring causal mutations for the same Mendelian disease often physically interact. We sought to evaluate the degree to which this is true of genes within strongly associated loci in complex disease. Using sets of loci defined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD) GWAS, we build protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks for genes within associated loci and find abundant physical interactions between protein products of associated genes. We apply multiple permutation approaches to show that these networks are more densely connected than chance expectation. To confirm biological relevance, we show that the components of the networks tend to be expressed in similar tissues relevant to the phenotypes in question, suggesting the network indicates common underlying processes perturbed by risk loci. Furthermore, we show that the RA and CD networks have predictive power by demonstrating that proteins in these networks, not encoded in the confirmed list of disease associated loci, are significantly enriched for association to the phenotypes in question in extended GWAS analysis. Finally, we test our method in 3 non-immune traits to assess its applicability to complex traits in general. We find that genes in loci associated to height and lipid levels assemble into significantly connected networks but did not detect excess connectivity among Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) loci beyond chance. Taken together, our results constitute evidence that, for many of the complex diseases studied here, common genetic associations implicate regions encoding proteins that physically interact in a preferential manner, in

  14. Approaching a complete repository of sequence-verified protein-encoding clones for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanhui; Rolfs, Andreas; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Murthy, Tellamraju V. S.; Zhu, Cong; Berger, Michael F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Kelley, Fontina; McCarron, Seamus; Jepson, Daniel; Richardson, Aaron; Raphael, Jacob; Moreira, Donna; Taycher, Elena; Zuo, Dongmei; Mohr, Stephanie; Kane, Michael F.; Williamson, Janice; Simpson, Andrew; Bulyk, Martha L.; Harlow, Edward; Marsischky, Gerald; Kolodner, Richard D.; LaBaer, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    The availability of an annotated genome sequence for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has made possible the proteome-scale study of protein function and protein–protein interactions. These studies rely on availability of cloned open reading frame (ORF) collections that can be used for cell-free or cell-based protein expression. Several yeast ORF collections are available, but their use and data interpretation can be hindered by reliance on now out-of-date annotations, the inflexible presence of N- or C-terminal tags, and/or the unknown presence of mutations introduced during the cloning process. High-throughput biochemical and genetic analyses would benefit from a “gold standard” (fully sequence-verified, high-quality) ORF collection, which allows for high confidence in and reproducibility of experimental results. Here, we describe Yeast FLEXGene, a S. cerevisiae protein-coding clone collection that covers over 5000 predicted protein-coding sequences. The clone set covers 87% of the current S. cerevisiae genome annotation and includes full sequencing of each ORF insert. Availability of this collection makes possible a wide variety of studies from purified proteins to mutation suppression analysis, which should contribute to a global understanding of yeast protein function. PMID:17322287

  15. Exploring the interactions between bacteriophage-encoded glycan binding proteins and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David J; Sacher, Jessica C; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-10-01

    There is an unprecedented interest in glycobiology due to the increasing appreciation of its impact on all aspects of life. Likewise, bacteriophage biology is enjoying a new renaissance as the post-antibiotic era fuels the search for novel ways to control harmful bacteria. Phages have spent the last 3 billion years developing ways of recognizing and manipulating bacterial surface glycans. Therefore, phages comprise a massive reservoir of glycan-binding and -hydrolyzing proteins with the potential to be exploited for glycan analysis, bacterial diagnostics and therapeutics. We discuss phage tail proteins that recognize bacterial surface polysaccharides, endolysins that bind and cleave peptidoglycan, Ig-like proteins that attach to mucin glycans, and phage effector proteins that recognize both bacterial and eukaryotic oligosaccharides. PMID:26275959

  16. Site-specific chemical protein conjugation using genetically encoded aldehyde tags.

    PubMed

    Rabuka, David; Rush, Jason S; deHart, Gregory W; Wu, Peng; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2012-06-01

    We describe a method for modifying proteins site-specifically using a chemoenzymatic bioconjugation approach. Formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE) recognizes a pentapeptide consensus sequence, CxPxR, and it specifically oxidizes the cysteine in this sequence to an unusual aldehyde-bearing formylglyine. The FGE recognition sequence, or aldehyde tag, can be inserted into heterologous recombinant proteins produced in either prokaryotic or eukaryotic expression systems. The conversion of cysteine to formylglycine is accomplished by co-overexpression of FGE, either transiently or as a stable cell line, and the resulting aldehyde can be selectively reacted with α-nucleophiles to generate a site-selectively modified bioconjugate. This protocol outlines both the generation and the analysis of proteins aldehyde-tagged at their termini and the methods for chemical conjugation to the formylglycine. The process of generating aldehyde-tagged protein followed by chemical conjugation and purification takes 20 d. PMID:22576105

  17. DETECTION OF THE WOLBACHIA-ENCODED DNA BINDING PROTEIN, HU beta, IN MOSQUITO GONADS

    PubMed Central

    BECKMANN, JOHN F.; MARKOWSKI, TODD W.; WITTHUHN, BRUCE A.; FALLON, ANN M.

    2013-01-01

    Wolbachia are obligate intracellular bacteria that cause cytoplasmic incompatibility in mosquitoes. In an incompatible cross, eggs of uninfected females fail to hatch when fertilized by sperm from infected males. We used polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry to identify Wolbachia proteins in infected mosquito gonads. These included surface proteins with masses of 25 and 18 kDa and the DNA binding protein, HU beta. Using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, we showed that the HU gene is transcribed in Wolbachia-infected Culex pipiens and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. We sequenced HU genes from four Wolbachia strains and compared deduced protein sequences with additional homologs from the databases. Among the Rickettsiales, Wolbachia HU has distinct N- and C-terminal basic/acidic amino acid motifs as well as a pair of conserved, cysteine residues. PMID:23287400

  18. Isolation and restriction site maps of the genes encoding five Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins.

    PubMed

    Shinnick, T M; Krat, C; Schadow, S

    1987-07-01

    A series of recombinant phage expressing five Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens were isolated. Restriction maps for these antigens were deduced, and the size of the expressed proteins was determined. PMID:3036711

  19. Isolation and restriction site maps of the genes encoding five Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Shinnick, T M; Krat, C; Schadow, S

    1987-01-01

    A series of recombinant phage expressing five Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens were isolated. Restriction maps for these antigens were deduced, and the size of the expressed proteins was determined. Images PMID:3036711

  20. Genetic linkage of capsid protein-encoding RNA segments in group A equine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Miño, Samuel; Barrandeguy, María; Parreño, Viviana; Parra, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    Rotavirus virions are formed by three concentric protein layers that enclose the 11 dsRNA genome segments and the viral proteins VP1 and VP3. Interactions amongst the capsid proteins (VP2, VP6, VP7 and VP4) have been described to play a major role in viral fitness, whilst restricting the reassortment of the genomic segments during co-infection with different rotavirus strains. In this work we describe and characterize the linkage between VP6 and VP7 proteins based on structural and genomic analyses of group A rotavirus strains circulating in Argentinean horses. Strains with the VP7 genotype G3 showed a strong association with the VP6 genotype I6, whilst strains with G14 were associated with the I2 genotype. Most of the differences on the VP6 and VP7 proteins were observed in interactive regions between the two proteins, suggesting that VP6 : VP7 interactions may drive the co-evolution and co-segregation of their respective gene segments. PMID:26758293

  1. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C.; van Alphen, Lieke B.; Patry, Robert T.; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  2. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26638980

  3. The Drosophila Hrb98DE locus encodes four protein isoforms homologous to the A1 protein of mammalian heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, S R; Raychaudhuri, G; Beyer, A L

    1990-01-01

    The Drosophila Hrb98DE locus encodes proteins that are highly homologous to the mammalian A1 protein, a major component of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. The Hrb98DE locus is transcribed throughout development, with the highest transcript levels found in ovaries, early embryos, and pupae. Eight different transcripts are produced by the use of combinations of alternative promoters, exons, and splice acceptor sites; the various species are not all equally abundant. The 3'-most exon is unusual in that it is completely noncoding. These transcripts can potentially generate four protein isoforms that differ in their N-terminal 16 to 21 amino acids but are identical in the remainder of the protein, including the RNP consensus motif domain and the glycine-rich domain characteristic of the mammalian A1 protein. We suggest that these sequence differences could affect the affinities of the proteins for RNA or other protein components of heterogeneous nuclear RNP complexes, leading to differences in function. Images PMID:2104660

  4. Cloning and sequencing of the cDNA encoding a core protein of the paired helical filament of Alzheimer's disease: Identification as the microtubule-associated protein tau

    SciTech Connect

    Goedert, M.; Wischik, C.M.; Crowther, R.A.; Walker, J.E.; Klug, A. )

    1988-06-01

    Screening of cDNA libraries prepared from the frontal cortex of an Alzheimer's disease patient and from fetal human brain has led to isolation of the cDNA for a core protein of the paired helical filament of Alzheimer's disease. The partial amino acid sequence of this core protein was used to design synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The cDNA encodes a protein of 352 amino acids that contains a characteristic amino acid repeat in its carboxyl-terminal half. This protein is highly homologous to the sequence of the mouse microtubule-associated protein tau and thus constitutes the human equivalent of mouse tau. RNA blot analysis indicates the presence of two major transcripts, 6 and 2 kilobases long, with a wide distribution in normal human brain. Tau protein mRNAs were found in normal amounts in the frontal cortex from patients with Alzheimer's disease. The proof that at least part of tau protein forms a component of the paired helical filament core opens the way to understanding the mode of formation of paired helical filaments and thus, ultimately, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Simultaneous detection of the two main proliferation driving EBV encoded proteins, EBNA-2 and LMP-1 in single B cells.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Abu E; Nagy, Noémi; Sohlberg, Ebba; Ádori, Mónika; Claesson, Hans-Erik; Klein, George; Klein, Eva

    2012-11-30

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is carried by almost all adults, mostly without clinical manifestations. Latent virus infection of B lymphocytes induces activation and proliferation that can be demonstrated in vitro. In healthy individuals, generation of EBV induced malignant proliferation is avoided by continuous immunological surveillance. The proliferation inducing set of the virally encoded genes is expressed exclusively in B cells in a defined differentiation window. It comprises nine EBV encoded nuclear proteins, EBNA 1-6, and three cell membrane associated proteins, LMP-1, 2A and 2B, designated as latency Type III. Outside this window the expression of the viral genes is limited. Healthy carriers harbor a low number of B lymphocytes in which the viral genome is either silent or expresses one virally encoded protein, EBNA-1, latency Type I. In addition, EBV genome carrying B cells can lack either EBNA-2 or LMP-1, latency Type IIa or Type IIb respectively. These cells have no inherent proliferation capacity. Detection of both EBNA-2 and LMP-1 can identify B cells with growth potential. We devised therefore a method for their simultaneous detection in cytospin deposited cell populations. Simultaneous detection of EBNA-2 and LMP-1 was reported earlier in tissues derived from infectious mononucleosis (IM), postransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) and from "humanized" mice infected with EBV. We show for the first time the occurrence of Type IIa and Type IIb cells in cord blood lymphocyte populations infected with EBV in vitro. Further, we confirm the variation of EBNA-2 and LMP-1 expression in several Type III lines and that they vary independently in individual cells. We visualize that in Type III LCL, induced for plasmacytoid differentiation by IL-21 treatment, EBV protein expression changes to Type IIa (EBNA-2 negative LMP-1 positive). We also show that when the proliferation of EBV infected cord blood lymphocyte culture is inhibited by the

  6. Characterizations of the human parainfluenza type 2 virus gene encoding the L protein and the intergenic sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, M; Okamoto, K; Bando, H; Kondo, K; Tsurudome, M; Komada, H; Nishio, M; Ito, Y

    1991-01-01

    We cloned and determined the nucleotide sequences of cDNAs against genomic RNA encoding the L protein of human parainfluenza type 2 virus (PIV-2). The L gene is 6904 nucleotides long including the intergenic region at the HN-L junction and putative negative strand leader RNA, almost all of which is complementary to the positive strand leader RNA of PIV-2. The deduced L protein contains 2262 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 256,366. The L protein of PIV-2 shows 39.9, 28.9, 27.8 and 28.3% homologies with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), Sendai virus (SV), parainfluenza type 3 virus (PIV-3) and measles virus (MV), respectively. Although sequence data on other components of transcriptive complex, NP and P, suggested a closer relationship between PIV-2 and MV, as concerns the L protein, MV is closely related to another group as SV and PIV-3. From analysis of the alignment of the five l proteins, six blocks composed of conserved amino acids were found in the L proteins. The L protein of PIV-2 was detected in purified virions and virus-infected cells using antiserum directed against an oligopeptide corresponding to the amino terminal region. Primer extension analyses showed that the intergenic regions at the NP-P, P-M, M-F, F-HN and HN-L junctions are 4, 45, 28, 8 and 42 nucleotides long, respectively, indicating that the intergenic regions exhibit no conservation of length and sequence. Furthermore, the starting and ending sequences of paramyxoviruses were summarized. Images PMID:1645865

  7. Elliptocytosis in patients with C-terminal domain mutations of protein 4.1 correlates with encoded messenger RNA levels rather than with alterations in primary protein structure.

    PubMed

    Morinière, M; Ribeiro, L; Dalla Venezia, N; Deguillien, M; Maillet, P; Cynober, T; Delhommeau, F; Almeida, H; Tamagnini, G; Delaunay, J; Baklouti, F

    2000-03-01

    Early biochemical studies defined 4 functional domains of the erythroid protein 4.1 (4.1R). From amino-terminal to carboxy-terminal, these are 30 kd, 16 kd, 10 kd, and 22/24 kd in size. Although the functional properties of both the 30-kd and the 10-kd domain have been demonstrated in red cells, no functional activities have been assigned to either the 16-kd or the 22/24-kd domain in these cells. We here describe new mutations in the sequence encoding the C-terminal 22/24-kd domain that are associated with hereditary elliptocytosis. An unusually mild phenotype observed in heterozygous and homozygous members of 1 family suggested heterogeneity in the pattern of expression of 4.1R deficiency. Using a variety of protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) quantification strategies, we showed that, regardless of the alteration in the C-terminal primary sequence, when the protein is produced, it assembles at the cell membrane. In addition, we found that alterations in red cell morphologic features and membrane function correlate with the amount of membrane-associated protein-and therefore with the amount of mRNA accumulated-rather than with the primary structure of the variant proteins. These data suggest that an intact sequence at exons 19 through 21 encoding part of the C-terminal 22/24-kd region is not required for proper protein 4.1R assembly in mature red cells. (Blood. 2000;95:1834-1841) PMID:10688845

  8. Expression and Processing of Proteins Encoded by the Saccharomyces Retrotransposon Ty5†

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Phillip A.; Voytas, Daniel F.

    2001-01-01

    Retroelements (retrotransposons and retroviruses) have two genes in common: gag, which specifies structural proteins that form a virus or virus-like particle, and pol, which specifies catalytic proteins required for replication. For many retroelements, gag and pol are present on separate reading frames. Their expression is highly regulated, and the ratio of Gag to Pol is critical for retroelement replication. The Saccharomyces retrotransposon Ty5 contains a single open reading frame, and we characterized Gag and Pol expression by generating transpositionally active Ty5 elements with epitope tags at the N terminus or C terminus or within the integrase coding region. Immunoblot analysis identified two Gag species (Gag-p27 and Gag-p37), reverse transcriptase (Pol-p59), and integrase (Pol-p80), all of which are largely insoluble in the absence of urea or ionic detergent. These proteins result from proteolytic processing of a polyprotein, because elements with mutations in the presumed active site of Ty5 protease express a single tagged protein (Gag-Pol-p182). Protease mutants are also transpositionally inactive. In a time course experiment, we monitored protein expression, proteolytic processing, and transposition of a Ty5 element with identical epitope tags at its N and C termini. Both transposition and the abundance of Gag-p27 increased over time. In contrast, the levels of Gag-p37 and reverse transcriptase peaked after ∼14 h of induction and then gradually decreased. This may be due to differences in stability of Gag-p27 relative to Gag-p37 and reverse transcriptase. The ratio of Ty5 Gag to Pol averaged 5:1 throughout the time course experiment, suggesting that differential protein stability regulates the amounts of these proteins. PMID:11160677

  9. Ribosomal protein methylation in Escherichia coli: the gene prmA, encoding the ribosomal protein L11 methyltransferase, is dispensable.

