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Sample records for encoding putative cell-surface

  1. SurfaceomeDB: a cancer-orientated database for genes encoding cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jorge Estefano Santana; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; de Almeida, Renan Valieris Bueno; da Cunha, Julia Pinheiro Chagas; Ohara, Daniel Takatori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Old, Lloyd J; de Souza, Sandro José

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface proteins (CSPs) are excellent targets for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic reagents, and it is estimated that 10-20% of all genes in the human genome encode CSPs. In an effort to integrate all data publicly available for genes encoding cell surface proteins, a database (SurfaceomeDB) was developed. SurfaceomeDB is a gene-centered portal containing different types of information, including annotation for gene expression, protein domains, somatic mutations in cancer, and protein-protein interactions for all human genes encoding CSPs. SurfaceomeDB was implemented as an integrative and relational database in a user-friendly web interface, where users can search for gene name, gene annotation, or keywords. There is also a streamlined graphical representation of all data provided and links to the most important data repositories and databases, such as NCBI, UCSC Genome Browser, and EBI. PMID:23390370

  2. Characterization and purification of proteins which bind high-density lipoprotein. A putative cell-surface receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, H M; Morrone, G; Venuta, S; Howell, K E

    1991-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is shown by ligand blotting to bind membrane-associated polypeptides with sizes of 60, 100 and 210 kDa. Binding was concentration-dependent and competed by excess unlabelled HDL. All the major apolipoproteins of HDL, apoA-I, apoA-II and apoA-IV, bound independently. The 100 kDa and 210 kDa HDL-binding activities were purified from membranes of Hep3B tumour cells by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The binding activities at 100 kDa and 210 kDa co-purified. After treatment with disulphide-reducing reagent, the 210 kDa band was no longer present and an increase was observed in the amount and binding ability of the 100 kDa polypeptide. The 100 kDa binding protein labelled at the cell surface with 125I could be immunoprecipitated after cross-linking to cell-surface-bound HDL. It is proposed that this HDL-binding activity, a putative cell-surface receptor for HDL, exists totally or in part as a high-molecular-mass complex composed of 100 kDa subunits. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:1659384

  3. A genetically encoded alkyne directs palladium-mediated protein labeling on live mammalian cell surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Ramil, Carlo P; Lim, Reyna K V; Lin, Qing

    2015-02-20

    The merging of site-specific incorporation of small bioorthogonal functional groups into proteins via amber codon suppression with bioorthogonal chemistry has created exciting opportunities to extend the power of organic reactions to living systems. Here we show that a new alkyne amino acid can be site-selectively incorporated into mammalian proteins via a known orthogonal pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair and directs an unprecedented, palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction-driven protein labeling on live mammalian cell surface. A comparison study with the alkyne-encoded proteins in vitro indicated that this terminal alkyne is better suited for the palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction than the copper-catalyzed click chemistry. PMID:25347611

  4. Expression and function of a putative cell surface receptor for fibronectin in hamster and human cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.J.; Juliano, R.L.

    1986-10-01

    The authors have previously reported the use of monoclonal antibodies to identify a 140-kD cell surface glycoprotein in mammalian cells that is specifically involved in fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. They now report the purification of this molecule using immunoaffinity chromatography and the subsequent generation of polyclonal antibodies that selectively immunoprecipitate 140-kD putative fibronectin receptor glycoprotein (gp140) extracted from rodent or human cells; these antibodies also specifically block fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion but not adhesion mediated by other factors in serum. Expression of gp140-like molecules was detected on the surfaces of several adherent human cell lines (HDF, WISH, and EFC) but not on erythrocytes; however, gp140 was also detected on a nonadherent human lymphoid line (DAUDI). Analysis of gp140 on nonreducing SDS gels revealed two closely migrating bands. Protease digestion and peptide mapping suggests that the two bnads are closely related polypeptides.

  5. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Shabbir A; Pendurthi, Usha R; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  6. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabbir A.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  7. Tomato Ve disease resistance genes encode cell surface-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kawchuk, Lawrence M.; Hachey, John; Lynch, Dermot R.; Kulcsar, Frank; van Rooijen, Gijs; Waterer, Doug R.; Robertson, Albert; Kokko, Eric; Byers, Robert; Howard, Ronald J.; Fischer, Rainer; Prüfer, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In tomato, Ve is implicated in race-specific resistance to infection by Verticillium species causing crop disease. Characterization of the Ve locus involved positional cloning and isolation of two closely linked inverted genes. Expression of individual Ve genes in susceptible potato plants conferred resistance to an aggressive race 1 isolate of Verticillium albo-atrum. The deduced primary structure of Ve1 and Ve2 included a hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide, leucine-rich repeats containing 28 or 35 potential glycosylation sites, a hydrophobic membrane-spanning domain, and a C-terminal domain with the mammalian E/DXXXLφ or YXXφ endocytosis signals (φ is an amino acid with a hydrophobic side chain). A leucine zipper-like sequence occurs in the hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide of Ve1 and a Pro-Glu-Ser-Thr (PEST)-like sequence resides in the C-terminal domain of Ve2. These structures suggest that the Ve genes encode a class of cell-surface glycoproteins with receptor-mediated endocytosis-like signals and leucine zipper or PEST sequences. PMID:11331751

  8. Crystal Structure of a Virus-Encoded Putative Glycosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Baxa, Ulrich; Zhang, Ying; Steven, Alasdair C.; Lewis, Gentry L.; Van Etten, James L.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-11-22

    The chloroviruses (family Phycodnaviridae), unlike most viruses, encode some, if not most, of the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of their structural proteins. Annotation of the gene product B736L from chlorovirus NY-2A suggests that it is a glycosyltransferase. The structure of the recombinantly expressed B736L protein was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.3-{angstrom} resolution, and the protein was shown to have two nucleotide-binding folds like other glycosyltransferase type B enzymes. This is the second structure of a chlorovirus-encoded glycosyltransferase and the first structure of a chlorovirus type B enzyme to be determined. B736L is a retaining enzyme and belongs to glycosyltransferase family 4. The donor substrate was identified as GDP-mannose by isothermal titration calorimetry and was shown to bind into the cleft between the two domains in the protein. The active form of the enzyme is probably a dimer in which the active centers are separated by about 40 {angstrom}.

  9. Phylogeny of Algal Sequences Encoding Carbohydrate Sulfotransferases, Formylglycine-Dependent Sulfatases, and Putative Sulfatase Modifying Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Many algae are rich sources of sulfated polysaccharides with biological activities. The physicochemical/rheological properties and biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides are affected by the pattern and number of sulfate moieties. Sulfation of carbohydrates is catalyzed by carbohydrate sulfotransferases (CHSTs) while modification of sulfate moieties on sulfated polysaccharides was presumably catalyzed by sulfatases including formylglycine-dependent sulfatases (FGly-SULFs). Post-translationally modification of Cys to FGly in FGly-SULFs by sulfatase modifiying factors (SUMFs) is necessary for the activity of this enzyme. The aims of this study are to mine for sequences encoding algal CHSTs, FGly-SULFs and putative SUMFs from the fully sequenced algal genomes and to infer their phylogenetic relationships to their well characterized counterparts from other organisms. Algal sequences encoding CHSTs, FGly-SULFs, SUMFs, and SUMF-like proteins were successfully identified from green and brown algae. However, red algal FGly-SULFs and SUMFs were not identified. In addition, a group of SUMF-like sequences with different gene structure and possibly different functions were identified for green, brown and red algae. The phylogeny of these putative genes contributes to the corpus of knowledge of an unexplored area. The analyses of these putative genes contribute toward future production of existing and new sulfated carbohydrate polymers through enzymatic synthesis and metabolic engineering. PMID:26635861

  10. Bacillus anthracis pXO1 plasmid encodes a putative membrane-bound bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Perlińska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary advantages over cousin cells in bacterial pathogens may decide about the success of a specific cell in its environment. Bacteria use a plethora of methods to defend against other cells and many devices to attack their opponents when competing for resources. Bacteriocins are antibacterial proteins that are used to eliminate competition. We report the discovery of a putative membrane-bound bacteriocin encoded by the Bacillus anthracis pathogenic pXO1 plasmid. We analyze the genomic structure of the bacteriocin operon. The proposed mechanisms of action predestine this operon as a potent competitive advantage over cohabitants of the same niche. PMID:25426338

  11. A Micropeptide Encoded by a Putative Long Non-coding RNA Regulates Muscle Performance

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas M.; Anderson, Kelly M.; Chang, Chi-Lun; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; McAnally, John R.; Kasaragod, Prasad; Shelton, John M.; Liou, Jen; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional micropeptides can be concealed within RNAs that appear to be non-coding. We discovered a conserved micropeptide, that we named myoregulin (MLN), encoded by a skeletal muscle-specific RNA annotated as a putative long non-coding RNA. MLN shares structural and functional similarity with phospholamban (PLN) and sarcolipin (SLN), which inhibit SERCA, the membrane pump that controls muscle relaxation by regulating Ca2+ uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). MLN interacts directly with SERCA and impedes Ca2+ uptake into the SR. In contrast to PLN and SLN, which are expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscle in mice, MLN is robustly expressed in all skeletal muscle. Genetic deletion of MLN in mice enhances Ca2+ handling in skeletal muscle and improves exercise performance. These findings identify MLN as an important regulator of skeletal muscle physiology and highlight the possibility that additional micropeptides are encoded in the many RNAs currently annotated as non-coding. PMID:25640239

  12. An endogenous hybrid mRNA encodes TWE-PRIL, a functional cell surface TWEAK–APRIL fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Pradet-Balade, B.; Medema, J.P.; López-Fraga, M.; Lozano, J.C.; Kolfschoten, G.M.; Picard, A.; Martínez-A., C.; Garcia-Sanz, J.A.; Hahne, M.

    2002-01-01

    TWEAK and APRIL are two recently identified tumour necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family members, implicated in angiogenesis and immune regulation, respectively. TWEAK is a transmembrane protein expressed on the cell surface, whereas APRIL acts solely as a secreted factor. In this report, using RACE, RT–PCR, cDNA library screening and an RNase protection assay, we characterize a hybrid transcript between TWEAK and APRIL mRNAs. The encoded TWE-PRIL protein is composed of TWEAK cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains fused to the APRIL C-terminal domain. TWE-PRIL mRNA is expressed and translated in human primary T cells and monocytes, and endogenous TWE-PRIL protein was detected in primary human T lymphocytes and monocytic cell lines. TWE-PRIL is membrane anchored and presents the APRIL receptor-binding domain at the cell surface. It is a biologically active ligand, as it stimulates cycling in T- and B-lymphoma cell lines. Much like membrane-bound and secreted TNF-α, the different cellular localizations of TWE-PRIL and APRIL suggest that they exert distinct biological roles. PMID:12411489

  13. Molecular Characterization of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum pvpA Gene Which Encodes a Putative Variable Cytadhesin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Boguslavsky, S.; Menaker, D.; Lysnyansky, I.; Liu, T.; Levisohn, S.; Rosengarten, R.; García, M.; Yogev, D.

    2000-01-01

    A putative cytadhesin-related protein (PvpA) undergoing variation in its expression was identified in the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The pvpA gene was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and sequenced. It exhibits 54 and 52% homology with the P30 and P32 cytadhesin proteins of the human pathogens Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Mycoplasma genitalium, respectively. In addition, 50% homology was found with the MGC2 cytadhesin of M. gallisepticum and 49% homology was found with a stretch of 205 amino acids of the cytadherence accessory protein HMW3 of M. pneumoniae. The PvpA molecule possesses a proline-rich carboxy-terminal region (28%) containing two identical directly repeated sequences of 52 amino acids and a tetrapeptide motif (Pro-Arg-Pro-X) which is repeated 14 times. Genetic analysis of several clonal isolates representing different expression states of the PvpA product ruled out chromosomal rearrangement as the mechanism for PvpA phase variation. The molecular basis of PvpA variation was revealed in a short tract of repeated GAA codons, encoding five successive glutamate resides, located in the N-terminal region and subject to frequent mutation generating an in-frame UAA stop codon. Size variation of the PvpA protein was observed among M. gallisepticum strains, ranging from 48 to 55 kDa and caused by several types of deletions occurring at the PvpA C-terminal end and within the two directly repeated sequences. By immunoelectron microscopy, the PvpA protein was localized on the mycoplasma cell surface, in particular on the terminal tip structure. Collectively, these findings suggest that PvpA is a newly identified variable surface cytadhesin protein of M. gallisepticum. PMID:10858209

  14. Molecular characterization of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum pvpA gene which encodes a putative variable cytadhesin protein.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, S; Menaker, D; Lysnyansky, I; Liu, T; Levisohn, S; Rosengarten, R; García, M; Yogev, D

    2000-07-01

    A putative cytadhesin-related protein (PvpA) undergoing variation in its expression was identified in the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The pvpA gene was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and sequenced. It exhibits 54 and 52% homology with the P30 and P32 cytadhesin proteins of the human pathogens Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Mycoplasma genitalium, respectively. In addition, 50% homology was found with the MGC2 cytadhesin of M. gallisepticum and 49% homology was found with a stretch of 205 amino acids of the cytadherence accessory protein HMW3 of M. pneumoniae. The PvpA molecule possesses a proline-rich carboxy-terminal region (28%) containing two identical directly repeated sequences of 52 amino acids and a tetrapeptide motif (Pro-Arg-Pro-X) which is repeated 14 times. Genetic analysis of several clonal isolates representing different expression states of the PvpA product ruled out chromosomal rearrangement as the mechanism for PvpA phase variation. The molecular basis of PvpA variation was revealed in a short tract of repeated GAA codons, encoding five successive glutamate resides, located in the N-terminal region and subject to frequent mutation generating an in-frame UAA stop codon. Size variation of the PvpA protein was observed among M. gallisepticum strains, ranging from 48 to 55 kDa and caused by several types of deletions occurring at the PvpA C-terminal end and within the two directly repeated sequences. By immunoelectron microscopy, the PvpA protein was localized on the mycoplasma cell surface, in particular on the terminal tip structure. Collectively, these findings suggest that PvpA is a newly identified variable surface cytadhesin protein of M. gallisepticum. PMID:10858209

  15. A 38-kilobase pathogenicity island specific for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis encodes cell surface proteins expressed in the host.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, Janin; Strommenger, Birgit; Goethe, Ralph; Dohmann, Karen; Gerlach, Gerald-F; Stevenson, Karen; Li, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Qing; Kapur, Vivek; Bull, Tim J

    2004-03-01

    We have used representational difference analysis to identify a novel Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific ABC transporter operon (mpt), which comprises six open reading frames designated mptA to -F and is immediately preceded by two putative Fur boxes. Functional genomics revealed that the mpt operon is flanked on one end by a fep cluster encoding proteins involved in the uptake of Fe(3+) and on the other end by a sid cluster encoding non-ribosome-dependent heterocyclic siderophore synthases. Together these genes form a 38-kb M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific locus flanked by an insertion sequence similar to IS1110. Expression studies using Western blot analyses showed that MptC is present in the envelope fraction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The MptD protein was shown to be surface exposed, using a specific phage (fMptD) isolated from a phage-peptide library, by differential screening of Mycobacterium smegmatis transformants. The phage fMptD-derived peptide could be used in a peptide-mediated capture PCR with milk from infected dairy herds, thereby showing surface-exposed expression of the MptD protein in the host. Together, these data suggest that the 38-kb locus constitutes an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogenicity island. PMID:14977927

  16. Leafy head2, which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein, regulates shoot development of rice.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guo Sheng; Hu, Xing Ming; Jiao, Yong Qing; Yu, Yan Chun; Chu, Cheng Cai; Li, Jia Yang; Qian, Qian; Wang, Yong Hong

    2006-03-01

    During vegetative development, higher plants continuously form new leaves in regular spatial and temporal patterns. Mutants with abnormal leaf developmental patterns not only provide a great insight into understanding the regulatory mechanism of plant architecture, but also enrich the ways to its modification by which crop yield could be improved. Here, we reported the characterization of the rice leafy-head2 (lhd2) mutant that exhibits shortened plastochron, dwarfism, reduced tiller number, and failure of phase transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. Anatomical and histological study revealed that the rapid emergence of leaves in lhd2 was resulted from the rapid initiation of leaf primordia whereas the reduced tiller number was a consequence of the suppression of the tiller bud outgrowth. The molecular and genetic analysis showed that LHD2 encodes a putative RNA binding protein with 67% similarity to maize TE1. Comparison of genome-scale expression profiles between wild-type and lhd2 plants suggested that LHD2 may regulate rice shoot development through KNOX and hormone-related genes. The similar phenotypes caused by LHD2 mutation and the conserved expression pattern of LHD2 indicated a conserved mechanism in controlling the temporal leaf initiation in grass. PMID:16541125

  17. Identification of genes encoding putative nucleoporins and transport factors in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a deletion analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue Qin; Du, Xianming; Liu, Jianhua; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Balasundaram, David

    2004-04-30

    In a systematic approach to study genes that are related to nucleocytoplasmic trafficking in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the open reading frames (ORFs) of 26 putative nucleoporins and transport factors were deleted. Here we report the initial characterization of these deletion mutants. Of the 26 putative genes deleted, 14 were found to be essential for viability. Null mutations of essential genes resulted in failure to either complete one round or to sustain cell division. Four of the 14 essential genes, SPBC582.11c, SPBC17G9.04c, SPBC3B9.16c and SPCC162.08c, encode putative nucleoporins and a myosin-like protein with homologues NUP84, NUP85, NUP120 and MLP1, respectively, that are not required for viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that their gene products perform critical functions in Sz. pombe. On the basis of combined drug sensitivity assays and genetic analysis we have identified five non-essential null mutants that were hypersensitive to the microtubule depolymerizing drug thiabendazole (TBZ) and exhibited a cut phenotype upon TBZ treatment, suggesting possible involvement in microtubule function. Three of the corresponding ORFs, SPCC18B5.07c, nup40 and SPAC1805.04, encode putative nucleoporins with low similarity to the S. cerevisiae nucleoporins NUP2p, NUP53p and NUP133p, respectively. Further genetic analysis revealed that one of the nucleoporin genes, nup40, and another gene, SPCC1322.06, encoding a putative importin-beta/Cse1p superfamily protein may have a spindle checkpoint function. PMID:15116432

  18. In silico cloning of genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors in a spider mite.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A; Rombauts, Stephane; Grbić, Miodrag

    2012-04-01

    The genome of the spider mite was prospected for the presence of genes coding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors. Fifty one candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or neurohormones. These include all known insect neuropeptides and neurohormones, with the exception of sulfakinin, corazonin, neuroparsin and PTTH. True orthologs of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) were neither found, but there are three genes encoding peptides similar in structure to both AKH and the AKH-corazonin-related peptide. We were also unable to identify the precursors for pigment dispersing factor (PDF) or the recently discovered trissin. However, the spider mite probably does have such genes, as we found their putative receptors. A novel arthropod neuropeptide gene was identified that shows similarity to previously described molluscan neuropeptide genes and was called EFLamide. A total of 65 putative neuropeptide GPCR genes were also identified, of these 58 belong to the A-family and 7 to the B-family. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 50 of them are closely related to insect GPCRs, which allowed the identification of their putative ligand in 39 cases with varying degrees of certainty. Other spider mite GPCRs however have no identifiable orthologs in the genomes of the four holometabolous insect species best analyzed. Whereas some of the latter have orthologs in hemimetabolous insect species, crustaceans or ticks, for others such arthropod homologs are currently unknown. PMID:22214827

  19. Isolation and characterization of 17 different genes encoding putative endopolygalacturonase genes from Rhizopus oryzae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase enzymes are a valuable aid in the retting of flax for production of linens and, more recently, production of biofuels from citrus wastes. In a search of the recently sequenced Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 genome database, 18 putative endopolygalacturonase genes were identified, w...

  20. Characterization of the BLR1 gene encoding a putative blue-light regulator in the phytopathogenic fungus Bipolaris oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Junichi; Moriwaki, Akihiro; Tanaka, Nozomi; Ueno, Makoto; Arase, Sakae

    2007-01-01

    Bipolaris oryzae is a filamentous ascomycetous fungus that causes brown leaf spot disease in rice. We isolated and characterized BLR1, a gene that encodes a putative blue-light regulator similar to Neurospora crassa white-collar 1 (WC-1). The deduced amino acid sequence of BLR1 showed high degrees of similarity to other fungal blue-light regulator protein. Disruption of the BLR1 gene demonstrated that this gene is essential for conidial development after conidiophore formation and for near-UV radiation-enhanced photolyase gene expression. PMID:17233721

  1. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    Large DNA viruses, in particular herpes- and poxviruses, have evolved proteins that serve as mimics or decoys for endogenous proteins in the host. The chemokines and their receptors serve key functions in both innate and adaptive immunity through control of leukocyte trafficking, and have as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines and their receptors to serve a variety of roles in viral life-cycle. This review focuses on the pharmacology of virus-encoded chemokine receptors, yet also the family of virus-encoded chemokines and chemokine-binding proteins will be touched upon. Key properties of the virus-encoded receptors, compared to their closest endogenous homologs, are interactions with a wider range of chemokines, which can act as agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists, and the exploitation of many signal transduction pathways. High constitutive activity is another key property of some--but not all--of these receptors. The chemokine receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled 7TM receptors that per se are excellent drug targets. At present, non-peptide antagonists have been developed against many chemokine receptors. The potentials of the virus-encoded chemokine receptors as drug targets--ie. as novel antiviral strategies--will be highlighted here together with the potentials of the virus-encoded chemokines and chemokine-binding proteins as novel anti-inflammatory biopharmaceutical strategies. PMID:15617722

  2. Functional analysis of putative genes encoding the PIP2 water channel subfamily in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Francesca; MacIver, Bryce; Zeidel, Mark L; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2009-11-01

    We located fully sequenced putative genes of the plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) family in the Populus trichocarpa (Torr. Gray), genome. Of 23 gene candidates, we assigned eight genes to the PIP2 subfamily. All eight putative genes were expressed in vegetative tissues (roots, leaves, bark and wood), and all of them showed water channel activity after being expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Six of eight proteins were affected by mercury ions. No proteins were affected by the presence of nickel or tungsten ions, or by lowering the pH of bathing external solution from 7.4 to 6.5. The presence of copper ions caused seven of eight PIP2 proteins to increase their water transport capacity by as much as 50%. This systematic study of the PIP2 subfamily of proteins in P. trichocarpa provides a basic overview of their activity as water channels and will be a useful reference for future physiological studies of plant water relations that use P. trichocarpa as a model system. PMID:19808706

  3. Cloning and characterization of CSP37, a novel gene encoding a putative membrane protein of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Sentandreu, M; Nieto, A; Iborra, A; Elorza, M V; Ponton, J; Fonzi, W A; Sentandreu, R

    1997-01-01

    In the course of an analysis of the functions and assembly of the cell wall of Candida albicans, we have cloned and characterized a gene, which we designated CSP37 (cell surface protein), encoding a 37-kDa polypeptide which is a membrane-associated protein. The gene was isolated by immunological screening of a DNA library constructed from mycelial cells with a polyclonal serum raised against cell walls of this morphology. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of a corresponding genomic DNA fragment revealed a single open reading frame which encodes a predicted protein of 321 amino acids with no significant homology to others in the databases. Disruption of the CSP37 gene by the method described by Fonzi and Irwin (Genetics 134:717-728, 1993) eliminated expression of the Csp37 protein. The mutant strains showed no apparent defect in cell viability, growth, or cell wall assembly but displayed attenuated virulence in systemic infections induced in mice and reduced the ability to adhere to polystyrene. PMID:9244249

  4. Genes encoding putative natural killer cell C-type lectin receptors in teleostean fishes

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akie; Mayer, Werner E.; Overath, Peter; Klein, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Mammalian natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that express receptors specific for MHC class I molecules. The NK cell receptors belong to two structurally unrelated families, the killer cell Ig-like receptors and the killer cell C-type lectin receptors. We describe a cDNA clone derived from the bony (cichlid) fish Paralabidochromis chilotes and show that it encodes a protein related to the CD94/NK cell group 2 (NKG2) subfamily of the killer cell C-type lectin receptors. The gene encoding this receptor in a related species, Oreochromis niloticus, has a similar structure to the human CD94/NKG2 genes and is a member of a multigene cluster that resembles the mammalian NK cell gene complex. Thus, the CD94/NKG2 subfamily of NK cell receptors must have arisen before the divergence of fish and tetrapods and may have retained its function (possibly monitoring the expression of MHC class I molecules) for >400 million years. PMID:12802013

  5. Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein and its role in self-incompatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were raised against purified SLSG and polyclonal antisera were raised against purified trpE/SLR1 fusion proteins. MAbH8 reacts with a protein epitope on SLSG. MAbH8 and the anit-SLR1 antisera were used with immunogold labeling to show SLSG and SLR1 proteins are localized in papillar cell walls in the stigma. MAbH8 reacts with SLSG from CRM+ cells but not CRM-cells; amino acid sequence identity between the two classes was only 65%, vs. 80% within the CRM+ class. SLSG is necessary but not sufficient for self-incompatibility. Variable molecular weight (MW) SLSG proteins are derived from the same SLG gene. MW variations in both SLSG and SLR1 are due to changes in glycosylation and phosphorylation state. SLSG is not detectable in mature pollen, but is expressed during microspore development. Using a SLG probe, a gene for a putative receptor with protein kinase activity was identified.

  6. A new gene encoding a putative transcription factor regulated by the Drosophila circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Rouyer, F; Rachidi, M; Pikielny, C; Rosbash, M

    1997-07-01

    Circadian rhythms of locomotor activity and eclosion in Drosophila depend upon the reciprocal autoregulation of the period (per) and timeless (tim) genes. As part of this regulatory loop, per and tim mRNA levels oscillate in a circadian fashion. Other cycling transcripts may participate in this central pacemaker mechanism or represent outputs of the clock. In this paper, we report the isolation of Crg-1, a new circadianly regulated gene. Like per and tim transcript levels, Crg-1 transcript levels oscillate with a 24 h period in light:dark (LD) conditions, with a maximal abundance at the beginning of the night. These oscillations persist in complete darkness and depend upon per and tim proteins. The putative CRG-1 proteins show some sequence similarity with the DNA-binding domain of the HNF3/fork head family of transcription factors. In the adult head, in situ hybridization analysis reveals that per and Crg-1 have similar expression patterns in the eyes and optic lobes. PMID:9233804

  7. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  8. Characterization and expression of two genes encoding isoforms of a putative Na, K-ATPase in the chytridiomycete Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Fietto, Luciano Gomes; Pugliese, Luciana; Gomes, Suely Lopes

    2002-06-01

    A P-type ATPase gene (BePAT1) from the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii, which surprisingly showed high similarity with the alpha-subunit of Na, K-ATPases from animal cells, has been reported recently [Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1383 (1998) 183]. In the present study, we describe the characterization of a second gene, denominated BePAT2, and show that these two genes have a different intron-exon structure but encode putative proteins with greater than 90% amino acid identity. Northern blot and multiplex reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays have revealed that BePAT1 and BePAT2 genes have a non-coordinate, developmentally regulated expression during B. emersonii life cycle. Phosphoenzyme formation experiments using the immunopurified enzymes have indicated the presence of a Na, K-ATPase-like activity. Furthermore, immunofluorescence studies using B. emersonii zoospores localized the ATPases on the plasma membrane of these cells. PMID:12031485

  9. A Putative Gene Cluster from a Lyngbya wollei Bloom that Encodes Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mihali, Troco K.; Carmichael, Wayne W.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin and its analogs cause the paralytic shellfish-poisoning syndrome, adversely affecting human health and coastal shellfish industries worldwide. Here we report the isolation, sequencing, annotation, and predicted pathway of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya wollei. The gene cluster spans 36 kb and encodes enzymes for the biosynthesis and export of the toxins. The Lyngbya wollei saxitoxin gene cluster differs from previously identified saxitoxin clusters as it contains genes that are unique to this cluster, whereby the carbamoyltransferase is truncated and replaced by an acyltransferase, explaining the unique toxin profile presented by Lyngbya wollei. These findings will enable the creation of toxin probes, for water monitoring purposes, as well as proof-of-concept for the combinatorial biosynthesis of these natural occurring alkaloids for the production of novel, biologically active compounds. PMID:21347365

  10. Arabidopsis Fragile Fiber8, Which Encodes a Putative Glucuronyltransferase, Is Essential for Normal Secondary Wall Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Peña, Maria J.; Zhou, Gong-Ke; Nairn, C. Joseph; Wood-Jones, Alicia; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Morrison, W. Herbert; Darvill, Alan G.; York, William S.; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2005-01-01

    Secondary walls in vessels and fibers of dicotyledonous plants are mainly composed of cellulose, xylan, and lignin. Although genes involved in biosynthesis of cellulose and lignin have been intensively studied, little is known about genes participating in xylan synthesis. We found that Arabidopsis thaliana fragile fiber8 (fra8) is defective in xylan synthesis. The fra8 mutation caused a dramatic reduction in fiber wall thickness and a decrease in stem strength. FRA8 was found to encode a member of glycosyltransferase family 47 and exhibits high sequence similarity to tobacco (Nicotiana plumbaginifolia) pectin glucuronyltransferase. FRA8 is expressed specifically in developing vessels and fiber cells, and FRA8 is targeted to Golgi. Comparative analyses of cell wall polysaccharide fractions from fra8 and wild-type stems showed that the xylan and cellulose contents are drastically reduced in fra8, whereas xyloglucan and pectin are elevated. Further structural analysis of cell walls revealed that although wild-type xylans contain both glucuronic acid and 4-O-methylglucuronic acid residues, xylans from fra8 retain only 4-O-methylglucuronic acid, indicating that the fra8 mutation results in a specific defect in the addition of glucuronic acid residues onto xylans. These findings suggest that FRA8 is a glucuronyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of glucuronoxylan during secondary wall formation. PMID:16272433

  11. A putative novel nuclear-encoded subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase complex in trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Dmitri A; Zíková, Alena; Kyselová, Iveta; Lukes, Julius

    2002-01-01

    A relatively large nuclear-encoded polypeptide, designated trCOIV, is found in the cytochrome c oxidase (CO) complex of trypanosomatids. In order to determine if this polypeptide represents a bona fide subunit of the complex, we have characterized the cDNA and the gene for this polypeptide in Leishmania tarentolae. Its nuclear gene has no sequence similarity to mammalian COIV. The trCOIV preprotein has a long mitochondrial targeting sequence of 31 residues. The mature polypeptide cofractionates with kinetoplast-mitochondria and its preferential mitochondrial localization was confirmed by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Based on the hydropathy plot analysis, the protein lacks pronounced transmembrane domains and likely occupies a peripheral position within the CO complex. The corresponding genes are also present in the sequenced portions of the Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major genomes, and the same polypeptide is found in cytochrome oxidase isolated from procyclic T. brucei and promastigote Leishmania mexicana amazonensis. However, the trCOIV gene, the mRNA and the polypeptide could not be detected in a respiration-deficient trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. PMID:12467979

  12. Monoclonal antibody against a putative myristoylated membrane protein encoded by grouper iridovirus 59L gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Yu; Chiou, Pinwen Peter; Liou, Chian-Jiun; Lai, Yu-Shen

    2015-04-01

    Groupers (Epinephelus spp.) are economically important fish species worldwide, and ranaviruses are major viral pathogens causing heavy economic losses in grouper aquaculture. In this study, the 59L gene of grouper iridovirus (GIV-59L) was cloned and characterized. This gene is 1521 bp and encodes a protein of 506 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 53.9 kDa. Interestingly, GIV-59L and its homologs are found in all genera of the family Iridoviridae. A mouse monoclonal antibody specific for the C-terminal domain (amino acid positions 254-506) of the GIV-59L protein, GIV-59L(760-1518)-MAb-21, was produced and proved to be well suited for use in a number of GIV immunoassays. RT-PCR, Western blotting, and cycloheximide and cytosine arabinoside drug inhibition analyses indicated that GIV-59L is a viral late gene in GIV-infected grouper kidney cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that GIV-59L protein mainly accumulates in the cytoplasm of infected cells and is finally packed into a whole virus particle. The GIV-59L(760-1518)-MAb-21 characterized in this study could have widespread application in GIV immunodiagnostics and other research on GIV. In addition, the results presented here offer important insights into the pathogenesis of GIV. PMID:25850399

  13. Characterization and Expression of DNA Sequences Encoding Putative Type-II Metallothioneins in the Seagrass Posidonia oceanica1

    PubMed Central

    Giordani, Tommaso; Natali, Lucia; Maserti, Bianca Elena; Taddei, Sonia; Cavallini, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica is a marine phanerogam, largely widespread in the Mediterranean sea, representing an important food substrate for many marine organisms. A progressive reduction of P. oceanica meadows has been reported, due to anthropogenic coastal activity. Studying mechanisms by which this species responds to environmental stresses, three DNA sequences putatively encoding metallothioneins (MTs) have been isolated, by PCR. Two sequences, Pomt2a (accession no. AJ249603) and Pomt2b (accession no. AJ249602), show high similarities with genes encoding type-II MTs and are interrupted by two and one intron, respectively. The third sequence, Pomt2c (accession no. AJ249604), is supposed to be a pseudogene, originated by retrotranscription of the Pomt2b mRNA. These sequences belong to a multigene family with at least five members. Northern hybridizations indicated that MT transcripts accumulation is constitutive and seasonally regulated. MT encoding RNAs increase after rhyzome harvesting and (at a lesser extent) after 15 d of cultivation in an aquarium. As for animal MTs, transcripts accumulation is observed also after exposure to trace metals such as copper and cadmium. In the case of copper, the effect depends on concentration. Finally, taking into consideration the great interest in studying the biogeochemical cycle of mercury in the Mediterranean basin and since P. oceanica is commonly considered a bioindicator of this metal, the effect of mercury treatments on the accumulation of MT transcripts has been analyzed: in only a few experiments a small increase in the level of transcripts was recorded, suggesting that MTs are not key elements in the mercury accumulation by this species. PMID:10938373

  14. The BAT1 gene in the MHC encodes an evolutionarily conserved putative nuclear RNA helicase of the DEAD family

    SciTech Connect

    Peelman, L.J.; Van Zeveren, A.; Coppeiters, W.

