Science.gov

Sample records for encoding sterol regulatory

  1. Structure of the human gene encoding sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBF1) and localization of SREBF1 and SREBF2 to chromosomes 17p11.2 and 22q13

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, X.; Wu, J.; Goldstein, J.L.

    1995-02-10

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP1) and SREBP2 are structurally related proteins that control cholesterol homeostasis by stimulating transcription of sterol-regulated genes, including those encoding the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase. SREBP1 and SREBP2 are 47% identical, and they share a novel structure comprising a transcriptionally active NH{sub 2}-terminal basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) domain followed by a membrane attachment domain. Cleavage by a sterol-regulated protease frees the bHLH-Zip domain from the membrane and allows it to enter the nucleus. SREBP1 exists in several forms, possibly as a result of alternative splicing at both the 5{prime} and the 3{prime} ends of the mRNA. The genes for SREBP1 (SREBF1) and SREBP2 (SREBF2) have not been studied. In this paper we describe the cloning and characterization of the human SREBF1 gene. The gene is 26 kb in length and has 22 exons and 20 introns. The 5{prime} and 3{prime} sequences that differ between the two SREBP1 cDNAs are encoded by discrete exons, conforming the hypothesis that they result from alternative splicing. The chromosomal locations of human SREBF1 and SREBF2 were determined by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The SREBF1 gene mapped to the proximal short arm of chromosome 17 (17p11.2), and the SREBF2 gene was localized to the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q13). 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. The Major Cellular Sterol Regulatory Pathway Is Required for Andes Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riblett, Amber M.; Didigu, Chukwuka A.; Wilen, Craig B.; Malani, Nirav; Male, Frances; Lee, Fang-Hua; Bushman, Frederic D.; Cherry, Sara; Doms, Robert W.; Bates, Paul; Briley, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae comprise a large family of RNA viruses with worldwide distribution and includes the pathogenic New World hantavirus, Andes virus (ANDV). Host factors needed for hantavirus entry remain largely enigmatic and therapeutics are unavailable. To identify cellular requirements for ANDV infection, we performed two parallel genetic screens. Analysis of a large library of insertionally mutagenized human haploid cells and a siRNA genomic screen converged on components (SREBP-2, SCAP, S1P and S2P) of the sterol regulatory pathway as critically important for infection by ANDV. The significance of this pathway was confirmed using functionally deficient cells, TALEN-mediated gene disruption, RNA interference and pharmacologic inhibition. Disruption of sterol regulatory complex function impaired ANDV internalization without affecting virus binding. Pharmacologic manipulation of cholesterol levels demonstrated that ANDV entry is sensitive to changes in cellular cholesterol and raises the possibility that clinically approved regulators of sterol synthesis may prove useful for combating ANDV infection. PMID:24516383

  3. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins are transcriptional regulators of the thyroglobulin gene in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gaiping; Eder, Klaus; Ringseis, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The genes encoding sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO), both of which are essential for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, were shown to be regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP)-1c and -2. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that transcription of a further gene essential for TH synthesis, the thyroglobulin (TG) gene, is under the control of SREBP. To test this hypothesis, we studied the influence of inhibition of SREBP maturation and SREBP knockdown on TG expression in FRTL-5 thyrocytes and explored transcriptional regulation of the TG promoter by reporter gene experiments in FRTL-5 and HepG2 cells, gel shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of SREBP maturation by 25-hydroxycholesterol and siRNA-mediated knockdown of either SREBP-1c or SREBP-2 decreased mRNA and protein levels of TG in FRTL-5 thyrocytes. Reporter gene assays with wild-type and mutated TG promoter reporter truncation constructs revealed that the rat TG promoter is transcriptionally activated by nSREBP-1c and nSREBP-2. DNA-binding assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that both nSREBP-1c and nSREBP-2 bind to a SREBP binding motif with characteristics of an E-box SRE at position -63 in the rat TG promoter. In connection with recent findings that NIS and TPO are regulated by SREBP in thyrocytes the present findings support the view that SREBP are regulators of essential steps of TH synthesis in the thyroid gland such as iodide uptake, iodide oxidation and iodination of tyrosyl residues of TG. This moreover suggests that SREBP may be molecular targets for pharmacological modulation of TH synthesis. PMID:27321819

  4. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Ritsu; Kallen, C.B.; Babalola, G.O.; Rennert, H.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Billheimer, J.T. )

    1991-01-15

    The authors report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). The 1.3-kilobase (kb) cDNA contains an open reading frame which encompasses a 143-amino acid sequence which is 89% identical to the rat SCP{sub 2} amino acid sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the polypeptide reveals a 20-residue amino-terminal leader sequence in front of the mature polypeptide, which contains a carboxyl-terminal tripeptide (Ala-Lys-Leu) related to the peroxisome targeting sequence. The expressed cDNA in COS-7 cells yields a 15.3-kDa polypeptide and increased amounts of a 13.2-kDa polypeptide, both reacting with a specific rabbit antiserum to rat liver SCP{sub 2}. The cDNA insert hybridizes with 3.2- and 1.8-kb mRNA species in human liver poly(A){sup +} RNA. In human fibroblasts and placenta the 1.8-kb mRNA was most abundant. Southern blot analysis suggests either that there are multiple copies of the SCP{sub 2} gene in the human genome or that the SCP{sub 2} gene is very large. Coexpression of the SCP{sub 2} cDNA with expression vectors for cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme and adrenodoxin resulted in a 2.5-fold enhancement of progestin synthesis over that obtained with expression of the steroidogenic enzyme system alone. These findings are concordant with the notion that SCP{sub 2} plays a role in regulating steroidogenesis, among other possible functions.

  5. Isolation, characterization, and regulation of the Candida albicans ERG27 gene encoding the sterol 3-keto reductase.

    PubMed

    Pierson, C A; Jia, N; Mo, C; Lees, N D; Sturm, A M; Eckstein, J; Barbuct, R; Bard, M

    2004-10-01

    The Candida albicans ERG27 gene which encodes the 3-keto reductase enzyme required for sterol C-4 demethylation was isolated and found to encode a 349 amino acid protein that is 60% identical at the amino acid level to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Erg27p. A C. albicans erg27 null was created in a strain containing an integrated ERG27 rescue cassette under the control of the pMAL2 inducible promoter. The C. albicans erg27 strain was able to grow only in the presence of maltose indicating that the ERG27 gene is essential. The C. albicans erg27 null showed complete loss of both 3-keto reductase and oxidosqualene cyclase (Erg7p) activities compromising all sterol synthesis. These results suggest that Erg27p inhibitors might be effective antifungals. To explore ERG27 regulation, an erg11 null strain was generated. C. albicans erg6 and erg24 mutants were also employed along with the inhibitors, itraconazole and zaragozic acid A, to characterize ERG27 expression using Northern analysis. Expression was increased two- to fourfold in erg11, erg6 and erg24 backgrounds. However, itraconazole which targets Erg11p (lanosterol demethylase) increased ERG27 expression 10-fold and zaragozic acid A which targets the Erg9p (squalene synthase) increased ERG27 expression fivefold. The azole and erg11 results support other observations that azoles may affect non-sterol targets. PMID:15552648

  6. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  7. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins are regulators of the NIS gene in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Ringseis, Robert; Rauer, Christine; Rothe, Susanne; Gessner, Denise K; Schütz, Lisa-Marie; Luci, Sebastian; Wen, Gaiping; Eder, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    The uptake of iodide into the thyroid, an essential step in thyroid hormone synthesis, is an active process mediated by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS). Despite its strong dependence on TSH, the master regulator of the thyroid, the NIS gene was also reported to be regulated by non-TSH signaling pathways. In the present study we provide evidence that the rat NIS gene is subject to regulation by sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which were initially identified as master transcriptional regulators of lipid biosynthesis and uptake. Studies in FRTL-5 thyrocytes revealed that TSH stimulates expression and maturation of SREBPs and expression of classical SREBP target genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and uptake. Almost identical effects were observed when the cAMP agonist forskolin was used instead of TSH. In TSH receptor-deficient mice, in which TSH/cAMP-dependent gene regulation is blocked, the expression of SREBP isoforms in the thyroid was markedly reduced when compared with wild-type mice. Sterol-mediated inhibition of SREBP maturation and/or RNA interference-mediated knockdown of SREBPs reduced expression of NIS and NIS-specific iodide uptake in FRTL-5 cells. Conversely, overexpression of active SREBPs caused a strong activation of the 5'-flanking region of the rat NIS gene mediated by binding to a functional SREBP binding site located in the 5'-untranslated region of the rat NIS gene. These findings show that TSH acts as a regulator of SREBP expression and maturation in thyroid epithelial cells and that SREBPs are novel transcriptional regulators of NIS. PMID:23542164

  8. Structural Requirements for Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Cleavage in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Rocky; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are central regulators of cellular lipid synthesis and homeostasis. Mammalian SREBPs are proteolytically activated and liberated from the membrane by Golgi Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. Fission yeast SREBPs, Sre1 and Sre2, employ a different mechanism that genetically requires the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex for cleavage activation. Here, we established Sre2 as a model to define structural requirements for SREBP cleavage. We showed that Sre2 cleavage does not require the N-terminal basic helix-loop-helix zipper transcription factor domain, thus separating cleavage of Sre2 from its transcription factor function. From a mutagenesis screen of 94 C-terminal residues of Sre2, we isolated 15 residues required for cleavage and further identified a glycine-leucine sequence required for Sre2 cleavage. Importantly, the glycine-leucine sequence is located at a conserved distance before the first transmembrane segment of both Sre1 and Sre2 and cleavage occurs in between this sequence and the membrane. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a broad conservation of this novel glycine-leucine motif in SREBP homologs of ascomycete fungi, including the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus where SREBP is required for virulence. Consistent with this, the sequence was also required for cleavage of the oxygen-responsive transcription factor Sre1 and adaptation to hypoxia, demonstrating functional conservation of this cleavage recognition motif. These cleavage mutants will aid identification of the fungal SREBP protease and facilitate functional dissection of the Dsc E3 ligase required for SREBP activation and fungal pathogenesis. PMID:23729666

  9. Sterol Synthesis in Diverse Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jeremy H; Yin, Xinchi; Welander, Paula V

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of eukaryotic cells whose biosynthesis and function has been studied extensively. Sterols are also recognized as the diagenetic precursors of steranes preserved in sedimentary rocks where they can function as geological proxies for eukaryotic organisms and/or aerobic metabolisms and environments. However, production of these lipids is not restricted to the eukaryotic domain as a few bacterial species also synthesize sterols. Phylogenomic studies have identified genes encoding homologs of sterol biosynthesis proteins in the genomes of several additional species, indicating that sterol production may be more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. Although the occurrence of sterol synthesis genes in a genome indicates the potential for sterol production, it provides neither conclusive evidence of sterol synthesis nor information about the composition and abundance of basic and modified sterols that are actually being produced. Here, we coupled bioinformatics with lipid analyses to investigate the scope of bacterial sterol production. We identified oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc), which catalyzes the initial cyclization of oxidosqualene to the basic sterol structure, in 34 bacterial genomes from five phyla (Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia) and in 176 metagenomes. Our data indicate that bacterial sterol synthesis likely occurs in diverse organisms and environments and also provides evidence that there are as yet uncultured groups of bacterial sterol producers. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic Osc sequences confirmed a complex evolutionary history of sterol synthesis in this domain. Finally, we characterized the lipids produced by Osc-containing bacteria and found that we could generally predict the ability to synthesize sterols. However, predicting the final modified sterol based on our current knowledge of sterol synthesis was difficult. Some bacteria

  10. Sterol Synthesis in Diverse Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jeremy H.; Yin, Xinchi; Welander, Paula V.

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of eukaryotic cells whose biosynthesis and function has been studied extensively. Sterols are also recognized as the diagenetic precursors of steranes preserved in sedimentary rocks where they can function as geological proxies for eukaryotic organisms and/or aerobic metabolisms and environments. However, production of these lipids is not restricted to the eukaryotic domain as a few bacterial species also synthesize sterols. Phylogenomic studies have identified genes encoding homologs of sterol biosynthesis proteins in the genomes of several additional species, indicating that sterol production may be more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. Although the occurrence of sterol synthesis genes in a genome indicates the potential for sterol production, it provides neither conclusive evidence of sterol synthesis nor information about the composition and abundance of basic and modified sterols that are actually being produced. Here, we coupled bioinformatics with lipid analyses to investigate the scope of bacterial sterol production. We identified oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc), which catalyzes the initial cyclization of oxidosqualene to the basic sterol structure, in 34 bacterial genomes from five phyla (Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia) and in 176 metagenomes. Our data indicate that bacterial sterol synthesis likely occurs in diverse organisms and environments and also provides evidence that there are as yet uncultured groups of bacterial sterol producers. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic Osc sequences confirmed a complex evolutionary history of sterol synthesis in this domain. Finally, we characterized the lipids produced by Osc-containing bacteria and found that we could generally predict the ability to synthesize sterols. However, predicting the final modified sterol based on our current knowledge of sterol synthesis was difficult. Some bacteria

  11. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome. PMID:26140926

  12. Sterol biosynthesis by a prokaryote: first in vitro identification of the genes encoding squalene epoxidase and lanosterol synthase from Methylococcus capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Chiaki; Motegi, Akihiro; Sato, Tsutomu; Onodera, Masayuki; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2007-10-01

    Sterol biosynthesis by prokaryotic organisms is very rare. Squalene epoxidase and lanosterol synthase are prerequisite to cyclic sterol biosynthesis. These two enzymes, from the methanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus, were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. Structural analyses of the enzymatic products indicated that the reactions proceeded in a complete regio- and stereospecific fashion to afford (3S)-2,3-oxidosqualene from squalene and lanosterol from (3S)-2,3-oxidosqualene, in full accordance with those of eukaryotes. However, our result obtained with the putative lanosterol synthase was inconsistent with a previous report that the prokaryote accepts both (3R)- and (3S)-2,3-oxidosqualenes to afford 3-epi-lanosterol and lanosterol, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the existence of the genes encoding squalene epoxidase and lanosterol synthase in prokaryotes by establishing the enzyme activities. The evolutionary aspect of prokaryotic squalene epoxidase and lanosterol synthase is discussed. PMID:17928701

  13. The sterol regulatory element binding proteins are essential for the metabolic programming of effector T cells and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kidani, Yoko; Elsaesser, Heidi; Hock, M Benjamin; Vergnes, Laurent; Williams, Kevin J; Argus, Joseph P; Marbois, Beth N; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Wilson, Elizabeth B; Osborne, Timothy F; Graeber, Thomas G; Reue, Karen; Brooks, David G; Bensinger, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Newly activated CD8+ T cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the extraordinary biosynthetic demands of clonal expansion; however, the signals mediating metabolic reprogramming remain poorly defined. Herein, we demonstrate an essential role for sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) in the acquisition of effector cell metabolism. Without SREBP signaling, CD8+ T cells are unable to blast, resulting in markedly attenuated clonal expansion during viral infection. Mechanistic studies indicate that SREBPs are essential to meet the heightened lipid requirements of membrane synthesis during blastogenesis. SREBPs are dispensable for homeostatic proliferation, indicating a context-specific requirement for SREBPs in effector responses. These studies provide insights into the molecular signals underlying metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells during the transition from quiescence to activation. PMID:23563690

  14. In vivo promoter analysis on refeeding response of hepatic sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c expression

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Yahagi, Naoya; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Sekiya, Motohiro; Iizuka, Yoko; Ohashi, Ken; Gotoda, Takanari; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nagai, Ryozo; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2007-11-16

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c is the master regulator of lipogenic gene expression in liver. The mRNA abundance of SREBP-1c is markedly induced when animals are refed after starvation, although the regulatory mechanism is so far unknown. To investigate the mechanism of refeeding response of SREBP-1c gene expression in vivo, we generated a transgenic mouse model that carries 2.2 kb promoter region fused to the luciferase reporter gene. These transgenic mice exhibited refeeding responses of the reporter in liver and adipose tissues with extents essentially identical to those of endogenous SREBP-1c mRNA. The same results were obtained from experiments using adenovirus-mediated SREBP-1c-promoter-luciferase fusion gene transduction to liver. These data demonstrate that the regulation of SREBP-1c gene expression is at the transcription level, and that the 2.2 kb 5'-flanking region is sufficient for this regulation. Moreover, when these transgenic or adenovirus-infected mice were placed on insulin-depleted state by streptozotocin treatment, the reporter expression was upregulated as strongly as in control mice, demonstrating that this regulation is not dominated by serum insulin level. These mice are the first models to provide the mechanistic insight into the transcriptional regulation of SREBP-1c gene in vivo.

  15. A clinical isolate of Candida albicans with mutations in ERG11 (encoding sterol 14alpha-demethylase) and ERG5 (encoding C22 desaturase) is cross resistant to azoles and amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Martel, Claire M; Parker, Josie E; Bader, Oliver; Weig, Michael; Gross, Uwe; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2010-09-01

    A clinical isolate of Candida albicans was identified as an erg5 (encoding sterol C22 desaturase) mutant in which ergosterol was not detectable and ergosta 5,7-dienol comprised >80% of the total sterol fraction. The mutant isolate (CA108) was resistant to fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and clotrimazole (MIC values, 64, 8, 2, 1, and 2 microg ml(-1), respectively); azole resistance could not be fully explained by the activity of multidrug resistance pumps. When susceptibility tests were performed in the presence of a multidrug efflux inhibitor (tacrolimus; FK506), CA108 remained resistant to azole concentrations higher than suggested clinical breakpoints for C. albicans (efflux-inhibited MIC values, 16 and 4 microg ml(-1) for fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively). Gene sequencing revealed that CA108 was an erg11 erg5 double mutant harboring a single amino acid substitution (A114S) in sterol 14alpha-demethylase (Erg11p) and sequence repetition (10 duplicated amino acids), which nullified C22 desaturase (Erg5p) function. Owing to a lack of ergosterol, CA108 was also resistant to amphotericin B (MIC, 2 microg ml(-1)). This constitutes the first report of a C. albicans erg5 mutant isolated from the clinic. PMID:20547793

  16. Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa reverses acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis through blocking sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 maturation.

    PubMed

    Lian, Li-Hua; Wu, Yan-Ling; Song, Shun-Zong; Wan, Ying; Xie, Wen-Xue; Li, Xin; Bai, Ting; Ouyang, Bing-Qing; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2010-12-22

    This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effects of Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa (GM) on acute alcohol-induced fatty liver. Mice were treated with ethanol (5 g/kg of body weight) by gavage every 12 h for a total of three doses to induce acute fatty liver. Methanol extract of GM (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) or silymarin (100 mg/kg) was gavaged simultaneously with ethanol for three doses. GM administration significantly reduced the increases in serum ALT and AST levels, the serum and hepatic triglyceride levels, at 4 h after the last ethanol administration. GM was also found to prevent ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and necrosis, as indicated by liver histopathological studies. Additionally, GM suppressed the elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, restored the glutathione (GSH) levels, and enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities. The concurrent administration of GM efficaciously abrogated cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction. Moreover, GM significantly reduced the nuclear translocation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (nSREBP-1) in ethanol-treated mice. These data indicated that GM possessed the ability to prevent ethanol-induced acute liver steatosis, possibly through blocking CYP2E1-mediated free radical scavenging effects and SREBP-1-regulated fatty acid synthesis. Especially, GM may be developed as a potential therapeutic candidate for ethanol-induced oxidative damage in liver. PMID:21105651

  17. Regulation of steroid 5-{alpha} reductase type 2 (Srd5a2) by sterol regulatory element binding proteins and statin

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young-Kyo; Zhu, Bing; Jeon, Tae-Il; Osborne, Timothy F.

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we show that sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate expression of Srd5a2, an enzyme that catalyzes the irreversible conversion of testosterone to dihydroxytestosterone in the male reproductive tract and is highly expressed in androgen-sensitive tissues such as the prostate and skin. We show that Srd5a2 is induced in livers and prostate from mice fed a chow diet supplemented with lovastatin plus ezitimibe (L/E), which increases the activity of nuclear SREBP-2. The three fold increase in Srd5a2 mRNA mediated by L/E treatment was accompanied by the induction of SREBP-2 binding to the Srd5a2 promoter detected by a ChIP-chip assay in liver. We identified a SREBP-2 responsive region within the first 300 upstream bases of the mouse Srd5a2 promoter by co-transfection assays which contain a site that bound SREBP-2 in vitro by an EMSA. Srd5a2 protein was also induced in cells over-expressing SREBP-2 in culture. The induction of Srd5a2 through SREBP-2 provides a mechanistic explanation for why even though statin therapy is effective in reducing cholesterol levels in treating hypercholesterolemia it does not compromise androgen production in clinical studies.

  18. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein Regulates the Expression and Metabolic Functions of Wild-Type and Oncogenic IDH1.

    PubMed

    Ricoult, Stéphane J H; Dibble, Christian C; Asara, John M; Manning, Brendan D

    2016-09-15

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) is a major transcriptional regulator of the enzymes underlying de novo lipid synthesis. However, little is known about the SREBP-mediated control of processes that indirectly support lipogenesis, for instance, by supplying reducing power in the form of NAPDH or directing carbon flux into lipid precursors. Here, we characterize isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) as a transcriptional target of SREBP across a spectrum of cancer cell lines and human cancers. IDH1 promotes the synthesis of lipids specifically from glutamine-derived carbons. Neomorphic mutations in IDH1 occur frequently in certain cancers, leading to the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). We found that SREBP induces the expression of oncogenic IDH1 and influences 2-HG production from glucose. Treatment of cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol or statins, which respectively inhibit or activate SREBP, further supports SREBP-mediated regulation of IDH1 and, in cells with oncogenic IDH1, carbon flux into 2-HG. PMID:27354064

  19. Piperine Induces Hepatic Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Expression through Proteolytic Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Ayasa; Miyata, Shingo; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Because the hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR) uptakes plasma lipoproteins and lowers plasma LDL cholesterol, the activation of LDLR is a promising drug target for atherosclerosis. In the present study, we identified the naturally occurring alkaloid piperine, as an inducer of LDLR gene expression by screening the effectors of human LDLR promoter. The treatment of HepG2 cells with piperine increased LDLR expression at mRNA and protein levels and stimulated LDL uptake. Subsequent luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the mutation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-binding element abolished the piperine-mediated induction of LDLR promoter activity. Further, piperine treatments increased mRNA levels of several SREBP targets and mature forms of SREBPs. However, the piperine-mediated induction of the mature forms of SREBPs was not observed in SRD–15 cells, which lack insulin-induced gene–1 (Insig–1) and Insig–2. Finally, the knockdown of SREBPs completely abolished the piperine-meditated induction of LDLR gene expression in HepG2 cells, indicating that piperine stimulates the proteolytic activation of SREBP and subsequent induction of LDLR expression and activity. PMID:26431033

  20. Noncholesterol sterols.

    PubMed

    Vecka, Marek; Zak, Ales; Tvrzická, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Although most of us are more or less familiar with the term "cholesterol", the world of sterols is far more complicated and interesting. Apart from cholesterol, many non-cholesterol sterols can be found in human plasma and these sterols serve many important functions in human organism. They are either derived from endogenous biosynthesis of cholesterol or they come from dietary sources (phytosterols). The sole cholesterol molecule is used for keeping our cell membranes fit, for signalization purposes as well as a precursor for bile acids and steroid hormones. The compounds prior to cholesterol in its biosynthetic pathway were identified as vitamin D3 precursor, meiosis activating sterols and nowadays it seems that they could play a role in cholesterol homeostasis. The sterols from ingested vegetable sources, the phytosterols, are expelled from enterocytes and thus indirectly help our gut in coping with abundant cholesterol in the lumen. Higher plants synthesize many phytosterols, but in marine organisms, we can find other innumerous sterol molecules. The diversity of sterol molecules produced and resistance of their tetracyclic core to enzymatic activities implies crucial importance of sterols during the ontogenesis of multicellular organisms. First oxygen appeared on the Earth app. 2.7 billion years ago and since that time, every new life form took the advantage of oxygen needed also for build-up of sterol molecules. The last decades changed our view to the sterol molecules on almost at all levels of their appearance in human body. In the gut, the absorption of sterols was proven to be protein dependent and the quest for the transporter was successful. The general concepts of intracellular homeostasis of cholesterol have been described including the covalent interaction unbelievable so far - cholesterol and a protein. The clinical importance of non-cholesterol sterols rises with the effort to discover underlying facts about the causes of atherosclerosis. The

  1. Mutations in the gene encoding peroxisomal sterol carrier protein X (SCPx) cause leukencephalopathy with dystonia and motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ferdinandusse, S; Kostopoulos, P; Denis, S; Rusch, H; Overmars, H; Dillmann, U; Reith, W; Haas, D; Wanders, R J A; Duran, M; Marziniak, M

    2006-06-01

    In this report, we describe the first known patient with a deficiency of sterol carrier protein X (SCPx), a peroxisomal enzyme with thiolase activity, which is required for the breakdown of branched-chain fatty acids. The patient presented with torticollis and dystonic head tremor as well as slight cerebellar signs with intention tremor, nystagmus, hyposmia, and azoospermia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed leukencephalopathy and involvement of the thalamus and pons. Metabolite analyses of plasma revealed an accumulation of the branched-chain fatty acid pristanic acid, and abnormal bile alcohol glucuronides were excreted in urine. In cultured skin fibroblasts, the thiolytic activity of SCPx was deficient, and no SCPx protein could be detected by western blotting. Mutation analysis revealed a homozygous 1-nucleotide insertion, 545_546insA, leading to a frameshift and premature stop codon (I184fsX7). PMID:16685654

  2. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-dependent regulation of lipid synthesis supports cell survival and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of lipid metabolism via activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) has emerged as an important function of the Akt/mTORC1 signaling axis. Although the contribution of dysregulated Akt/mTORC1 signaling to cancer has been investigated extensively and altered lipid metabolism is observed in many tumors, the exact role of SREBPs in the control of biosynthetic processes required for Akt-dependent cell growth and their contribution to tumorigenesis remains unclear. Results We first investigated the effects of loss of SREBP function in non-transformed cells. Combined ablation of SREBP1 and SREBP2 by siRNA-mediated gene silencing or chemical inhibition of SREBP activation induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and engaged the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, specifically under lipoprotein-deplete conditions in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Induction of ER-stress led to inhibition of protein synthesis through increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. This demonstrates for the first time the importance of SREBP in the coordination of lipid and protein biosynthesis, two processes that are essential for cell growth and proliferation. SREBP ablation caused major changes in lipid composition characterized by a loss of mono- and poly-unsaturated lipids and induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Alterations in lipid composition and increased ROS levels, rather than overall changes to lipid synthesis rate, were required for ER-stress induction. Next, we analyzed the effect of SREBP ablation in a panel of cancer cell lines. Importantly, induction of apoptosis following SREBP depletion was restricted to lipoprotein-deplete conditions. U87 glioblastoma cells were highly susceptible to silencing of either SREBP isoform, and apoptosis induced by SREBP1 depletion in these cells was rescued by antioxidants or by restoring the levels of mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, silencing of SREBP1

  3. Alterations in the predicted regulatory and coding regions of the sterol 14α-demethylase gene (CYP51) confer decreased azole sensitivity in the oilseed rape pathogen Pyrenopeziza brassicae.

    PubMed

    Carter, Helen E; Fraaije, Bart A; West, Jonathan S; Kelly, Steven L; Mehl, Andreas; Shaw, Michael W; Cools, Hans J

    2014-06-01

    The incidence and severity of light leaf spot epidemics caused by the ascomycete fungus Pyrenopeziza brassicae on UK oilseed rape crops are increasing. The disease is currently controlled by a combination of host resistance, cultural practices and fungicide applications. We report decreases in sensitivity of modern UK P. brassicae isolates to the azole (imidazole and triazole) class of fungicides. By cloning and sequencing the P. brassicae CYP51 (PbCYP51) gene, encoding the azole target sterol 14α-demethylase, we identified two non-synonymous mutations encoding substitutions G460S and S508T associated with reduced azole sensitivity. We confirmed the impact of the encoded PbCYP51 changes on azole sensitivity and protein activity by heterologous expression in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant YUG37:erg11 carrying a controllable promoter of native CYP51 expression. In addition, we identified insertions in the predicted regulatory regions of PbCYP51 in isolates with reduced azole sensitivity. The presence of these insertions was associated with enhanced transcription of PbCYP51 in response to subinhibitory concentrations of the azole fungicide tebuconazole. Genetic analysis of in vitro crosses of sensitive and resistant isolates confirmed the impact of PbCYP51 alterations in coding and regulatory sequences on a reduced sensitivity phenotype, as well as identifying a second major gene at another locus contributing to resistance in some isolates. The least sensitive field isolates carry combinations of upstream insertions and non-synonymous mutations, suggesting that PbCYP51 evolution is ongoing and the progressive decline in azole sensitivity of UK P. brassicae populations will continue. The implications for the future control of light leaf spot are discussed. PMID:24298976

  4. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1)c promoter: Characterization and transcriptional regulation by mature SREBP-1 and liver X receptor α in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Wang, H P; Wang, H; Zhang, T Y; Tian, H B; Yao, D W; Loor, J J

    2016-02-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) is a key transcription factor that regulates lipogenesis in rodent liver. Two isoforms (SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c) of SREBP-1 are transcribed by an alternative promoter on the same gene (SREBF1), and the isoforms differ only in their first exon. Although the regulatory effects of SREBP-1 on lipid and milk fat synthesis have received much attention in ruminants, SREBP-1c promoter and its regulatory mechanisms have not been characterized in the goat. In the present study, we cloned and sequenced a 2,012-bp fragment of the SREBP-1c 5'-flanking region from goat genomic DNA. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that SREBP-1c is transcriptionally activated by the liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist T0901317, and is decreased by SREBP-1 small interfering (si)RNA. A 5' deletion analysis revealed a core promoter region located -395 to +1 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site (TSS). Site-directed mutagenesis of LXRα binding elements (LXRE1 and LXRE2) and sterol regulatory elements (SRE1 and SRE2) revealed that the full effects of T 4506585 require the presence of both LXRE and SRE. We also characterized a new SRE (SRE1) and demonstrated a direct role of SREBP-1 (auto-loop regulation) in maintaining its basal transcription activity. Results suggest that goat SREBP-1c gene is transcriptionally regulated by mature SREBP-1 (auto-loop circuit regulation) and LXRα in goat mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26709176

  5. A Sterol-Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is Required for Cell Polarity, Hypoxia Adaptation, Azole Drug Resistance, and Virulence in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Willger, Sven D.; Puttikamonkul, Srisombat; Kim, Kwang-Hyung; Burritt, James B.; Grahl, Nora; Metzler, Laurel J.; Barbuch, Robert; Bard, Martin; Lawrence, Christopher B.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    At the site of microbial infections, the significant influx of immune effector cells and the necrosis of tissue by the invading pathogen generate hypoxic microenvironments in which both the pathogen and host cells must survive. Currently, whether hypoxia adaptation is an important virulence attribute of opportunistic pathogenic molds is unknown. Here we report the characterization of a sterol-regulatory element binding protein, SrbA, in the opportunistic pathogenic mold, Aspergillus fumigatus. Loss of SrbA results in a mutant strain of the fungus that is incapable of growth in a hypoxic environment and consequently incapable of causing disease in two distinct murine models of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Transcriptional profiling revealed 87 genes that are affected by loss of SrbA function. Annotation of these genes implicated SrbA in maintaining sterol biosynthesis and hyphal morphology. Further examination of the SrbA null mutant consequently revealed that SrbA plays a critical role in ergosterol biosynthesis, resistance to the azole class of antifungal drugs, and in maintenance of cell polarity in A. fumigatus. Significantly, the SrbA null mutant was highly susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Thus, these findings present a new function of SREBP proteins in filamentous fungi, and demonstrate for the first time that hypoxia adaptation is likely an important virulence attribute of pathogenic molds. PMID:18989462

  6. Allyl isothiocyanate suppresses the proteolytic activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins and de novo fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2016-05-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are a family of transcription factors that regulate lipid homeostasis by controlling the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis. In this study, we used a stable cell line that expresses a luciferase reporter gene driven by an SRE-containing fatty acid synthase promoter to identify allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), one of the major isothiocyanates in cruciferous vegetables, as a novel SREBP inactivator. We found that AITC downregulated the proteolytic processing of SREBPs and the expression of their target genes in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells. Furthermore, AITC reduced the de novo synthesis of both fatty acids and cholesterol. Our results indicate a novel physiological function of AITC in lipid metabolism regulation. PMID:26822063

  7. The sterol C-14 reductase encoded by the Neurospora crassa erg-3 gene: essential charged and polar residues identified by site-specific mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Kasbekar, D P

    2002-01-01

    Sterol C-14 reductase catalyses the reduction of the Delta(14,15) bond in intermediates in the sterol biosynthesis pathway using NADPH as a cofactor. We have undertaken a systematic site-directed mutational analysis of all the conserved charged and potentially proton-donating residues of the sterol C-14 reductase from Neurospora crassa. The effect of each mutation was determined using an in vivo assay based on the complementation of the corresponding N. crassa mutant ( erg-3). The non-complementing mutations were also tested in the erg24 mutant of Saccharomyces cervisiae. The results are discussed with reference to the predicted topology of the enzyme and to its proposed catalytic mechanism, which involves addition of a proton from an appropriately positioned charged or polar residue to the substrate double bond, followed by addition of hydride ion from NADPH. PMID:11810252

  8. Genetic, anatomic, and clinical determinants of human serum sterol and vitamin D levels

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Ashlee R.; Kozlitina, Julia; Thompson, Bonne M.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; King, Kevin S.; Russell, David W.