    PubMed

    Vanet, A; Plumbridge, J A; Guérin, M F; Alix, J H

    1994-12-01

    The prmA gene, located at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, is the genetic determinant of ribosomal protein L11-methyltransferase activity. Mutations at this locus, prmA1 and prmA3, result in a severely undermethylated form of L11. No effect, other than the lack of methyl groups on L11, has been ascribed to these mutations. DNA sequence analysis of the mutant alleles prmA1 and prmA3 detected point mutations near the C-terminus of the protein and plasmids overproducing the wild-type and the two mutant proteins have been constructed. The wild-type PrmA protein could be crosslinked to its radiolabelled substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), by u.v. irradiation indicating that it is the gene for the methyltransferase rather than a regulatory protein. One of the mutant proteins, PrmA3, was also weakly crosslinked to SAM. Both mutant enzymes when expressed from the overproducing plasmids were capable of catalysing the incorporation of 3H-labelled methyl groups from SAM to L11 in vitro. This confirmed the observation that the mutant proteins possess significant residual activity which could account for their lack of growth phenotype. However, a strain carrying an in vitro-constructed null mutation of the prmA gene, transferred to the E. coli chromosome by homologous recombination, was perfectly viable. PMID:7715456

  10. Hermes RNA-binding protein targets RNAs-encoding proteins involved in meiotic maturation, early cleavage, and germline development.

    PubMed

    Song, Hye-Won; Cauffman, Karen; Chan, Agnes P; Zhou, Yi; King, Mary Lou; Etkin, Laurence D; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2007-07-01

    The early development of metazoans is mainly regulated by differential translation and localization of maternal mRNAs in the embryo. In general, these processes are orchestrated by RNA-binding proteins interacting with specific sequence motifs in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of their target RNAs. Hermes is an RNA-binding protein, which contains a single RNA recognition motif (RRM) and is found in various vertebrate species from fish to human. In Xenopus laevis, Hermes mRNA and protein are localized in the vegetal region of oocytes. A subpopulation of Hermes protein is concentrated in a specific structure in the vegetal cortex, called the germ plasm (believed to contain determinants of the germ cell fate) where Hermes protein co-localizes with Xcat2 and RINGO/Spy mRNAs. The level of total Hermes protein decreases during maturation. The precocious depletion of Hermes protein by injection of Hermes antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (HE-MO) accelerates the process of maturation and results in cleavage defects in vegetal blastomeres of the embryo. It is known that several maternal mRNAs including RINGO/Spy and Mos are regulated at the translational level during meiotic maturation and early cleavage in Xenopus. The ectopic expression of RINGO/Spy or Mos causes resumption of meiotic maturation and cleavage arrests, which resemble the loss of Hermes phenotypes. We found that the injection of HE-MO enhances the acceleration of maturation caused by the injection of RINGO/Spy mRNA, and that Hermes protein is present as mRNP complex containing RINGO/Spy, Mos, and Xcat2 mRNAs in vivo. We propose that as an RNA-binding protein, Hermes may be involved in maturation, cleavage events at the vegetal pole and germ cell development by negatively regulating the expression of RINGO/Spy, Mos, and Xcat2 mRNAs. PMID:17309605

  11. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Haryanto, Aris; Ermawati, Ratna; Wati, Vera; Irianingsih, Sri Handayani; Wijayanti, Nastiti

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Avian encephalomyelitis (AE) is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2) encoding gene of AE virus (AEV) from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Results: Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/µl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Conclusions: Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with sample code 499

  12. Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein and its role in self-incompatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were raised against purified SLSG and polyclonal antisera were raised against purified trpE/SLR1 fusion proteins. MAbH8 reacts with a protein epitope on SLSG. MAbH8 and the anit-SLR1 antisera were used with immunogold labeling to show SLSG and SLR1 proteins are localized in papillar cell walls in the stigma. MAbH8 reacts with SLSG from CRM+ cells but not CRM-cells; amino acid sequence identity between the two classes was only 65%, vs. 80% within the CRM+ class. SLSG is necessary but not sufficient for self-incompatibility. Variable molecular weight (MW) SLSG proteins are derived from the same SLG gene. MW variations in both SLSG and SLR1 are due to changes in glycosylation and phosphorylation state. SLSG is not detectable in mature pollen, but is expressed during microspore development. Using a SLG probe, a gene for a putative receptor with protein kinase activity was identified.

  13. MitoDrome: a database of Drosophila melanogaster nuclear genes encoding proteins targeted to the mitochondrion

    PubMed Central

    Sardiello, Marco; Licciulli, Flavio; Catalano, Domenico; Attimonelli, Marcella; Caggese, Corrado

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles present in the cytoplasm of most eukaryotic cells; although they have their own DNA, the majority of the proteins necessary for a functional mitochondrion are coded by the nuclear DNA and only after transcription and translation they are imported in the mitochondrion as proteins. The primary role of the mitochondrion is electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. Although it has been studied for a long time, the interest of researchers in mitochondria is still alive thanks to the discovery of mitochondrial role in apoptosis, aging and cancer. Aim of the MitoDrome database is to annotate the Drosophila melanogaster nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in order to contribute to the functional characterization of nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins and to knowledge of gene diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunctions. Indeed D. melanogaster is one of the most studied organisms and a model for the Human genome. Data are derived from the comparison of Human mitochondrial proteins versus the Drosophila genome, ESTs and cDNA sequence data available in the FlyBase database. Links from the MitoDrome entries to the related homologous entries available in MitoNuC will be soon imple-mented. The MitoDrome database is available at http://bighost.area.ba.cnr.it/BIG/MitoDrome. Data are organised in a flat-file format and can be retrieved using the SRS system. PMID:12520013

  14. Molecular characterization of the gene encoding an 18-kilodalton small heat shock protein associated with the membrane of Leuconostoc oenos.

    PubMed Central

    Jobin, M P; Delmas, F; Garmyn, D; Diviès, C; Guzzo, J

    1997-01-01

    In Leuconostoc oenos, different stresses such as heat, ethanol, and acid shocks dramatically induce the expression of an 18-kDa small heat shock protein called Lo 18. The corresponding gene (hsp18) was cloned from a genomic library of L. oenos constructed in Escherichia coli. A 2.3-kb DNA fragment carrying the hsp18 gene was sequenced. The hsp18 gene encodes a polypeptide of 148 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 16,938 Da. The Lo18 protein has a significant identity with small heat shock proteins of the alpha-crystallin family. The transcriptional start site was determined by primer extension. This experiment allowed us to identify the promoter region exhibiting high similarity to consensus promoter sequences of gram-positive bacteria, as well as E. coli. Northern blot analysis showed that hsp18 consists of a unique transcription unit of 0.6 kb. Moreover, hsp18 expression seemed to be controlled at the transcriptional level. This small heat shock protein was found to be peripherally associated with the membrane of L. oenos. PMID:9023938

  15. mRNA encoding Sec61β, a tail-anchored protein, is localized on the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xianying A.; Zhang, Hui; Ilan, Lena; Liu, Ai Xin; Kharchuk, Iryna; Palazzo, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although one pathway for the post-translational targeting of tail-anchored proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been well defined, it is unclear whether additional pathways exist. Here, we provide evidence that a subset of mRNAs encoding tail-anchored proteins, including Sec61β and nesprin-2, is partially localized to the surface of the ER in mammalian cells. In particular, Sec61b mRNA can be targeted to, and later maintained on, the ER using both translation-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Our data suggests that this process is independent of p180 (also known as RRBP1), a known mRNA receptor on the ER, and the transmembrane domain recognition complex (TRC) pathway components, TRC40 (also known as ASNA1) and BAT3 (also known as BAG6). In addition, our data indicates that Sec61b mRNA might access translocon-bound ribosomes. Our results show that certain tail-anchored proteins are likely to be synthesized directly on the ER, and this facilitates their membrane insertion. Thus, it is clear that mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to ensure efficient targeting of tail-anchored proteins to the surface of the ER. PMID:26272916

  16. Mutation of the rice ASL2 gene encoding plastid ribosomal protein L21 causes chloroplast developmental defects and seedling death.

    PubMed

    Lin, D; Jiang, Q; Zheng, K; Chen, S; Zhou, H; Gong, X; Xu, J; Teng, S; Dong, Y

    2015-05-01

    The plastid ribosome proteins (PRPs) play important roles in plastid protein biosynthesis, chloroplast differentiation and early chloroplast development. However, the specialised functions of individual protein components of the chloroplast ribosome in rice (Oryza sativa) remain unresolved. In this paper, we identified a novel rice PRP mutant named asl2 (Albino seedling lethality 2) exhibiting an albino, seedling death phenotype. In asl2 mutants, the alteration of leaf colour was associated with chlorophyll (Chl) content and abnormal chloroplast development. Through map-based cloning and complementation, the mutated ASL2 gene was isolated and found to encode the chloroplast 50S ribosome protein L21 (RPL21c), a component of the chloroplast ribosome large subunit, which was localised in chloroplasts. ASL2 was expressed at a higher level in the plumule and leaves, implying its tissue-specific expression. Additionally, the expression of ASL2 was regulated by light. The transcript levels of the majority of genes for Chl biosynthesis, photosynthesis and chloroplast development were strongly affected in asl2 mutants. Collectively, the absence of functional ASL2 caused chloroplast developmental defects and seedling death. This report establishes the important role of RPL21c in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:25280352

  17. Mutations in DNAJC5, Encoding Cysteine-String Protein Alpha, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosková, Lenka; Stránecký, Viktor; Hartmannová, Hana; Přistoupilová, Anna; Barešová, Veronika; Ivánek, Robert; Hůlková, Helena; Jahnová, Helena; van der Zee, Julie; Staropoli, John F.; Sims, Katherine B.; Tyynelä, Jaana; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Nijssen, Peter C.G.; Mole, Sara E.; Elleder, Milan; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent storage material in neural tissues and neurodegeneration and has an age of onset in the third decade of life or later. The genetic and molecular basis of the disease has remained unknown for many years. We carried out linkage mapping, gene-expression analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate-gene sequencing in affected individuals from 20 families and/or individuals with simplex cases; we identified in five individuals one of two disease-causing mutations, c.346_348delCTC and c.344T>G, in DNAJC5 encoding cysteine-string protein alpha (CSPα). These mutations—causing a deletion, p.Leu116del, and an amino acid exchange, p.Leu115Arg, respectively—are located within the cysteine-string domain of the protein and affect both palmitoylation-dependent sorting and the amount of CSPα in neuronal cells. The resulting depletion of functional CSPα might cause in parallel the presynaptic dysfunction and the progressive neurodegeneration observed in affected individuals and lysosomal accumulation of misfolded and proteolysis-resistant proteins in the form of characteristic ceroid deposits in neurons. Our work represents an important step in the genetic dissection of a genetically heterogeneous group of ANCLs. It also confirms a neuroprotective role for CSPα in humans and demonstrates the need for detailed investigation of CSPα in the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses and other neurodegenerative diseases presenting with neuronal protein aggregation. PMID:21820099

  18. Yeast RNC1 encodes a chimeric protein, RhoNUC, with a human rho motif and deoxyribonuclease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, T Y; Perkins, E L; Resnick, M A

    1992-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains an endoexonuclease yNucR that has been implicated in both recombination and repair. We describe the isolation and characterization of the corresponding gene. Within the predicted N-terminal half of the protein there is extensive homology (approximately 50%) with human rho genes, which are related to the ras oncogene, particularly in the proposed GTP-binding region. The C-terminal region, which is related to the Escherichia coli recC protein, presumably encodes the endoexonuclease activity. The yNucR may thus represent a new class of GTP-binding proteins. Because of the chimeric nature of the polypeptide, this protein is renamed RhoNUC (rather than the original yNucR) and the gene is RNC1 for Rho-associated-NuClease. Over expression of the gene leads to altered cell growth and nuclear morphology. We propose that the gene plays an important role in cell development as well as DNA repair/recombination. Images PMID:1408836

  19. The nuclear protein encoded by the Drosophila neurogenic gene mastermind is widely expressed and associates with specific chromosomal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B.

    1996-06-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. 94 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Immunogenicity of the recombinant HxuCBA proteins encoded by hxuCBA gene cluster of Haemophilus parasuis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yiping; Yan, Xuefeng; Wen, Yiping; Cao, Sanjie; He, Lvqin; Ding, Lingqiang; Zhang, Luhua; Zhou, Peng; Huang, Xiaobo; Wu, Rui; Wen, Xintian

    2016-10-15

    Haemophilus parasuis causes serious economic losses in pigs, which is the etiology of Glässer's disease. In this study we studied the immunogenicity of proteins encoded by the hxuCBA gene cluster in H. parasuis. Through bioinformatics analysis, HxuC, HxuB, and HxuA proteins were found that they might have strong antigenicity, with 31 putative cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes and multiple B-cell antigenic determinants. Western blotting assay indicated that all these antigens are highly immunogenic. The antibody levels and the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ in the groups of HxuA, HxuB, HxuC, HxuCBA (include HxuC, HxuB and HxuA proteins), and M-3 were observed to significantly increase with time post vaccination. HxuC, HxuB, HxuCBA and H. parasuis M-3 vaccinated groups showed a strong immune response and protection against challenge with 6.5×10(9)cfu (5×LD50) of H. parasuis M-3 strain in a mouse model, but HxuA group showed only a low level protection. Additionally, the immune response induced by all of the proteins reduced histopathological lesions and their antisera could inhibit the growth of H. parasuis. We concluded that HxuC, HxuB and HxuCBA may have potential for use as a recombinant subunit vaccine against H. parasuis challenge. PMID:27378742

  1. Macroglobulin complement-related encodes a protein required for septate junction organization and paracellular barrier function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sonia; Bone, Courtney; Oshima, Kenzi; Zhang, Liang; McGraw, Molly; Lucas, Bethany; Fehon, Richard G.; Ward, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Polarized epithelia play crucial roles as barriers to the outside environment and enable the formation of specialized compartments for organs to carry out essential functions. Barrier functions are mediated by cellular junctions that line the lateral plasma membrane between cells, principally tight junctions in vertebrates and septate junctions (SJs) in invertebrates. Over the last two decades, more than 20 genes have been identified that function in SJ biogenesis in Drosophila, including those that encode core structural components of the junction such as Neurexin IV, Coracle and several claudins, as well as proteins that facilitate the trafficking of SJ proteins during their assembly. Here we demonstrate that Macroglobulin complement-related (Mcr), a gene previously implicated in innate immunity, plays an essential role during embryonic development in SJ organization and function. We show that Mcr colocalizes with other SJ proteins in mature ectodermally derived epithelial cells, that it shows interdependence with other SJ proteins for SJ localization, and that Mcr mutant epithelia fail to form an effective paracellular barrier. Tissue-specific RNA interference further demonstrates that Mcr is required cell-autonomously for SJ organization. Finally, we show a unique interdependence between Mcr and Nrg for SJ localization that provides new insights into the organization of the SJ. Together, these studies demonstrate that Mcr is a core component of epithelial SJs and also highlight an interesting relationship between innate immunity and epithelial barrier functions. PMID:24496625

  2. Isolation and characterisation of cDNA encoding a wheat heavy metal-associated isoprenylated protein involved in stress responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Feng, H; Feng, C; Xu, H; Huang, X; Wang, Q; Duan, X; Wang, X; Wei, G; Huang, L; Kang, Z

    2015-11-01

    In cells, metallochaperones are important proteins that safely transport metal ions. Heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant proteins (HIPPs) are metallochaperones that contain a metal binding domain and a CaaX isoprenylation motif at the carboxy-terminal end. To investigate the roles of wheat heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant protein (TaHIPP) genes in plant development and in stress responses, we isolated cDNA encoding the wheat TaHIPP1 gene, which contains a heavy metal-associated domain, nuclear localisation signals and an isoprenylation motif (CaaX motif). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that the TaHIPP1 gene was differentially expressed under biotic and abiotic stresses. Specifically, TaHIPP1 expression was up-regulated by ABA exposure or wounding. Additionally, TaHIPP1 over-expression in yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) significantly increased the cell growth rate under Cu(2+) and high salinity stresses. The nuclear localisation of the protein was confirmed with confocal laser scanning microscopy of epidermal onion cells after particle bombardment with chimeric TaHIPP1-GFP constructs. In addition, TaHIPP1 was shown to enhance the susceptibility of wheat to Pst as determined by virus-induced gene silencing. These data indicate that TaHIPP1 is an important component in defence signalling pathways and may play a crucial role in the defence response of wheat to biotic and certain abiotic stresses. PMID:25951496

  3. Characterization of a novel anther-specific gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat protein in petunia.