    1995-03-20

    The BAT1 gene has previously been identified about 30 kb upstream from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) locus and close to a NF{sub kb}-related gene of the nuclear factor family in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of human, mouse, and pig. We now show that the BAT1 translation product is the homolog of the rat p47 nuclear protein, the WM6 Drosophila gene product, and probably also Ce08102 of Caenorhabditis elegans, all members of the DEAD protein family of ATP-dependent RNA helicases. This family has more than 40 members, including the eukaryotic translation initiation factor-4A (eIF-4A), the human nuclear protein p68, and the Drosophila oocyte polar granule component vasa. BAT1 spans about 10 kb, is split into 10 exons of varying length, and encodes a protein of 428 amino acids ({approximately}48 kDa). Human and pig BAT1 cDNAs display 95.6% identity in the coding region and 80% identity in the 5{prime} and 3{prime} noncoding regions. Several repeat sequences of different types were identified in introns of the porcine BAT1 gene. Three different mRNAs, 4.1,1.7, and 0.9 kb, respectively, were detected in all tissues analyzed upon hybridization with porcine BAT1 cDNA. Transfection and expression of human BAT1 cDNA after tagging with a heterologous antibody recognition epitope revealed a nuclear localization of the hybrid protein. An MspI RFLP was detected in an SLA class I typed family, confirming the localization of the BAT1 gene in the porcine MHC. BAT1 thus encodes a putative nuclear ATP-dependent RNA helicase and is likely to have an indispensable function. 35 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Molecular and Functional Characterization of cDNAs Putatively Encoding Carboxylesterases from the Migratory Locust, Locusta migratoria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Ge, Pingting; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) belong to a superfamily of metabolic enzymes encoded by a number of genes and are widely distributed in microbes, plants and animals including insects. These enzymes play important roles in detoxification of insecticides and other xenobiotics, degradation of pheromones, regulation of neurodevelopment, and control of animal development. In this study, we characterized a total of 39 full-length cDNAs putatively encoding different CarEs from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, one of the most severe insect pests in many regions of the world, and evaluated the role of four CarE genes in insecticide detoxification. Our phylogenetic analysis grouped the 39 CarEs into five different clades including 20 CarEs in clade A, 3 in D, 13 in E, 1 in F and 2 in I. Four CarE genes (LmCesA3, LmCesA20, LmCesD1, LmCesE1), representing three different clades (A, D and E), were selected for further analyses. The transcripts of the four genes were detectable in all the developmental stages and tissues examined. LmCesA3 and LmCesE1 were mainly expressed in the fat bodies and Malpighian tubules, whereas LmCesA20 and LmCesD1 were predominately expressed in the muscles and hemolymph, respectively. The injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) synthesized from each of the four CarE genes followed by the bioassay with each of four insecticides (chlorpyrifos, malathion, carbaryl and deltamethrin) increased the nymphal mortalities by 37.2 and 28.4% in response to malathion after LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 were silenced, respectively. Thus, we proposed that both LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 played an important role in detoxification of malathion in the locust. These results are expected to help researchers reveal the characteristics of diverse CarEs and assess the risk of insecticide resistance conferred by CarEs in the locust and other insect species. PMID:24722667

  16. A Putatively Functional Haplotype in the Gene Encoding Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 as a Potential Biomarker for Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, Markus A.; Brockmoeller, Juergen; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Virsik, Patricia; Wilken, Barbara; Kuehnle, Elna; Campean, Radu; Hoffmann, Arne O.; Mueller, Katarina; Goetze, Robert G.; Neumann, Michael; Janke, Joerg H.; Nasser, Fatima; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans; Hille, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether genetic variability in TGFB1 is related to circulating transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) plasma concentrations after radiotherapy and to radiosensitivity of lymphoid cells. Patients and Methods: Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 plasma concentrations (n = 79) were measured in patients 1 year after radiotherapy and chromosomal aberrations (n = 71) ex vivo before therapy start. Furthermore, TGF-{beta}1 secretion and apoptosis were measured in isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 55 healthy volunteers. These phenotypes were analyzed in relation to five germline polymorphisms in the 5' region of the TGFB1 gene. Because of high linkage disequilibrium, these five polymorphisms reflect frequent genetic variation in this region. A presumed impact of TGF-{beta}1 on DNA damage or repair was measured as micronucleus formation in 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines. Results: We identified a hypofunctional genetic haplotype termed H3 tagging the 5' region of the TGFB1 gene encoding TGF-{beta}1. H3 was associated with lower TGF-{beta}1 plasma concentrations in patients (p = 0.01) and reduced TGF-{beta}1 secretion in irradiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (p = 0.003). Furthermore, cells with H3 were less prone to induction of chromosomal aberrations (p = 0.001) and apoptosis (p = 0.003) by irradiation. The hypothesis that high TGF-{beta}1 could sensitize cells to DNA damage was further supported by increased micronuclei formation in 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines when preincubated with TGF-{beta}1 before irradiation (p = 0.04). Conclusions: On the basis of TGF-{beta}1 plasma levels and radiation sensitivity of lymphoid cells, this study revealed a putatively hypofunctional TGFB1 haplotype. The significance of this haplotype and the suggested link between TGF-{beta}1 function and DNA integrity should be further explored in other cell types, as well as other experimental and clinical conditions.

  17. The putative cell cycle gene, enhancer of rudimentary, encodes a highly conserved protein found in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Gelsthorpe, M; Pulumati, M; McCallum, C; Dang-Vu, K; Tsubota, S I

    1997-02-28

    The enhancer of rudimentary gene, e(r), in Drosophila melanogaster encodes a protein, ER, whose function has been implicated in pyrimidine biosynthesis and the cell cycle (Wojcik et al. (1994) Genetics 138, 1163-1170). In order to identify conserved regions of the protein and potentially important functional domains, the e(r) gene was cloned and sequenced from two other insects (Drosophila virilis and Aedes aegypti) and three vertebrates (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Brachydanio rerio) and sequenced from a flowering plant (Arabidopsis thaliana). These sequences along with those of a nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) exhibit a high degree of identity. ER of Drosophila melanogaster is 76% identical to the three vertebrate proteins, 49% identical to the nematode protein, and 40% identical to the plant protein. There is high evolutionary conservation among the vertebrates. The mouse and human proteins are identical and differ from that of the zebrafish by a single conservative amino-acid change (valine for isoleucine). A dramatic sequence conservation is seen in the position of the hydrophobic amino acids. Of the 27 positions occupied by hydrophobic amino acids in ER of Drosophila melanogaster, 25 of the corresponding positions in the human protein, 23 of the positions in Caenorhabditis elegans, and 20 of the positions in Arabidopsis thaliana have hydrophobic amino acids. Most of these residues are present in three conserved amphipathic alpha-helices, which are proposed to function in protein-protein interactions. Two phosphorylation sites for casein kinase II (CKII) have also been conserved within the animal groups. Purified ER from Drosophila melanogaster is phosphorylated in vitro by CKII, arguing that these two sites are functional in vivo. A putative shift in the secondary structure of ER caused by the phosphorylation of these sites suggests that CKII may be regulating the activity of the ER in vivo. PMID:9074495

  18. Identification of genes encoding zinc finger proteins, non-histone chromosomal HMG protein homologue, and a putative GTP phosphohydrolase in the genome of Chilo iridescent virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, P; Hug, M; Handermann, M; Janssen, W; Koonin, E V; Delius, H; Darai, C

    1994-01-01

    Five RNA transcripts of about 1.2 to 1.7 kilobases were mapped to a part of the genome of insect iridescent virus type 6 (Chilo iridescent virus; CIV) between genome coordinates 0.832 and 0.856 within the EcoRI DNA fragment F. The nucleotide sequence of this particular region (5702 base pairs) of the CIV genome was determined. The DNA sequence contains a number of perfect direct, inverted, and palindromic repeats including three clusters of tandemly organized repetitive DNA elements located between the nucleotide positions 1534 to 1566, 3720 to 3780, and 4350 to 4450. Eight long open reading frames (ORFs; EF1 to 8) were detected in the sequenced region of the CIV genome. ORF EF1 encodes a putative protein of 221 amino acid residues (aa) that is closely related to eukaryotic nonhistone chromosomal proteins of the high mobility group (HMG) superfamily. Virus encoded homologues of HMG proteins have not been reported so far. The EF2 gene product (145 aa) contains a specific zinc finger motif and belongs to a distinct group of identified and putative zinc finger proteins including a second putative protein (239 aa) of CIV encoded in the EcoRI DNA fragment Y (1984 bp; 0.381 to 0.391 viral map units). The product of EF6 (127 aa) is related to D250 ORF product of African swine fever virus (ASFV) and belongs to the recently described protein family sharing a highly conserved sequence motif with bacterial antimutator GTP phosphohydrolase MutT. Thus the sequenced region of the CIV genome encodes three putative proteins which may be directly involved in the replication and/or transcription of the viral DNA. Images PMID:8121799

  19. TOM1, an Arabidopsis gene required for efficient multiplication of a tobamovirus, encodes a putative transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, T; Ohta, T; Takahashi, M; Meshi, T; Schmidt, R; Dean, C; Naito, S; Ishikawa, M

    2000-08-29

    Host-encoded factors play an important role in virus multiplication, acting in concert with virus-encoded factors. However, information regarding the host factors involved in this process is limited. Here we report the map-based cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene, TOM1, which is necessary for the efficient multiplication of tobamoviruses, positive-strand RNA viruses infecting a wide variety of plants. The TOM1 mRNA is suggested to encode a 291-aa polypeptide that is predicted to be a multipass transmembrane protein. The Sos recruitment assay supported the hypothesis that TOM1 is associated with membranes, and in addition, that TOM1 interacts with the helicase domain of tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins. Taken into account that the tobamovirus replication complex is associated with membranes, we propose that TOM1 participates in the in vivo formation of the replication complex by serving as a membrane anchor. PMID:10944200

  20. Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma cruzi: molecular characterization of genes encoding putative calcium-binding proteins, highly conserved in trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Porcel, B M; Bontempi, E J; Henriksson, J; Rydåker, M; Aslund, L; Segura, E L; Pettersson, U; Ruiz, A M

    1996-12-01

    Genes encoding a 29-kDa flagellar calcium-binding protein (F29) in Trypanosoma cruzi, strongly homologous to EF-hand calcium-binding protein-encoding genes previously reported in this parasite, were isolated by immunoscreening. F29 is encoded by a number of very similar genes, highly conserved among different T. cruzi isolates. The genes are located on a pair of homologous chromosomes, arranged in one or two clusters of tandem repeats. PCR amplification of Trypanosoma rangeli genomic DNA, using primers derived from the T. cruzi F29 sequence made it possible to isolate the homologous gene in T. rangeli, encoding a 23-kDa protein called TrCaBP. Gene sequence comparisons showed homology to EF-hand calcium-binding proteins from T. cruzi (82.8%), Trypanosoma brucei brucei (60.2%), and Entamoeba histolytica (28.4%). Northern blot analysis revealed that the TrCaBP gene is expressed in T. rangeli as a polyadenylated transcript. The TrCaBP-encoding genes are present in at least 20 copies per cell, organized in tandem arrays, on large T. rangeli chromosomes in some isolates and on two smaller ones in others. This gene, however, seems to be absent from Leishmania. PMID:8948328

  1. A Putative Type III Secretion System Effector Encoded by the MA20_12780 Gene in Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 Causes Incompatibility with Rj4 Genotype Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Syougo; Okizaki, Kouhei; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Yamakawa, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    The nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 is restricted by Rj4 genotype soybeans (Glycine max). To identify the genes responsible for this incompatibility, Tn5 mutants of B. japonicum Is-34 that were able to overcome this nodulation restriction were obtained. Analysis of the Tn5 mutants revealed that Tn5 was inserted into a region containing the MA20_12780 gene. In addition, direct disruption of this gene using marker exchange overcame the nodulation restriction by Rj4 genotype soybeans. The MA20_12780 gene has a tts box motif in its upstream region, indicating a possibility that this gene encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein. Bioinformatic characterization revealed that the MA20_12780 protein contains the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease domain of the C48 peptidase (ubiquitin-like protease 1 [Ulp1]) family. The results of the present study indicate that a putative T3SS effector encoded by the MA20_12780 gene causes the incompatibility with Rj4 genotype soybeans, and they suggest the possibility that the nodulation restriction of B. japonicum Is-34 may be due to Rj4 genotype soybeans recognizing the putative T3SS effector (MA20_12780 protein) as a virulence factor. PMID:26092458

  2. Overexpression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a putative transposase from Thermoplasma acidophilum encoded by the Ta0474 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Ji Yong; Lee, Hyung Ho; Kim, Do Jin; Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Olesya; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Lee, Sang Jae; Suh, Se Won

    2006-11-01

    A putative transposase from T. acidophilum encoded by the Ta0474 gene was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.78 Å. IS200 transposases, originally identified in Salmonella typhimurium LT2, are present in many bacteria and archaea and are distinct from other groups of transposases. To facilitate further structural comparisons among IS200-like transposases, structural analysis has been initiated of a putative transposase from Thermoplasma acidophilum encoded by the Ta0474 gene. Its 137-residue polypeptide shows high levels of sequence similarity to other members of the IS200 transposase family. The protein was overexpressed in intact form in Escherichia coli and crystallized at 297 K using a reservoir solution consisting of 100 mM Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 20%(v/v) ethanol. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.78 Å. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.00, b = 34.07, c = 121.58 Å, α = 90, β = 100.20, γ = 90°. Four monomers, representing two copies of a dimeric molecule, are present in the asymmetric unit, giving a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 2.02 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 39.2%.

  3. A Putative Type III Secretion System Effector Encoded by the MA20_12780 Gene in Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 Causes Incompatibility with Rj4 Genotype Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Syougo; Okizaki, Kouhei; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Yamakawa, Takeo

    2015-09-01

    The nodulation of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Is-34 is restricted by Rj4 genotype soybeans (Glycine max). To identify the genes responsible for this incompatibility, Tn5 mutants of B. japonicum Is-34 that were able to overcome this nodulation restriction were obtained. Analysis of the Tn5 mutants revealed that Tn5 was inserted into a region containing the MA20_12780 gene. In addition, direct disruption of this gene using marker exchange overcame the nodulation restriction by Rj4 genotype soybeans. The MA20_12780 gene has a tts box motif in its upstream region, indicating a possibility that this gene encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein. Bioinformatic characterization revealed that the MA20_12780 protein contains the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease domain of the C48 peptidase (ubiquitin-like protease 1 [Ulp1]) family. The results of the present study indicate that a putative T3SS effector encoded by the MA20_12780 gene causes the incompatibility with Rj4 genotype soybeans, and they suggest the possibility that the nodulation restriction of B. japonicum Is-34 may be due to Rj4 genotype soybeans recognizing the putative T3SS effector (MA20_12780 protein) as a virulence factor. PMID:26092458

  4. Sequencing and characterization of six cDNAs putatively encoding three pairs of pheromone receptors in two sibling species, Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa assulta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Zhu, Kun Yan; Wang, Chen-Zhu

    2010-06-01

    Pheromone receptors (PRs) on male antennae mediate specific and sensitive detection of sex pheromone components in lepidopterans. In this study, we identified and sequenced six putative cDNAs encoding PRs from sibling species, namely HarmOR1, HarmOR2 and HarmOR3 in Helicoverpa armigera and HassOR1, HassOR2 and HassOR3 in Helicoverpa assulta, which appeared to be orthologs of Heliothis virescens putative PR genes HvOR13, HvOR11 and HvOR16, respectively. Expression patterns of the six PR genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). All the putative PR genes exhibited male-biased expression patterns in adult antennae except for HarmOR2 and HassOR2 that showed similar expression levels in male and female antennae. Expression level of HarmOR1 was significantly higher than those of HarmOR2 and HarmOR3 in male antennae of H. armigera, but the three corresponding PR genes in male antennae of H. assulta showed similar expression levels. This implies the role of the PR encoded by HarmOR1 for interacting with Z11-16:Ald. The level of HarmOR1 transcript was significantly higher than that of HassOR1. These results were consistent with the ratio of Z11-16:Ald in their sex pheromone blends and the abundance of sensilla tuned to Z11-16:Ald on antennae of male adults of the two species. PMID:19962987

  5. Identification and transcriptional analysis of a Treponema pallidum operon encoding a putative ABC transport system, an iron-activated repressor protein homolog, and a glycolytic pathway enzyme homolog.

    PubMed

    Hardham, J M; Stamm, L V; Porcella, S F; Frye, J G; Barnes, N Y; Howell, J K; Mueller, S L; Radolf, J D; Weinstock, G M; Norris, S J

    1997-09-15

    We have characterized a 5.2-kilobase (kb) putative transport related operon (tro) locus of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain) (Tp) encoding six proteins: TroA, TroB, TroC, TroD, TroR and Phosphoglycerate mutase (Pgm). Four of these gene products (TroA-TroD) are homologous to members of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of bacterial transport proteins. TroA (previously identified as Tromp1) has significant sequence similarity to a family of Gram-negative periplasmic substrate-binding proteins and to a family of streptococcal proteins that may have dual roles as substrate binding proteins and adhesins. TroB is homologous to the ATP-binding protein component, whereas TroC and TroD are related to the hydrophobic membrane protein components of ABC transport systems. TroR is similar to Gram-positive iron-activated repressor proteins (DesR, DtxR, IdeR, and SirR). The last open reading frame (ORF) of the tro operon encodes a protein that is highly homologous to the glycolytic pathway enzyme, Pgm. Primer extension results demonstrated that the tro operon is transcribed from a sigma 70-type promoter element. Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions provided evidence for the presence of a primary 1-kb troA transcript and a secondary, less abundant, troA-pgm transcript. The tro operon is flanked by a Holliday structure DNA helicase homolog (upstream) and two ORFs representing a purine nucleoside phosphorylase homolog and tpp15, a previously characterized gene encoding a membrane lipoprotein (downstream). The presence of a complex operon containing a putative ABC transport system and a DtxR homolog indicates a possible linkage between transport and gene regulation in Tp. PMID:9332349

  6. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding partial putative molt-inhibiting hormone from Penaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zai-Zhao; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2002-09-01

    Total RNA was extracted from eyestalks of shrimp Penaeus chinensis. Eyestalk cDNA was obtained from total RNA by reverse transcription. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was initiated using eyestalk cDNA and degenerate primers designed from the amino acid sequence of molt-inhibiting hormone from shrimp Penaeus japonicus. A specific cDNA was obtained and cloned into a T vector for sequencing. The cDNA consisted of 201 base pairs and encoding for a peptide of 67 amino acid residues. The peptide of P. chinensis had the highest identity with molt-inhibiting hormones of P. japonicus. The cDNA could be a partial gene of molt-inhibiting hormones from P. chinensis. This paper reports for the first time cDNA encoding for neuropeptide of P. chinensis.

  7. The putative ABC transporter encoded by the orf19.4531 plays a role in the sensitivity of Candida albicans cells to azole antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Linghuo; Xu, Dayong; Chen, Zhen; Cao, Yongbing; Gao, Pinghui; Jiang, Yuanying

    2016-05-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute a large superfamily of integral membrane proteins in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, there are 28 genes encoding ABC transporters and many of them have not been characterized so far. The orf19.4531 (also known as IPF7530) encodes a putative ABC transporter. In this study, we have demonstrated that disruption of orf19.4531 causes C. albicans cells to become tolerant to azoles, but not to polyene antifungals and terbinafine. Therefore, the protein encoded by orf19.4531 is involved in azole sensitivity and we name it as ROA1, the regulator of azole sensitivity 1 gene. Consistently, we show that the expression of ROA1 is responsive to treatment of either fluconazole or ketoconazole inC. albicans In addition, through a GFP tagging approach, Roa1 is localized in a small punctuate compartment adjacent to the vacuolar membrane. However, ROA1 is not essential for the in vitro filamentation of C. albicans cells. PMID:26975389

  8. The indigenous Pseudomonas plasmid pQBR103 encodes plant-inducible genes, including three putative helicases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Xian; Lilley, Andrew K; Bailey, Mark J; Rainey, Paul B

    2004-12-27

    Plasmid pQBR103 ( approximately 400 kb) is representative of many self-transmissible, mercury resistant plasmids observed in the Pseudomonas community colonising the phytosphere of sugar beet. A promoter trapping strategy (IVET) was employed to identify pQBR103 genes showing elevated levels of expression on plant surfaces. Thirty-seven different plant-inducible gene fusions were isolated that were silent in laboratory media, but active in the plant environment. Three of the fusions were to DNA sequences whose protein products show significant homology to DNA-unwinding helicases. The three helicase-like genes, designated helA, helB and helC, are restricted to a defined group of related Pseudomonas plasmids. They are induced in both the root and shoot environments of sugar beet seedlings. Sequence analysis of the three plasmid-encoded helicase-like genes shows that they are phylogenetically distinct and likely to have independent evolutionary histories. The helA gene is predicted to encode a protein of 1121 amino acids, containing conserved domains found in the ultraviolet (UV) resistance helicase, UvrD. A helA knockout mutant was constructed and no phenotypic changes were found with plasmid-conferred UV resistance or plasmid conjugation. The other 34 fusions are unique with no homologues in the public gene databases, including the Pseudomonas genomes. These data demonstrate the presence of plant responsive genes in plasmid DNA comprising a component of the genomes of plant-associated bacteria. PMID:16329852

  9. Deletion of potD, encoding a putative spermidine-binding protein, results in a complex phenotype in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Abdelhady, Hany; Tompkins, Nicholas P; Carson, Kaitlyn R; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-07-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). We previously observed that the polyamine spermidine, produced by host cells or added exogenously, enhances the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. To study this enhancing effect and determine whether polyamines are used as nutrients, we deleted potD from L. pneumophila strain JR32. The gene potD encodes a spermidine-binding protein that in other bacteria is essential for the function of the PotABCD polyamine transporter. Deletion of potD did not affect L. pneumophila growth in vitro in the presence or absence of spermidine and putrescine, suggesting that PotD plays a redundant or no role in polyamine uptake. However, deletion of potD resulted in a puzzlingly complex phenotype that included defects in L. pneumophila's ability to form filaments, tolerate Na(+), associate with macrophages and amoeba, recruit host vesicles to the LCV, and initiate intracellular growth. Moreover, the ΔpotD mutant was completely unable to grow in L929 cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of spermidine synthesis. These complex and disparate effects suggest that the L. pneumophila potD encodes either: (i) a multifunctional protein, (ii) a protein that interacts with, or regulates a, multifunctional protein, or (iii) a protein that contributes (directly or indirectly) to a regulatory network. Protein function studies with the L. pneumophila PotD protein are thus warranted. PMID:24928741

  10. The yrpAB operon of Yersinia ruckeri encoding two putative U32 peptidases is involved in virulence and induced under microaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Navais, Roberto; Méndez, Jessica; Pérez-Pascual, David; Cascales, Desirée; Guijarro, José A

    2014-07-01

    In an attempt to dissect the virulence mechanisms of Yersinia ruckeri two adjacent genes, yrpA and yrpB, encoding putative peptidases belonging to the U32 family, were analyzed. Similar genes, with the same genetic organization were identified in genomic analysis of human-pathogenic yersiniae. RT-PCR studies indicated that these genes form an operon in Y. ruckeri. Transcriptional studies using an yrpB::lacZY fusion showed high levels of expression of these genes in the presence of peptone in the culture medium, as well as under oxygen-limited conditions. These two factors had a synergic effect on gene induction when both were present simultaneously during bacterial incubation, which indicates the important role that environmental conditions in the fish gut can play in the regulation of specific genes. LD 50 experiments using an yrpA insertional mutant strain demonstrated the participation of this gene in the virulence of Y. ruckeri. PMID:24865652

  11. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae YDL112w ORF encodes the putative 2'-O-ribose methyltransferase catalyzing the formation of Gm18 in tRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Cavaillé, J; Chetouani, F; Bachellerie, J P

    1999-01-01

    The protein sequences of three known RNA 2'-O-ribose methylases were used as probes for detecting putative homologs through iterative searches of genomic databases. We have identified 45 new positive Open Reading Frames (ORFs), mostly in prokaryotic genomes. Five complete eukaryotic ORFs were also detected, among which was a single ORF (YDL112w) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. After genetic depletion of YDL112w, we observed a specific defect in tRNA ribose methylation, with the complete disappearance of Gm18 in all tRNAs that naturally contain this modification, whereas other tRNA ribose methylations and the complex pattern of rRNA ribose methylations were not affected. The tRNA G18 methylation defect was suppressed by transformation of the disrupted strain with a plasmid allowing expression of YDL112wp. The formation of Gm18 on an in vitro transcript of a yeast tRNASer naturally containing this methylation, which was efficiently catalyzed by cell-free extracts from the wild-type yeast strain, did not occur with extracts from the disrupted strain. The protein encoded by the YDL112w ORF, termed Trm3 (tRNA methylation), is therefore likely to be the tRNA (Gm18) ribose methylase. In in vitro assays, its activity is strongly dependent on tRNA architecture. Trm3p, the first putative tRNA ribose methylase identified in an eukaryotic organism, is considerably larger than its Escherichia coli functional homolog spoU (1,436 amino acids vs. 229 amino acids), or any known or putative prokaryotic RNA ribose methyltransferase. Homologs found in human (TRP-185 protein), Caenorhabditis elegans and Arabidopsis thaliana also exhibit a very long N-terminal extension not related to any protein sequence in databases. PMID:9917067

  12. Gene amplification at a locus encoding a putative Na+/H+ antiporter confers sodium and lithium tolerance in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Z P; McCullough, N; Martel, R; Hemmingsen, S; Young, P G

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a new locus, sodium 2 (sod2) based on selection for increased LiCl tolerance in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Tolerant strains have enhanced pH-dependent Na+ export capacity and sodium transport experiments suggest that the gene encodes an Na+/H+ antiport. The predicted sod2 gene product can be placed in the broad class of transporters which possess 12 hydrophobic transmembrane domains. The protein shows some sequence similarity to the human and bacterial Na+/H+ antiporters. Overexpression of sod2 increased Na+ export capacity and conferred sodium tolerance. Osmotolerance was not affected and sod2 cells were unaffected for growth in K+. In a sod2 disruption strain cells were incapable of exporting sodium. They were hypersensitive to Na+ or Li+ and could not grow under conditions that approximate pH7. The sod2 gene amplification could be selected stepwise and the degree of such amplification correlated with the level of Na+ or Li+ tolerance. Images PMID:1314171

  13. Two putative subunits of a peptide pump encoded in the human major histocompatability complex class 2 region

    SciTech Connect

    Bahram, S.; Arnold, D.; Bresnahan, M.; Strominger, J.L.; Spies, T. )

    1991-11-15

    The class 2 region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may encode several genes controlling the processing of endogenous antigen and the presentation of peptide epitopes by MHC class 1 molecules to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. A previously described peptide supply factor (PSF1) is a member of the multidrug-resistance family of transporters and may pump cytosolic peptides into the membrane-bound compartment where class 1 molecules assemble. A second transporter gene, PSF2, was identified 10 kilobases (kb) from PSF1, near the class 2 DOB gene. The complete sequences of PSF1 and PSF2 were determined from cDNA clones. The translation products are closely related in sequence and predicted secondary structure. Both contain a highly conserved ATP-binding fold and share 25% homology in a hydrophobic domain with a tentative number of eight membrane-spanning segments. Based on the principle dimeric organization of these two domains in other transporters, PSF1 and PSF2 may function as complementary subunits, independently as homodimers, or both. Taken together with previous genetic evidence, the coregulation of PSF1 and PSF2 by {gamma} interferon and the to-some-degree coordinate transcription of these genes suggest a common role in peptide-loading of class 1 molecules, although a distinct function of PSF2 cannot be ruled out.

  14. Gravistimulation changes expression of genes encoding putative carrier proteins of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, T.; Hitotsubashi, R.; Miyamoto, K.; Tanimoto, E.; Ueda, J.

    STS-95 space experiment has showed that auxin polar transport in etiolated epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings is controlled by gravistimulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana auxin polar transport has considered to be regulated by efflux and influx carrier proteins in plasma membranes, AtPIN1 and AtAUX1, respectively. In order to know how gravistimuli control auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls at molecular levels, strenuous efforts have been made, resulting in successful isolation of full-length cDNAs of a putative auxin efflux and influx carriers, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (accession no. AY222857, Chawla and DeMason, 2003) and AtPINs, and also among PsAUX1, AtAUX1 and their related genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 relating to lateral transport of auxin, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1 relating to auxin polar transport. In the present study, we examined the effects of gravistimuli on the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 in etiolated pea seedlings by northern blot analysis. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in hook region of 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat increased as compared with that of the seedlings grown under 1 g conditions. On the other hand, that of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the 1st internode region under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat also increased, while that of PsPIN2 was affected little. These results suggest that expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 regulating polar/lateral transport of auxin is substantially under the control of gravity. A possible role of PsPINs and PsAUX1 of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea seedlings will also be discussed.

  15. ZNF1 Encodes a Putative C2H2 Zinc-Finger Protein Essential for Appressorium Differentiation by the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaofeng; Que, Yawei; Xu, Lin; Deng, Shuzhen; Peng, Youliang; Talbot, Nicholas J; Wang, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae forms specialized infection structures called appressoria which are essential for gaining entry to plant tissue. Here, we report the identification of a novel nonpathogenic T-DNA-tagged mutant XF696 of M. oryzae with a single insertion in the promoter of ZNF1, which encodes a putative transcription factor (TF). Targeted gene deletion mutants of ZNF1 are nonpathogenic and unable to develop appressoria. However, Δznf1 mutants still respond to exogenous cyclic AMP on hydrophilic surfaces and can sense hydrophobic surfaces, initiating the differentiation of germ tubes. Interestingly, Δznf1 mutants also produce significantly more conidia compared with the isogenic wild-type strain. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis and green fluorescent protein fusion experiments revealed that expression of ZNF1 was highly induced during germination and appressorium development in M. oryzae and potentially regulated by the Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. We observed that Δznf1 mutants are affected in mitosis and impaired in mobilization and degradation of lipid droplets and glycogen reserves during appressorium differentiation. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that three of the four C2H2 zinc-finger domains are essential for the function of Znf1. Taken together, we conclude that a C2H2 zinc-finger TF encoded by ZNF1 is essential for appressorium development by the rice blast fungus. PMID:26441322

  16. A Semidwarf Phenotype of Barley uzu Results from a Nucleotide Substitution in the Gene Encoding a Putative Brassinosteroid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chono, Makiko; Honda, Ichiro; Zeniya, Haruko; Yoneyama, Koichi; Saisho, Daisuke; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Takatsuto, Suguru; Hoshino, Tsuguhiro; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles throughout plant growth and development. Despite the importance of clarifying the mechanism of BR-related growth regulation in cereal crops, BR-related cereal mutants have been identified only in rice (Oryza sativa). We previously found that semidwarf barley (Hordeum vulgare) accessions carrying the “uzu” gene, called “uzu” barley in Japan, are non-responding for brassinolide (BL). We then performed chemical and molecular analyses to clarify the mechanisms of uzu dwarfism using isogenic line pairs of uzu gene. The response of the uzu line to BL was significantly lower than that of its corresponding normal line. Measurement of BRs showed that the uzu line accumulates BRs, similar to known BR-insensitive mutants. The marker synteny of rice and barley chromosomes suggests that the uzu gene may be homologous to rice D61, a rice homolog of Arabidopsis BR-insensitive 1 (BRI1), encoding a BR-receptor protein. A barley homolog of BRI1, HvBRI1, was isolated by using degenerate primers. A comparison of HvBRI1 sequences in uzu and normal barley varieties showed that the uzu phenotype is correlated with a single nucleotide substitution. This substitution results in an amino acid change at a highly conserved residue in the kinase domain of the BR-receptor protein. These results may indicate that uzu dwarfism is caused by the missense mutation in HvBRI1. The uzu gene is being introduced into all hull-less barley cultivars in Japan as an effective dwarf gene for practical use, and this is the first report about an agronomically important mutation related to BRs. PMID:14551335

  17. Characterization of gprK Encoding a Putative Hybrid G-Protein-Coupled Receptor in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mun-Gu; Kim, Sung Su; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Shin, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest and most varied collection of membrane embedded proteins that are sensitized by ligand binding and interact with heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite their presumed critical roles in fungal biology, the functions of the GPCR family members in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are largely unknown, as only two (GprC and GprD) of the 15 predicted GPCRs have been studied. Here, we characterize the gprK gene, which is predicted to encode a hybrid GPCR with both 7-transmembrane and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) domains. The deletion of gprK causes severely impaired asexual development coupled with reduced expression of key developmental activators. Moreover, ΔgprK results in hyper-activation of germination even in the absence of carbon source, and elevated expression and activity of the protein kinase A PkaC1. Furthermore, proliferation of the ΔgprK mutant is restricted on the medium when pentose is the sole carbon source, suggesting that GprK may function in external carbon source sensing. Notably, the absence of gprK results in reduced tolerance to oxidative stress and significantly lowered mRNA levels of the stress-response associated genes sakA and atfA. Activities of catalases and SODs are severely decreased in the ΔgprK mutant, indicating that GprK may function in proper activation of general stress response. The ΔgprK mutant is also defective in gliotoxin (GT) production and slightly less virulent toward the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Transcriptomic studies reveal that a majority of transporters are down-regulated by ΔgprK. In summary, GprK is necessary for proper development, GT production, and oxidative stress response, and functions in down-regulating the PKA-germination pathway. PMID:27584150

  18. Evidence for a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein gene (mcp1) that encodes a putative sensory transducer in virulent Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Hagman, K E; Porcella, S F; Popova, T G; Norgard, M V

    1997-01-01

    The clinical and histopathological manifestations of syphilis and the invasive behavior of Treponema pallidum in tissue culture systems reflect the propensity for treponemes to migrate through skin, hematogenously disseminate, and invade targeted tissues. Treponemal motility is believed to be essential to this process and thereby an important facet of syphilis pathogenesis. By analogy with other bacterial pathogens, it is plausible that treponemal motility and tissue invasion are modulated by sensory transduction events associated with chemotactic responses. Recent studies have demonstrated the existence in T. pallidum of accessory molecules typically associated with sensory transduction events involving methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs). Intrinsic radiolabeling of T. pallidum in vitro with L-[methyl-3H] methionine revealed one methylated treponemal polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 64 kDa. A degenerate oligonucleotide probe corresponding to a highly conserved C-terminal domain within Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli MCPs was used in Southern blotting of T. pallidum DNA to identify and subsequently clone a putative T. pallidum MCP gene (mcp1). Computer analyses predicted a near-consensus promoter upstream of mcp1, and primer extension analysis employing T. pallidum RNA revealed a transcriptional initiation site. T. pallidum mcp1 encoded a 579-amino-acid (64.6-kDa) polypeptide which was highly homologous to at least 69 other known or putative sensory transducer proteins, with the highest degrees of homology existing between the C terminus of mcp1 and the C-terminal (signaling) domains of the other bacterial MCPs. Other salient features of Mcp1 included (i) six potential membrane-spanning domains at the N terminus, (ii) two predicted alpha-helical coiled coil regions containing at least three putative methylation sites, and (iii) homologies with two ligand-binding domains (LI-1 and LI-2) of the E. coli MCPs Trg and Tar. This study is the

  19. Klebsiella pneumoniae Asparagine tDNAs Are Integration Hotspots for Different Genomic Islands Encoding Microcin E492 Production Determinants and Other Putative Virulence Factors Present in Hypervirulent Strains

    PubMed Central

    Marcoleta, Andrés E.; Berríos-Pastén, Camilo; Nuñez, Gonzalo; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Due to the developing of multi-resistant and invasive hypervirulent strains, Klebsiella pneumoniae has become one of the most urgent bacterial pathogen threats in the last years. Genomic comparison of a growing number of sequenced isolates has allowed the identification of putative virulence factors, proposed to be acquirable mainly through horizontal gene transfer. In particular, those related with synthesizing the antibacterial peptide microcin E492 (MccE492) and salmochelin siderophores were found to be highly prevalent among hypervirulent strains. The determinants for the production of both molecules were first reported as part of a 13-kbp segment of K. pneumoniae RYC492 chromosome, and were cloned and characterized in E. coli. However, the genomic context of this segment in K. pneumoniae remained uncharacterized. In this work, we provided experimental and bioinformatics evidence indicating that the MccE492 cluster is part of a highly conserved 23-kbp genomic island (GI) named GIE492, that was integrated in a specific asparagine-tRNA gene (asn-tDNA) and was found in a high proportion of isolates from liver abscesses sampled around the world. This element resulted to be unstable and its excision frequency increased after treating bacteria with mitomycin C and upon the overexpression of the island-encoded integrase. Besides the MccE492 genetic cluster, it invariably included an integrase-coding gene, at least seven protein-coding genes of unknown function, and a putative transfer origin that possibly allows this GI to be mobilized through conjugation. In addition, we analyzed the asn-tDNA loci of all the available K. pneumoniae assembled chromosomes to evaluate them as GI-integration sites. Remarkably, 73% of the strains harbored at least one GI integrated in one of the four asn-tDNA present in this species, confirming them as integration hotspots. Each of these tDNAs was occupied with different frequencies, although they were 100% identical. Also, we identified

  20. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of cDNA Encoding a Putative Stress-Induced Heat-Shock Protein from Camelus dromedarius

    PubMed Central

    Elrobh, Mohamed S.; Alanazi, Mohammad S.; Khan, Wajahatullah; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Al-Amri, Abdullah; Bazzi, Mohammad D.