    2014-01-01

    An unknown fraction of the genome participates in the metabolism of sterols and vitamin D, two classes of lipids with diverse physiological and pathophysiological roles. Here, we used mass spectrometry to measure the abundance of >60 sterol and vitamin D derivatives in 3,230 serum samples from a well-phenotyped patient population. Twenty-nine of these lipids were detected in a majority of samples at levels that varied over thousands of fold in different individuals. Pairwise correlations between sterol and vitamin D levels revealed evidence for shared metabolic pathways, additional substrates for known enzymes, and transcriptional regulatory networks. Serum levels of multiple sterols and vitamin D metabolites varied significantly by sex, ethnicity, and age. A genome-wide association study identified 16 loci that were associated with levels of 19 sterols and 25-hydroxylated derivatives of vitamin D (P < 10−7). Resequencing, expression analysis, and biochemical experiments focused on one such locus (CYP39A1), revealed multiple loss-of-function alleles with additive effects on serum levels of the oxysterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a substrate of the encoded enzyme. Body mass index, serum lipid levels, and hematocrit were strong phenotypic correlates of interindividual variation in multiple sterols and vitamin D metabolites. We conclude that correlating population-based analytical measurements with genotype and phenotype provides productive insight into human intermediary metabolism. PMID:25201972

  9. Andrographolide prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice by suppressing the sterol regulatory element-binding protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Li, Jinmei; Song, Baoliang; Xiao, Xu; Huang, Wendong; Zhang, Binfeng; Tang, Xiaowen; Qi, Meng; Yang, Qiming; Yang, Qiaoling; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2014-11-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are major transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis of cholesterol, fatty acids, and triglycerides. We investigated the effect of the specific SREBP suppressor andrographolide, a natural compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata, on the regulation of SREBP signaling by use of Western blot, reporter gene assay, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, the antiobesity effects of andrographolide were evaluated in C57BL/6 mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Our results showed that andrographolide downregulated the expressions of SREBPs target genes and decreased cellular lipid accumulation in vitro. Further, andrographolide (100 mg/kg per day) attenuated HFD-induced body weight gain and fat accumulation in liver or adipose tissues, and improved serum lipid levels and insulin or glucose sensitivity in HFD-induced obese mice. Andrographolide effectively suppressed the respiratory quotient, energy expenditure, and oxygen consumption, which may have contributed to the decreased body-weight gain of the obese mice fed with a HFD. Consistently, andrographolide regulated SREBP target genes and metabolism-associated genes in liver or brown adipose tissue, which may have directly contributed to the lower lipid levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Taken together, our results indicated that andrographolide ameliorated lipid metabolism and improved glucose use in mice with HFD-induced obesity. Andrographolide has potential as a leading compound in the prevention or treatment of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:25204338

  10. Pu-erh tea down-regulates sterol regulatory element-binding protein and stearyol-CoA desaturase to reduce fat storage in Caenorhaditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ding, YiHong; Zou, XiaoJu; Jiang, Xue; Wu, JieYu; Zhang, YuRu; Chen, Dan; Liang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of Pu-erh has been reported to result in numerous health benefits, but the mechanisms underlying purported weight-loss and lowering of lipid are poorly understood. Here, we used the nematode Caenorhaditis elegans to explore the water extract of Pu-erh tea (PTE) functions to reduce fat storage. We found that PTE down-regulates the expression of the master fat regulator SBP-1, a homologue of sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) and its target stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), a key enzyme in fat biosynthesis, leading to an increased ratio of stearic acid (C18:0) to oleic acid (C18:1n-9), and subsequently decreased fat storage. We also found that both the pharyngeal pumping rate and food uptake of C. elegans decreased with exposure to PTE. Collectively, these results provide an experimental basis for explaining the ability of Pu-erh tea in promoting inhibition of food uptake and the biosynthesis of fat via SBP-1 and SCD, thereby reducing fat storage. PMID:25659129

  11. Renoprotective effect of myricetin restrains dyslipidemia and renal mesangial cell proliferation by the suppression of sterol regulatory element binding proteins in an experimental model of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-11-15

    Myricetin is a natural flavonoid used in various health management systems. In this present study myricetin tested to evaluate the effect on lipids and lipid metabolism enzymes in normal and streptozotocin (STZ) with cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. Diabetic nephrotoxic rats were significantly (P<0.05) increased the levels of urinary albumin and lipid profiles: total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TGs), free fatty acids (FFAs), phospholipids (PLs), low density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and decreased in the levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). In addition, the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) were decreased significantly, whereas the 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HmgCoA) reductase activity was increased. The upregulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1a (SREBP-1a), SREBP-1c, SREBP-2, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and downregulation peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) proteins expression levels were noticed. An administration of myricetin (1.0 mg/kg body weight (b/w)) for 12 weeks was brought the above parameters towards normal level. Histopathological study of kidney samples showed that extracellular mesangial matrix expansion, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephrotoxic rats was suppressed by myricetin treatment. Further our results indicate that administration of myricetin afforded remarkable protection against STZ-Cd induced alterations in lipid metabolism and thereby reduced the diabetic nephropathy in experimental rats. PMID:25240712

  12. Preventing Phosphorylation of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a by MAP-Kinases Protects Mice from Fatty Liver and Visceral Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Jutta; Kremer, Lorena; Jacob, Sylvia; Hartwig, Sonja; Nitzgen, Ulrike; Muller–Wieland, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1a plays a pivotal role in lipid metabolism. Using the SREBP-1a expressing human hepatoma cell line HepG2 we have shown previously that human SREBP-1a is phosphorylated at serine 117 by ERK-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Using a combination of cell biology and protein chemistry approach we show that SREBP-1a is also target of other MAPK-families, i.e. c-JUN N-terminal protein kinases (JNK) or p38 stress activated MAP kinases. Serine 117 is also the major phosphorylation site in SREBP-1a for JNK. In contrast to that the major phosphorylation sites of p38 MAPK family are serine 63 and threonine 426. Functional analyses reveal that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a does not alter protein/DNA interaction. The identified phosphorylation sites are specific for both kinase families also in cellular context. To provide direct evidence that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a is a regulatory principle of biological and clinical relevance, we generated transgenic mice expressing mature transcriptionally active N-terminal domain of human SREBP–1a variant lacking all identified phosphorylaton sites designed as alb-SREBP-1aΔP and wild type SREBP-1a designed as alb-SREBP-1a liver specific under control of the albumin promoter and a liver specific enhancer. In contrast to alb-SREBP–1a mice the phosphorylation–deficient mice develop no enlarged fatty livers under normocaloric conditions. Phenotypical examination reveales a massive accumulation of adipose tissue in alb-SREBP-1a but not in the phosphorylation deficient alb-SREBP-1aΔP mice. Moreover, preventing phosphorylation of SREBP-1a protects mice also from dyslipidemia. In conclusion, phosphorylation of SREBP-1a by ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK-families resembles a biological principle and plays a significant role, in vivo. PMID:22384276

  13. Light-dependent and circadian clock-regulated activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein, X-box-binding protein 1, and heat shock factor pathways.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Megumi; Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Iitsuka, Michiko; Kurabayashi, Nobuhiro; Haraguchi, Shogo; Kokame, Koichi; Sato, Ryuichiro; Nakai, Akira; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2011-03-22

    The circadian clock is phase-delayed or -advanced by light when given at early or late subjective night, respectively. Despite the importance of the time-of-day-dependent phase responses to light, the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of light-inducible genes in the chicken pineal gland, which consists of light-sensitive clock cells representing a prototype of the clock system. Light stimulated expression of 62 genes and 40 ESTs by >2.5-fold, among which genes responsive to the heat shock and endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as their regulatory transcription factors heat shock factor (HSF)1, HSF2, and X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) were strongly activated when a light pulse was given at late subjective night. In contrast, the light pulse at early subjective night caused prominent induction of E4bp4, a key regulator in the phase-delaying mechanism of the pineal clock, along with activation of a large group of cholesterol biosynthetic genes that are targets of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor. We found that the light pulse stimulated proteolytic formation of active SREBP-1 that, in turn, transactivated E4bp4 expression, linking SREBP with the light-input pathway of the pineal clock. As an output of light activation of cholesterol biosynthetic genes, we found light-stimulated pineal production of a neurosteroid, 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, demonstrating a unique endocrine function of the pineal gland. Intracerebroventricular injection of 7α-hydroxypregnenolone activated locomotor activities of chicks. Our study on the genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed time-of-day-dependent light activation of signaling pathways and provided molecular connection between gene expression and behavior through neurosteroid release from the pineal gland. PMID:21383147

  14. A novel sterol regulatory element-binding protein gene (sreA) identified in penicillium digitatum is required for prochloraz resistance, full virulence and erg11 (cyp51) regulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yuan, Yongze; Wu, Zhi; Li, Na; Chen, Yuanlei; Qin, Tingting; Geng, Hui; Xiong, Li; Liu, Deli

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the most destructive postharvest pathogen of citrus fruits, causing fruit decay and economic loss. Additionally, control of the disease is further complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant strains due to the extensive use of triazole antifungal drugs. In this work, an orthologus gene encoding a putative sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) was identified in the genome of P. digitatum and named sreA. The putative SreA protein contains a conserved domain of unknown function (DUF2014) at its carboxyl terminus and a helix-loop-helix (HLH) leucine zipper DNA binding domain at its amino terminus, domains that are functionally associated with SREBP transcription factors. The deletion of sreA (ΔsreA) in a prochloraz-resistant strain (PdHS-F6) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation led to increased susceptibility to prochloraz and a significantly lower EC50 value compared with the HS-F6 wild-type or complementation strain (COsreA). A virulence assay showed that the ΔsreA strain was defective in virulence towards citrus fruits, while the complementation of sreA could restore the virulence to a large extent. Further analysis by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that prochloraz-induced expression of cyp51A and cyp51B in PdHS-F6 was completely abolished in the ΔsreA strain. These results demonstrate that sreA is a critical transcription factor gene required for prochloraz resistance and full virulence in P. digitatum and is involved in the regulation of cyp51 expression. PMID:25699519

  15. A Novel Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein Gene (sreA) Identified in Penicillium digitatum Is Required for Prochloraz Resistance, Full Virulence and erg11 (cyp51) Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Yuan, Yongze; Wu, Zhi; Li, Na; Chen, Yuanlei; Qin, Tingting; Geng, Hui; Xiong, Li; Liu, Deli

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the most destructive postharvest pathogen of citrus fruits, causing fruit decay and economic loss. Additionally, control of the disease is further complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant strains due to the extensive use of triazole antifungal drugs. In this work, an orthologus gene encoding a putative sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) was identified in the genome of P. digitatum and named sreA. The putative SreA protein contains a conserved domain of unknown function (DUF2014) at its carboxyl terminus and a helix-loop-helix (HLH) leucine zipper DNA binding domain at its amino terminus, domains that are functionally associated with SREBP transcription factors. The deletion of sreA (ΔsreA) in a prochloraz-resistant strain (PdHS-F6) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation led to increased susceptibility to prochloraz and a significantly lower EC50 value compared with the HS-F6 wild-type or complementation strain (COsreA). A virulence assay showed that the ΔsreA strain was defective in virulence towards citrus fruits, while the complementation of sreA could restore the virulence to a large extent. Further analysis by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that prochloraz-induced expression of cyp51A and cyp51B in PdHS-F6 was completely abolished in the ΔsreA strain. These results demonstrate that sreA is a critical transcription factor gene required for prochloraz resistance and full virulence in P. digitatum and is involved in the regulation of cyp51 expression. PMID:25699519

  16. Honokiol reverses alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and the expression of its downstream lipogenesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Youn-Chul; Chung, Young-Suk; Kim, Young-Chul; Shin, Young-Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-04-01

    Ethanol induces hepatic steatosis via a complex mechanism that is not well understood. Among the variety of molecules that have been proposed to participate in this mechanism, the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding proteins (SREBPs) have been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of honokiol on alcoholic steatosis and investigated its possible effect on the inhibition of SREBP-1c maturation. In in vitro studies, H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells developed increased lipid droplets when exposed to ethanol, but co-treatment with honokiol reversed this effect. Honokiol inhibited the maturation of SREBP-1c and its translocation to the nucleus, the binding of nSREBP-1c to SRE or SRE-related sequences of its lipogenic target genes, and the expression of genes for fatty acid synthesis. In contrast, magnolol, a structural isomer of honokiol, had no effect on nSREBP-1c levels. Male Wistar rats fed with a standard Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet for 4 weeks exhibited increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased hepatic glutathione levels, with concomitantly increased serum alanine aminotransferase and TNF-{alpha} levels. Daily administration of honokiol (10 mg/kg body weight) by gavage during the final 2 weeks of ethanol treatment completely reversed these effects on hepatotoxicity markers, including hepatic triglyceride, hepatic glutathione, and serum TNF-{alpha}, with efficacious abrogation of fat accumulation in the liver. Inhibition of SREBP-1c protein maturation and of the expression of Srebf1c and its target genes for hepatic lipogenesis were also observed in vivo. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated inhibition of specific binding of SREBP-1c to the Fas promoter by honokiol in vivo. These results demonstrate that honokiol has the potential to ameliorate alcoholic steatosis by blocking fatty acid synthesis regulated by SREBP-1c.

  17. The relationship of sterol regulatory element-binding protein cleavage-activation protein and apolipoprotein E gene polymorphisms with metabolic changes during weight reduction.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Tuomo; Matinheikki, Jussi; Nenonen, Arja; Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina; Lindi, Virpi; Hämelahti, Päivi; Laaksonen, Reijo; Fan, Yue-Mei; Kähönen, Mika; Fogelholm, Mikael; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2007-07-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) and apolipoprotein E (apo E) regulate cellular and plasma lipid metabolism. Therefore, variations in the corresponding genes might influence weight reduction and obesity-associated metabolic changes. We investigated the relationships of SCAP (Ile796Val) and apo E polymorphisms on metabolic changes during weight reduction by using a 12-week very low-energy diet. Body composition, serum lipids, plasma glucose, and insulin were assessed in 78 healthy premenopausal women (initial body mass index, 34 +/- 4 kg/m(2); age, 40 +/- 4 years) before and after the intervention. The SCAP genotype groups did not differ in the responses of any parameters measured during weight reduction. Apo E did not differentiate the weight loss, but the changes in total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for the genotype groups apo E epsilon2/3, epsilon3/3, as well as epsilon3/4 and epsilon4/4 combined were -0.94 +/- 0.56 and -0.59 +/- 0.32, -0.71 +/- 0.49 and -0.49 +/- 0.45, and -0.55 +/- 0.47 and -0.37 +/- 0.39 mmol/L, respectively (P < .05 for both). In conclusion, neither the SCAP Ile796Val nor the apo E polymorphism was associated with weight loss in obese premenopausal women. However, the apo E-but not SCAP genotype-seems to be one of the modifying factors for serum cholesterol concentrations during very low-energy diet in obese premenopausal women. PMID:17570245

  18. Ring finger protein20 regulates hepatic lipid metabolism through protein kinase A-dependent sterol regulatory element binding protein1c degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Gha Young; Jang, Hagoon; Choe, Sung Sik; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Kim, Jae Bum

    2014-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein1c (SREBP1c) is a key transcription factor for de novo lipogenesis during the postprandial state. During nutritional deprivation, hepatic SREBP1c is rapidly suppressed by fasting signals to prevent lipogenic pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms that control SREBP1c turnover in response to fasting status are not thoroughly understood. To elucidate which factors are involved in the inactivation of SREBP1c, we attempted to identify SREBP1c-interacting proteins by mass spectrometry analysis. Since we observed that ring finger protein20 (RNF20) ubiquitin ligase was identified as one of SREBP1c-interacting proteins, we hypothesized that fasting signaling would promote SREBP1c degradation in an RNF20-dependent manner. In this work, we demonstrate that RNF20 physically interacts with SREBP1c, leading to degradation of SREBP1c via ubiquitination. In accordance with these findings, RNF20 represses the transcriptional activity of SREBP1c and turns off the expression of lipogenic genes that are targets of SREBP1c. In contrast, knockdown of RNF20 stimulates the expression of SREBP1c and lipogenic genes and induces lipogenic activity in primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase A (PKA) with glucagon or forskolin enhances the expression of RNF20 and potentiates the ubiquitination of SREBP1c via RNF20. In wild-type and db/db mice, adenoviral overexpression of RNF20 markedly suppresses FASN promoter activity and reduces the level of hepatic triglycerides, accompanied by a decrease in the hepatic lipogenic program. Here, we reveal that RNF20-induced SREBP1c ubiquitination down-regulates hepatic lipogenic activity upon PKA activation. Conclusion: RNF20 acts as a negative regulator of hepatic fatty acid metabolism through degradation of SREBP1c upon PKA activation. Knowledge regarding this process enhances our understanding of how SREBP1c is able to turn off hepatic lipid metabolism during nutritional deprivation

  19. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits proteolytic processing of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) via activation of AMP-activated kinase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiong; Dong, Qingming; Bridges, Dave; Raghow, Rajendra; Park, Edwards A; Elam, Marshall B

    2015-12-01

    In hyperinsulinemic states including obesity and T2DM, overproduction of fatty acid and triglyceride contributes to steatosis of the liver, hyperlipidemia and hepatic insulin resistance. This effect is mediated in part by the transcriptional regulator sterol responsive element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), which stimulates the expression of genes involved in hepatic fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis. SREBP-1c is up regulated by insulin both via increased transcription of nascent full-length SREBP-1c and by enhanced proteolytic processing of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound precursor to yield the transcriptionally active n-terminal form, nSREBP-1c. Polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin (n-3 PUFA) prevent induction of SREBP-1c by insulin thereby reducing plasma and hepatic triglycerides. Despite widespread use of n-3 PUFA supplements to reduce triglycerides in clinical practice, the exact mechanisms underlying their hypotriglyceridemic effect remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:5 n-3) reduces nSREBP-1c by inhibiting regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of the nascent SREBP-1c. We further show that this effect of DHA is mediated both via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and by inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The inhibitory effect of AMPK on SREBP-1c processing is linked to phosphorylation of serine 365 of SREBP-1c in the rat. We have defined a novel regulatory mechanism by which n-3 PUFA inhibit induction of SREBP-1c by insulin. These findings identify AMPK as an important negative regulator of hepatic lipid synthesis and as a potential therapeutic target for hyperlipidemia in obesity and T2DM. PMID:26327595

  20. FoxO4 interacts with the sterol regulatory factor SREBP2 and the hypoxia inducible factor HIF2α at the CYP51 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Jiang, Xiangning; Chehab, Farid F.

    2014-01-01

    The late steps of cholesterol biosynthesis are oxygen demanding, requiring eleven oxygen molecules per synthesized cholesterol molecule. A key enzymatic reaction, which occurs at the top of the Bloch and Kandutsch-Russell pathways, is the demethylation of lanosterol and dihydrolanosterol (DHL). This reaction is catalyzed by lanosterol 14α demethylase (CYP51) and requires three oxygen molecules. Thus, it is the first step in the distal pathway to be susceptible to oxygen deprivation. Having previously identified that the forkhead transcription factor 4 (FoxO4) represses CYP51 expression, we aimed to characterize its role at the CYP51 promoter. Hypoxia-treated 3T3L1 cells showed decreased cholesterol biosynthesis, accumulation of lanosterol/DHL, and stimulation of FoxO4 expression and its cytoplasmic translocation to the nucleus. Transfection assays with a CYP51 promoter reporter gene revealed that FoxO4 and sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)2 exert a stimulatory effect, whereas FoxO4 and the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)2α repress CYP51 promoter activity. Electromobility shift, chromatin immunoprecipitation, pull-down, and coimmunoprecipitation assays show that FoxO4 interacts with SREBP2 and HIF2α to modulate CYP51 promoter activity. We also show an inverse correlation between FoxO4 and CYP51 in adipose tissue of ob/ob mice and mouse fetal cortical neurons exposed to hypoxia. Overall, these studies demonstrate a role for FoxO4 in the regulation of CYP51 expression. PMID:24353279

  1. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  2. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Liu, Qiang

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  3. p75 Neurotrophin Receptor Signaling Activates Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein-2 in Hepatocyte Cells via p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase and Caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Pham, Dan Duc; Do, Hai Thi; Bruelle, Céline; Kukkonen, Jyrki P; Eriksson, Ove; Mogollón, Isabel; Korhonen, Laura T; Arumäe, Urmas; Lindholm, Dan

    2016-05-13

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) influences the survival and differentiation of a specific population of neurons during development, but its role in non-neuronal cells has been less studied. We observed here that NGF and its pro-form, pro-NGF, are elevated in fatty livers from leptin-deficient mice compared with controls, concomitant with an increase in low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs). Stimulation of mouse primary hepatocytes with NGF or pro-NGF increased LDLR expression through the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Studies using Huh7 human hepatocyte cells showed that the neurotrophins activate the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP2) that regulates genes involved in lipid metabolism. The mechanisms for this were related to stimulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and activation of caspase-3 and SREBP2 cleavage following NGF and pro-NGF stimulations. Cell fractionation experiments showed that caspase-3 activity was increased particularly in the membrane fraction that harbors SREBP2 and caspase-2. Experiments showed further that caspase-2 interacts with pro-caspase-3 and that p38 MAPK reduced this interaction and caused caspase-3 activation. Because of the increased caspase-3 activity, the cells did not undergo cell death following p75NTR stimulation, possibly due to concomitant activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway by the neurotrophins. These results identify a novel signaling pathway triggered by ligand-activated p75NTR that via p38 MAPK and caspase-3 mediate the activation of SREBP2. This pathway may regulate LDLRs and lipid uptake particularly after injury or during tissue inflammation accompanied by an increased production of growth factors, including NGF and pro-NGF. PMID:26984409

  4. Insect growth regulatory effects of some extracts and sterols from Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda and Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Salazar, J Rodrigo; Martínez, Mariano; Aranda, Eduardo

    2005-10-01

    A methanol extract from the roots and aerial parts of Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) yielded peniocerol 1, macdougallin 2, and chichipegenin 3. The natural products 1, 2 their mixtures, MeOH and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts showed insecticidal and insect growth regulatory activity against fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], an important insect pest of corn, and [Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera)], a pest of stored grains in Mexico. The most active compounds were 1, 2, and a mixture (M(2)) of 1 and 2 (6:4). All these extracts, compounds and the mixture had insect growth regulating (IGR) activity between 5.0 and 50.0 ppm and insecticidal effects between 50 and 300 ppm in diets. The extracts were insecticidal to larvae, with lethal doses between 100 and 200 ppm. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of Coleoptera, because in all treatments of the larvae of T. molitor, pupation were shortened and this process show precociousness in relation to controls. In contrast to S. frugiperda larvae, onset of pupation was noticeably delayed. Emergence in both cases was drastically diminished. In both pupae and in the few adults that were able to emerge, many deformations were observed. The results of these assays indicated that the compounds were more active than other known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and methanol extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Yucca periculosa. Peniocerol, macdougallin and chichipegenin, as well as mixtures of these substances, may be useful as natural insecticidal agents. PMID:16122768

  5. Oxysterol sulfation by cytosolic sulfotransferase suppresses liver X receptor/sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c signaling pathway and reduces serum and hepatic lipids in mouse models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qianming; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Leyuan; Kakiyama, Genta; Heuman, Douglas; Sanyal, Arun; Pandak, William M; Yin, Lianhua; Xie, Wen; Ren, Shunlin

    2012-06-01

    Cytosolic sulfotransferase (SULT2B1b) catalyzes oxysterol sulfation. 5-Cholesten-3β-25-diol-3-sulfate (25HC3S), one product of this reaction, decreases intracellular lipids in vitro by suppressing liver X receptor/sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1c signaling, with regulatory properties opposite to those of its precursor 25-hydroxycholesterol. Upregulation of SULT2B1b may be an effective strategy to treat hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. The objective of the study was to explore the effect and mechanism of oxysterol sulfation by SULT2B1b on lipid metabolism in vivo. C57BL/6 and LDLR(-/-) mice were fed with high-cholesterol diet or high-fat diet for 10 weeks and infected with adenovirus encoding SULT2B1b. SULT2B1b expressions in different tissues were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Sulfated oxysterols in liver were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Serum and hepatic lipid levels were determined by kit reagents and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Gene expressions were determined by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot. Following infection, SULT2B1b was successfully overexpressed in the liver, aorta, and lung tissues, but not in the heart or kidney. SULT2B1b overexpression, combined with administration of 25-hydroxycholesterol, significantly increased the formation of 25HC3S in liver tissue and significantly decreased serum and hepatic lipid levels, including triglycerides, total cholesterol, free cholesterol, and free fatty acids, as compared with controls in both C57BL/6 and LDLR(-/-) mice. Gene expression analysis showed that increases in SULT2B1b expression were accompanied by reduction in key regulators and enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, including liver X receptor α, SREBP-1, SREBP-2, acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1, and fatty acid synthase. These findings support the hypothesis that 25HC3S is an important endogenous regulator of lipid biosynthesis. PMID:22225954

  6. Overexpression of SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) promotes de novo fatty acid synthesis and triacylglycerol accumulation in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Zhao, W S; Yang, Y C; Tian, H B; Shi, H B; Bionaz, M

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1; gene name SREBF1) is known to be the master regulator of lipid homeostasis in mammals, including milk fat synthesis. The major role of SREBP1 in controlling milk fat synthesis has been demonstrated in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Except for a demonstrated role in controlling the expression of FASN, a regulatory role of SREBP1 on milk fat synthesis is very likely, but has not yet been demonstrated in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC). To explore the regulatory function of SREBP1 on de novo fatty acids and triacylglycerol synthesis in GMEC, we overexpressed the mature form of SREBP1 (active NH2-terminal fragment) in GMEC using a recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-nSREBP1), with Ad-GFP (recombinant adenovirus of green fluorescent protein) as control, and infected the GMEC for 48 h. In infected cells, we assessed the expression of 20 genes related to milk fat synthesis using real time-quantitative PCR, the protein abundance of SREBP1 and FASN by Western blot, the production of triacylglycerol, and the fatty acid profile. Expression of SREBF1 was modest in mammary compared with the other tissues in dairy goats but its expression increased approximately 30-fold from pregnancy to lactation. The overexpression of the mature form of SREBP1 was confirmed by >200-fold higher expression of SREBF1 in Ad-nSREBP1 compared with Ad-GFP. We observed no changes in amount of the precursor form of SREBP1 protein but a >10-fold increase of the mature form of SREBP1 protein with Ad-nSREBP1. Compared with Ad-GFP cells (control), Ad-nSREBP1 cells had a significant increase in expression of genes related to long-chain fatty acid activation (ACSL1), transport (FABP3), desaturation (SCD1), de novo synthesis of fatty acids (ACSS2, ACLY, IDH1, ACACA, FASN, and ELOVL6), and transcriptional factors (NR1H3 and PPARG). We observed a >10-fold increase in expression of INSIG1 but SCAP was downregulated by Ad-nSREBP1. Among genes related to

  7. Detection of Regulatory SNPs in Human Genome Using ChIP-seq ENCODE Data

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Marina Yu.; Shilov, Alexander G.; Kashina, Elena V.; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A.; Merkulova, Tatyana I.

    2013-01-01

    A vast amount of SNPs derived from genome-wide association studies are represented by non-coding ones, therefore exacerbating the need for effective identification of regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) among them. However, this task remains challenging since the regulatory part of the human genome is annotated much poorly as opposed to coding regions. Here we describe an approach aggregating the whole set of ENCODE ChIP-seq data in order to search for rSNPs, and provide the experimental evidence of its efficiency. Its algorithm is based on the assumption that the enrichment of a genomic region with transcription factor binding loci (ChIP-seq peaks) indicates its regulatory function, and thereby SNPs located in this region are more likely to influence transcription regulation. To ensure that the approach preferably selects functionally meaningful SNPs, we performed enrichment analysis of several human SNP datasets associated with phenotypic manifestations. It was shown that all samples are significantly enriched with SNPs falling into the regions of multiple ChIP-seq peaks as compared with the randomly selected SNPs. For experimental verification, 40 SNPs falling into overlapping regions of at least 7 TF binding loci were selected from OMIM. The effect of SNPs on the binding of the DNA fragments containing them to the nuclear proteins from four human cell lines (HepG2, HeLaS3, HCT-116, and K562) has been tested by EMSA. A radical change in the binding pattern has been observed for 29 SNPs, besides, 6 more SNPs also demonstrated less pronounced changes. Taken together, the results demonstrate the effective way to search for potential rSNPs with the aid of ChIP-seq data provided by ENCODE project. PMID:24205329

  8. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L.; Landolin, Jane M.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F.; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I.; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L.; Stefano, Luisa Di; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D.; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W.; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brooks, Angela N.; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A.; Duff, Michael O.; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K.; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K.; Riddle, Nicole C.; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W.; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J.; Celniker, Susan E.; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H.; Lai, Eric C.; MacAlpine, David M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; White, Kevin P.; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-22

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation. Several years after the complete genetic sequencing of many species, it is still unclear how to translate genomic information into a functional map of cellular and developmental programs. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) (1) and model organism ENCODE (modENCODE) (2) projects use diverse genomic assays to comprehensively annotate the Homo sapiens (human), Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), and Caenorhabditis elegans (worm) genomes, through systematic generation and computational integration of functional genomic data sets. Previous genomic studies in flies have made seminal contributions to our understanding of basic biological mechanisms and genome functions, facilitated by genetic, experimental, computational, and manual annotation of the euchromatic and heterochromatic genome (3), small genome size, short life cycle, and a deep knowledge of development, gene function, and chromosome biology. The functions

  9. Influence of energy supply on expression of genes encoding for lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in growing beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty crossbred beef steers were used to determine the effects metabolizable energy (ME) intake and of site and complexity of carbohydrate (CHO) infusion on expression of genes encoding lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in subcutaneous (SC), mesenteric (MES) and omental (OM) adipose. Treatm...

  10. Overproduction of lactimidomycin by cross-overexpression of genes encoding Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Dong; Yan, Yijun; Pan, Guohui; Xiang, Wensheng; Shen, Ben

    2016-03-01

    The glutarimide-containing polyketides represent a fascinating class of natural products that exhibit a multitude of biological activities. We have recently cloned and sequenced the biosynthetic gene clusters for three members of the glutarimide-containing polyketides-iso-migrastatin (iso-MGS) from Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993, lactimidomycin (LTM) from Streptomyces amphibiosporus ATCC 53964, and cycloheximide (CHX) from Streptomyces sp. YIM56141. Comparative analysis of the three clusters identified mgsA and chxA, from the mgs and chx gene clusters, respectively, that were predicted to encode the PimR-like Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins (SARPs) but failed to reveal any regulatory gene from the ltm gene cluster. Overexpression of mgsA or chxA in S. platensis NRRL 18993, Streptomyces sp. YIM56141 or SB11024, and a recombinant strain of Streptomyces coelicolor M145 carrying the intact mgs gene cluster has no significant effect on iso-MGS or CHX production, suggesting that MgsA or ChxA regulation may not be rate-limiting for iso-MGS and CHX production in these producers. In contrast, overexpression of mgsA or chxA in S. amphibiosporus ATCC 53964 resulted in a significant increase in LTM production, with LTM titer reaching 106 mg/L, which is five-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain. These results support MgsA and ChxA as members of the SARP family of positive regulators for the iso-MGS and CHX biosynthetic machinery and demonstrate the feasibility to improve glutarimide-containing polyketide production in Streptomyces strains by exploiting common regulators. PMID:26552797

  11. Retroviral vectors encoding ADA regulatory locus control region provide enhanced T-cell-specific transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Murine retroviral vectors have been used in several hundred gene therapy clinical trials, but have fallen out of favor for a number of reasons. One issue is that gene expression from viral or internal promoters is highly variable and essentially unregulated. Moreover, with retroviral vectors, gene expression is usually silenced over time. Mammalian genes, in contrast, are characterized by highly regulated, precise levels of expression in both a temporal and a cell-specific manner. To ascertain if recapitulation of endogenous adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression can be achieved in a vector construct we created a new series of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) based retroviral vector that carry human regulatory elements including combinations of the ADA promoter, the ADA locus control region (LCR), ADA introns and human polyadenylation sequences in a self-inactivating vector backbone. Methods A MuLV-based retroviral vector with a self-inactivating (SIN) backbone, the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter (PGK) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as a reporter gene, was generated. Subsequent vectors were constructed from this basic vector by deletion or addition of certain elements. The added elements that were assessed are the human ADA promoter, human ADA locus control region (LCR), introns 7, 8, and 11 from the human ADA gene, and human growth hormone polyadenylation signal. Retroviral vector particles were produced by transient three-plasmid transfection of 293T cells. Retroviral vectors encoding eGFP were titered by transducing 293A cells, and then the proportion of GFP-positive cells was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Non T-cell and T-cell lines were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1 and the yield of eGFP transgene expression was evaluated by FACS analysis using mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) detection. Results Vectors that contained the ADA LCR were preferentially expressed in T

  12. Recent advances in sterol research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1970, the AOCS has been a regular host to the sterol symposia. The 2008 Sterol Symposium, “Recent Advances in Sterol Research,” was held at the AOCS Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington. This year the symposium held special significance, for it hosted the presentation of the fourth G.J. Schro...