    PubMed

    Yue, Y Z; Sun, J; Huang, X; Peng, H; Liu, G F; Hu, H R

    2014-01-01

    In Petunia x hybrida 'Fantasy Red', a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene referred to as PhLRR, was identified in a flower bud cDNA library. The open reading frame sequence of PhLRR was 1251 bp, encoding a putative 46.2-kDa protein of 416 amino acids. The PhLRR protein showed high similarity to members of polygalacturonase inhibitor proteins (PGIPs), contained 11 conserved LRR domains, and was an extracellular localization protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PhLRR belonged to the same PGIPs subfamily as SHY, indicating that PhLRR may be involved in the development of pollen-like SHY. Expression analysis revealed that PhLRR was abundantly expressed during early stages of flower bud and anther development, while it was not detected in any other examined organs, such as sepals, petals, pistils, roots, stems, leaves, or open flowers. Furthermore, many cis-acting elements (such as AGAAA and GTGA) related to anther-specific gene expression were identified in the PhLRR gene promoter region, indicating that the promoter is also anther-specific. These results suggested that PhLRR is a novel anther-specific gene that may be essential for the early development of anthers. PMID:25501199

  4. IFT81, encoding an IFT-B core protein, as a very rare cause of a ciliopathy phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Isabelle; Halbritter, Jan; Porath, Jonathan D; Gérard, Xavier; Braun, Daniela A; Gee, Heon Yung; Fathy, Hanan M; Saunier, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Thomas, Sophie; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Boddaert, Nathalie; Taschner, Michael; Schueler, Markus; Lorentzen, Esben; Lifton, Richard P; Lawson, Jennifer A; Garfa-Traore, Meriem; Otto, Edgar A; Bastin, Philippe; Caillaud, Catherine; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    Background Bidirectional intraflagellar transport (IFT) consists of two major protein complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B. In contrast to the IFT-B complex, all components of IFT-A have recently been linked to human ciliopathies when defective. We therefore hypothesised that mutations in additional IFT-B encoding genes can be found in patients with multisystemic ciliopathies. Methods We screened 1628 individuals with reno-ocular ciliopathies by targeted next-generation sequencing of ciliary candidate genes, including all IFT-B encoding genes. Results Consequently, we identified a homozygous mutation in IFT81 affecting an obligatory donor splice site in an individual with nephronophthisis and polydactyly. Further, we detected a loss-of-stop mutation with extension of the deduced protein by 10 amino acids in an individual with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-1. This proband presented with retinal dystrophy and brain lesions including cerebellar atrophy, a phenotype to which the IFT81 variant might contribute. Cultured fibroblasts of this latter affected individual showed a significant decrease in ciliated cell abundance compared with controls and increased expression of the transcription factor GLI2 suggesting deranged sonic hedgehog signalling. Conclusions This work describes identification of mutations of IFT81 in individuals with symptoms consistent with the clinical spectrum of ciliopathies. It might represent the rare case of a core IFT-B complex protein found associated with human disease. Our data further suggest that defects in the IFT-B core are an exceedingly rare finding, probably due to its indispensable role for ciliary assembly in development. PMID:26275418

  5. Three genes encoding AOP2, a protein involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, are differentially expressed in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jifang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liang, Jianli; Wu, Jian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-10-01

    The glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2 encodes an enzyme that plays a crucial role in catalysing the conversion of beneficial glucosinolates into anti-nutritional ones. In Brassica rapa, three copies of BrAOP2 have been identified, but their function in establishing the glucosinolate content of B. rapa is poorly understood. Here, we used phylogenetic and gene structure analyses to show that BrAOP2 proteins have evolved via a duplication process retaining two highly conserved domains at the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while the middle part has experienced structural divergence. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays and Arabidopsis mutant complementation studies showed that all three BrAOP2 genes encode functional BrAOP2 proteins that convert the precursor methylsulfinyl alkyl glucosinolate to the alkenyl form. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that His356, Asp310, and Arg376 residues are required for the catalytic activity of one of the BrAOP2 proteins (BrAOP2.1). Promoter-β-glucuronidase lines revealed that the BrAOP2.3 gene displayed an overlapping but distinct tissue- and cell-specific expression profile compared with that of the BrAOP2.1 and BrAOP2.2 genes. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays demonstrated that BrAOP2.1 showed a slightly different pattern of expression in below-ground tissue at the seedling stage and in the silique at the reproductive stage compared with BrAOP2.2 and BrAOP2.3 genes in B. rapa. Taken together, our results revealed that all three BrAOP2 paralogues are active in B. rapa but have functionally diverged. PMID:26188204

  6. Three genes encoding AOP2, a protein involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, are differentially expressed in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jifang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liang, Jianli; Wu, Jian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-01-01

    The glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2 encodes an enzyme that plays a crucial role in catalysing the conversion of beneficial glucosinolates into anti-nutritional ones. In Brassica rapa, three copies of BrAOP2 have been identified, but their function in establishing the glucosinolate content of B. rapa is poorly understood. Here, we used phylogenetic and gene structure analyses to show that BrAOP2 proteins have evolved via a duplication process retaining two highly conserved domains at the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while the middle part has experienced structural divergence. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays and Arabidopsis mutant complementation studies showed that all three BrAOP2 genes encode functional BrAOP2 proteins that convert the precursor methylsulfinyl alkyl glucosinolate to the alkenyl form. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that His356, Asp310, and Arg376 residues are required for the catalytic activity of one of the BrAOP2 proteins (BrAOP2.1). Promoter–β-glucuronidase lines revealed that the BrAOP2.3 gene displayed an overlapping but distinct tissue- and cell-specific expression profile compared with that of the BrAOP2.1 and BrAOP2.2 genes. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays demonstrated that BrAOP2.1 showed a slightly different pattern of expression in below-ground tissue at the seedling stage and in the silique at the reproductive stage compared with BrAOP2.2 and BrAOP2.3 genes in B. rapa. Taken together, our results revealed that all three BrAOP2 paralogues are active in B. rapa but have functionally diverged. PMID:26188204

  7. Expression of modified gene encoding functional human alpha-1-antitrypsin protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Singh, Rahul; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2008-10-01

    Transgenic plants offer promising alternative for large scale, sustainable production of safe, functional, recombinant proteins of therapeutic and industrial importance. Here, we report the expression of biologically active human alpha-1-antitrypsin in transgenic tomato plants. The 1,182 bp cDNA sequence of human AAT was strategically designed, modified and synthesized to adopt codon usage pattern of dicot plants, elimination of mRNA destabilizing sequences and modifications around 5' and 3' flanking regions of the gene to achieve high-level regulated expression in dicot plants. The native signal peptide sequence was substituted with modified signal peptide sequence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pathogenesis related protein PR1a, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamineA and with dicot-preferred native signal peptide sequence of AAT gene. A dicot preferred translation initiation context sequence, 38 bp alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated region were incorporated at 5' while an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (KDEL) was incorporated at 3' end of the gene. The modified gene was synthesized by PCR based method using overlapping oligonucleotides. Tomato plants were genetically engineered by nuclear transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring three different constructs pPAK, pSAK and pNAK having modified AAT gene with different signal peptide sequences under the control of CaMV35S duplicated enhancer promoter. Promising transgenic plants expressing recombinant AAT protein upto 1.55% of total soluble leaf protein has been developed and characterized. Plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein with molecular mass of around approximately 50 kDa was biologically active, showing high specific activity and efficient inhibition of elastase activity. The enzymatic deglycosylation established proper glycosylation of the plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein in contrast to unglycosylated rAAT expressed in E. coli ( approximately 45 kDa). Our results demonstrate

  8. Genetically Encoded Cyclopropene Directs Rapid, Photoclick Chemistry-Mediated Protein Labeling in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhipeng; Pan, Yanchao; Wang, Zhiyong; Wang, Jiangyun; Lin, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Genetic incorporation of a cyclopropene amino acid, Nε-(1-methylcycloprop-2-enecarboxamido)-lysine (CpK), into sperm whale myoglobin site-specifically in E. coli as well as enhanced green fluorescent protein in mammalian cells was achieved through amber codon suppression employing an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair. Because of its high ring strain, cyclopropene exhibited fast reaction kinetics (up to 58 ± 16 M−1 s−1) in the photoclick reaction and allowed rapid (~ 2 min) bioorthogonal labeling of proteins in mammalian cells. PMID:22997015

  9. Wound induced Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein genes encode a longer leucine-rich repeat domain and inhibit fungal polygalacturonases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins involved in plant defense. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes, BvPGIP1, BvPGIP2 and BvPGIP3, were isolated from two breeding lines, F1016 and F1010. Full-length cDNA sequences of the three BvPGIP genes encod...

  10. Identification of cDNA clones encoding valosin-containing protein and other plant plasma membrane-associated proteins by a general immunoscreening strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, J; Dixon, R A; Gonzales, R A; Kjellbom, P; Bhattacharyya, M K

    1995-01-01

    An approach was developed for the isolation and characterization of soybean plasma membrane-associated proteins by immunoscreening of a cDNA expression library. An antiserum was raised against purified plasma membrane vesicles. In a differential screening of approximately 500,000 plaque-forming units with the anti-(plasma membrane) serum and DNA probes derived from highly abundant clones isolated in a preliminary screening, 261 clones were selected from approximately 1,200 antiserum-positive plaques. These clones were classified into 40 groups by hybridization analysis and 5'- and 3'-terminal sequencing. By searching nucleic acid and protein sequence data bases, 11 groups of cDNAs were identified, among which valosin-containing protein (VCP), clathrin heavy chain, phospholipase C, and S-adenosylmethionine:delta 24-sterol-C-methyltransferase have not to date been cloned from plants. The remaining 29 groups did not match any current data base entries and may, therefore, represent additional or yet uncharacterized genes. A full-length cDNA encoding the soybean VCP was sequenced. The high level of amino acid identity with vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein indicates that the soybean protein is a plant homolog of vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753826

  11. Molecular Characterization of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum pvpA Gene Which Encodes a Putative Variable Cytadhesin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Boguslavsky, S.; Menaker, D.; Lysnyansky, I.; Liu, T.; Levisohn, S.; Rosengarten, R.; García, M.; Yogev, D.

    2000-01-01

    A putative cytadhesin-related protein (PvpA) undergoing variation in its expression was identified in the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The pvpA gene was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and sequenced. It exhibits 54 and 52% homology with the P30 and P32 cytadhesin proteins of the human pathogens Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Mycoplasma genitalium, respectively. In addition, 50% homology was found with the MGC2 cytadhesin of M. gallisepticum and 49% homology was found with a stretch of 205 amino acids of the cytadherence accessory protein HMW3 of M. pneumoniae. The PvpA molecule possesses a proline-rich carboxy-terminal region (28%) containing two identical directly repeated sequences of 52 amino acids and a tetrapeptide motif (Pro-Arg-Pro-X) which is repeated 14 times. Genetic analysis of several clonal isolates representing different expression states of the PvpA product ruled out chromosomal rearrangement as the mechanism for PvpA phase variation. The molecular basis of PvpA variation was revealed in a short tract of repeated GAA codons, encoding five successive glutamate resides, located in the N-terminal region and subject to frequent mutation generating an in-frame UAA stop codon. Size variation of the PvpA protein was observed among M. gallisepticum strains, ranging from 48 to 55 kDa and caused by several types of deletions occurring at the PvpA C-terminal end and within the two directly repeated sequences. By immunoelectron microscopy, the PvpA protein was localized on the mycoplasma cell surface, in particular on the terminal tip structure. Collectively, these findings suggest that PvpA is a newly identified variable surface cytadhesin protein of M. gallisepticum. PMID:10858209

  12. Molecular characterization of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum pvpA gene which encodes a putative variable cytadhesin protein.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, S; Menaker, D; Lysnyansky, I; Liu, T; Levisohn, S; Rosengarten, R; García, M; Yogev, D

    2000-07-01

    A putative cytadhesin-related protein (PvpA) undergoing variation in its expression was identified in the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The pvpA gene was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and sequenced. It exhibits 54 and 52% homology with the P30 and P32 cytadhesin proteins of the human pathogens Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Mycoplasma genitalium, respectively. In addition, 50% homology was found with the MGC2 cytadhesin of M. gallisepticum and 49% homology was found with a stretch of 205 amino acids of the cytadherence accessory protein HMW3 of M. pneumoniae. The PvpA molecule possesses a proline-rich carboxy-terminal region (28%) containing two identical directly repeated sequences of 52 amino acids and a tetrapeptide motif (Pro-Arg-Pro-X) which is repeated 14 times. Genetic analysis of several clonal isolates representing different expression states of the PvpA product ruled out chromosomal rearrangement as the mechanism for PvpA phase variation. The molecular basis of PvpA variation was revealed in a short tract of repeated GAA codons, encoding five successive glutamate resides, located in the N-terminal region and subject to frequent mutation generating an in-frame UAA stop codon. Size variation of the PvpA protein was observed among M. gallisepticum strains, ranging from 48 to 55 kDa and caused by several types of deletions occurring at the PvpA C-terminal end and within the two directly repeated sequences. By immunoelectron microscopy, the PvpA protein was localized on the mycoplasma cell surface, in particular on the terminal tip structure. Collectively, these findings suggest that PvpA is a newly identified variable surface cytadhesin protein of M. gallisepticum. PMID:10858209

  13. Bioinformatic Analyses of Integral Membrane Transport Proteins Encoded Within the Genome of the Planctomycetes species, Rhodopirellula baltica

    PubMed Central

    Paparoditis, Philipp; Vastermark, Ake; Le, Andrew J.; Fuerst, John A.; Saier, Milton H.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopirellula baltica (R. baltica) is a Planctomycete, known to have intracellular membranes. Because of its unusual cell structure and ecological significance, we have conducted comprehensive analyses of its transmembrane transport proteins. The complete proteome of R. baltica was screened against the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB) to identify recognizable integral membrane transport proteins. 342 proteins were identified with a high degree of confidence, and these fell into several different classes. R. baltica encodes in its genome channels (12%), secondary carriers (33%), and primary active transport proteins (41%) in addition to classes represented in smaller numbers. Relative to most non-marine bacteria, R. baltica possesses a larger number of sodium-dependent symporters but fewer proton-dependent symporters, and it has dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and trimethyl-amine-oxide (TMAO) reductases, consistent with its Na+-rich marine environment. R. baltica also possesses a Na+-translocating NADH:quinone dehydrogenase (Na+-NDH), a Na+ efflux decarboxylase, two Na+-exporting ABC pumps, two Na+-translocating F-type ATPases, two Na+:H+ antiporters and two K+:H+ antiporters. Flagellar motility probably depends on the sodium electrochemical gradient. Surprisingly, R. baltica also has a complete set of H+-translocating electron transport complexes similar to those present in β-proteobacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria. The transport proteins identified proved to be typical of the bacterial domain with little or no indication of the presence of eukaryotic-type transporters. However, novel functionally uncharacterized multispanning membrane proteins were identified, some of which are found only in Rhodopirellula species, but others of which are widely distributed in bacteria. The analyses lead to predictions regarding the physiology, ecology and evolution of R. baltica. PMID:23969110

  14. Albino Leaf1 That Encodes the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Responsible for Chloroplast Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jianjie; Xing, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Qiaoling; Zhu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast, the photosynthetic organelle in plants, plays a crucial role in plant development and growth through manipulating the capacity of photosynthesis. However, the regulatory mechanism of chloroplast development still remains elusive. Here, we characterized a mutant with defective chloroplasts in rice (Oryza sativa), termed albino leaf1 (al1), which exhibits a distinct albino phenotype in leaves, eventually leading to al1 seedling lethality. Electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that the number of thylakoids was reduced and the structure of thylakoids was disrupted in the al1 mutant during rice development, which eventually led to the breakdown of chloroplast. Molecular cloning revealed that AL1 encodes the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein (RAP) in rice. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rap mutants indicated that the AL1 protein is a functional RAP. Further analysis illustrated that three transcript variants were present in the AL1 gene, and the altered splices occurred at the 3′ untranslated region of the AL1 transcript. In addition, our results also indicate that disruption of the AL1 gene results in an altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes. Consistently, proteomic analysis demonstrated that the abundance of photosynthesis-associated proteins is altered significantly, as is that of a group of metabolism-associated proteins. More specifically, we found that the loss of AL1 resulted in altered abundances of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RAP likely also regulates the homeostasis of ribosomal proteins in rice in addition to the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, we propose that AL1, particularly the AL1a and AL1c isoforms, plays an essential role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:27208287

  15. Cloning, expression analysis and recombinant expression of a gene encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengsheng; Feng, Chao; Wang, Jing; Kong, Fanyu; Sun, Wenxiu; Wang, Fenglong