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are ubiquitous, induced under a number of environmental and metabolic stresses, with highly conserved DNA sequences among mammalian species. Camelus dromedaries (the Arabian camel) domesticated under semi-desert environments, is well adapted to tolerate and survive against severe drought and high temperatures for extended periods. This is the first report of molecular cloning and characterization of full length cDNA of encoding a putative stress-induced heat shock HSPA6 protein (also called HSP70B′) from Arabian camel. A full-length cDNA (2417 bp) was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and cloned in pET-b expression vector. The sequence analysis of HSPA6 gene showed 1932 bp-long open reading frame encoding 643 amino acids. The complete cDNA sequence of the Arabian camel HSPA6 gene was submitted to NCBI GeneBank (accession number HQ214118.1). The BLAST analysis indicated that C. dromedaries HSPA6 gene nucleotides shared high similarity (77–91%) with heat shock gene nucleotide of other mammals. The deduced 643 amino acid sequences (accession number ADO12067.1) showed that the predicted protein has an estimated molecular weight of 70.5 kDa with a predicted isoelectric point (pI) of 6.0. The comparative analyses of camel HSPA6 protein sequences with other mammalian heat shock proteins (HSPs) showed high identity (80–94%). Predicted camel HSPA6 protein structure using Protein 3D structural analysis high similarities with human and mouse HSPs. Taken together, this study indicates that the cDNA sequences of HSPA6 gene and its amino acid and protein structure from the Arabian camel are highly conserved and have similarities with other mammalian species. PMID:21845074

  1. EFO1 and EFO2, encoding putative WD-domain proteins, have overlapping and distinct roles in the regulation of vegetative development and flowering of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyi; Yang, Dennis; Feldmann, Kenneth A

    2011-01-01

    From screening a population of Arabidopsis overexpression lines, two Arabidopsis genes were identified, EFO1 (early flowering by overexpression 1) and EFO2, that confer early flowering when overexpressed. The two genes encode putative WD-domain proteins which share high sequence similarity and constitute a small subfamily. Interestingly, the efo2-1 loss-of-function mutant also flowered earlier in short days and slightly earlier in long days than the wild type, while no flowering-time or morphological differences were observed in efo1-1 relative to the wild type. In addition, the efo2-1 mutation perturbed hypocotyl elongation, leaf expansion and formation, and stem elongation. EFO1 and EFO2 are both regulated by the circadian clock. Expression and genetic analyses revealed that EFO2 suppresses flowering largely through the action of CONSTANS (CO) and flowering locus T (FT), suggesting that EFO2 is a negative regulator of photoperiodic flowering. The growth defects in efo2-1 were augmented in efo1 efo2, but the induction of FT in the double mutant was comparable to that in efo2-1. Thus, while EFO2 acts as a floral repressor, EFO1 may not be directly involved in flowering, but the two genes do have overlapping roles in regulating other developmental processes. EFO1 and EFO2 may function collectively to serve as one of the converging points where the signals of growth and flowering intersect. PMID:21242318

  2. Overexpression of the OsChI1 gene, encoding a putative laccase precursor, increases tolerance to drought and salinity stress in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Yong; Lee, Chanhui; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Park, Yong Chan; Lim, Hye Lee; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2014-11-15

    In a previous study, we identified a number of genes induced by chilling using a microarray approach. In order to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying chilling tolerance and possible crosstalk with other abiotic stresses, we selected a rice gene, OsChI1 (Os01g61160), for further analysis. The OsChI1 gene encodes a putative laccase precursor protein. In accordance with our previous results, its transcript is highly accumulated during a 12-day period of chilling treatment. Higher expression of the OsChI1 gene was also detected in roots and tissues at the vegetative and productive stages. In addition, we also observed increased transcript levels of the OsChI1 gene during dehydration and high salinity conditions. Transient expression of OsChI1 proteins tagged with fluorescence protein in rice protoplasts revealed that OsChI1 is localized in the plasma membrane. The Arabidopsis transgenic plants overexpressing OsChI1-EGFP resulted in an increased tolerance to drought and salinity stress. In silico analysis of OsChI1 suggests that several genes coexpressed with OsChI1 in the root during various abiotic stresses, such as chilling, drought and salt stress, may play an important role in the ROS signaling pathway. Potential roles of OsChI1 in response to abiotic stresses are discussed. PMID:25218040

  3. Transcriptional Organization and Regulatory Elements of a Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP Operon Encoding a LysR-Type Regulator and a Putative Solute Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Platero, Ana Isabel; García-Jaramillo, Manuel; Santero, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The atzS-atzT-atzU-atzV-atzW gene cluster of the Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP atrazine-degradative plasmid pADP-1, which carries genes for an outer membrane protein and the components of a putative ABC-type solute transporter, is located downstream from atzR, which encodes the LysR-type transcriptional regulator of the cyanuric acid-degradative operon atzDEF. Here we describe the transcriptional organization of these genes. Our results show that all six genes are cotranscribed from the PatzR promoter to form the atzRSTUVW operon. A second, stronger promoter, PatzT, is found within atzS and directs transcription of the four distal genes. PatzT is σN dependent, activated by NtrC in response to nitrogen limitation with the aid of IHF, and repressed by AtzR. A combination of in vivo mutational analysis and primer extension allowed us to locate the PatzT promoter and map the transcriptional start site. Similarly, we used deletion and point mutation analyses, along with in vivo expression studies and in vitro binding assays, to locate the NtrC, IHF, and AtzR binding sites and address their functionality. Our results suggest a regulatory model in which NtrC activates PatzT transcription via DNA looping, while AtzR acts as an antiactivator that diminishes expression by interfering with the activation process. PMID:23042989

  4. LMOh7858_0369, a gene encoding a putative leucine-rich repeat-containing protein, is required for virulence of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul; Wang, Chinling

    2016-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes possesses the highest number of leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing proteins among all Gram-positive bacteria; these LRR-containing molecules are known as the 'internalin' family. To understand the functions of largely uncharacterized LRR-containing molecules, we constructed seven deletion mutants in the L. monocytogenes H7858 strain targeting genes in this family and tested their virulence. Among the seven mutants, the ΔLMOh7858_0369 strain and the ΔLMOh7858_2546 strain showed significantly impaired invasiveness of HepG2 cells. We further tested the virulence of these two strains in the intravascular sepsis model using BALB/c mice. Interestingly, the ΔLMOh7858_0369 strain showed significant reduction in organ colonization, bacteremia and invasion of the brain compared with the parental wild-type strain. Host immune responses to listerial intravascular infection were measured at 24 and 72 h post-infection. Transcript levels of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were significantly lower when induced by the ΔlmOh7858_0369 strain than when induced by the wild type. These results suggest that the putative LRR-containing protein encoded by LMOh7858_0369 might be a novel virulence factor of the L. monocytogenes H7858 strain. PMID:26976852

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel repeat-containing Leishmania major gene, ppg1, that encodes a membrane-associated form of proteophosphoglycan with a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor.

    PubMed

    Ilg, T; Montgomery, J; Stierhof, Y D; Handman, E

    1999-10-29

    Leishmania parasites secrete a variety of proteins that are modified by phosphoglycan chains structurally similar to those of the cell surface glycolipid lipophosphoglycan. These proteins are collectively called proteophosphoglycans. We report here the cloning and sequencing of a novel Leishmania major proteophosphoglycan gene, ppg1. It encodes a large polypeptide of approximately 2300 amino acids. The N-terminal domain of approximately 70 kDa exhibits 11 imperfect amino acid repeats that show some homology to promastigote surface glycoproteins of the psa2/gp46 complex. The large central domain apparently consists exclusively of approximately 100 repetitive peptides of the sequence APSASSSSA(P/S)SSSSS(+/-S). Gene fusion experiments demonstrate that these peptide repeats are the targets of phosphoglycosylation in Leishmania and that they form extended filamentous structures reminiscent of mammalian mucins. The C-terminal domain contains a functional glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor addition signal sequence, which confers cell surface localization to a normally secreted Leishmania acid phosphatase, when fused to its C terminus. Antibody binding studies show that the ppg1 gene product is phosphoglycosylated by phosphoglycan repeats and cap oligosaccharides. In contrast to previously characterized proteophosphoglycans, the ppg1 gene product is predominantly membrane-associated and it is expressed on the promastigote cell surface. Therefore this membrane-bound proteophosphoglycan may be important for direct host-parasite interactions. PMID:10531342

  6. TCFL4: a gene at 17q21.1 encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix leucine-zipper transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Bjerknes, M; Cheng, H

    1996-11-28

    TCFL4 (transcription factor like 4) is the HGMW-approved symbol for the gene of a widely expressed putative basic helix-loop-helix leucine-zipper (bHLH-zip) transcription factor which is located 3' to HSD17B1 (17-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene) at 17q21.1, centromeric to the BRCA1 (a gene implicated in familial breast cancer) locus. We report the human gene structure and the murine cDNA sequence of two variants, about 1.5 and 2.2 kb in size. The deduced protein is highly conserved between mouse and man. PMID:8973301

  7. Analysis of the Corynebacterium diphtheriae DtxR regulon: identification of a putative siderophore synthesis and transport system that is similar to the Yersinia high-pathogenicity island-encoded yersiniabactin synthesis and uptake system.

    PubMed

    Kunkle, Carey A; Schmitt, Michael P

    2003-12-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor, DtxR, is a global iron-dependent regulatory protein in Corynebacterium diphtheriae that controls gene expression by binding to 19-bp operator sequences. To further define the DtxR regulon in C. diphtheriae, a DtxR repressor titration assay (DRTA) was developed and used to identify 10 previously unknown DtxR binding sites. Open reading frames downstream from seven of the newly identified DtxR binding sites are predicted to encode proteins associated with iron or heme transport. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that DtxR was able to bind to DNA fragments carrying the 19-bp operator regions, and transcriptional analysis of putative promoter elements adjacent to the binding site sequences revealed that most of these regions displayed iron- and DtxR-regulated activity. A putative siderophore biosynthesis and transport operon located downstream from one of the DtxR binding sites, designated sid, is similar to the yersiniabactin synthesis and uptake genes encoded on the Yersinia pestis high pathogenicity island. The siderophore biosynthetic genes in the sid operon contained a large deletion in the C. diphtheriae C7 strain, but the sid genes were unaffected in four clinical isolates that are representative of the dominant strains from the recent diphtheria epidemic in the former Soviet Union. Mutations in the siderophore biosynthetic genes in a clinical strain had no effect on siderophore synthesis or growth in low-iron conditions; however, a mutation in one of the putative transport proteins, cdtP, resulted in reduced growth in iron-depleted media, which suggests that this system may have a role in iron uptake. The findings from this study indicate that C. diphtheriae contains at least 18 DtxR binding sites and that DtxR may affect the expression of as many as 40 genes. PMID:14617647

  8. The ken and barbie gene encoding a putative transcription factor with a BTB domain and three zinc finger motifs functions in terminalia development of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lukacsovich, Tamas; Yuge, Kazuya; Awano, Wakae; Asztalos, Zoltan; Kondo, Shunzo; Juni, Naoto; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2003-10-01

    Mutations in the ken and barbie locus are accompanied by the malformation of terminalia in adult Drosophila. Male and female genitalia often remain inside the body, and the same portions of genitalia and analia are missing in a fraction of homozygous flies. Rotated and/or duplicated terminalia are also observed. Terminalia phenotypes are enhanced by mutations in the gap gene tailless, the homeobox gene caudal, and the decapentaplegic gene that encodes a TGFbeta-like morphogen. The ken and barbie gene encodes a protein with three CCHH-type zinc finger motifs that are conserved in several transcription factors such as Krüppel and BCL-6. All defects in ken and barbie mutants are fully rescued by the expression of a wild-type genomic construct, which establishes the causality between phenotypes and the gene. PMID:14518006

  9. Phylogenetic Relationships and Functional Genes: Distribution of a Gene (mnxG) Encoding a Putative Manganese-Oxidizing Enzyme in Bacillus Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, Lisa E.; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Martin, Andy P.; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2008-01-01

    Several Bacillus and Paenibacillus species were isolated from Fe and Mn oxide minerals precipitating at a deep subsurface oxic-anoxic interface at Henderson Molybdenum Mine, Empire, CO. The isolates were investigated for their Mn(II)-oxidizing potential and interrogated for possession of the mnxG gene, a gene that codes for a putative Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme in Bacillus species. Seven of eight Bacillus species were capable of Mn(II) oxidation; however, the mnxG gene was detected in only one isolate. Using sequences of known Bacillus species both with and without amplifiable mnxG genes and Henderson Mine isolates, the 16S rRNA and mnxG gene phylogenies were compared to determine if 16S rRNA sequences could be used to predict the presence or absence of an amplifiable mnxG gene within the genomes of the isolates. We discovered a strong correspondence between 16S rRNA sequence similarity and the presence/absence of an amplifiable mnxG gene in the isolates. The data revealed a complex phylogenetic distribution of the mnxG gene in which vertical inheritance and gene loss influence the distribution of the gene among the Bacillus species included in this study. Comparisons of 16S rRNA and functional gene phylogenies can be used as a tool to aid in unraveling the history and dispersal of the mnxG gene within the Bacillus clade. PMID:18849460

  10. Molecular characterization of two human autoantigens: unique cDNAs encoding 95- and 160-kD proteins of a putative family in the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, M J; Hamel, J C; Ochs, R L; Chan, E K

    1993-07-01

    Serum autoantibodies from a patient with autoantibodies directed against the Golgi complex were used to screen clones from a HepG2 lambda Zap cDNA library. Three related clones, designated SY2, SY10, and SY11, encoding two distinct polypeptides were purified for further analysis. Antibodies affinity purified by adsorption to the lambda Zap-cloned recombinant proteins and antibodies from NZW rabbits immunized with purified recombinant proteins reproduced Golgi staining and bound two different proteins, 95 and 160 kD, from whole cell extracts. The SY11 protein was provisionally named golgin-95 and the SY2/SY10 protein was named golgin-160. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA clone of SY2 and SY11 represented 58.7- and 70-kD proteins of 568 and 620 amino acids. The in vitro translation products of SY2 and SY11 cDNAs migrated in SDS-PAGE at 65 and 95 kD, respectively. The in vitro translated proteins were immunoprecipitated by human anti-Golgi serum or immune rabbit serum, but not by normal human serum or preimmune rabbit serum. Features of the cDNA suggested that SY11 was a full-length clone encoding golgin-95 but SY2 and SY10 together encoded a partial sequence of golgin-160. Analysis of the SY11 recombinant protein identified a leucine zipper spanning positions 419-455, a glutamic acid-rich tract spanning positions 322-333, and a proline-rich tract spanning positions 67-73. A search of the SwissProt data bank indicated sequence similarity of SY11 to human restin, the heavy chain of kinesin, and the heavy chain of myosin. SY2 shared sequence similarity with the heavy chain of myosin, the USO1 transport protein from yeast, and the 150-kD cytoplasmic dynein-associated polypeptide. Sequence analysis demonstrated that golgin-95 and golgin-160 share 43% sequence similarity and, therefore, may be functionally related proteins. PMID:8315394

  11. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein/Apolipoprotein E receptor and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9pter-p23[sup 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gafvels, M.E.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Caird, M.; Patterson, D. ); Britt, D.; Jackson, C.L. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors report the cloning of a 3656-bp cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) receptor. The gene encoding this protein was mapped to chromosome 9pter-p23. Northern analysis of human RNA identified cognate mRNAs of 6.0 and 3.8 kb with most abundant expression in heart and skeletal muscle, followed by kidney, placenta, pancreas, and brain. The pattern of expression generally paralleled that of lipoprotein lipase mRNA but differed from that of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/[alpha][sub 2]-macroglobulin receptor (LRP), which are members of the same gene family. VLDL/ApoE receptor message was not detected in liver, whereas mRNAs for both LDL receptor and LRP were found in hepatic tissue. In mouse 3T3-L1 cells, VLDL/ApoE receptor mRNA was induced during the transformation of the cells into adipocytes. Expression was also detected in human choriocarcinoma cells, suggesting that at least part of the expression observed in placenta may be in trophoblasts, cells which would be exposed to maternal blood. Expression in brain may be related to high levels of ApoE expression in that organ, an observation of potential relevance to the recently hypothesized role for ApoE in late onset Alzheimer disease. The results suggest that the putative VLDL/ApoE receptor could play a role in the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles by specific organs including striated and cardiac muscle and adipose tissue and in the transport of maternal lipids across the placenta. The findings presented here, together with recent observations from other laboratories, bring up the possibility that a single gene, the VLDL/ApoE receptor, may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain forms of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and obesity.

  12. A mutation in the Cc.arp9 gene encoding a putative actin-related protein causes defects in fruiting initiation and asexual development in the agaricomycete Coprinopsis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Takehito; Ando, Yuki; Hata, Takeshi; Nakahori, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Agaricomycetes exhibit a remarkable morphological differentiation from vegetative mycelia to huge fruiting bodies. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the fruiting body development, we have isolated and characterized many Coprinopsis cinerea mutant strains defective in fruiting initiation to date. Dikaryon formation in agaricomycetes, which is followed by fruiting development, is governed by the mating type loci, A and B. Recently, mutations in the Cc.snf5 gene, which encodes a putative component of the chromatin remodeling complex switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF), were shown to cause defects in A-regulated clamp cell morphogenesis, as well as in fruiting initiation. Here, we demonstrate that Cc.arp9, which encodes a putative actin-related protein associated with two chromatin remodeling complexes, SWI/SNF and remodels the structure of chromatin (RSC), is also essential for fruiting initiation. In contrast to Cc.snf5 mutants, Cc.arp9 mutants were not defective in clamp cell formation. The effects of mutations in Cc.arp9 and Cc.snf5 on oidia production and the transcriptional expression levels of clp1 and pcc1, which are under the control of the A gene, were also examined. These indicated that Cc.Snf5 is involved in A-regulated pathways, whereas Cc.Arp9 is not apparently. Cc.arp9/Cc.snf5 double-gene disruptants were generated and their phenotypes were analyzed, which suggested a complicated developmental regulation mechanism mediated by chromatin remodeling. PMID:26746642

  13. Isolation and fine mapping of 16 novel human zinc finger-encoding cDNAs identify putative candidate genes for developmental and malignant disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Tommerup, N.; Vissing, H.

    1995-05-20

    The authors have isolated and chromosomally fine-mapped 16 novel genes belonging to the human zinc finger Krueppel family (ZNF131-140, 142, 143, 148, 151, 154, and 155), including 1 of the GLI type (ZNF143) and 3 containing a KRAB (Krueppel-associated box) segment (ZNF133, 136, and 140). Based on their map position, several of these ZNF genes are putative candidate genes for both developmental and malignant disorders: ZNF138, ZNF139, and ZNF143 were localized to 7q11.2, 7q21.3-q22.1, and 11p15.3-p15.4, regions involved in deletions and/or translocations associated with Williams syndrome, split hand and foot disease (SHFD1), and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, respectively. ZNF133 was localized to 20p11.2, close to, but probably distinct from, the region deleted in Alagille syndrome. Zinc finger genes mapping to regions commonly deleted in solid tumors included ZNF132, 134, 135, 137, 154, and 155, all located on 19q13 (thyroid adenoma), and ZNF151, at 1p36.1-p36.2 (neuroblastoma, colon cancer, and other tumors). In addition, several of the ZNFs mapped to regions implicated in recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in hematological malignancies (ZNF139, 7q21.3-q22.1; ZNF148, 3q21-q22; ZNF151, 1p36.1-p36.2). The study indicates that the number of ZNF genes in human is large and that systematic isolation and mapping of ZNF genes is a straightforward approach for the identification of novel candidate disease genes. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Functional characterization of the gene FoOCH1 encoding a putative α-1,6-mannosyltransferase in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Hui; Xie, Xiao-Ling; Lin, Xian-Feng; Shi, Jin-Xiu; Ding, Zhao-Jian; Ling, Jin-Feng; Xi, Ping-Gen; Zhou, Jia-Nuan; Leng, Yueqiang; Zhong, Shaobin; Jiang, Zi-De

    2014-04-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (FOC) is the causal agent of banana Fusarium wilt and has become one of the most destructive pathogens threatening the banana production worldwide. However, few genes related to morphogenesis and pathogenicity of this fungal pathogen have been functionally characterized. In this study, we identified and characterized the disrupted gene in a T-DNA insertional mutant (L953) of FOC with significantly reduced virulence on banana plants. The gene disrupted by T-DNA insertion in L953 harbors an open reading frame, which encodes a protein with homology to α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (OCH1) in fungi. The deletion mutants (ΔFoOCH1) of the OCH1 orthologue (FoOCH1) in FOC were impaired in fungal growth, exhibited brighter staining with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-Concanavalin A, had less cell wall proteins and secreted more proteins into liquid media than the wild type. Furthermore, the mutation or deletion of FoOCH1 led to loss of ability to penetrate cellophane membrane and decline in hyphal attachment and colonization as well as virulence to the banana host. The mutant phenotypes were fully restored by complementation with the wild type FoOCH1 gene. Our data provide a first evidence for the critical role of FoOCH1 in maintenance of cell wall integrity and virulence of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense. PMID:24503549

  15. The maize glossy13 gene, cloned via BSR-Seq and Seq-walking encodes a putative ABC transporter required for the normal accumulation of epicuticular waxes.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Li, Delin; Liu, Sanzhen; Ma, Xiaoli; Dietrich, Charles R; Hu, Heng-Cheng; Zhang, Gaisheng; Liu, Zhiyong; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Guoying; Schnable, Patrick S

    2013-01-01

    Aerial plant surfaces are covered by epicuticular waxes that among other purposes serve to control water loss. Maize glossy mutants originally identified by their "glossy" phenotypes exhibit alterations in the accumulation of epicuticular waxes. By combining data from a BSR-Seq experiment and the newly developed Seq-Walking technology, GRMZM2G118243 was identified as a strong candidate for being the glossy13 gene. The finding that multiple EMS-induced alleles contain premature stop codons in GRMZM2G118243, and the one knockout allele of gl13, validates the hypothesis that gene GRMZM2G118243 is gl13. Consistent with this, GRMZM2G118243 is an ortholog of AtABCG32 (Arabidopsis thaliana), HvABCG31 (barley) and OsABCG31 (rice), which encode ABCG subfamily transporters involved in the trans-membrane transport of various secondary metabolites. We therefore hypothesize that gl13 is involved in the transport of epicuticular waxes onto the surfaces of seedling leaves. PMID:24324772

  16. p190RhoGAP can act to inhibit PDGF-induced gliomas in mice: a putative tumor suppressor encoded on human Chromosome 19q13.3

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Rebecca M.; Draghi, Nicole; Liang, Xiquan; Dai, Chengkai; Uhrbom, Lene; Eklöf, Charlotta; Westermark, Bengt; Holland, Eric C.; Resh, Marilyn D.

    2003-01-01

    p190RhoGAP and Rho are key regulators of oligodendrocyte differentiation. The gene encoding p190RhoGAP is located at 19q13.3 of the human chromosome, a locus that is deleted in 50%–80% of oligodendrogliomas. Here we provide evidence that p190RhoGAP may suppress gliomagenesis by inducing a differentiated glial phenotype. Using a cell culture model of autocrine loop PDGF stimulation, we show that reduced Rho activity via p190RhoGAP overexpression or Rho kinase inhibition induced cellular process extension, a block in proliferation, and reduced expression of the neural precursor marker nestin. In vivo infection of mice with retrovirus expressing PDGF and the p190 GAP domain caused a decreased incidence of oligodendrogliomas compared with that observed with PDGF alone. Independent experiments revealed that the retroviral vector insertion site in 3 of 50 PDGF-induced gliomas was within the p190RhoGAP gene. This evidence strongly suggests that p190 regulates critical components of PDGF oncogenesis and can act as a tumor suppressor in PDGF-induced gliomas by down-regulating Rho activity. PMID:12600941

  17. Human TRMU encoding the mitochondrial 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase is a putative nuclear modifier gene for the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Qingfeng; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Li Ronghua; Mengesha, Emebet; Shohat, Mordechai; Estivill, Xavier; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-04-21

    Nuclear modifier genes have been proposed to modulate the phenotypic manifestation of human mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1491G mutation associated with deafness in many families world-wide. Here we identified and characterized the putative nuclear modifier gene TRMU encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial protein related to tRNA modification. A 1937 bp TRMU cDNA has been isolated and the genomic organization of TRMU has been elucidated. The human TRMU gene containing 11 exons encodes a 421 residue protein with a strong homology to the TRMU-like proteins of bacteria and other homologs. TRMU is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, but abundantly in tissues with high metabolic rates including heart, liver, kidney, and brain. Immunofluorescence analysis of human 143B cells expressing TRMU-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that the human Trmu localizes and functions in mitochondrion. Furthermore, we show that in families with the deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1491G mutation there is highly suggestive linkage and linkage disequilibrium between microsatellite markers adjacent to TRMU and the presence of deafness. These observations suggest that human TRMU may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

  18. Ectopic Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of an NB-ARC Encoding Putative Disease Resistance Gene from Wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata Enhances Resistance to Phytopathogenic Fungi and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yao, Liping; Wan, Ran; Li, Zhi; Liu, Chonghuai; Wang, Xiping

    2015-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins mediate pathogen recognition and activate innate immune responses to restrict pathogen proliferation. One common feature of these proteins is an NB-ARC domain. In this study, we characterized a gene encoding a protein with an NB-ARC domain from wild Chinese grapevine Vitis pseudoreticulata accession “Baihe-35-1,” which was identified in a transcriptome analysis of the leaves following inoculation with Erysiphe necator (Schw.), a causal agent of powdery mildew. Transcript levels of this gene, designated VpCN (GenBank accession number KT265084), increased strongly after challenge of grapevine leaves with E. necator. The deduced amino acid sequence was predicted to contain an NB-ARC domain in the C-terminus and an RxCC-like domain similar to CC domain of Rx protein in the N-terminus. Ectopic expression of VpCN in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in either a wild-type phenotype or a dwarf phenotype. The phenotypically normal transgenic A. thaliana showed enhance resistance to A. thaliana powdery mildew Golovinomyces cichoracearum, as well as to a virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Moreover, promoter::GUS (β-glucuronidase) analysis revealed that powdery mildew infection induced the promoter activity of VpCN in grapevine leaves. Finally, a promoter deletion analysis showed that TC rich repeat elements likely play an important role in the response to E. necator infection. Taken together, our results suggest that VpCN contribute to powdery mildew disease resistant in grapevine. PMID:26697041

  19. The SUD1 Gene Encodes a Putative E3 Ubiquitin Ligase and Is a Positive Regulator of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Doblas, Verónica G.; Amorim-Silva, Vítor; Posé, David; Rosado, Abel; Esteban, Alicia; Arró, Montserrat; Azevedo, Herlander; Bombarely, Aureliano; Borsani, Omar; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Ferrer, Albert; Tavares, Rui M.; Botella, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) enzyme catalyzes the major rate-limiting step of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway from which sterols and other isoprenoids are synthesized. In contrast with our extensive knowledge of the regulation of HMGR in yeast and animals, little is known about this process in plants. To identify regulatory components of the MVA pathway in plants, we performed a genetic screen for second-site suppressor mutations of the Arabidopsis thaliana highly drought-sensitive drought hypersensitive2 (dry2) mutant that shows decreased squalene epoxidase activity. We show that mutations in SUPPRESSOR OF DRY2 DEFECTS1 (SUD1) gene recover most developmental defects in dry2 through changes in HMGR activity. SUD1 encodes a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows sequence and structural similarity to yeast Degradation of α factor (Doα10) and human TEB4, components of the endoplasmic reticulum–associated degradation C (ERAD-C) pathway. While in yeast and animals, the alternative ERAD-L/ERAD-M pathway regulates HMGR activity by controlling protein stability, SUD1 regulates HMGR activity without apparent changes in protein content. These results highlight similarities, as well as important mechanistic differences, among the components involved in HMGR regulation in plants, yeast, and animals. PMID:23404890

  20. Expression of PIN and AUX1 genes encoding putative carrier proteins for auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls [correction of epicotyles] under simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional clinostat.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Hitotsubashi, Reiko; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Tanimoto, Eiichi; Ueda, Junichi

    2003-10-01

    Etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat showed automorphosis-like growth and development similar to that observed in true microgravity conditions in space. Application of inhibitors of auxin polar transport phenocopied automorphosis-like growth on 1 g conditions, suggesting that automorophosis is closely related to auxin polar transport. Strenuous efforts to know the relationships between automorphosis and auxin polar transport in pea seedlings at molecular bases resulted in successful identification of PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 encoding putative auxin efflux and influx carrier protein, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 and AtPINs, and between PsAUX1 and AtAUX1. Expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 genes in etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were substantially affected, but that of PsPIN2 was not. Roles of these genes in auxin polar transport and automorphosis of etiolated pea seedlings are also described. PMID:14676360

  1. The putative imprinted locus D15S9 within the common deletion region for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes encodes two overlapping mRNAs transcribed from opposite strands

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Driscoll, D.J.; Saitoh, S.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is typically caused by a deletion of paternal 15q11-q13, or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15, while Angelman syndrome is caused by a maternal deletion or paternal UPD of the same region. Therefore, these two clinically distinct neurobehavioral syndromes result from differential expression of imprinted genes within 15q11-q13. A 3.1 kb cDNA, DN34, from the D15S9 locus within 15q11-q13 was isolated from a human fetal brain library. We showed previously that DN34 probe detects a DNA methylation imprint and therefore may represent a candidate imprinted gene. Isolation of genomic clones and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the gene segment encoding the partial cDNA DN34 was split by a 2 kb intron, but did not encode a substantial open reading frame (ORF). Preliminary analysis of expression by RT-PCR suggests that this gene is expressed in fetal but not in tested tissue types from the adult, and thus its imprinting status has not been possible to assess at present. Surprisingly, we found an ORF on the antisense strand of the DN34 cDNA. This ORF encodes a putative polypeptide of 505 amino acid residues containing a RING C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc-finger motif and other features of nuclear proteins. Subsequent characterization of this gene, ZNF127, and a mouse homolog, demonstrated expression of 3.2 kb transcript from all tested fetal and adult tissues. Transcripts initiate from within a CpG-island, shown to be differentially methylated on parental alleles in the human. Interestingly, functional imprinting of the mouse homolog was subsequently demonstrated in an F{sub 1} cross by analyzing a VNTR polymorphism in the mRNA. The ZNF127 gene is intronless, has significant overlap with the DN34 gene on the antisense strand, and a 1 kb 3{prime} end within the 2 kb DN34 intron.