  13. The prrF-Encoded Small Regulatory RNAs Are Required for Iron Homeostasis and Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Alexandria A.; Powell, Daniel A.; Nguyen, Angela T.; O'Neill, Maura; Djapgne, Louise; Wilks, Angela; Ernst, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that requires iron to cause infection, but it also must regulate the uptake of iron to avoid iron toxicity. The iron-responsive PrrF1 and PrrF2 small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are part of P. aeruginosa's iron regulatory network and affect the expression of at least 50 genes encoding iron-containing proteins. The genes encoding the PrrF1 and PrrF2 sRNAs are encoded in tandem in P. aeruginosa, allowing for the expression of a distinct, heme-responsive sRNA named PrrH that appears to regulate genes involved in heme metabolism. Using a combination of growth, mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis, we showed that the ΔprrF1,2 mutant, which lacks expression of the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs, is defective for both iron and heme homeostasis. We also identified phuS, encoding a heme binding protein involved in heme acquisition, and vreR, encoding a previously identified regulator of P. aeruginosa virulence genes, as novel targets of prrF-mediated heme regulation. Finally, we showed that the prrF locus encoding the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs is required for P. aeruginosa virulence in a murine model of acute lung infection. Moreover, we showed that inoculation with a ΔprrF1,2 deletion mutant protects against future challenge with wild-type P. aeruginosa. Combined, these data demonstrate that the prrF-encoded sRNAs are critical regulators of P. aeruginosa virulence. PMID:25510881

  14. Dietary fiber prevents obesity-related liver lipotoxicity by modulating sterol-regulatory element binding protein pathway in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shufen; Jiao, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jiaying; Wan, Zhongxiao; Zhang, Weiguo; Gao, Xiaoran; Qin, Liqiang

    2015-01-01

    Adequate intake of dietary fibers has proven metabolic and cardiovascular benefits, molecular mechanisms remain still limited. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of cereal dietary fiber on obesity-related liver lipotoxicity in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet and underlying mechanism. Forty-eight adult male C57BL/6J mice were randomly given a reference chow diet, or a high fat/choleserol (HFC) diet supplemented with or without oat fiber or wheat bran fiber for 24 weeks. Our results showed mice fed oat or wheat bran fiber exhibtied lower weight gain, lipid profiles and insulin resistance, compared with HFC diet. The two cereal dietary fibers potently decreased protein expressions of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and key factors involved in lipogenesis, including fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in target tissues. At molecular level, the two cereal dietary fibers augmented protein expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma, liver X receptor alpha, and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in target tissues. Our findings indicated that cereal dietary fiber supplementation abrogated obesity-related liver lipotoxicity and dyslipidemia in C57BL/6J mice fed a HFC diet. In addition, the efficacy of oat fiber is greater than wheat bran fiber in normalizing these metabolic disorders and pathological profiles. PMID:26510459

  15. Intracellular Sterol Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mesmin, Bruno; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We review the cellular mechanisms implicated in cholesterol trafficking and distribution. Recent studies have provided new information about the distribution of sterols within cells, including analysis of its transbilayer distribution. The cholesterol interaction with other lipids and its engagement in various trafficking processes will determine its proper level in a specific membrane; making the cholesterol distribution uneven among the various intracellular organelles. The cholesterol content is important since cholesterol plays an essential role in membranes by controlling their physicochemical properties as well as key cellular events such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. Cholesterol movement between cellular organelles is highly dynamic, and can be achieved by vesicular and non-vesicular processes. Various studies have analyzed the proteins that play a significant role in these processes, giving us new information about the relative importance of these two trafficking pathways in cholesterol transport. Although still poorly characterized in many trafficking routes, several potential sterol transport proteins have been described in detail; as a result, molecular mechanisms for sterol transport among membranes start to be appreciated. PMID:19286471

  16. Sterol Biosynthesis and Azole Tolerance Is Governed by the Opposing Actions of SrbA and the CCAAT Binding Complex.

    PubMed

    Gsaller, Fabio; Hortschansky, Peter; Furukawa, Takanori; Carr, Paul D; Rash, Bharat; Capilla, Javier; Müller, Christoph; Bracher, Franz; Bowyer, Paul; Haas, Hubertus; Brakhage, Axel A; Bromley, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    Azole drugs selectively target fungal sterol biosynthesis and are critical to our antifungal therapeutic arsenal. However, resistance to this class of drugs, particularly in the major human mould pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, is emerging and reaching levels that have prompted some to suggest that there is a realistic probability that they will be lost for clinical use. The dominating class of pan-azole resistant isolates is characterized by the presence of a tandem repeat of at least 34 bases (TR34) within the promoter of cyp51A, the gene encoding the azole drug target sterol C14-demethylase. Here we demonstrate that the repeat sequence in TR34 is bound by both the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) SrbA, and the CCAAT binding complex (CBC). We show that the CBC acts complementary to SrbA as a negative regulator of ergosterol biosynthesis and show that lack of CBC activity results in increased sterol levels via transcriptional derepression of multiple ergosterol biosynthetic genes including those coding for HMG-CoA-synthase, HMG-CoA-reductase and sterol C14-demethylase. In agreement with these findings, inactivation of the CBC increased tolerance to different classes of drugs targeting ergosterol biosynthesis including the azoles, allylamines (terbinafine) and statins (simvastatin). We reveal that a clinically relevant mutation in HapE (P88L) significantly impairs the binding affinity of the CBC to its target site. We identify that the mechanism underpinning TR34 driven overexpression of cyp51A results from duplication of SrbA but not CBC binding sites and show that deletion of the 34 mer results in lack of cyp51A expression and increased azole susceptibility similar to a cyp51A null mutant. Finally we show that strains lacking a functional CBC are severely attenuated for pathogenicity in a pulmonary and systemic model of aspergillosis. PMID:27438727

  17. Sterol Biosynthesis and Azole Tolerance Is Governed by the Opposing Actions of SrbA and the CCAAT Binding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Gsaller, Fabio; Furukawa, Takanori; Carr, Paul D.; Rash, Bharat; Capilla, Javier; Müller, Christoph; Bracher, Franz; Bowyer, Paul; Haas, Hubertus; Brakhage, Axel A.; Bromley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Azole drugs selectively target fungal sterol biosynthesis and are critical to our antifungal therapeutic arsenal. However, resistance to this class of drugs, particularly in the major human mould pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, is emerging and reaching levels that have prompted some to suggest that there is a realistic probability that they will be lost for clinical use. The dominating class of pan-azole resistant isolates is characterized by the presence of a tandem repeat of at least 34 bases (TR34) within the promoter of cyp51A, the gene encoding the azole drug target sterol C14-demethylase. Here we demonstrate that the repeat sequence in TR34 is bound by both the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) SrbA, and the CCAAT binding complex (CBC). We show that the CBC acts complementary to SrbA as a negative regulator of ergosterol biosynthesis and show that lack of CBC activity results in increased sterol levels via transcriptional derepression of multiple ergosterol biosynthetic genes including those coding for HMG-CoA-synthase, HMG-CoA-reductase and sterol C14-demethylase. In agreement with these findings, inactivation of the CBC increased tolerance to different classes of drugs targeting ergosterol biosynthesis including the azoles, allylamines (terbinafine) and statins (simvastatin). We reveal that a clinically relevant mutation in HapE (P88L) significantly impairs the binding affinity of the CBC to its target site. We identify that the mechanism underpinning TR34 driven overexpression of cyp51A results from duplication of SrbA but not CBC binding sites and show that deletion of the 34 mer results in lack of cyp51A expression and increased azole susceptibility similar to a cyp51A null mutant. Finally we show that strains lacking a functional CBC are severely attenuated for pathogenicity in a pulmonary and systemic model of aspergillosis. PMID:27438727

  18. Plant Sterols, Stanols, and Sitosterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Ajagbe, Bridget O.; Othman, Rgia A.; Myrie, Semone B.

    2015-01-01

    Phytosterolemia (sitosterolemia) is a rare autosomal recessive sterol storage disease caused by mutations in either of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette transporter genes; (ABC)G5 or ABCG8, leading to impaired elimination of plant sterols and stanols, with their increased accumulation in the blood and tissues. Thus the disease is characterized by substantially elevated serum plant sterols and stanols, with moderate to high plasma cholesterol levels, and increased risk of premature atherosclerosis. Hematologic abnormalities including macrothrombocytopenia, stomatocytosis and hemolysis are frequently observed in sitosterolemia patients. Currently, ezetimibe, a sterol absorption inhibitor, is used as the routine treatment for sitosterolemia, with reported improvement in plant sterol levels and hemolytic parameters. This review summarizes the research related to the health impact of plant sterols and stanols on sitosterolemia. PMID:25941971

  19. Sterol requirement of Mycoplasma capricolum.

    PubMed Central

    Odriozola, J M; Waitzkin, E; Smith, T L; Bloch, K

    1978-01-01

    Mycoplasmas require an external source of sterol for growth. For Mycoplasma capricolum this requirement is met not only by cholesterol but also by the methylcholestane derivatives lanosterol, cycloartenol, 4,4-dimethylcholesterol, and 4beta-methylcholestanol. Cholesteryl methyl ether and 3alpha-methylcholestanol serve equally well as sterol supplements. None of the growth-supporting sterol derivatives tested was metabolically modified. The unusual acceptance of diverse cholestane derivatives by a mycoplasma species contrasts with the structural attributes thought to be necessary for sterol function in eukaryotic membranes. PMID:279900

  20. hydra Mutants of Arabidopsis Are Defective in Sterol Profiles and Auxin and Ethylene Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Souter, Martin; Topping, Jennifer; Pullen, Margaret; Friml, Jiri; Palme, Klaus; Hackett, Rachel; Grierson, Don; Lindsey, Keith

    2002-01-01

    The hydra mutants of Arabidopsis are characterized by a pleiotropic phenotype that shows defective embryonic and seedling cell patterning, morphogenesis, and root growth. We demonstrate that the HYDRA1 gene encodes a Δ8-Δ7 sterol isomerase, whereas HYDRA2 encodes a sterol C14 reductase, previously identified as the FACKEL gene product. Seedlings mutant for each gene are similarly defective in the concentrations of the three major Arabidopsis sterols. Promoter::reporter gene analysis showed misexpression of the auxin-regulated DR5 and ACS1 promoters and of the epidermal cell file–specific GL2 promoter in the mutants. The mutants exhibit enhanced responses to auxin. The phenotypes can be rescued partially by inhibition of auxin and ethylene signaling but not by exogenous sterols or brassinosteroids. We propose a model in which correct sterol profiles are required for regulated auxin and ethylene signaling through effects on membrane function. PMID:12034894

  1. Advanced Running Performance by Genetic Predisposition in Male Dummerstorf Marathon Mice (DUhTP) Reveals Higher Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP) Related mRNA Expression in the Liver and Higher Serum Levels of Progesterone

    PubMed Central

    Brenmoehl, Julia; Walz, Christina; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Schwerin, Manfred; Fuellen, Georg; Hoeflich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Long-term-selected DUhTP mice represent a non-inbred model for inborn physical high-performance without previous training. Abundance of hepatic mRNA in 70-day male DUhTP and control mice was analyzed using the Affymetrix mouse array 430A 2.0. Differential expression analysis with PLIER corrected data was performed using AltAnalyze. Searching for over-representation in biochemical pathways revealed cholesterol metabolism being most prominently affected in DUhTP compared to unselected control mice. Furthermore, pathway analysis by AltAnalyze plus PathVisio indicated significant induction of glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver of DUhTP mice versus unselected control mice. In contrast, gluconeogenesis was partially inactivated as judged from the analysis of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance in DUhTP mice. Analysis of mRNA transcripts related to steroid hormone metabolism inferred elevated synthesis of progesterone and reduced levels of sex steroids. Abundance of steroid delta isomerase-5 mRNA (Hsd3b5, FC 4.97) was increased and steroid 17-alpha-monooxygenase mRNA (Cyp17a1, FC -11.6) was massively diminished in the liver of DUhTP mice. Assessment of steroid profiles by LC-MS revealed increased levels of progesterone and decreased levels of sex steroids in serum from DUhTP mice versus controls. Analysis of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance indicates that sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) may play a major role in metabolic pathway activation in the marathon mouse model DUhTP. Thus, results from bioinformatics modeling of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance correlated with direct steroid analysis by mass spectrometry and further indicated functions of SREBP-1 and steroid hormones for endurance performance in DUhTP mice. PMID:26799318

  2. Advanced Running Performance by Genetic Predisposition in Male Dummerstorf Marathon Mice (DUhTP) Reveals Higher Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP) Related mRNA Expression in the Liver and Higher Serum Levels of Progesterone.

    PubMed

    Ohde, Daniela; Moeller, Mark; Brenmoehl, Julia; Walz, Christina; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Schwerin, Manfred; Fuellen, Georg; Hoeflich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Long-term-selected DUhTP mice represent a non-inbred model for inborn physical high-performance without previous training. Abundance of hepatic mRNA in 70-day male DUhTP and control mice was analyzed using the Affymetrix mouse array 430A 2.0. Differential expression analysis with PLIER corrected data was performed using AltAnalyze. Searching for over-representation in biochemical pathways revealed cholesterol metabolism being most prominently affected in DUhTP compared to unselected control mice. Furthermore, pathway analysis by AltAnalyze plus PathVisio indicated significant induction of glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver of DUhTP mice versus unselected control mice. In contrast, gluconeogenesis was partially inactivated as judged from the analysis of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance in DUhTP mice. Analysis of mRNA transcripts related to steroid hormone metabolism inferred elevated synthesis of progesterone and reduced levels of sex steroids. Abundance of steroid delta isomerase-5 mRNA (Hsd3b5, FC 4.97) was increased and steroid 17-alpha-monooxygenase mRNA (Cyp17a1, FC -11.6) was massively diminished in the liver of DUhTP mice. Assessment of steroid profiles by LC-MS revealed increased levels of progesterone and decreased levels of sex steroids in serum from DUhTP mice versus controls. Analysis of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance indicates that sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) may play a major role in metabolic pathway activation in the marathon mouse model DUhTP. Thus, results from bioinformatics modeling of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance correlated with direct steroid analysis by mass spectrometry and further indicated functions of SREBP-1 and steroid hormones for endurance performance in DUhTP mice. PMID:26799318

  3. SREBP2 Activation Induces Hepatic Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (ACSL1) Expression in Vivo and in Vitro through a Sterol Regulatory Element (SRE) Motif of the ACSL1 C-promoter.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-03-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) plays a key role in fatty acid metabolism. To identify novel transcriptional modulators of ACSL1, we examined ACSL1 expression in liver tissues of hamsters fed a normal diet, a high fat diet, or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD). Feeding hamsters HCHFD markedly reduced hepatic Acsl1 mRNA and protein levels as well as acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Decreases in Acsl1 expression strongly correlated with reductions in hepatic Srebp2 mRNA level and mature Srebp2 protein abundance. Conversely, administration of rosuvastatin (RSV) to hamsters increased hepatic Acsl1 expression. These new findings were reproduced in mice treated with RSV or fed the HCHFD. Furthermore, the RSV induction of acyl-CoA activity in mouse liver resulted in increases in plasma and hepatic cholesterol ester concentrations and reductions in free cholesterol amounts. Investigations on different ACSL1 transcript variants in HepG2 cells revealed that the mRNA expression of C-ACSL1 was specifically regulated by the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, and RSV treatment increased the C-ACSL1 abundance from a minor mRNA species to an abundant transcript. We analyzed 5'-flanking sequence of exon 1C of the human ACSL1 gene and identified one putative SRE site. By performing a promoter activity assay and DNA binding assays, we firmly demonstrated the key role of this SRE motif in SREBP2-mediated activation of C-ACSL1 gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrated that knockdown of endogenous SREBP2 in HepG2 cells lowered ACSL1 mRNA and protein levels. Altogether, this work discovered an unprecedented link between ACSL1 and SREBP2 via the specific regulation of the C-ACSL1 transcript. PMID:26728456

  4. Bezafibrate at clinically relevant doses decreases serum/liver triglycerides via down-regulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c in mice: a novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takero; Tanaka, Naoki; Kanbe, Hiroki; Hara, Atsushi; Kamijo, Yuji; Zhang, Xiaowei; Gonzalez, Frank J; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2009-04-01

    The triglyceride-lowering effect of bezafibrate in humans has been attributed to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha activation based on results from rodent studies. However, the bezafibrate dosages used in conventional rodent experiments are typically higher than those in clinical use (> or =50 versus < or =10 mg/kg/day), and thus it remains unclear whether such data can be translated to humans. Furthermore, because bezafibrate is a pan-PPAR activator, the actual contribution of PPARalpha to its triglyceride-lowering properties remains undetermined. To address these issues, bezafibrate at clinically relevant doses (10 mg/kg/day; low) was administered to wild-type and Ppara-null mice, and its effects were compared with those from conventionally used doses (100 mg/kg/day; high). Pharmacokinetic analyses showed that maximum plasma concentration and area under the concentration-time curve in bezafibrate-treated mice were similar to those in humans at low doses, but not at high doses. Low-dose bezafibrate decreased serum/liver triglycerides in a PPARalpha-independent manner by attenuation of hepatic lipogenesis and triglyceride secretion. It is noteworthy that instead of PPAR activation, down-regulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c was observed in mice undergoing low-dose treatment. High-dose bezafibrate decreased serum/liver triglycerides by enhancement of hepatic fatty acid uptake and beta-oxidation via PPARalpha activation, as expected. In conclusion, clinically relevant doses of bezafibrate exert a triglyceride-lowering effect by suppression of the SREBP-1c-regulated pathway in mice and not by PPARalpha activation. Our results may provide novel information about the pharmacological mechanism of bezafibrate action and new insights into the treatment of disorders involving SREBP-1c. PMID:19124612

  5. The Effects of Sterol Structure upon Sterol Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Don; Steiner, Robert D.; Merkens, Louise S.; Pappu, Anuradha S.; Connor, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol is esterified in mammals by two enzymes: LCAT (lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase) in plasma and ACAT1 and ACAT2 (acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferases) in the tissues. We hypothesized that the sterol structure may have significant effects on the outcome of esterification by these enzymes. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed sterol esters in plasma and tissues in patients having non-cholesterol sterols (sitosterolemia and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). The esterification of a given sterol was defined as the sterol ester percentage of total sterols. The esterification of cholesterol in plasma by LCAT was 67 percent and in tissues by ACAT was 64 percent. Esterification of nine sterols, (cholesterol, cholestanol, campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol, campestanol, sitostanol, 7-dehydrocholesterol and 8-dehydrocholesterol) was examined.(The relative esterification (cholesterol being 1.0) of these sterols by the plasma LCAT was 1.00, 0.95, 0.89, 0.40, 0.85, 0.82 and 0.80, 0.69 and 0.82 respectively. The esterification by the tissue ACAT was 1.00, 1.29, 0.75, 0.49, 0.45, 1.21 and 0.74 respectively. The predominant fatty acid of the sterol esters was linoleic acid for LCAT and oleic acid for ACAT. We compared the esterification of two sterols differing by only one functional group (a chemical group attached to sterol nucleus) and were able to quantify the effects of individual functional groups on sterol esterification. The saturation of the A ring of cholesterol increased ester formation by ACAT by 29 percent and decreased the esterification by LCAT by 5.9 percent. Esterification by ACAT and LCAT was reduced respectively by 25 percent and 11 percent by the presence of an additional methyl group on the side chain of cholesterol at the C-24 position. This data supports our hypothesis that the structure of the sterol substrate has a significant effect on its esterification by ACAT or LCAT. PMID:19679306

  6. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Catherine; Fiquet, Samuel; Boudet, Julie; Dardevet, Mireille; Vincent, Jonathan; Merlino, Marielle; Michard, Robin; Martre, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs) in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules (CCRMs) including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs) and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator). In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression. PMID:25429295

  7. Characterization of a novel bile-inducible operon encoding a two-component regulatory system in Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Pfeiler, Erika A; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2007-07-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is an industrially important strain used extensively as a probiotic culture. Tolerance of the presence of bile is an attribute important to microbial survival in the intestinal tract. A whole-genome microarray was employed to examine the effects of bile on the global transcriptional profile of this strain, with the intention of elucidating genes contributing to bile tolerance. Genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism were generally induced, while genes involved in other aspects of cellular growth were mostly repressed. A 7-kb eight-gene operon encoding a two-component regulatory system (2CRS), a transporter, an oxidoreductase, and four hypothetical proteins was significantly upregulated in the presence of bile. Deletion mutations were constructed in six genes of the operon. Transcriptional analysis of the 2CRS mutants showed that mutation of the histidine protein kinase (HPK) had no effect on the induction of the operon, whereas the mutated response regulator (RR) showed enhanced induction when the cells were exposed to bile. These results indicate that the 2CRS plays a role in bile tolerance and that the operon it resides in is negatively controlled by the RR. Mutations in the transporter, the HPK, the RR, and a hypothetical protein each resulted in loss of tolerance of bile. Mutations in genes encoding another hypothetical protein and a putative oxidoreductase resulted in significant increases in bile tolerance. This functional analysis showed that the operon encoded proteins involved in both bile tolerance and bile sensitivity. PMID:17449631

  8. Distinct Roles of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Encoded Viral Interferon Regulatory Factors in Inflammatory Response and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baresova, Petra; Pitha, Paula M.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). Similar to other herpesviruses, KSHV has two life cycles, latency and lytic replication. In latency, the KSHV genome persists as a circular episome in the nucleus of the host cell and only a few viral genes are expressed. In this review, we focus on oncogenic, antiapoptotic, and immunomodulating properties of KSHV-encoded homologues of cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs)—viral IRF1 (vIRF1) to vIRF4—and their possible role in the KSHV-mediated antiviral response, apoptosis, and oncogenicity. PMID:23785197

  9. Inhibition of mTOR complex 2 induces GSK3/FBXW7-dependent degradation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and suppresses lipogenesis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Oh, Y-T; Yue, P; Khuri, F R; Sun, S-Y

    2016-02-01

    Cancer cells feature increased de novo lipogenesis. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), when presented in its mature form (mSREBP1), enhances lipogenesis by increasing transcription of several of its target genes. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, are master regulators of cellular survival, growth and metabolism. A role for mTORC1 in the regulation of SREBP1 activity has been suggested; however, the connection between mTORC2 and SREBP1 has not been clearly established and hence is the focus of this study. mTOR kinase inhibitors (for example, INK128), which inhibit both mTORC1 and mTORC2, decreased mSREBP1 levels in various cancer cell lines. Knockdown of rictor, but not raptor, also decreased mSREBP1. Consistently, reduced mSREBP1 levels were detected in cells deficient in rictor or Sin1 compared with parent or rictor-deficient cells with re-expression of ectopic rictor. Hence it is mTORC2 inhibition that causes mSREBP1 reduction. As a result, expression of the mSREBP1 target genes acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty-acid synthase was suppressed, along with suppressed lipogenesis in cells exposed to INK128. Moreover, mSREBP1 stability was reduced in cells treated with INK128 or rictor knockdown. Inhibition of proteasome, GSK3 or the E3 ubiquitin ligase, FBXW7, prevented mSREBP1 reduction induced by mTORC2 inhibition. Thus mTORC2 inhibition clearly facilitates GSK3-dependent, FBXW7-mediated mSREBP1 degradation, leading to mSREBP1 reduction. Accordingly, we conclude that mTORC2 positively regulates mSREBP1 stability and lipogenesis. Our findings reveal a novel biological function of mTORC2 in the regulation of lipogenesis and warrant further study in this direction. PMID:25893295

  10. Inhibition of mTOR complex 2 induces GSK3/FBXW7-dependent degradation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and suppresses lipogenesis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaohua; Oh, You-Take; Yue, Ping; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells feature increased de novo lipogenesis. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), when presented in its mature form (mSREBP1), enhances lipogenesis through increasing transcription of several of its target genes. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, are master regulators of cellular survival, growth and metabolism. A role for mTORC1 in the regulation of SREBP1 activity has been suggested; however the connection between mTORC2 and SREBP1 has not been clearly established and hence is the focus of this study. mTOR kinase inhibitors (e.g., INK128), which inhibit both mTORC1 and mTORC2, decreased mSREBP1 levels in various cancer cell lines. Knockdown of rictor, but not raptor, also decreased mSREBP1. Consistently, reduced mSREBP1 levels were detected in cells deficient in rictor or Sin1 compared to parent or rictor-deficient cells with re-expression of ectopic rictor. Hence it is mTORC2 inhibition that causes mSREBP1 reduction. As a result, expression of the mSREBP1 target genes acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase was suppressed, accompanied with suppressed lipogenesis in cells exposed to INK128. Moreover, mSREBP1 stability was reduced in cells treated with INK128 or rictor knockdown. Inhibition of proteasome, GSK3 or the E3 ubiquitin ligase, FBXW7, prevented mSREBP1 reduction induced by mTORC2 inhibition. Thus mTORC2 inhibition clearly facilitates GSK3-dependent, FBXW7-mediated mSREBP1 degradation, leading to mSREBP1 reduction. Accordingly, we conclude that mTORC2 positively regulates mSREBP1 stability and lipogenesis. Our findings reveal a novel biological function of mTORC2 in the regulation of lipogenesis and warrant further study in this direction. PMID:25893295

  11. Varicella-zoster virus open reading frame 4 encodes an immediate-early protein with posttranscriptional regulatory properties.

    PubMed Central

    Defechereux, P; Debrus, S; Baudoux, L; Rentier, B; Piette, J

    1997-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) encodes four putative immediate-early proteins based on sequence homology with herpes simplex virus type 1: the products of ORF4, -61, -62, and -63. Until now, only two VZV proteins have been described as being truly expressed with immediate-early kinetics (IE62 and IE63). The ORF4-encoded protein can stimulate gene expression either alone or in synergy with the major regulatory protein IE62. Making use of a sequential combination of transcription and protein synthesis inhibitors (actinomycin D and cycloheximide, respectively), we demonstrated the immediate-early nature of the ORF4 gene product, which can thus be named IE4. The fact that IE4 is expressed with kinetics similar to that of IE62 further underlines the possible cooperation between these two VZV proteins in gene expression. Analysis of the IE4-mediated autologous or heterologous viral gene expression at the mRNA levels clearly indicated that IE4 may have several mechanisms of action. Activation of the two VZV genes tested could occur partly by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since increases in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) mRNA levels do not account for the stimulation of CAT activity. On the other hand, stimulation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat- or the cytomegalovirus promoter-associated CAT activity is correlated with an increase in the corresponding CAT mRNA. PMID:9261438

  12. [Sterols in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni].

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, M; De Simone, F; Pizza, C; Aquino, R

    1984-12-30

    The sterol fraction of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni contains, essentially, the following sterols: stigmasterol (45,8%), beta-sitosterol (39,4%) and campesterol (13,1%). The individual components were separated, after acetylation, by HPLC with absolute methanol as eluant. The identification of the compounds has been carried out through NMR and MS, while the corresponding percentages have been desumed from the GLC data. PMID:6529501

  13. Direct control of type IIA topoisomerase activity by a chromosomally encoded regulatory protein

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Seychelle M.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Hershey, David M.; Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Sengupta, Sugopa; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Berger, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Precise control of supercoiling homeostasis is critical to DNA-dependent processes such as gene expression, replication, and damage response. Topoisomerases are central regulators of DNA supercoiling commonly thought to act independently in the recognition and modulation of chromosome superstructure; however, recent evidence has indicated that cells tightly regulate topoisomerase activity to support chromosome dynamics, transcriptional response, and replicative events. How topoisomerase control is executed and linked to the internal status of a cell is poorly understood. To investigate these connections, we determined the structure of Escherichia coli gyrase, a type IIA topoisomerase bound to YacG, a recently identified chromosomally encoded inhibitor protein. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that YacG is frequently associated with coenzyme A (CoA) production enzymes, linking the protein to metabolism and stress. The structure, along with supporting solution studies, shows that YacG represses gyrase by sterically occluding the principal DNA-binding site of the enzyme. Unexpectedly, YacG acts by both engaging two spatially segregated regions associated with small-molecule inhibitor interactions (fluoroquinolone antibiotics and the newly reported antagonist GSK299423) and remodeling the gyrase holoenzyme into an inactive, ATP-trapped configuration. This study establishes a new mechanism for the protein-based control of topoisomerases, an approach that may be used to alter supercoiling levels for responding to changes in cellular state. PMID:24990966

  14. Systematic discovery and characterization of regulatory motifs in ENCODE TF binding experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have led to a dramatic increase in the number of available transcription factor ChIP-seq and ChIP-chip data sets. Understanding the motif content of these data sets is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of regulation. Here we provide a systematic motif analysis for 427 human ChIP-seq data sets using motifs curated from the literature and also discovered de novo using five established motif discovery tools. We use a systematic pipeline for calculating motif enrichment in each data set, providing a principled way for choosing between motif variants found in the literature and for flagging potentially problematic data sets. Our analysis confirms the known specificity of 41 of the 56 analyzed factor groups and reveals motifs of potential cofactors. We also use cell type-specific binding to find factors active in specific conditions. The resource we provide is accessible both for browsing a small number of factors and for performing large-scale systematic analyses. We provide motif matrices, instances and enrichments in each of the ENCODE data sets. The motifs discovered here have been used in parallel studies to validate the specificity of antibodies, understand cooperativity between data sets and measure the variation of motif binding across individuals and species. PMID:24335146

  15. Sterols as Complex-forming Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, D. V.

    1986-02-01

    The formation of complexes of sterols with different compounds determines the biological properties of both sterols and various natural substances such as saponins and polyene antibiotics. Complex formation by sterols with phospholipids, steroid saponins, and polyene antibiotics is determined by the same characteristic features of the structure of the sterol molecule. The principal role in complex formation is played by the hydrophobic reaction of the cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene ring. The formation of a hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group of the sterol and a proton acceptor, which is assumed in most complexes, has been proved only in the complexes of sterols with water and acids. The bibliography contains 122 references.

  16. MarRA, SoxSR, and Rob encode a signal dependent regulatory network in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kirti; Saini, Supreet

    2016-05-24

    When exposed to low concentrations of toxic chemicals, bacteria modulate the expression of a number of cellular processes. Typically, these processes include those related to porin production, dismutases, and metabolic fluxes. In Escherichia coli (E. coli), the expression of these systems is largely controlled by three homologous transcriptional regulators: MarA, SoxS, and Rob. Each of the three regulators responds to distinct chemical signals (salicylate for MarA; paraquat for SoxS; and bipyridyl for Rob) and controls the expression of an overlapping set of downstream targets. In addition, the three systems autoregulate their own expression, and cross-regulate each other's expression. Specifically, MarA is known to activate SoxS expression, and Rob is known to activate MarA expression. In addition, a number of conflicting regulatory interactions are known to exist between the three loci. Thus, the three systems encode a complex regulatory topology with multiple feedback loops, the precise nature of whose interactions or their significance in cellular physiology is not well understood currently. In this work, we focus on understanding the details of this crosstalk between the Mar-Sox-Rob systems in E. coli, and the resulting control and dynamics of the expression of cellular processes by studying gene expression at the population level and at single-cell resolution in wild type and mutants. Our results indicate that the regulatory architecture between MarA, SoxS, and Rob is dependent on the signal (inducer) present in the environment. The regulators, in response to an inducer, form a Feed Forward Loop (FFL), which leads to faster and stronger induction of target genes in the cell, consequently resulting in better cellular growth. Through the FFL, the cell is able to integrate qualitatively different signals in the network, and consequently, control cellular physiology. In addition, we present two intriguing dynamic features of the Mar-Sox-Rob regulon. First, in the

  17. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  18. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  19. A new sterol glycoside from Securidaca inappendiculata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Jie; Yang, Xue-Dong; Xu, Li-Zhen; Zou, Zhong-Mei; Yang, Shi-Lin

    2005-08-01

    From the roots of Securidaca inappendiculata, one new sterol glycoside securisteroside (1) has been isolated, along with two known sterols, spinasterol (2) and 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-spinasterol (3). The new sterol was characterized by chemical and spectrometric methods, including EIMS, FABMS and one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments. PMID:16087640

  20. Sterol dynamics during endocytic trafficking in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Stanislas, Thomas; Grebe, Markus; Boutté, Yohann

    2014-01-01

    Sterols are lipids found in membranes of eukaryotic cells. Functions of sterols have been demonstrated for various cellular processes including endocytic trafficking in animal, fungal, and plant cells. The ability to visualize sterols at the subcellular level is crucial to understand sterol distribution and function during endocytic trafficking. In plant cells, the polyene antibiotic filipin is the most extensively used tool for the specific detection of fluorescently labeled 3-β-hydroxysterols in situ. Filipin can to some extent be used to track sterol internalization in live cells, but this application is limited, due to the inhibitory effects filipin exerts on sterol-dependent endocytosis. Nevertheless, filipin-sterol labeling can be performed on aldehyde-fixed cells which allows for sterol detection in endocytic compartments. This approach can combine studies correlating sterol distribution with experimental manipulations of endocytic trafficking pathways. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols and troubleshooting for procedures on live and fixed cells to visualize sterols during endocytic trafficking. We also provide a detailed discussion of advantages and limitations of both methods. Moreover, we illustrate the use of the endocytic recycling inhibitor brefeldin A and a genetically modified version of one of its target molecules for studying endocytic sterol trafficking. PMID:25117272

  1. Zinc Finger Transcription Factors Displaced SREBP Proteins as the Major Sterol Regulators during Saccharomycotina Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sarah L.; Wang, Can; Holland, Linda M.; Brunel, François; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Zavrel, Martin; White, Theodore C.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, including the majority of fungi, expression of sterol biosynthesis genes is regulated by Sterol-Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs), which are basic helix-loop-helix transcription activators. However, in yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans sterol synthesis is instead regulated by Upc2, an unrelated transcription factor with a Gal4-type zinc finger. The SREBPs in S. cerevisiae (Hms1) and C. albicans (Cph2) have lost a domain, are not major regulators of sterol synthesis, and instead regulate filamentous growth. We report here that rewiring of the sterol regulon, with Upc2 taking over from SREBP, likely occurred in the common ancestor of all Saccharomycotina. Yarrowia lipolytica, a deep-branching species, is the only genome known to contain intact and full-length orthologs of both SREBP (Sre1) and Upc2. Deleting YlUPC2, but not YlSRE1, confers susceptibility to azole drugs. Sterol levels are significantly reduced in the YlUPC2 deletion. RNA-seq analysis shows that hypoxic regulation of sterol synthesis genes in Y. lipolytica is predominantly mediated by Upc2. However, YlSre1 still retains a role in hypoxic regulation; growth of Y. lipolytica in hypoxic conditions is reduced in a Ylupc2 deletion and is abolished in a Ylsre1/Ylupc2 double deletion, and YlSre1 regulates sterol gene expression during hypoxia adaptation. We show that YlSRE1, and to a lesser extent YlUPC2, are required for switching from yeast to filamentous growth in hypoxia. Sre1 appears to have an ancestral role in the regulation of filamentation, which became decoupled from its role in sterol gene regulation by the arrival of Upc2 in the Saccharomycotina. PMID:24453983

  2. The structure of the human sterol carrier protein X/sterol carrier protein 2 gene (SCP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Ohba, Takashi; Rennert, H.; Pfeifer, S.M.