    2016-05-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are major defensive proteins produced by plant cell walls that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance by reducing polygalacturonase (PG) activity. In the present study, a novel PGIP gene was isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), hereafter referred as NtPGIP. A full-length NtPGIP cDNA of 1,412 bp with a 186 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), and 209 bp 3'-UTR was cloned from tobacco, NtPGIP is predicted to encode a protein of 338 amino acids. The NtPGIP sequence from genomic DNA showed no introns and sequence alignments of NtPGIP's deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology with known PGIPs from other plant species. Moreover, the putative NtPGIP protein was closely clustered with several Solanaceae PGIPs. Further, the expression profile of NtPGIP was examined in tobacco leaves following stimulation with the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae and other stressors, including salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), salt, and cold treatment. The results showed that all of the treatments up-regulated the expression of NtPGIP at different times. To understand the biochemical activity of NtPGIP gene, a full-length NtPGIP cDNA sequence was subcloned into a pET28a vector and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). Recombinant proteins were successfully induced by 1.0 nmol/L IPTG and the purified proteins effectively inhibited Phytophthora capsici PG activity. The results of this study suggest that NtPGIP may be a new candidate gene with properties that could be exploited in plant breeding. PMID:27441281

  16. Predicting Electrophoretic Mobility of Protein-Ligand Complexes for Ligands from DNA-Encoded Libraries of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiayin; Krylova, Svetlana M; Cherney, Leonid T; Hale, Robert L; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Chiu, Cynthia H; Shaginian, Alex; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-05-17

    Selection of target-binding ligands from DNA-encoded libraries of small molecules (DELSMs) is a rapidly developing approach in drug-lead discovery. Methods of kinetic capillary electrophoresis (KCE) may facilitate highly efficient homogeneous selection of ligands from DELSMs. However, KCE methods require accurate prediction of electrophoretic mobilities of protein-ligand complexes. Such prediction, in turn, requires a theory that would be applicable to DNA tags of different structures used in different DELSMs. Here we present such a theory. It utilizes a model of a globular protein connected, through a single point (small molecule), to a linear DNA tag containing a combination of alternating double-stranded and single-stranded DNA (dsDNA and ssDNA) regions of varying lengths. The theory links the unknown electrophoretic mobility of protein-DNA complex with experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities of the protein and DNA. Mobility prediction was initially tested by using a protein interacting with 18 ligands of various combinations of dsDNA and ssDNA regions, which mimicked different DELSMs. For all studied ligands, deviation of the predicted mobility from the experimentally determined value was within 11%. Finally, the prediction was tested for two proteins and two ligands with a DNA tag identical to those of DELSM manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. Deviation between the predicted and experimentally determined mobilities did not exceed 5%. These results confirm the accuracy and robustness of our model, which makes KCE methods one step closer to their practical use in selection of drug leads, and diagnostic probes from DELSMs. PMID:27119259

  17. Elicitor- and A23187-induced expression of WCK-1, a gene encoding mitogen-activated protein kinase in wheat.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, D

    1999-08-01

    Wheat cultured cells were used to study the role of Ca2+ in regulating protein kinases during the induction of defense-related genes by fungal elicitor treatments. Manipulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentrations by treatment with calcium ionophore A23187 in the presence of high extracellular Ca2+ resulted in the induction of mRNA expression of WCK-1, a gene encoding mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The induction of WCK-1 mRNA by A23187 did not occur when extracellular Ca2+ was chelated by 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). The WCK-1 mRNA was also induced by Typhula ishikariensis-derived elicitors, suggesting a possible involvement of WCK-1 in the plant defense response against pathogens. BAPTA and a calcium channel blocker, La3+, inhibited the elicitor-induced expression of the WCK-1 mRNA. A recombinant fusion protein of WCK-1 (GST-WCK-1) autophosphorylated at the Tyr residue and exhibited an autophosphorylation-dependent protein kinase activity towards myelin basic protein. Alteration of Tyr-196 in the conserved 'TEY' motif in GST-WCK-1 to Phe by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the autophosphorylation. The GST-WCK-1 protein was activated by elicitor-treated wheat cell extracts but not by the control extract. These results suggest that fungal elicitors activate WCK-1, a specific MAP kinase in wheat. Furthermore, the results suggest a possible involvement of Ca2+ in enhancing the MAP kinase signaling cascade in plants by controlling the levels of the MAP kinase transcripts. PMID:10527417

  18. Hypomorphic Mutations in PGAP2, Encoding a GPI-Anchor-Remodeling Protein, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko; Mang, Yuan; ur Rehman, Shoaib; Buchert, Rebecca; Schaffer, Stefanie; Muhammad, Safia; Bak, Mads; Nöthen, Markus M.; Bennett, Eric P.; Maeda, Yusuke; Aigner, Michael; Reis, André; Kinoshita, Taroh; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2013-01-01

    PGAP2 encodes a protein involved in remodeling the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor in the Golgi apparatus. After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), GPI anchors are transferred to the proteins and are remodeled while transported through the Golgi to the cell membrane. Germline mutations in six genes (PIGA, PIGL, PIGM, PIGV, PIGN, and PIGO) in the ER-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway have been reported, and all are associated with phenotypes extending from malformation and lethality to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, minor dysmorphisms, and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous families. Rescue experiments with the altered proteins in PGAP2-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell lines showed less expression of cell-surface GPI-anchored proteins DAF and CD59 than of the wild-type protein, substantiating the pathogenicity of the identified alterations. Furthermore, we observed a full rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability with elevated ALP. GPI-anchor deficiencies can be interpreted within the concept of a disease family, and we propose that the severity of the phenotype is dependent on the location of the altered protein in the biosynthesis chain. PMID:23561846

  19. Comparative genomic analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Leptospira species.

    PubMed

    Buyuktimkin, Bora; Saier, Milton H

    2015-11-01

    Select species of the bacterial genus Leptospira are causative agents of leptospirosis, an emerging global zoonosis affecting nearly one million people worldwide annually. We examined two Leptospira pathogens, Leptospira interrogans serovar Lai str. 56601 and Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo-bovis str. L550, as well as the free-living leptospiral saprophyte, Leptospira biflexa serovar Patoc str. 'Patoc 1 (Ames)'. The transport proteins of these leptospires were identified and compared using bioinformatics to gain an appreciation for which proteins may be related to pathogenesis and saprophytism. L. biflexa possesses a disproportionately high number of secondary carriers for metabolite uptake and environmental adaptability as well as an increased number of inorganic cation transporters providing ionic homeostasis and effective osmoregulation in a rapidly changing environment. L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii possess far fewer transporters, but those that they have are remarkably similar, with near-equivalent representation in most transporter families. These two Leptospira pathogens also possess intact sphingomyelinases, holins, and virulence-related outer membrane porins. These virulence-related factors, in conjunction with decreased transporter substrate versatility, indicate that pathogenicity was accompanied by progressively narrowing ecological niches and the emergence of a limited set of proteins responsible for host invasion. The variability of host tropism and mortality rates by infectious leptospires suggests that small differences in individual sets of proteins play important physiological and pathological roles. PMID:26247102

  20. A Large Gene Cluster Encoding Several Magnetosome Proteins Is Conserved in Different Species of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Karen; Wawer, Cathrin; Tebo, Bradley M.; Schüler, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In magnetotactic bacteria, a number of specific proteins are associated with the magnetosome membrane (MM) and may have a crucial role in magnetite biomineralization. We have cloned and sequenced the genes of several of these polypeptides in the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense that could be assigned to two different genomic regions. Except for mamA, none of these genes have been previously reported to be related to magnetosome formation. Homologous genes were found in the genome sequences of M. magnetotacticum and magnetic coccus strain MC-1. The MM proteins identified display homology to tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (MamA), cation diffusion facilitators (MamB), and HtrA-like serine proteases (MamE) or bear no similarity to known proteins (MamC and MamD). A major gene cluster containing several magnetosome genes (including mamA and mamB) was found to be conserved in all three of the strains investigated. The mamAB cluster also contains additional genes that have no known homologs in any nonmagnetic organism, suggesting a specific role in magnetosome formation. PMID:11571158

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of 18 Oral Streptococcus Strains That Encode Amylase-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Amarpreet; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Haase, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of commensal oral streptococcal species produce a heterogeneous group of proteins that mediate binding of salivary α-amylase. This interaction likely influences streptococcal colonization of the oral cavity. Here, we present draft genome sequences of several strains of oral streptococcal species that bind human salivary amylase. PMID:25999552

  2. Draft genome sequences of 18 oral streptococcus strains that encode amylase-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Amarpreet; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Haase, Elaine M; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    A number of commensal oral streptococcal species produce a heterogeneous group of proteins that mediate binding of salivary α-amylase. This interaction likely influences streptococcal colonization of the oral cavity. Here, we present draft genome sequences of several strains of oral streptococcal species that bind human salivary amylase. PMID:25999552

  3. Unconventional conservation among genes encoding small secreted salivary sland proteins from a gall midge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to functional constraints associated with protein-coding sequences, introns and the 3’-untranslated region (UTR) of most genes vary the most, followed by the 5’-UTR. The coding region is the most conserved due to stronger functional constraints. During characterization of transcripts and gene...

  4. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  5. The yeast telomere length regulator TEL2 encodes a protein that binds to telomeric DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kota, R S; Runge, K W

    1998-01-01

    TEL2 is required for telomere length regulation and viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate the mechanism by which Tel2p regulates telomere length, the majority (65%) of the TEL2 ORF was fused to the 3'-end of the gene for maltose binding protein, expressed in bacteria and the purified protein used in DNA binding studies. Rap1p, the major yeast telomere binding protein, recognizes a 13 bp duplex site 5'-GGTGTGTGGGTGT-3' in yeast telomeric DNA with high affinity. Gel shift experiments revealed that the MBP-Tel2p fusion binds the double-stranded yeast telomeric Rap1p site in a sequence-specific manner. Analysis of mutated sites showed that MBP-Tel2p could bind 5'-GTGTGTGG-3' within this 13 bp site. Methylation interference analysis revealed that Tel2p contacts the 5'-terminal guanine in the major groove. MBP-Tel2p did not bind duplex telomeric DNA repeats from vertebrates, Tetrahymena or Oxytricha. These results suggest that Tel2p is a DNA binding protein that recognizes yeast telomeric DNA. PMID:9490802

  6. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Leptospira species.

    PubMed

    Buyuktimkin, Bora; Saier, Milton H

    2016-09-01

    Select species of the bacterial genus Leptospira are causative agents of leptospirosis, an emerging global zoonosis affecting nearly one million people worldwide annually. We examined two Leptospira pathogens, Leptospira interrogans serovar Lai str. 56601 and Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo-bovis str. L550, as well as the free-living leptospiral saprophyte, Leptospira biflexa serovar Patoc str. 'Patoc 1 (Ames)'. The transport proteins of these leptospires were identified and compared using bioinformatics to gain an appreciation for which proteins may be related to pathogenesis and saprophytism. L. biflexa possesses a disproportionately high number of secondary carriers for metabolite uptake and environmental adaptability as well as an increased number of inorganic cation transporters providing ionic homeostasis and effective osmoregulation in a rapidly changing environment. L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii possess far fewer transporters, but those that they all have are remarkably similar, with near-equivalent representation in most transporter families. These two Leptospira pathogens also possess intact sphingomyelinases, holins, and virulence-related outer membrane porins. These virulence-related factors, in conjunction with decreased transporter substrate versatility, indicate that pathogenicity arose in Leptospira correlating to progressively narrowing ecological niches and the emergence of a limited set of proteins responsible for host invasion. The variability of host tropism and mortality rates by infectious leptospires suggests that small differences in individual sets of proteins play important physiological and pathological roles. PMID:27296707

  7. Metalloregulatory DNA-Binding Protein Encoded by the merR Gene: Isolation and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, Thomas; Walsh, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    The MerR protein mediates the induction of the mercury resistance phenotype in bacteria; it has been isolated in order to study the effects of metal-ion induced changes in the metabolism of prokaryotic cells at the molecular level. After DNA sequences responsible for negative autoregulation were removed, the 16-kilodalton protein was overproduced and purified to more than 90 percent homogeneity by a salt extraction procedure that yields about 5 milligrams of protein per gram of cells. Complementation data, amino terminal analysis, gel filtration, and deoxyribonuclease I protection studies demonstrate that the purified merR gene product is a dimer under nondenaturing conditions and that it binds specifically to DNA, in the presence and absence of mercury, at a palindromic site which is directly between the -10 and -35 regions of the structural genes and adjacent to its own promoter. These initial results indicate that MerR is a DNA-binding metalloregulatory protein that plays a central role in this heavy metal responsive system and they delineate an operator site in the mer operon.

  8. Digitally encoded DNA nanostructures for multiplexed, single-molecule protein sensing with nanopores.

    PubMed

    Bell, Nicholas A W; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous detection of a large number of different analytes is important in bionanotechnology research and in diagnostic applications. Nanopore sensing is an attractive method in this regard as the approach can be integrated into small, portable device architectures, and there is significant potential for detecting multiple sub-populations in a sample. Here, we show that highly multiplexed sensing of single molecules can be achieved with solid-state nanopores by using digitally encoded DNA nanostructures. Based on the principles of DNA origami, we designed a library of DNA nanostructures in which each member contains a unique barcode; each bit in the barcode is signalled by the presence or absence of multiple DNA dumbbell hairpins. We show that a 3-bit barcode can be assigned with 94% accuracy by electrophoretically driving the DNA structures through a solid-state nanopore. Select members of the library were then functionalized to detect a single, specific antibody through antigen presentation at designed positions on the DNA. This allows us to simultaneously detect four different antibodies of the same isotype at nanomolar concentration levels. PMID:27043197

  9. Digitally encoded DNA nanostructures for multiplexed, single-molecule protein sensing with nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-07-01

    The simultaneous detection of a large number of different analytes is important in bionanotechnology research and in diagnostic applications. Nanopore sensing is an attractive method in this regard as the approach can be integrated into small, portable device architectures, and there is significant potential for detecting multiple sub-populations in a sample. Here, we show that highly multiplexed sensing of single molecules can be achieved with solid-state nanopores by using digitally encoded DNA nanostructures. Based on the principles of DNA origami, we designed a library of DNA nanostructures in which each member contains a unique barcode; each bit in the barcode is signalled by the presence or absence of multiple DNA dumbbell hairpins. We show that a 3-bit barcode can be assigned with 94% accuracy by electrophoretically driving the DNA structures through a solid-state nanopore. Select members of the library were then functionalized to detect a single, specific antibody through antigen presentation at designed positions on the DNA. This allows us to simultaneously detect four different antibodies of the same isotype at nanomolar concentration levels.

  10. Murine cerebellar neurons express a novel gene encoding a protein related to cell cycle control and cell fate determination proteins.