  2. Cloning and expression of a cell surface receptor for advanced glycosylation end products of proteins.

    PubMed

    Neeper, M; Schmidt, A M; Brett, J; Yan, S D; Wang, F; Pan, Y C; Elliston, K; Stern, D; Shaw, A

    1992-07-25

    Advanced glycosylation end products of proteins (AGEs) are nonenzymatically glycosylated proteins which accumulate in vascular tissue in aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. A approximately 35-kDa polypeptide with a unique NH2-terminal sequence has been isolated from bovine lung and found to be present on the surface of endothelial cells where it mediates the binding of AGEs (receptor for advanced glycosylation end product or RAGE). Using an oligonucleotide probe based on the amino-terminal sequence of RAGE, an apparently full-length cDNA of 1.5 kilobases was isolated from a bovine lung cDNA library. This cDNA encoded a 394 amino acid mature protein comprised of the following putative domains: an extracellular domain of 332 amino acids, a single hydrophobic membrane spanning domain of 19 amino acids, and a carboxyl-terminal domain of 43 amino acids. A partial clone encoding the human counterpart of RAGE, isolated from a human lung library, was found to be approximately 90% homologous to the bovine molecule. Based on computer analysis of the amino acid sequence of RAGE and comparison with databases, RAGE is a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules and shares significant homology with MUC 18, NCAM, and the cytoplasmic domain of CD20. Expression of the RAGE cDNA in 293 cells allowed them to bind 125I-AGE-albumin in a saturable and dose-dependent manner (Kd approximately 100 nM), blocked by antibody to RAGE. Western blots of 293 cells transfected with RAGE cDNA probed with anti-RAGE IgG demonstrated expression of immunoreactive protein compared to its absence in mock-transfected cells. These results suggest that RAGE functions as a cell surface receptor for AGEs, which could potentially mediate cellular effects of this class of glycosylated proteins. PMID:1378843

  3. An update on cell surface proteins containing extensin-motifs.

    PubMed

    Borassi, Cecilia; Sede, Ana R; Mecchia, Martin A; Salgado Salter, Juan D; Marzol, Eliana; Muschietti, Jorge P; Estevez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that there are several molecular links that interconnect the plant cell surface continuum, which is highly important in many biological processes such as plant growth, development, and interaction with the environment. The plant cell surface continuum can be defined as the space that contains and interlinks the cell wall, plasma membrane and cytoskeleton compartments. In this review, we provide an updated view of cell surface proteins that include modular domains with an extensin (EXT)-motif followed by a cytoplasmic kinase-like domain, known as PERKs (for proline-rich extensin-like receptor kinases); with an EXT-motif and an actin binding domain, known as formins; and with extracellular hybrid-EXTs. We focus our attention on the EXT-motifs with the short sequence Ser-Pro(3-5), which is found in several different protein contexts within the same extracellular space, highlighting a putative conserved structural and functional role. A closer understanding of the dynamic regulation of plant cell surface continuum and its relationship with the downstream signalling cascade is a crucial forthcoming challenge. PMID:26475923

  4. ENCODE data at the ENCODE portal.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Cricket A; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Malladi, Venkat S; Strattan, J Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T; Rowe, Laurence D; Dreszer, Timothy R; Roe, Greg; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Tanaka, Forrest; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is in its third phase of creating a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human genome. This phase of the project includes an expansion of assays that measure diverse RNA populations, identify proteins that interact with RNA and DNA, probe regions of DNA hypersensitivity, and measure levels of DNA methylation in a wide range of cell and tissue types to identify putative regulatory elements. To date, results for almost 5000 experiments have been released for use by the scientific community. These data are available for searching, visualization and download at the new ENCODE Portal (www.encodeproject.org). The revamped ENCODE Portal provides new ways to browse and search the ENCODE data based on the metadata that describe the assays as well as summaries of the assays that focus on data provenance. In addition, it is a flexible platform that allows integration of genomic data from multiple projects. The portal experience was designed to improve access to ENCODE data by relying on metadata that allow reusability and reproducibility of the experiments. PMID:26527727

  5. ENCODE data at the ENCODE portal

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Cricket A.; Chan, Esther T.; Davidson, Jean M.; Malladi, Venkat S.; Strattan, J. Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K.; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T.; Rowe, Laurence D.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Roe, Greg; Podduturi, Nikhil R.; Tanaka, Forrest; Hong, Eurie L.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is in its third phase of creating a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human genome. This phase of the project includes an expansion of assays that measure diverse RNA populations, identify proteins that interact with RNA and DNA, probe regions of DNA hypersensitivity, and measure levels of DNA methylation in a wide range of cell and tissue types to identify putative regulatory elements. To date, results for almost 5000 experiments have been released for use by the scientific community. These data are available for searching, visualization and download at the new ENCODE Portal (www.encodeproject.org). The revamped ENCODE Portal provides new ways to browse and search the ENCODE data based on the metadata that describe the assays as well as summaries of the assays that focus on data provenance. In addition, it is a flexible platform that allows integration of genomic data from multiple projects. The portal experience was designed to improve access to ENCODE data by relying on metadata that allow reusability and reproducibility of the experiments. PMID:26527727

  6. Diffusing colloidal probes of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-05-25

    Measurements and analyses are reported to quantify dynamic and equilibrium interactions between colloidal particles and live cell surfaces using dark field video microscopy. Two-dimensional trajectories of micron-sized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated silica colloids relative to adherent epithelial breast cancer cell perimeters are determined allowing measurement of position dependent diffusivities and interaction potentials. PEG was chosen as the material system of interest to assess non-specific interactions with cell surfaces and establishes a basis for investigation of specific interactions in future studies. Analysis of measured potential energies on cell surfaces reveals the spatial dependence in cell topography. With the measured cell topography and models for particle-cell surface hydrodynamic interactions, excellent agreement is obtained between theoretical and measured colloidal transport on cell surfaces. Quantitative analyses of association lifetimes showed that PEG coatings act to stabilize colloids above the cell surface through net repulsive, steric interactions. Our results demonstrate a self-consistent analysis of diffusing colloidal probe interactions due to conservative and non-conservative forces to characterize biophysical cell surface properties. PMID:27117575

  7. The molecular cloning and characterization of BM1P1 and BM1P2 proteins, putative positive transcription factors involved in barbiturate-mediated induction of the genes encoding cytochrome P450BM-1 of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    He, J S; Liang, Q; Fulco, A J

    1995-08-01

    Analysis of a 1.3-kilobase segment of 5'-flanking DNA from the barbiturate-inducible P450BM-1 gene (CYP106) of Bacillus megaterium revealed two open reading frames. One, BM1P1, encodes 98 amino acids and is located 267 base pairs upstream from the sequence encoding cytochrome P450BM-1 but in the opposite orientation. The second, BM1P2 (88 amino acids), is 892 base pairs upstream from the P450BM-1 coding sequence and in the same coding strand. The expression of BM1P1 and BM1P2 was strongly stimulated in cells grown in the presence of pentobarbital, and the BM1P1 gene product exerted positive control on expression of P450BM-1. When a 177-base pair fragment encompassing the overlapping promoter regions of the P450BM-1 and BM1P1 genes was used as a probe in DNA binding assays, the BM1P1 and BM1P2 gene products and Bm3R1 (the repressor protein regulating the barbiturate-mediated expression of P450BM-3) could bind individually, but the addition of BM1P1 or BM1P2 to a binding mixture containing Bm3R1 completely prevented the appearance of a Bm3R1 binding band. When a 208-base pair fragment containing a Barbie box sequence and located upstream of the 177-base pair fragment was used as a probe, only a Bm3R1 binding band was detected. Although neither BM1P1 and BM1P2 appeared to bind to this 208-base pair fragment, their presence strongly inhibited the binding of Bm3R1 to the same probe. The evidence suggests that BM1P1 and BM1P2 may, in part, act as positive regulatory proteins involved in the expression of the P450BM-1 gene by interfering with the binding of the repressor protein, Bm3R1, to the regulatory regions of P450BM-1. PMID:7629192

  8. Characterization of the lacticin 481 operon: the Lactococcus lactis genes lctF, lctE, and lctG encode a putative ABC transporter involved in bacteriocin immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Rincé, A; Dufour, A; Uguen, P; Le Pennec, J P; Haras, D

    1997-01-01

    The lantibiotic lacticin 481 is a bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis strains. The genetic determinants of lacticin 481 production are organized as an operon encoded by a 70-kb plasmid. We previously reported the first three genes of this operon, lctA, lctM, and lctT, which are involved in the bacteriocin biosynthesis and export (A. Rincé, A. Dufour, S. Le Pogam, D. Thuault, C. M. Bourgeois, and J.-P. Le Pennec, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 60:1652-1657, 1994). The operon contains three additional open reading frames: lctF, lctE, and lctG. The hydrophobicity profiles and sequence similarities strongly suggest that the three gene products associate to form an ABC transporter. When the three genes were coexpressed into a lacticin 481-sensitive L. lactis strain, the strain became resistant to the bacteriocin. This protection could not be obtained when any of the three genes was deleted, confirming that lctF, lctE, and lctG are all necessary to provide immunity to lacticin 481. The quantification of the levels of immunity showed that lctF, lctE, and lctG could account for at least 6% and up to 100% of the immunity of the wild-type lacticin 481 producer strain, depending on the gene expression regulation. The lacticin 481 biosynthesis and immunity systems are discussed and compared to other lantibiotic systems. PMID:9361411

  9. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal inhibits expression of the glucose transporter genes by inactivating the cell surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Adhiraj; Hashmi, Salman; Li, Zerui; Dement, Angela D.; Hong Cho, Kyu; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a cytotoxic by-product of glycolysis. MG has inhibitory effect on the growth of cells ranging from microorganisms to higher eukaryotes, but its molecular targets are largely unknown. The yeast cell-surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 function as glucose receptors that sense extracellular glucose and generate a signal for induction of expression of genes encoding glucose transporters (HXTs). Here we provide evidence that these glucose sensors are primary targets of MG in yeast. MG inhibits the growth of glucose-fermenting yeast cells by inducing endocytosis and degradation of the glucose sensors. However, the glucose sensors with mutations at their putative ubiquitin-acceptor lysine residues are resistant to MG-induced degradation. These results suggest that the glucose sensors are inactivated through ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degraded in the presence of MG. In addition, the inhibitory effect of MG on the glucose sensors is greatly enhanced in cells lacking Glo1, a key component of the MG detoxification system. Thus the stability of these glucose sensors seems to be critically regulated by intracellular MG levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that MG attenuates glycolysis by promoting degradation of the cell-surface glucose sensors and thus identify MG as a potential glycolytic inhibitor. PMID:26764094

  10. Cell surface localization and processing of the ComG proteins, required for DNA binding during transformation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y S; Breidt, F; Dubnau, D

    1998-08-01

    The comG operon of Bacillus subtilis encodes seven proteins essential for the binding of transforming DNA to the competent cell surface. We have explored the processing of the ComG proteins and the cellular localization of six of them. All of the proteins were found to be membrane associated. The four proteins with N-terminal sequence motifs typical of type 4 pre-pilins (ComGC, GD, GE and GG) are processed by a pathway that requires the product of comC, also an essential competence gene. The unprocessed forms of ComGC and GD behave like integral membrane proteins. Pre-ComGG differs from pre-ComGC and pre-ComGD, in that it is accessible to proteolysis only from the cytoplasmic face of the membrane and at least a portion of it behaves like a peripheral membrane protein. The mature forms of these proteins are translocated to the outer face of the membrane and are liberated when peptidoglycan is hydrolysed by lysozyme or mutanolysin. ComGG exists in part as a disulphide-cross-linked homodimer in vivo. ComGC was found to possess an intramolecular disulphide bond. The previously identified homodimer form of this protein is not stabilized by disulphide bond formation. ComGF behaves as an integral membrane protein, while ComGA, a putative ATPase, is located on the inner face of the membrane as a peripheral membrane protein. Possible roles of the ComG proteins in DNA binding to the competent cell surface are discussed in the light of these and other results. PMID:9723928

  11. Messenger RNAs encoding the beta subunits of guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) luteinizing hormone (gpLH) and putative chorionic gonadotropin (gpCG) are transcribed from a single-copy gpLH/CGbeta gene.

    PubMed

    Sherman, G B; Heilman, D F; Hoss, A J; Bunick, D; Lund, L A

    2001-06-01

    Neither gene locus nor gene sequence characterizations have been reported for the beta subunits of guinea pig (gp) LH and putative gp chorionic gonadotropin (CG). Descriptions of this locus would allow comparison with functionally relevant molecular genetic features of other species' homologous loci including the single-copy equid LH/CGbeta gene and the primate LHbeta-CGbeta gene cluster locus. Contiguous cDNA and genomic DNA fragments spanning the entire mature coding sequence of gpLHbeta mRNA, gpCGbeta mRNA and a homologous gpLH/CGbeta gene were amplified using PCR methodologies. With the exception of one silent mutation, the two cDNA and the genomic sequences were identical where they overlapped. Comparison of guinea pig coding sequence with LHbeta, CGbeta and LH/CGbeta sequences of other vertebrate species revealed the following order of similarity expressed as per cent coding sequence identity: rhinoceros LHbeta (83.6%)>pig LHbeta (81.8%)>donkey LH/CGbeta=bovine LHbeta (81.5%)> horse LH/CGbeta (80.6%)>dog LHbeta (79.7%)>human LHbeta (78.2%)>rat LHbeta (77.9%)>human CGbeta (75.8%)>turkey LHbeta (52.7%); values that are generally consistent with recently postulated phylogenetic relationships. Like the consensus mammalian LHbeta gene, the 5'-flanking region of the gpLH/CGbeta gene contains a single TATA sequence 37 bp upstream of the translation start codon. The first in-frame stop codon occurred at codon position +122 which is consistent with the 121 amino acid residue length of the consensus mammalian mature LHbeta peptide. To estimate gene copy number, full-length gpLHbeta cDNA was radiolabeled and hybridized to Southern blots of guinea pig genomic DNA digested with a panel of six restriction endonucleases. The resulting simple hybridization pattern strongly suggested that there is a single-copy gpLH/CGbeta gene. Northern analysis of total pituitary RNA using the same probe indicated that gpLHbeta transcript size is indistinguishable from that of consensus

  12. A testis-specific gene, TPTE, encodes a putative transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase and maps to the pericentromeric region of human chromosomes 21 and 13, and to chromosomes 15, 22, and Y.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Rossier, C; Morris, M A; Scott, H S; Gos, A; Bairoch, A; Antonarakis, S E

    1999-11-01

    To contribute to the creation of a transcription map of human chromosome 21 (HC21) and to the identification of genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, exon trapping was performed from HC21-specific cosmids covering the entire chromosome. More than 700 exons have been identified to date. One such exon, hmc01a06, maps to YAC 831B6 which contains marker D21Z1 (alphoid repeats) and had previously been localized to the pericentromeric region of HC21. Northern-blot analysis revealed a 2.5-kb mRNA species strongly and exclusively expressed in the testis. We cloned the corresponding full-length cDNA, which encodes a predicted polypeptide of 551 amino acids with at least two potential transmembrane domains and a tyrosine phosphatase motif. The cDNA has sequence homology to chicken tensin, bovine auxilin and rat cyclin-G associated kinase (GAK). The entire polypeptide sequence also has significant homology to tumor suppressor PTEN/MMAC1 protein. We termed this novel gene/protein TPTE (transmembrane phosphatase with tensin homology). Polymerase chain reaction amplification, fluorescent in situ hybridization, Southern-blot and sequence analysis using monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids showed that this gene has highly homologous copies on HC13, 15, 22, and Y, in addition to its HC21 copy or copies. The estimated minimum number of copies of the TPTE gene in the haploid human genome is 7 in male and 6 in female. Zoo-blot analysis showed that TPTE is conserved between humans and other species. The biological function of the TPTE gene is presently unknown; however, its expression pattern, sequence homologies, and the presence of a potential tyrosine phosphatase domain suggest that it may be involved in signal transduction pathways of the endocrine or spermatogenetic function of the testis. It is also unknown whether all copies of TPTE are functional or whether some are pseudogenes. TPTE is, to our knowledge, the gene located closest to the human

  13. A lectin chromatography/mass spectrometry discovery workflow identifies putative biomarkers of aggressive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Penelope M.; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K.; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Li, Bensheng; Jung, Kwanyoung; Cho, Wonryeon; Braten, Miles; Inerowicz, Halina D.; Williams, Katherine; Albertolle, Matthew; Held, Jason M.; Iacovides, Demetris; Sorensen, Dylan J.; Griffith, Obi L.; Johansen, Eric; Zawadzka, Anna M.; Cusack, Michael P.; Allen, Simon; Gormley, Matthew; Hall, Steven C.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Gray, Joe W.; Regnier, Fred; Gibson, Bradford W.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    We used a lectin chromatography/MS-based approach to screen conditioned medium from a panel of luminal (less aggressive) and triple negative (more aggressive) breast cancer cell lines (n = 5/subtype). The samples were fractionated using the lectins Aleuria aurantia (AAL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), which recognize fucose and sialic acid, respectively. The bound fractions were enzymatically N-deglycosylated and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, we identified 533 glycoproteins, ~90% of which were components of the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We observed 1011 glycosites, 100 of which were solely detected in ≥3 triple negative lines. Statistical analyses suggested that a number of these glycosites were triple negative-specific and thus potential biomarkers for this tumor subtype. An analysis of RNAseq data revealed that approximately half of the mRNAs encoding the protein scaffolds that carried potential biomarker glycosites were upregulated in triple negative vs. luminal cell lines, and that a number of genes encoding fucosyl- or sialyltransferases were differentially expressed between the two subtypes, suggesting that alterations in glycosylation may also drive candidate identification. Notably, the glycoproteins from which these putative biomarker candidates were derived are involved in cancer-related processes. Thus, they may represent novel therapeutic targets for this aggressive tumor subtype. PMID:22309216

  14. Cell Surface Relocalization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone and Unfolded Protein Response Regulator GRP78/BiP*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Ren; Ni, Min; Gill, Parkash; Lee, Amy S.

    2010-01-01

    The recent discovery that GRP78/BiP, a typical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumenal chaperone, can be expressed on the cell surface, interacting with an increasing repertoire of surface proteins and acting as receptor in signaling pathways, represents a paradigm shift in its biological function. However, the mechanism of GRP78 trafficking from the ER to the cell surface is not well understood. Using a combination of cellular, biochemical, and mutational approaches, we tested multiple hypotheses. Here we report that ER stress actively promotes GRP78 localization on the cell surface, whereas ectopic expression of GRP78 is also able to cause cell surface relocation in the absence of ER stress. Moreover, deletion of the C-terminal ER retention motif in GRP78 alters its cell surface presentation in a dose-dependent manner; however, mutation of the putative O-linked glycosylation site Thr648 of human GRP78 is without effect. We also identified the exposure of multiple domains of GRP78 on the cell surface and determined that binding of extracellular GRP78 to the cell surface is unlikely. A new topology model for cell surface GRP78 is presented. PMID:20208072

  15. Bacteriophage-encoded depolymerases: their diversity and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Pires, Diana P; Oliveira, Hugo; Melo, Luís D R; Sillankorva, Sanna; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), natural enemies of bacteria, can encode enzymes able to degrade polymeric substances. These substances can be found in the bacterial cell surface, such as polysaccharides, or are produced by bacteria when they are living in biofilm communities, the most common bacterial lifestyle. Consequently, phages with depolymerase activity have a facilitated access to the host receptors, by degrading the capsular polysaccharides, and are believed to have a better performance against bacterial biofilms, since the degradation of extracellular polymeric substances by depolymerases might facilitate the access of phages to the cells within different biofilm layers. Since the diversity of phage depolymerases is not yet fully explored, this is the first review gathering information about all the depolymerases encoded by fully sequenced phages. Overall, in this study, 160 putative depolymerases, including sialidases, levanases, xylosidases, dextranases, hyaluronidases, peptidases as well as pectate/pectin lyases, were found in 143 phages (43 Myoviridae, 47 Siphoviridae, 37 Podoviridae, and 16 unclassified) infecting 24 genera of bacteria. We further provide information about the main applications of phage depolymerases, which can comprise areas as diverse as medical, chemical, or food-processing industry. PMID:26767986

  16. Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Nagata, S; Suzuki, J; Segawa, K; Fujii, T

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) is a phospholipid that is abundant in eukaryotic plasma membranes. An ATP-dependent enzyme called flippase normally keeps PtdSer inside the cell, but PtdSer is exposed by the action of scramblase on the cell's surface in biological processes such as apoptosis and platelet activation. Once exposed to the cell surface, PtdSer acts as an 'eat me' signal on dead cells, and creates a scaffold for blood-clotting factors on activated platelets. The molecular identities of the flippase and scramblase that work at plasma membranes have long eluded researchers. Indeed, their identity as well as the mechanism of the PtdSer exposure to the cell surface has only recently been revealed. Here, we describe how PtdSer is exposed in apoptotic cells and in activated platelets, and discuss PtdSer exposure in other biological processes. PMID:26891692

  17. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-07-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  18. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  19. The yeast SNF3 gene encodes a glucose transporter homologous to the mammalian protein.

    PubMed Central

    Celenza, J L; Marshall-Carlson, L; Carlson, M

    1988-01-01

    The SNF3 gene is required for high-affinity glucose transport in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has also been implicated in control of gene expression by glucose repression. We report here the nucleotide sequence of the cloned SNF3 gene. The predicted amino acid sequence shows that SNF3 encodes a 97-kilodalton protein that is homologous to mammalian glucose transporters and has 12 putative membrane-spanning regions. We also show that a functional SNF3-lacZ gene-fusion product cofractionates with membrane proteins and is localized to the cell surface, as judged by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Expression of the fusion protein is regulated by glucose repression. Images PMID:3281163

  20. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  1. Encoding Dictionaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Describes problems in devising a Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) encoding format for dictionaries. Asserts that the high degree of structuring and compression of information are among the most complex text types treated in the TEI. Concludes that the source of some TEI problems lies in the design of Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML). (CFR)

  2. Large Scale Identification of Genes Involved in Cell Surface Biosynthesis and Architecture in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, M.; White, A. M.; Sheraton, J.; di-Paolo, T.; Treadwell, J.; Southard, S. B.; Horenstein, C. I.; Chen-Weiner, J.; Ram, AFJ.; Kapteyn, J. C.; Roemer, T. W.; Vo, D. H.; Bondoc, D. C.; Hall, J.; Wei Zhong, W.; Sdicu, A. M.; Davies, J.; Klis, F. M.; Robbins, P. W.; Bussey, H.

    1997-01-01

    The sequenced yeast genome offers a unique resource for the analysis of eukaryotic cell function and enables genome-wide screens for genes involved in cellular processes. We have identified genes involved in cell surface assembly by screening transposon-mutagenized cells for altered sensitivity to calcofluor white, followed by supplementary screens to further characterize mutant phenotypes. The mutated genes were directly retrieved from genomic DNA and then matched uniquely to a gene in the yeast genome database. Eighty-two genes with apparent perturbation of the cell surface were identified, with mutations in 65 of them displaying at least one further cell surface phenotype in addition to their modified sensitivity to calcofluor. Fifty of these genes were previously known, 17 encoded proteins whose function could be anticipated through sequence homology or previously recognized phenotypes and 15 genes had no previously known phenotype. PMID:9335584

  3. Phenotypic and functional changes in peripheral blood monocytes during progression of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Effects of soluble immune complexes, cytokines, subcellular particulates from apoptotic cells, and HIV-1-encoded proteins on monocytes phagocytic function, oxidative burst, transendothelial migration, and cell surface phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Trial, J; Birdsall, H H; Hallum, J A; Crane, M L; Rodriguez-Barradas, M C; de Jong, A L; Krishnan, B; Lacke, C E; Figdor, C G; Rossen, R D

    1995-01-01

    We postulated that changes in the cell surface display of molecules that facilitate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions may reflect the changing immunosurveillance capacity of blood monocytes during progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. In Centers for Disease Control (CDC) stage A patients, whose monocytes' ability to phagocytose bacteria and generate reactive oxygen intermediates is often increased, the frequency of monocytes expressing CD49d, HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and an activation epitope of CD11a/CD18 was increased and monocyte transendothelial migration was unimpaired. In CDC stage B/C patients, whose monocytes' ability to phagocytose bacteria and migrate across confluent endothelial monolayers was diminished, surface expression of CD49e and CD62L and the percentage of monocytes expressing CD18, CD11a, CD29, CD49e, CD54, CD58, CD31, and HLA-I were significantly decreased. Incubating normal donor monocytes with immune complexes in vitro reproduced the phenotypic and functional abnormalities seen in stage B/C patients. By contrast, in vitro stimulation with subcellular particulates released by apoptotic lymphocytes reproduced changes seen in stage A patients' monocytes. Although circulating monocytes appear to be activated at all stages, these data suggest that the high levels of circulating immune complexes, found predominantly in the later stages of HIV infection, may be particularly instrumental in reducing the monocyte's capacity to maintain surveillance against infection. Images PMID:7706478

  4. MP1 encodes an abundant and highly antigenic cell wall mannoprotein in the pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Chan, C M; Lee, C; Wong, S S; Yuen, K Y

    1998-03-01

    We cloned the MP1 gene, which encodes an abundant antigenic cell wall mannoprotein from the dimorphic pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei. MP1 is a unique gene without homologs in sequence databases. It codes for a protein, Mp1p, of 462 amino acid residues, with a few sequence features that are present in several cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. It contains two putative N glycosylation sites, a serine- and threonine-rich region for O glycosylation, a signal peptide, and a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol attachment signal sequence. Specific anti-Mp1p antibody was generated with recombinant Mp1p protein purified from Escherichia coli to allow further characterization of Mp1p. Western blot analysis with anti-Mp1p antibody revealed that Mp1p has predominant bands with molecular masses of 58 and 90 kDa and that it belongs to a group of cell wall proteins that can be readily removed from yeast cell surfaces by glucanase digestion. In addition, Mp1p is an abundant yeast glycoprotein and has high affinity for concanavalin A, a characteristic indicative of a mannoprotein. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis with immunogold staining indicated that Mp1p is present in the cell walls of the yeast, hyphae, and conidia of P. marneffei. Finally, it was observed that infected patients develop a specific antibody response against Mp1p, suggesting that this protein represents a good cell surface target for host humoral immunity. PMID:9488383

  5. Cell Surface Analysis Techniques: What Do Cell Preparation Protocols Do to Cell Surface Properties?

    PubMed Central

    Pembrey, Richard S.; Marshall, Kevin C.; Schneider, René P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell surface analysis often requires manipulation of cells prior to examination. The most commonly employed procedures are centrifugation at different speeds, changes of media during washing or final resuspension, desiccation (either air drying for contact angle measurements or freeze-drying for sensitive spectroscopic analysis, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), and contact with hydrocarbon (hydrophobicity assays). The effects of these procedures on electrophoretic mobility, adhesion to solid substrata, affinity to a number of Sepharose columns, structural integrity, and cell viability were systematically investigated for a range of model organisms, including carbon- and nitrogen-limited Psychrobacter sp. strain SW8 (glycocalyx-bearing cells), Escherichia coli (gram-negative cells without a glycocalyx), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (gram-positive cells without a glycocalyx). All of the cell manipulation procedures severely modified the physicochemical properties of cells, but with each procedure some organisms were more susceptible than others. Considerable disruption of cell surfaces occurred when organisms were placed in contact with a hydrocarbon (hexadecane). The majority of cells became nonculturable after air drying and freeze-drying. Centrifugation at a high speed (15,000 × g) modified many cell surface parameters significantly, although cell viability was considerably affected only in E. coli. The type of washing or resuspension medium had a strong influence on the values of cell surface parameters, particularly when high-salt solutions were compared with low-salt buffers. The values for parameters obtained with different methods that allegedly measure similar cell surface properties did not correlate for most cells. These results demonstrate that the methods used to prepare cells for cell surface analysis need to be critically investigated for each microorganism so that the final results obtained reflect the nature of the in situ microbial cell

  6. Multilocus analysis of extracellular putative virulence proteins made by group A Streptococcus: population genetics, human serologic response, and gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Reid, S D; Green, N M; Buss, J K; Lei, B; Musser, J M

    2001-06-19

    Species of pathogenic microbes are composed of an array of evolutionarily distinct chromosomal genotypes characterized by diversity in gene content and sequence (allelic variation). The occurrence of substantial genetic diversity has hindered progress in developing a comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of virulence and new therapeutics such as vaccines. To provide new information that bears on these issues, 11 genes encoding extracellular proteins in the human bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus identified by analysis of four genomes were studied. Eight of the 11 genes encode proteins with a LPXTG(L) motif that covalently links Gram-positive virulence factors to the bacterial cell surface. Sequence analysis of the 11 genes in 37 geographically and phylogenetically diverse group A Streptococcus strains cultured from patients with different infection types found that recent horizontal gene transfer has contributed substantially to chromosomal diversity. Regions of the inferred proteins likely to interact with the host were identified by molecular population genetic analysis, and Western immunoblot analysis with sera from infected patients confirmed that they were antigenic. Real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (TaqMan) assays found that transcription of six of the 11 genes was substantially up-regulated in the stationary phase. In addition, transcription of many genes was influenced by the covR and mga trans-acting gene regulatory loci. Multilocus investigation of putative virulence genes by the integrated approach described herein provides an important strategy to aid microbial pathogenesis research and rapidly identify new targets for therapeutics research. PMID:11416223

  7. Adhesion properties of a putative polymorphic fimbrial subunit protein from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenta; Nishiyama, Keita; Miyajima, Hiroki; Osawa, Ro; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that the open reading frame bl0675 in the genome of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum isolated from human feces encoded a novel putative fimbrial protein, was highly polymorphic, and had five variants (A, B, C, D, and E types). The aim of this study was to evaluate the affinity of these variants to porcine colonic mucins (PCMs). Protein-binding properties were examined using the recombinant BL0675 protein containing a C-terminal 6 × His tag (His-BL0675). Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that the His-BL0675 A type had strong affinity to PCMs (KD = 9.82 × 10(-8) M), whereas the B, C, D, and E types exhibited little or no binding. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, His-BL0675 A type binding was reduced by addition of mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting that the binding occurs via carbohydrate chains of PCMs. The localization of BL0675 to the B. longum subsp. longum cell surface was confirmed by western blot analysis using A type polyclonal antibodies. Bacterial adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum to PCMs was also blocked by A type-specific antibodies; however, its adhesion properties were strain specific. Our results suggest that the BL0675 variants significantly contribute to the adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum strains. The expression and the adhesive properties of this protein are affected by genetic polymorphisms and are specific for B. longum subsp. longum strains. However, further studies are required on the properties of binding of these putative fimbrial proteins to the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26858927

  8. Adhesion properties of a putative polymorphic fimbrial subunit protein from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Kenta; NISHIYAMA, Keita; MIYAJIMA, Hiroki; OSAWA, Ro; YAMAMOTO, Yuji; MUKAI, Takao

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that the open reading frame bl0675 in the genome of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum isolated from human feces encoded a novel putative fimbrial protein, was highly polymorphic, and had five variants (A, B, C, D, and E types). The aim of this study was to evaluate the affinity of these variants to porcine colonic mucins (PCMs). Protein-binding properties were examined using the recombinant BL0675 protein containing a C-terminal 6 × His tag (His-BL0675). Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that the His-BL0675 A type had strong affinity to PCMs (KD = 9.82 × 10−8 M), whereas the B, C, D, and E types exhibited little or no binding. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, His-BL0675 A type binding was reduced by addition of mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting that the binding occurs via carbohydrate chains of PCMs. The localization of BL0675 to the B. longum subsp. longum cell surface was confirmed by western blot analysis using A type polyclonal antibodies. Bacterial adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum to PCMs was also blocked by A type-specific antibodies; however, its adhesion properties were strain specific. Our results suggest that the BL0675 variants significantly contribute to the adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum strains. The expression and the adhesive properties of this protein are affected by genetic polymorphisms and are specific for B. longum subsp. longum strains. However, further studies are required on the properties of binding of these putative fimbrial proteins to the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26858927

  9. Deciphering ENCODE.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Adam G; Boyle, Alan P

    2016-04-01

    The ENCODE project represents a major leap from merely describing and comparing genomic sequences to surveying them for direct indicators of function. The astounding quantity of data produced by the ENCODE consortium can serve as a map to locate specific landmarks, guide hypothesis generation, and lead us to principles and mechanisms underlying genome biology. Despite its broad appeal, the size and complexity of the repository can be intimidating to prospective users. We present here some background about the ENCODE data, survey the resources available for accessing them, and describe a few simple principles to help prospective users choose the data type(s) that best suit their needs, where to get them, and how to use them to their best advantage. PMID:26962025

  10. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  11. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities. PMID:27098435

  12. A secreted form of the human lymphocyte cell surface molecule CD8 arises from alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Giblin, P.; Kavathas, P. ); Ledbetter, J.A. )

    1989-02-01

    The human lymphocyte differentiation antigen CD8 is encoded by a single gene that gives rise to a 33- to 34-kDa glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface as a dimer and in higher molecular mass forms. The authors demonstrate that the mRNA is alternatively spliced so that an exon encoding a transmembrane domain is deleted. This gives rise to a 30-kDa molecule that is secreted and exists primarily as a monomer. mRNA corresponding to both forms is present in peripheral blood lymphocytes, Con A-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, and three CD8{sup +} T-cell lines, with the membrane form being the major species. However, differences in the ratio of mRNA for membrane CD8 and secreted CD8 exist. In addition, the splicing pattern observed differs from the pattern found for the mouse CD8 gene. This mRNA is also alternatively spliced, but an exon encoding a cytoplasmic region is deleted, giving rise to a cell surface molecule that differs in its cytoplasmic tail from the protein encoded by the longer mRNA. Neither protein is secreted. This is one of the first examples of a different splicing pattern between two homologous mouse and human genes giving rise to very different proteins. This represents one mechanism of generating diversity during speciation.