    1994-11-15

    Sterol carrier protein X (SCPx) is a 58-kDa protein that is localized to peroxisomes. The amino acid sequence of the protein suggests that SCPx may function as a thiolase. The gene encoding SCPx also codes for a 15.3-kDa protein called sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). Here the authors report the structure of this gene (SCP2), which spans approximately 80 kb and consists of 16 exons and 15 introns. Multiple transcription start sites were identified. The 5{prime} flanking region has characteristics of other peroxisomal protein promoters, which include the absence of a TATA box and G+C-enriched region containing several reverse GC boxes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. FACKEL is a sterol C-14 reductase required for organized cell division and expansion in Arabidopsis embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schrick, Kathrin; Mayer, Ulrike; Horrichs, Andrea; Kuhnt, Christine; Bellini, Catherine; Dangl, Jeff; Schmidt, Jürgen; Jürgens, Gerd

    2000-01-01

    In flowering plants, the developing embryo consists of growing populations of cells whose fates are determined in a position-dependent manner to form the adult organism. Mutations in the FACKEL (FK) gene affect body organization of the Arabidopsis seedling. We report that FK is required for cell division and expansion and is involved in proper organization of the embryo. We isolated FK by positional cloning. Expression analysis in embryos revealed that FK mRNA becomes localized to meristematic zones. FK encodes a predicted integral membrane protein related to the vertebrate lamin B receptor and sterol reductases across species, including yeast sterol C-14 reductase ERG24. We provide functional evidence that FK encodes a sterol C-14 reductase by complementation of erg24. GC/MS analysis confirmed that fk mutations lead to accumulation of intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway preceding the C-14 reductase step. Although fk represents a sterol biosynthetic mutant, the phenotype was not rescued by feeding with brassinosteroids (BRs), the only plant sterol signaling molecules known so far. We propose that synthesis of sterol signals in addition to BRs is important in mediating regulated cell growth and organization during embryonic development. Our results indicate a novel role for sterols in the embryogenesis of plants. PMID:10859166

  4. A Novel Sterol Desaturase-Like Protein Promoting Dealkylation of Phytosterols in Tetrahymena thermophila▿

    PubMed Central

    Tomazic, Mariela L.; Najle, Sebastián R.; Nusblat, Alejandro D.; Uttaro, Antonio D.; Nudel, Clara B.

    2011-01-01

    The gene TTHERM_00438800 (DES24) from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila encodes a protein with three conserved histidine clusters, typical of the fatty acid hydroxylase superfamily. Despite its high similarity to sterol desaturase-like enzymes, the phylogenetic analysis groups Des24p in a separate cluster more related to bacterial than to eukaryotic proteins, suggesting a possible horizontal gene transfer event. A somatic knockout of DES24 revealed that the gene encodes a protein, Des24p, which is involved in the dealkylation of phytosterols. Knocked-out mutants were unable to eliminate the C-24 ethyl group from C29 sterols, whereas the ability to introduce other modifications, such as desaturations at positions C-5(6), C-7(8), and C-22(23), were not altered. Although C-24 dealkylations have been described in other organisms, such as insects, neither the enzymes nor the corresponding genes have been identified to date. Therefore, this is the first identification of a gene involved in sterol dealkylation. Moreover, the knockout mutant and wild-type strain differed significantly in growth and morphology only when cultivated with C29 sterols; under this culture condition, a change from the typical pear-like shape to a round shape and an alteration in the regulation of tetrahymanol biosynthesis were observed. Sterol analysis upon culture with various substrates and inhibitors indicate that the removal of the C-24 ethyl group in Tetrahymena may proceed by a mechanism different from the one currently known. PMID:21257793

  5. Sterol phylogenesis and algal evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Nes, W.D.; Norton, R.A.; Crumley, F.G. ); Madigan, S.J.; Katz, E.R. )

    1990-10-01

    The stereochemistry of several sterol precursors and end products synthesized by two fungal-like microorganisms Prototheca wickerhamii (I) and Dictyostelium discoideum (II) have been determined by chromatographic (TLC, GLC, and HPLC) and spectral (UV, MS, and {sup 1}H NMR) methods. From I and II the following sterols were isolated from the cells: cycloartenol, cyclolaudenol, 24(28)-methylenecy-cloartanol, ergosterol, protothecasterol, 4{alpha}-methylergostanol, 4{alpha}-methylclionastanol, clionastanol, 24{beta}-ethylcholesta-8,22-enol, and dictyosterol. In addition, the mechanism of C-24 methylation was investigated in both organisms by feeding to I (2-{sup 3}H)lanosterol, (2-{sup 3}H)cycloartenol, (24{sup 3}H)lanosterol, and (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})methionine and by feeding to II (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})methionine. The results demonstrate that the 24{beta} configuration is formed by different alkylation routes in I and II. The authors conclude that Prototheca is an apoplastic Chlorella (i.e., an alga) and that Dictyostelium as well as the other soil amoebae that synthesize cycloartenol evolved from algal rather than fungal ancestors.

  6. The sterols of the echinoderm Asterias rubens

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew G.; Rubinstein, Ian; Goad, L. John

    1973-01-01

    1. Twenty-two sterols were identified in the starfish Asterias rubens (Phylum, Echinodermata; Class, Asteroidea). 2. The major 4-demethyl sterols had a Δ7 bond and the C27 compound 5α-cholest-7-en-3β-ol predominated over other mono- and di-unsaturated sterols belonging to the C26, C27, C28 and C29 series. 3. Small amounts of cholest-5-en-3β-ol and 5α-cholestan-3β-ol were also present. 4. The minor sterols identified all contained either one or two methyl groups at C-4 and are considered to be potential biosynthetic precursors of 5α-cholest-7-en-3β-ol. 5. Three sterols possessing a 9β,19-cyclopropane ring were also isolated and were probably derived by the starfish from a dietary source. PMID:4772271

  7. Comparative molecular modelling of biologically active sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Mariusz; Mazerski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sterols are targets for a clinically important antifungal agent - amphotericin B. The relatively specific antifungal action of the drug is based on a stronger interaction of amphotericin B with fungal ergosterol than with mammalian cholesterol. Conformational space occupied by six sterols has been defined using the molecular dynamics method to establish if the conformational features correspond to the preferential interaction of amphotericin B with ergosterol as compared with cholesterol. The compounds studied were chosen on the basis of structural features characteristic for cholesterol and ergosterol and on available experimental data on the ability to form complexes with the antibiotic. Statistical analysis of the data obtained has been performed. The results show similarity of the conformational spaces occupied by all the sterols tested. This suggests that the conformational differences of sterol molecules are not the major feature responsible for the differential sterol - drug affinity.

  8. The Arabidopsis pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase regulatory proteins encode a novel, unprecedented Ser/Thr protein kinase primary structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) is a ubiquitous, low abundance metabolic enzyme of undetermined function in C3 plants. Its activity in C3 chloroplasts is light-regulated via reversible phosphorylation of an active-site Thr residue by the PPDK regulatory protein (RP), a most unusual, bifuncti...

  9. FarR regulates the farAB-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae via an MtrR regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, E-H; Rouquette-Loughlin, C; Folster, J P; Shafer, W M

    2003-12-01

    The farAB operon of Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes an efflux pump which mediates gonococcal resistance to antibacterial fatty acids. It was previously observed that expression of the farAB operon was positively regulated by MtrR, which is a repressor of the mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump system (E.-H. Lee and W. M. Shafer, Mol. Microbiol. 33:839-845, 1999). This regulation was believed to be indirect since MtrR did not bind to the farAB promoter. In this study, computer analysis of the gonococcal genome sequence database, lacZ reporter fusions, and gel mobility shift assays were used to elucidate the regulatory mechanism by which expression of the farAB operon is modulated by MtrR in gonococci. We identified a regulatory protein belonging to the MarR family of transcriptional repressors and found that it negatively controls expression of farAB by directly binding to the farAB promoter. We designated this regulator FarR to signify its role in regulating the farAB operon. We found that MtrR binds to the farR promoter, thereby repressing farR expression. Hence, MtrR regulates farAB in a positive fashion by modulating farR expression. This MtrR regulatory cascade seems to play an important role in adjusting levels of the FarAB and MtrCDE efflux pumps to prevent their excess expression in gonococci. PMID:14645274

  10. Synthesis of Hydroxylated Sterols in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants Alters Growth and Steroid Metabolism1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Lisa; Nahar, Nurun; Dalman, Kerstin; Fujioka, Shozo; Jonsson, Lisbeth; Dutta, Paresh C.; Sitbon, Folke

    2011-01-01

    To explore mechanisms in plant sterol homeostasis, we have here increased the turnover of sterols in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants by overexpressing four mouse cDNA encoding cholesterol hydroxylases (CHs), hydroxylating cholesterol at the C-7, C-24, C-25, or C-27 positions. Compared to the wild type, the four types of Arabidopsis transformant showed varying degrees of phenotypic alteration, the strongest one being in CH25 lines, which were dark-green dwarfs resembling brassinosteroid-related mutants. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of extracts from wild-type Arabidopsis plants revealed trace levels of α and β forms of 7-hydroxycholesterol, 7-hydroxycampesterol, and 7-hydroxysitosterol. The expected hydroxycholesterol metabolites in CH7-, CH24-, and CH25 transformants were identified and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Additional hydroxysterol forms were also observed, particularly in CH25 plants. In CH24 and CH25 lines, but not in CH7 ones, the presence of hydroxysterols was correlated with a considerable alteration of the sterol profile and an increased sterol methyltransferase activity in microsomes. Moreover, CH25 lines contained clearly reduced levels of brassinosteroids, and displayed an enhanced drought tolerance. Equivalent transformations of potato plants with the CH25 construct increased hydroxysterol levels, but without the concomitant alteration of growth and sterol profiles observed in Arabidopsis. The results suggest that an increased hydroxylation of cholesterol and/or other sterols in Arabidopsis triggers compensatory processes, acting to maintain sterols at adequate levels. PMID:21746809

  11. A plasmid-encoded two-component regulatory system involved in copper-inducible transcription in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Khunajakr, N; Liu, C Q; Charoenchai, P; Dunn, N W

    1999-03-18

    Two regulatory genes (lcoR and lcoS) were identified from a plasmid-borne lactococcal copper resistance determinant and characterized by transcriptional fusion to the promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat). RT-PCR analysis indicates that lcoR and lcoS are organized within an operon, controlling the transcription of cat in a copper-inducible manner. The amino acid sequences deduced from lcoR and lcoS show homology to the response and sensor proteins of known two-component regulatory systems. Deletion within either lcoS or both genes inactivated the copper-dependent activity, suggesting the presence of no trans-acting lcoR and lcoS homologs in the lactococcal host chromosome. The transcription start site involved in copper induction was mapped by primer extension. PMID:10095123

  12. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics. PMID:9148788

  13. Characterization of a Novel Human Herpesvirus 8-Encoded Protein, vIRF-3, That Shows Homology to Viral and Cellular Interferon Regulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lubyova, Barbora; Pitha, Paula M.

    2000-01-01

    The genome of the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) contains a cluster of open reading frames (ORFs) encoding proteins with homology to the cellular transcription factors of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family. Two of these homologues, vIRF-1 and vIRF-2, were previously identified and functionally analyzed. In this study, we have characterized a novel gene, designated vIRF-3, encoded within the previously predicted ORF K10.5 and our newly identified ORF K10.6. Northern blotting of RNA extracted from BCBL-1 cells with a vIRF-3-specific probe and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed a single transcript of 2.2 kb with a splice present in the coding region. The vIRF-3 mRNA levels in BCBL-1 cells were increased upon 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment, with kinetics of expression similar to those of the early immediate genes. The vIRF-3 ORF encodes a 73-kDa protein with homology to cellular IRF-4 and HHV-8-encoded vIRF-2 and K11. In transient transfection assays with the IFNACAT reporter, vIRF-3 functioned as a dominant-negative mutant of both IRF-3 and IRF-7 and inhibited virus-mediated transcriptional activity of the IFNA promoter. Similarly, the overexpression of vIRF-3 in mouse L929 cells resulted in inhibition of virus-mediated synthesis of biologically active interferons. These results suggest that by targeting IRF-3 and IRF-7, which play a critical role in the activation of alpha/beta interferon (IFN) genes, HHV-8 has evolved a mechanism by which it directly subverts the functions of IRFs and down-regulates the induction of the IFN genes that are important components of the innate immunity. PMID:10933732

  14. Regulation of Squalene Synthase, a Key Enzyme of Sterol Biosynthesis, in Tobacco1

    PubMed Central

    Devarenne, Timothy P.; Ghosh, Anirban; Chappell, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) represents a putative branch point in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway capable of diverting carbon flow specifically to the biosynthesis of sterols and, hence, is considered a potential regulatory point for sterol metabolism. For example, when plant cells grown in suspension culture are challenged with fungal elicitors, suppression of sterol biosynthesis has been correlated with a reduction in SS enzyme activity. The current study sought to correlate changes in SS enzyme activity with changes in the level of the corresponding protein and mRNA. Using an SS-specific antibody, the initial suppression of SS enzyme activity in elicitor-challenged cells was not reflected by changes in the absolute level of the corresponding polypeptide, implicating a post-translational control mechanism for this enzyme activity. In comparison, the absolute level of the SS mRNA did decrease approximately 5-fold in the elicitor-treated cells, which is suggestive of decreased transcription of the SS gene. Study of SS in intact plants was also initiated by measuring the level of SS enzyme activity, the level of the corresponding protein, and the expression of SS gene promoter-reporter gene constructs in transgenic plants. SS enzyme activity, polypeptide level, and gene expression were all localized predominately to the shoot apical meristem, with much lower levels observed in leaves and roots. These later results suggest that sterol biosynthesis is localized to the apical meristems and that apical meristems may be a source of sterols for other plant tissues. PMID:12114564

  15. Sterols from the Madagascar sponge Fascaplysinopsis sp.

    PubMed

    Aknin, Maurice; Gros, Emmanuelle; Vacelet, Jean; Kashman, Yoel; Gauvin-Bialecki, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The sponge Fascaplysinopsis sp. (order Dictyoceratida, Family Thorectidae) from the west coast of Madagascar (Indian Ocean) is a particularly rich source of bioactive nitrogenous macrolides. The previous studies on this organism led to the suggestion that the latter should originate from associated microsymbionts. In order to evaluate the influence of microsymbionts on lipid content, 10 samples of Fascaplysinopsis sp. were investigated for their sterol composition. Contrary to the secondary metabolites, the sterol patterns established were qualitatively and quantitatively stable: 14 sterols with different unsaturated nuclei, Δ(5), Δ(7) and Δ(5,7), were identified; the last ones being the main sterols of the investigated sponges. The chemotaxonomic significance of these results for the order Dictyoceratida is also discussed in the context of the literature. The conjugated diene system in Δ(5,7) sterols is known to be unstable and easily photo-oxidized during storage and/or experiments to produce 5α,8α-epidioxy sterols. However, in this study, no 5α,8α-epidioxysterols (or only trace amounts) were observed. Thus, it was supposed that photo-oxidation was avoided thanks to the natural antioxidants detected in Fascaplysinopsis sp. by both the DPPH and β-caroten bleaching assays. PMID:21339959

  16. Sterol synthesis in the human arterial intima

    PubMed Central

    Chobanian, Aram V.

    1968-01-01

    Intimal sterol synthesis was examined in isolated human arterial segments obtained at surgery or at postmortem examination. The tissues were incubated with acetate-1-14C and mevalonate-2-14C and the incorporation of these precursors into sterols was determined. Intimal sterols were isolated by multiple chromatographic techniques and purified by bromination and oxidation procedures. The results indicate that the arterial intima can incorporate acetate and mevalonate into cholesterol, cholestanol, and squalene. Cholestanol was the major sterol synthesized by the arterial wall, but cholesterol production was also consistently observed. The findings suggest that local synthesis is a potential source of sterol accumulation within the arterial wall. The conversion of cholesterol to other sterols was also studied in terminally ill patients receiving labeled cholesterol before death. Tissue analyses revealed the presence of labeled cholestanol as well as cholesterol in the tissue 5-104 days after labeled cholesterol administration. The results demonstrate the conversion of cholesterol to cholestanol in man and suggest that the exchange of cholestanol between the blood and tissues is similar to that of cholesterol. PMID:5637146

  17. Regulatory domain or CpG site variation in SLC12A5, encoding the chloride transporter KCC2, in human autism and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Merner, Nancy D; Chandler, Madison R; Bourassa, Cynthia; Liang, Bo; Khanna, Arjun R; Dion, Patrick; Rouleau, Guy A; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2015-01-01

    Many encoded gene products responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) like autism spectrum disorders (ASD), schizophrenia (SCZ), intellectual disability (ID), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) converge on networks controlling synaptic function. An increase in KCC2 (SLC12A5) Cl(-) transporter activity drives the developmental GABA excitatory-inhibitory sequence, but the role of KCC2 in human NDs is essentially unknown. Here, we report two rare, non-synonymous (NS), functionally-impairing variants in the KCC2 C-terminal regulatory domain (CTRD) in human ASD (R952H and R1049C) and SCZ (R952H) previously linked with IGE and familial febrile seizures, and another novel NS KCC2 variant in ASD (R1048W) with highly-predicted pathogenicity. Exome data from 2517 simplex families in the ASD Simon Simplex Collection (SSC) revealed significantly more KCC2 CTRD variants in ASD cases than controls, and interestingly, these were more often synonymous and predicted to disrupt or introduce a CpG site. Furthermore, full gene analysis showed ASD cases are more likely to contain rare KCC2 variants affecting CpG sites than controls. These data suggest genetically-encoded dysregulation of KCC2-dependent GABA signaling may contribute to multiple human NDs. PMID:26528127

  18. Regulatory domain or CpG site variation in SLC12A5, encoding the chloride transporter KCC2, in human autism and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Merner, Nancy D.; Chandler, Madison R.; Bourassa, Cynthia; Liang, Bo; Khanna, Arjun R.; Dion, Patrick; Rouleau, Guy A.; Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Many encoded gene products responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) like autism spectrum disorders (ASD), schizophrenia (SCZ), intellectual disability (ID), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) converge on networks controlling synaptic function. An increase in KCC2 (SLC12A5) Cl− transporter activity drives the developmental GABA excitatory-inhibitory sequence, but the role of KCC2 in human NDs is essentially unknown. Here, we report two rare, non-synonymous (NS), functionally-impairing variants in the KCC2 C-terminal regulatory domain (CTRD) in human ASD (R952H and R1049C) and SCZ (R952H) previously linked with IGE and familial febrile seizures, and another novel NS KCC2 variant in ASD (R1048W) with highly-predicted pathogenicity. Exome data from 2517 simplex families in the ASD Simon Simplex Collection (SSC) revealed significantly more KCC2 CTRD variants in ASD cases than controls, and interestingly, these were more often synonymous and predicted to disrupt or introduce a CpG site. Furthermore, full gene analysis showed ASD cases are more likely to contain rare KCC2 variants affecting CpG sites than controls. These data suggest genetically-encoded dysregulation of KCC2-dependent GABA signaling may contribute to multiple human NDs. PMID:26528127

  19. Multidrug Transporters and Alterations in Sterol Biosynthesis Contribute to Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Berkow, Elizabeth L.; Manigaba, Kayihura; Parker, Josie E.; Barker, Katherine S.; Kelly, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    While much is known concerning azole resistance in Candida albicans, considerably less is understood about Candida parapsilosis, an emerging species of Candida with clinical relevance. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of azole resistance in a collection of resistant C. parapsilosis clinical isolates in order to determine which genes might play a role in this process within this species. We examined the relative expression of the putative drug transporter genes CDR1 and MDR1 and that of ERG11. In isolates overexpressing these genes, we sequenced the genes encoding their presumed transcriptional regulators, TAC1, MRR1, and UPC2, respectively. We also sequenced the sterol biosynthesis genes ERG3 and ERG11 in these isolates to find mutations that might contribute to this phenotype in this Candida species. Our findings demonstrate that the putative drug transporters Cdr1 and Mdr1 contribute directly to azole resistance and suggest that their overexpression is due to activating mutations in the genes encoding their transcriptional regulators. We also observed that the Y132F substitution in ERG11 is the only substitution occurring exclusively among azole-resistant isolates, and we correlated this with specific changes in sterol biosynthesis. Finally, sterol analysis of these isolates suggests that other changes in sterol biosynthesis may contribute to azole resistance in C. parapsilosis. PMID:26169412

  20. Multidrug Transporters and Alterations in Sterol Biosynthesis Contribute to Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Elizabeth L; Manigaba, Kayihura; Parker, Josie E; Barker, Katherine S; Kelly, Stephen L; Rogers, P David

    2015-10-01

    While much is known concerning azole resistance in Candida albicans, considerably less is understood about Candida parapsilosis, an emerging species of Candida with clinical relevance. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of azole resistance in a collection of resistant C. parapsilosis clinical isolates in order to determine which genes might play a role in this process within this species. We examined the relative expression of the putative drug transporter genes CDR1 and MDR1 and that of ERG11. In isolates overexpressing these genes, we sequenced the genes encoding their presumed transcriptional regulators, TAC1, MRR1, and UPC2, respectively. We also sequenced the sterol biosynthesis genes ERG3 and ERG11 in these isolates to find mutations that might contribute to this phenotype in this Candida species. Our findings demonstrate that the putative drug transporters Cdr1 and Mdr1 contribute directly to azole resistance and suggest that their overexpression is due to activating mutations in the genes encoding their transcriptional regulators. We also observed that the Y132F substitution in ERG11 is the only substitution occurring exclusively among azole-resistant isolates, and we correlated this with specific changes in sterol biosynthesis. Finally, sterol analysis of these isolates suggests that other changes in sterol biosynthesis may contribute to azole resistance in C. parapsilosis. PMID:26169412

  1. Design of modular "plug-and-play" expression platforms derived from natural riboswitches for engineering novel genetically encodable RNA regulatory devices.

    PubMed

    Trausch, Jeremiah J; Batey, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encodable RNA devices that directly detect small molecules in the cellular environment are of increasing interest for a variety of applications including live cell imaging and synthetic biology. Riboswitches are naturally occurring sensors of intracellular metabolites, primarily found in the bacterial mRNA leaders and regulating their expression. These regulatory elements are generally composed of two domains: an aptamer that binds a specific effector molecule and an expression platform that informs the transcriptional or translational machinery. While it was long established that riboswitch aptamers are modular and portable, capable of directing different output domains including ribozymes, switches, and fluorophore-binding modules, the same has not been demonstrated until recently for expression platforms. We have engineered and validated a set of expression platforms that regulate transcription through a secondary structural switch that can host a variety of different aptamers, including those derived through in vitro selection methods, to create novel chimeric riboswitches. These synthetic switches are capable of a highly specific regulatory response both in vitro and in vivo. Here we present the methodology for the design and engineering of chimeric switches using biological expression platforms. PMID:25605380

  2. The Drosophila gene taranis encodes a novel trithorax group member potentially linked to the cell cycle regulatory apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Calgaro, Stéphane; Boube, Muriel; Cribbs, David L; Bourbon, Henri-Marc

    2002-01-01

    Genes of the Drosophila Polycomb and trithorax groups (PcG and trxG, respectively) influence gene expression by modulating chromatin structure. Segmental expression of homeotic loci (HOM) initiated in early embryogenesis is maintained by a balance of antagonistic PcG (repressor) and trxG (activator) activities. Here we identify a novel trxG family member, taranis (tara), on the basis of the following criteria: (i) tara loss-of-function mutations act as genetic antagonists of the PcG genes Polycomb and polyhomeotic and (ii) they enhance the phenotypic effects of mutations in the trxG genes trithorax (trx), brahma (brm), and osa. In addition, reduced tara activity can mimic homeotic loss-of-function phenotypes, as is often the case for trxG genes. tara encodes two closely related 96-kD protein isoforms (TARA-alpha/-beta) derived from broadly expressed alternative promoters. Genetic and phenotypic rescue experiments indicate that the TARA-alpha/-beta proteins are functionally redundant. The TARA proteins share evolutionarily conserved motifs with several recently characterized mammalian nuclear proteins, including the cyclin-dependent kinase regulator TRIP-Br1/p34(SEI-1), the related protein TRIP-Br2/Y127, and RBT1, a partner of replication protein A. These data raise the possibility that TARA-alpha/-beta play a role in integrating chromatin structure with cell cycle regulation. PMID:11861561

  3. Identification of alternatively spliced mRNAs encoding potential new regulatory proteins in cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Carpenter, S; Christensen, J; Storgaard, T; Viuff, B; Wannemuehler, Y; Belousov, J; Roth, J A

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction was used to detect and characterize low-abundance bovine leukemia virus (BLV) mRNAs. In infected cattle we could detect spliced mRNA with a splice pattern consistent with a Tax/Rex mRNA, as well as at least four alternatively spliced RNAs. Two of the alternatively spliced mRNAs encoded hitherto unrecognized BLV proteins, designated RIII and GIV. The Tax/Rex and alternatively spliced mRNAs could be detected at their highest levels in BLV-infected cell cultures; the next highest levels were found in samples from calves experimentally infected at 6 weeks postinoculation. Alternatively spliced mRNAs were also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in naturally infected animals; they were detected by a nested polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, the GIV mRNA was specifically detected in naturally infected cows with persistent lymphocytosis and in two of five calves at 6 months after experimental infection with BLV. Furthermore, the calf with the strongest signal for GIV had the highest lymphocyte counts. These data may suggest a correlation between expression of the GIV product and development of persistent lymphocytosis. Some of the donor and acceptor sites in the alternatively spliced mRNAs were highly unusual. The biological mechanisms and significance of such a choice of unexpected splice sites are currently unknown. Images PMID:8380084

  4. Purification, characterization and catalytic properties of human sterol 8-isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Nes, W David; Zhou, Wenxu; Dennis, Allen L; Li, Haoxia; Jia, Zhonghua; Keith, Richard A; Piser, Timothy M; Furlong, Stephen T

    2002-01-01

    CHO 2, encoding human sterol 8-isomerase (hSI), was introduced into plasmids pYX213 or pET23a. The resulting native protein was overexpressed in erg 2 yeast cells and purified to apparent homogeneity. The enzyme exhibited a K (m) of 50 microM and a turnover number of 0.423 s(-1) for zymosterol, an isoelectric point of 7.70, a native molecular mass of 107000 Da and was tetrameric. The structural features of zymosterol provided optimal substrate acceptability. Biomimetic studies of acid-catalysed isomerization of zymosterol resulted in formation of cholest-8(14)-enol, whereas the enzyme-generated product was a Delta(7)-sterol, suggesting absolute stereochemical control of the reaction by hSI. Using (2)H(2)O and either zymosterol or cholesta-7,24-dienol as substrates, the reversibility of the reaction was confirmed by GC-MS of the deuterated products. The positional specific incorporation of deuterium at C-9alpha was established by a combination of (1)H- and (13)C-NMR analyses of the enzyme-generated cholesta-7,24-dienol. Kinetic analyses indicated the reaction equilibrium ( K (eq)=14; DeltaG(o')=-6.5 kJ/mol) for double-bond isomerization favoured the forward direction, Delta(8) to Delta(7). Treatment of hSI with different high-energy intermediate analogues produced the following dissociation constants ( K (i)): emopamil (2 microM)=tamoxifen (1 microM)=tridemorph (1 microM)<25-azacholesterol (21 microM) sterol formation in cholesterol synthesis. PMID:12133002

  5. Plant sterols in food: No consensus in guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Weingärtner, Oliver; Baber, Ronny; Teupser, Daniel

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Plant sterols are used as food supplement to reduce serum cholesterol levels. • Reductions in serum cholesterol levels are achieved at the expense of increased plant sterol levels. • The potential atherogenicity of increased serum plant sterol levels is controversially debated. • This dispute is reflected by different guideline recommendations in regard to plant sterols. - Abstract: Plant sterols are supplemented in foods to reduce cardiovascular risk. Randomized controlled trials show 2 g of plant sterols a day reduce serum cholesterol by about 10%. This reduction in serum cholesterol levels is achieved at the expense of increased serum plant sterol levels. Findings in patients with phytosterolemia, in experimental studies and in clinical trials have lead to speculations that plant sterols might be atherogenic. In view of emerging safety issues the role of plant sterols in cardiovascular prevention has become controversial. This review reflects the ongoing controversial scientific debate and points out recent developments in guidelines of national and international societies.

  6. Monitoring sterol uptake, acetylation, and export in yeast.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Vineet; Schneiter, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are essential lipid components of eukaryotic membranes. They are synthesized in the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) from where they are efficiently transported to the plasma membrane, which harbors ~90% of the free sterol pool of the cell. The molecular mechanisms that govern this lipid transport, however, are not well characterized and are challenging to analyze. Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers the opportunity to circumvent some of the technical limitations associated with studying this forward transport of sterols from the ER to the plasma membrane, because the organism can also take up sterols from the environment, incorporate them into the plasma membrane and transport them back to the ER, where the free sterol is converted to steryl esters. This reverse sterol transport, however, occurs only under anaerobic conditions, where the cells become sterol auxotroph, or in mutant cells that cannot synthesize heme. The reverse sterol transport pathway, however, is more amenable to experimental studies, because arrival of the sterol in the ER membrane can be monitored unambiguously by following the formation of steryl esters. Apart from sterol acylation, we have recently described a reversible sterol acetylation cycle that is operating in the lumen of the ER. Acetylation occurs on both cholesterol and pregnenolone, a steroid precursor, and serves as a signal for export of the acetylated sterols into the culture media. The time-dependent appearance of acetylated sterols in the culture supernatant thus provides a new means to monitor the forward transport of chemically modified sterols out of the ER. PMID:19784602

  7. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Katarzyna E.; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J.; Kasson, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol’s ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion. PMID:27431907

  8. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Katarzyna E; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol's ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion. PMID:27431907

  9. Targeted disruption of the mouse gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein provides insights into congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Kathleen M.; Soo, Shiu-Ching; Wetsel, William C.; Stocco, Douglas M.; Clark, Barbara J.; Parker, Keith L.

    1997-01-01

    An essential component of regulated steroidogenesis is the translocation of cholesterol from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme carries out the first committed step in steroidogenesis. Recent studies showed that a 30-kDa mitochondrial phosphoprotein, designated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), is essential for this translocation. To allow us to explore the roles of StAR in a system amenable to experimental manipulation and to develop an animal model for the human disorder lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), we used targeted gene disruption to produce StAR knockout mice. These StAR knockout mice were indistinguishable initially from wild-type littermates, except that males and females had female external genitalia. After birth, they failed to grow normally and died from adrenocortical insufficiency. Hormone assays confirmed severe defects in adrenal steroids—with loss of negative feedback regulation at hypothalamic–pituitary levels—whereas hormones constituting the gonadal axis did not differ significantly from levels in wild-type littermates. Histologically, the adrenal cortex of StAR knockout mice contained florid lipid deposits, with lesser deposits in the steroidogenic compartment of the testis and none in the ovary. The sex-specific differences in gonadal involvement support a two-stage model of the pathogenesis of StAR deficiency, with trophic hormone stimulation inducing progressive accumulation of lipids within the steroidogenic cells and ultimately causing their death. These StAR knockout mice provide a useful model system in which to determine the mechanisms of StAR’s essential roles in adrenocortical and gonadal steroidogenesis. PMID:9326645

  10. Plant Oxidosqualene Metabolism: Cycloartenol Synthase–Dependent Sterol Biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Gas-Pascual, Elisabet; Berna, Anne; Bach, Thomas J.; Schaller, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The plant sterol pathway exhibits a major biosynthetic difference as compared with that of metazoans. The committed sterol precursor is the pentacyclic cycloartenol (9β,19-cyclolanost-24-en-3β-ol) and not lanosterol (lanosta-8,24-dien-3β-ol), as it was shown in the late sixties. However, plant genome mining over the last years revealed the general presence of lanosterol synthases encoding sequences (LAS1) in the oxidosqualene cyclase repertoire, in addition to cycloartenol synthases (CAS1) and to non-steroidal triterpene synthases that contribute to the metabolic diversity of C30H50O compounds on earth. Furthermore, plant LAS1 proteins have been unambiguously identified by peptidic signatures and by their capacity to complement the yeast lanosterol synthase deficiency. A dual pathway for the synthesis of sterols through lanosterol and cycloartenol was reported in the model Arabidopsis thaliana, though the contribution of a lanosterol pathway to the production of 24-alkyl-Δ5-sterols was quite marginal (Ohyama et al. (2009) PNAS 106, 725). To investigate further the physiological relevance of CAS1 and LAS1 genes in plants, we have silenced their expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We used virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) based on gene specific sequences from a Nicotiana tabacum CAS1 or derived from the solgenomics initiative (http://solgenomics.net/) to challenge the respective roles of CAS1 and LAS1. In this report, we show a CAS1-specific functional sterol pathway in engineered yeast, and a strict dependence on CAS1 of tobacco sterol biosynthesis. PMID:25343375

  11. Effects of sterols on the development and aging of caenorhabditis elegans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because Caenorhabditis elegans lacks several components of the de novo sterol biosynthesis pathway, it requires sterols as essential nutrients. Supplemented cholesterol undergoes extensive enzymatic modification in C. elegans to form other sterols of unknown function. Because sterol metabolism in ...