    PubMed

    Taoka, M; Isobe, T; Okuyama, T; Watanabe, M; Kondo, H; Yamakawa, Y; Ozawa, F; Hishinuma, F; Kubota, M; Minegishi, A

    1994-04-01

    We cloned cDNAs of a novel protein (designated V-1) that has been identified from among the developmentally regulated proteins in the rat cerebellum. Protein sequencing analysis (Taoka, M., Yamakuni, T., Song, S.-Y., Yamakawa, Y., Seta, K., Okuyama, T., and Isobe, T. (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 207, 615-620) and cDNA sequence analysis revealed that the V-1 protein consists of 117 amino acids and contains 2.5 contiguous repeats of the cdc10/SWI6 motif, which was originally found in the products of the cell cycle control genes of yeasts and the cell fate determination genes in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that the expression of the V-1 gene is transiently increased in postmigratory granule cells during postnatal rat cerebellar development and thereafter is markedly suppressed, whereas Purkinje cells constitutively express V-1 mRNA. In contrast, cerebellar granule cells of the staggerer mutant mouse continue to express the V-1 gene even when the granule cells of the normal mouse have ceased to express the V-1 gene, suggesting that the expression of the V-1 gene in granule cells is regulated through the interaction with Purkinje cells. On the basis of these results, we postulate that the V-1 protein has a potential role in the differentiation of granule cells. PMID:8144589

  11. The NMR solution structure of the 30S ribosomal protein S27e encoded in gene RS27_ARCFU of Archaeoglobus fulgidis reveals a novel protein fold

    PubMed Central

    Herve du Penhoat, Catherine; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Shen, Yang; Liu, Gaohua; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Li, Zhaohui; Murray, Diana; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Archaeoglobus fulgidis gene RS27_ARCFU encodes the 30S ribosomal protein S27e. Here, we present the high-quality NMR solution structure of this archaeal protein, which comprises a C4 zinc finger motif of the CX2CX14-16CX2C class. S27e was selected as a target of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (target ID: GR2), and its three-dimensional structure is the first representative of a family of more than 116 homologous proteins occurring in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. As a salient feature of its molecular architecture, S27e exhibits a β-sandwich consisting of two three-stranded sheets with topology B(↓), A(↑), F(↓), and C(↑), D(↓), E(↑). Due to the uniqueness of the arrangement of the strands, the resulting fold was found to be novel. Residues that are highly conserved among the S27 proteins allowed identification of a structural motif of putative functional importance; a conserved hydrophobic patch may well play a pivotal role for functioning of S27 proteins, be it in archaeal or eukaryotic cells. The structure of human S27, which possesses a 26-residue amino-terminal extension when compared with the archaeal S27e, was modeled on the basis of two structural templates, S27e for the carboxy-terminal core and the amino-terminal segment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L37Ae for the extension. Remarkably, the electrostatic surface properties of archaeal and human proteins are predicted to be entirely different, pointing at either functional variations among archaeal and eukaryotic S27 proteins, or, assuming that the function remained invariant, to a concerted evolutionary change of the surface potential of proteins interacting with S27. PMID:15096641

  12. Identification of a family of bacteriophage T4 genes encoding proteins similar to those present in group I introns of fungi and phage.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, M; Ellis, R L; Hinton, D M

    1992-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 segA gene lies in a genetically unmapped region between the gene beta gt (beta-glucosyltransferase) and uvsX (recombination protein) and encodes a protein of 221 amino acids. We have found that the first 100 amino acids of the SegA protein are highly similar to the N termini of four other predicted T4 proteins, also of unknown function. Together these five proteins, SegA-E (similar to endonucleases of group I introns), contain regions of similarity to the endonuclease I-Tev I, which is encoded by the mobile group I intron of the T4 td gene, and to putative endonucleases of group I introns present in the mitochondria of Neurospora crassa, Podospora anserina, and Saccharomyces douglasii. Intron-encoded endonucleases are required for the movement (homing) of the intron DNA into an intronless gene, cutting at or near the site of intron insertion. Our in vitro assays indicate that SegA, like I-Tev I, is a Mg(2+)-dependent DNA endonuclease that has preferred sites for cutting. Unlike the I-Tev I gene, however, there is no evidence that segA (or the other seg genes) resides within introns. Thus, it is possible that segA encodes an endonuclease that is involved in the movement of the endonuclease-encoding DNA rather than in the homing of an intron. Images PMID:1631169

  13. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S.

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  14. Modulation of expression of genes encoding nuclear proteins following exposure to JANUS neutrons or {gamma}-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1994-05-01

    Previous work has shown that exposure of cells to ionizing radiations causes modulation of a variety of genes, including those encoding c-fos, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, and cytoskeletal elements. The experiments reported herein were designed to examine the effects of either JANUS neutron or {gamma}-ray exposure on expression of genes encoding nucleus-associated proteins (H4-histone, c-jun, c-myc, Rb, and p53). Cycling Syrian hamster embryo cells were irradiated with varying doses and dose rates of either JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons or {gamma}-rays; after incubation of the cell cultures for 1 h following radiation exposure, mRNA was harvested and analyzed by Northern blot. Results revealed induction of transcripts for c-jun, H4-histone, and (to a lesser extent) Rb following {gamma}-ray but not following neutron exposure. Expression of p53 and c-myc genes was unaffected by radiation exposure. Radiations at different doses and dose rates were compared for each of the genes studied.

  15. The two paralogue phoN (phosphinothricin acetyl transferase) genes of Pseudomonas putida encode functionally different proteins.

    PubMed

    Páez-Espino, A David; Chavarría, Max; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-09-01

    Phosphinothricin (PPT) is a non-specific inhibitor of glutamine synthetase that has been employed as herbicide for selection of transgenic plants expressing cognate resistance genes. While the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has been generally considered PPT-sensitive, inspection of its genome sequence reveals the presence of two highly similar open reading frames (PP_1924 and PP_4846) encoding acetylases with a potential to cause tolerance to the herbicide. To explore this possibility, each of these genes (named phoN1 and phoN2) was separately cloned and their activities examined in vivo and in vitro. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicated that phoN1 encodes a bona fide PPT-acetyl transferase, the expression of which suffices to make P. putida tolerant to high concentrations of the herbicide. In contrast, PhoN2 does not act on PPT but displays instead activity against methionine sulfoximine (MetSox), another glutamine synthetase inhibitor. When the geometry of the substrate-binding site of PhoN1 was grafted with the equivalent residues of the predicted PhoN2 structure, the resulting protein increased significantly MetSox resistance of the expression host concomitantly with the loss of activity on PPT. These observations uncover intricate biochemical and genetic interactions among soil microorganisms and how they can be perturbed by exposure to generic herbicides in soil. PMID:25684119

  16. In silico cloning of genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors in a spider mite.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A; Rombauts, Stephane; Grbić, Miodrag

    2012-04-01

    The genome of the spider mite was prospected for the presence of genes coding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors. Fifty one candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or neurohormones. These include all known insect neuropeptides and neurohormones, with the exception of sulfakinin, corazonin, neuroparsin and PTTH. True orthologs of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) were neither found, but there are three genes encoding peptides similar in structure to both AKH and the AKH-corazonin-related peptide. We were also unable to identify the precursors for pigment dispersing factor (PDF) or the recently discovered trissin. However, the spider mite probably does have such genes, as we found their putative receptors. A novel arthropod neuropeptide gene was identified that shows similarity to previously described molluscan neuropeptide genes and was called EFLamide. A total of 65 putative neuropeptide GPCR genes were also identified, of these 58 belong to the A-family and 7 to the B-family. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 50 of them are closely related to insect GPCRs, which allowed the identification of their putative ligand in 39 cases with varying degrees of certainty. Other spider mite GPCRs however have no identifiable orthologs in the genomes of the four holometabolous insect species best analyzed. Whereas some of the latter have orthologs in hemimetabolous insect species, crustaceans or ticks, for others such arthropod homologs are currently unknown. PMID:22214827

  17. scratch, a pan-neural gene encoding a zinc finger protein related to snail, promotes neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Roark, M; Sturtevant, M A; Emery, J; Vaessin, H; Grell, E; Bier, E

    1995-10-01

    The Drosophila scratch (scrt) gene is expressed in most or all neuronal precursor cells and encodes a predicted zinc finger transcription factor closely related to the product of the mesoderm determination gene snail (sna). Adult flies homozygous for scrt null alleles have a reduced number of photoreceptors in the eye, and embryos lacking the function of both scrt and the pan-neural gene deadpan (dpn), which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, exhibit a significant loss of neurons. Conversely, ectopic expression of a scrt transgene during embryonic and adult development leads to the production of supernumerary neurons. Consistent with scrt functioning as a transcription factor, various genes are more broadly expressed than normal in scrt null mutants. Reciprocally, these same genes are expressed at reduced levels in response to ectopic scrt expression. We propose that scrt promotes neuronal cell fates by suppressing expression of genes promoting non-neuronal cell fates. We discuss the similarities between the roles of the ancestrally related scrt, sna, and escargot (esc) genes in regulating cell fate choices. PMID:7557390

  18. Evaluation of DNA encoding acidic ribosomal protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum as a potential vaccine candidate for cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Alvaro; Priest, Jeffrey W.; Ehigiator, Humphrey N.; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R.

    2011-01-01

    The Cryptosporidium parvum acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2) is an important immunodominant marker in C. parvum infection. In this study, the CpP2 antigen was evaluated as a vaccine candidate using a DNA vaccine model in adult C57BL/6 IL-12 knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding CpP2 (CpP2-DNA) cloned into the pUMVC4b vector induced a significant anti-CpP2 IgG antibody response that was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Compared to control KO mice immunized with plasmid alone, CpP2-immunized mice demonstrated specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation as well as enhanced IFN-γ production to recombinant CpP2. Further, parasite loads in CpP2 DNA-immunized mice were compared to control mice challenged with C. parvum oocysts. Although a trend in reduction of infection was observed in the CpP2 DNA-immunized mice, differences between groups were not statistically significant. These results suggest that a DNA vaccine encoding the C. parvum P2 antigen is able to provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and has the potential to generate protective immunity against C. parvum infection but may require using alternative vectors or adjuvant to generate a more potent and balanced response. PMID:21968447

  19. The Rice HGW Gene Encodes a Ubiquitin-Associated (UBA) Domain Protein That Regulates Heading Date and Grain Weight

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Chu, Huangwei; Zhang, Yonghong; Mou, Tongmin; Wu, Changyin; Zhang, Qifa; Xu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Heading date and grain weight are two determining agronomic traits of crop yield. To date, molecular factors controlling both heading date and grain weight have not been identified. Here we report the isolation of a hemizygous mutation, heading and grain weight (hgw), which delays heading and reduces grain weight in rice. Analysis of hgw mutant phenotypes indicate that the hemizygous hgw mutation decreases latitudinal cell number in the lemma and palea, both composing the spikelet hull that is known to determine the size and shape of brown grain. Molecular cloning and characterization of the HGW gene showed that it encodes a novel plant-specific ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain protein localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and functions as a key upstream regulator to promote expressions of heading date- and grain weight-related genes. Moreover, co-expression analysis in rice and Arabidopsis indicated that HGW and its Arabidopsis homolog are co-expressed with genes encoding various components of ubiquitination machinery, implying a fundamental role for the ubiquitination pathway in heading date and grain weight control. PMID:22457828

  20. PRKCE gene encoding protein kinase C-epsilon-Dual roles at sarcomeres and mitochondria in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Scruggs, Sarah B; Wang, Ding; Ping, Peipei

    2016-09-15

    Protein kinase C-epsilon (PKCε) is an isoform of a large PKC family of enzymes that has a variety of functions in different cell types. Here we discuss two major roles of PKCε in cardiac muscle cells; specifically, its role in regulating cardiac muscle contraction via targeting the sarcomeric proteins, as well as modulating cardiac cell energy production and metabolism by targeting cardiac mitochondria. The importance of PKCε action is described within the context of intracellular localization, as substrate selectivity and specificity is achieved through spatiotemporal targeting of PKCε. Accordingly, the role of PKCε in regulating myocardial function in physiological and pathological states has been documented in both cardioprotection and cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27312950

  1. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro ); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi )

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Structure and localization of the gene encoding human peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro ); Takahashi, Ei-Ichi ); Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi )

    1993-11-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2) is a small, basic, and cytoplasmic lipid-binding protein of peripheral myelin. In this paper, the authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human PMP2 gene. The gene is about 8 kb long and consists of four exons. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box) and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human PMP2 was assigned to chromosome 8q21.3-q22.1 by spot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Nmf9 Encodes a Highly Conserved Protein Important to Neurological Function in Mice and Flies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuxiao; Ross, Kevin D.; Seidner, Glen A.; Gorman, Michael R.; Poon, Tiffany H.; Wang, Xiaobo; Keithley, Elizabeth M.; Lee, Patricia N.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Joiner, William J.; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Many protein-coding genes identified by genome sequencing remain without functional annotation or biological context. Here we define a novel protein-coding gene, Nmf9, based on a forward genetic screen for neurological function. ENU-induced and genome-edited null mutations in mice produce deficits in vestibular function, fear learning and circadian behavior, which correlated with Nmf9 expression in inner ear, amygdala, and suprachiasmatic nuclei. Homologous genes from unicellular organisms and invertebrate animals predict interactions with small GTPases, but the corresponding domains are absent in mammalian Nmf9. Intriguingly, homozygotes for null mutations in the Drosophila homolog, CG45058, show profound locomotor defects and premature death, while heterozygotes show striking effects on sleep and activity phenotypes. These results link a novel gene orthology group to discrete neurological functions, and show conserved requirement across wide phylogenetic distance and domain level structural changes. PMID:26131556

  4. The human hGSTA5 gene encodes an enzymatically active protein

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sharda P.; Zimniak, Ludwika; Zimniak, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Background Of the five human Alpha-class glutathione transferases, expression of hGSTA5 has not been experimentally documented, even though in silico the hGSTA5 sequence can be assembled into a mRNA and translated. The present work was undertaken to determine whether hGSTA5 is functional. Methods Human K562 cells were transfected with the hGSTA5 gene driven by the CMV promoter, and hGSTA5 cDNA was recovered from mature mRNA by reverse transcription. The cDNA was used in bacterial and eukaryotic protein expression systems. The resulting protein, after purification by glutathione affinity chromatography where appropriate, was tested for glutathione transferase activity. Results Human K562 cells transfected with the hGSTA5 gene under control of a CMV promoter produced a fully spliced mRNA which, after reverse transcription and expression in E. coli, yielded a protein that catalyzed the conjugation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal to glutathione. Similarly, transfection of human HEK-293 cells with the hGSTA5 gene driven by the CMV promoter led to an elevated 4-hydroxynonenal-conjugating activity in the cell lysate. In addition, translation of hGSTA5 cDNA in a cell-free eukaryotic system gave rise to a protein with 4-hydroxynonenal-conjugating activity. Conclusions hGSTA5 can be processed to a mature mRNA which is translation-competent, producing a catalytically active enzyme. General Significance Because a functional gene would not be maintained in the absence of selective pressure, we conclude that the native hGSTA5 promoter is active but has a spatially or temporally restricted expression pattern, and/or is expressed only under specific (patho)physiological conditions. PMID:19664689

  5. Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported in gene transfer experiments using the soybean seed storage protein gene. The sequencing of gene Gmg ..cap alpha..' 17.1 has been completed. Several deletion mutants of this gene are being prepared for experiments to transfer the gene into the Ti-plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The purpose is to determine which, if any, of the upstream sequences are those which regulate the developmental expression of the gene. (ACR)

  6. The C. elegans sex-determining gene fem-2 encodes a putative protein phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Pilgrim, D; McGregor, A; Jäckle, P; Johnson, T; Hansen, D

    1995-01-01

    The genetic and molecular analysis of genes involved in the regulation of sex determination in Caenorhabditis elegans suggests that the gene fem-2 plays an important role in regulating a pathway transducing a non-cell-autonomous signal to a nuclear transcription factor. The wild-type fem-2 gene was cloned by identifying sequences from the C. elegans physical map that could restore normal Fem-2 function to homozygous mutant fem-2 transgenic animals. cDNA sequences mapping to the minimal rescuing region correspond to an open reading frame with a sequence similar to protein phosphatase 2C enzymes from systems as diverse as yeast, humans, and plants, but the alignments suggest that FEM-2 falls into a separate class of proteins than the canonical homologues. Several fem-2 mutant alleles were sequenced, and the mutations are predicted to cause protein changes consistent with their observed phenotypes, such as missense mutations in conditional alleles, and a nonsense mutation in a predicted null allele. This is the first evidence implicating phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation as a control mechanism in C. elegans sex determination. Images PMID:8534913

  7. HCMV Encoded Glycoprotein M (UL100) Interacts with Rab11 Effector Protein FIP4

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Magdalena A.; Mach, Michael; Britt, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The envelope of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) consists of a large number of glycoproteins. The most abundant glycoprotein in the HCMV envelope is the glycoprotein M (UL100) which together with glycoprotein N (UL73) form the gM/gN protein complex. Using yeast two hybrid screening, we found that the gM carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic tail (gM-CT) interacts with FIP4, a Rab11-GTPase effector protein. Depletion of FIP4 expression in HCMV infected cells resulted in a decrease of infectious virus production that was also associated with an alteration of the HCMV assembly compartment (AC) phenotype. A similar phenotype was also observed in HCMV infected cells that expressed dominant negative Rab11(S25N). Recently, it has been shown that FIP4 interactions with Rab11 and additionally with Arf6/Arf5 are important for the vesicular transport of proteins in the endosomal recycling compartment (ERC) and during cytokinesis. Surprisingly, FIP4 interaction with gM-CT limited binding of FIP4 with Arf5/Arf6, however, FIP4 interaction with gM-CT did not prevent recruitment of Rab11 into the ternary complex. These data argued for a contribution of the ERC during cytoplasmic envelopment of HCMV and revealed a novel FIP4 function independent of Arf5 or Arf6 activity. PMID:19761540

  8. Bcmimp1, a Botrytis cinerea Gene Transiently Expressed in planta, Encodes a Mitochondrial Protein

    PubMed Central

    Benito-Pescador, David; Santander, Daniela; Arranz, M.; Díaz-Mínguez, José M.; Eslava, Arturo P.; van Kan, Jan A. L.; Benito, Ernesto P.