  13. Biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John Tanner

    Islet transplantation has emerged as a promising cell-based therapy for the treatment of diabetes, but its clinical efficacy remains limited by deleterious host responses that underlie islet destruction. In this dissertation, we describe the assembly of ultrathin conformal coatings that confer molecular-level control over the composition and biophysicochemical properties of the islet surface with implications for improving islet engraftment. Significantly, this work provides novel biomolecular strategies for cell surface engineering with broad biomedical and biotechnological applications in cell-based therapeutics and beyond. Encapsulation of cells and tissue offers a rational approach for attenuating deleterious host responses towards transplanted cells, but a need exists to develop cell encapsulation strategies that minimize transplant volume. Towards this end, we endeavored to generate nanothin films of diverse architecture with tunable properties on the extracellular surface of individual pancreatic islets through a process of layer-by-layer (LbL) self assembly. We first describe the formation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-rich conformal coatings on islets via LbL self assembly of poly(L-lysine)-g-PEG(biotin) and streptavidin. Multilayer thin films conformed to the geometrically and chemically heterogeneous islet surface, and could be assembled without loss of islet viability or function. Significantly, coated islets performed comparably to untreated controls in a murine model of allogenic intraportal islet transplantation, and, to our knowledge, this is the first study to report in vivo survival and function of nanoencapsulated cells or cell aggregates. Based on these findings, we next postulated that structurally similar PLL-g-PEG copolymers comprised of shorter PEG grafts might be used to initiate and propagate the assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films on pancreatic islets, while simultaneously preserving islet viability. Through control of PLL

  14. Specificity of human galectins on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, E M; Bovin, N V

    2015-07-01

    Galectins are β-galactoside-binding proteins sharing homology in amino acid sequence of their carbohydrate-recognition domain. Their carbohydrate specificity outside cells has been studied previously. The main conclusion of these studies was that several levels of glycan ligand recognition exist for galectins: (i) disaccharide Galβ1-4GlcNAc (LN, N-acetyllactosamine) binds stronger than β-galactopyranose; (ii) substitution at O-2 and O-3 of galactose residue as well as core fragments ("right" from GlcNAc) provides significant increase in affinity; (iii) similarly glycosylated proteins can differ significantly in affinity to galectins. Information about the natural cellular receptors of galectins is limited. Until recently, it was impossible to study specificity of cell-bound galectins. A model based on controlled incorporation of a single protein into glycocalyx of cells and subsequent interaction of loaded cells with synthetic glycoprobes measured by flow cytometry made this possible recently. In this review, data about glycan specificity of proto-, chimera-, and tandem-repeat type galectins on the cell surface are systematized, and comparative analysis of the results with data on specificity of galectins in artificial systems was performed. The following conclusions from these studies were made: (i) cellular galectins have practically no ability to bind disaccharide LNn, but display affinity to 3'-substituted oligolactosamines and oligomers LNn; (ii) tandem-repeat type galectins recognize another disaccharide, namely Galβ1-3GlcNAc (Le(c)); (iii) on the cell surface, tandem-repeat type galectins conserve the ability to display high affinity to blood group antigens of ABH system; (iv) in general, when galectins are immersed into glycocalyx, they are more selective regarding glycan interactions. Thus, we conclude that competitive interaction of galectins with cell microenvironment (endogenous cell glycans) is the main factor providing selectivity of galectins in

  15. TgaA, a VirB1-Like Component Belonging to a Putative Type IV Secretion System of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75

    PubMed Central

    Balzaretti, Silvia; Taverniti, Valentina; Miriani, Matteo; Milani, Christian; Scarafoni, Alessio; Corona, Silvia; Ciranna, Alessandro; Arioli, Stefania; Santala, Ville; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Ventura, Marco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 is a human intestinal isolate demonstrated to be interactive with the host and efficacious as a probiotic. However, the molecular biology of this microorganism is yet largely unknown. For this reason, we undertook whole-genome sequencing of B. bifidum MIMBb75 to identify potential genetic factors that would explain the metabolic and probiotic attributes of this bacterium. Comparative genomic analysis revealed a 45-kb chromosomal region that comprises 19 putative genes coding for a potential type IV secretion system (T4SS). Thus, we undertook the initial characterization of this genetic region by studying the putative virB1-like gene, named tgaA. Gene tgaA encodes a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT, cd00254.3) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP, pfam05257.4). By means of several in vitro assays, we experimentally confirmed that protein TgaA, consistent with its computationally assigned role, has peptidoglycan lytic activity, which is principally associated to the LT domain. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling showed that the protein TgaA is abundantly expressed on the cell surface of B. bifidum MIMBb75. According to the literature, the T4SSs, which have not been characterized before in bifidobacteria, can have important implications for bacterial cell-to-cell communication as well as cross talk with host cells, justifying the interest for further studies aimed at the investigation of this genetic region. PMID:24951779

  16. Cell Surface Markers in Colorectal Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Larissa; Zhou, Jerry; Christopherson, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    The classification of colorectal cancers (CRC) is currently based largely on histologically determined tumour characteristics, such as differentiation status and tumour stage, i.e., depth of tumour invasion, involvement of regional lymph nodes and the occurrence of metastatic spread to other organs. These are the conventional prognostic factors for patient survival and often determine the requirement for adjuvant therapy after surgical resection of the primary tumour. However, patients with the same CRC stage can have very different disease-related outcomes. For some, surgical removal of early-stage tumours leads to full recovery, while for others, disease recurrence and metastasis may occur regardless of adjuvant therapy. It is therefore important to understand the molecular processes that lead to disease progression and metastasis and to find more reliable prognostic markers and novel targets for therapy. This review focuses on cell surface proteins that correlate with tumour progression, metastasis and patient outcome, and discusses some of the challenges in finding prognostic protein markers in CRC. PMID:21339979

  17. Glycopeptide Capture for Cell Surface Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. C. Gilbert; Sun, Bingyun

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, participate in all major cellular processes and functions, such as growth, differentiation, and proliferation. A comprehensive characterization of these proteins provides rich information for biomarker discovery, cell-type identification, and drug-target selection, as well as helping to advance our understanding of cellular biology and physiology. Surface proteins, however, pose significant analytical challenges, because of their inherently low abundance, high hydrophobicity, and heavy post-translational modifications. Taking advantage of the prevalent glycosylation on surface proteins, we introduce here a high-throughput glycopeptide-capture approach that integrates the advantages of several existing N-glycoproteomics means. Our method can enrich the glycopeptides derived from surface proteins and remove their glycans for facile proteomics using LC-MS. The resolved N-glycoproteome comprises the information of protein identity and quantity as well as their sites of glycosylation. This method has been applied to a series of studies in areas including cancer, stem cells, and drug toxicity. The limitation of the method lies in the low abundance of surface membrane proteins, such that a relatively large quantity of samples is required for this analysis compared to studies centered on cytosolic proteins. PMID:24836557

  18. Unveiling Cell Surface and Type IV Secretion Proteins Responsible for Archaeal Rudivirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ling; He, Fei; Bhoobalan-Chitty, Yuvaraj; Martinez-Alvarez, Laura; Guo, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Sulfolobus mutants resistant to archaeal lytic virus Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) were isolated, and mutations were identified in two gene clusters, cluster sso3138 to sso3141 and cluster sso2386 and sso2387, encoding cell surface and type IV secretion proteins, respectively. The involvement of the mutations in the resistance was confirmed by genetic complementation. Blocking of virus entry into the mutants was demonstrated by the lack of early gene transcription, strongly supporting the idea of a role of the proteins in SIRV2 entry. PMID:24965447

  19. Cell Surface-based Sensing with Metallic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ziwen; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles provide versatile scaffolds for biosensing applications. In this review, we focus on the use of metallic nanoparticles for cell surface sensings. Examples of the use of both specific recognition and array-based “chemical nose” approaches to cell surface sensing will be discussed. PMID:25853985

  20. Yeast cell-surface expression of chitosanase from Paenibacillus fukuinensis.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Isogawa, Danya; Takagi, Madoka; Kato-Murai, Michiko; Kimoto, Hisashi; Kusaoke, Hideo; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Suye, Shin-Ichiro

    2007-11-01

    To produce chitoorigosaccharides using chitosan, we attempted to construct Paenibacillus fukuinensis chitosanase-displaying yeast cells as a whole-cell biocatalyst through yeast cell-surface engineering. The localization of the chitosanase on the yeast cell surface was confirmed by immunofluorescence labeling of cells. The chitosanase activity of the constructed yeast was investigated by halo assay and the dinitrosalicylic acid method. PMID:17986777

  1. Rare TREM2 variants associated with Alzheimer's disease display reduced cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Sirkis, Daniel W; Bonham, Luke W; Aparicio, Renan E; Geier, Ethan G; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Wang, Qing; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Zachary A; Miller, Bruce L; Coppola, Giovanni; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Rare variation in TREM2 has been associated with greater risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). TREM2 encodes a cell surface receptor expressed on microglia and related cells, and the R47H variant associated with AD appears to affect the ability of TREM2 to bind extracellular ligands. In addition, other rare TREM2 mutations causing early-onset neurodegeneration are thought to impair cell surface expression. Using a sequence kernel association (SKAT) analysis in two independent AD cohorts, we found significant enrichment of rare TREM2 variants not previously characterized at the protein level. Heterologous expression of the identified variants showed that novel variants S31F and R47C displayed significantly reduced cell surface expression. In addition, we identified rare variant R136Q in a patient with language-predominant AD that also showed impaired surface expression. The results suggest rare TREM2 variants enriched in AD may be associated with altered TREM2 function and that AD risk may be conferred, in part, from altered TREM2 surface expression. PMID:27589997

  2. Improving genetic immobilization of a cellulase on yeast cell surface for bioethanol production using cellulose.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinying; Dang, Hongyue; Lu, Jian Ren

    2013-04-01

    In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was genetically engineered to harbor the capability of utilizing celluloses for bioethanol production by displaying active cellulolytic enzymes on the cell surface. An endo-1,4-β-glucanase gene egX was cloned from Bacillus pumilus C-9 and its expression products, the EGX cellulases, were displayed on the cell surface of S. cerevisiae by fusing egX with aga2 that encodes the binding subunit of the S. cerevisiae cell wall protein α-agglutinin. To achieve high gene copies and stability, multicopy integration was obtained by integrating the fusion aga2-egX gene into the rDNA region of the S. cerevisiae chromosome. To achieve high expression and surface display efficiency, the aga2-egX gene was expressed under the control of a strong promoter. The presence of the enzymatically active cellulase fusion proteins on the S. cerevisiae cell surface was verified by carboxymethyl cellulase activity assay and immunofluorescence microscopy. This work presented a promising strategy to genetically engineer yeasts to perform efficient fermentation of cellulosic materials for bioethanol production. PMID:22915066

  3. Illumination of growth, division and secretion by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Siegrist, M. Sloan; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Fox, Douglas M.; Lim, Shion An; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the essential interface between a bacterium and its surroundings. Composed primarily of molecules that are not directly genetically encoded, this highly dynamic structure accommodates the basic cellular processes of growth and division as well as the transport of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular milieu. In this review, we describe aspects of bacterial growth, division and secretion that have recently been uncovered by metabolic labeling of the cell envelope. Metabolite derivatives can be used to label a variety of macromolecules, from proteins to non-genetically-encoded glycans and lipids. The embedded metabolite enables precise tracking in time and space, and the versatility of newer chemoselective detection methods offers the ability to execute multiple experiments concurrently. In addition to reviewing the discoveries enabled by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell envelope, we also discuss the potential of these techniques for translational applications. Finally, we offer some guidelines for implementing this emerging technology. PMID:25725012

  4. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  5. Construction of a starch-utilizing yeast by cell surface engineering.

    PubMed Central

    Murai, T; Ueda, M; Yamamura, M; Atomi, H; Shibasaki, Y; Kamasawa, N; Osumi, M; Amachi, T; Tanaka, A

    1997-01-01

    We have engineered the cell surface of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by anchoring active glucoamylase protein on the cell wall, and we have endowed the yeast cells with the ability to utilize starch directly as the sole carbon source. The gene encoding Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase with its secretion signal peptide was fused with the gene encoding the C-terminal half (320 amino acid residues from the C terminus) of yeast alpha-agglutinin, a protein involved in mating and covalently anchored to the cell wall. The constructed plasmid containing this fusion gene was introduced into S. cerevisiae and expressed under the control of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter from S. cerevisiae. The glucoamylase activity as not detected in the culture medium, but it was detected in the cell pellet fraction. The glucoamylase protein transferred to the soluble fraction from the cell wall fraction after glucanase treatment but not after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment, indicating the covalent binding of the fusion protein to the cell wall. Display of the fused protein was further confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. The transformant cells could surely grow on starch as the sole carbon source. These results showed that the glucoamylase was anchored on the cell wall and displayed as its active form. This is the first example of an application of cell surface engineering to utilize and improve the metabolic ability of cells. PMID:9097432

  6. Cell-surface MHC density profiling reveals instability of autoimmunity-associated HLA

    PubMed Central

    Miyadera, Hiroko; Ohashi, Jun; Lernmark, Åke; Kitamura, Toshio; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms within HLA gene loci are strongly associated with susceptibility to autoimmune disorders; however, it is not clear how genetic variations in these loci confer a disease risk. Here, we devised a cell-surface MHC expression assay to detect allelic differences in the intrinsic stability of HLA-DQ proteins. We found extreme variation in cell-surface MHC density among HLA-DQ alleles, indicating a dynamic allelic hierarchy in the intrinsic stability of HLA-DQ proteins. Using the case-control data for type 1 diabetes (T1D) for the Swedish and Japanese populations, we determined that T1D risk–associated HLA-DQ haplotypes, which also increase risk for autoimmune endocrinopathies and other autoimmune disorders, encode unstable proteins, whereas the T1D–protective haplotypes encode the most stable HLA-DQ proteins. Among the amino acid variants of HLA-DQ, alterations in 47α, the residue that is located on the outside of the peptide-binding groove and acts as a key stability regulator, showed strong association with T1D. Evolutionary analysis suggested that 47α variants have been the target of positive diversifying selection. Our study demonstrates a steep allelic hierarchy in the intrinsic stability of HLA-DQ that is associated with T1D risk and protection, suggesting that HLA instability mediates the development of autoimmune disorders. PMID:25485681

  7. A Putative Cell Surface Receptor for White Spot Syndrome Virus Is a Member of a Transporter Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huai-Ting; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Huang, Po-Yu; Chen, Li-Li

    2012-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), a large enveloped DNA virus, can cause the most serious viral disease in shrimp and has a wide host range among crustaceans. In this study, we identified a surface protein, named glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), which could also interact with WSSV envelope protein, VP53A. Sequence analysis revealed that Glut1 is a member of a large superfamily of transporters and that it is most closely related to evolutionary branches of this superfamily, branches that function to transport this sugar. Tissue tropism analysis showed that Glut1 was constitutive and highly expressed in almost all organs. Glut1's localization in shrimp cells was further verified and so was its interaction with Penaeus monodon chitin-binding protein (PmCBP), which was itself identified to interact with an envelope protein complex formed by 11 WSSV envelope proteins. In vitro and in vivo neutralization experiments using synthetic peptide contained WSSV binding domain (WBD) showed that the WBD peptide could inhibit WSSV infection in primary cultured hemocytes and delay the mortality in shrimps challenged with WSSV. These findings have important implications for our understanding of WSSV entry. PMID:22427993

  8. Cell surface expression and turnover of the alpha-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Kleyman, T R; Zuckerman, J B; Middleton, P; McNulty, K A; Hu, B; Su, X; An, B; Eaton, D C; Smith, P R

    2001-08-01

    The renal epithelial cell line A6, derived from Xenopus laevis, expresses epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaCs) and serves as a model system to study hormonal regulation and turnover of ENaCs. Our previous studies suggest that the alpha-subunit of Xenopus ENaC (alpha-xENaC) is detectable as 150- and 180-kDa polypeptides, putative immature and mature alpha-subunit heterodimers. The 150- and 180-kDa alpha-xENaC were present in distinct fractions after sedimentation of A6 cell lysate through a sucrose density gradient. Two anti-alpha-xENaC antibodies directed against distinct domains demonstrated that only 180-kDa alpha-xENaC was expressed at the apical cell surface. The half-life of cell surface-expressed alpha-xENaC was 24-30 h, suggesting that once ENaC matures and is expressed at the plasma membrane, its turnover is similar to that reported for mature cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. No significant changes in apical surface expression of alpha-xENaC were observed after treatment of A6 cells with aldosterone for 24 h, despite a 5.3-fold increase in short-circuit current. This lack of change in surface expression is consistent with previous observations in A6 cells and suggests that aldosterone regulates ENaC gating and increases channel open probability. PMID:11457713

  9. A Mass Spectrometric-Derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P.; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L.; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  10. Beyond the cell surface: new mechanisms of receptor function.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2010-05-21

    The text book view of cell surface receptors depicts them at the top of a vertical chain of command that starts with ligand binding and proceeds in a lineal fashion towards the cell nucleus. Although pedagogically useful, this view is incomplete and recent findings suggest that the extracellular domain of cell surface receptors can be a transmitter as much as a receiver in intercellular communication. GFRalpha1 is a GPI-anchored receptor for GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), a neuronal growth factor with widespread functions in the developing and adult nervous system. GFRalpha1 partners with transmembrane proteins, such as the receptor tyrosine kinase RET or the cell adhesion molecule NCAM, for intracellular transmission of the GDNF signal. In addition to this canonical role, GFRalpha1 can also engage in horizontal interactions and thereby modify the function of other cell surface components. GFRalpha1 can also function as a ligand-induced adhesion cell molecule, mediating homophilic cell-cell interactions in response to GDNF. Finally, GFRalpha1 can also be released from the cell surface and act at a distance as a soluble factor together with its ligand. This plethora of unconventional mechanisms is likely to be a feature common to several other receptors and considerably expands our view of cell surface receptor function. PMID:20494105

  11. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  12. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  13. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  14. A Rapid Method for Refolding Cell Surface Receptors and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu; Wu, Ling; Li, Feng; Burnham, Robert S.; Pizarro, Juan C.; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Production of membrane-associated cell surface receptors and their ligands is often a cumbersome, expensive, and time-consuming process that limits detailed structural and functional characterization of this important class of proteins. Here we report a rapid method for refolding inclusion-body-based, recombinant cell surface receptors and ligands in one day, a speed equivalent to that of soluble protein production. This method efficiently couples modular on-column immobilized metal ion affinity purification and solid-phase protein refolding. We demonstrated the general utility of this method for producing multiple functionally active immunoreceptors, ligands, and viral decoys, including challenging cell surface proteins that cannot be produced using typical dialysis- or dilution-based refolding approaches. PMID:27215173

  15. Atomic force and super-resolution microscopy support a role for LapA as a cell-surface biofilm adhesin of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Ivan E.; Boyd, Chelsea D.; Newell, Peter D.; Schwartz, Mary E.; Turnbull, Lynne; Johnson, Michael S.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; O’Toole, George A.; Camesano, Terri A.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescence Pf0-1 requires the large repeat protein LapA for stable surface attachment. This study presents direct evidence that LapA is a cell-surface-localized adhesin. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed a significant twofold reduction in adhesion force for mutants lacking the LapA protein on the cell surface compared to the wild-type strain. Deletion of lapG, a gene encoding a periplasmic cysteine protease that functions to release LapA from the cell surface, resulted in a twofold increase in the force of adhesion. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) revealed the presence of the LapA protein on the cell surface, consistent with its role as an adhesin. The protein is only visualized in the cytoplasm for a mutant of the ABC transporter responsible for translocating LapA to the cell surface. Together, these data highlight the power of combining the use of AFM and 3D-SIM with genetic studies to demonstrate that LapA, a member of a large group of RTX-like repeat proteins, is a cell-surface adhesin. PMID:23064158

  16. Identification and isolation of a 140 kd cell surface glycoprotein with properties expected of a fibronectin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pytela, R.; Pierschbacher, M.D.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify a putative cell surface receptor for fibronectin. A large cell-attachment-promoting fibronectin fragment was used as the affinity matrix, and specific elution was effected by using synthetic peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which is derived from the cell recognition sequence in the fibronectin cell attachment site. A 140 kd protein was bound by the affinity matrix from octylglucoside extracts of MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells and specifically eluted with the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. The 140 kd protein was labeled by cell surface specific radioiodination and became incorporated into liposomes at a high efficiency. Liposomes containing this protein showed specific affinity toward fibronectin-coated surfaces, and this binding could be selectively inhibited by the synthetic cell-attachment peptide but not by inactive peptides. Affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose showed that the 140 kd protein is a glycoprotein and, in combination with the fibronectin fragment chromatography, gave highly enriched preparations of the 140 kd protein. These properties suggest that the 140 kd glycoprotein is a membrane-embedded cell surface protein directly involved in the initial step of cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates.

  17. An in-house multiplex pcr method to detect of putative virulence factors in aeromonas species

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera-Arreola, Ma. Guadalupe; Martínez, Alma Aidee Carmona; Castro-Escarpulli, Graciela

    2011-01-01

    A pentaplex PCR was developed and optimised to detect the genes that encode the five most important putative virulence factors in Aeromonas isolates. It seems to be more efficient than previously reported techniques and promises to be a powerful tool for more accurate risk assessments and for monitoring pathogenic strains. PMID:24031758

  18. Identification of Cell Surface Targets through Meta-analysis of Microarray Data1

    PubMed Central

    Haeberle, Henry; Dudley, Joel T; Liu, Jonathan TC; Butte, Atul J; Contag, Christopher H

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution image guidance for resection of residual tumor cells would enable more precise and complete excision for more effective treatment of cancers, such as medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain cancer. Numerous studies have shown that brain tumor patient outcomes correlate with the precision of resection. To enable guided resection with molecular specificity and cellular resolution, molecular probes that effectively delineate brain tumor boundaries are essential. Therefore, we developed a bioinformatics approach to analyze micro-array datasets for the identification of transcripts that encode candidate cell surface biomarkers that are highly enriched in medulloblastoma. The results identified 380 genes with greater than a two-fold increase in the expression in the medulloblastoma compared with that in the normal cerebellum. To enrich for targets with accessibility for extracellular molecular probes, we further refined this list by filtering it with gene ontology to identify genes with protein localization on, or within, the plasma membrane. To validate this meta-analysis, the top 10 candidates were evaluated with immunohistochemistry. We identified two targets, fibrillin 2 and EphA3, which specifically stain medulloblastoma. These results demonstrate a novel bioinformatics approach that successfully identified cell surface and extracellular candidate markers enriched in medulloblastoma versus adjacent cerebellum. These two proteins are high-value targets for the development of tumor-specific probes in medulloblastoma. This bioinformatics method has broad utility for the identification of accessible molecular targets in a variety of cancers and will enable probe development for guided resection. PMID:22904683

  19. Complete genome sequences of a putative new alphapartitivirus detected in Rosa spp.

    PubMed

    Phelan, James; James, Delano

    2016-09-01

    A putative new alphapartitivirus was detected by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in Rosa spp. and identified as rose partitivirus isolate Phyllis Bide (RoPV-PB). The virus is bipartite with a dsRNA1 fragment (1937 bp) encoding a putative RdRp and a dsRNA2 fragment (1811 bp) encoding the putative CP subunit of the virus. dsRNA1 of RoPV-BP is closely related to Vicia faba partitivirus 1, with identities of 67 % and 72 % for the nucleotide (nt) and deduced amino acid (aa) sequences, respectively. In NGS analysis of RoPV-BP, coverage was uneven across both dsRNA fragments, with GC/AT content appearing to be a major determinant of depth of coverage. PMID:27368993

  20. Las1 Is an Essential Nuclear Protein Involved in Cell Morphogenesis and Cell Surface Growth

    PubMed Central

    Doseff, A. I.; Arndt, K. T.

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutations that cause a requirement for SSD1-v for viability were isolated, yielding one new gene, LAS1, and three previously identified genes, SIT4, BCK1/SLK1, and SMP3. Three of these genes, LAS1, SIT4, and BCK1/SLK1, encode proteins that have roles in bud formation or morphogenesis. LAS1 is essential and loss of LAS1 function causes the cells to arrest as 80% unbudded cells and 20% large budded cells that accumulate many vesicles at the mother-daughter neck. Overexpression of LAS1 results in extra cell surface projections in the mother cell, alterations in actin and SPA2 localization, and the accumulation of electron-dense structures along the periphery of both the mother cell and the bud. The nuclear localization of LAS1 suggests a role of LAS1 for regulating bud formation and morphogenesis via the expression of components that function directly in these processes. PMID:8582632

  1. M135R is a novel cell surface virulence factor of myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John W; Sypula, Joanna; Wang, Fuan; Alston, Lindsay R; Shao, Zhuhong; Gao, Xiujuan; Irvine, Timothy S; McFadden, Grant

    2007-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MV) encodes a cell surface protein (M135R) that is predicted to mimic the host alpha/beta interferon receptor (IFN-alpha/beta-R) and thus prevent IFN-alpha/beta from triggering a host antiviral response. This prediction is based on sequence similarity to B18R, the viral IFN-alpha/beta-R from vaccinia virus (VV), which has been demonstrated to bind and inhibit type I interferons. However, M135R is only half the size of VV B18R. All other poxvirus-encoded IFN-alpha/beta-R homologs align only to the amino-terminal half of M135R. Peptide antibodies raised against M135R were used for immunoblotting and immunofluorescence and indicate that M135R is expressed as an early gene and that the product is a cell surface N-linked glycoprotein that is not secreted. In contrast to the predicted properties of M135R as an inhibitor of type I interferon, all binding and inhibition assays designed to demonstrate whether M135R can interact with IFN-alpha/beta have been negative. However, pathogenesis studies with a targeted M135-knockout MV construct (vMyx135KO) indicate that the deletion of M135R severely attenuates MV pathogenesis in the European rabbit. We propose that M135R is an important immunomodulatory virulence factor for myxomatosis but that the target immune ligand is not from the predicted type I interferon family and remains to be identified. PMID:17065210

  2. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits...

  3. The cell surface environment for pathogen recognition and entry

    PubMed Central

    Stow, Jennifer L; Condon, Nicholas D

    2016-01-01

    The surface of mammalian cells offers an interface between the cell interior and its surrounding milieu. As part of the innate immune system, macrophages have cell surface features optimised for probing and sampling as they patrol our tissues for pathogens, debris or dead cells. Their highly dynamic and constantly moving cell surface has extensions such as lamellipodia, filopodia and dorsal ruffles that help detect pathogens. Dorsal ruffles give rise to macropinosomes for rapid, high volume non-selective fluid sampling, receptor internalisation and plasma membrane turnover. Ruffles can also generate phagocytic cups for the receptor-mediated uptake of pathogens or particles. The membrane lipids, actin cytoskeleton, receptors and signalling proteins that constitute these cell surface domains are discussed. Although the cell surface is designed to counteract pathogens, many bacteria, viruses and other pathogens have evolved to circumvent or hijack these cell structures and their underlying machinery for entry and survival. Nevertheless, these features offer important potential for developing vaccines, drugs and preventative measures to help fight infection. PMID:27195114

  4. Transcript Abundance of Putative Lipid Phosphate Phosphatases During Development of Trypanosoma brucei in the Tsetse Fly.

    PubMed

    Alves e Silva, Thiago Luiz; Savage, Amy F; Aksoy, Serap

    2016-04-01

    African trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei spp.) cause devastating diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. Trypanosomes differentiate repeatedly during development in tsetse flies before gaining mammalian infectivity in fly salivary glands. Lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) are involved in diverse biological processes, such as cell differentiation and cell migration. Gene sequences encoding two putative T. brucei LPP proteins were used to search the T. brucei genome, revealing two additional putative family members. Putative structural features and transcript abundance during parasite development in tsetse fly were characterized. Three of the four LPP proteins are predicted to have six transmembrane domains, while the fourth shows only one. Semiquantitative gene expression revealed differential regulation of LPPs during parasite development. Transcript abundance for three of the four putative LPP genes was elevated in parasites infecting salivary glands, but not mammalian-infective metacyclic cells in fly saliva, indicating a potential role of this family in parasite establishment in tsetse salivary glands. PMID:26856918

  5. Hundreds of putatively functional small open reading frames in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between DNA sequence and encoded information is still an unsolved puzzle. The number of protein-coding genes in higher eukaryotes identified by genome projects is lower than was expected, while a considerable amount of putatively non-coding transcription has been detected. Functional small open reading frames (smORFs) are known to exist in several organisms. However, coding sequence detection methods are biased against detecting such very short open reading frames. Thus, a substantial number of non-canonical coding regions encoding short peptides might await characterization. Results Using bio-informatics methods, we have searched for smORFs of less than 100 amino acids in the putatively non-coding euchromatic DNA of Drosophila melanogaster, and initially identified nearly 600,000 of them. We have studied the pattern of conservation of these smORFs as coding entities between D. melanogaster and Drosophila pseudoobscura, their presence in syntenic and in transcribed regions of the genome, and their ratio of conservative versus non-conservative nucleotide changes. For negative controls, we compared the results with those obtained using random short sequences, while a positive control was provided by smORFs validated by proteomics data. Conclusions The combination of these analyses led us to postulate the existence of at least 401 functional smORFs in Drosophila, with the possibility that as many as 4,561 such functional smORFs may exist. PMID:22118156

  6. Cell surface display of chimeric glycoproteins via the S-layer of Paenibacillus alvei

    PubMed Central

    Zarschler, Kristof; Janesch, Bettina; Kainz, Birgit; Ristl, Robin; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive, mesophilic bacterium Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051T possesses a two-dimensional crystalline protein surface layer (S-layer) with oblique lattice symmetry composed of a single type of O-glycoprotein species. Herein, we describe a strategy for nanopatterned in vivo cell surface co-display of peptide and glycan epitopes based on this S-layer glycoprotein self-assembly system. The open reading frame of the corresponding structural gene spaA codes for a protein of 983 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 24 amino acids. The mature S-layer protein has a theoretical molecular mass of 105.95 kDa and a calculated pI of 5.83. It contains three S-layer homology domains at the N-terminus that are involved in anchoring of the glycoprotein via a non-classical, pyruvylated secondary cell wall polymer to the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. For this polymer, several putative biosynthesis enzymes were identified upstream of the spaA gene. For in vivo cell surface display, the hexahistidine tag and the enhanced green fluorescent protein, respectively, were translationally fused to the C-terminus of SpaA. Immunoblot analysis, immunofluorescence staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the fused epitopes were efficiently expressed and successfully displayed via the S-layer glycoprotein matrix on the surface of P. alvei CCM 2051T cells. In contrast, exclusively non-glycosylated chimeric SpaA proteins were displayed, when the S-layer of the glycosylation-deficient wsfP mutant was used as a display matrix. PMID:20513375

  7. Cell surface display of chimeric glycoproteins via the S-layer of Paenibacillus alvei.

    PubMed

    Zarschler, Kristof; Janesch, Bettina; Kainz, Birgit; Ristl, Robin; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2010-07-01

    The Gram-positive, mesophilic bacterium Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T) possesses a two-dimensional crystalline protein surface layer (S-layer) with oblique lattice symmetry composed of a single type of O-glycoprotein species. Herein, we describe a strategy for nanopatterned in vivo cell surface co-display of peptide and glycan epitopes based on this S-layer glycoprotein self-assembly system. The open reading frame of the corresponding structural gene spaA codes for a protein of 983 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 24 amino acids. The mature S-layer protein has a theoretical molecular mass of 105.95kDa and a calculated pI of 5.83. It contains three S-layer homology domains at the N-terminus that are involved in anchoring of the glycoprotein via a non-classical, pyruvylated secondary cell wall polymer to the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. For this polymer, several putative biosynthesis enzymes were identified upstream of the spaA gene. For in vivo cell surface display, the hexahistidine tag and the enhanced green fluorescent protein, respectively, were translationally fused to the C-terminus of SpaA. Immunoblot analysis, immunofluorescence staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the fused epitopes were efficiently expressed and successfully displayed via the S-layer glycoprotein matrix on the surface of P. alvei CCM 2051(T) cells. In contrast, exclusively non-glycosylated chimeric SpaA proteins were displayed, when the S-layer of the glycosylation-deficient wsfP mutant was used as a display matrix. PMID:20513375

  8. KSHV attachment and entry are dependent on αVβ3 integrin localized to specific cell surface microdomains and do not correlate with the presence of heparan sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, H. Jacques; DeMaster, Laura K.; Rubinchikova, Yelena E.; Rose, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular receptors for KSHV attachment and entry were characterized using tyramide signal amplification (TSA)-enhanced confocal microscopy. Integrins αVβ3, αVβ5 and α3β1 were detected on essentially all the actin-based cell surface microdomains that initially bind KSHV, while the presence of CD98 and heparan sulfate (HS), the putative attachment receptor, was more variable. KSHV bound to the same cell surface microdomains with and without HS indicating that initial attachment of KSHV is not dependent on HS and that receptors other than HS can mediate attachment. A human salivary gland (HSG) epithelial line was identified, which lacks αVβ3 but expresses high levels of HS, α3β1 and other putative KSHV receptors. These cells were resistant to KSHV-binding and infection. Reconstitution of cell surface αVβ3 rendered HSG cells highly susceptible to KSHV infection, demonstrating a critical role for αVβ3 in the binding and entry of KSHV that is not shared with other proposed receptors. PMID:25063885

  9. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed. PMID:23915280

  10. Cell surface recycling in yeast: mechanisms and machineries.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Chris; Piper, Robert C

    2016-04-15

    Sorting internalized proteins and lipids back to the cell surface controls the supply of molecules throughout the cell and regulates integral membrane protein activity at the surface. One central process in mammalian cells is the transit of cargo from endosomes back to the plasma membrane (PM) directly, along a route that bypasses retrograde movement to the Golgi. Despite recognition of this pathway for decades we are only beginning to understand the machinery controlling this overall process. The budding yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae, a stalwart genetic system, has been routinely used to identify fundamental proteins and their modes of action in conserved trafficking pathways. However, the study of cell surface recycling from endosomes in yeast is hampered by difficulties that obscure visualization of the pathway. Here we briefly discuss how recycling is likely a more prevalent process in yeast than is widely appreciated and how tools might be built to better study the pathway. PMID:27068957

  11. A Generalizable Platform for the Photoactivation of Cell Surface Receptors.

    PubMed

    Duc, Thinh Nguyen; Huse, Morgan

    2015-11-20

    Polarized signal transduction from cell surface receptors plays a central role in the development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms, and it also contributes to cellular dysfunction in many disease states. Understanding the molecular and cellular bases of polarized signaling requires experimental methods that provide precise spatiotemporal control of receptor activation. However, we currently lack strategies for inducing both sustained and spatially constrained signal transduction. In the present study, we combined synthetic and cell biological tools to develop a generalizable photoactivation approach for the stimulation of cell surface receptors. Our system, which is based upon the local decaging of a "universal" peptide ligand, is particularly well suited for the live imaging of single cells. We anticipate that it will greatly facilitate future mechanistic analyses of polarized signal transduction in a variety of cell types. PMID:26295186

  12. Cell Surface Changes Associated with Cellular Immune Reactions in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nappi, Anthony J.; Silvers, Michael

    1984-09-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster a temperature-induced change in immune competence accompanies cell surface alterations that cause its blood cells to adhere and to encapsulate a parasite. At 29 degrees C the blood cells of the tumorous-lethal (Tuml) mutant show a high degree of immune competence and encapsulate the eggs of the parasitic wasp Leptopilina heterotoma. At 21 degrees C the blood cells are essentially immune incompetent. High percentages of lectin binding cells were found under conditions which potentiated cellular encapsulation responses. Some immune reactive blood cells did not bind lectin. The low percentages of lectin binding cells in susceptible hosts suggest that developing parasites alter the cell surface of the blood cells of immune reactive hosts.