  12. Sterol composition of Bulgarian soya and corn oils.

    PubMed

    Milkova, T; Popov, A; Selva, A; Vettori, U

    1977-01-01

    The free sterols, the sterol esters and the sterol glycosides of the raw soya and corn oils as well as those of the technical lecithin and the deodorizer distillated of the latter oils were isolated by preparative TLC. The composition of each of the isolated sterol derivatives was determined by GLC and MS. Sitosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol and an unknown sterol with a molecular weight of 428 are contained in almost all of the examined fractions of the soya oil and its refinement byproducts. Dehydrocampesterol is present in the free sterols of the raw soya oil and the soya lecithin. Stigmasterol is contained in the soya deodorizer distillate in high amounts. It was established that cholesterol was present in the sterol esters of the raw soya oil high amounts. Delta7-stigmastenol occurs only in the sterol esters of the latter oil. Sitosterol, campesterol and stimgasterol are the main components of all sterol fractions of the corn oil and its refinement products. Dehydrocampesterol and unknown sterols with molecular weights of 428 are present in the free sterols of the raw corn oil. Some sterol glycosides of the soya and corn lecithin are esterified with the same major fatty acid components of the glycerides, palmitic acid being the main one. The fatty acid compositon of sterol esters of the raw soya and corn oil roughly corresponds to the fatty acid composition of oils. PMID:558512

  13. p53 Tumor Suppressor Protein Stability and Transcriptional Activity Are Targeted by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Encoded Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Baresova, Petra; Musilova, Jana; Pitha, Paula M.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses have developed numerous strategies to counteract the host cell defense. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a DNA tumor virus linked to the development of Kaposi's sarcoma, Castleman's disease, and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). The virus-encoded viral interferon regulatory factor 3 (vIRF-3) gene is a latent gene which is involved in the regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle, antiviral immunity, and tumorigenesis. vIRF-3 was shown to interact with p53 and inhibit p53-mediated apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon has not been established. Here, we show that vIRF-3 associates with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibits p53 phosphorylation on serine residues S15 and S20, and antagonizes p53 oligomerization and the DNA-binding affinity. Furthermore, vIRF-3 destabilizes p53 protein by increasing the levels of p53 polyubiquitination and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. Consequently, vIRF-3 attenuates p53-mediated transcription of the growth-regulatory p21 gene. These effects of vIRF-3 are of biological relevance since the knockdown of vIRF-3 expression in KSHV-positive BC-3 cells, derived from PEL, leads to an increase in p53 phosphorylation, enhancement of p53 stability, and activation of p21 gene transcription. Collectively, these data suggest that KSHV evolved an efficient mechanism to downregulate p53 function and thus facilitate uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:24248600

  14. Enzyme mechanisms for sterol C-methylations.

    PubMed

    Nes, W David

    2003-09-01

    The mechanisms by which sterol methyl transferases (SMT) transform olefins into structurally different C-methylated products are complex, prompting over 50 years of intense research. Recent enzymological studies, together with the latest discoveries in the fossil record, functional analyses and gene cloning, establish new insights into the enzymatic mechanisms of sterol C-methylation and form a basis for understanding regulation and evolution of the sterol pathway. These studies suggest that SMTs, originated shortly after life appeared on planet earth. SMTs, including those which ultimately give rise to 24 alpha- and 24 beta-alkyl sterols, align the si(beta)-face pi-electrons of the Delta(24)-double bond with the S-methyl group of AdoMet relative to a set of deprotonation bases in the active site. From the orientation of the conformationally flexible side chain in the SMT Michaelis complex, it has been found that either a single product is formed or cationic intermediates are partitioned into multiple olefins. The product structure and stereochemistry of SMT action is phylogenetically distinct and physiologically significant. SMTs control phytosterol homeostasis and their activity is subject to feedback regulation by specific sterol inserts in the membrane. A unified conceptual framework has been formulated in the steric-electric plug model that posits SMT substrate acceptability on the generation of single or double 24-alkylated side chains, which is the basis for binding order, stereospecificity and product diversity in this class of AdoMet-dependent methyl transferase enzymes. The focus of this review is the mechanism of the C-methylation process which, as discussed, can be altered by point mutations in the enzyme to direct the shape of sterol structure to optimize function. PMID:12946407

  15. Identification of the Sensory Neuron Specific Regulatory Region for the Mouse Gene Encoding the Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.8

    PubMed Central

    Puhl, Henry L.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are critical membrane components that participate in the electrical activity of excitable cells. The type one VGSC family includes the tetrodotoxin insensitive sodium channel, Nav1.8, encoded by the Scn10a gene. Nav1.8 expression is restricted to small and medium diameter nociceptive sensory neurons of the dorsal root (DRG) and cranial sensory ganglia. In order to understand the stringent transcriptional regulation of the Scn10a gene, the sensory neuron specific promoter was functionally identified. While identifying the mRNA 5’ end, alternative splicing within the 5’ UTR was observed to create heterogeneity in the RNA transcript. Four kilobases of upstream genomic DNA was cloned and the presence of tissue specific promoter activity was tested by microinjection and adenoviral infection of fluorescent protein reporter constructs into primary mouse and rat neurons, and cell lines. The region contained many putative transcription factor binding sites and strong homology with the predicted rat ortholog. Homology to the predicted human ortholog was limited to the proximal end and several conserved cis elements were noted. Two regulatory modules were identified by microinjection of reporter constructs into DRG and superior cervical ganglia neurons: a neuron specific proximal promoter region between −1.6 and −0.2kb of the transcription start site cluster, and a distal sensory neuron switch region beyond −1.6kb that restricted fluorescent protein expression to a subset of primary sensory neurons. PMID:18466327

  16. Transcriptional Organization and Regulatory Elements of a Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP Operon Encoding a LysR-Type Regulator and a Putative Solute Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Platero, Ana Isabel; García-Jaramillo, Manuel; Santero, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The atzS-atzT-atzU-atzV-atzW gene cluster of the Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP atrazine-degradative plasmid pADP-1, which carries genes for an outer membrane protein and the components of a putative ABC-type solute transporter, is located downstream from atzR, which encodes the LysR-type transcriptional regulator of the cyanuric acid-degradative operon atzDEF. Here we describe the transcriptional organization of these genes. Our results show that all six genes are cotranscribed from the PatzR promoter to form the atzRSTUVW operon. A second, stronger promoter, PatzT, is found within atzS and directs transcription of the four distal genes. PatzT is σN dependent, activated by NtrC in response to nitrogen limitation with the aid of IHF, and repressed by AtzR. A combination of in vivo mutational analysis and primer extension allowed us to locate the PatzT promoter and map the transcriptional start site. Similarly, we used deletion and point mutation analyses, along with in vivo expression studies and in vitro binding assays, to locate the NtrC, IHF, and AtzR binding sites and address their functionality. Our results suggest a regulatory model in which NtrC activates PatzT transcription via DNA looping, while AtzR acts as an antiactivator that diminishes expression by interfering with the activation process. PMID:23042989

  17. Mutations in GAS8, a Gene Encoding a Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex Subunit, Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia with Axonemal Disorganization.

    PubMed

    Jeanson, Ludovic; Thomas, Lucie; Copin, Bruno; Coste, André; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Montantin, Guy; Collot, Nathalie; Tissier, Sylvie; Papon, Jean-François; Clement, Annick; Louis, Bruno; Escudier, Estelle; Amselem, Serge; Legendre, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by chronic respiratory infections of the upper and lower airways, hypofertility, and, in approximately half of the cases, situs inversus. This complex phenotype results from defects in motile cilia and sperm flagella. Among the numerous genes involved in PCD, very few-including CCDC39 and CCDC40-carry mutations that lead to a disorganization of ciliary axonemes with microtubule misalignment. Focusing on this particular phenotype, we identified bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in GAS8, a gene that encodes a subunit of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) orthologous to DRC4 of the flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Unlike the majority of PCD patients, individuals with GAS8 mutations have motile cilia, which, as documented by high-speed videomicroscopy, display a subtle beating pattern defect characterized by slightly reduced bending amplitude. Immunofluorescence studies performed on patients' respiratory cilia revealed that GAS8 is not required for the proper expression of CCDC39 and CCDC40. Rather, mutations in GAS8 affect the subcellular localization of another N-DRC subunit called DRC3. Overall, this study, which identifies GAS8 as a PCD gene, unveils the key importance of the corresponding protein in N-DRC integrity and in the proper alignment of axonemal microtubules in humans. PMID:27120127

  18. Mutations and polymorphisms in the gene encoding regulatory subunit type 1-alpha of protein kinase A (PRKAR1A): an update.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Anélia; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Tsang, Kitman; Cazabat, Laure; Libé, Rosella; Remmers, Elaine; René-Corail, Fernande; Faucz, Fabio Rueda; Clauser, Eric; Calender, Alain; Bertagna, Xavier; Carney, J Aidan; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-04-01

    PRKAR1A encodes the regulatory subunit type 1-alpha (RIalpha) of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Inactivating PRKAR1A mutations are known to be responsible for the multiple neoplasia and lentiginosis syndrome Carney complex (CNC). To date, at least 117 pathogenic variants in PRKAR1A have been identified (online database: http://prkar1a.nichd.nih.gov). The majority are subject to nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD), leading to RIalpha haploinsufficiency and, as a result, activated cAMP signaling. Recently, it became apparent that CNC may be caused not only by RIalpha haploinsufficiency, but also by the expression of altered RIalpha protein, as proven by analysis of expressed mutations in the gene, consisting of amino acid substitutions and in-frame genetic alterations. In addition, a new subgroup of mutations that potentially escape NMD and result in CNC through altered (rather than missing) protein has been analyzed-these are frame-shifts in the 3' end of the coding sequence that shift the stop codon downstream of the normal one. The mutation detection rate in CNC patients is recently estimated at above 60%; PRKAR1A mutation-negative CNC patients are characterized by significant phenotypic heterogeneity. In this report, we present a comprehensive analysis of all presently known PRKAR1A sequence variations and discuss their molecular context and clinical phenotype. PMID:20358582

  19. Biological removal of phyto-sterols in pulp mill effluents.

    PubMed

    Mahmood-Khan, Zahid; Hall, Eric R

    2013-12-15

    Phyto-sterols and extractives found in pulp mill effluents are suspected to cause endocrine abnormalities in receiving water fish. The control of sterols in pulp mill effluents through biological secondary wastewater treatment was studied using two lab-scale bioreactor systems. After achieving a stable performance, both bioreactor systems successfully removed (>90%) sterols and the estimated biodegradation was up to 80%. Reactor 1 system operating at 6.7 ± 0.2 pH effectively treated pulp mill effluent sterols spiked up to 4500 μg/L in 11 h HRT and 11 day SRT. However, Reactor 2 system operating at 7.6 ± 0.2 pH performed relatively poorly. Retention time reductions beyond critical values deteriorated the performance of treatment systems and quickly reduced the sterols biodegradation. The biodegradation loss was indicated by mixed liquor sterols content that started increasing. This biodegradation loss was compensated by the increased role of bio-adsorption and the overall sterols removal remained relatively high. Hence, a relatively small (20-30%) loss in the overall sterols removal efficiency did not fully reflect the associated major (60-70%) loss in the sterols biodegradation because the amount of sterols accumulated in the sludge due to adsorption increased so the estimate of sterols removal through adsorption increased from 30-40% to 70-80% keeping the overall sterols removal still high. PMID:24211569

  20. A sterol with an unusual side chain from Anoectochilus koshunensis.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Yasumoto, K; Kasai, R; Yamasaki, K

    1994-08-01

    A new sterol with a non-conventional side chain has been isolated from the whole plant of Anoectochilus koshunensis, together with four known sterols, a megastigmane glucoside and 2'-deoxyadenosine. The structure of the new sterol was elucidated as 26-methylstigmasta-5,22,25, (27)-trien-3 beta-ol based on chemical and detailed spectroscopic evidence. PMID:7765430

  1. Nuclear hormone receptors put immunity on sterols.

    PubMed

    Santori, Fabio R

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are transcription factors regulated by small molecules. The functions of NHRs range from development of primary and secondary lymphoid organs, to regulation of differentiation and function of DCs, macrophages and T cells. The human genome has 48 classic (hormone and vitamin receptors) and nonclassic (all others) NHRs; 17 nonclassic receptors are orphans, meaning that the endogenous ligand is unknown. Understanding the function of orphan NHRs requires the identification of their natural ligands. The mevalonate pathway, including its sterol and nonsterol intermediates and derivatives, is a source of ligands for many classic and nonclassic NHRs. For example, cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates (CBIs) are natural ligands for RORγ/γt. CBIs are universal endogenous metabolites in mammalian cells, and to study NHRs that bind CBIs requires ligand-free reporters system in sterol auxotroph cells. Furthermore, RORγ/γt shows broad specificity to sterol lipids, suggesting that RORγ/γt is either a general sterol sensor or specificity is defined by an abundant endogenous ligand. Unlike other NHRs, which regulate specific metabolic pathways, there is no connection between the genetic programs induced by RORγ/γt and ligand biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the roles of nonclassic NHRs and their potential ligands in the immune system. PMID:26222181

  2. Steroid and sterol 7-hydroxylation: ancient pathways.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard

    2002-11-01

    B-ring hydroxylation is a major metabolic pathway for cholesterols and some steroids. In liver, 7 alpha-hydroxylation of cholesterols, mediated by CYP7A and CYP39A1, is the rate-limiting step of bile acid synthesis and metabolic elimination. In brain and other tissues, both sterols and some steroids including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are prominently 7 alpha-hydroxylated by CYP7B. The function of extra-hepatic steroid and sterol 7-hydroxylation is unknown. Nevertheless, 7-oxygenated cholesterols are potent regulators of cell proliferation and apoptosis; 7-oxygenated derivatives of DHEA, pregnenolone, and androstenediol can have major effects in the brain and in the immune system. The receptor targets involved remain obscure. It is argued that B-ring modification predated steroid evolution: non-enzymatic oxidation of membrane sterols primarily results in 7-oxygenation. Such molecules may have provided early growth and stress signals; a relic may be found in hydroxylation at the symmetrical 11-position of glucocorticoids. Early receptor targets probably included intracellular sterol sites, some modern steroids may continue to act at these targets. 7-Hydroxylation of DHEA may reflect conservation of an early signaling pathway. PMID:12398993

  3. Functional antagonism between inhibitor of DNA binding (Id) and adipocyte determination and differentiation factor 1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (ADD1/SREBP-1c) trans-factors for the regulation of fatty acid synthase promoter in adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Moldes, M; Boizard, M; Liepvre, X L; Fève, B; Dugail, I; Pairault, J

    1999-01-01

    We show that Id (inhibitor of DNA binding) 2 and Id3, dominant negative members of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) family, interact with the adipocyte determination and differentiation factor 1 (ADD1)/sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 1c, a transcription factor of the basic HLH-leucine zipper family that controls the expression of several key genes of adipose metabolism. Gel mobility-shift assays performed with in vitro-translated ADD1, Id2 or Id3 proteins and a fatty acid synthase (FAS) promoter oligonucleotide showed evidence for a marked inhibition of the formation of DNA-ADD1 complexes by Id2 or Id3 proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation studies using in vitro-translated proteins demonstrated further the physical interaction of Id and ADD1/SREBP-1c proteins in the absence of DNA. Using the FAS gene as a model of an ADD1-regulated promoter in transiently transfected isolated rat adipocytes or mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes, a potent inhibition of the activity of the FAS-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene was observed by overexpression of Id2 or Id3. Reciprocally, co-transfection of Id3 antisense and ADD1 expression vectors in preadipocytes potentiated the ADD1/SREBP-1c effect on the FAS promoter activity. Finally, in the non adipogenic NIH-3T3 cell line, most of the ADD1-mediated trans-activation of the FAS promoter was counteracted by co-transfection of Id2 or Id3 expression vectors. Previous studies have indicated Id gene expression to be down-regulated during adipogenesis [Moldes, Lasnier, Fève, Pairault and Djian (1997) Mol. Cell. Biol. 17, 1796-1804]. We here demonstrated that there was a dramatic rise of Id2 and Id3 mRNA levels when 3T3-L1 adipocytes or isolated rat fat cells were exposed to lipolytic and anti-lipogenic agents, forskolin and isoproterenol. Taken together, our data show that Id products are functionally involved in modulating ADD1/SREBP-1c transcriptional activity, and thus lipogenesis in adipocytes. PMID:10585876

  4. The Hypoxic Regulator of Sterol Synthesis Nro1 Is a Nuclear Import Adaptor

    SciTech Connect

    T Yeh; C Lee; L Amzel; P Espenshade; M Bianchet

    2011-12-31

    Fission yeast protein Sre1, the homolog of the mammalian sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), is a hypoxic transcription factor required for sterol homeostasis and low-oxygen growth. Nro1 regulates the stability of the N-terminal transcription factor domain of Sre1 (Sre1N) by inhibiting the action of the prolyl 4-hydroxylase-like Ofd1 in an oxygen-dependent manner. The crystal structure of Nro1 determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution shows an all-{alpha}-helical fold that can be divided into two domains: a small N-terminal domain, and a larger C-terminal HEAT-repeat domain. Follow-up studies showed that Nro1 defines a new class of nuclear import adaptor that functions both in Ofd1 nuclear localization and in the oxygen-dependent inhibition of Ofd1 to control the hypoxic response.

  5. Insights into the mechanisms of sterol transport between organelles.

    PubMed

    Mesmin, Bruno; Antonny, Bruno; Drin, Guillaume

    2013-09-01

    In cells, the levels of sterol vary greatly among organelles. This uneven distribution depends largely on non-vesicular routes of transfer, which are mediated by soluble carriers called lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). These proteins have a domain with a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates one sterol molecule. However, a demonstration of their role in sterol transport in cells remains difficult. Numerous LTPs also contain membrane-binding elements, but it is not clear how these LTPs couple their ability to target organelles with lipid transport activity. This issue appears critical, since many sterol transporters are thought to act at contact sites between two membrane-bound compartments. Here, we emphasize that biochemical and structural studies provide precious insights into the mode of action of sterol-binding proteins. Recent studies on START, Osh/ORP and NPC proteins suggest models on how these proteins could transport sterol between organelles and, thereby, influence cellular functions. PMID:23283302

  6. Distribution of sterols in the fungi. I - Fungal spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.; Laseter, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Mass spectrometry was used to examine freely extractable sterols from spores of several species of fungi. Ergosterol was the most common sterol produced by any individual species, but it was completely absent from two species belonging to apparently distantly related groups of fungi: the aquatic Phycomycetes and the rust fungi. This fact could have taxonomic or phylogenetic implications. The use of glass capillary columns in the resolution of the sterols is shown to eliminate some of the difficulty inherent in this process.

  7. Non-cholesterol sterols and cholesterol metabolism in sitosterolemia.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rgia A; Myrie, Semone B; Jones, Peter J H

    2013-12-01

    Sitosterolemia (STSL) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, manifested by extremely elevated plant sterols (PS) in plasma and tissue, leading to xanthoma and premature atherosclerotic disease. Therapeutic approaches include limiting PS intake, interrupting enterohepatic circulation of bile acid using bile acid binding resins such as cholestyramine, and/or ileal bypass, and inhibiting intestinal sterol absorption by ezetimibe (EZE). The objective of this review is to evaluate sterol metabolism in STSL and the impact of the currently available treatments on sterol trafficking in this disease. The role of PS in initiation of xanthomas and premature atherosclerosis is also discussed. Blocking sterols absorption with EZE has revolutionized STSL patient treatment as it reduces circulating levels of non-cholesterol sterols in STSL. However, none of the available treatments including EZE have normalized plasma PS concentrations. Future studies are needed to: (i) explore where cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols accumulate, (ii) assess to what extent these sterols in tissues can be mobilized after blocking their absorption, and (iii) define the factors governing sterol flux. PMID:24267242

  8. Cholesterol homeostasis: How do cells sense sterol excess?

    PubMed

    Howe, Vicky; Sharpe, Laura J; Alexopoulos, Stephanie J; Kunze, Sarah V; Chua, Ngee Kiat; Li, Dianfan; Brown, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol is vital in mammals, but toxic in excess. Consequently, elaborate molecular mechanisms have evolved to maintain this sterol within narrow limits. How cells sense excess cholesterol is an intriguing area of research. Cells sense cholesterol, and other related sterols such as oxysterols or cholesterol synthesis intermediates, and respond to changing levels through several elegant mechanisms of feedback regulation. Cholesterol sensing involves both direct binding of sterols to the homeostatic machinery located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and indirect effects elicited by sterol-dependent alteration of the physical properties of membranes. Here, we examine the mechanisms employed by cells to maintain cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:26993747

  9. The Cytochrome b5 dependent C-5(6) sterol desaturase DES5A from the endoplasmic reticulum of Tetrahymena thermophila complements ergosterol biosynthesis mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Poklepovich, Tomas J.; Rinaldi, Mauro A.; Tomazic, Mariela L.; Favale, Nicolas O.; Turkewitz, Aaron P.; Nudel, Clara B.; Nusblat, Alejandro D.

    2012-01-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila is a free-living ciliate with no exogenous sterol requirement. However, it can perform several modifications on externally added sterols including desaturation at C5(6), C7(8), and C22(23). Sterol desaturases in Tetrahymena are microsomal enzymes that require Cyt b5, Cyt b5 reductase, oxygen, and reduced NAD(P)H for their activity, and some of the genes encoding these functions have recently been identified. The DES5A gene encodes a C-5(6) sterol desaturase, as shown by gene knockout in Tetrahymena. To confirm and extend that result, and to develop new approaches to gene characterization in Tetrahymena, we have now, expressed DES5A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The DES5A gene was codon optimized and expressed in a yeast mutant, erg3Δ, which is disrupted for the gene encoding the S. cerevisiae C-5(6) sterol desaturase ERG3. The complemented strain was able to accumulate 74% of the wild type level of ergosterol, and also lost the hypersensitivity to cycloheximide associated with the lack of ERG3 function. C-5(6) sterol desaturases are expected to function at the endoplasmic reticulum. Consistent with this, a GFP-tagged copy of Des5Ap was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum in both Tetrahymena and yeast. This work shows for the first time that both function and localization are conserved for a microsomal enzyme between ciliates and fungi, notwithstanding the enormous evolutionary distance between these lineages. The results suggest that heterologous expression of ciliate genes in S. cerevisiae provides a useful tool for the characterization of genes in Tetrahymena, including genes encoding membrane protein complexes. PMID:22982564

  10. Post-transcriptional control of nuclear-encoded cytochrome oxidase subunits in Trypanosoma brucei: evidence for genome-wide conservation of life-cycle stage-specific regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Mayho, Matthew; Fenn, Katelyn; Craddy, Paul; Crosthwaite, Susan; Matthews, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Trypanosomes represent an excellent model for the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression because their genome is organized into polycistronic transcription units. However, few signals governing developmental stage-specific expression have been identified, with there being no compelling evidence for widespread conservation of regulatory motifs. As a tool to search for common regulatory sequences we have used the nuclear-encoded components of the cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex of the trypanosome respiratory chain. Components of this complex represent a form of post-transcriptional operon because trypanosome mitochondrial activity is unusual in being developmentally programmed. By genome analysis we identified the genes for seven components of the COX complex. Each mRNA exhibits bloodstream stage-specific instability, which is not mediated by the RNA silencing pathway but which is alleviated by cycloheximide. Reporter assays have identified regulatory regions within the 3′-untranslated regions of three COX mRNAs operating principally at the translational level, but also via mRNA stability. Interrogation of the mapped regions via oligonucleotide frequency scoring provides evidence for genome-wide conservation of regulatory sequences among a large cohort of procyclic-enriched transcripts. Analysis of the co-regulated subunits of a stage-specific enzyme is therefore a novel approach to uncover cryptic regulatory sequences controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:17012283

  11. Scap is required for sterol synthesis and crypt growth in intestinal mucosa[S

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Matthew R.; Cantoria, Mary Jo; Linden, Albert G.; January, Brandon A.; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    SREBP cleavage-activating protein (Scap) is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for cleavage and activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which activate the transcription of genes in sterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Liver-specific loss of Scap is well tolerated; hepatic synthesis of sterols and fatty acids is reduced, but mice are otherwise healthy. To determine whether Scap loss is tolerated in the intestine, we generated a mouse model (Vil-Scap−) in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT2, a fusion protein of Cre recombinase with a mutated ligand binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, ablates Scap in intestinal mucosa. After 4 days of tamoxifen, Vil-Scap− mice succumb with a severe enteropathy and near-complete collapse of intestinal mucosa. Organoids grown ex vivo from intestinal crypts of Vil-Scap− mice are readily killed when Scap is deleted by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Death is prevented when culture medium is supplemented with cholesterol and oleate. These data show that, unlike the liver, the intestine requires Scap to sustain tissue integrity by maintaining the high levels of lipid synthesis necessary for proliferation of intestinal crypts. PMID:25896350

  12. STEROLS AS BIOMARKERS IN GYMNODINIUM BREVE DISTRIBUTION IN DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sterol composition of marine microalgae has been shown to be a chemotaxonomic property potentially of value in distinguishing members of different algal classes. For example, members of the class Dinophyceae display sterol compositions ranging from as few as two (cholesterol ...

  13. Composition of Plant Sterols and Stanols in Supplemented Food Products.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    All fruits, vegetables, grains and other plant materials contain small amounts of plant sterols, which are essential for the function of the biological membranes in living cells. The average human consumption of plant sterols has been estimated to be about 150-350 mg/day and trace amounts of stanols (which are defined as saturated sterols such as sitostanol), but this number varies regionally and is higher for vegetarians. When consumed in the diet, plant sterols reduce the levels of serum cholesterol. In 1995 the first functional food product, Benecol spread (enriched in plant stanol fatty acid esters), was developed by Raisio and marketed, first in Finland and then globally. Since then many other functional food products have been developed and are now available globally. In addition to stanol esters, other functional food products contain plant sterol esters and/or free (unesterified) plant sterols and stanols. In essentially all of the current functional foods that are enriched in sterols and stanols, the feedstock from which the sterols and stanols are obtained is either tall oil (a byproduct/coproduct of the pulping of pine wood) or vegetable oil deodorizer distillate (a byproduct/coproduct of the refining of vegetable oils). PMID:25942633

  14. Composition of plant sterols and stanols in supplemented food products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All fruits, vegetables, grains and other plant materials contain small amounts of plant sterols, which are essential for the function of the biological membranes in living cells. The average human consumption of plant sterols has been estimated to be about 150-350 mg/day and trace amounts of stanol...

  15. Origin assessment of EV olive oils by esterified sterols analysis.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Rosa; Giuliano, Salvatore; Gulotta, Eleonora; Monfreda, Maria; Presti, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    In this study extra virgin olive oils of Italian and non-Italian origin (from Spain, Tunisia and blends of EU origin) were differentiated by GC-FID analysis of sterols and esterified sterols followed by chemometric tools. PCA allowed to highlight the high significance of esterified sterols to characterise extra virgin olive oils in relation to their origin. SIMCA provided a sensitivity and specificity of 94.39% and 91.59% respectively; furthermore, an external set of 54 extra virgin olive oils bearing a designation of Italian origin on the labelling was tested by SIMCA. Prediction results were also compared with organoleptic assessment. Finally, the poor correlation found between ethylesters and esterified sterols allowed to hazard the guess, worthy of further investigations, that esterified sterols may prove to be promising in studies of geographical discrimination: indeed they appear to be independent of those factors causing the formation of ethyl esters and related to olive oil production. PMID:26041193

  16. Diversity of Sterol Composition in Tunisian Pistacia lentiscus Seed Oil.

    PubMed

    Mezni, Faten; Labidi, Arbia; Khouja, Mohamed Larbi; Martine, Lucy; Berdeaux, Olivier; Khaldi, Abdelhamid

    2016-05-01

    Pistacia lentiscus L. seed oil is used in some Mediterranean forest area for culinary and medicinal purposes. In this study, we aim to examine, for the first time, the effect of growing area on sterol content of Pistacia lentiscus seed oil. Fruits were harvested from 13 different sites located in northern and central Tunisia. Gas chromatography-flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) was used to quantify sterols and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to identify them. The major sterol identified was β-sitosterol with a value ranging from 854.12 to 1224.09 mg/kg of oil, thus making up more than 54% of the total sterols. The other two main sterols were cycloartenol (11%) and 24-methylene-cycloartenol (5%). Statistical results revealed that growing location significantly (P < 0.001) affected phytosterol levels in these oils. PMID:27060921

  17. Fatty acid and sterol composition of three phytomonas species.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, C V; Waldow, L; Pelegrinello, S R; Ueda-Nakamura, T; Filho, B A; Filho, B P

    1999-01-01

    Fatty acid and sterol analysis were performed on Phytomonas serpens and Phytomonas sp. grown in chemically defined and complex medium, and P. françai cultivated in complex medium. The three species of the genus Phytomonas had qualitatively identical fatty acid patterns. Oleic, linoleic, and linolenic were the major unsaturated fatty acids. Miristic and stearic were the major saturated fatty acids. Ergosterol was the only sterol isolated from Phytmonas sp. and P. serpens grown in a sterol-free medium, indicating that it was synthesized de novo. When P. françai that does not grow in defined medium was cultivated in a complex medium, cholesterol was the only sterol detected. The fatty acids and sterol isolated from Phytomonas sp. and P. serpens grown in a chemically defined lipid-free medium indicated that they were able to biosynthesize fatty acids and ergosterol from acetate or from acetate precursors such as glucose or threonine. PMID:10446013

  18. Profiling and Metabolism of Sterols in the Weaver Ant Genus Oecophylla.

    PubMed

    Vidkjær, Nanna H; Jensen, Karl-Martin V; Gislum, René; Fomsgaard, Inge S

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential to insects because they are vital for many biochemical processes, nevertheless insects cannot synthesize sterols but have to acquire them through their diet. Studies of sterols in ants are sparse and here the sterols of the weaver ant genus Oecophylla are identified for the first time. The sterol profile and the dietary sterols provided to a laboratory Oecophylla longinoda colony were analyzed. Most sterols originated from the diet, except one, which was probably formed via dealkylation in the ants and two sterols of fungal origin, which likely originate from hitherto unidentified endosymbionts responsible for supplying these two compounds. The sterol profile of a wild Oecophylla smaragdina colony was also investigated. Remarkable qualitative similarities were established between the two species despite the differences in diet, species, and origin. This may reflect a common sterol need/aversion in the weaver ants. Additionally, each individual caste of both species displayed unique sterol profiles. PMID:26996016

  19. The Evolution of Sterol Biosynthesis in Bacteria: In Situ Fluorescence Localization of Sterols in the Nucleoid Bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budin, M.; Jorgenson, T. L.; Pearson, A.

    2004-12-01

    The biosynthesis of sterols is generally regarded as a eukaryotic process. The first enzymatic step in the production of sterols requires molecular oxygen. Therefore, both the origin of eukaryotes and the evolution of sterol biosynthesis were thought to postdate the rise of oxygen in earth's atmosphere, until Brocks et al. discovered steranes in rocks aged 2.7 Ga (1). Many prokaryotes produce hopanoids, sterol-like compounds that are synthesized from the common precursor squalene without the use of molecular oxygen. However, a few bacterial taxa are also known to produce sterols, suggesting this pathway could precede the rise of oxygen (2, 3). Recently, we discovered the shortest sterol-producing biosynthetic pathway known to date in the bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus (4). Using genomic searches, we found that Gemmata has the enzymes necessary for synthesis of sterols, and lipid analyses showed that the sterols produced are lanosterol and its isomer parkeol. Gemmata is a member of the Planctomycetes, an unusual group of bacteria, all of the known species of which contain intracellular compartmentalization. Among the Planctomycetes, Gemmata uniquely is the only prokaryote known to contain a double-membrane-bounded nuclear body (5). Since sterols usually are found in eukaryotes, and Gemmata has a eukaryote-like nuclear organelle, we investigated the location of the sterols within Gemmata to postulate whether they play a role in stabilization of the nuclear membrane and control of genomic organization. We used the sterol-specific fluorescent dye Filipin III in conjunction with fluorescent dyes for internal and external cellular membranes in order to determine whether the sterols are located in the nuclear body membrane, external membrane, or both. We found that sterols in Gemmata are concentrated in the internal membrane, implying that they function in maintaining this unusual cellular component. It is notable that Gemmata also produce hopanoids, suggesting that they

  20. Comparison of Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Acid Hydrolysis of Sterol Glycosides from Foods Rich in Δ(7)-Sterols.