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a widespread necrotrophic fungus which infects more than 200 plant species. In an attempt to characterize the physiological status of the fungus in planta and to identify genetic factors contributing to its ability to infect the host cells, a differential gene expression analysis during the interaction B. cinerea-tomato was carried out. Gene Bcmimp1 codes for a mRNA detected by differential display in the course of this analysis. During the interaction with the host, it shows a transient expression pattern with maximal expression levels during the colonization and maceration of the infected tissues. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that BCMIMP1 is an integral membrane protein located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Co-localization experiments with a BCMIMP1-GFP fusion protein confirmed that the protein is targeted to the mitochondria. ΔBcmimp1 mutants do not show obvious phenotypic differences during saprophytic growth and their infection ability was unaltered as compared to the wild-type. Interestingly, the mutants produced increased levels of reactive oxygen species, likely as a consequence of disturbed mitochondrial function. Although Bcmimp1 expression is enhanced in planta it cannot be considered a pathogenicity factor. PMID:26952144

  9. Mutations in FBXL4, Encoding a Mitochondrial Protein, Cause Early-Onset Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Xiaowu; Ghezzi, Daniele; Johnson, Mark A.; Biagosch, Caroline A.; Shamseldin, Hanan E.; Haack, Tobias B.; Reyes, Aurelio; Tsukikawa, Mai; Sheldon, Claire A.; Srinivasan, Satish; Gorza, Matteo; Kremer, Laura S.; Wieland, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Polyak, Erzsebet; Place, Emily; Consugar, Mark; Ostrovsky, Julian; Vidoni, Sara; Robinson, Alan J.; Wong, Lee-Jun; Sondheimer, Neal; Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jishi, Emtethal; Raab, Christopher P.; Bean, Charles; Furlan, Francesca; Parini, Rossella; Lamperti, Costanza; Mayr, Johannes A.; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Huemer, Martina; Pierce, Eric A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Freisinger, Peter; Sperl, Wolfgang; Prokisch, Holger; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Falk, Marni J.; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing and autozygosity mapping studies, independently performed in subjects with defective combined mitochondrial OXPHOS-enzyme deficiencies, identified a total of nine disease-segregating FBXL4 mutations in seven unrelated mitochondrial disease families, composed of six singletons and three siblings. All subjects manifested early-onset lactic acidemia, hypotonia, and developmental delay caused by severe encephalomyopathy consistently associated with progressive cerebral atrophy and variable involvement of the white matter, deep gray nuclei, and brainstem structures. A wide range of other multisystem features were variably seen, including dysmorphism, skeletal abnormalities, poor growth, gastrointestinal dysmotility, renal tubular acidosis, seizures, and episodic metabolic failure. Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency was present in muscle or fibroblasts of all tested individuals, together with markedly reduced oxygen consumption rate and hyperfragmentation of the mitochondrial network in cultured cells. In muscle and fibroblasts from several subjects, substantially decreased mtDNA content was observed. FBXL4 is a member of the F-box family of proteins, some of which are involved in phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination and/or G protein receptor coupling. We also demonstrate that FBXL4 is targeted to mitochondria and localizes in the intermembrane space, where it participates in an approximately 400 kDa protein complex. These data strongly support a role for FBXL4 in controlling bioenergetic homeostasis and mtDNA maintenance. FBXL4 mutations are a recurrent cause of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy onset in early infancy. PMID:23993194

  10. MID1, a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene encoding a plasma membrane protein, is required for Ca2+ influx and mating.

    PubMed Central

    Iida, H; Nakamura, H; Ono, T; Okumura, M S; Anraku, Y

    1994-01-01

    By establishing a unique screening method, we have isolated yeast mutants that die only after differentiating into cells with a mating projection, and some of them are also defective in Ca2+ signaling. The mutants were classified into five complementation groups, one of which we studied extensively. This mutation defines a new gene, designated MID1, which encodes an N-glycosylated, integral plasma membrane protein with 548 amino acid residues. The mid1-1 mutant has low Ca2+ uptake activity, loses viability after receiving mating pheromones, and escapes death when incubated with high concentrations of CaCl2. The MID1 gene is nonessential for vegetative growth. The efficiency of mating between MATa mid1-1 and MAT alpha mid1-1 cells is low. These results demonstrate that MID1 is required for Ca2+ influx and mating. Images PMID:7526155

  11. A Dde I RFLP in exon 21 of human EL1 gene, encoding protein 4.1, detectable by SSCP.

    PubMed

    Maillet, P; Dalla Venezia, N; Bozon, M; Vallier, A; Delaunay, J; Baklouti, F

    1998-01-01

    Protein 4.1 is a major component of the junctional complex at the red cell skeleton. Genomic studies have recently evidenced that the encoding gene (EL1 locus) is present in a single copy per haploid genome. Several RFLPs have already been characterized within intron sequences. Here, we describe the first RFLP found within the coding sequence. This polymorphism (C or T at position 2723, in exon 21) does not affect the amino acid sequence (Thr-->Thr). It can be detected by either Dde I restriction digestion of an appropriate PCR product, or simply by SSCP These findings should facilitate analysis of families with 4.1 deficiencies causing hereditary elliptocytosis. PMID:9554757

  12. Vaxfectin-formulated influenza DNA vaccines encoding NP and M2 viral proteins protect mice against lethal viral challenge.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Gretchen S; Planchon, Rodrick; Wei, Qun; Rusalov, Denis; Geall, Andrew; Enas, Joel; Lalor, Peggy; Leamy, Vicky; Vahle, Ruth; Luke, Catherine J; Rolland, Alain; Kaslow, David C; Smith, Larry R

    2007-01-01

    Next generation influenza vaccines containing conserved antigens may enhance immunity against seasonal or pandemic influenza virus strains. Using a plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccine approach, we systematically tested combinations of NP, M1, and M2 antigens derived from consensus sequences for protection against lethal influenza challenge and compared formulations for adjuvanting low pDNA vaccine doses. The highest level of protection at the lowest pDNA doses was provided by Vaxfectin-formulated NP + M2. Vaxfectin adjuvanticity was confirmed with a low dose of HA pDNA. These promising proof-of-concept data support the clinical development of Vaxfectin-formulated pDNA encoding NP + M2 consensus proteins. PMID:17637571

  13. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F.

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Cloning and expression of two human genes encoding calcium-binding proteins that are regulated during myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Lagasse, E; Clerc, R G

    1988-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms involved in chronic inflammatory processes are poorly understood. This is especially true for the role of macrophages, which figure prominently in the inflammatory response. Two proteins, MRP8 and MRP14, which are expressed in infiltrate macrophages during inflammatory reactions but not in normal tissue macrophages, have been characterized. Here we report that MRP8 and MRP14 mRNAs are specifically expressed in human cells of myeloid origin and that their expression is regulated during monocyte-macrophage and granulocyte differentiation. To initiate the analysis of cis-acting elements governing the tissue-specific expression of the MRP genes, we cloned the human genes encoding MRP8 and MRP14. Both genes contain three exons, are single copy, and have a strikingly similar organization. They belong to a novel subfamily of highly homologous calcium-binding proteins which includes S100 alpha, S100 beta, intestinal calcium-binding protein, P11, and calcyclin (2A9). A transient expression assay was devised to investigate the tissue-specific regulatory elements responsible for MRP gene expression after differentiation in leukemia HL60 cells. The results of this investigation demonstrated that the cis-acting elements responsible for MRP expression are present on the cloned DNA fragment containing the MRP gene loci. Images PMID:3405210

  15. The TORMOZ Gene Encodes a Nucleolar Protein Required for Regulated Division Planes and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Megan E.; Mayer, Ulrike; Capron, Arnaud; Ngo, Quy A.; Surendrarao, Anandkumar; McClinton, Regina; Jürgens, Gerd; Sundaresan, Venkatesan

    2007-01-01

    Embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is marked by a predictable sequence of oriented cell divisions, which precede cell fate determination. We show that mutation of the TORMOZ (TOZ) gene yields embryos with aberrant cell division planes and arrested embryos that appear not to have established normal patterning. The defects in toz mutants differ from previously described mutations that affect embryonic cell division patterns. Longitudinal division planes of the proembryo are frequently replaced by transverse divisions and less frequently by oblique divisions, while divisions of the suspensor cells, which divide only transversely, appear generally unaffected. Expression patterns of selected embryo patterning genes are altered in the mutant embryos, implying that the positional cues required for their proper expression are perturbed by the misoriented divisions. The TOZ gene encodes a nucleolar protein containing WD repeats. Putative TOZ orthologs exist in other eukaryotes including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the protein is predicted to function in 18S rRNA biogenesis. We find that disruption of the Sp TOZ gene results in cell division defects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous studies in yeast and animal cells have identified nucleolar proteins that regulate the exit from M phase and cytokinesis, including factors involved in pre-rRNA processing. Our study suggests that in plant cells, nucleolar functions might interact with the processes of regulated cell divisions and influence the selection of longitudinal division planes during embryogenesis. PMID:17616738

  16. Sex-dependent expression of mRNA encoding a major egg protein in the gonochoric coral Galaxea fascicularis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, H.; Nakano, Y.; Andoh, T.; Watanabe, T.

    2005-11-01

    A cDNA encoding a major egg protein was cloned in Galaxea fascicularis, a hermatypic coral with a gonochoric breeding system, and gene expression at the transcriptional level was compared between female and functional male colonies. In an electrophoretic analysis, four soluble proteins were present in high abundance in the female egg, but not in the pseudo-eggs of functional males. Partial amino acid sequences of one of the major proteins named GfEP-1 (88 kDa) were determined, and a cDNA fragment of about 2 kb containing a partial GfEP-1 sequence was isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited sequence similarities to vertebrate and invertebrate vitellogenins. GfEP-1 transcripts were detected in both sexes 0 1 month before spawning. However, the mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in functional males. The expression of GfEP-1 may be utilized in sexing and also monitoring effects of environmental and anthropogenic factors on vitellogenesis and sex determination.

  17. The protein and the gene encoding the receptor for the cellular uptake of transcobalamin-bound cobalamin

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Yasumi; Sequeira, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    The transcobalamin (TC, TCII) receptor (TCblR) on the plasma membrane binds TC- cobalamin (Cbl) and internalizes the complex by endocytosis. This receptor was purified from human placental membranes by affinity chromatography. Tryptic digest of the protein extracted from a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel and subjected to liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry identified 4 peptides that matched with a membrane protein in the data bank. TCblR belongs to the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, with 2 low-density lipoprotein receptor type A domains separated by a complement-like cysteine-rich region. The 282-amino acid sequence includes a signal peptide of 31 residues, extracellular domain of 198 residues, a transmembrane region of 21 residues, and a cytoplasmic domain of 32 residues. The binding of TC-Cbl does not require the cytoplasmic domain or its orientation in the plasma membrane because the recombinant extracellular domain binds TC-Cbl with high affinity and specificity. The protein is heavily glycosylated and accounts for the 58-kDa size by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The human gene first identified as 8D6A and more recently as CD 320 encoding TCblR is located at p13.2 on the short arm of chromosome 19, spans a length of 6.224 kb, and is composed of 5 exons and 4 introns. PMID:18779389

  18. Characterization of cDNA clones encoding rabbit and human serum paraoxonase: The mature protein retains its signal sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, C.; Richter, R.J.; Humbert, R.; Omiecinski, C.J.; Furlong, C.E. ); Chapline, C.; Crabb, J.W. )

    1991-10-22

    Serum paraoxonase hydrolyzes the toxic metabolites of a variety of organophosphorus insecticides. High serum paraoxonase levels appear to protect against the neurotoxic effects of organophosphorus substrates of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence accounting for 42% of rabbit paraoxonase was determined. From these data, two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized and used to screen a rabbit liver cDNA library. Human paraoxonase clones were isolated from a liver cDNA library by using the rabbit cDNA as a hybridization probe. Inserts from three of the longest clones were sequenced, and one full-length clone contained an open reading frame encoding 355 amino acids, four less than the rabbit paraoxonase protein. Amino-terminal sequences derived from purified rabbit and human paraoxonase proteins suggested that the signal sequence is retained, with the exception of the initiator methionine residue. Characterization of the rabbit and human paraoxonase cDNA clones confirms that the signal sequences are not processed, except for the N-terminal methionine residue. The rabbit and human cDNA clones demonstrate striking nucleotide and deduced amino acid similarities (greater than 85%), suggesting an important metabolic role and constraints on the evolution of this protein.

  19. An endogenous hybrid mRNA encodes TWE-PRIL, a functional cell surface TWEAK–APRIL fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Pradet-Balade, B.; Medema, J.P.; López-Fraga, M.; Lozano, J.C.; Kolfschoten, G.M.; Picard, A.; Martínez-A., C.; Garcia-Sanz, J.A.; Hahne, M.

    2002-01-01

    TWEAK and APRIL are two recently identified tumour necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family members, implicated in angiogenesis and immune regulation, respectively. TWEAK is a transmembrane protein expressed on the cell surface, whereas APRIL acts solely as a secreted factor. In this report, using RACE, RT–PCR, cDNA library screening and an RNase protection assay, we characterize a hybrid transcript between TWEAK and APRIL mRNAs. The encoded TWE-PRIL protein is composed of TWEAK cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains fused to the APRIL C-terminal domain. TWE-PRIL mRNA is expressed and translated in human primary T cells and monocytes, and endogenous TWE-PRIL protein was detected in primary human T lymphocytes and monocytic cell lines. TWE-PRIL is membrane anchored and presents the APRIL receptor-binding domain at the cell surface. It is a biologically active ligand, as it stimulates cycling in T- and B-lymphoma cell lines. Much like membrane-bound and secreted TNF-α, the different cellular localizations of TWE-PRIL and APRIL suggest that they exert distinct biological roles. PMID:12411489

  20. GANP protein encoded on human chromosome 21/mouse chromosome 10 is associated with resistance to mammary tumor development.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Phimsen, Suchada; Gondo, Naomi; Yamashita, Hiroko; Takeo, Toru; Nakagata, Naomi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Fukushima, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Iwata, Hiroji; Saya, Hideyuki; Kondo, Eisaku; Matsuo, Keitaro; Takeya, Motohiro; Iwase, Hirotaka; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    Human chromosome 21 is known to be associated with the high risk of hematological malignancy but with resistance to breast cancer in the study of Down syndrome. In human cancers, we previously observed the significant alterations of the protein expression encoded by the ganp/MCM3AP gene on human chromosome 21q22.3. Here, we investigated GANP protein alterations in human breast cancer samples (416 cases) at various stages by immunohistochemical analysis. This cohort study clearly showed that expression of GANP is significantly decreased in human breast cancer cases with poor prognosis as an independent risk factor (relapse-free survival, hazard ratio = 2.37, 95% confidence interval, 1.27-4.42, P = 0.007 [univariate analysis]; hazard ratio = 2.70, 95% confidence interval, 1.42-5.13, P = 0.002 [multivariate analysis]). To investigate whether the altered GANP expression is associated with mammary tumorigenesis, we created mutant mice that were conditionally deficient in the ganp/MCM3AP gene using wap-cre recombinase transgenic mice. Mammary gland tumors occurred at a very high incidence in female mammary gland-specific GANP-deficient mice after severe impairment of mammary gland development during pregnancy. Moreover, tumor development also occurred in female post parous GANP-heterodeficient mice. GANP has a significant role in the suppression of DNA damage caused by estrogen in human breast cancer cell lines. These results indicated that the GANP protein is associated with breast cancer resistance. PMID:26749495

  1. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, K.; Kastury, K.; Druck, T.