  13. Cell surface changes associated with cellular immune reactions in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nappi, A J; Silvers, M

    1984-09-14

    In Drosophila melanogaster a temperature-induced change in immune competence accompanies cell surface alterations that cause its blood cells to adhere and to encapsulate a parasite. At 29 degrees C the blood cells of the tumorous-lethal (Tuml) mutant show a high degree of immune competence and encapsulate the eggs of the parasitic wasp Leptopilina heterotoma. At 21 degrees C the blood cells are essentially immune incompetent. High percentages of lectin binding cells were found under conditions which potentiated cellular encapsulation responses. Some immune reactive blood cells did not bind lectin. The low percentages of lectin binding cells in susceptible hosts suggest that developing parasites alter the cell surface of the blood cells of immune reactive hosts. PMID:6433482

  14. Production of cell surface and secreted glycoproteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Seiradake, Elena; Zhao, Yuguang; Lu, Weixian; Aricescu, A Radu; Jones, E Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian protein expression systems are becoming increasingly popular for the production of eukaryotic secreted and cell surface proteins. Here we describe methods to produce recombinant proteins in adherent or suspension human embryonic kidney cell cultures, using transient transfection or stable cell lines. The protocols are easy to scale up and cost-efficient, making them suitable for protein crystallization projects and other applications that require high protein yields. PMID:25502196

  15. Cell-surface markers for colon adenoma and adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sewda, Kamini; Coppola, Domenico; Enkemann, Steven; Yue, Binglin; Kim, Jongphil; Lopez, Alexis S.; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Stark, Valerie E.; Morse, Brian; Shibata, David; Vignesh, Shivakumar; Morse, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is crucial for effective treatment. Among CRC screening techniques, optical colonoscopy is widely considered the gold standard. However, it is a costly and invasive procedure with a low rate of compliance. Our long-term goal is to develop molecular imaging agents for the non-invasive detection of CRC by molecular imaging-based colonoscopy using CT, MRI or fluorescence. To achieve this, cell surface targets must be identified and validated. Here, we report the discovery of cell-surface markers that distinguish CRC from surrounding tissues that could be used as molecular imaging targets. Profiling of mRNA expression microarray data from patient tissues including adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and normal gastrointestinal tissues was used to identify potential CRC specific cell-surface markers. Of the identified markers, six were selected for further validation (CLDN1, GPR56, GRM8, LY6G6D/F, SLCO1B3 and TLR4). Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of patient tissues. Except for SLCO1B3, diffuse and low expression was observed for each marker in normal colon tissues. The three markers with the greatest protein overexpression were CLDN1, LY6G6D/F and TLR4, where at least one of these markers was overexpressed in 97% of the CRC samples. GPR56, LY6G6D/F and SLCO1B3 protein expression was significantly correlated with the proximal tumor location and with expression of mismatch repair genes. Marker expression was further validated in CRC cell lines. Hence, three cell-surface markers were discovered that distinguish CRC from surrounding normal tissues. These markers can be used to develop imaging or therapeutic agents targeted to the luminal surface of CRC. PMID:26894861

  16. Actomyosin contractility controls cell surface area of oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kippert, Angelika; Fitzner, Dirk; Helenius, Jonne; Simons, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    Background To form myelin oligodendrocytes expand and wrap their plasma membrane multiple times around an axon. How is this expansion controlled? Results Here we show that cell surface area depends on actomyosin contractility and is regulated by physical properties of the supporting matrix. Moreover, we find that chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG), molecules associated with non-permissive growth properties within the central nervous system (CNS), block cell surface spreading. Most importantly, the inhibitory effects of CSPG on plasma membrane extension were completely prevented by treatment with inhibitors of actomyosin contractility and by RNAi mediated knockdown of myosin II. In addition, we found that reductions of plasma membrane area were accompanied by changes in the rate of fluid-phase endocytosis. Conclusion In summary, our results establish a novel connection between endocytosis, cell surface extension and actomyosin contractility. These findings open up new possibilities of how to promote the morphological differentiation of oligodendrocytes in a non-permissive growth environment. See related minireview by Bauer and ffrench-Constant: PMID:19781079

  17. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  18. Cell Surface Vimentin Is an Attachment Receptor for Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ning; Cong, Haolong; Tian, Hongchao; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Wenliang; Song, Lei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a highly transmissible pathogenic agent that causes severe central nervous system diseases in infected infants and young children. Here, we reported that EV71 VP1 protein could bind to vimentin intermediate filaments expressed on the host cell surface. Soluble vimentin or an antibody against vimentin could inhibit the binding of EV71 to host cells. Accompanied with the reduction of vimentin expression on the cell surface, the binding of EV71 to cells was remarkably decreased. Further evidence showed that the N terminus of vimentin is responsible for the interaction between EV71 and vimentin. These results indicated that vimentin on the host cell surface may serve as an attachment site that mediated the initial binding and subsequently increased the infectivity of EV71. IMPORTANCE This study delivers important findings on the roles of vimentin filaments in relation to EV71 infection and provides information that not only improves our understanding of EV71 pathogenesis but also presents us with potentially new strategies for the treatment of diseases caused by EV71 infections. PMID:24623428

  19. Establishment of cell surface engineering and its development.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface display of proteins/peptides has been established based on mechanisms of localizing proteins to the cell surface. In contrast to conventional intracellular and extracellular (secretion) expression systems, this method, generally called an arming technology, is particularly effective when using yeasts as a host, because the control of protein folding that is often required for the preparation of proteins can be natural. This technology can be employed for basic and applied research purposes. In this review, I describe various strategies for the construction of engineered yeasts and provide an outline of the diverse applications of this technology to industrial processes such as the production of biofuels and chemicals, as well as bioremediation and health-related processes. Furthermore, this technology is suitable for novel protein engineering and directed evolution through high-throughput screening, because proteins/peptides displayed on the cell surface can be directly analyzed using intact cells without concentration and purification. Functional proteins/peptides with improved or novel functions can be created using this beneficial, powerful, and promising technique. PMID:27305282

  20. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  1. Cell surface expression and biosynthesis of epithelial Na+ channels.

    PubMed Central

    Prince, L S; Welsh, M J

    1998-01-01

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) complex is composed of three homologous subunits: alpha, beta and gamma. Mutations in ENaC subunits can increase the number of channels on the cell surface, causing a hereditary form of hypertension called Liddle's syndrome, or can decrease channel activity, causing pseudohypoaldosteronism type I, a salt-wasting disease of infancy. To investigate surface expression, we studied ENaC subunits expressed in COS-7 and HEK293 cells. Using surface biotinylation and protease sensitivity, we found that when individual ENaC subunits are expressed alone, they traffic to the cell surface. The subunits are glycosylated with high-mannose oligosaccharides, but seem to have the carbohydrate removed before they reach the cell surface. Moreover, subunits form a complex that cannot be disrupted by several non-ionic detergents. The pattern of glycosylation and detergent solubility/insolubility persists when the N-teminal and C-terminal cytoplasmic regions of ENaC are removed. With co-expression of all three ENaC subunits, the insoluble complex is the predominant species. These results show that ENaC and its family members are unique in their trafficking, biochemical characteristics and post-translational modifications. PMID:9841884

  2. Cell Surface Glycoprotein of Reactive Stromal Fibroblasts as a Potential Antibody Target in Human Epithelial Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Old, Lloyd J.; Rettig, Wolfgang J.

    1990-09-01

    The F19 antigen is a cell surface glycoprotein (M_r, 95,000) of human sarcomas and proliferating, cultured fibroblasts that is absent from resting fibroblasts in normal adult tissues. Normal and malignant epithelial cells are also F19^-. The present immunohistochemical study describes induction of F19 in the reactive mesenchyme of epithelial tumors. F19^+ fibroblasts were found in primary and metastatic carcinomas, including colorectal (18 of 18 cases studied), breast (14/14), ovarian (21/21), bladder (9/10), and lung carcinomas (13/13). In contrast, the stroma of benign colorectal adenomas, fibrocystic disease and fibroadenomas of breast, benign prostate hyperplasia, in situ bladder carcinomas, and benign ovarian tumors showed no or only moderate numbers of F19^+ fibroblasts. Analysis of dermal incision wounds revealed that F19 is strongly induced during scar formation. Comparison of F19 with the extracellular matrix protein tenascin, a putative marker of tumor mesenchyme, showed a cellular staining pattern for F19 vs. the extracellular matrix pattern for tenascin and widespread expression of tenascin in F19^- normal tissues and benign tumors. Our results suggest that the F19^+ phenotype correlates with specialized fibroblast functions in wound healing and malignant tumor growth. Because of its abundance in tumor mesenchyme, F19 may serve as a target for antibodies labeled with radioisotopes or toxic agents, or inflammatogenic antibodies, in carcinoma patients.

  3. Cloning of a DNA fragment encoding a heme-repressible hemoglobin-binding outer membrane protein from Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H; Ren, Z; Pozsgay, J M; Elkins, C; Whitby, P W; Morton, D J; Stull, T L

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is able to use hemoglobin as a sole source of heme, and heme-repressible hemoglobin binding to the cell surface has been demonstrated. Using an affinity purification methodology, a hemoglobin-binding protein of approximately 120 kDa was isolated from H. influenzae type b strain HI689 grown in heme-restricted but not in heme-replete conditions. The isolated protein was subjected to N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and the derived amino acid sequence was used to design corresponding oligonucleotides. The oligonucleotides were used to probe a Southern blot of EcoRI-digested HI689 genomic DNA. A hybridizing band of approximately 4.2 kb was successfully cloned into pUC19. Using a 1.9-kb internal BglII fragment of the 4.2-kb clone as a probe, hybridization was seen in both typeable and nontypeable H. influenzae but not in other bacterial species tested. Following partial nucleotide sequencing of the 4.2-kb insert, a putative open reading frame was subcloned into an expression vector. The host Escherichia coli strain in which the cloned fragment was expressed bound biotinylated human hemoglobin, whereas binding of hemoglobin was not detected in E. coli with the vector alone. In conclusion, we hypothesize that the DNA fragment encoding an approximately 120-kDa heme-repressible hemoglobin-binding protein mediates one step in the acquisition of hemoglobin by H. influenzae in vivo. PMID:8757844

  4. Targeting vaccinia virus-expressed secretory beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin to the cell surface induces antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, J; Singh, O; Chakrabarti, S; Talwar, G P

    1995-01-01

    We carried out experiments designed to study the effect of a protein's localization on its immunogenicity. A novel cell-surface protein was generated from a small, glycosylated secretory protein. The DNA sequence encoding the entire precursor of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta (beta hCG) subunit was fused in the correct reading frame to the DNA sequence encoding the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. This chimeric gene was introduced into the vaccinia virus genome to generate a recombinant virus. The recombinant virus, when used to infect animal cells, expressed a 135-amino-acid beta hCG subunit anchored in cellular membranes by the 48 carboxy-terminal amino acids of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The immunogenicity of this recombinant virus with respect to its ability to generate anti-hCG antibodies was compared with that of a second recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG. All animals immunized with the vaccinia virus expressing beta hCG on the cell surface elicited high titers of anti-hCG antibodies. Even after a single immunization with the recombinant vaccinia virus, the anti-hCG antibody titers persisted for a long period of time (more than 6 months). None of the animals immunized with vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG showed any hCG-specific antibody response. PMID:7591154

  5. neu protooncogene fused to an immunoglobulin heavy chain gene requires immunoglobulin light chain for cell surface expression and oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, J G; Leder, P

    1988-01-01

    The protein encoded by the neu protooncogene (human gene symbol NGL for neuro/glioblastoma-derived) is a member of the surface receptor/tyrosine kinase family. Though its structure suggests that it can transduce a transmembrane signal, neither its extracellular ligand nor its critical intracellular substrates are known. To explore the functional properties of the protein encoded by neu, we created a fusion gene that joins the cytoplasmic domain of neu to the extracellular portion of an immunoglobulin heavy chain. The localization of the fusion polypeptide can then be controlled by coexpression with immunoglobulin light chain. In the absence of light chain, the heavy chain-neu polypeptide is expressed intracellularly and has no transforming activity. By contrast, in the presence of light chain the fusion polypeptide is expressed at the cell surface and produces tumorigenic foci. Thus, transformation apparently requires expression at the cell surface, where the neu intracellular domain can interact with components that are localized to the plasma membrane. The fusion protein is active in cellular transformation when the transmembrane domain is derived either from neu or from immunoglobulin, indicating that the neu transmembrane domain is not specifically required for transformation, although neu activation in tumors is known to result from a point mutation in this region. The extracellular immunoglobulin heavy and light chain domains of the fusion protein form a functional binding site that allows antigen to modulate its activity, reversing the transforming effect. Images PMID:2903500

  6. Characterization of a Cell Surface Protein of Clostridium difficile with Adhesive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Waligora, Anne-Judith; Hennequin, Claire; Mullany, Peter; Bourlioux, Pierre; Collignon, Anne; Karjalainen, Tuomo

    2001-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously shown that Clostridium difficile adherence to cultured cells is enhanced after heat shock at 60°C and that it is mediated by a proteinaceous surface component. The present study was undertaken to identify the surface molecules of this bacterium that could play a role in its adherence to the intestine. The cwp66 gene, encoding a cell surface-associated protein of C. difficile 79-685, was isolated by immunoscreening of a C. difficile gene library with polyclonal antibodies against C. difficile heated at 60°C. The Cwp66 protein (66 kDa) contains two domains, each carrying three imperfect repeats and one presenting homologies to the autolysin CwlB of Bacillus subtilis. A survey of 36 strains of C. difficile representing 11 serogroups showed that the 3′ portion of the cwp66 gene is variable; this was confirmed by sequencing of cwp66 from another strain, C-253. Two recombinant protein fragments corresponding to the two domains of Cwp66 were expressed in fusion with glutathione S-transferase in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography using gluthatione-Sepharose 4B. Antibodies raised against the two domains recognized Cwp66 in bacterial surface extracts. By immunoelectron microscopy, the C-terminal domain was found to be cell surface exposed. When used as inhibitors in cell binding studies, the antibodies and protein fragments partially inhibited adherence of C. difficile to cultured cells, confirming that Cwp66 is an adhesin, the first to be identified in clostridia. PMID:11254569

  7. Sialylation of cell surface glycoconjugates is essential for osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takahata, Masahiko; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Abe, Yuichiro; Watanabe, Takuya; Ito, Manabu; Majima, Tokifumi; Minami, Akio

    2007-07-01

    Sialic acid, which is located at the end of the carbohydrate moiety of cell surface glycoconjugates, is involved in many biologic responses, such as intercellular reactions and virus-cell fusion, especially in hematopoietic cells. Here we provide experimental evidence that the sialic acid of cell surface glycoconjugates has a role in osteoclast differentiation. Lectin histochemical study demonstrated the existence of both alpha (2,3)-linked-sialic acid and alpha (2,6)-linked-sialic acid in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and in the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line, which are osteoclast precursors. Flow cytometric analysis of surface lectin staining revealed the kinetics of these sialic acids during osteoclastogenesis: alpha (2,3)-linked-sialic acid was abundantly expressed throughout osteoclastogenesis, whereas alpha (2,6)-linked-sialic acid levels declined at the terminal stage of osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of sialic acid in osteoclast differentiation, we performed an osteoclastogenesis assay with or without exogenous sialidase treatment. Desialylated cells formed TRAP-positive mononuclear cells, but did not become multinuclear cells despite the normal expression of osteoclast markers such as cathepsin K, integrin beta3, and nuclear factor-ATc1. Flow cytometric analysis also demonstrated that exogenous sialidase effectively removed alpha (2,6)-linked-sialic acid, but only slightly changed the alpha (2,3)-linked-sialic acid content, suggesting that alpha (2,6)-linked-sialic acid might be involved in osteoclast differentiation. Findings from knockdown analysis using small interfering RNA oligonucleotides against alpha 2,6-sialyltransferase support this idea: alpha (2,6)-linked-sialic acid-deficient cells markedly inhibit the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. Our findings suggest that alpha (2,6)-linked-sialic acid of cell surface glycoconjugates has a role in osteoclast differentiation, possibly via its role in the cell-cell fusion

  8. Cell-surface prion protein interacts with glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Wong, Boon-Seng; Liu, Tong; Li, Ruliang; Petersen, Robert B; Sy, Man-Sun

    2002-01-01

    We used ELISA and flow cytometry to study the binding of prion protein PrP to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). We found that recombinant human PrP (rPrP) binds GAGs including chondroitin sulphate A, chondroitin sulphate B, hyaluronic acid, and heparin. rPrP binding to GAGs occurs via the N-terminus, a region known to bind divalent cations. Additionally, rPrP binding to GAGs is enhanced in the presence of Cu2+ and Zn2+, but not Ca2+ and Mn2+. rPrP binds heparin strongest, and the binding is inhibited by certain heparin analogues, including heparin disaccharide and sulphate-containing monosaccharides, but not by acetylated heparin. Full-length normal cellular prion protein (PrPC), but not N-terminally truncated PrPC species, from human brain bind GAGs in a similar Cu2+/Zn2+-enhanced fashion. We found that GAGs specifically bind to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 23-35 in the N-terminus of rPrP. We further demonstrated that while both wild-type PrPC and an octapeptide-repeat-deleted mutant PrP produced by transfected cells bound heparin at the cell surface, the PrP N-terminal deletion mutant and non-transfectant control failed to bind heparin. Binding of heparin to wild-type PrPC on the cell surface results in a reduction of the level of cell-surface PrPC. These results provide strong evidence that PrPC is a surface receptor for GAGs. PMID:12186633

  9. Cell Surface Nucleolin Facilitates Enterovirus 71 Binding and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pei-Yi; Wang, Ya-Fang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Lo, Yu-Chih; Wang, Ya-Hui; Wu, Shang-Rung; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Wang, Jen-Ren; Lai, Ming-Der

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the pathogenesis of enterovirus 71 (EV71) remains mostly ambiguous, identifying the factors that mediate viral binding and entry to host cells is indispensable to ultimately uncover the mechanisms that underlie virus infection and pathogenesis. Despite the identification of several receptors/attachment molecules for EV71, the binding, entry, and infection mechanisms of EV71 remain unclear. Herein, we employed glycoproteomic approaches to identify human nucleolin as a novel binding receptor for EV71. Glycoproteins purified by lectin chromatography from the membrane extraction of human cells were treated with sialidase, followed by immunoprecipitation with EV71 particles. Among the 16 proteins identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis, cell surface nucleolin attracted our attention. We found that EV71 interacted directly with nucleolin via the VP1 capsid protein and that an antinucleolin antibody reduced the binding of EV71 to human cells. In addition, the knockdown of cell surface nucleolin decreased EV71 binding, infection, and production in human cells. Furthermore, the expression of human nucleolin on the cell surface of a mouse cell line increased EV71 binding and conferred EV71 infection and production in the cells. These results strongly indicate that human nucleolin can mediate EV71 binding to and infection of cells. Our findings also demonstrate that the use of glycoproteomic approaches is a reliable methodology to discover novel receptors for pathogens. IMPORTANCE Outbreaks of EV71 have been reported in Asia-Pacific countries and have caused thousands of deaths in young children during the last 2 decades. The discovery of new EV71-interacting molecules to understand the infection mechanism has become an emergent issue. Hence, this study uses glycoproteomic approaches to comprehensively investigate the EV71-interacting glycoproteins. Several EV71-interacting glycoproteins are identified, and the role of cell surface nucleolin in

  10. Mycobacteriophage putative GTPase-activating protein can potentiate antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuangquan; Xu, Mengmeng; Duan, Xiangke; Yu, Zhaoxiao; Li, Qiming; Xie, Longxiang; Fan, Xiangyu; Xie, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The soaring incidences of infection by antimicrobial resistant (AR) pathogens and shortage of effective antibiotics with new mechanisms of action have renewed interest in phage therapy. This scenario is exemplified by resistant tuberculosis (TB), caused by resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacteriophage SWU1 A321_gp67 encodes a putative GTPase-activating protein. Mycobacterium smegmatis with gp67 overexpression showed changed colony formation and biofilm morphology and supports the efficacy of streptomycin and capreomycin against Mycobacterium. gp67 down-regulated the transcription of genes involved in cell wall and biofilm development. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that phage protein in addition to lysin or recombination components can synergize with existing antibiotics. Phage components might represent a promising new clue for better antibiotic potentiators. PMID:27345061

  11. Putative Genes Involved in Saikosaponin Biosynthesis in Bupleurum Species

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsai-Yun; Chiou, Chung-Yi; Chiou, Shu-Jiau

    2013-01-01

    Alternative medicinal agents, such as the herb Bupleurum, are increasingly used in modern medicine to supplement synthetic drugs. First, we present a review of the currently known effects of triterpene saponins-saikosaponins of Bupleurum species. The putative biosynthetic pathway of saikosaponins in Bupleurum species is summarized, followed by discussions on identification and characterization of genes involved in the biosynthesis of saikosaponins. The purpose is to provide a brief review of gene extraction, functional characterization of isolated genes and assessment of expression patterns of genes encoding enzymes in the process of saikosaponin production in Bupleurum species, mainly B. kaoi. We focus on the effects of MeJA on saikosaponin production, transcription patterns of genes involved in biosynthesis and on functional depiction. PMID:23783277

  12. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome Resource Reveals Markers, Extracellular Epitopes, and Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Boheler, Kenneth R.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Kropp, Erin M.; Chuppa, Sandra; Riordon, Daniel R.; Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Burridge, Paul W.; Wu, Joseph C.; Wersto, Robert P.; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Rao, Sridhar; Wollscheid, Bernd; Gundry, Rebekah L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Detailed knowledge of cell-surface proteins for isolating well-defined populations of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) would significantly enhance their characterization and translational potential. Through a chemoproteomic approach, we developed a cell-surface proteome inventory containing 496 N-linked glycoproteins on human embryonic (hESCs) and induced PSCs (hiPSCs). Against a backdrop of human fibroblasts and 50 other cell types, >100 surface proteins of interest for hPSCs were revealed. The >30 positive and negative markers verified here by orthogonal approaches provide experimental justification for the rational selection of pluripotency and lineage markers, epitopes for cell isolation, and reagents for the characterization of putative hiPSC lines. Comparative differences between the chemoproteomic-defined surfaceome and the transcriptome-predicted surfaceome directly led to the discovery that STF-31, a reported GLUT-1 inhibitor, is toxic to hPSCs and efficient for selective elimination of hPSCs from mixed cultures. PMID:25068131

  13. Expression analysis of secreted and cell surface genes of five transformed human cell lines and derivative xenograft tumors

    PubMed Central

    Stull, Robert A; Tavassoli, Roya; Kennedy, Scot; Osborn, Steve; Harte, Rachel; Lu, Yan; Napier, Cheryl; Abo, Arie; Chin, Daniel J

    2005-01-01

    Background Since the early stages of tumorigenesis involve adhesion, escape from immune surveillance, vascularization and angiogenesis, we devised a strategy to study the expression profiles of all publicly known and putative secreted and cell surface genes. We designed a custom oligonucleotide microarray containing probes for 3531 secreted and cell surface genes to study 5 diverse human transformed cell lines and their derivative xenograft tumors. The origins of these human cell lines were lung (A549), breast (MDA MB-231), colon (HCT-116), ovarian (SK-OV-3) and prostate (PC3) carcinomas. Results Three different analyses were performed: (1) A PCA-based linear discriminant analysis identified a 54 gene profile characteristic of all tumors, (2) Application of MANOVA (Pcorr < .05) to tumor data revealed a larger set of 149 differentially expressed genes. (3) After MANOVA was performed on data from individual tumors, a comparison of differential genes amongst all tumor types revealed 12 common differential genes. Seven of the 12 genes were identified by all three analytical methods. These included late angiogenic, morphogenic and extracellular matrix genes such as ANGPTL4, COL1A1, GP2, GPR57, LAMB3, PCDHB9 and PTGER3. The differential expression of ANGPTL4 and COL1A1 and other genes was confirmed by quantitative PCR. Conclusion Overall, a comparison of the three analyses revealed an expression pattern indicative of late angiogenic processes. These results show that a xenograft model using multiple cell lines of diverse tissue origin can identify common tumorigenic cell surface or secreted molecules that may be important biomarker and therapeutic discoveries. PMID:15836779

  14. Functional analysis of putative adhesion factors in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    PubMed

    Buck, B Logan; Altermann, Eric; Svingerud, Tina; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2005-12-01

    Lactobacilli are major inhabitants of the normal microflora of the gastrointestinal tract, and some select species have been used extensively as probiotic cultures. One potentially important property of these organisms is their ability to interact with epithelial cells in the intestinal tract, which may promote retention and host-bacterial communication. However, the mechanisms by which they attach to intestinal epithelial cells are unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate cell surface proteins in Lactobacillus acidophilus that may promote attachment to intestinal tissues. Using genome sequence data, predicted open reading frames were searched against known protein and protein motif databases to identify four proteins potentially involved in adhesion to epithelial cells. Homologous recombination was used to construct isogenic mutations in genes encoding a mucin-binding protein, a fibronectin-binding protein, a surface layer protein, and two streptococcal R28 homologs. The abilities of the mutants to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells were then evaluated in vitro. Each strain was screened on Caco-2 cells, which differentiate and express markers characteristic of normal small-intestine cells. A significant decrease in adhesion was observed in the fibronectin-binding protein mutant (76%) and the mucin-binding protein mutant (65%). A surface layer protein mutant also showed reduction in adhesion ability (84%), but the effect of this mutation is likely due to the loss of multiple surface proteins that may be embedded in the S-layer. This study demonstrated that multiple cell surface proteins in L. acidophilus NCFM can individually contribute to the organism's ability to attach to intestinal cells in vitro. PMID:16332821

  15. Interactions of macromolecules with the mammalian cell surface.

    PubMed

    Wall, J; Ayoub, F; O'Shea, P

    1995-07-01

    The characterisation of fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) as a real-time indicator of the electrostatic nature of the cell membrane surface is described. The conditions appropriate for the labelling of cell membranes and the implementation of FPE as a tool to monitor the interactions of various proteins and peptides with membranes are outlined. Some complications attributed to the erythrocyte glycocalyx are examined. In addition it is shown using neuraminidase as an example, that some types of enzyme-catalysed reactions on the cell surface may be monitored in real time. It is also shown that information concerning the binding of several proteins such as serum albumin and monoclonal antibodies are accessible with this technique. The albumin in particular is shown to exhibit a saturation of binding, the analysis of which indicates that the dissociation constant for erythrocytes was determined to be 8 microM and for lymphocytes to be almost 3 microM. On the basis of this comparison together with artificial membranes, the membrane protein components of the lymphocyte surface are implicated in the binding of albumin or the erythrocyte membrane proteins reduce the affinity of the cell surface for albumin. PMID:7593308

  16. Methods To Identify Aptamers against Cell Surface Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Cibiel, Agnes; Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Ducongé, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are nucleic acid-based ligands identified through a process of molecular evolution named SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment). During the last 10-15 years, numerous aptamers have been developed specifically against targets present on or associated with the surface of human cells or infectious pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites. Several of the aptamers have been described as potent probes, rivalling antibodies, for use in flow cytometry or microscopy. Some have also been used as drugs by inhibiting or activating functions of their targets in a manner similar to neutralizing or agonistic antibodies. Additionally, it is straightforward to conjugate aptamers to other agents without losing their affinity and they have successfully been used in vitro and in vivo to deliver drugs, siRNA, nanoparticles or contrast agents to target cells. Hence, aptamers identified against cell surface biomarkers represent a promising class of ligands. This review presents the different strategies of SELEX that have been developed to identify aptamers for cell surface-associated proteins as well as some of the methods that are used to study their binding on living cells.

  17. Cdon, a cell surface protein, mediates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-06-01

    During central nervous system development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) establish multiple branched processes and axonal contacts to initiate myelination. A complete understanding of the molecular signals implicated in cell surface interaction to initiate myelination/remyelination is currently lacking. The objective of our study was to assess whether Cdon, a cell surface protein that was shown to participate in muscle and neuron cell development, is involved in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous Cdon protein is expressed in OLPs, increasing in the early differentiation stages and decreasing in mature OLGs. Immunocytochemistry of endogenous Cdon showed localization on both OLG cell membranes and cellular processes exhibiting puncta- or varicosity-like structures. Cdon knockdown with siRNA decreased protein levels by 62% as well as two myelin-specific proteins, MBP and MAG. Conversely, overexpression of full-length rat Cdon increased myelin proteins in OLGs. The complexity of OLGs branching and contact point numbers with axons were also increased in Cdon overexpressing cells growing alone or in coculture with dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Furthermore, myelination of DRGNs was decreased when OLPs were transfected with Cdon siRNA. Altogether, our results suggest that Cdon participates in OLG differentiation and myelination, most likely in the initial stages of development. GLIA 2016;64:1021-1033. PMID:26988125

  18. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  19. Cell surface morphology in epithelial malignancy and its precursor lesions.

    PubMed

    Kenemans, P; Davina, J H; de Haan, R W; van der Zanden, P; Vooys, G P; Stolk, J G; Stadhouders, A M

    1981-01-01

    The cell surface organization of cancer cells is of potentially great significance, as it may not only allow (early) diagnosis, but as it may also harbour markers for refined prognosis (degree of oncogenetic and metastatic potential), and targets for selective cancer (chemo- and immuno) therapy. With these aspects in mind, the present review deals with SEM work done on (pre-) malignant cells, both in vivo and in vitro, and in animal models. Attention, however, is focused on human cancer cells. Cancer cells in vitro may lose many of their original malignant characteristics, and show adaptations to culture conditions. Many other factors have been shown to influence cell surface morphology, such as cell cycle, cell contacts, and preparations technique. Cancer cells differ in their surface morphology from normal cells, and have an extra ordinary amount of surface activity. Human malignant epithelial cells show abundant long. pleomorphic microvilli, especially those present in effusions. In squamous epithelium (bladder, cervix) microridge system present on normal superficial cells are progressively replaced by microvilli which increase in number and degree of pleomorphism during experimental and clinical oncogenesis. The question of whether or not the appearance of long. Pleomorphic microvilli reflects an irreversible alteration of the epithelium, and thus provides an early marker of irreversible neoplastic transformation is considered and assessed on the basis of our work with (pre-) malignant cells of the human uterine cervix. Although SEM has contributed significantly to the description of oncogenesis, up to now it has no early diagnostic, prognostic or therapeutic significance. PMID:7199203

  20. Equine herpesvirus type 4 UL56 and UL49.5 proteins downregulate cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I expression independently of each other.