    PubMed

    Münger, Linda H; Jutzi, Sabrina; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Nyström, Laura

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present the difference in sterol composition of extracted steryl glycosides (SG) hydrolyzed by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis. SG were analyzed from foods belonging to the plant families Cucurbitaceae (melon and pumpkin seeds) and Amaranthaceae (amaranth and beetroot), both of which are dominated by Δ(7)-sterols. Released sterols were quantified by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All Δ(7)-sterols identified (Δ(7)-stigmastenyl, spinasteryl, Δ(7)-campesteryl, Δ(7)-avenasteryl, poriferasta-7,25-dienyl and poriferasta-7,22,25-trienyl glucoside) underwent isomerization under acidic conditions and high temperature. Sterols with an ethylidene or methylidene side chain were found to form multiple artifacts. The artifact sterols coeluted with residues of incompletely isomerized Δ(7)-sterols, or Δ(5)-sterols if present, and could be identified as Δ(8(14))-sterols on the basis of relative retention time, and their MS spectra as trimethylsilyl (TMS) and acetate derivatives. For instance, SG from melon were composed of 66% Δ(7)-stigmastenol when enzymatic hydrolysis was performed, whereas with acid hydrolysis only 8% of Δ(7)-stigmastenol was determined. The artifact of Δ(7)-stigmastenol coeluted with residual non-isomerized spinasterol, demonstrating the high risk of misinterpretation of compositional data obtained after acid hydrolysis. Therefore, the accurate composition of SG from foods containing sterols with a double bond at C-7 can only be obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis or by direct analysis of the intact SG. PMID:25757602

  1. ENCODE data at the ENCODE portal.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Cricket A; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Malladi, Venkat S; Strattan, J Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T; Rowe, Laurence D; Dreszer, Timothy R; Roe, Greg; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Tanaka, Forrest; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is in its third phase of creating a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human genome. This phase of the project includes an expansion of assays that measure diverse RNA populations, identify proteins that interact with RNA and DNA, probe regions of DNA hypersensitivity, and measure levels of DNA methylation in a wide range of cell and tissue types to identify putative regulatory elements. To date, results for almost 5000 experiments have been released for use by the scientific community. These data are available for searching, visualization and download at the new ENCODE Portal (www.encodeproject.org). The revamped ENCODE Portal provides new ways to browse and search the ENCODE data based on the metadata that describe the assays as well as summaries of the assays that focus on data provenance. In addition, it is a flexible platform that allows integration of genomic data from multiple projects. The portal experience was designed to improve access to ENCODE data by relying on metadata that allow reusability and reproducibility of the experiments. PMID:26527727

  2. ENCODE data at the ENCODE portal

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Cricket A.; Chan, Esther T.; Davidson, Jean M.; Malladi, Venkat S.; Strattan, J. Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K.; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T.; Rowe, Laurence D.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Roe, Greg; Podduturi, Nikhil R.; Tanaka, Forrest; Hong, Eurie L.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is in its third phase of creating a comprehensive catalog of functional elements in the human genome. This phase of the project includes an expansion of assays that measure diverse RNA populations, identify proteins that interact with RNA and DNA, probe regions of DNA hypersensitivity, and measure levels of DNA methylation in a wide range of cell and tissue types to identify putative regulatory elements. To date, results for almost 5000 experiments have been released for use by the scientific community. These data are available for searching, visualization and download at the new ENCODE Portal (www.encodeproject.org). The revamped ENCODE Portal provides new ways to browse and search the ENCODE data based on the metadata that describe the assays as well as summaries of the assays that focus on data provenance. In addition, it is a flexible platform that allows integration of genomic data from multiple projects. The portal experience was designed to improve access to ENCODE data by relying on metadata that allow reusability and reproducibility of the experiments. PMID:26527727

  3. Sterols of a contemporary lacustrine sediment. [in English postglacial lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, S. J.; Eglinton, G.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for detailed sterol analyses of several depths (corresponding to between zero and about 150 yr in age) in a contemporary lacustrine sediment from a freshwater lake of postglacial origin in England. Delta 5-, delta 22-, and delta 5,22-sterols are identified along with 5 alpha- and 5 beta-stanols as well as a C26 stanol with a C7 side chain. Solvent extraction yields carbon number distributions for the 5 alpha- and 5 beta-stanol sediment constituents that parallel the corresponding delta 5-sterol distributions. The amounts of 5 alpha-stanols are found to exceed those of 5 beta-stanols in the sediment, and variations in the ratio of 5 alpha- to 5 beta-stanol between sediment samples from similar depths are shown to suggest an inhomogeneity of the sediment. It is found that the sterol composition of sediment cores varies markedly with depth, reflecting both the effects of a sterol hydrogenation process and a changing input to the sediment. It is concluded that C29 sterols, of probable higher-plant origin, predominate at lower sediment depths while C27 sterols, possibly derived from autochthonous sources, are more abundant in the surface sediment.

  4. Analysis of the activity and regulon of the two-component regulatory system encoded by Cjj1484 and Cjj1483 of Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial diarrheal disease throughout the world and a frequent commensal in the intestinal tract of poultry and many other animals. For maintaining optimal growth and ability to colonize various hosts, C. jejuni depends upon two-component regulatory system...

  5. Analysis of sterol oxidation products in foods.

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Francesc; Bou, Ricard; Boatella, Josep; Codony, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    The main aspects related to the analysis of sterol oxidation products (SOP) in foods are comprehensively reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the critical and controversial points of this analysis because these points affect crucial analytical parameters such as precision, accuracy, selectivity, and sensitivity. The effect of sample preparation and the conditions of quantification by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography on these parameters are also reviewed. The results show that, in order to choose an adequate method to analyze SOP in a certain food, the analyst must consider its SOP concentration and matrix complexity. The term SOP includes both cholesterol oxidation products (COP) and phytosterol oxidation products (POP). The state of the art of COP and POP analysis is quite different; many more studies have dealt with the analysis of COP than of POP. However, most of the results presented here about COP analysis may be extrapolated to POP analysis because both groups of compounds show similar structures and characteristics. PMID:15164841

  6. Terpenoids and sterols from some Japanese mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Yaoita, Yasunori; Kikuchi, Masao; Machida, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    Over the past twenty years, our research group has been studying the chemical constituents of mushrooms. From nineteen species, namely, Amanita virgineoides Bas (Amanitaceae), Daedaleopsis tricolor (Bull.: Fr.) Bond. et Sing. (Polyporaceae), Grifolafrondosa (Fr.) S. F. Gray (Polyporaceae), Hericium erinaceum (Bull.: Fr.) Pers. (Hericiaceae), Hypsizigus marmoreus (Peck) Bigelow (Tricholomataceae), Lactarius piperatus (Scop.: Fr.) S. F. Gray (Russulaceae), Lentinula edodes (Berk.) Sing. (Pleurotaceae), Lyophyllyum connatum (Schum.: Fr.) Sing. (Tricholomataceae), Naematoloma sublateritium (Fr.) Karst. (Strophariaceae), Ompharia lapidescens Schroeter (Polyporaceae), Panellus serotinus (Pers.: Fr.) Kuhn. (Tricholomataceae), Pholiota nameko (T. Ito) S. Ito et Imai in Imai (Strophariaceae), Pleurotus eringii (DC.: Fr.) Quel. (Pleurotaceae), Polyporus umbellatus Fries (Polyporaceae), Russula delica Fr. (Russulaceae), Russula sanguinea (Bull.) Fr. (Russulaceae), Sarcodon aspratus (Berk.) S. Ito (Thelephoraceae), Tricholoma matsutake (S. Ito et Imai) Sing. (Tricholomataceae), and Tricholomaportentosum (Fr.) Quel. (Tricholomataceae), we isolated eight new sesquiterpenoids, six new meroterpenoids, three new triterpenoids, and twenty eight new sterols. In this review, structural features of these new compounds are discussed. PMID:24689228

  7. Interaction of the P-Glycoprotein Multidrug Transporter with Sterols.

    PubMed

    Clay, Adam T; Lu, Peihua; Sharom, Frances J

    2015-11-01

    The ABC transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) actively exports structurally diverse substrates from within the lipid bilayer, leading to multidrug resistance. Many aspects of Pgp function are altered by the phospholipid environment, but its interactions with sterols remain enigmatic. In this work, the functional interaction between purified Pgp and various sterols was investigated in detergent solution and proteoliposomes. Fluorescence studies showed that dehydroergosterol, cholestatrienol, and NBD-cholesterol interact intimately with Pgp, resulting in both quenching of protein Trp fluorescence and enhancement of sterol fluorescence. Kd values indicated binding affinities in the range of 3-9 μM. Collisional quenching experiments showed that Pgp-bound NBD-cholesterol was protected from the external milieu, resonance energy transfer was observed between Pgp Trp residues and the sterol, and the fluorescence emission of bound sterol was enhanced. These observations suggested an intimate interaction of bound sterols with the transporter at a protected nonpolar site. Cholesterol hemisuccinate altered the thermal unfolding of Pgp and greatly stabilized its basal ATPase activity in both a detergent solution and reconstituted proteoliposomes of certain phospholipids. Other sterols, including dehydroergosterol, did not stabilize the basal ATPase activity of detergent-solubilized Pgp, which suggests that this is not a generalized sterol effect. The phospholipid composition and cholesterol hemisuccinate content of Pgp proteoliposomes altered the basal ATPase and drug transport cycles differently. Sterols may interact with Pgp and modulate its structure and function by occupying part of the drug-binding pocket or by binding to putative consensus cholesterol-binding (CRAC/CARC) motifs located within the transmembrane domains. PMID:26484739

  8. The product of the nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nfrX of Azotobacter vinelandii is functionally and structurally homologous to the uridylyltransferase encoded by glnD in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, A; Drummond, M; Bali, A; Blanco, G; Garcia, E; Bush, G; Kennedy, C; Merrick, M

    1991-01-01

    We sequenced the nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nfrX from Azotobacter vinelandii, mutations in which cause a Nif- phenotype, and found that it encodes a 105-kDa protein (NfrX), the N terminus of which is highly homologous to that of the uridylyltransferase-uridylyl-removing enzyme encoded by glnD in Escherichia coli. In vivo complementation experiments demonstrate that the glnD and nfrX products are functionally interchangeable. A vinelandii nfrX thus appears to encode a uridylyltransferase-uridylyl-removing enzyme, and in this paper we report the first sequence of such a protein. The Nif- phenotype of nfrX mutants can be suppressed by a second mutation in a recently identified nifL-like gene immediately upstream of nifA in A. vinelandii. NifL mediates nif regulation in response to the N status in A. vinelandii, presumably by inhibiting NifA activator function as occurs in Klebsiella pneumoniae; thus, one role of NfrX is to modify, either directly or indirectly, the activity of the nifL product. PMID:1683868

  9. The product of the nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nfrX of Azotobacter vinelandii is functionally and structurally homologous to the uridylyltransferase encoded by glnD in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Contreras, A; Drummond, M; Bali, A; Blanco, G; Garcia, E; Bush, G; Kennedy, C; Merrick, M

    1991-12-01

    We sequenced the nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nfrX from Azotobacter vinelandii, mutations in which cause a Nif- phenotype, and found that it encodes a 105-kDa protein (NfrX), the N terminus of which is highly homologous to that of the uridylyltransferase-uridylyl-removing enzyme encoded by glnD in Escherichia coli. In vivo complementation experiments demonstrate that the glnD and nfrX products are functionally interchangeable. A vinelandii nfrX thus appears to encode a uridylyltransferase-uridylyl-removing enzyme, and in this paper we report the first sequence of such a protein. The Nif- phenotype of nfrX mutants can be suppressed by a second mutation in a recently identified nifL-like gene immediately upstream of nifA in A. vinelandii. NifL mediates nif regulation in response to the N status in A. vinelandii, presumably by inhibiting NifA activator function as occurs in Klebsiella pneumoniae; thus, one role of NfrX is to modify, either directly or indirectly, the activity of the nifL product. PMID:1683868

  10. Two C4-sterol methyl oxidases (Erg25) catalyse ergosterol intermediate demethylation and impact environmental stress adaptation in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Blosser, Sara J.; Merriman, Brittney; Grahl, Nora; Chung, Dawoon

    2014-01-01

    The human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus adapts to stress encountered in the mammalian host as part of its ability to cause disease. The transcription factor SrbA plays a significant role in this process by regulating genes involved in hypoxia and low-iron adaptation, antifungal drug responses and virulence. SrbA is a direct transcriptional regulator of genes encoding key enzymes in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway, including erg25A and erg25B, and ΔsrbA accumulates C4-methyl sterols, suggesting a loss of Erg25 activity [C4-sterol methyl oxidase (SMO)]. Characterization of the two genes encoding SMOs in Aspergillus fumigatus revealed that both serve as functional C4-demethylases, with Erg25A serving in a primary role, as Δerg25A accumulates more C4-methyl sterol intermediates than Δerg25B. Single deletion of these SMOs revealed alterations in canonical ergosterol biosynthesis, indicating that ergosterol may be produced in an alternative fashion in the absence of SMO activity. A Δerg25A strain displayed moderate susceptibility to hypoxia and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agent DTT, but was not required for virulence in murine or insect models of invasive aspergillosis. Inducing expression of erg25A partially restored the hypoxia growth defect of ΔsrbA. These findings implicated Aspergillus fumigatus SMOs in the maintenance of canonical ergosterol biosynthesis and indicated an overall involvement in the fungal stress response. PMID:25107308

  11. Free and glycosylated sterol bioaccumulation in developing Cycas micronesica seeds

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E.; Shaw, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of free and glycosylated forms of stigmasterol and β-sitosterol were determined from Cycas micronesica K.D. Hill seeds throughout seed ontogeny. Per-seed pool of the four compounds increased linearly from 2 to 24 months, indicating no developmental period elicited a major shift in the rate of bioaccumulation. The slopes were not homogeneous, signifying a change in relative sterol profile concomitant with seed maturation. This shift was in favour of the glucosides, as their rate of accumulation exceeded that of the free sterols. Stigmasterol content exceeded that of β-sitosterol, but ontogeny did not influence the ratio of these dominant sterols. The quantity and quality of sterol exposure during consumption of foods prepared from gametophytes by humans is strongly influenced by age of harvested seeds. Results are critical for a further understanding of the link between human neurodegenerative diseases and historical consumption of foods derived from the seed gametophyte tissue. PMID:20157628

  12. Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culea, M.

    2007-04-01

    A GC-MS analytical method is described for some natural juices analysis. The fingerprint of sterols was used to characterize the natural juice. A rapid liquid-liquid extraction method was used. The sterols were separated on a Rtx-5MS capillary column, 15m×0.25mm, 0.25μm film thickness, in a temperature program from 50°C for 1 min, then ramped at 15°C/min to 300°C and held for 15 min. Identification of sterols and their patterns were used for juice characterization. The sterol profile is a useful approach for confirming the presence of juices of orange, grapefruit, pineapple and passion fruit in compounded beverages and for detecting of adulteration of fruit juices.

  13. Sterol Profile for Natural Juices Authentification by GC-MS

    SciTech Connect

    Culea, M.

    2007-04-23

    A GC-MS analytical method is described for some natural juices analysis. The fingerprint of sterols was used to characterize the natural juice. A rapid liquid-liquid extraction method was used. The sterols were separated on a Rtx-5MS capillary column, 15mx0.25mm, 0.25{mu}m film thickness, in a temperature program from 50 deg. C for 1 min, then ramped at 15 deg. C/min to 300 deg. C and held for 15 min. Identification of sterols and their patterns were used for juice characterization. The sterol profile is a useful approach for confirming the presence of juices of orange, grapefruit, pineapple and passion fruit in compounded beverages and for detecting of adulteration of fruit juices.

  14. Digitonide precipitable sterols: a reevaluation with special attention to lanosterol

    SciTech Connect

    Cenedella, R.J.

    1982-06-01

    The ability of digitonin to precipitate lanosterol from prepared mixtures and biological sources was evaluated. Commercially available lanosterol was determined to be composed of about 60% lanosterol and 40% dihydrolanosterol. Both sterols were only partially precipitated by digitonin under all conditions examined. The presence of cholesterol increased the precipitation of lanosterol, but never to completion. About 40% of the lanosterols from saponified sheep's-wool fat was not precipitated by digitonin. Also /sup 14/C-labeled lanosterol recovered from rat brain following intracerebral injection of 2-(/sup 14/C)mevalonate was only 70% precipitated by digitonin. Steric hinderance by the methyl groups at carbon -4 is suggesed to explain the poor precipitability of this sterol. In conclusion, lanosterol can not be considered to be a digitonide-precipitable sterol equivalent to cholesterol. Caution should be exercised in situations where digitonin-precipitable sterols are being prepared from sources containing significant concentrations of lanosterol (i.e., mass and/or radiolabel).

  15. Encoding Dictionaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Describes problems in devising a Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) encoding format for dictionaries. Asserts that the high degree of structuring and compression of information are among the most complex text types treated in the TEI. Concludes that the source of some TEI problems lies in the design of Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML). (CFR)

  16. Plant sterols: Friend or foe in CNS disorders?

    PubMed

    Vanmierlo, Tim; Bogie, Jeroen F J; Mailleux, Jo; Vanmol, Jasmine; Lütjohann, Dieter; Mulder, Monique; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, the central nervous system (CNS) is the most cholesterol rich organ by weight. Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated in the CNS and all cholesterol available is synthesized in situ. Deficits in cholesterol homeostasis at the level of synthesis, transport, or catabolism result in severe disorders featured by neurological disability. Recent studies indicate that a disturbed cholesterol metabolism is involved in CNS disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In contrast to circulating cholesterol, dietary plant sterols, can cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the membranes of CNS cells. Plant sterols are well-known for their ability to lower circulating cholesterol levels. The finding that they gain access to the CNS has fueled research focusing on the physiological roles of plant sterols in the healthy and diseased CNS. To date, both beneficial and detrimental effects of plant sterols on CNS disorders are defined. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding the impact of plant sterols on homeostatic and pathogenic processes in the CNS, and elaborate on the therapeutic potential of plant sterols in CNS disorders. PMID:25623279

  17. SURVEY OF THE STEROL COMPOSITION OF THE MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES KARENIA BREVIS, KARENIA MIKIMOTOI, AND KARLODINIUM MICRUM: DISTRIBUTION OF STEROLS WITHIN OTHER MEMBERS OF THE CLASS DINOPHYCEAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sterol composition of different marine microalgae was examined to determine the utility of sterols as biomarkers to distinguish members of various algal classes. For example, members of the class Dinophyceae possess certain 4-methyl sterols, such as dinosterol, which are rare...

  18. Exposure of a 23F Serotype Strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Cigarette Smoke Condensate Is Associated with Selective Upregulation of Genes Encoding the Two-Component Regulatory System 11 (TCS11)

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Jenny A.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Dickens, Caroline; Anderson, Ronald; Feldman, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in whole genome expression profiles following exposure of the pneumococcus (strain 172, serotype 23F) to cigarette smoke condensate (160 μg/mL) for 15 and 60 min have been determined using the TIGR4 DNA microarray chip. Exposure to CSC resulted in the significant (P < 0.014–0.0006) upregulation of the genes encoding the two-component regulatory system 11 (TCS11), consisting of the sensor kinase, hk11, and its cognate response regulator, rr11, in the setting of increased biofilm formation. These effects of cigarette smoke on the pneumococcus may contribute to colonization of the airways by this microbial pathogen. PMID:25013815

  19. The biosynthesis of sterols in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Goad, L. J.; Goodwin, T. W.

    1966-01-01

    1. [2-14C]Mevalonate was incorporated into squalene and the major phytosterols of pea and maize leaves; it was also incorporated into compounds belonging to the 4,4-dimethyl and 4α-methyl steroid groups and which may be possible phytosterol intermediates. 2. l-[Me-14C]Methionine was incorporated into the major sterols and also into the 4,4-dimethyl and 4α-methyl steroid groups. No radioactivity was detected in squalene. 3. Under anaerobic conditions incorporation of [2-14C]-mevalonate into the non-saponifiable lipid of pea leaves was drastically decreased but radioactive squalene was accumulated. 4. Cycloartenol, 24-methylenecycloartanol, 24-methylenelophenol, 24-ethylidenelophenol, fucosterol, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol and campesterol have been identified by gas–liquid chromatography in pea leaves. 5. The significance of these results in connexion with phytosterol biosynthesis and the introduction of the alkyl group at C-24 into phytosterols is discussed. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:5964970

  20. Identifying avian sources of faecal contamination using sterol analysis.

    PubMed

    Devane, Megan L; Wood, David; Chappell, Andrew; Robson, Beth; Webster-Brown, Jenny; Gilpin, Brent J

    2015-10-01

    Discrimination of the source of faecal pollution in water bodies is an important step in the assessment and mitigation of public health risk. One tool for faecal source tracking is the analysis of faecal sterols which are present in faeces of animals in a range of distinctive ratios. Published ratios are able to discriminate between human and herbivore mammal faecal inputs but are of less value for identifying pollution from wildfowl, which can be a common cause of elevated bacterial indicators in rivers and streams. In this study, the sterol profiles of 50 avian-derived faecal specimens (seagulls, ducks and chickens) were examined alongside those of 57 ruminant faeces and previously published sterol profiles of human wastewater, chicken effluent and animal meatwork effluent. Two novel sterol ratios were identified as specific to avian faecal scats, which, when incorporated into a decision tree with human and herbivore mammal indicative ratios, were able to identify sterols from avian-polluted waterways. For samples where the sterol profile was not consistent with herbivore mammal or human pollution, avian pollution is indicated when the ratio of 24-ethylcholestanol/(24-ethylcholestanol + 24-ethylcoprostanol + 24-ethylepicoprostanol) is ≥0.4 (avian ratio 1) and the ratio of cholestanol/(cholestanol + coprostanol + epicoprostanol) is ≥0.5 (avian ratio 2). When avian pollution is indicated, further confirmation by targeted PCR specific markers can be employed if greater confidence in the pollution source is required. A 66% concordance between sterol ratios and current avian PCR markers was achieved when 56 water samples from polluted waterways were analysed. PMID:26370196

  1. Spatial and temporal regulation of sterol biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Suza, Walter P; Chappell, Joe

    2016-06-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana was used as a model to investigate the spatial and developmental relationship between sterol synthesis rates and sterol content in plants. Stigmasterol levels were approximately twice the level in roots as that found in aerial tissues, while its progenitor sterol sitosterol was the inverse. When incorporation of radiolabeled precursors into sterols was used as measure of in vivo synthesis rates, acetate incorporation was similar across all tissue types, but approximately twofold greater in roots than any other tissue. In contrast, mevalonate incorporation exhibited the greatest differential with the rate of incorporation in roots approximately one-tenth that in apical shoots. Similar to acetate, incorporation of farnesol was higher in roots but remained fairly constant in aerial tissues, suggesting less regulation of the downstream sterol biosynthetic steps. Consistent with the precursor incorporation data, analysis of gene transcript and measurements of putative rate-limiting enzyme activities for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (EC 2.3.3.10) and reductase (EC 1.1.1.34) showed the greatest modulation of levels, while the activity levels for isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.3.2) and prenyltransferases (EC 2.5.1.10 and EC 2.5.1.1) also exhibited a strong but moderate correlation with the development age of the aerial tissues of the plants. Overall, the data suggest a multitude of means from transcriptional to posttranslational control affecting sterol biosynthesis and accumulation across an entire plant, and point to some particular control points that might be manipulated using molecular genetic approaches to better probe the role of sterols in plant growth and development. PMID:26671544

  2. The Inactivation of KlNOT4, a Kluyveromyces lactis Gene Encoding a Component of the CCR4-NOT Complex, Reveals New Regulatory Functions

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Cristina; Serafini, Agnese; Falcone, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    We have isolated the KlNOT4 gene of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, which encodes a component of the evolutionarily conserved CCR4-NOT complex. We show that inactivation of the gene leads to pleiotropic defects that were differentially suppressed by the NOT4 gene of S. cerevisiae, indicating that these genes have overlapping, but not identical, functions. K. lactis strains lacking Not4p are defective in fermentation and show reduced transcription of glucose transporter and glycolytic genes, which are phenotypes that are not found in the corresponding mutant of S. cerevisiae. We also show that Not4 proteins control the respiratory pathway in both yeasts, although with some differences. They activate transcription of KlACS2 and KlCYC1, but repress KlICL1, ScICL1, ScACS1, and ScCYC1. Altogether, our results indicate that Not4p is a pivotal factor involved in the regulation of carbon metabolism in yeast.

  3. The regulatory c1 locus of Zea mays encodes a protein with homology to myb proto-oncogene products and with structural similarities to transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Ares, J; Ghosal, D; Wienand, U; Peterson, P A; Saedler, H

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the wild-type c1 locus of Zea mays was determined by sequence analysis of one genomic and two cDNA clones. The coding region is composed of three exons (150 bp, 129 bp and one, at least 720 bp) and two small introns (88 bp and 145 bp). Transcription of the mRNAs corresponding to the two cDNA clones cLC6 (1.1 kb) and cLC28 (2.1 kb) starts from the same promoter. Both cDNAs are identical except that cLC28 extends further at its 3' end. A putative protein, 273 amino acids in length was deduced from the sequence of both transcripts. It contains two domains, one basic and the other acidic and might function as a transcriptional activator. The basic domain of this c1-encoded protein shows 40% sequence homology to the protein products of animal myb proto-oncogenes. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3428265

  4. Biallelic Truncating Mutations in FMN2, Encoding the Actin-Regulatory Protein Formin 2, Cause Nonsyndromic Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Law, Rosalind; Dixon-Salazar, Tracy; Jerber, Julie; Cai, Na; Abbasi, Ansar A.; Zaki, Maha S.; Mittal, Kirti; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Rafiq, Muhammad Arshad; Khan, Valeed; Nguyen, Maria; Ali, Ghazanfar; Copeland, Brett; Scott, Eric; Vasli, Nasim; Mikhailov, Anna; Khan, Muhammad Nasim; Andrade, Danielle M.; Ayaz, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ayub, Muhammad; Vincent, John B.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines represent the major site of neuronal activity in the brain; they serve as the receiving point for neurotransmitters and undergo rapid activity-dependent morphological changes that correlate with learning and memory. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping and next-generation sequencing in two consanguineous families affected by nonsyndromic autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, we identified truncating mutations in formin 2 (FMN2), encoding a protein that belongs to the formin family of actin cytoskeleton nucleation factors and is highly expressed in the maturing brain. We found that FMN2 localizes to punctae along dendrites and that germline inactivation of mouse Fmn2 resulted in animals with decreased spine density; such mice were previously demonstrated to have a conditioned fear-learning defect. Furthermore, patient neural cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells showed correlated decreased synaptic density. Thus, FMN2 mutations link intellectual disability either directly or indirectly to the regulation of actin-mediated synaptic spine density. PMID:25480035

  5. Expression of mRNA Encoding Mcu and Other Mitochondrial Calcium Regulatory Genes Depends on Cell Type, Neuronal Subtype, and Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Márkus, Nóra M; Hasel, Philip; Qiu, Jing; Bell, Karen F S; Heron, Samuel; Kind, Peter C; Dando, Owen; Simpson, T Ian; Hardingham, Giles E

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix controls cellular metabolism and survival-death pathways. Several genes are implicated in controlling mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (mitochondrial calcium regulatory genes, MCRGs), however, less is known about the factors which influence their expression level. Here we have compared MCRG mRNA expression, in neural cells of differing type (cortical neurons vs. astrocytes), differing neuronal subtype (CA3 vs. CA1 hippocampus) and in response to Ca2+ influx, using a combination of qPCR and RNA-seq analysis. Of note, we find that the Mcu-regulating Micu gene family profile differs substantially between neurons and astrocytes, while expression of Mcu itself is markedly different between CA3 and CA1 regions in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, dynamic control of MCRG mRNA expression in response to membrane depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx is also apparent, resulting in repression of Letm1, as well as Mcu. Thus, the mRNA expression profile of MCRGs is not fixed, which may cause differences in the coupling between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca2+, as well as diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mechanisms. PMID:26828201

  6. Expression of mRNA Encoding Mcu and Other Mitochondrial Calcium Regulatory Genes Depends on Cell Type, Neuronal Subtype, and Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Márkus, Nóra M.; Hasel, Philip; Qiu, Jing; Bell, Karen F. S.; Heron, Samuel; Kind, Peter C.; Dando, Owen; Simpson, T. Ian; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix controls cellular metabolism and survival-death pathways. Several genes are implicated in controlling mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (mitochondrial calcium regulatory genes, MCRGs), however, less is known about the factors which influence their expression level. Here we have compared MCRG mRNA expression, in neural cells of differing type (cortical neurons vs. astrocytes), differing neuronal subtype (CA3 vs. CA1 hippocampus) and in response to Ca2+ influx, using a combination of qPCR and RNA-seq analysis. Of note, we find that the Mcu-regulating Micu gene family profile differs substantially between neurons and astrocytes, while expression of Mcu itself is markedly different between CA3 and CA1 regions in the adult hippocampus. Moreover, dynamic control of MCRG mRNA expression in response to membrane depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx is also apparent, resulting in repression of Letm1, as well as Mcu. Thus, the mRNA expression profile of MCRGs is not fixed, which may cause differences in the coupling between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca2+, as well as diversity of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mechanisms. PMID:26828201

  7. The Proprotein Convertase Encoded by amontillado (amon) Is Required in Drosophila Corpora Cardiaca Endocrine Cells Producing the Glucose Regulatory Hormone AKH

    PubMed Central

    Rhea, Jeanne M.; Wegener, Christian; Bender, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Peptide hormones are potent signaling molecules that coordinate animal physiology, behavior, and development. A key step in activation of these peptide signals is their proteolytic processing from propeptide precursors by a family of proteases, the subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (PCs). Here, we report the functional dissection of amontillado (amon), which encodes the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian PC2 protein, using cell-type specific inactivation and rescue experiments, and we show that amon is required in the islet-like adipokinetic hormone (AKH)–producing cells that regulate sugar homeostasis. In Drosophila, AKH acts analogously to vertebrate glucagon to increase circulating sugar levels from energy stores, while insulin-like peptides (DILPs) act to decrease sugar levels. amon mutant larvae have significantly reduced hemolymph sugar levels, and thus phenocopy larvae where the AKH–producing cells in the corpora cardiaca have been ablated. Reduction of amon expression in these cells via cell-specific RNA inactivation also results in larvae with reduced sugar levels while expression of amon in AKH cells in an amon mutant background rescues hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia in larvae resulting from amon RNA inactivation in the AKH cells can be rescued by global expression of the akh gene. Finally, mass spectrometric profiling shows that the production of mature AKH is inhibited in amon mutants. Our data indicate that amon function in the AKH cells is necessary to maintain normal sugar homeostasis, that amon functions upstream of akh, and that loss of mature AKH is correlated with loss of amon activity. These observations indicate that the AKH propeptide is a proteolytic target of the amon proprotein convertase and provide evidence for a conserved role of PC2 in processing metabolic peptide hormones. PMID:20523747

  8. The proprotein convertase encoded by amontillado (amon) is required in Drosophila corpora cardiaca endocrine cells producing the glucose regulatory hormone AKH.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Jeanne M; Wegener, Christian; Bender, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Peptide hormones are potent signaling molecules that coordinate animal physiology, behavior, and development. A key step in activation of these peptide signals is their proteolytic processing from propeptide precursors by a family of proteases, the subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (PCs). Here, we report the functional dissection of amontillado (amon), which encodes the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian PC2 protein, using cell-type specific inactivation and rescue experiments, and we show that amon is required in the islet-like adipokinetic hormone (AKH)-producing cells that regulate sugar homeostasis. In Drosophila, AKH acts analogously to vertebrate glucagon to increase circulating sugar levels from energy stores, while insulin-like peptides (DILPs) act to decrease sugar levels. amon mutant larvae have significantly reduced hemolymph sugar levels, and thus phenocopy larvae where the AKH-producing cells in the corpora cardiaca have been ablated. Reduction of amon expression in these cells via cell-specific RNA inactivation also results in larvae with reduced sugar levels while expression of amon in AKH cells in an amon mutant background rescues hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia in larvae resulting from amon RNA inactivation in the AKH cells can be rescued by global expression of the akh gene. Finally, mass spectrometric profiling shows that the production of mature AKH is inhibited in amon mutants. Our data indicate that amon function in the AKH cells is necessary to maintain normal sugar homeostasis, that amon functions upstream of akh, and that loss of mature AKH is correlated with loss of amon activity. These observations indicate that the AKH propeptide is a proteolytic target of the amon proprotein convertase and provide evidence for a conserved role of PC2 in processing metabolic peptide hormones. PMID:20523747

  9. TOPORS, a Dual E3 Ubiquitin and Sumo1 Ligase, Interacts with 26 S Protease Regulatory Subunit 4, Encoded by the PSMC1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Czub, Barbara; Shah, Amna Z.; Alfano, Giovanna; Kruczek, Przemysław M.; Chakarova, Christina F.; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2016-01-01

    The significance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) for protein degradation has been highlighted in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, including retinal dystrophies. TOPORS, a dual E3 ubiquitin and SUMO1 ligase, forms a component of the UPS and selected substrates for its enzymatic activities, such as DJ-1/PARK7 and APOBEC2, are important for neuronal as well as retinal homeostasis, respectively. TOPORS is ubiquitously expressed, yet its mutations are only known to result in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We performed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen of a human retinal cDNA library in order to identify interacting protein partners of TOPORS from the retina, and thus begin delineating the putative disease mechanism(s) associated with the retina-specific phenotype resulting from mutations in TOPORS. The screen led to isolation of the 26 S protease regulatory subunit 4 (P26s4/ PSMC1), an ATPase indispensable for correct functioning of UPS-mediated proteostasis. The interaction between endogenous TOPORS and P26s4 proteins was validated by co-immuno-precipitation from mammalian cell extracts and further characterised by immunofluorescent co-localisation studies in cell lines and retinal sections. Findings from hTERT-RPE1 and 661W cells demonstrated that TOPORS and P26s4 co-localise at the centrosome in cultured cells. Immunofluorescent staining of mouse retinae revealed a strong P26s4 reactivity at the interface between retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) layer and the photoreceptors outer segments (OS). This finding leads us to speculate that P26s4, along with TOPORS, may have a role(s) in RPE phagocytosis, in addition to contributing to the overall photoreceptor and retinal homeostasis via the UPS. PMID:26872363

  10. Phytoalexin-Deficient Mutants of Arabidopsis Reveal That Pad4 Encodes a Regulatory Factor and That Four Pad Genes Contribute to Downy Mildew Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Glazebrook, J.; Zook, M.; Mert, F.; Kagan, I.; Rogers, E. E.; Crute, I. R.; Holub, E. B.; Hammerschmidt, R.; Ausubel, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    We are working to determine the role of the Arabidopsis phytoalexin, camalexin, in protecting the plant from pathogen attack by isolating phytoalexin-deficient (pad) mutants in the accession Columbia (Col-0) and examining their response to pathogens. Mutations in PAD1, PAD2, and PAD4 caused enhanced susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola strain ES4326 (PsmES4326), while mutations in PAD3 or PAD5 did not. Camalexin was not detected in any of the double mutants pad1-1 pad2-1, pad1-1 pad3-1 or pad2-1 pad3-1. Growth of PsmES4326 in pad1-1 pad2-1 was greater than that in pad1-1 or pad2-1 plants, while growth in pad1-1 pad3-1 and pad2-1 pad3-1 plants was similar to that in pad1-1 and pad2-1 plants, respectively. The pad4-1 mutation caused reduced camalexin synthesis in response to PsmES4326 infection, but not in response to Cochliobolus carbonum infection, indicating that PAD4 has a regulatory function. PAD1, PAD2, PAD3 and PAD4 are all required for resistance to the eukaryotic biotroph Peronospora parasitica. The pad4-1 mutation caused the most dramatic change, exhibiting full susceptibility to four of six Col-incompatible parasite isolates. Interestingly, each combination of double mutants between pad1-1, pad2-1 and pad3-1 exhibited additive shifts to moderate or full susceptibility to most of the isolates. PMID:9136026

  11. A Potential Regulatory Role for Intronic microRNA-338-3p for Its Host Gene Encoding Apoptosis-Associated Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Aron; Olde Loohuis, Nikkie F. M.; Wieczorek, Martha L.; Glennon, Jeffrey C.; Martens, Gerard J. M.; Kolk, Sharon M.; Aschrafi, Armaz

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important gene regulators that are abundantly expressed in both the developing and adult mammalian brain. These non-coding gene transcripts are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory processes by binding to specific target mRNAs. Approximately one third of known miRNA genes are located within intronic regions of protein coding and non-coding regions, and previous studies have suggested a role for intronic miRNAs as negative feedback regulators of their host genes. In the present study, we monitored the dynamic gene expression changes of the intronic miR-338-3p and miR-338-5p and their host gene Apoptosis-associated Tyrosine Kinase (AATK) during the maturation of rat hippocampal neurons. This revealed an uncorrelated expression pattern of mature miR-338 strands with their host gene. Sequence analysis of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of rat AATK mRNA revealed the presence of two putative binding sites for miR-338-3p. Thus, miR-338-3p may have the capacity to modulate AATK mRNA levels in neurons. Transfection of miR-338-3p mimics into rat B35 neuroblastoma cells resulted in a significant decrease of AATK mRNA levels, while the transfection of synthetic miR-338-5p mimics did not alter AATK levels. Our results point to a possible molecular mechanism by which miR-338-3p participates in the regulation of its host gene by modulating the levels of AATK mRNA, a kinase which plays a role during differentiation, apoptosis and possibly in neuronal degeneration. PMID:22363537

  12. Deciphering ENCODE.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Adam G; Boyle, Alan P

    2016-04-01

    The ENCODE project represents a major leap from merely describing and comparing genomic sequences to surveying them for direct indicators of function. The astounding quantity of data produced by the ENCODE consortium can serve as a map to locate specific landmarks, guide hypothesis generation, and lead us to principles and mechanisms underlying genome biology. Despite its broad appeal, the size and complexity of the repository can be intimidating to prospective users. We present here some background about the ENCODE data, survey the resources available for accessing them, and describe a few simple principles to help prospective users choose the data type(s) that best suit their needs, where to get them, and how to use them to their best advantage. PMID:26962025

  13. Characterization of fatty alcohol and sterol fractions in olive tree.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Solano, Mara; Ruiz-Jimenez, José; Luque De Castro, María D

    2010-07-14

    The determination of sterols and fatty alcohols is a part of the study of the metabolomic profile of the unsaponifiable fraction in olive tree. Leaves and drupes from three varieties of olive tree (Arbequina, Picual, and Manzanilla) were used. The content of the target compounds was studied in five ripeness stages and three harvesting periods for olive drupes and leaves, respectively. A method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction and derivatization for the individual identification and quantitation of sterols and fatty alcohols, involving chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry detection by selected ion monitoring, was used. The concentrations of alcohols and sterols in the drupes ranged between 0.1 and 1086.9 mug/g and between 0.1 and 5855.3 mug/g, respectively, which are higher than in leaves. Statistical studies were developed to show the relationship between the concentration of the target analytes and variety, ripeness stage, and harvesting period. PMID:20550122

  14. Transbilayer distribution of sterols in mycoplasma membranes: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Bittman, R.; Clejan, S.; Rottem, S.