    1994-07-15

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding {open_quotes}adapter{close_quotes} proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent-human hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Cloning of a DNA fragment encoding a heme-repressible hemoglobin-binding outer membrane protein from Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H; Ren, Z; Pozsgay, J M; Elkins, C; Whitby, P W; Morton, D J; Stull, T L

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is able to use hemoglobin as a sole source of heme, and heme-repressible hemoglobin binding to the cell surface has been demonstrated. Using an affinity purification methodology, a hemoglobin-binding protein of approximately 120 kDa was isolated from H. influenzae type b strain HI689 grown in heme-restricted but not in heme-replete conditions. The isolated protein was subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and the derived amino acid sequence was used to design corresponding oligonucleotides. The oligonucleotides were used to probe a Southern blot of EcoRI-digested HI689 genomic DNA. A hybridizing band of approximately 4.2 kb was successfully cloned into pUC19. Using a 1.9-kb internal BglII fragment of the 4.2-kb clone as a probe, hybridization was seen in both typeable and nontypeable H. influenzae but not in other bacterial species tested. Following partial nucleotide sequencing of the 4.2-kb insert, a putative open reading frame was subcloned into an expression vector. The host Escherichia coli strain in which the cloned fragment was expressed bound biotinylated human hemoglobin, whereas binding of hemoglobin was not detected in E. coli with the vector alone. In conclusion, we hypothesize that the DNA fragment encoding an approximately 120-kDa heme-repressible hemoglobin-binding protein mediates one step in the acquisition of hemoglobin by H. influenzae in vivo. PMID:8757844

  3. The Arabidopsis pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase regulatory proteins encode a novel, unprecedented Ser/Thr protein kinase primary structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) is a ubiquitous, low abundance metabolic enzyme of undetermined function in C3 plants. Its activity in C3 chloroplasts is light-regulated via reversible phosphorylation of an active-site Thr residue by the PPDK regulatory protein (RP), a most unusual, bifuncti...

  4. Identification and expression analysis of ABC protein-encoding genes in Toxoplasma gondii. Toxoplasma gondii ATP-binding cassette superfamily.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, Virginie; Millot, Jean-Marc; Aubert, Dominique; Visneux, Vincent; Marle-Plistat, Maggy; Pinon, Jean-Michel; Villena, Isabelle

    2006-06-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are one of the largest evolutionarily conserved families of proteins. They are characterized by the presence of nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), which are highly conserved among organisms. In the present study, we used human and protozoan ABC sequences, and ATP-binding consensus motifs to screen the Toxoplasma gondii TwinScan2 predicted proteins database. We identified 24 ABC open reading frames (ORFs), whose deduced amino acid sequences exhibited all the typical biochemical features of the ABC family members. Fifteen of them clustered into five of the seven families of human ABC proteins: six ABCBs (drug, peptides and lipid export), two ABCCs (organic anion conjugates and drug export), one ABCE (Rnase L inhibitor, RLI, antibiotic resistance and translation regulation), one ABCF (drug resistance and regulation of gene expression) and five ABCGs (drug export and resistance). The nine other ORFs were represented by four ABCHs (energy-generating subunits), four SMCs (structural maintenance of chromosomes) and one member of unclear origin, whose closest homologue was the yeast Elf1 protein (mRNA export factor). A notable feature of the Toxoplasma ABC superfamily seems to be the absence of genes encoding ABCA and ABCD members. Expression analysis of ABC genes in tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages revealed the presence of ABC transcripts for all genes studied. Further research on the implication of these ABC proteins will increase our knowledge of the basic biology of Toxoplasma and provide the opportunity to identify novel therapeutic targets. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ABC transporters in T. gondii. PMID:16600400

  5. Characterization of gprK Encoding a Putative Hybrid G-Protein-Coupled Receptor in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mun-Gu; Kim, Sung Su; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most varied collection of membrane embedded proteins that are sensitized by ligand binding and interact with heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite their presumed critical roles in fungal biology, the functions of the GPCR family members in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are largely unknown, as only two (GprC and GprD) of the 15 predicted GPCRs have been studied. Here, we characterize the gprK gene, which is predicted to encode a hybrid GPCR with both 7-transmembrane and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) domains. The deletion of gprK causes severely impaired asexual development coupled with reduced expression of key developmental activators. Moreover, ΔgprK results in hyper-activation of germination even in the absence of carbon source, and elevated expression and activity of the protein kinase A PkaC1. Furthermore, proliferation of the ΔgprK mutant is restricted on the medium when pentose is the sole carbon source, suggesting that GprK may function in external carbon source sensing. Notably, the absence of gprK results in reduced tolerance to oxidative stress and significantly lowered mRNA levels of the stress-response associated genes sakA and atfA. Activities of catalases and SODs are severely decreased in the ΔgprK mutant, indicating that GprK may function in proper activation of general stress response. The ΔgprK mutant is also defective in gliotoxin (GT) production and slightly less virulent toward the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Transcriptomic studies reveal that a majority of transporters are down-regulated by ΔgprK. In summary, GprK is necessary for proper development, GT production, and oxidative stress response, and functions in down-regulating the PKA-germination pathway. PMID:27584150

  6. Cytokinins modulate the expression of genes encoding the protein of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex.

    PubMed

    de la Serve, B T; Axelos, M; Péaud-Lenoël, C

    1985-05-01

    Tobacco cell suspension cultures responded to cytokinins (for instance kinetin) by full chloroplast differentiation. The hormone had the effect of stimulating the appearance of a few prominent plastid proteins. Synthesis of the light-harvesting chlorophyl a/b-binding protein (LHCP) in response to kinetin was noteworthy (Axelos M. et al.: Plant Sci Lett 33:201-212, 1984).Poly(A)(+)RNAs were prepared from cells grown in the presence of or without added kinetin. Poly(A)(+)RNA recovery and translation activity were not quantitatively altered by the hormone treatment. In vitro translation of polyadenylated mRNA into precursor polypeptides of LHCP (pLHCP) was quantified by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE fractionation of pLHCP immunoprecipitates: pLHCP-mRNA translating activity was found to be stimulated in parallel to mature LHCP accumulation by kinetin-induced cells.Dot-blot and northern-blot hybridizations of poly(A)(+)RNA were carried out, using as a probe a pea LHCP-cDNA clone (Broglie R. et al.: Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 78: 7304-7308, 1981). A ten-fold increase of the level of pLHCP-encoding sequences was observed in poly(A)(+)RNA prepared from 9-d kinetin-stimulated cells, compared to control cells. Oligo(dT)-cellulose-excluded RNA fractions exhibited very low hybridization levels, in the same ratios as those obtained with poly(A)(+)RNA.Thus, the expression of LHCP-gene activity, in response to kinetin addition to tobacco cell suspension cultures, is regulated by the level of pLHCP-encoding mRNA rather than by translational or post-translational controls. re]19850218 rv]19850605 ac]19850613. PMID:24306651

  7. The porcine gene TBP10 encodes a protein homologous to the human tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family.

    PubMed

    Leeb, T; Rettenberger, G; Breech, J; Hameister, H; Brenig, B

    1996-03-01

    We have cloned a porcine gene, designated TBP1O, that belongs to the Tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family. The genomic structure of the porcine TBP1O gene was analyzed after isolation of three overlapping genomic phage lambda clones. The TBP10 gene harbors 12 exons spanning 4.5 kb of chromosomal DNA. The TBP1O gene was assigned to Chromosome (Chr) 12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes. The chromosomal location was confirmed by PCR analysis of a porcine-rodent hybrid cell panel. The TBP1O protein is encoded by a 1221 nucleotide cDNA and has a molecular mass of 45.6 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence has highest similarity to the human and bovine p45 subunit of the 26S protease and the human transcription factor TRIP1. Further similarities were detected to the slime mold protein DdTBP1O and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein SUG1. Like DdTBP1O and other members of the protein family, the porcine TBP1O harbors a leucine zipper motif in the N-terminal region and a domain characteristics of ATP-dependent proteases in the C-terminal region. PMID:8833236

  8. Structure of an invertebrate gene encoding cytoplasmic intermediate filament (IF) proteins: implications for the origin and the diversification of IF proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Dodemont, H; Riemer, D; Weber, K

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the single gene encoding the cytoplasmic intermediate filament (IF) proteins in non-neuronal cells of the gastropod Helix aspersa is described. Genomic and cDNA sequences show that the gene is composed of 10 introns and 11 exons, spanning greater than 60 kb of DNA. Alternative RNA processing accounts for two mRNA families which encode two IF proteins differing only in their C-terminal sequence. The intron/exon organization of the Helix rod domain is identical to that of the vertebrate type III IF genes in spite of low overall protein sequence homology and the presence of an additional 42 residues in coil 1b of the invertebrate sequence. Intron position homology extends to the entire coding sequence comprising both the rod and tail domains when the invertebrate IF gene is compared with the nuclear lamin LIII gene of Xenopus laevis presented in the accompanying report of Döring and Stick. In contrast the intron patterns of the tail domains of the invertebrate IF and the lamin genes differ from those of the vertebrate type III genes. The combined data are in line with an evolutionary descent of cytoplasmic IF proteins from a nuclear lamin-like progenitor and suggest a mechanism for this derivation. The unique position of intron 7 in the Helix IF gene indicates that the archetype IF gene arose by the elimination of the nuclear localization sequence due to the recruitment of a novel splice site. The presumptive structural organization of the archetype IF gene allows predictions with respect to the later diversification of metazoan IF genes. Whereas models proposing a direct derivation of neurofilament genes seem unlikely, the earlier speculation of an mRNA transposition mechanism is compatible with current results. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:2249666

  9. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding ribosome inactivating protein from Dianthus sinensis L.

    PubMed

    Cho, H J; Lee, S J; Kim, S; Kim, B D

    2000-04-30

    To isolate a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) gene, six plant species were surveyed for antiviral activity. Crude proteins extracted from these plants were tested for the antiviral activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Nicotiana glutinosa. All the plants, Spinacia oleracea, Amaranthus lividus, Dianthus superbus, Dianthus sinensis and Celosia cristata, with an exception of Oenanthe stolonifera, presented 70-90% inhibition of viral infectivity. In an attempt to search for the RIP gene from D. sinensis, partial cDNA was obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the poly(A)+ RNA from D. sinensis leaves. DNA gel blot analysis showed that D. sinensis has multi-copy RIP genes. The expression of RIP gene was investigated in the flower, leaf, root and stem of D. sinensis, and was found to be most abundant in the leaf. Using the partial cDNA as a probe, seven full-length cDNAs were isolated from a library prepared from D. sinensis leaves. They were divided into three groups on the basis of their nucleotide sequence homology. The three representative clones, cDsRIP1, cDsRIP2 and cDsRIP3 were completely sequenced. They all had an open reading frame of 882 bp. The cDsRIP2 showed 79% homology with dianthin 30 and saporin genes; 59% with PAP and Mirabilis antiviral protein MAP genes. From the analysis of deduced amino acid sequences, it was predicted that D. sinensis RIP cDNAs might have a putative signal peptide of 23 amino acid residues at their N-terminus. When the cDNA was expressed in E. coli, the bacteria was unable to grow upon IPTG induction, suggesting that expression of the gene renders toxicity to E. coli cells. PMID:10850653

  10. Cloning and characterization of three genes encoding Qb-SNARE proteins in rice.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yong-Mei; Wang, Jian-Fei; Huang, Ji; Zhang, Hong-Sheng

    2008-03-01

    Qb-SNARE proteins belong to the superfamily of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and function as important components of the vesicle trafficking machinery in eukaryotic cells. Here, we report three novel plant SNARE (NPSN) genes isolated from rice and named OsNPSN11, OsNPSN12 and OsNPSN13. They have about 70% nucleotide identity over their entire coding regions and similar genomic organization with ten exons and nine introns in each gene. Multiple alignment of deduced amino acid sequences indicate that the OsNPSNs proteins are homologous to AtNPSNs from Arabidopsis, containing a Qb-SNARE domain and a membrane-spanning domain in the C-terminal region. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR assays showed that the OsNPSNs were ubiquitously and differentially expressed in roots, culms, leaves, immature spikes and flowering spikes. The expression of OsNPSNs was significantly activated in rice seedlings treated with H(2)O(2), but down-regulated under NaCl and PEG6000 stresses. Transient expression method in onion epidermal cells revealed that OsNPSNs were located in the plasma membrane. Transformed yeast cells with OsNPSNs had better growth rates than empty-vector transformants when cultured on either solid or liquid selective media containing various concentrations of H(2)O(2), but more sensitive to NaCl and mannitol stresses. The 35S:OsNPSN11 transgenic tobacco also showed more tolerance to H(2)O(2) and sensitivity to NaCl and mannitol than non-transgenic tobacco. These results indicate that OsNPSNs may be involved in different aspects of the signal transduction in plant and yeast responses to abiotic stresses. PMID:18197419

  11. Mutations in STIL, encoding a pericentriolar and centrosomal protein, cause primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Girimaji, Satish C; Duvvari, Mahesh R; Blanton, Susan H

    2009-02-01

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) is an autosomal-recessive congenital disorder characterized by smaller-than-normal brain size and mental retardation. MCPH is genetically heterogeneous with six known loci: MCPH1-MCPH6. We report mapping of a novel locus, MCPH7, to chromosome 1p32.3-p33 between markers D1S2797 and D1S417, corresponding to a physical distance of 8.39 Mb. Heterogeneity analysis of 24 families previously excluded from linkage to the six known MCPH loci suggested linkage of five families (20.83%) to the MCPH7 locus. In addition, four families were excluded from linkage to the MCPH7 locus as well as all of the six previously known loci, whereas the remaining 15 families could not be conclusively excluded or included. The combined maximum two-point LOD score for the linked families was 5.96 at marker D1S386 at theta = 0.0. The combined multipoint LOD score was 6.97 between markers D1S2797 and D1S417. Previously, mutations in four genes, MCPH1, CDK5RAP2, ASPM, and CENPJ, that code for centrosomal proteins have been shown to cause this disorder. Three different homozygous mutations in STIL, which codes for a pericentriolar and centrosomal protein, were identified in patients from three of the five families linked to the MCPH7 locus; all are predicted to truncate the STIL protein. Further, another recently ascertained family was homozygous for the same mutation as one of the original families. There was no evidence for a common haplotype. These results suggest that the centrosome and its associated structures are important in the control of neurogenesis in the developing human brain. PMID:19215732

  12. A family of transcripts encoding water channel proteins: tissue-specific expression in the common ice plant.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, S; Katsuhara, M; Kelly, W B; Michalowski, C B; Bohnert, H J

    1995-01-01

    Seawater-strength salt stress of the ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) initially results in wilting, but full turgor is restored within approximately 2 days. We are interested in a mechanistic explanation for this behavior and, as a requisite for in-depth biochemical studies, have begun to analyze gene expression changes in roots coincident with the onset of stress. cDNAs that suggested changes in mRNA amount under stress were found; their deduced amino acid sequences share homologies with proteins of the Mip (major intrinsic protein) gene family and potentially encode aquaporins. One transcript, MipB, was found only in root RNA, whereas two other transcripts, MipA and MipC, were detected in roots and leaves. Transcript levels of MipB were of low abundance. All transcripts declined initially during salt stress but later recovered to at least prestress level. The most drastic decline was in MipA and MipC transcripts. MipA mRNA distribution in roots detected by in situ hybridization indicated that the transcript was present in all cells in the root tip. In the expansion zone of the root where vascular bundles differentiate, MipA transcript amounts were most abundant in the endodermis. In older roots, which had undergone secondary growth, MipA was highly expressed in cell layers surrounding individual xylem strands. MipA was also localized in leaf vascular tissue and, in lower amounts, in mesophyll cells. Transcripts for MipB seemed to be present exclusively in the tip of the root, in a zone before and possibly coincident with the development of a vascular system. MipA- and MipB-encoded proteins expressed in Xenopus oocytes led to increased water permeability. mRNA fluctuations of the most highly expressed MipA and MipC coincided with turgor changes in leaves under stress. As the leaves regained turgor, transcript levels of these water channel proteins increased. PMID:7549476

  13. Nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the nitrogenase iron protein of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pretorius, I.M.; Rawlings, D.E.; O'Neill, E.G.; Jones, W.A.; Kirby, R.; Woods, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA sequence was determined for the cloned Thiobacillus ferrooxidans nifH and part of the nifD genes. The DNA chains were radiolabeled with (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)dCTP (3000 Ci/mmol) or (..cap alpha..-/sup 35/S)dCTP (400 Ci/mmol). A putative T. ferrooxidans nifH promoter was identified whose sequences showed perfect consensus with those of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nif promoter. Two putative consensus upstream activator sequences were also identified. The amino acid sequence was deduced from the DNA sequence. In a comparison of nifH DNA sequences from T. ferrooxidans and eight other nitrogen-fixing microbes, a Rhizobium sp. isolated from Parasponia andersonii showed the greatest homology (74%) and Clostridium pasteurianum (nifH1) showed the least homology (54%). In the comparison of the amino acid sequences of the Fe proteins, the Rhizobium sp. and Rhizobium japonicum showed the greatest homology (both 86%) and C. pasteurianum (nifH1 gene product) demonstrated the least homology (56%) to the T. ferrooxidans Fe protein.