    PubMed

    Said, Abdelrahman; Azab, Walid; Damiani, Armando; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules are critically important in the host defense against various pathogens through presentation of viral peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), a process resulting in the destruction of virus-infected cells. Herpesviruses interfere with CTL-mediated elimination of infected cells by various mechanisms, including inhibition of peptide transport and loading, perturbation of MHC-I trafficking, and rerouting and proteolysis of cell surface MHC-I. In this study, we show that equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) modulates MHC-I cell surface expression through two different mechanisms. First, EHV-4 can lead to a significant downregulation of MHC-I expression at the cell surface through the product of ORF1, a protein expressed with early kinetics from a gene that is homologous to herpes simplex virus 1 UL56. The EHV-4 UL56 protein reduces cell surface MHC-I as early as 4 h after infection. Second, EHV-4 can interfere with MHC-I antigen presentation, starting at 6 h after infection, by inhibition of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) through its UL49.5 protein. Although pUL49.5 has no immediate effect on overall surface MHC-I levels in infected cells, it blocks the supply of antigenic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transport of peptide-loaded MHC-I to the cell surface. Taken together, our results show that EHV-4 encodes at least two viral immune evasion proteins: pUL56 reduces MHC-I molecules on the cell surface at early times after infection, and pUL49.5 interferes with MHC-I antigen presentation by blocking peptide transport in the ER. PMID:22623773

  1. Exceptional error minimization in putative primordial genetic codes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The standard genetic code is redundant and has a highly non-random structure. Codons for the same amino acids typically differ only by the nucleotide in the third position, whereas similar amino acids are encoded, mostly, by codon series that differ by a single base substitution in the third or the first position. As a result, the code is highly albeit not optimally robust to errors of translation, a property that has been interpreted either as a product of selection directed at the minimization of errors or as a non-adaptive by-product of evolution of the code driven by other forces. Results We investigated the error-minimization properties of putative primordial codes that consisted of 16 supercodons, with the third base being completely redundant, using a previously derived cost function and the error minimization percentage as the measure of a code's robustness to mistranslation. It is shown that, when the 16-supercodon table is populated with 10 putative primordial amino acids, inferred from the results of abiotic synthesis experiments and other evidence independent of the code's evolution, and with minimal assumptions used to assign the remaining supercodons, the resulting 2-letter codes are nearly optimal in terms of the error minimization level. Conclusion The results of the computational experiments with putative primordial genetic codes that contained only two meaningful letters in all codons and encoded 10 to 16 amino acids indicate that such codes are likely to have been nearly optimal with respect to the minimization of translation errors. This near-optimality could be the outcome of extensive early selection during the co-evolution of the code with the primordial, error-prone translation system, or a result of a unique, accidental event. Under this hypothesis, the subsequent expansion of the code resulted in a decrease of the error minimization level that became sustainable owing to the evolution of a high-fidelity translation system

  2. Autonomous molecular cascades for evaluation of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rudchenko, Maria; Taylor, Steven; Pallavi, Payal; Dechkovskaia, Alesia; Khan, Safana; Butler, Vincent P; Rudchenko, Sergei; Stojanovic, Milan N

    2013-08-01

    Molecular automata are mixtures of molecules that undergo precisely defined structural changes in response to sequential interactions with inputs. Previously studied nucleic acid-based automata include game-playing molecular devices (MAYA automata) and finite-state automata for the analysis of nucleic acids, with the latter inspiring circuits for the analysis of RNA species inside cells. Here, we describe automata based on strand-displacement cascades directed by antibodies that can analyse cells by using their surface markers as inputs. The final output of a molecular automaton that successfully completes its analysis is the presence of a unique molecular tag on the cell surface of a specific subpopulation of lymphocytes within human blood cells. PMID:23892986

  3. The Putative Son's Attractiveness Alters the Perceived Attractiveness of the Putative Father.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Pavol

    2015-08-01

    A body of literature has investigated female mate choice in the pre-mating context (pre-mating sexual selection). Humans, however, are long-living mammals forming pair-bonds which sequentially produce offspring. Post-mating evaluations of a partner's attractiveness may thus significantly influence the reproductive success of men and women. I tested herein the theory that the attractiveness of putative sons provides extra information about the genetic quality of fathers, thereby influencing fathers' attractiveness across three studies. As predicted, facially attractive boys were more frequently attributed to attractive putative fathers and vice versa (Study 1). Furthermore, priming with an attractive putative son increased the attractiveness of the putative father with the reverse being true for unattractive putative sons. When putative fathers were presented as stepfathers, the effect of the boy's attractiveness on the stepfather's attractiveness was lower and less consistent (Study 2). This suggests that the presence of an attractive boy has the strongest effect on the perceived attractiveness of putative fathers rather than on non-fathers. The generalized effect of priming with beautiful non-human objects also exists, but its effect is much weaker compared with the effects of putative biological sons (Study 3). Overall, this study highlighted the importance of post-mating sexual selection in humans and suggests that the heritable attractive traits of men are also evaluated by females after mating and/or may be used by females in mate poaching. PMID:25731909

  4. Cell Surface GRP78 Accelerated Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Migration by Activating STAT3.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaoli; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Xinghua; Zhang, Liang; Li, Xiang; Wang, Changhua; Sun, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    High levels of cell surface glucose regulated protein 78 (sGRP78) have been implicated in cancer growth, survival, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we report that the level of sGRP78 expression in human breast tumors gradually increases during cancer progression. Overexpression of GRP78 significantly enhanced its membrane distribution in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells, but had no effect on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. High levels of sGRP78 facilitated cell proliferation and migration, as well as suppressed cell apoptosis. Neutralization of sGRP78 by a specific antibody against GRP78 alleviated sGRP78-induced cell growth and migration. Importantly, high phosphorylation levels of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were found in human breast tumors that express sGRP78 and MCF-7 cells infected with adenovirus encoding human GRP78. Pretreatment with a GRP78 antibody suppressed STAT3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 reversed the impacts of GRP78 on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. These findings indicate that STAT3 mediates sGRP78-promoted breast cancer cell growth and migration. PMID:25973748

  5. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5

    PubMed Central

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J.; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M.; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J.; Ashford, Michael L. J.; Calaghan, Sarah C.; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J.; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J.; Fuller, William

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme–substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump. PMID:25422474

  6. Cell-surface translational dynamics of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Synapse efficacy heavily relies on the number of neurotransmitter receptors available at a given time. In addition to the equilibrium between the biosynthetic production, exocytic delivery and recycling of receptors on the one hand, and the endocytic internalization on the other, lateral diffusion and clustering of receptors at the cell membrane play key roles in determining the amount of active receptors at the synapse. Mobile receptors traffic between reservoir compartments and the synapse by thermally driven Brownian motion, and become immobilized at the peri-synaptic region or the synapse by: (a) clustering mediated by homotropic inter-molecular receptor–receptor associations; (b) heterotropic associations with non-receptor scaffolding proteins or the subjacent cytoskeletal meshwork, leading to diffusional “trapping,” and (c) protein-lipid interactions, particularly with the neutral lipid cholesterol. This review assesses the contribution of some of these mechanisms to the supramolecular organization and dynamics of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor of muscle and neuronal cells -the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Currently available information stemming from various complementary biophysical techniques commonly used to interrogate the dynamics of cell-surface components is critically discussed. The translational mobility of nAChRs at the cell surface differs between muscle and neuronal receptors in terms of diffusion coefficients and residence intervals at the synapse, which cover an ample range of time regimes. A peculiar feature of brain α7 nAChR is its ability to spend much of its time confined peri-synaptically, vicinal to glutamatergic (excitatory) and GABAergic (inhibitory) synapses. An important function of the α7 nAChR may thus be visiting the territories of other neurotransmitter receptors, differentially regulating the dynamic equilibrium between excitation and inhibition, depending on its residence time in each domain. PMID

  7. TGM2 A Cell Surface Marker in Esophageal Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Leicht, Deborah T.; Kausar, Tasneem; Wang, Zhuwen; Ferrer-Torres, Daysha; Wang, Thomas D.; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Lin, Jules; Chang, Andrew C.; Lin, Lin; Beer, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAC) are aggressive cancers that are increasing in incidence and associated with a poor prognosis. The identification of highly expressed genes in EAC relative to metaplastic Barrett’s esophagus (BE) may provide new targets for novel early cancer detection strategies using endoscopically administered, fluorescently labeled peptides. Methods Gene expression analysis of BE and EACs were used to identify the cell surface marker transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) as overexpressed in cancer. The expression of two major isoforms of TGM2 was determined by qRT-polymerase chain reaction in an independent cohort of 128 EACs. Protein expression was confirmed by tissue microarrays and immunoblot analysis of EAC cell lines. TGM2 DNA copy number was assessed using single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays and confirmed by qPCR. TGM2 expression in neoadjuvantly treated EACs and following small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown in cisplatin-treated EAC cells was used to determine its possible role in chemoresistance. Results TGM2 is overexpressed in 15 EACs relative to 26 BE samples. Overexpression of both TGM2 isoforms was confirmed in 128 EACs and associated with higher tumor stage, poor differentiation, and increased inflammatory and desmoplastic response. Tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry confirmed elevated TGM2 protein expression in EAC. Single nucleotide polymorphism and qPCR analysis revealed increased TGM2 gene copy number as one mechanism underlying elevated TGM2 expression. TGM2 was highly expressed in resistant EAC after patient treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy/radiation suggesting a role for TGM2 in chemoresistance. Conclusion TGM2 may be a useful cell surface biomarker for early detection of EAC. PMID:24828664

  8. The C. elegans sex-determining gene fem-2 encodes a putative protein phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Pilgrim, D; McGregor, A; Jäckle, P; Johnson, T; Hansen, D

    1995-01-01

    The genetic and molecular analysis of genes involved in the regulation of sex determination in Caenorhabditis elegans suggests that the gene fem-2 plays an important role in regulating a pathway transducing a non-cell-autonomous signal to a nuclear transcription factor. The wild-type fem-2 gene was cloned by identifying sequences from the C. elegans physical map that could restore normal Fem-2 function to homozygous mutant fem-2 transgenic animals. cDNA sequences mapping to the minimal rescuing region correspond to an open reading frame with a sequence similar to protein phosphatase 2C enzymes from systems as diverse as yeast, humans, and plants, but the alignments suggest that FEM-2 falls into a separate class of proteins than the canonical homologues. Several fem-2 mutant alleles were sequenced, and the mutations are predicted to cause protein changes consistent with their observed phenotypes, such as missense mutations in conditional alleles, and a nonsense mutation in a predicted null allele. This is the first evidence implicating phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation as a control mechanism in C. elegans sex determination. Images PMID:8534913

  9. rmtA, encoding a putative anginine methyltransferase, regulates secondary metabolism and development in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is found colonizing numerous oil seed crops such as corn, peanuts, sorghum, treenuts and cotton worldwide, contaminating them with aflatoxin and other harmful potent toxins. In the phylogenetically related model fungus Aspergillus nidulans, the methyltransferase, RmtA, has been de...

  10. A Putative PP2C-Encoding Gene Negatively Regulates ABA Signaling in Populus euphratica.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhuan; Zhang, Dongzhi; Zhang, Chong; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun; Tian, Qianqian

    2015-01-01

    A PP2C homolog gene was cloned from the drought-treated cDNA library of Populus euphratica. Multiple sequence alignment analysis suggested that the gene is a potential ortholog of HAB1. The expression of this HAB1 ortholog (PeHAB1) was markedly induced by drought and moderately induced by ABA. To characterize its function in ABA signaling, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing this gene. Transgenic lines exhibited reduced responses to exogenous ABA and reduced tolerance to drought compared to wide-type lines. Yeast two-hybrid analyses indicated that PeHAB1 could interact with the ABA receptor PYL4 in an ABA-independent manner. Taken together; these results indicated that PeHAB1 is a new negative regulator of ABA responses in poplar. PMID:26431530

  11. Schizosaccharomyces pombe sxa1+ and sxa2+ encode putative proteases involved in the mating response.

    PubMed

    Imai, Y; Yamamoto, M

    1992-04-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe sxa1 and sxa2 mutants showed an exaggerated response to mating pheromones, producing excessively long conjugation tubes and exhibiting mating deficiency. This phenotype was similar to phenotypes of cells bearing an activated allele of ras1, such as ras1Val-17 or ras1Leu-66, and phenotypes of cells defective in gap1. However, genetic evidence suggested that the sxa1 and sxa2 gene products are not directly involved in the Ras1 pathway. The gene products of sxa1 and sxa2, as deduced from their nucleotide sequences, were homologous to aspartyl proteases and serine carboxypeptidases, respectively. The sxa1 gene function was required for efficient mating only in h+ cells, although even disruption of sxa1 did not completely abolish the mating ability. Conversely, the sxa2 gene function was required only in h- cells. Wild-type cells produced a diffusible substance, which may be the sxa2 gene product itself, that could confer fertility to sxa2 mutant cells placed at a distance. These observations are consistent with the possibility that the sxa gene products are involved in degradation or processing of the mating pheromones and that their loss cause a persistent response to the pheromones. PMID:1549128

  12. A Putative PP2C-Encoding Gene Negatively Regulates ABA Signaling in Populus euphratica

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinhuan; Zhang, Dongzhi; Zhang, Chong; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun; Tian, Qianqian

    2015-01-01

    A PP2C homolog gene was cloned from the drought-treated cDNA library of Populus euphratica. Multiple sequence alignment analysis suggested that the gene is a potential ortholog of HAB1. The expression of this HAB1 ortholog (PeHAB1) was markedly induced by drought and moderately induced by ABA. To characterize its function in ABA signaling, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing this gene. Transgenic lines exhibited reduced responses to exogenous ABA and reduced tolerance to drought compared to wide-type lines. Yeast two-hybrid analyses indicated that PeHAB1 could interact with the ABA receptor PYL4 in an ABA-independent manner. Taken together; these results indicated that PeHAB1 is a new negative regulator of ABA responses in poplar. PMID:26431530

  13. Identification and characterization of kraken, a gene encoding a putative hydrolytic enzyme in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Edwin Chan, H Y; Harris, S J; O'Kane, C J

    1998-11-19

    Kraken, a novel Drosophila gene isolated from a 4-8-h-old Drosophila embryo cDNA library, shows homology to a family of serine hydrolases whose common feature is that they all catalyse breakage of substrates with a carbonyl-containing group. It is a single-copy gene with at least two introns and maps to position 21D on polytene chromosomes. kraken is a member of a conserved gene family. Messenger RNA of kraken is expressed ubiquitously in early embryogenesis. Later, it is concentrated in the foregut and the posterior midgut primordium. Towards the end of embryogenesis, expression of kraken is confined to the gastric caeca. During the third-instar larval stage, kraken is expressed at low levels in the gastric caeca and parts of the gut, and at higher levels in the fat body. We suggest a role for Kraken in detoxification and digestion during embryogenesis and larval development. PMID:9831651

  14. Toddlers' Duration of Attention toward Putative Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although individual differences in reactions to novelty in the toddler years have been consistently linked to risk of developing anxious behavior, toddlers' attention toward a novel, putatively threatening stimulus while in the presence of other enjoyable activities has rarely been examined as a precursor to such risk. The current study examined…

  15. Neural signals encoding shifts in beliefs.

    PubMed

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H B; Dolan, Ray

    2016-01-15

    Dopamine is implicated in a diverse range of cognitive functions including cognitive flexibility, task switching, signalling novel or unexpected stimuli as well as advance information. There is also longstanding line of thought that links dopamine with belief formation and, crucially, aberrant belief formation in psychosis. Integrating these strands of evidence would suggest that dopamine plays a central role in belief updating and more specifically in encoding of meaningful information content in observations. The precise nature of this relationship has remained unclear. To directly address this question we developed a paradigm that allowed us to decompose two distinct types of information content, information-theoretic surprise that reflects the unexpectedness of an observation, and epistemic value that induces shifts in beliefs or, more formally, Bayesian surprise. Using functional magnetic-resonance imaging in humans we show that dopamine-rich midbrain regions encode shifts in beliefs whereas surprise is encoded in prefrontal regions, including the pre-supplementary motor area and dorsal cingulate cortex. By linking putative dopaminergic activity to belief updating these data provide a link to false belief formation that characterises hyperdopaminergic states associated with idiopathic and drug induced psychosis. PMID:26520774

  16. Neural signals encoding shifts in beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H.B.; Dolan, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is implicated in a diverse range of cognitive functions including cognitive flexibility, task switching, signalling novel or unexpected stimuli as well as advance information. There is also longstanding line of thought that links dopamine with belief formation and, crucially, aberrant belief formation in psychosis. Integrating these strands of evidence would suggest that dopamine plays a central role in belief updating and more specifically in encoding of meaningful information content in observations. The precise nature of this relationship has remained unclear. To directly address this question we developed a paradigm that allowed us to decompose two distinct types of information content, information-theoretic surprise that reflects the unexpectedness of an observation, and epistemic value that induces shifts in beliefs or, more formally, Bayesian surprise. Using functional magnetic-resonance imaging in humans we show that dopamine-rich midbrain regions encode shifts in beliefs whereas surprise is encoded in prefrontal regions, including the pre-supplementary motor area and dorsal cingulate cortex. By linking putative dopaminergic activity to belief updating these data provide a link to false belief formation that characterises hyperdopaminergic states associated with idiopathic and drug induced psychosis. PMID:26520774

  17. Alignment system for encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villani, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An improved encoder alignment system is disclosed which provides an indication of the extent of misalignment and a measure of the rate at which the misalignment may be changing. The invention is adapted for use with a conventional encoder which provides a digital coarse word having at least significant bit and a digital fine word having a least significant bit and a most significant bit. The invention generates the exclusive or of the least significant bit of the coarse digital signal and the least significant bit of the fine digital signal to provide a first signal. The invention then generates the exclusive or of the first signal and the complement of the most significant bit of the fine digital signal to provide an output signal which represents the misalignment of the encoder.

  18. Developmental expression of a cell surface protein involved in sea urchin skeleton formation. [Strongylocentrotus purpuratus; Lytechinus pictus

    SciTech Connect

    Farach, M.C.; Valdizan, M.; Park, H.R.; Decker, G.L.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have previously used a monoclonal antibody (1223) to identify a 130 Kd cell surface protein involved in skeleton formation is sea urchin embryos. In the current study the authors have examined the expression of the 1223 antigen over the course of development of embryos of two species, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus pictus. The 130 Kd protein is detected in S. purp eggs on immunoblots. Labeling with (/sup 3/H) leucine and immunoaffinity chromatography show that it also is synthesized shortly after fertilization. Immunofluroescence reveals that at this early stage the 1223 antigen is uniformly distributed on all of the cells. Synthesis decreases to a minimum by the time of hatching (18 h), as does the total amount of antigen present in the embryo. A second period of synthesis commences at the mesenchyme blastula stage, when the spicule-forming primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) have appeared. During this later stage, synthesis and cell surface expression are restricted to the PMCs. In contrast to S. purp., in L. pictus the 130 Kd protein does not appear until the PMCs are formed. Hybrid embryos demonstrate a pattern of expression of the maternal species. These results suggest that early expression of 1223 antigen in S. purp. is due to utilization of maternal transcripts present in the egg. In both species later expression in PMCs appears to be the result of cell-type specific synthesis, perhaps encoded by embryonic transcripts.

  19. Cloning, protein expression and display of synthetic multi-epitope mycobacterial antigens on Salmonella typhi Ty21a cell surface.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Mohammed A A; Musa, Mustaffa; Zainuddin, Zainul F

    2011-09-01

    Expressing proteins of interest as fusion to proteins of bacterial envelope is a powerful technique for biotechnological and medical applications. The synthetic gene (VacII) encoding for T-cell epitopes of selected genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis namely, ESAT6, MTP40, 38 kDa, and MPT64 was fused with N- terminus of Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein (INP) outer membrane protein. The fused genes were cloned into a bacterial expression vector pKK223-3. The recombinant protein was purified by Ni-NAT column. VacII gene was displayed on the cell surface of Salmonella typhi Ty21a using N-terminal region of ice nucleation proteins (INP) as an anchoring motif. Glycine method confirmed that VacII was anchored on the cell surface. Western blot analysis further identified the synthesis of INP derivatives containing the N-terminal domain INP- VacII fusion protein of the expected size (52 kDa). PMID:21941936

  20. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared. PMID:24690806

  1. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates the Cell Surface Proteome and Integrin Membrane Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Thanusi; Medvedev, Sergei; Bowden, Peter; Marshall, John G.; Antonescu, Costin N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface proteome controls numerous cellular functions including cell migration and adhesion, intercellular communication and nutrient uptake. Cell surface proteins are controlled by acute changes in protein abundance at the plasma membrane through regulation of endocytosis and recycling (endomembrane traffic). Many cellular signals regulate endomembrane traffic, including metabolic signaling; however, the extent to which the cell surface proteome is controlled by acute regulation of endomembrane traffic under various conditions remains incompletely understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key metabolic sensor that is activated upon reduced cellular energy availability. AMPK activation alters the endomembrane traffic of a few specific proteins, as part of an adaptive response to increase energy intake and reduce energy expenditure. How increased AMPK activity during energy stress may globally regulate the cell surface proteome is not well understood. To study how AMPK may regulate the cell surface proteome, we used cell-impermeable biotinylation to selectively purify cell surface proteins under various conditions. Using ESI-MS/MS, we found that acute (90 min) treatment with the AMPK activator A-769662 elicits broad control of the cell surface abundance of diverse proteins. In particular, A-769662 treatment depleted from the cell surface proteins with functions in cell migration and adhesion. To complement our mass spectrometry results, we used other methods to show that A-769662 treatment results in impaired cell migration. Further, A-769662 treatment reduced the cell surface abundance of β1-integrin, a key cell migration protein, and AMPK gene silencing prevented this effect. While the control of the cell surface abundance of various proteins by A-769662 treatment was broad, it was also selective, as this treatment did not change the cell surface abundance of the transferrin receptor. Hence, the cell surface proteome is subject to acute

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy in Microbiology: New Structural and Functional Insights into the Microbial Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial cells sense and respond to their environment using their surface constituents. Therefore, understanding the assembly and biophysical properties of cell surface molecules is an important research topic. With its ability to observe living microbial cells at nanometer resolution and to manipulate single-cell surface molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful tool in microbiology. Here, we survey major breakthroughs made in cell surface microbiology using AFM techniques, emphasizing the most recent structural and functional insights. PMID:25053785

  3. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  4. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  5. Extracellular Protease Digestion to Evaluate Membrane Protein Cell Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Besingi, Richard N.; Clark, Patricia L.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins play crucial roles in signaling and as anchors for cell surface display. Proper secretion of a membrane protein can be evaluated by its susceptibility to digestion by an extracellular protease, but this requires a crucial control to confirm membrane integrity during digestion. This protocol describes how to use this approach to determine how efficiently a protein is secreted to the outer surface of Gram-negative bacteria. Its success relies upon careful selection of an appropriate intracellular reporter protein that will remain undigested if the membrane barrier remains intact, but is rapidly digested when cells are lysed prior to evaluation. Reporter proteins that are resistant to proteases (e.g. maltose-binding protein) do not return accurate results; in contrast, proteins that are more readily digested (e.g. SurA) serve as more sensitive reporters of membrane integrity, yielding more accurate measurements of membrane protein localization. Similar considerations apply when evaluating membrane protein localization in other contexts, including eukaryotic cells and organelle membranes. Evaluating membrane protein localization using this approach requires only standard biochemistry laboratory equipment for cell lysis, gel electrophoresis and western blotting. After expression of the protein of interest, this procedure can be completed in 4 h. PMID:26584447

  6. EXAFS Study of Uranyl Complexation at Pseudomonas fluorescens Cell Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh, R.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2002-12-01

    Little is known about the roles of microbial biomass as a sink and source for uranium in contaminated aquifers, nor of the impact of bacterial biochemistry on uranium speciation in the subsurface. A significant role is implied by the high affinities of both Gram positive and Gram negative cells for binding uranyl (UO2{ 2+}). In the present study, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used to identify membrane functional groups involved in uranyl binding to the Gram negative bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens from pH 3 to pH 8. Throughout this pH-range, EXAFS spectra can be described primarily in terms of coordination of carboxylic groups to uranyl. U-C distances characteristic of 4-, 5- and 8- membered rings were observed, as well as the possibility of phosphato groups. Both shell-by-shell fits and principle component analyses indicate that the functional groups involved in binding of uranyl to the cell surface do not vary systematically across the pH range investigated. This result contrasts with EXAFS results of uranyl sorbed to Gram positive bacteria, and suggests an important role for long-chain carboxylate-terminated membrane functional groups in binding uranyl.

  7. Antifouling property of highly oleophobic substrates for solar cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukada, Kenta; Nishizawa, Shingo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of solar cell conversion efficiency by bird spoor or oil smoke is a common issue. Maintaining the surface of solar cells clean to retain the incident light is of utmost importance. In this respect, there has been growing interest in the area of superhydrophobicity for developing water repelling and self-cleaning surfaces. This effect is inspired by lotus leaves that have micro papillae covered with hydrophobic wax nanostructures. Superhydrophobic surfaces on transparent substrates have been developed for removing contaminants from solar cell surfaces. However, oil cannot be removed by superhydrophobic effect. In contrast, to prevent bird spoor, a highly oleophobic surface is required. In a previous study, we reported transparent-type fabrics comprising nanoparticles with a nano/micro hierarchical structure that ensured both oleophobicity and transparency. In the current study, we developed new highly oleophobic stripes that were constructed into semi-transparent oleophobic surfaces for solar cells. Solar cell performance was successfully maintained; the total transmittance was a key factor for determining conversion efficiency.

  8. Cell Surface Access Is Modulated by Tethered Bottlebrush Proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Patrick S; McLane, Louis T; Fogg, Ruth; Scrimgeour, Jan; Temenoff, Johnna S; Granqvist, Anna; Curtis, Jennifer E

    2016-06-21

    The hyaluronan-rich pericellular matrix (PCM) plays physical and chemical roles in biological processes ranging from brain plasticity, to adhesion-dependent phenomena such as cell migration, to the onset of cancer. This study investigates how the spatial distribution of the large negatively charged bottlebrush proteoglycan, aggrecan, impacts PCM morphology and cell surface access. The highly localized pericellular milieu limits transport of nanoparticles in a size-dependent fashion and sequesters positively charged molecules on the highly sulfated side chains of aggrecan. Both rat chondrocyte and human mesenchymal stem cell PCMs possess many unused binding sites for aggrecan, showing a 2.5x increase in PCM thickness from ∼7 to ∼18 μm when provided exogenous aggrecan. Yet, full extension of the PCM occurs well below aggrecan saturation. Hence, cells equipped with hyaluronan-rich PCM can in principle manipulate surface accessibility or sequestration of molecules by tuning the bottlebrush proteoglycan content to alter PCM porosity and the number of electrostatic binding sites. PMID:27332132

  9. Cell surface lectin array: parameters affecting cell glycan signature.

    PubMed

    Landemarre, Ludovic; Cancellieri, Perrine; Duverger, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Among the "omics", glycomics is one of the most complex fields and needs complementary strategies of analysis to decipher the "glycan dictionary". As an alternative method, which has developed since the beginning of the 21st century, lectin array technology could generate relevant information related to glycan motifs, accessibility and a number of other valuable insights from molecules (purified and non-purified) or cells. Based on a cell line model, this study deals with the key parameters that influence the whole cell surface glycan interaction with lectin arrays and the consequences on the interpretation and reliability of the results. The comparison between the adherent and suspension forms of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, showed respective glycan signatures, which could be inhibited specifically by neoglycoproteins. The modifications of the respective glycan signatures were also revealed according to the detachment modes and cell growth conditions. Finally the power of lectin array technology was highlighted by the possibility of selecting and characterizing a specific clone from the mother cell line, based on the slight difference determination in the respective glycan signatures. PMID:22899543

  10. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-02-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE.

  11. Specific cell surface labeling of GPCRs using split GFP.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen-Xue; Dong, Xu; Jiang, Jing; Yang, Yu-Hong; Yang, Ju; Lu, Yun-Bi; Fang, San-Hua; Wei, Er-Qing; Tang, Chun; Zhang, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Specific cell surface labeling is essential for visualizing the internalization processes of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and for gaining mechanistic insight of GPCR functions. Here we present a rapid, specific, and versatile labeling scheme for GPCRs at living-cell membrane with the use of a split green fluorescent protein (GFP). Demonstrated with two GPCRs, GPR17 and CysLT2R, we show that two β-stands (β-stands 10 and 11) derived from a superfolder GFP (sfGFP) can be engineered to one of the three extracellular loop of a GPCR. The complementary fragment of sfGFP has nine β-strands (β-stands 1-9) that carries the mature fluorophore, and can be proteolytically derived from the full-length sfGFP. Separately the GFP fragments are non-fluorescent, but become fluorescent upon assembly, thus allowing specific labeling of the target proteins. The two GFP fragments rapidly assemble and the resulting complex is extremely tight under non-denaturing conditions, which allows real-time and quantitative assessment of the internalized GPCRs. We envision that this labeling scheme will be of great use for labeling other membrane proteins in various biological and pharmacological applications. PMID:26857153

  12. Sorption of heavy metals by prepared bacterial cell surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, S.A.; Walters, J.V.; Churchill, P.F.

    1995-10-01

    Prepared biomass from two Gram-negative and one Gram-positive bacterial strains was examined for single, binary, and quaternary mixtures of polyvalent metal cation binding to cell surfaces. The biosorption of {sub 24}Cr{sup 3+}, {sub 27}Co{sup 2+}, {sub 28}Ni{sup 2+}, and {sub 29}Cu{sup 2+} for each bacterial cell type was evaluated using a batch equilibrium method. The binding of each metal by all three bacterial cells could be described by the Freundlich sorption model. The isotherm binding constants suggest that E. coli cells are the most efficient at binding copper, chromium, and nickel; and M. luteus adsorbs cobalt most efficiently. The K-values for copper bound to P. aeruginosa and E. coli are > 2-fold and > 8-fold greater, respectively, than previous reported for intact cells. The general metal-affinity series observed was Cr{sup 3+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+}. There was a marked lower affinity of all biosorbents for Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}. M. luteus and E. coli had a strong preference for Co{sup 2+} over Ni{sup 2+}. Metal-binding enhancement could be ascribed to increased cell barrier surface porosity to metal-bearing solutions.

  13. TARM1 is a novel LRC-encoded ITAM receptor that co-stimulates pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Radjabova, Valeria; Mastroeni, Piero; Skjødt, Karsten; Zaccone, Paola; de Bono, Bernard; Goodall, Jane C; Chilvers, Edwin R; Juss, Jatinder K; Jones, Des C; Trowsdale, John; Barrow, Alexander David

    2015-01-01

    We identified a novel, evolutionarily conserved receptor encoded within the human Leukocyte Receptor Complex (LRC) and syntenic region of mouse chromosome 7, named T cell-interacting, activating receptor on myeloid cells-1 (TARM1). The transmembrane region of TARM1 contained a conserved arginine residue, consistent with association with a signaling adaptor. TARM1 associated with the ITAM adaptor Fc receptor common γ chain but not with DAP10 or DAP12. In healthy mice, TARM1 is constitutively expressed on the cell-surface of mature and immature CD11b+ Gr-1+ neutrophils within the bone marrow. Following intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment or systemic bacterial challenge TARM1 expression was upregulated by neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes and TARM1+ cells were rapidly recruited to sites of inflammation. TARM1 expression was also upregulated by bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells following stimulation with TLR agonists in vitro. Ligation of TARM1 receptor in the presence of TLR ligands, such as LPS, enhanced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages and primary mouse neutrophils, whereas TARM1 stimulation alone had no effect. Finally, an immobilized TARM1-Fc fusion protein suppressed CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation in vitro. These results suggest that a putative T cell ligand can interact with TARM1 receptor resulting in bi-directional signaling, raising the T cell activation threshold whilst co-stimulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages and neutrophils. PMID:26311901

  14. Video Time Encoding Machines

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Aurel A.; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value. PMID:21296708

  15. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  16. Reed-Solomon Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troung, T. K.; Reed, I. S.; Deutsch, L. J.; Hsu, I. S.; Wang, K.; Yeh, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Report presents mathematical principles of Berlekamp bit serial multiplier algorithm and its application to design of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) encoders for Reed-Solomon error-correcting codes. Structure made readily on single chip of negatively doped channel metal oxide semiconductor.

  17. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  18. An efficient delivery of DAMPs on the cell surface by the unconventional secretion pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haiyan; Wang, Lan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Dongmei; Min, Zhihui; Xie, Jianhui; Yu, Min; Gu, Jianxin

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} Hsp60 transported to cell surface through the classical secretory pathway was modified with N-glycosylation. {yields} HSAPB-N18 could efficiently deliver Hsp60 to the cell surface via the unconventional secretory pathway. {yields} Cell surface Hsp60 delivered by HASPB-N18 has a proper conformation. {yields} HASPB-N18 is an efficient delivery signal for other DAMP molecules such as Hsp70 and HMGB1. -- Abstract: Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are signals released from dying cells evoking the immune system response in several inflammatory disorders. In normal situations, many of DAMPs are nuclear or cytosolic proteins with defined intracellular function, but they could be found on the cell surface following tissue injury. The biological function of the translocated DAMPs is still not well known and an efficient delivery of these molecules on the cell surface is required to clarify their biological effects. In this study, we demonstrated that an unclassical secretory signal peptide, N-terminal 18 amino acids of HASPB (HASPB-N18), could efficiently deliver Hsp60, Hsp70, and HMGB1 on the cell surface. Furthermore, the delivery of these molecules on the cell surface by HASPB-N18 is not limited to a special cell line because several cell lines could use this delivery signal to deliver these molecules on the cell surface. Moreover, we demonstrated that Hsp60 on the cell surface delivered by HASPB-N18 could be recognized by a soluble form of LOX-1, which implies that DAMPs on the cell surface delivered by HASPB-N18 have a proper conformation during transport. Therefore, delivery of DAMPs by HASPB-N18 is a reliable model to further understand the biological significance of DAMPs on the cell surface.

  19. Magnetism and the putative early Martian life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.

    2001-08-01

    A short critical review is provided on three questions linking magnetism and the putative early Mars life. Was there a large internal Martian magnetic field, during which period, and is it a requisite for life? What is the origin of the paleomagnetic signal of Martian meteorites, including ALH84001? What is the present credibility of the case for fossil bacterial magnetite grains in ALH84001?

  20. Hydrophobic and Electrostatic Cell Surface Properties of Thermophilic Dairy Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    van der Mei, H. C.; de Vries, J.; Busscher, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) and microelectrophoresis were done in 10 mM potassium phosphate solutions to characterize the surfaces of thermophilic dairy streptococci, isolated from pasteurizers. Regardless of whether they were grown (in M17 broth) with lactose, sucrose, or glucose added, strains were relatively hydrophilic (showing low initial removal rates by hexadecane) and slightly negatively charged. A tendency exists for cells grown with sucrose added to be more hydrophilic than cells grown with glucose or lactose added. Also, the lowest isoelectric points, i.e., the pH values for which the zeta potentials are zero, were measured for strains with glucose added to the growth medium. The isoelectric points for the strains were all rather high, between pH 3 and 5, indicative of protein-rich surfaces, although X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy did not measure excessively large amounts of nitrogen on the cell surfaces. Both MATH and microelectrophoresis were done as a function of pH. Maxima in hydrophobicity were observed at certain pH values. Usually these pH values were in the range of the isoelectric points of the cells. Thus it appears that MATH measures an interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatic interactions. MATH measures solely hydrophobicity only when electrostatic interactions are absent, i.e., close to the isoelectric points of the cells. Considering that these thermophilic streptococci are all rather hydrophilic, a possible pathway to prevent fouling in the pasteurization process might be to render the heat exchanger plates of the pasteurizer more hydrophobic. PMID:16349127

  1. The β1-subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase interacts with BKCa channels and affects their steady-state expression on the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Smita; Dryer, Stuart E.