    1983-01-01

    The polyene antibiotic, filipin, binds to 3 beta-hydroxysterols. The initial rate of filipin-sterol association, monitored in a stopped-flow spectrophotometer, was first order in each reacting partner. The ratio of rate constants in intact mycoplasma cells relative to isolated, unsealed membranes provides an estimate of sterol distribution in the membrane bilayer. Cholesterol is distributed symmetrically in the bilayer of M. gallisepticum cells from the early exponential phase. However, in the M. capricolum membrane two-thirds of the unesterified cholesterol is localized in the outer leaflet; alkyl-sterols are distributed predominantly in the external monolayer. Cholesterol is translocated rapidly in the bilayer of M. capricolum cells. Exogenous phospholipids incorporated into the membrane had no effect on the cholesterol distribution in M. capricolum. PMID:6382819

  15. A data mining approach to dinoflagellate clustering according to sterol composition: Correlations with evolutionary history.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the sterol compositions of 102 dinoflagellates (including several previously unexamined species) using clustering techniques as a means of determining the relatedness of the organisms. In addition, dinoflagellate sterol-based relationships were compared statistically to dinoflag...

  16. Sterol and genomic analyses validate the sponge biomarker hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Gold, David A; Grabenstatter, Jonathan; de Mendoza, Alex; Riesgo, Ana; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Summons, Roger E

    2016-03-01

    Molecular fossils (or biomarkers) are key to unraveling the deep history of eukaryotes, especially in the absence of traditional fossils. In this regard, the sterane 24-isopropylcholestane has been proposed as a molecular fossil for sponges, and could represent the oldest evidence for animal life. The sterane is found in rocks ∼650-540 million y old, and its sterol precursor (24-isopropylcholesterol, or 24-ipc) is synthesized today by certain sea sponges. However, 24-ipc is also produced in trace amounts by distantly related pelagophyte algae, whereas only a few close relatives of sponges have been assayed for sterols. In this study, we analyzed the sterol and gene repertoires of four taxa (Salpingoeca rosetta, Capsaspora owczarzaki, Sphaeroforma arctica, and Creolimax fragrantissima), which collectively represent the major living animal outgroups. We discovered that all four taxa lack C30 sterols, including 24-ipc. By building phylogenetic trees for key enzymes in 24-ipc biosynthesis, we identified a candidate gene (carbon-24/28 sterol methyltransferase, or SMT) responsible for 24-ipc production. Our results suggest that pelagophytes and sponges independently evolved C30 sterol biosynthesis through clade-specific SMT duplications. Using a molecular clock approach, we demonstrate that the relevant sponge SMT duplication event overlapped with the appearance of 24-isopropylcholestanes in the Neoproterozoic, but that the algal SMT duplication event occurred later in the Phanerozoic. Subsequently, pelagophyte algae and their relatives are an unlikely alternative to sponges as a source of Neoproterozoic 24-isopropylcholestanes, consistent with growing evidence that sponges evolved long before the Cambrian explosion ∼542 million y ago. PMID:26903629

  17. Sterol and genomic analyses validate the sponge biomarker hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, David A.; Grabenstatter, Jonathan; de Mendoza, Alex; Riesgo, Ana; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2016-01-01

    Molecular fossils (or biomarkers) are key to unraveling the deep history of eukaryotes, especially in the absence of traditional fossils. In this regard, the sterane 24-isopropylcholestane has been proposed as a molecular fossil for sponges, and could represent the oldest evidence for animal life. The sterane is found in rocks ∼650–540 million y old, and its sterol precursor (24-isopropylcholesterol, or 24-ipc) is synthesized today by certain sea sponges. However, 24-ipc is also produced in trace amounts by distantly related pelagophyte algae, whereas only a few close relatives of sponges have been assayed for sterols. In this study, we analyzed the sterol and gene repertoires of four taxa (Salpingoeca rosetta, Capsaspora owczarzaki, Sphaeroforma arctica, and Creolimax fragrantissima), which collectively represent the major living animal outgroups. We discovered that all four taxa lack C30 sterols, including 24-ipc. By building phylogenetic trees for key enzymes in 24-ipc biosynthesis, we identified a candidate gene (carbon-24/28 sterol methyltransferase, or SMT) responsible for 24-ipc production. Our results suggest that pelagophytes and sponges independently evolved C30 sterol biosynthesis through clade-specific SMT duplications. Using a molecular clock approach, we demonstrate that the relevant sponge SMT duplication event overlapped with the appearance of 24-isopropylcholestanes in the Neoproterozoic, but that the algal SMT duplication event occurred later in the Phanerozoic. Subsequently, pelagophyte algae and their relatives are an unlikely alternative to sponges as a source of Neoproterozoic 24-isopropylcholestanes, consistent with growing evidence that sponges evolved long before the Cambrian explosion ∼542 million y ago. PMID:26903629

  18. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB) that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a) statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b) bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c) zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS), which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d) allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e) azoles, which inhibit C14α-demethylase, and (f) azasterols, which inhibit Δ24(25)-sterol methyltransferase (SMT). Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures), and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy) and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take place in

  19. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Wanderley; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola Fernandes

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB) that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a) statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b) bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c) zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS), which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d) allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e) azoles, which inhibit C14alpha-demethylase, and (f) azasterols, which inhibit Delta(24(25))-sterol methyltransferase (SMT). Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures), and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy) and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take

  20. Simultaneous Effects of Light Intensity and Phosphorus Supply on the Sterol Content of Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Piepho, Maike; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Wacker, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Sterol profiles of microalgae and their change with environmental conditions are of great interest in ecological food web research and taxonomic studies alike. Here, we investigated effects of light intensity and phosphorus supply on the sterol content of phytoplankton and assessed potential interactive effects of these important environmental factors on the sterol composition of algae. We identified sterol contents of four common phytoplankton genera, Scenedesmus, Chlamydomonas, Cryptomonas and Cyclotella, and analysed the change in sterol content with varying light intensities in both a high-phosphorus and a low-phosphorus approach. Sterol contents increased significantly with increasing light in three out of four species. Phosphorus-limitation reversed the change of sterol content with light intensity, i.e., sterol content decreased with increasing light at low phosphorus supply. Generally sterol contents were lower in low-phosphorus cultures. In conclusion, both light and phosphorus conditions strongly affect the sterol composition of algae and hence should be considered in ecological and taxonomic studies investigating the biochemical composition of algae. Data suggest a possible sterol limitation of growth and reproduction of herbivorous crustacean zooplankton during summer when high light intensities and low phosphorus supply decrease sterol contents of algae. PMID:21209879

  1. A novel sterol 14alpha-demethylase/ferredoxin fusion protein (MCCYP51FX) from Methylococcus capsulatus represents a new class of the cytochrome P450 superfamily.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Colin J; Lamb, David C; Marczylo, Timothy H; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Manning, Nigel J; Lowe, David J; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2002-12-01

    Sterol 14alpha-demethylase encoded by CYP51 is a member of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of enzymes and has been shown to have an essential role in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes, with orthologues recently being described in some bacteria. Examination of the genome sequence data for the proteobacterium Methylococcus capsulatus, a bacterial species known to produce sterol, revealed the presence of a single CYP with strong homology to CYP51, particularly to a form in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This M. capsulatus CYP51 protein represents a new class of CYP consisting of the CYP domain naturally fused to a ferredoxin domain at the C terminus via an alanine-rich linker. Expression of the M. capsulatus MCCYP51FX fusion in Escherichia coli yielded a P450, which, when purified to homogeneity, had the predicted molecular mass approximately 62 kDa on SDS/PAGE and bound lanosterol as a putative substrate. Sterol 14alpha-demethylase activity was shown (0.24 nmol of lanosterol metabolized per minute per nanomole of MCCYP51FX fusion) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with the activity dependent upon the presence of ferredoxin reductase and NADPH. Our unique findings describe a new class of naturally existing cytochrome P450, which will provide pivotal information for CYP structure/function in general. PMID:12235134

  2. Interactome Analysis of the NS1 Protein Encoded by Influenza A H1N1 Virus Reveals a Positive Regulatory Role of Host Protein PRP19 in Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Rei-Lin; Li, Zong-Hua; Li, Li-Hsin; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Tam, Ee-Hong; Liu, Helene M; Liu, Hao-Ping; Shih, Shin-Ru; Wu, Chih-Ching

    2016-05-01

    Influenza A virus, which can cause severe respiratory illnesses in infected individuals, is responsible for worldwide human pandemics. The NS1 protein encoded by this virus plays a crucial role in regulating the host antiviral response through various mechanisms. In addition, it has been reported that NS1 can modulate cellular pre-mRNA splicing events. To investigate the biological processes potentially affected by the NS1 protein in host cells, NS1-associated protein complexes in human cells were identified using coimmunoprecipitation combined with GeLC-MS/MS. By employing software to build biological process and protein-protein interaction networks, NS1-interacting cellular proteins were found to be related to RNA splicing/processing, cell cycle, and protein folding/targeting cellular processes. By monitoring spliced and unspliced RNAs of a reporter plasmid, we further validated that NS1 can interfere with cellular pre-mRNA splicing. One of the identified proteins, pre-mRNA-processing factor 19 (PRP19), was confirmed to interact with the NS1 protein in influenza A virus-infected cells. Importantly, depletion of PRP19 in host cells reduced replication of influenza A virus. In summary, the interactome of influenza A virus NS1 in host cells was comprehensively profiled, and our findings reveal a novel regulatory role for PRP19 in viral replication. PMID:27096427

  3. Insect molting hormone and sterol biosynthesis in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenok, R.J.; Adler, J.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Insect molting hormones, which are produced by plants and are effective molecules in the control of insect crop pests, are biosynthesized in developing spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.). The major sterols biosynthesized by spinach are avenasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,24(28)-dien-3{beta}-ol), spinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholesta-7,22-dien-3{beta}-ol), and 22-dihydrospinasterol (24{alpha}-ethyl-5{alpha}-cholest-7-en-3{beta}-ol). The major ecdysteroids biosynthesized are ecdysterone (2{beta},3{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-hexahydroxy-5{beta}-cholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahycroxycholest-7-en-6-one) and polypodine B (2{beta},3{beta},5{beta},14{alpha},20R,22R,25-heptahydroxycholest-7-en-6-one). When labeled 2-{sup 14}C-mevalonic acid was incorporated into young leaves isolated squalene, sterols and ecdysteroids contained the label. During a short (16 h) incorporation period in intact young leaves of 100 day old plants, the avenasterol has the highest specific activity in counts per minute per {mu}g of sterol followed by 22-dihydrospinasterol which is more highly labeled than spinasterol. The ecdysteroids synthesized, on an entire plant basis, account for 20% of the total steroid (sterol and ecdysteroid) isolated from the plant.

  4. The counterflow transport of sterols and PI4P.

    PubMed

    Mesmin, Bruno; Antonny, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Cholesterol levels in intracellular membranes are constantly adjusted to match with specific organelle functions. Cholesterol is kept high in the plasma membrane (PM) because it is essential for its barrier function, while low levels are found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where cholesterol mediates feedback control of its own synthesis by sterol-sensor proteins. The ER→Golgi→PM concentration gradient of cholesterol in mammalian cells, and ergosterol in yeast, appears to be sustained by specific intracellular transport processes, which are mostly mediated by lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Here we review a recently described function of two LTPs, OSBP and its yeast homolog Osh4p, which consists in creating a sterol gradient between membranes by vectorial transport. OSBP also contributes to the formation of ER/Golgi membrane contact sites, which are important hubs for the transfer of several lipid species. OSBP and Osh4p organize a counterflow transport of lipids whereby sterols are exchanged for the phosphoinositide PI4P, which is used as a fuel to drive sterol transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26928592

  5. Azasterol inhibitors in yeast. Inhibition of the 24-methylene sterol delta24(28)-reductase and delta24-sterol methyltransferase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by 23-azacholesterol.

    PubMed

    Pierce, H D; Pierce, A M; Srinivasan, R; Unrau, A M; Oehlschlager, A C

    1978-06-23

    The effects of 23-azacholesterol on sterol biosynthesis and growth of Saccharomyces cervisiae were examined. In the presence of 0.2, 0.5, and 1 micron 23-azacholesterol, aerobically-growing yeast produced a nearly constant amount of ergosta-5,7,22,24(28)-tetraenol (approx. 36% of total sterol) and slowly accumulated zymosterol with a concommitant decline in ergosterol synthesis. Growth and total sterol content of yeast cultures treated with 0.2-1 micron 23-azacholesterol were similar to that of the control culture. Yeast cultures treated with 5 and 10 micron 23-azacholesterol produced mostly zymosterol (58-61% of total sterol), while ergosta-5,7,22,24(28)-tetraenol production declined to less than 10% of total sterol. The observed changes in the distribution of sterols in treated cultures are consistent with inhibition of 24-methylene sterol 24(28)-sterol reductase (total inhibition at 1 micron 23-azacholesterol) and of 24-sterol methyltransferase (71% inhibition at 10 micron 23-azacholesterol). Yeast cultures treated with 10 micron 23-azacholesterol were found to contain 4,4-dimethylcholesta-8,14,24-trienol and 4alpha-methylcholesta-8,14,24-trienol, which were isolated and characterized for the first time. PMID:352402

  6. Virus-induced gene silencing of Withania somnifera squalene synthase negatively regulates sterol and defence-related genes resulting in reduced withanolides and biotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anup Kumar; Dwivedi, Varun; Rai, Avanish; Pal, Shaifali; Reddy, Sajjalavarahalli Gangireddy Eswara; Rao, Dodaghatta Krishnarao Venkata; Shasany, Ajit Kumar; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2015-12-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is an important Indian medicinal plant that produces withanolides, which are triterpenoid steroidal lactones having diverse biological activities. To enable fast and efficient functional characterization of genes in this slow-growing and difficult-to-transform plant, a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) was established by silencing phytoene desaturase (PDS) and squalene synthase (SQS). VIGS of the gene encoding SQS, which provides precursors for triterpenoids, resulted in significant reduction of squalene and withanolides, demonstrating its application in studying withanolides biosynthesis in W. somnifera leaves. A comprehensive analysis of gene expression and sterol pathway intermediates in WsSQS-vigs plants revealed transcriptional modulation with positive feedback regulation of mevalonate pathway genes, and negative feed-forward regulation of downstream sterol pathway genes including DWF1 (delta-24-sterol reductase) and CYP710A1 (C-22-sterol desaturase), resulting in significant reduction of sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol. However, there was little effect of SQS silencing on cholesterol, indicating the contribution of sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol, but not of cholesterol, towards withanolides formation. Branch-point oxidosqualene synthases in WsSQS-vigs plants exhibited differential regulation with reduced CAS (cycloartenol synthase) and cycloartenol, and induced BAS (β-amyrin synthase) and β-amyrin. Moreover, SQS silencing also led to the down-regulation of brassinosteroid-6-oxidase-2 (BR6OX2), pathogenesis-related (PR) and nonexpressor of PR (NPR) genes, resulting in reduced tolerance to bacterial and fungal infection as well as to insect feeding. Taken together, SQS silencing negatively regulated sterol and defence-related genes leading to reduced phytosterols, withanolides and biotic stress tolerance, thus implicating the application of VIGS for functional analysis of genes related to withanolides

  7. Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Tadao; Khan, Md Shahadat Hossain; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maejima, Eriko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokota, Takao; Nakano, Takeshi; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Matsuo; Ishikawa, Satoru; Ikka, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akifumi; Kawamura, Takeshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Ueki, Nozomi; Umetsu, Asami; Kannari, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Phospholipids create a negative charge at the surface of the plasma membrane and enhance Al sensitivity as a result of the accumulation of positively charged Al(3+) ions. The phospholipids will be balanced by other electrically neutral lipids, such as sterols. In the present research, Al tolerance was compared among pea (Pisum sativum) genotypes. Compared with Al-tolerant genotypes, the Al-sensitive genotype accumulated more Al in the root tip, had a less intact plasma membrane, and showed a lower expression level of PsCYP51, which encodes obtusifoliol-14α-demethylase (OBT 14DM), a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme. The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in the sensitive genotype than in the tolerant genotypes, suggesting that the sterol biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in Al tolerance. Consistent with this idea, a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression showed an Al-sensitive phenotype. Uniconazole-P, an inhibitor of OBT 14DM, suppressed the Al tolerance of Al-tolerant genotypes of maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmark cv. Currency). These results suggest that increased sterol content, regulated by CYP51, with concomitant lower phospholipid content in the root tip, results in lower negativity of the plasma membrane. This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species. PMID:25416794

  8. Identification of a hard surface contact-induced gene in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides conidia as a sterol glycosyl transferase, a novel fungal virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Ki; Wang, Yuhuan; Liu, Zhi-Mei; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E

    2002-04-01

    Hard surface contact has been known to be necessary to induce infection structure (appressorium) formation in many phytopathogenic fungi. However, the molecular basis of this requirement is unknown. We have used a differential display approach to clone some of the genes induced in the conidia by hard surface contact. We report that one of the genes induced by hard-surface contact of the conidia of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, chip6, encodes a protein with homology to sterol glycosyl transferases. chip6 expressed in E. coli catalyses glucosyl transfer from UDP-glucose to cholesterol. Disruption of chip6 causes a marked decrease in the transferase activity and a drastic reduction in virulence on its natural host, avocado fruits, although the mutant is capable of normal growth and appressorium formation. The requirement for sterol glycosyl transferase for pathogenicity suggests a novel biological function for this transferase. PMID:12000454

  9. Effects of a diet high in plant sterols, vegetable proteins, and viscous fibers (dietary portfolio) on circulating sterol levels and red cell fragility in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter J; Raeini-Sarjaz, Mahmoud; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Vidgen, Edward; Trautwein, Elke A; Lapsley, Karen G; Marchie, Augustine; Cunnane, Stephen C; Connelly, Philip W

    2005-02-01

    Plant sterols, soy proteins, viscous fibers, and nuts are advised for cholesterol reduction, but their combined effect on plant sterol absorption has never been tested. We assessed their combined action on serum sterols in hyperlipidemic subjects who were following low-saturated fat diets before starting the study and who returned to these diets post-test. The 1-mon test (combination) diet was high in plant sterols (1 g/1,000 kcal), soy protein (23 g/1,000 kcal), viscous fiber (9 g/1,000 kcal), and almonds (14 g/1000 kcal). Fasting blood was obtained for serum lipids and sterols, and erythrocytes were obtained for fragility prior to and at 2-wk intervals during the study. The combination diet raised serum campesterol concentrations by 50% and beta-sitosterol by 27%, although these changes were not significant after Bonferroni correction; near-maximal rises were found by the end of the first week, but no change was found in red cell fragility despite a 29% reduction in the LDL cholesterol level. No significant associations were observed between changes in red cell fragility and blood lipids or sterols. We conclude that plant sterols had a minimal impact on serum sterol concentrations or red cell fragility in hyperlipidemic subjects on diets that greatly reduced their serum lipids. PMID:15884765

  10. Differential effects of fenpropimorph and fenhexamid, two sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicides, on arbuscular mycorrhizal development and sterol metabolism in carrot roots.

    PubMed

    Campagnac, Estelle; Fontaine, Joël; Sahraoui, Anissa Lounès-Hadj; Laruelle, Frédéric; Durand, Roger; Grandmougin-Ferjani, Anne

    2008-12-01

    Sterols composition of transformed carrot roots incubated in presence of increasing concentrations of fenpropimorph (0.02; 0.2; 2mgl(-1)) and fenhexamid (0.02; 0.2; 2; 20mgl(-1)), colonized or not by Glomus intraradices was determined. In mycorrhizal roots treated with fenpropimorph, normal Delta(5)-sterols were replaced by unusual compounds such as 9beta,19-cyclopropylsterols (24-methylpollinastanol), Delta(8,14)-sterols (ergosta-8,14-dienol, stigmasta-8,14-dienol), Delta(8)-sterols (Delta(8) sitosterol) and Delta(7)-sterols (ergosta-7,22-dienol). After application of fenpropimorph, a drastic reduction of the mycorrhizal root growth, root colonization and extraradical fungal development was observed. Application of fenhexamid did not modify sterol profiles and the total colonization of roots. But the arbuscule frequency of the fungal partner was significantly affected. Comparison of the effects caused by the tested fungicides indicates that the usual phytosterols may be involved in symbiosis development. Indeed, observed modifications of root sterols composition could explain the high fenpropimorph toxicity to the AM symbiosis. However, the absence of sterolic modifications in the roots treated with fenhexamid could account for its more limited impact on mycorrhization. PMID:19007946

  11. Sterol Biosynthesis Is Required for Heat Resistance but Not Extracellular Survival in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Baykal, Eda; Huang, Juyang; Zhang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Sterol biosynthesis is a crucial pathway in eukaryotes leading to the production of cholesterol in animals and various C24-alkyl sterols (ergostane-based sterols) in fungi, plants, and trypanosomatid protozoa. Sterols are important membrane components and precursors for the synthesis of powerful bioactive molecules, including steroid hormones in mammals. Their functions in pathogenic protozoa are not well characterized, which limits the development of sterol synthesis inhibitors as drugs. Here we investigated the role of sterol C14α-demethylase (C14DM) in Leishmania parasites. C14DM is a cytochrome P450 enzyme and the primary target of azole drugs. In Leishmania, genetic or chemical inactivation of C14DM led to a complete loss of ergostane-based sterols and accumulation of 14-methylated sterols. Despite the drastic change in lipid composition, C14DM-null mutants (c14dm−) were surprisingly viable and replicative in culture. They did exhibit remarkable defects including increased membrane fluidity, failure to maintain detergent resistant membrane fraction, and hypersensitivity to heat stress. These c14dm− mutants showed severely reduced virulence in mice but were highly resistant to itraconazole and amphotericin B, two drugs targeting sterol synthesis. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of toxic sterol intermediates in c14dm− causes strong membrane perturbation and significant vulnerability to stress. The new knowledge may help improve the efficacy of current drugs against pathogenic protozoa by exploiting the fitness loss associated with drug resistance. PMID:25340392

  12. Tracing origins of sewage and organic matter using dissolved sterols in Masan and Haengam Bay, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo Jin; Hong, Sang Hee; Kim, Moonkoo; Ha, Sung Yong; An, Soon Mo; Shim, Won Joon

    2011-06-01

    Masan and Haengam Bays in Korea are highly polluted and semi-enclosed. Domestic and industrial effluents are directly or indirectly discharged into the bays through sewage treatment plants (STP) and creeks. In this study, 15 dissolved sterol compounds were determined in order to understand their sources and relative contribution. Freshwater samples were taken from 13 creeks and at two STP sites on a monthly basis. Total dissolved sterol concentrations ranged from 993 to 4158 ng/L. The concentrations of sterols in winter were higher than in summer. Among the sterols analyzed, cholesterol, β-sitosterol, coprostanol and cholestanone were major compounds in creek water. Seawater samples were concurrently collected at 21 stations in Masan Bay. Total sterol concentrations ranged 118-6,956 ng/L. Inner bay showed high concentrations of sterols in summer, while outer bay showed high sterol concentrations in winter. Among the sterols, cholesterol, β-sitosterol and brassicasterol were major compounds in seawater. In order to examine the contribution of urban sewage, the concentration of coprostanol and fecal sterol ratios were calculated. Most of the creek water, inner bay and near STP outlet samples were affected by sewage. Terrestrial organic matters accounted for a high proportion of dissolved organic matter origin. Fecal origins were relatively high in the inner bay areas and in the STP outlet, while sterols of marine origin were high in the outer bay areas.

  13. The sterols of Cucurbita moschata ("calabacita") seed oil.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J B; Gros, E G; Bertoni, M H; Cattaneo, P

    1996-11-01

    From the sterol fraction of seed oil from commercial Cucurbita moschata Dutch ("calabacita") delta 5 and delta 7 sterols having saturated and unsaturated side chain were isolated by chromatographic procedures and characterized by spectroscopic (1H and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry) methods. The main components were identified as 24S-ethyl 5 alpha-cholesta-7,22E-dien-3 beta-ol (alpha-spinasterol); 24S-ethyl 5 alpha-cholesta-7,22E,25-trien-3 beta-ol (25-dehydrochondrillasterol); 24S-ethyl 5 alpha-cholesta-7,25-dien-3 beta-ol; 24R-ethyl-cholesta-7-en-3 beta-ol (delta 7-stigmastenol) and 24-ethyl-cholesta-7, 24(28)-dien-3 beta-ol (delta 7,24(28)-stigmastadienol). PMID:8934454

  14. Cytotoxic sterols from the formosan brown alga Turbinaria ornata.

    PubMed

    Sheu, J H; Wang, G H; Sung, P J; Chiu, Y H; Duh, C Y

    1997-12-01

    Two hydroperoxysterols 24-hydroperoxy-24-vinyl-cholesterol (1) and 29-hydroperoxystigmasta-5,24(28)-dien-3beta-ol (2), and fucosterol (3) were isolated from the brown alga Turbinaria ornata (Sargassaceae). Hydroperoxide 2 is a new natural compound and was converted into 29-hydroxystigmasta-5,24 (28)-dien-3beta-ol (4) by reaction with LAH. Sterols 1, 2, and 4 exhibited cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines. PMID:17252381

  15. Building Synthetic Sterols Computationally – Unlocking the Secrets of Evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Róg, Tomasz; Pöyry, Sanja; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is vital in regulating the physical properties of animal cell membranes. While it remains unclear what renders cholesterol so unique, it is known that other sterols are less capable in modulating membrane properties, and there are membrane proteins whose function is dependent on cholesterol. Practical applications of cholesterol include its use in liposomes in drug delivery and cosmetics, cholesterol-based detergents in membrane protein crystallography, its fluorescent analogs in studies of cholesterol transport in cells and tissues, etc. Clearly, in spite of their difficult synthesis, producing the synthetic analogs of cholesterol is of great commercial and scientific interest. In this article, we discuss how synthetic sterols non-existent in nature can be used to elucidate the roles of cholesterol’s structural elements. To this end, we discuss recent atomistic molecular dynamics simulation studies that have predicted new synthetic sterols with properties comparable to those of cholesterol. We also discuss more recent experimental studies that have vindicated these predictions. The paper highlights the strength of computational simulations in making predictions for synthetic biology, thereby guiding experiments. PMID:26347865

  16. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization. PMID:27180904

  17. Distribution of free and glycosylated sterols within Cycas micronesica plants

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E.; Shaw, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Flour derived from Cycas micronesica seeds was once the dominant source of starch for Guam's residents. Cycad consumption has been linked to high incidence of human neurodegenerative diseases. We determined the distribution of the sterols stigmasterol and β-sitosterol and their derived glucosides stigmasterol β-d-glucoside and β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside among various plant parts because they have been identified in cycad flour and have been shown to elicit neurodegenerative outcomes. All four compounds were common in seeds, sporophylls, pollen, leaves, stems, and roots. Roots contained the greatest concentration of both free sterols, and photosynthetic leaflet tissue contained the greatest concentration of both steryl glucosides. Concentration within the three stem tissue categories was low compared to other organs. Reproductive sporophyll tissue contained free sterols similar to seeds, but greater concentration of steryl glucosides than seeds. One of the glucosides was absent from pollen. Concentration in young seeds was higher than old seeds as reported earlier, but concentration did not differ among age categories of leaf, sporophyll, or vascular tissue. The profile differences among the various tissues within these organs may help clarify the physiological role of these compounds. PMID:20157629

  18. Attenuation of Leishmania infantum chagasi Metacyclic Promastigotes by Sterol Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Gaur Dixit, Upasna; Barker, Jason H.; Teesch, Lynn M.; Love-Homan, Laurie; Donelson, John E.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The infectious metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania protozoa establish infection in a mammalian host after they are deposited into the dermis by a sand fly vector. Several Leishmania virulence factors promote infection, including the glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane-anchored major surface protease (MSP). Metacyclic Leishmania infantum chagasi promastigotes were treated with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD), a sterol-chelating reagent, causing a 3-fold reduction in total cellular sterols as well as enhancing MSP release without affecting parasite viability in vitro. MβCD-treated promastigotes were more susceptible to complement-mediated lysis than untreated controls and reduced the parasite load 3-fold when inoculated into BALB/c mice. Paradoxically, MβCD-treated promastigotes caused a higher initial in vitro infection rate in human or murine macrophages than untreated controls, although their intracellular multiplication was hindered upon infection establishment. There was a corresponding larger amount of covalently bound C3b than iC3b on the parasite surfaces of MβCD-treated promastigotes exposed to healthy human serum in vitro, as well as loss of MSP, a protease that enhances C3b cleavage to iC3b. Mass spectrometry showed that MβCD promotes the release of proteins into the extracellular medium, including both MSP and MSP-like protein (MLP), from virulent metacyclic promastigotes. These data support the hypothesis that plasma membrane sterols are important for the virulence of Leishmania protozoa at least in part through retention of membrane virulence proteins. PMID:23630964

  19. Absence of sterols constrains food quality of cyanobacteria for an invasive freshwater bivalve.

    PubMed

    Basen, Timo; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik

    2012-09-01

    The accumulation of cyanobacterial biomass may severely affect the performance of aquatic consumers. Here, we investigated the role of sterols in determining the food quality of cyanobacteria for the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea, which has become a common benthic invertebrate in many freshwater ecosystems throughout the world. In standardized growth experiments, juvenile clams were fed mixtures of different cyanobacteria (Anabaena variabilis, Aphanothece clathrata, Synechococcus elongatus) or sterol-containing eukaryotic algae (Cryptomonas sp., Nannochloropsis limnetica, Scenedesmus obliquus). In addition, the cyanobacterial food was supplemented with different sterols. We provide evidence that somatic growth of C. fluminea on cyanobacterial diets is constrained by the absence of sterols, as indicated by a growth-enhancing effect of sterol supplementation. Thus, our findings contribute to our understanding of the consequences of cyanobacterial mass developments for benthic consumers and highlight the importance of considering sterols as potentially limiting nutrients in aquatic food webs. PMID:22398861

  20. Sterol O-Acyltransferase 2-Driven Cholesterol Esterification Opposes Liver X Receptor-Stimulated Fecal Neutral Sterol Loss.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Manya; Zhang, Jun; Bura, Kanwardeep; Kelley, Kathryn; Wilson, Martha D; Rudel, Lawrence L; Brown, J Mark

    2016-02-01

    Statin drugs have proven a successful and relatively safe therapy for the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, even with the substantial low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering achieved with statin treatment, CVD remains the top cause of death in developed countries. Selective inhibitors of the cholesterol esterifying enzyme sterol-O acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) hold great promise as effective CVD therapeutics. In mouse models, previous work has demonstrated that either antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) or small molecule inhibitors of SOAT2 can effectively reduce CVD progression, and even promote regression of established CVD. Although it is well known that SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can alter both the packaging and retention of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins, here we set out to determine whether SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can also impact basal and liver X receptor (LXR)-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss. These studies demonstrate that SOAT2 is a negative regulator of LXR-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss in mice. PMID:26729489

  1. The physiology of sterol nutrition in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Bouvaine, Sophie; T Behmer, Spencer; Lin, George G; Faure, Marie-Line; Grebenok, Robert J; Douglas, Angela E

    2012-11-01

    The phloem sap of fava bean (Vicia faba) plants utilized by the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum contains three sterols, cholesterol, stigmasterol and sitosterol, in a 2:2:1 ratio. To investigate the nutritional value of these sterols, pea aphids were reared on chemically-defined diets containing each sterol at 0.1, 1 and 10μgml(-1) with a sterol-free diet as control. Larval growth rate and aphid lifespan did not vary significantly across the diets, indicating that sterol reserves can buffer some performance indices against a shortfall in dietary sterol over at least one generation. However, lifetime reproductive output was depressed in aphids on diets containing stigmasterol or no sterol, relative to diets supplemented with cholesterol or sitosterol. The cholesterol density of embryos in teneral adults was significantly higher than in the total body; and the number and biomass of embryos in aphids on diets with stigmasterol and no sterols were reduced relative to diets with cholesterol or sitosterol, indicating that the reproductive output of the pea aphid can be limited by the amount and composition of dietary sterol. In a complementary RNA-seq analysis of pea aphids reared on plants and diets with different sterol contents, 7.6% of the 17,417 detected gene transcripts were differentially expressed. Transcript abundance of genes with annotated function in sterol utilization did not vary significantly among treatments, suggesting that the metabolic response to dietary sterol may be mediated primarily at the level of enzyme function or metabolite concentration. PMID:22878342

  2. The PsychENCODE project

    PubMed Central

    Akbarian, Schahram; Liu, Chunyu; Knowles, James A; Vaccarino, Flora M; Farnham, Peggy J; Crawford, Gregory E; Jaffe, Andrew E; Pinto, Dalila; Dracheva, Stella; Geschwind, Daniel H; Mill, Jonathan; Nairn, Angus C; Abyzov, Alexej; Pochareddy, Sirisha; Prabhakar, Shyam; Weissman, Sherman; Sullivan, Patrick F; State, Matthew W; Weng, Zhiping; Peters, Mette A; White, Kevin P; Gerstein, Mark B; Senthil, Geetha; Lehner, Thomas; Sklar, Pamela; Sestan, Nenad

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on disparate psychiatric disorders has implicated rare variants in genes involved in global gene regulation and chromatin modification, as well as many common variants located primarily in regulatory regions of the genome. Understanding precisely how these variants contribute to disease will require a deeper appreciation for the mechanisms of gene regulation in the developing and adult human brain. The PsychENCODE project aims to produce a public resource of multidimensional genomic data using tissue- and cell type–specific samples from approximately 1,000 phenotypically well-characterized, high-quality healthy and disease-affected human post-mortem brains, as well as functionally characterize disease-associated regulatory elements and variants in model systems. We are beginning with a focus on autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and expect that this knowledge will apply to a wide variety of psychiatric disorders. This paper outlines the motivation and design of PsychENCODE. PMID:26605881

  3. Molecular Cloning and Biochemical Characterization of a Recombinant Sterol 3-O-Glucosyltransferase from Gymnema sylvestre R.Br. Catalyzing Biosynthesis of Steryl Glucosides

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Asha; Mishra, B. N.; Sangwan, Neelam S.