  14. Immunogenicity of a novel enhanced consensus DNA vaccine encoding the leptospiral protein LipL45

    PubMed Central

    Vijayachari, P; Vedhagiri, K; Mallilankaraman, K; Mathur, PP; Sardesai, NY; Weiner, DB; Ugen, KE; Muthumani, K

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a bacterial zoonotic disease caused by an infection with a spirochete belonging to the genus Leptospira. In animals, leptospirosis displays a wide range of pathologies, including fever, abortion, icterus, and uveitis. Conversely, infection in humans is associated with multi-organ injury, resulting in an increased rate of fatalities. Pathogenic leptospires are able to translocate through cell monolayers at a rate significantly greater than that of non-pathogenic leptospires. Thus, vaccine approaches have been focused on targeting bacterial motility, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), lipoproteins, outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) and other potential virulence factors. Previous studies have indicated that leptospiral proteins elicit long-lasting immunological memory in infected humans. In the study reported here, the efficacy of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine developed against the Leptospira membrane lipoprotein LipL45 was tested. After in vivo electroporation (EP) mediated intramuscular immunization with a synthetic LipL45 DNA vaccine (pLipL45) immunized mice developed a significant cellular response along with the development of anti-LipL45-specific antibodies. Specifically, the pLipL45 vaccine induced a significant Th1 type immune response, indicated by the higher production of IL-12 and IFN-γ cytokines. The results presented here are the first demonstration that a LipL45 based DNA immunogen has potential as a anti-Leptospira vaccine. PMID:26020621

  15. New variants of lepidoptericidal toxin genes encoding Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins.

    PubMed

    Sauka, Diego H; Rodriguez, Sonia E; Benintende, Graciela B

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an entomopathogenic bacterium characterized by producing parasporal proteinaceous insecticidal crystal inclusions during sporulation. Many strains are capable of also expressing other insecticidal proteins called Vip during the vegetative growing phase. Particularly, Vip3A proteins have activity against certain Lepidoptera species through a unique mechanism of action which emphasized their possible use in resistance management strategies against resistant pests. The aim of the work was to develop a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method that can distinguish between vip3A genes from B. thuringiensis strains. In addition, 4 novel vip3Aa genes were cloned and sequenced. The method was originally based on amplification of a single PCR amplicon and the use of 2 restriction enzymes with recognition sites that facilitate simultaneous detection. Subsequently, a third restriction enzyme was used to distinguish between vip3A variants. Thirteen vip3Aa genes were identified in strains belonging to 10 different B. thuringiensis serovars. Three intra-subclass variants of vip3Aa genes could be differentiated. The presented method can serve as an invaluable tool for the investigation of known and novel vip3A genes in B. thuringiensis strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where variants of a same subclass of insecticidal genes could be distinguished following PCR-RFLP. PMID:23307196

  16. A comprehensive evolutionary classification of proteins encoded in complete eukaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V; Fedorova, Natalie D; Jackson, John D; Jacobs, Aviva R; Krylov, Dmitri M; Makarova, Kira S; Mazumder, Raja; Mekhedov, Sergei L; Nikolskaya, Anastasia N; Rao, B Sridhar; Rogozin, Igor B; Smirnov, Sergei; Sorokin, Alexander V; Sverdlov, Alexander V; Vasudevan, Sona; Wolf, Yuri I; Yin, Jodie J; Natale, Darren A

    2004-01-01

    Background Sequencing the genomes of multiple, taxonomically diverse eukaryotes enables in-depth comparative-genomic analysis which is expected to help in reconstructing ancestral eukaryotic genomes and major events in eukaryotic evolution and in making functional predictions for currently uncharacterized conserved genes. Results We examined functional and evolutionary patterns in the recently constructed set of 5,873 clusters of predicted orthologs (eukaryotic orthologous groups or KOGs) from seven eukaryotic genomes: Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Encephalitozoon cuniculi. Conservation of KOGs through the phyletic range of eukaryotes strongly correlates with their functions and with the effect of gene knockout on the organism's viability. The approximately 40% of KOGs that are represented in six or seven species are enriched in proteins responsible for housekeeping functions, particularly translation and RNA processing. These conserved KOGs are often essential for survival and might approximate the minimal set of essential eukaryotic genes. The 131 single-member, pan-eukaryotic KOGs we identified were examined in detail. For around 20 that remained uncharacterized, functions were predicted by in-depth sequence analysis and examination of genomic context. Nearly all these proteins are subunits of known or predicted multiprotein complexes, in agreement with the balance hypothesis of evolution of gene copy number. Other KOGs show a variety of phyletic patterns, which points to major contributions of lineage-specific gene loss and the 'invention' of genes new to eukaryotic evolution. Examination of the sets of KOGs lost in individual lineages reveals co-elimination of functionally connected genes. Parsimonious scenarios of eukaryotic genome evolution and gene sets for ancestral eukaryotic forms were reconstructed. The gene set of the last common ancestor of

  17. RRB1 and RRB2 encode maize retinoblastoma-related proteins that interact with a plant D-type cyclin and geminivirus replication protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ach, R A; Durfee, T; Miller, A B; Taranto, P; Hanley-Bowdoin, L; Zambryski, P C; Gruissem, W

    1997-01-01

    Unlike mammalian and yeast cells, little is known about how plants regulate G1 progression and entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. In mammalian cells, a key regulator of this process is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). In contrast, G1 control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not utilize an RB-like protein. We report here the cloning of cDNAs from two Zea mays genes, RRB1 and RRB2, that encode RB-related proteins. Further, RRB2 transcripts are alternatively spliced to yield two proteins with different C termini. At least one RRB gene is expressed in all the tissues examined, with the highest levels seen in the shoot apex. RRB1 is a 96-kDa nuclear protein that can physically interact with two mammalian DNA tumor virus oncoproteins, simian virus 40 large-T antigen and adenovirus E1A, and with a plant D-type cyclin. These associations are abolished by mutation of a conserved cysteine residue in RRB1 that is also essential for RB function. RRB1 binding potential is also sensitive to deletions in the conserved A and B domains, although differences exist in these effects compared to those of human RB. RRB1 can also bind to the AL1 protein from tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV), a protein which is essential for TGMV DNA replication. These results suggest that G1 regulation in plant cells is controlled by a mechanism which is much more similar to that found in mammalian cells than that in yeast. PMID:9271385

  18. An essential yeast gene encoding a TTAGGG repeat-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Brigati, C. Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genoa ); Kurtz, S.; Balderes, D.; Shore, D. ); Vidali, G. )

    1993-02-01

    Among all eukaryotes examined to date, telomere is a highly conserved structure. It is designed to protect chromosomes from degradation and fusion. Telomeres are composed of multiple repeats of short sequence elements and range in length from a few repeat units to > kb. The repeated sequence TTAGGG is found at telomeres in all vertebrates, certain slime molds, and trypanosomes. Because sequence TTAGGG is present at the telomere of all of these divergent organisms, it is likely that it constitutes a binding site for highly conserved proteins with important roles in chromosomal structure and function. The occurrence of a TTAGGG-binding activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the presence of TTAGGG sequences at telomere junctions raise the possibility that there is a related factor with a functional role at telomeres in S. cervisiae. The research in this paper tests this hypothesis. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Cloning and expression of a gene encoding a protein obtained from earthworm secretion that is a chemoattractant for garter snakes.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Wang, D; Chen, P; Halpern, M

    1997-10-24

    The protein ES20, derived from earthworm shock secretion, is a vomeronasally mediated chemoattractant for garter snakes (Jiang, X. C., Inouchi, J., Wang, D., and Halpern, M. (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 8736-8744). Based on its 15-residue N-terminal amino acid sequence, degenerative oligodeoxynucleotide probes were synthesized and used to screen a cDNA library that was constructed in sense orientation using a Uni-ZAPTM XR vector and XL1-Blue MRF' host. A gene was cloned from a polymerase chain reaction as well as from the cDNA library. A combination of the forward degenerative primer and T7 primer was used to obtain gene-specific DNA fragments, from which probes were synthesized and successfully used in screening the cDNA library. The ES20 gene is about 700 base pairs long and encodes 208 amino residues. The ES20 gene was excised from a recombinant plasmid pSK-ES20, ligated to pQE30 expression vector, and transformed into Escherichia coli strain JM109. The selected recombinant plasmids were transformed into expression host cell, E. coli M15[pREP4]. Three transformants were selected, induced with isopropyl-1-thio-beta-D-galactopyranoside for fusion gene expression and an expressed 20-kDa fusion protein purified under denaturing conditions. This protein was refolded and gave a positive reaction against ES20-specific polyclonal antibodies. The fusion protein that had not been denatured remained as an aggregate and was an active chemoattractant for garter snakes. PMID:9341189

  20. Three hamster species with different scrapie incubation times and neuropathological features encode distinct prion proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, D H; Butler, D A; Westaway, D; McKinley, M P; DeArmond, S J; Prusiner, S B

    1990-01-01

    Given the critical role of the prion protein (PrP) in the transmission and pathogenesis of experimental scrapie, we investigated the PrP gene and its protein products in three hamster species, Chinese (CHa), Armenian (AHa), and Syrian (SHa), each of which were found to have distinctive scrapie incubation times. Passaging studies demonstrated that the host species, and not the source of scrapie prions, determined the incubation time for each species, and histochemical studies of hamsters with clinical signs of scrapie revealed characteristic patterns of neuropathology. Northern (RNA) analysis showed the size of PrP mRNA from CHa, AHa, and SHa hamsters to be 2.5, 2.4, and 2.1 kilobases, respectively. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the PrP isoforms were of similar size (33 to 35 kilodaltons); however, the monoclonal antibody 13A5 raised against SHa PrP did not react with the CHa or AHa PrP molecules. Comparison of the three predicted amino acid sequences revealed that each is distinct. Furthermore, differences within the PrP open reading frame that uniquely distinguish the three hamster species are within a hydrophilic segment of 11 amino acids that includes polymorphisms linked to scrapie incubation times in inbred mice and an inherited prion disease of humans. Single polymorphisms in this region correlate with the presence or absence of amyloid plaques for a given hamster species or mouse inbred strain. Our findings demonstrate distinctive molecular, pathological, and clinical characteristics of scrapie in three related species and are consistent with the hypothesis that molecular properties of the host PrP play a pivotal role in determining the incubation time and neuropathological features of scrapie. Images PMID:2406562

  1. Construction and application of the vectors to identify genes encoding exported proteins of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dong; Shen, Qinfang; Zhu, Junli; Liu, Jiangmei; Yuan, Jiajie; Tan, Shuang; Yu, Xuping

    2013-10-01

    In order to clone genes having signal sequences of Escherichia coli, four vectors with or without Lac or Ara promoter were constructed using a leaderless β-lactamase as reporter. Fragments of tetracycline resistance gene (Tet) with or without promoter were used to confirm the vectors' ability to clone and report signal sequences. The minimum inhibitory concentration of ampicillin of the transformants was measured to detect the expression and secretion efficiency of the vectors. The results showed that the β-lactamase could be co-expressed and secreted with Tet protein. The Lac or Ara promoter in the vectors could be regulated by different inducers, and the Ara promoter showed higher regulative efficiency than the Lac. The best induction dose of L-arabinose for the Ara promoter is 1.25 %. All the four vectors were stably maintained in host after being inoculated for 20 passages in antibiotics-free media. Genomic library of an avian pathogenic strain, E. coli O2, was constructed using the pMB-Ara-T vector we developed. 318 clones were obtained from the genomic library of E. coli strain O2, and the inserts in these clones represented 276 genes based on sequence analysis. Among the 276 cloned fragments, only 128 had complete promoter sequence. For the 128 fragments with promoter, only 27 could be expressed under LB culture condition without inducer, the other 101 were only expressed under induction. The results showed our constructed vectors could efficiently capture all kinds of exported protein genes in vitro, including the ones without promoter or with inactive promoter. PMID:24052231

  2. Mutations in APOPT1, Encoding a Mitochondrial Protein, Cause Cavitating Leukoencephalopathy with Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Melchionda, Laura; Haack, Tobias B.; Hardy, Steven; Abbink, Truus E.M.; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Lamantea, Eleonora; Marchet, Silvia; Morandi, Lucia; Moggio, Maurizio; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Torraco, Alessandra; Diodato, Daria; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Tekturk, Pinar; Yapici, Zuhal; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Stevens, René; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Lamperti, Costanza; Ardissone, Anna; Moroni, Isabella; Uziel, Graziella; Prokisch, Holger; Taylor, Robert W.; Bertini, Enrico; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is a frequent biochemical abnormality in mitochondrial disorders, but a large fraction of cases remains genetically undetermined. Whole-exome sequencing led to the identification of APOPT1 mutations in two Italian sisters and in a third Turkish individual presenting severe COX deficiency. All three subjects presented a distinctive brain MRI pattern characterized by cavitating leukodystrophy, predominantly in the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres. We then found APOPT1 mutations in three additional unrelated children, selected on the basis of these particular MRI features. All identified mutations predicted the synthesis of severely damaged protein variants. The clinical features of the six subjects varied widely from acute neurometabolic decompensation in late infancy to subtle neurological signs, which appeared in adolescence; all presented a chronic, long-surviving clinical course. We showed that APOPT1 is targeted to and localized within mitochondria by an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is eventually cleaved off from the mature protein. We then showed that APOPT1 is virtually absent in fibroblasts cultured in standard conditions, but its levels increase by inhibiting the proteasome or after oxidative challenge. Mutant fibroblasts showed reduced amount of COX holocomplex and higher levels of reactive oxygen species, which both shifted toward control values by expressing a recombinant, wild-type APOPT1 cDNA. The shRNA-mediated knockdown of APOPT1 in myoblasts and fibroblasts caused dramatic decrease in cell viability. APOPT1 mutations are responsible for infantile or childhood-onset mitochondrial disease, hallmarked by the combination of profound COX deficiency with a distinctive neuroimaging presentation. PMID:25175347

  3. Replication of Epstein-Barr virus oriLyt: lack of a dedicated virally encoded origin-binding protein and dependence on Zta in cotransfection assays.

    PubMed Central

    Fixman, E D; Hayward, G S; Hayward, S D

    1995-01-01

    Using a transient replication assay in which cosmid DNAs were cotransfected into Vero cells, we had previously demonstrated that oriLyt replication required six Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded replication genes. No oriLyt origin-binding protein was identified in this study, but oriLyt replication in the cotransfection assay was also dependent on the three lytic cycle transactivators Zta, Rta, and Mta and an activity encoded by the EBV Sal/I F fragment. We have now used expression plasmids for the six known replication proteins to further examine the question of the requirement for an oriLyt origin-binding protein. The activity in Sal/I-F was shown to be encoded by BKRF3. The predicted product of this open reading frame is an enzyme, uracyl DNA glycosylase, not an origin-binding protein, and is dispensable for replication in assays using expression plasmids. BBLF2, which is positionally related to the gene for the herpes simplex virus (HSV) UL9 origin-binding protein, was confirmed to be expressed as a spliced transcript with BBLF3 and not as an independent product. Examination of the requirement for the EBV transactivators revealed that Rta, while contributing to replication efficiency, was dispensable. Mta could be substituted by HSV IE63, and in complementation experiments with HSV replication genes, Mta was no longer required for replication of EBV oriLyt, suggesting that the contribution of Mta to replication may be indirect. Zta continued to be required for detectable oriLyt replication both with the EBV replication proteins and in the complementation assays with HSV replication proteins. We conclude that EBV does not encode an equivalent of HSV UL9 and that Zta is the sole virally encoded protein serving an essential origin-binding function. PMID:7707526

  4. Identification and characterization of the herpes simplex virus type 2 gene encoding the essential capsid protein ICP32/VP19c.

    PubMed Central

    Yei, S P; Chowdhury, S I; Bhat, B M; Conley, A J; Wold, W S; Batterson, W

    1990-01-01

    We describe the characterization of the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) gene encoding infected cell protein 32 (ICP32) and virion protein 19c (VP19c). We also demonstrate that the HSV-1 UL38/ORF.553 open reading frame (ORF), which has been shown to specify a viral protein essential for capsid formation (B. Pertuiset, M. Boccara, J. Cebrian, N. Berthelot, S. Chousterman, F. Puvian-Dutilleul, J. Sisman, and P. Sheldrick, J. Virol. 63: 2169-2179, 1989), must encode the cognate HSV type 1 (HSV-1) ICP32/VP19c protein. The region of the HSV-2 genome deduced to contain the gene specifying ICP32/VP19c was isolated and subcloned, and the nucleotide sequence of 2,158 base pairs of HSV-2 DNA mapping