    2009-01-01

    Large conductance Ca2+- activated K+ channels (BKCa) encoded by the Slo1 gene play a role in the physiological regulation of many cell types. Here, we show that the β1 subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase (NKβ1) interacts with the cytoplasmic COOH-terminal region of Slo1 proteins. Reduced expression of endogenous NKβ1 markedly inhibits evoked BKCa currents with no apparent effect on their gating. In addition, NKβ1 down-regulated cells show decreased density of Slo1 subunits on the cell surface. PMID:19729011

  2. Variation of expression defects in cell surface 190-kDa protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nomura, Ryota; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans, which consists of four serotypes, c, e, f, and k, possesses a 190-kDa cell surface protein antigen (PA) for initial tooth adhesion. We used Western blot analysis to determine PA expression in 750 S. mutans isolates from 150 subjects and found a significantly higher prevalence of the isolates with PA expression defects in serotypes f and k compared to serotypes c and e. Moreover, the defect patterns could be classified into three types; no PA expression on whole bacterial cells and in their supernatant samples (Type N1), PA expression mainly seen in supernatant samples (Type N2), and only low expression of PA in the samples of whole bacterial cells (Type W). The underlying reasons for the defects were mutations in the gene encoding PA as well as in the transcriptional processing of this gene for Type N1, defects in the sortase gene for Type N2, and low mRNA expression of PA for Type W. Since cellular hydrophobicity and phagocytosis susceptibility of the PA-defective isolates were significantly lower than those of the normal expression isolates, the potential implication of such defective isolates in systemic diseases involving bacteremia other than dental caries was suggested. Additionally, multilocus sequence typing was utilized to characterize S. mutans clones that represented a proportion of isolates with PA defects of 65-100%. Therefore, we described the molecular basis for variation defects in PA expression of S. mutans. Furthermore, we also emphasized the strong association between PA expression defects and serotypes f and k as well as the clonal relationships among these isolates. PMID:25792295

  3. A novel protein, ubiquitous in marine phytoplankton, concentrates iron at the cell surface and facilitates uptake.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Joe; Sutak, Robert; Paz-Yepes, Javier; Tanaka, Atsuko; Moustafa, Ahmed; Veluchamy, Alaguraj; Thomas, Yann; Botebol, Hugo; Bouget, François-Yves; McQuaid, Jeffrey B; Tirichine, Leila; Allen, Andrew E; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Bowler, Chris

    2015-02-01

    Numerous cellular functions including respiration require iron. Plants and phytoplankton must also maintain the iron-rich photosynthetic electron transport chain, which most likely evolved in the iron-replete reducing environments of the Proterozoic ocean [1]. Iron bioavailability has drastically decreased in the contemporary ocean [1], most likely selecting for the evolution of efficient iron acquisition mechanisms among modern phytoplankton. Mesoscale iron fertilization experiments often result in blooms dominated by diatoms [2], indicating that diatoms have adaptations that allow survival in iron-limited waters and rapid multiplication when iron becomes available. Yet the genetic and molecular bases are unclear, as very few iron uptake genes have been functionally characterized from marine eukaryotic phytoplankton, and large portions of diatom iron starvation transcriptomes are genes encoding unknown functions [3-5]. Here we show that the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum utilizes ISIP2a to concentrate Fe(III) at the cell surface as part of a novel, copper-independent and thermodynamically controlled iron uptake system. ISIP2a is expressed in response to iron limitation several days prior to the induction of ferrireductase activity, and it facilitates significant Fe(III) uptake during the initial response to Fe limitation. ISIP2a is able to directly bind Fe(III) and increase iron uptake when heterologously expressed, whereas knockdown of ISIP2a in P. tricornutum decreases iron uptake, resulting in impaired growth and chlorosis during iron limitation. ISIP2a is expressed by diverse marine phytoplankton, indicating that it is an ecologically significant adaptation to the unique nutrient composition of marine environments. PMID:25557662

  4. The cell surface GRP78 facilitates the invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Xiu; Li, Hong-Dan; Zhao, Song; Zhao, Liang; Song, Hui-Juan; Wang, Guan; Guo, Qing-Jun; Luan, Zhi-Dong; Su, Rong-Jian

    2013-01-01

    Invasion is a major characteristic of hepatocellular carcinoma and one of the main causes of refractory to treatment. We have previously reported that GRP78 promotes the invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma although the mechanism underlying this change remains uncertain. In this paper, we explored the role of the cell surface GRP78 in the regulation of cancer cell invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. We found that neutralization of the endogenous cell surface GRP78 with the anti-GRP78 antibody inhibited the adhesion and invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines Mahlavu and SMMC7721. However, forced expression of the cell surface GRP78 facilitated the adhesion and invasion in SMMC7721. We further demonstrated that inhibition of the endogenous cell surface GRP78 specifically inhibited the secretion and activity of MMP-2 but did not affect the secretion and activity of MMP-9. We also found that inhibition of the cell surface GRP78 increased E-Cadherin expression and decreased N-Cadherin level. On the contrary, forced expression of the cell surface GRP78 increased N-Cadherin expression and decreased E-Cadherin level, suggesting that the cell surface GRP78 plays critical role in the regulation of EMT process. These findings suggest that the cell surface GRP78 plays a stimulatory role in the invasion process and may be a potential anti-invasion target for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24383061

  5. Oxidation of cell surface thiol groups by contact sensitizers triggers the maturation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kagatani, Saori; Sasaki, Yoshinori; Hirota, Morihiko; Mizuashi, Masato; Suzuki, Mie; Ohtani, Tomoyuki; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Aiba, Setsuya

    2010-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has a crucial role in the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) by sensitizers. Recently, it has been reported that the oxidation of cell surface thiols by an exogenous impermeant thiol oxidizer can phosphorylate p38 MAPK. In this study, we examined whether sensitizers oxidize cell surface thiols of monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). When cell surface thiols were quantified by flow cytometry using Alexa fluor maleimide, all the sensitizers that we examined decreased cell surface thiols on MoDCs. To examine the effects of decreased cell surface thiols by sensitizers on DC maturation, we analyzed the effects of an impermeant thiol oxidizer, o-phenanthroline copper complex (CuPhen). The treatment of MoDCs with CuPhen decreased cell surface thiols, phosphorylated p38 MAPK, and induced MoDC maturation, that is, the augmentation of CD83, CD86, HLA-DR, and IL-8 mRNA, as well as the downregulation of aquaporin-3 mRNA. The augmentation of CD86 was significantly suppressed when MoDCs were pretreated with N-acetyl-L-cystein or treated with SB203580. Finally, we showed that epicutaneous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene on mouse skin significantly decreased cell surface thiols of Langerhans cells in vivo. These data suggest that the oxidation of cell surface thiols has some role in triggering DC maturation by sensitizers. PMID:19641517

  6. An efficient delivery of DAMPs on the cell surface by the unconventional secretion pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Wang, Lan; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Dongmei; Min, Zhihui; Xie, Jianhui; Yu, Min; Gu, Jianxin

    2011-01-21

    Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are signals released from dying cells evoking the immune system response in several inflammatory disorders. In normal situations, many of DAMPs are nuclear or cytosolic proteins with defined intracellular function, but they could be found on the cell surface following tissue injury. The biological function of the translocated DAMPs is still not well known and an efficient delivery of these molecules on the cell surface is required to clarify their biological effects. In this study, we demonstrated that an unclassical secretory signal peptide, N-terminal 18 amino acids of HASPB (HASPB-N18), could efficiently deliver Hsp60, Hsp70, and HMGB1 on the cell surface. Furthermore, the delivery of these molecules on the cell surface by HASPB-N18 is not limited to a special cell line because several cell lines could use this delivery signal to deliver these molecules on the cell surface. Moreover, we demonstrated that Hsp60 on the cell surface delivered by HASPB-N18 could be recognized by a soluble form of LOX-1, which implies that DAMPs on the cell surface delivered by HASPB-N18 have a proper conformation during transport. Therefore, delivery of DAMPs by HASPB-N18 is a reliable model to further understand the biological significance of DAMPs on the cell surface. PMID:21168385

  7. Functional analysis of the putative integrin recognition motif on adeno-associated virus 9.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shen; Berry, Garrett E; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Cheung, Roland Y; Troupes, Andrew N; Brown, Sarah M; Kafri, Tal; Asokan, Aravind

    2015-01-16

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) display a highly conserved NGR motif on the capsid surface. Earlier studies have established this tripeptide motif as being essential for integrin-mediated uptake of recombinant AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) in cultured cells. However, functional attributes of this putative integrin recognition motif in other recombinant AAV serotypes displaying systemic transduction in vivo remain unknown. In this study, we dissect the biology of an integrin domain capsid mutant derived from the human isolate AAV9 in mice. The AAV9/NGA mutant shows decreased systemic transduction in mice. This defective phenotype was accompanied by rapid clearance of mutant virions from the blood circulation and nonspecific sequestration by the spleen. Transient vascular hyperpermeability, induced by histamine coinjection, exacerbated AAV9/NGA uptake by the spleen but not the liver. However, such treatment did not affect AAV9 virions, suggesting a potential entry/post-entry defect for the mutant in different tissues. Further characterization revealed modestly decreased cell surface binding but a more pronounced defect in the cellular entry of mutant virions. These findings were corroborated by the observation that blocking multiple integrins adversely affected recombinant AAV9 transduction in different cell types, albeit with variable efficiencies. From a structural perspective, we observed that the integrin recognition motif is located in close proximity to the galactose binding footprint on AAV9 capsids and postulate that this feature could influence cell surface attachment, cellular uptake at the tissue level, and systemic clearance by the reticuloendothelial system. PMID:25404742

  8. Functional analysis of putative phosphoenolpyruvate transporters localized to the Golgi apparatus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Higuchi, Yujiro; Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2014-11-01

    The cell surface of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is negatively charged due to the presence of pyruvylated oligosaccharides, which is important for cell-cell recognition. However, the mechanism of pyruvate supply to oligosaccharides is not clearly understood. Here, we analyzed three putative phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) transporter genes (pet1(+) , pet2(+) , and pet3(+) ) in S. pombe, identified by sequence homology search against the Arabidopsis thaliana PEP transporter AtPPT1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain carrying a disruption in pet1(+) (pet1Δ) or in pet2(+) (pet2Δ), but not the strain carrying a disruption in pet3(+) (pet3Δ), showed reduced pyruvate level on the cell surface. This reduction in pyruvate level was restored to the control level by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p in respective disruptants. Fluorescence microscope studies revealed that GFP-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p were localized to the Golgi apparatus. Although expression of neither AtPPT1 nor AtPPT2 suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype, that of chimeric constructs, where the N-terminal regions of AtPPT1 and AtPPT2 were replaced by the N-terminal region of Pet1p, partially suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction in cell surface negative charge in pet1Δ cells was restored by incubating these cells with recombinant Pvg1p and PEP. Thus, Pet1p and Pet2p are likely involved in transporting PEP from the cytoplasm into the Golgi. PMID:25195688

  9. The Text Encoding Initiative: Flexible and Extensible Document Encoding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, David T.; Ide, Nancy M.

    1997-01-01

    The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), an international collaboration aimed at producing a common encoding scheme for complex texts, examines the requirement for generality versus the requirement to handle specialized text types. Discusses how documents and users tax the limits of fixed schemes requiring flexible extensible encoding to support…

  10. Insulin stimulates movement of sorting nexin 9 between cellular compartments: a putative role mediating cell surface receptor expression and insulin action.

    PubMed Central

    MaCaulay, S Lance; Stoichevska, Violet; Grusovin, Julian; Gough, Keith H; Castelli, Laura A; Ward, Colin W

    2003-01-01

    SNX9 (sorting nexin 9) is one member of a family of proteins implicated in protein trafficking. This family is characterized by a unique PX (Phox homology) domain that includes a proline-rich sequence and an upstream phospholipid binding domain. Many sorting nexins, including SNX9, also have a C-terminal coiled region. SNX9 additionally has an N-terminal SH3 (Src homology 3) domain. Here we have investigated the cellular localization of SNX9 and the potential role it plays in insulin action. SNX9 had a cytosolic and punctate distribution, consistent with endosomal and cytosolic localization, in 3T3L1 adipocytes. It was excluded from the nucleus. The SH3 domain was responsible, at least in part, for the membrane localization of SNX9, since expression of an SH3-domain-deleted GFP (green fluorescent protein)-SNX9 fusion protein in HEK293T cells rendered the protein cytosolic. Membrane localization may also be attributed in part to the PX domain, since in vitro phospholipid binding studies demonstrated SNX9 binding to polyphosphoinositides. Insulin induced movement of SNX9 to membrane fractions from the cytosol. A GST (glutathione S-transferase)-SNX9 fusion protein was associated with IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) and insulin receptors in vitro. A GFP-SNX9 fusion protein, overexpressed in 3T3L1 adipocytes, co-immunoprecipitated with insulin receptors. Furthermore, overexpression of this GFP-SNX9 fusion protein in CHOT cells decreased insulin binding, consistent with a role for SNX9 in the trafficking of insulin receptors. Microinjection of 3T3L1 cells with an antibody against SNX9 inhibited stimulation by insulin of GLUT4 translocation. These results support the involvement of SNX9 in insulin action, via an influence on the processing/trafficking of insulin receptors. A secondary role in regulation of the cellular processing, transport and/or subcellular localization of GLUT4 is also suggested. PMID:12917015

  11. Wellcome Prize Lecture. Cell surface, ion-sensing receptors.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Daniela

    2002-07-01

    Changes in extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)o) concentration ([Ca2+]o) affect kidney function both under basal and hormone-stimulated conditions. The molecular identification of an extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR) has confirmed a direct role of Ca(2+)o on parathyroid and kidney function (i.e. independent of calciotropic hormones) as a modulator of Ca2+ homeostasis. In addition, evidence accumulated over the last 10 years has shown that CaR is also expressed in regions outside the calcium homeostatic system where its role is largely undefined but seems to be linked to regulation of local ionic homeostasis. The parathyroid and kidney CaRs are 1081 and 1079 amino acids long, respectively, and belong to the type III family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which includes other CaRs, metabotropic glutamate receptors and putative vomeronasal organ receptors. For the CaR, its low (millimolar) affinity for Ca2+, its positive cooperativity and its large ion-sensing extracellular domain, indicate that the receptor is more sensitive to changes in net cationic charge rather than to a specific ligand. Mg2+, trivalent cations of the lanthanide series and polyvalent cations such as spermine and aminoglycoside antibiotics can all activate the receptor in vitro with EC50 values in the micromolar range for trivalent and polyvalent cations or in the millimolar range for Ca2+ and Mg2+. In addition to true CaR agonists, CaR sensitivity to Ca(2+)o is also susceptible to allosteric modulation by ionic strength, L-amino acids and by pharmacological agents. This review will address endogenous and exogenous CaR agonists, the role of the receptor in the calcium homeostatic system and some speculation on possible role(s) of the CaR in regions not involved in mineral ion homeostasis. PMID:12392104

  12. Putative Excitatory and Putative Inhibitory Inputs Localize to Different Dendritic Domains in a Drosophila Flight Motoneuron

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Claudia; Duch, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Input-output computations of individual neurons may be affected by the three-dimensional structure of their dendrites and by the targeting of input synapses to specific parts of their dendrites. However, only few examples exist where dendritic architecture can be related to behaviorally relevant computations of a neuron. By combining genetic, immunohistochemical, and confocal laser scanning methods this study estimates the location of the spike initiating zone and the dendritic distribution patterns of putative synaptic inputs on an individually identified Drosophila flight motorneuron, MN5. MN5 is a monopolar neuron with more than 4000 dendritic branches. The site of spike initiation was estimated by mapping sodium channel immunolabel onto geometric reconstructions of MN5. Maps of putative excitatory cholinergic and of putative inhibitory GABAergic inputs on MN5 dendrites were created by charting tagged Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Rdl GABAA receptors onto MN5 dendritic surface reconstructions. Although these methods provided only an estimate of putative input synapse distributions, the data indicated that inhibitory and excitatory synapses were targeted preferentially to different dendritic domains of MN5, and thus, computed mostly separately. Most putative inhibitory inputs were close to spike initiation, which was consistent with sharp inhibition, as predicted previously based on recordings of motoneuron firing patterns during flight. By contrast, highest densities of putative excitatory inputs at more distant dendritic regions were consistent with the prediction that in response to different power demands during flight, tonic excitatory drive to flight motoneuron dendrites must be smoothly translated into different tonic firing frequencies. PMID:23279094

  13. VLSI Reed-Solomon Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Modular Reed-solomon encoder uses identical custom VLSI chips called "symbol slices." By cascading and properly interconnecting group of these chips, encoder is made for any desired error-correcting capability and interleaving level. VLSI encoder requires only one-tenth the number of chips required by conventional Reed-Solomon Circuit implemented with discrete IC's.

  14. Ketone isosteres of 2-N-acetamidosugars as substrates for metabolic cell surface engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, Howard C.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2000-08-22

    Novel chemical reactivity can be engendered on cell surfaces by the metabolic incorporation of unnatural sugars into cell surface glycoconjuagtes. 2-N-Acetamido sugars such as GalNAc and GlcNAc are abundant components of cell surface glycoconjugates, and hence attractive targets for metabolic cell surface engineering. Here we report (1) the synthesis of isosteric analogs bearing a ketone group in place of the N-acetamido group, and (2) evaluation of their metabolic incorporation into mammalian cell surface glycans. A ketone isostere of GalNAc was metabolized by CHO cells through the salvage pathway and delivered to O-linked glycoproteins on the cell surface. Its residence at the core position of O-linked glycans is suggested by studies with a-benzyl GalNAc, an inhibitor of O-linked oligosaccharide extension. A mutant CHO cell line lacking endogenous UDP-GalNAc demonstrated enhanced metabolism of the GalNAc analog, suggesting that competition with native intermediates might limits enzymatic transformation in mammalian cells. A ketone isostere of GlcNAc could not be detected on CHO or human cell surfaces after incubation. Thus, the enzymes in the GlcNAc salvage pathway might be less permissive of unnatural substrates than those comprising the GalNAc salvage pathway. Alternatively, high levels of endogenous GlcNAc derivatives might compete with the ketone isostere and prevent its incorporation into oligosaccharides.

  15. Multiple transcripts encode glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) is an enzyme that plays a critical role in the production of NADPH. Here we describe the identification of four transcripts (G6PDH-A, -B, -C, and -D) that putatively encode the enzyme in the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The geno...

  16. Structure of PA4019, a putative aromatic acid decarboxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Jolanta; Schnell, Robert; Schneider, Gunter

    2011-01-01

    The ubiX gene (PA4019) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been annotated as encoding a putative 3-octaprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate decarboxylase from the ubiquinone-biosynthesis pathway. Based on a transposon mutagenesis screen, this gene was also implicated as being essential for the survival of this organism. The crystal structure of recombinant UbiX determined to 1.5 Å resolution showed that the protein belongs to the superfamily of homo-oligomeric flavine-containing cysteine decarboxylases. The enzyme assembles into a dodecamer with 23 point symmetry. The subunit displays a typical Rossmann fold and contains one FMN molecule bound at the interface between two subunits. PMID:22102023

  17. Ten Putative Contributors to the Obesity Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Emily J.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Keith, Scott W.; Aronne, Louis J.; Barger, Jamie; Baskin, Monica; Benca, Ruth M.; Biggio, Joseph; Boggiano, Mary M.; Eisenmann, Joe C.; Elobeid, Mai; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Gluckman, Peter; Hanlon, Erin C.; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Redden, David T.; Ruden, Douglas M.; Wang, Chenxi; Waterland, Robert A.; Wright, Suzanne M.; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a global issue and shows no signs of abating, while the cause of this epidemic remains unclear. Marketing practices of energy-dense foods and institutionally-driven declines in physical activity are the alleged perpetrators for the epidemic, despite a lack of solid evidence to demonstrate their causal role. While both may contribute to obesity, we call attention to their unquestioned dominance in program funding and public efforts to reduce obesity, and propose several alternative putative contributors that would benefit from equal consideration and attention. Evidence for microorganisms, epigenetics, increasing maternal age, greater fecundity among people with higher adiposity, assortative mating, sleep debt, endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical iatrogenesis, reduction in variability of ambient temperatures, and intrauterine and intergenerational effects, as contributing factors to the obesity epidemic are reviewed herein. While the evidence is strong for some contributors such as pharmaceutical-induced weight gain, it is still emerging for other reviewed factors. Considering the role of such putative etiological factors of obesity may lead to comprehensive, cause specific, and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this global epidemic. PMID:19960394

  18. Quantification of differential ErbB1 and ErbB2 cell surface expression and spatial nanoclustering through plasmon coupling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Xinwei; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Reinhard, Björn M

    2012-06-13

    Cell surface receptors play ubiquitous roles in cell signaling and communication and their expression levels are important biomarkers for many diseases. Expression levels are, however, only one factor that determines the physiological activity of a receptor. For some surface receptors, their distribution on the cell surface, especially their clustering, provides additional mechanisms for regulation. To access this spatial information robust assays are required that provide detailed insight into the organization of cell surface receptors on nanometer length scales. In this manuscript, we demonstrate through combination of scattering spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and generalized multiple particle Mie theory (GMT) simulations that the density- and morphology-dependent spectral response of Au nanoparticle (NP) immunolabels bound to the epidermal growth factor receptors ErbB1 and ErbB2 encodes quantitative information of both the cell surface expression and spatial clustering of the two receptors in different unliganded in vitro cancer cell lines (SKBR3, MCF7, A431). A systematic characterization of the collective spectral responses of NPs targeted at ErbB1 and ErbB2 at various NP concentrations indicates differences in the large-scale organization of ErbB1 and ErbB2 in cell lines that overexpress these receptors. Validation experiments in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) confirm that NPs targeted at ErbB1 on A431 are more strongly clustered than NPs bound to ErbB2 on SKBR3 or MCF7 at overall comparable NP surface densities. This finding is consistent with the existence of larger receptor clusters for ErbB1 than for ErbB2 in the plasma membranes of the respective cells. PMID:22587495

  19. Genetic Modification of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Express a Single-Chain Antibody Against EGFRvIII on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Franco-Gou, Rosa; Mathis, J. Michael; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2010-01-01

    Human adult mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are under active investigation as cellular carriers for gene therapy. hMSC possess natural tropism toward tumors, however, the targeting of hMSC to specific cell populations within tumors is unexplored. In the case of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), at least half of the tumors express EGFRvIII on the cell surface, an ideal target for antibody-mediated gene/drug delivery. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of genetically modifying hMSC to express a single-chain antibody (scFv) to EGFRvIII on their surface. Nucleofection was used to transfect hMSC with cDNA encoding scFv EGFRvIII fused with PDGFR or human B7-1 transmembrane domains. The expression of scFv EGFRvIII on the cell surface was assessed by FACS. A stable population of scFv EGFRvIII-expressing hMSC was selected based on antibiotic resistance and enriched using FACS. We found that nucleofection allows the efficient expression of scFv EGFRvIII on the cell surface of hMSC. hMSCs transfected with the construct encoding scFv EGFRvIII as a fusion with PDGFRtm showed scFv EGFRvIII expression in up to 86% of cells. Most importantly, human MSC expressing scFv against EGFRvIII demonstrated enhanced binding to U87-EGFRvIII cells in vitro and at least 7-fold increased retention in human U87-EGFRvIII expressing tumors in vivo. In summary, we provide the first conclusive evidence of genetic modification of hMSC with a single-chain antibody against an antigen expressed on the surface of tumor cells, thereby opening up a new venue for enhanced delivery of gene therapy applications in the context of malignant brain cancer. PMID:19937911

  20. The naturally competent strain Streptococcus thermophilus LMD-9 as a new tool to anchor heterologous proteins on the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background From fundamental studies to industrial processes, synthesis of heterologous protein by micro-organisms is widely employed. The secretion of soluble heterologous proteins in the extracellular medium facilitates their recovery, while their attachment to the cell surface permits the use of the recombinant host cells as protein or peptide supports. One of the key points to carry out heterologous expression is to choose the appropriate host. We propose to enlarge the panel of heterologous secretion hosts by using Streptococcus thermophilus LMD-9. This lactic acid bacterium has a generally recognised as safe status, is widely used in the manufacture of yogurts, fermented milks and cheeses, and is easy to transform by natural competence. This study demonstrates the feasibility of secretion of a heterologous protein anchored to the cell surface by S. thermophilus. For this, we used the cell envelope proteinase (CEP) PrtH of Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ32 CIRM-BIA 103. Results Using S. thermophilus LMD-9 as the background host, three recombinant strains were constructed: i) a negative control corresponding to S. thermophilus PrtS- mutant where the prtS gene encoding its CEP was partially deleted; ii) a PrtH+ mutant expressing the L. helveticus PrtH pro-protein with its own motif (S-layer type) of cell-wall attachment and iii) a PrtH+WANS mutant expressing PrtH pro-protein with the LPXTG anchoring motif from PrtS. The PrtH + and PrtH + WANS genes expression levels were measured by RT-qPCR in the corresponding mutants and compared to that of prtS gene in the strain LMD-9. The expression levels of both fused prtH CEPs genes, regardless of the anchoring motif, reached up-to more than 76% of the wild-type prtS expression level. CEPs were sought and identified on the cell surface of LMD-9 wild-type strain, PrtH+ and PrtH+WANS mutants using shaving technique followed by peptide identification with tandem mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the heterologous secretion

  1. Influence of manufacturing processes on cell surface properties of probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lcr35®.

    PubMed

    Nivoliez, Adrien; Veisseire, Philippe; Alaterre, Elina; Dausset, Caroline; Baptiste, Fabrice; Camarès, Olivier; Paquet-Gachinat, Marylise; Bonnet, Muriel; Forestier, Christiane; Bornes, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the industrial process on the properties of probiotics, administered as complex manufactured products, has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we comparatively assessed the cell wall characteristics of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lcr35® together with three of its commercial formulations with intestinal applications. Putative secreted and transmembrane-protein-encoding genes were initially searched in silico in the genome of L. rhamnosus Lcr35®. A total of 369 candidate genes were identified which expressions were followed using a custom Lactobacillus DNA chip. Among them, 60 or 67 genes had their expression either upregulated or downregulated in the Lcr Restituo® packet or capsule formulations, compared to the native Lcr35® strain. Moreover, our data showed that the probiotic formulations (Lcr Lenio®, Lcr restituo® capsule and packet) showed a better capacity to adhere to intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells than the native Lcr35® strain. Microbial (MATS) tests showed that the probiotic was an electron donor and that they were more hydrophilic than the native strain. The enhanced adhesion capacity of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to epithelial Caco-2 cells and their antipathogen effect could be due to this greater surface hydrophilic character. These findings suggest that the manufacturing process influences the protein composition and the chemical properties of the cell wall. It is therefore likely that the antipathogen effect of the formulation is modulated by the industrial process. Screening of the manufactured products' properties would therefore represent an essential step in evaluating the effects of probiotic strains. PMID:25280746

  2. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOEpatents

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  3. Rotary encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for position encoding of a rotating shaft in which a polygonal mirror having a number of facets is mounted to the shaft and a light beam is directed towards the facets is presented. The facets of the polygonal mirror reflect the light beam such that a light spot is created on a linear array detector. An analog-to-digital converter is connected to the linear array detector for reading the position of the spot on the linear array detector. A microprocessor with memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate the data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the position of the shaft based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  4. Linear encoding device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A Linear Motion Encoding device for measuring the linear motion of a moving object is disclosed in which a light source is mounted on the moving object and a position sensitive detector such as an array photodetector is mounted on a nearby stationary object. The light source emits a light beam directed towards the array photodetector such that a light spot is created on the array. An analog-to-digital converter, connected to the array photodetector is used for reading the position of the spot on the array photodetector. A microprocessor and memory is connected to the analog-to-digital converter to hold and manipulate data provided by the analog-to-digital converter on the position of the spot and to compute the linear displacement of the moving object based upon the data from the analog-to-digital converter.

  5. Proteomic analysis and identification of cell surface-associated proteins of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Jayaramaiah, Usharani; Singh, Neetu; Thankappan, Sabarinath; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2016-06-01

    Blackleg is a highly fatal disease of cattle and sheep, caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore forming bacteria. Cell surface-associated proteins play a major role in inducing the protective immunity. However, the identity of a majority of cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei is not known. In the present investigation, we have used SDS-PAGE, 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting followed by mass spectrometry to identify cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei. Among the identified proteins, which have shown to offer protective antigencity in other bacteria, Enolase, Chaperonin, Ribosomal protein L10, Glycosyl Hydrolase and Flavoprotein were characterized by sequencing and their overexpression in Escherichia coli. In conclusion, cell surface-associated proteins were identified using proteomic approach and the genes for the immunoreactive proteins were expressed, which may prove to be potential diagnostic or vaccine candidates. PMID:26971466

  6. Microbial cell surface characteristics: Elucidating attachment/detachment using hydrophobicity and electrokinetic measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface properties of microorganisms play an important role in their behavior within the environment. Electrophoretic mobility and cell surface hydrophobicity of bacterial cells influence their initial interaction with surfaces and mediate their stability within an aqueous su...

  7. The expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and a putative ABC transporter permease is inversely correlated during biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes 4b G

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the molecular basis of biofilm formation in Listeria monocytogenes. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) of the deletion mutant of lm.G_1771 gene, which encodes for a putative ABC_transporter permease, is highly expressed in biofilm. In this study, the sod gene deletion mutant delta ...

  8. Effects of entrapment on nucleic acid content, cell morphology, cell surface property, and stress of pure cultures commonly found in biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Sudipta; Khanna, Rohit; Katti, Kalpana; McEvoy, John; Khan, Eakalak

    2011-10-01

    The effects of cell entrapment on nucleic acid content, cell morphology, cell surface property, and stress of major groups of bacteria (betaproteobacteria and gammaproteobacteria) in biological municipal wastewater treatment were investigated. Three different entrapment media (alginate, carrageenan, and polyvinyl alcohol) were examined. Results indicated that the entrapment and type of entrapment media affected nucleic acid content, cell morphology, cell surface property, and stress of the three representative species (Alcaligenes faecalis, Comamonas testosteroni, and Pseudomonas putida) studied. The highest deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid increases were observed with the alginate and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) entrapment, respectively. A cell morphological change from bacilli to coccoidal was observed in the case of alginate entrapment while the PVA-entrapped cells had a slim morphology when compared to non-entrapped cells and formed putative nanowires. The entrapment increased or decreased the surface roughness of cells depending on the type of entrapment media. Expression of a nitrosative stress gene, which is linked to oxygen deprivation, was observed more in the alginate-entrapped cells. These research findings advance the fundamental understanding of the entrapped cell physiology which can lead to more efficient entrapped cell-based wastewater treatment. PMID:21660542

  9. Cell surface nucleolin serves as receptor for DNA nanoparticles composed of pegylated polylysine and DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuguang; Kube, Dianne M; Cooper, Mark J; Davis, Pamela B

    2008-02-01

    Compacted DNA nanoparticles deliver transgenes efficiently to the lung following intrapulmonary dosing. Here we show that nucleolin, a protein known to shuttle between the nucleus, cytoplasm, and cell surface, is a receptor for DNA nanoparticles at the cell surface. By using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that nucleolin binds to DNA nanoparticles directly. The presence of nucleolin on the surface of HeLa and 16HBEo- cells was confirmed by surface biotinylation assay and immunofluorescence. Rhodamine-labeled DNA nanoparticles colocalize with nucleolin on the cell surface, as well as in the cytoplasm and nucleus, but not with transferrin or markers of early endosome or lysosome following cellular uptake. Reducing nucleolin on the cell surface by serum-free medium or siRNA against nucleolin treatment leads to significant reduction in luciferase reporter gene activity, while overexpressing nucleolin has the opposite effect. Competition for binding to DNA nanoparticles with exogenous purified nucleolin decreases the transfection efficiency by 60-90% in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, the data strongly suggest that cell surface nucleolin serves as a receptor for DNA nanoparticles, and that nucleolin is essential for internalization and/or transport of the nanoparticles from cell surface to the nucleus. PMID:18059369

  10. Cell-surface nucleolin is involved in lipopolysaccharide internalization and signalling in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Mao, Mei; Xu, Jian-cheng

    2011-07-01

    C23 (nucleolin) shuttling between the nucleus, cytoplasm and cell surface has been implicated in controlling regulatory processes and may play a role in pathogen infection and autoimmune diseases. It has been reported that cell surface-expressed C23 on THP-1 monocytes is involved in the inflammatory response induced by LPS (lipopolysaccharide). This study investigates whether C23 is a membrane receptor for LPS during LPS-induced AMs (alveolar macrophages) activation. First, using immunofluorescence and microscopy, we detected the expression of C23 on the surface of AMs. Second, using LPS affinity columns, we demonstrated that C23 directly binds to LPS. Third, we found that LPS colocalized with C23 on both the cell surface and in the cytoplasm. Finally, knockdown of C23 expression on the cell surface using siRNA (small interfering RNA) led to significant reductions in the internalization of LPS, in LPS-induced NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)-DNA binding and in the protein expression of TNF (tumour necrosis factor)-α and IL-6 (interleukin-6). These findings provide evidence that cell-surface C23 on AMs may serve as a receptor for LPS and are essential for internalization and transport of LPS. Furthermore, C23 participates in the regulation of LPS-induced inflammation of AMs, which indicates that cell-surface C23 is a new and promising therapeutic target for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:21309751