    2014-01-01

    Gymnema sylvestre R.Br., a pharmacologically important herb vernacularly called Gur-Mar (sugar eliminator), is widely known for its antidiabetic action. This property of the herb has been attributed to the presence of bioactive triterpene glycosides. Although some information regarding pharmacology and phytochemical profiles of the plant are available, no attempts have been made so far to decipher the biosynthetic pathway and key enzymes involved in biosynthesis of steryl glucosides. The present report deals with the identification and catalytic characterization of a glucosyltransferase, catalyzing biosynthesis of steryl glycosides. The full length cDNA (2572 bp) contained an open reading frame of 2106 nucleotides that encoded a 701 amino acid protein, falling into GT-B subfamily of glycosyltransferases. The GsSGT was expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme suggested its key role in the biosynthesis of steryl glucosides with catalytic preference for C-3 hydroxyl group of sterols. To our knowledge, this pertains to be the first report on cloning and biochemical characterization of a sterol metabolism gene from G. sylvestre R.Br. catalyzing glucosylation of a variety of sterols of biological origin from diverse organisms such as bacteria, fungi, and plants. PMID:25250339

  4. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of a recombinant sterol 3-O-glucosyltransferase from Gymnema sylvestre R.Br. catalyzing biosynthesis of steryl glucosides.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Pragya; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Asha; Mishra, B N; Sabir, Farzana; Sangwan, Neelam S

    2014-01-01

    Gymnema sylvestre R.Br., a pharmacologically important herb vernacularly called Gur-Mar (sugar eliminator), is widely known for its antidiabetic action. This property of the herb has been attributed to the presence of bioactive triterpene glycosides. Although some information regarding pharmacology and phytochemical profiles of the plant are available, no attempts have been made so far to decipher the biosynthetic pathway and key enzymes involved in biosynthesis of steryl glucosides. The present report deals with the identification and catalytic characterization of a glucosyltransferase, catalyzing biosynthesis of steryl glycosides. The full length cDNA (2572 bp) contained an open reading frame of 2106 nucleotides that encoded a 701 amino acid protein, falling into GT-B subfamily of glycosyltransferases. The GsSGT was expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme suggested its key role in the biosynthesis of steryl glucosides with catalytic preference for C-3 hydroxyl group of sterols. To our knowledge, this pertains to be the first report on cloning and biochemical characterization of a sterol metabolism gene from G. sylvestre R.Br. catalyzing glucosylation of a variety of sterols of biological origin from diverse organisms such as bacteria, fungi, and plants. PMID:25250339

  5. Impact of ice melting on distribution of particulate sterols in glacial fjords of Chilean Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Marcelo H.; Riquelme, Pablo; Pantoja, Silvio

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed variability in abundance and composition of sterols in waters of the fjord adjacent to glacier Jorge Montt, one of the fastest retreated glaciers in Patagonian Icefields. The study was carried out between August 2012 and November 2013 under different meltwater scenarios. Distribution of sterols in surface and bottom waters was determined by Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry. Sterol concentration ranged from 18 to 1726 ng/L in surface and bottom waters and was positive correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration. Under high melting conditions in austral summer, surface meltwaters showed high concentrations of sterols and were dominated by methylene-cholesterol, a representative sterol of centric diatoms. In the area near open ocean and in austral autumn, winter and spring in proglacial fjord, lower sterol concentrations in surface waters were accompanied by other microalgae sterols and an increase in relative abundance of plant sterols, evidencing a different source of organic matter. In autumn, when high meltwater flux was also evidenced, presence of stanols and an uncommon tri-unsaturated sterol suggests influence of meltwaters in composition of sterols in the downstream fjord. We conclude that ice melting can modify sterol composition by setting conditions for development of a singular phytoplankton population able to thrive in surface meltwater and by carrying glacier organic matter into Patagonian glacial fjords. In projected ice melting scenario, these changes in organic matter quantity and quality can potentially affect availability of organic substrates for heterotrophic activity and trophic status of glacial fjords. This research was funded by COPAS Sur-Austral (PFB-31)

  6. StAR enhances transcription of genes encoding the mitochondrial proteases involved in its own degradation.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is essential for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonads. StAR activity facilitates the supply of cholesterol substrate into the inner mitochondrial membranes where conversion of the sterol to a steroid is catalyzed. Mitochondrial import terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity of StAR and leads to mounting accumulation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix. Our studies suggest that to prevent mitochondrial impairment, StAR proteolysis is executed by at least 2 mitochondrial proteases, ie, the matrix LON protease and the inner membrane complexes of the metalloproteases AFG3L2 and AFG3L2:SPG7/paraplegin. Gonadotropin administration to prepubertal rats stimulated ovarian follicular development associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. In addition, enrichment of LON and AFG3L2 is evident in StAR-expressing ovarian cells examined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, reporter studies of the protease promoters examined in the heterologous cell model suggest that StAR expression stimulates up to a 3.5-fold increase in the protease gene transcription. Such effects are StAR-specific, are independent of StAR activity, and failed to occur upon expression of StAR mutants that do not enter the matrix. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the presence of a novel regulatory loop, whereby acute accumulation of an apparent nuisance protein in the matrix provokes a mitochondria to nucleus signaling that, in turn, activates selected transcription of genes encoding the enrichment of mitochondrial proteases relevant for enhanced clearance of StAR. PMID:24422629

  7. Structure and Function of the Sterol Carrier Protein-2 N-Terminal Presequence†

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory G.; Hostetler, Heather A.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Tichy, Shane E.; Williams, Brad J.; Russell, David H.; Berg, Jeremy M.; Spencer, Thomas A.; Ball, Judith; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Although sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) is encoded as a precursor protein (proSCP-2), little is known regarding the structure and function of the 20-amino acid N-terminal presequence. As shown herein, the presequence contains significant secondary structure and alters SCP-2: (i) secondary structure (CD), (ii) tertiary structure (aqueous exposure of Trp shown by UV absorbance, fluorescence, fluorescence quenching), (iii) ligand binding site [Trp response to ligands, peptide cross-linked by photoactivatable free cholesterol (FCBP)], (iv) selectivity for interaction with anionic phospholipid-rich membranes, (v) interaction with a peroxisomal import protein [FRET studies of Pex5p(C) binding], the N-terminal presequence increased SCP-2’s affinity for Pex5p(C) by 10-fold, and (vi) intracellular targeting in living and fixed cells (confocal microscopy). Nearly 5-fold more SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with plasma membrane lipid rafts/caveolae (AF488-CTB), 2.8-fold more SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with a mitochondrial marker (Mitotracker), but nearly 2-fold less SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with peroxisomes (AF488-antibody to PMP70). These data indicate the importance of the N-terminal presequence in regulating SCP-2 structure, cholesterol localization within the ligand binding site, membrane association, and, potentially, intracellular targeting. PMID:18465878

  8. AAA ATPases regulate membrane association of yeast oxysterol binding proteins and sterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Penghua; Zhang, Yong; Li, Hongzhe; Chieu, Hai Kee; Munn, Alan L; Yang, Hongyuan

    2005-09-01

    The yeast genome encodes seven oxysterol binding protein homologs, Osh1p-Osh7p, which have been implicated in regulating intracellular lipid and vesicular transport. Here, we show that both Osh6p and Osh7p interact with Vps4p, a member of the AAA (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) family. The coiled-coil domain of Osh7p was found to interact with Vps4p in a yeast two-hybrid screen and the interaction between Osh7p and Vps4p appears to be regulated by ergosterol. Deletion of VPS4 induced a dramatic increase in the membrane-associated pools of Osh6p and Osh7p and also caused a decrease in sterol esterification, which was suppressed by overexpression of OSH7. Lastly, overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Osh7p (Osh7pCC) resulted in a multivesicular body sorting defect, suggesting a dominant negative role of Osh7pCC possibly through inhibiting Vps4p function. Our data suggest that a common mechanism may exist for AAA proteins to regulate the membrane association of yeast OSBP proteins and that these two protein families may function together to control subcellular lipid transport. PMID:16096648

  9. Serum response element-like sequences of the human low density lipoprotein receptor promoter: possible regulation sites for sterol-independent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Pak, Y K

    1996-02-01

    Serum factors stimulate low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene expression in HepG2 cells through sterol-independent pathways. Promoter element other than sterol regulatory element-1 (SRE-1) seems to be necessary. Protein binding activity of the human LDLR promoter fragment (550bp) beyond the SRE-1 was determined by DNase I footprint assay. Five different promoter regions were protected from DNase I digestion; -226 to -258, -291 to -304, -324 to -336, -360 to -373, and -521 to -528. The regions of -324 to -336 and -521 to -528 showed serum response element (SRE)-like consensus sequence of CC(A/T)6GG. Serum incubation affected the protection degree of the SRE-like elements, but 25-hydroxycholesterol did not. It is proposed, therefore, that the promoter region of -324 to -336 and/or -521 to -528 showed serum response elements, but 25-hydroxycholesterol did not. It is proposed, therefore, that the promoter region of -324 to -336 and/or -521 to -528 in human LDLR gene may be responsible for the rapid activation of the gene transcription by serum factor in a sterol-independent manner. PMID:8932516

  10. Sterol ratios as a tool for sewage pollution assessment of river sediments in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Matić Bujagić, Ivana; Grujić, Svetlana; Jauković, Zorica; Laušević, Mila

    2016-06-01

    In this work, source pollution tracing of the sediments of the Danube River and its tributaries in Serbia was performed using sterol ratios. Improved liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method, which enabled complete chromatographic separation of four analytes with identical fragmentation reactions (epicoprostanol, coprostanol, epicholestanol and cholestanol), was applied for the determination of steroid compounds (hormones, human/animal and plant sterols). A widespread occurrence of sterols was identified in all analyzed samples, whereas the only detected hormones were mestranol and 17α-estradiol. A human-sourced sewage marker coprostanol was detected at the highest concentration (up to 1939 ng g(-1)). The ratios between the key sterol biomarkers, as well as the percentage of coprostanol relative to the total sterol amount, were applied with the aim of selecting the most reliable for distinction between human-sourced pollution and the sterols originated from the natural sources in river sediments. The coprostanol/(cholesterol + cholestanol) and coprostanol/epicoprostanol ratios do not distinguish between human and natural sources of sterols in the river sediments in Serbia. The most reliable sterol ratios for the sewage pollution assessment of river sediments in the studied area were found to be coprostanol/(coprostanol + cholestanol), coprostanol/cholesterol and epicoprostanol/coprostanol. For the majority of sediments, human-derived pollution was determined. Two sediment samples were identified as influenced by a combination of human and natural biogenic sources. PMID:26874877

  11. Sterols as biomarkers in the surface microlayer of the estuarine areas.

    PubMed

    Alsalahi, Murad Ali; Latif, Mohd Talib; Ali, Masni Mohd; Dominick, Doreena; Khan, Md Firoz; Mustaffa, Nur Ili Hamizah; Nadzir, Mohd Shahrul Mohd; Nasher, Essam; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi

    2015-04-15

    This study aims to determine the concentration of sterols used as biomarkers in the surface microlayer (SML) in estuarine areas of the Selangor River, Malaysia. Samples were collected during different seasons through the use of a rotation drum. The analysis of sterols was performed using gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionisation detector (GC-FID). The results showed that the concentrations of total sterols in the SML ranged from 107.06 to 505.55 ng L(-1). The total sterol concentration was found to be higher in the wet season. Cholesterol was found to be the most abundant sterols component in the SML. The diagnostic ratios of sterols show the influence of natural sources and waste on the contribution of sterols in the SML. Further analysis, using principal component analysis (PCA), showed distinct inputs of sterols derived from human activity (40.58%), terrigenous and plant inputs (22.59%) as well as phytoplankton and marine inputs (17.35%). PMID:25682566

  12. Phylogenomics of Sterol Synthesis: Insights into the Origin, Evolution, and Diversity of a Key Eukaryotic Feature

    PubMed Central

    Desmond, Elie

    2009-01-01

    The availability of complete genomes from a wide sampling of eukaryotic diversity has allowed the application of phylogenomics approaches to study the origin and evolution of unique eukaryotic cellular structures, but these are still poorly applied to study unique eukaryotic metabolic pathways. Sterols are a good example because they are an essential feature of eukaryotic membranes. The sterol pathway has been well dissected in vertebrates, fungi, and land plants. However, although different types of sterols have been identified in other eukaryotic lineages, their pathways have not been fully characterized. We have carried out an extensive analysis of the taxonomic distribution and phylogeny of the enzymes of the sterol pathway in a large sampling of eukaryotic lineages. This allowed us to tentatively indicate features of the sterol pathway in organisms where this has not been characterized and to point out a number of steps for which yet-to-discover enzymes may be at work. We also inferred that the last eukaryotic common ancestor already harbored a large panel of enzymes for sterol synthesis and that subsequent evolution over the eukaryotic tree occurred by tinkering, mainly by gene losses. We highlight a high capacity of sterol synthesis in the myxobacterium Plesiocystis pacifica, and we support the hypothesis that the few bacteria that harbor homologs of the sterol pathway have likely acquired these via horizontal gene transfer from eukaryotes. Finally, we propose a potential candidate for the elusive enzyme performing C-3 ketoreduction (ERG27 equivalent) in land plants and probably in other eukaryotic phyla. PMID:20333205

  13. Inhaled tobacco sterols: uptake by the lungs and disposition to selected organs of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, W.E.; Maier, J.M.; Liebler, J.M.; Malinow, M.R.

    1988-08-01

    Tobacco sterols (cholesterol, beta-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol) are present in tobacco smoke and appear in plasma of mammals exposed to cigarette smoke. Because tobacco sterols may be important in the pathogenesis of smoking-induced lung and vascular diseases, we studied the pattern of deposition of cigarette sterols in the lungs and appearance of cigarette sterols in plasma and body organs of rats. After exposure to twenty 5 ml puffs of smoke from tobacco labeled with (4-/sup 14/C)cholesterol or beta-(4-/sup 14/C)sitosterol, rats were killed just after exposure (day 0) and on days 2, 5, 8, 11, 15, and 30, and the lungs and selected body organs analyzed for activity. We found that cigarette sterols are associated with particulates in cigarette smoke, deposited mostly in distal airspaces and parenchyma of the lungs, and appear in plasma and several body organs for more than 30 days after this single exposure to cigarette smoke. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid contained relatively small amounts of radiolabel for only the first few days, suggesting that most of the sterols were rapidly incorporated in lung parenchyma. Because disorders of sterol metabolism have been implicated in a variety of diseases including atherosclerosis and cancer, the significance of tobacco sterols to human smoking-induced diseases deserves further study.

  14. Effect of plant sterols and tannins on Phytophthora ramorum growth and sporulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acquisition of plant sterols, mediated via elicitins, is required for growth and sporulation of Phytophthora spp. In this paper, we looked at the interaction between elicitins, sterols, and tannins. When ground leaf tissue was added to growth media, P. ramorum growth and sporulation was greates...

  15. A potential biochemical mechanism underlying the influence of sterol deprivation stress on Caenorhabditis elegans longevity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the biochemical mechanism for sterol-mediated alteration in aging in Caenorhabditis elegans, we established sterol depletion conditions by treating worms with azacoprostane, which reduced mean lifespan of adult C. elegans by 35%. Proteomic analyses of egg proteins from treated and un...

  16. Applying Clustering and Phylogeny Analysis to Study Dinoflagellates based on Sterol Composition.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sterol compositions of dinoflagellates have been studied for several decades as a means of assessing whether certain species possess unique chemical biomarkers. However, no attempt has been made to compile the results from numerous studies to examine how sterol compositions may relate to the phylog...

  17. Regulation of Sterol Content in Membranes by Subcellular Compartmentation of Steryl-Esters Accumulating in a Sterol-Overproducing Tobacco Mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Gondet, L.; Bronner, R.; Benveniste, P.

    1994-01-01

    The study of sterol overproduction in tissues of LAB 1-4 mutant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Xanthi) (P. Maillot-Vernier, H. Schaller, P. Benveniste, G. Belliard [1989] Biochem Biophys Res Commun 165: 125-130) over several generations showed that the overproduction phenotype is stable in calli, with a 10-fold stimulation of sterol content when compared with wild-type calli. However, leaves of LAB 1-4 plants obtained after two steps of self-fertilization were characterized by a mere 3-fold stimulation, whereas calli obtained from these plants retained a typical sterol-overproducing mutant phenotype (i.e. a 10-fold increase of sterol content). These results suggest that the expression of the LAB 1-4 phenotype is dependent on the differentiation state of cells. Most of the sterols accumulating in the mutant tissues were present as steryl-esters, which were minor species in wild-type tissues. Subcellular fractionation showed that in both mutant and wild-type tissues, free sterols were associated mainly with microsomal membranes. In contrast, the bulk of steryl-esters present in mutant tissues was found in the soluble fraction of cells. Numerous lipid droplets were detected in the hyaloplasm of LAB 1-4 cells by cytochemical and cytological techniques. After isolation, these lipid granules were shown to contain steryl-esters. These results show that the overproduced sterols of mutant tissues accumulate as steryl-esters in hyaloplasmic bodies. The esterification process thus allows regulation of the amount of free sterols in membranes by subcellular compartmentation. PMID:12232218

  18. Fungal genomes mining to discover novel sterol esterases and lipases as catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sterol esterases and lipases are enzymes able to efficiently catalyze synthesis and hydrolysis reactions of both sterol esters and triglycerides and due to their versatility could be widely used in different industrial applications. Lipases with this ability have been reported in the yeast Candida rugosa that secretes several extracellular enzymes with a high level of sequence identity, although different substrate specificity. This versatility has also been found in the sterol esterases from the ascomycetes Ophiostoma piceae and Melanocarpus albomyces. Results In this work we present an in silico search of new sterol esterase and lipase sequences from the genomes of environmental fungi. The strategy followed included identification and search of conserved domains from these versatile enzymes, phylogenetic studies, sequence analysis and 3D modeling of the selected candidates. Conclusions Six potential putative enzymes were selected and their kinetic properties and substrate selectivity are discussed on the basis of their similarity with previously characterized sterol esterases/lipases with known structures. PMID:24138290

  19. Serum lipid and antioxidant responses in hypercholesterolemic men and women receiving plant sterol esters vary by apolipoprotein E genotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant sterol esters reduce serum total cholesterol (TC) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), but with striking inter-individual variability. In this randomized, double-blind, controlled study, serum lipid, plant sterol, fat-soluble vitamin, and carotenoid responses to plant sterols were studied according to...

  20. Mechanisms and genetic determinants regulating sterol absorption, circulating LDL levels, and sterol elimination: implications for classification and disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Calandra, Sebastiano; Tarugi, Patrizia; Speedy, Helen E.; Dean, Andrew F.; Bertolini, Stefano; Shoulders, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    This review integrates historical biochemical and modern genetic findings that underpin our understanding of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) dyslipidemias that bear on human disease. These range from life-threatening conditions of infancy through severe coronary heart disease of young adulthood, to indolent disorders of middle- and old-age. We particularly focus on the biological aspects of those gene mutations and variants that impact on sterol absorption and hepatobiliary excretion via specific membrane transporter systems (NPC1L1, ABCG5/8); the incorporation of dietary sterols (MTP) and of de novo synthesized lipids (HMGCR, TRIB1) into apoB-containing lipoproteins (APOB) and their release into the circulation (ANGPTL3, SARA2, SORT1); and receptor-mediated uptake of LDL and of intestinal and hepatic-derived lipoprotein remnants (LDLR, APOB, APOE, LDLRAP1, PCSK9, IDOL). The insights gained from integrating the wealth of genetic data with biological processes have important implications for the classification of clinical and presymptomatic diagnoses of traditional LDL dyslipidemias, sitosterolemia, and newly emerging phenotypes, as well as their management through both nutritional and pharmaceutical means. PMID:21862702

  1. Mechanisms and genetic determinants regulating sterol absorption, circulating LDL levels, and sterol elimination: implications for classification and disease risk.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Sebastiano; Tarugi, Patrizia; Speedy, Helen E; Dean, Andrew F; Bertolini, Stefano; Shoulders, Carol C

    2011-11-01

    This review integrates historical biochemical and modern genetic findings that underpin our understanding of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) dyslipidemias that bear on human disease. These range from life-threatening conditions of infancy through severe coronary heart disease of young adulthood, to indolent disorders of middle- and old-age. We particularly focus on the biological aspects of those gene mutations and variants that impact on sterol absorption and hepatobiliary excretion via specific membrane transporter systems (NPC1L1, ABCG5/8); the incorporation of dietary sterols (MTP) and of de novo synthesized lipids (HMGCR, TRIB1) into apoB-containing lipoproteins (APOB) and their release into the circulation (ANGPTL3, SARA2, SORT1); and receptor-mediated uptake of LDL and of intestinal and hepatic-derived lipoprotein remnants (LDLR, APOB, APOE, LDLRAP1, PCSK9, IDOL). The insights gained from integrating the wealth of genetic data with biological processes have important implications for the classification of clinical and presymptomatic diagnoses of traditional LDL dyslipidemias, sitosterolemia, and newly emerging phenotypes, as well as their management through both nutritional and pharmaceutical means. PMID:21862702

  2. Lessons from modENCODE.

    PubMed

    Brown, James B; Celniker, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    The modENCODE (Model Organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) Consortium aimed to map functional elements-including transcripts, chromatin marks, regulatory factor binding sites, and origins of DNA replication-in the model organisms Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. During its five-year span, the consortium conducted more than 2,000 genome-wide assays in developmentally staged animals, dissected tissues, and homogeneous cell lines. Analysis of these data sets provided foundational insights into genome, epigenome, and transcriptome structure and the evolutionary turnover of regulatory pathways. These studies facilitated a comparative analysis with similar data types produced by the ENCODE Consortium for human cells. Genome organization differs drastically in these distant species, and yet quantitative relationships among chromatin state, transcription, and cotranscriptional RNA processing are deeply conserved. Of the many biological discoveries of the modENCODE Consortium, we highlight insights that emerged from integrative studies. We focus on operational and scientific lessons that may aid future projects of similar scale or aims in other, emerging model systems. PMID:26133010

  3. Fecal sterols, seasonal variability, and probable sources along the ring of cenotes, Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arcega-Cabrera, F; Velázquez-Tavera, N; Fargher, L; Derrien, M; Noreña-Barroso, E

    2014-11-01

    Rapid development in Yucatan has had a dramatic impact on the environment, especially the water supply. Groundwater is the only source of water in Yucatan, since surface water is virtually absent due to the karstic nature of the soil. The ring of cenotes (RC) is a geological feature which functions as a source of water and as nodes in the underground river system that canalizes water towards the coast. Numerous productive and domestic activities take place around the RC in the absence of wastewater treatment or sewage systems. Consequently, a number of researchers have hypothesized that pollutants could migrate from the land surface to the underlying aquifer and, eventually, to the coast. Therefore, the present study investigates the relationship among sources of fecal sterols and their levels in cenotes, using the expected levels of fecal sterols obtained by a spatial analysis of the sources and a Pollution Source Index. Accordingly, expected levels are compared with the detected levels of fecal sterols in 5 areas around the RC. Regarding levels, observed during a sampling campaign carried out along the RC during September 2011 (rainy season) and May 2012 (dry season), varied from low to high concentrations of sterols (0.5-2396.42 μg g(-1)) and fecal sterols (0.3-1690.18 μg g(-1)). These concentrations showed no relationship between neighboring cenotes, where similar fecal sterol concentrations or gradients were expected. When comparing expected fecal sterols levels with the detected ones, only two of the five analyzed areas concur, suggesting that no clear relationship exists among sources and fecal sterols levels at the regional scale. Multivariate analysis showed that fecal sterols were associated with sterols and fine grain particulates during the rainy season, which suggests co-transport. During the dry season, fecal sterols associated with fine grain particulate and organic matter, which indicates a change to a deposition phenomenon. These findings

  4. Fecal sterols, seasonal variability, and probable sources along the ring of cenotes, Yucatan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcega-Cabrera, F.; Velázquez-Tavera, N.; Fargher, L.; Derrien, M.; Noreña-Barroso, E.

    2014-11-01

    Rapid development in Yucatan has had a dramatic impact on the environment, especially the water supply. Groundwater is the only source of water in Yucatan, since surface water is virtually absent due to the karstic nature of the soil. The ring of cenotes (RC) is a geological feature which functions as a source of water and as nodes in the underground river system that canalizes water towards the coast. Numerous productive and domestic activities take place around the RC in the absence of wastewater treatment or sewage systems. Consequently, a number of researchers have hypothesized that pollutants could migrate from the land surface to the underlying aquifer and, eventually, to the coast. Therefore, the present study investigates the relationship among sources of fecal sterols and their levels in cenotes, using the expected levels of fecal sterols obtained by a spatial analysis of the sources and a Pollution Source Index. Accordingly, expected levels are compared with the detected levels of fecal sterols in 5 areas around the RC. Regarding levels, observed during a sampling campaign carried out along the RC during September 2011 (rainy season) and May 2012 (dry season), varied from low to high concentrations of sterols (0.5-2396.42 μg g- 1) and fecal sterols (0.3-1690.18 μg g- 1). These concentrations showed no relationship between neighboring cenotes, where similar fecal sterol concentrations or gradients were expected. When comparing expected fecal sterols levels with the detected ones, only two of the five analyzed areas concur, suggesting that no clear relationship exists among sources and fecal sterols levels at the regional scale. Multivariate analysis showed that fecal sterols were associated with sterols and fine grain particulates during the rainy season, which suggests co-transport. During the dry season, fecal sterols associated with fine grain particulate and organic matter, which indicates a change to a deposition phenomenon. These findings indicate

  5. The sterol-binding protein Kes1/Osh4p is a regulator of polarized exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Gabriel; Johansen, Jesper; Dighe, Shubha A; Duamel, Giselle; Kozminski, Keith G; Beh, Christopher T

    2011-11-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related protein Kes1/ Osh4p is implicated in nonvesicular sterol transfer between membranes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, we found that Osh4p associated with exocytic vesicles that move from the mother cell into the bud, where Osh4p facilitated vesicle docking by the exocyst tethering complex at sites of polarized growth on the plasma membrane. Osh4p formed complexes with the small GTPases Cdc42p, Rho1p and Sec4p, and the exocyst complex subunit Sec6p, which was also required for Osh4p association with vesicles. Although Osh4p directly affected polarized exocytosis, its role in sterol trafficking was less clear. Contrary to what is predicted for a sterol-transfer protein, inhibition of sterol binding by the Osh4p Y97F mutation did not cause its inactivation. Rather, OSH4(Y97F) is a gain-of-function mutation that causes dominant lethality. We propose that in response to sterol binding and release Osh4p promotes efficient exocytosis through the co-ordinate regulation of Sac1p, a phosphoinositide 4-phosphate (PI4P) phosphatase, and the exocyst complex. These results support a model in which Osh4p acts as a sterol-dependent regulator of polarized vesicle transport, as opposed to being a sterol-transfer protein. PMID:21819498

  6. Lipid-lowering Activity of Natural and Semi-Synthetic Sterols and Stanols.

    PubMed

    Taha, Dhiaa A; Wasan, Ellen K; Wasan, Kishor M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of plant sterols/ stanols has long been demonstrated to reduce plasma cholesterol levels. The objective of this review is to demonstrate the lipid-lowering activity and anti-atherogenic effects of natural and semi-synthetic plant sterols/ stanols based on evidence from cell-culture studies, animal studies and clinical trials. Additionally, this review highlights certain molecular mechanisms by which plant sterols/ stanols lower plasma cholesterol levels with a special emphasis on factors that affect the cholesterol-lowering activity of plant sterols/stanols. The crystalline nature and the poor oil solubility of these natural products could be important factors that limit their cholesterol-lowering efficiency. Several attempts have been made to improve the cholesterol-lowering activity by enhancing the bioavailability of crystalline sterols and stanols. Approaches involved reduction of the crystal size and/or esterification with fatty acids from vegetable or fish oils. However, the most promising approach in this context is the chemical modification of plant sterols /stanols into water soluble disodium ascorbyl phytostanyl phosphates analogue by esterification with ascorbic acid. This novel semi-synthetic stanol derivative has improved efficacy over natural plant sterols/ stanols and can provide additional benefits by combining the cholesterol-lowering properties of plant stanols with the antioxidant potential of ascorbic acid. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page. PMID:26626241

  7. Genome profiling of sterol synthesis shows convergent evolution in parasites and guides chemotherapeutic attack

    PubMed Central

    Fügi, Matthias A.; Gunasekera, Kapila; Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Guan, Xueli; Wenk, Markus R.; Mäser, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Sterols are an essential class of lipids in eukaryotes, where they serve as structural components of membranes and play important roles as signaling molecules. Sterols are also of high pharmacological significance: cholesterol-lowering drugs are blockbusters in human health, and inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis are widely used as antifungals. Inhibitors of ergosterol synthesis are also being developed for Chagas’s disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we develop an in silico pipeline to globally evaluate sterol metabolism and perform comparative genomics. We generate a library of hidden Markov model-based profiles for 42 sterol biosynthetic enzymes, which allows expressing the genomic makeup of a given species as a numerical vector. Hierarchical clustering of these vectors functionally groups eukaryote proteomes and reveals convergent evolution, in particular metabolic reduction in obligate endoparasites. We experimentally explore sterol metabolism by testing a set of sterol biosynthesis inhibitors against trypanosomatids, Plasmodium falciparum, Giardia, and mammalian cells, and by quantifying the expression levels of sterol biosynthetic genes during the different life stages of T. cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei. The phenotypic data correlate with genomic makeup for simvastatin, which showed activity against trypanosomatids. Other findings, such as the activity of terbinafine against Giardia, are not in agreement with the genotypic profile. PMID:24627128

  8. Roles of Sterol Derivatives in Regulating the Properties of Phospholipid Bilayer Systems.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tham Thi; Suga, Keishi; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-21

    Liposomes are considered an ideal biomimetic environment and are potential functional carriers for important molecules such as steroids and sterols. With respect to the regulation of self-assembly via sterol insertion, several pathways such as the sterol biosynthesis pathway are affected by the physicochemical properties of the membranes. However, the behavior of steroid or sterol molecules (except cholesterol (Chl)) in the self-assembled membranes has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, to analyze the fundamental behavior of steroid molecules in fluid membranes, Chl, lanosterol, and ergosterol were used as representative sterols in order to clarify how they regulate the physicochemical properties of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) liposomes. Membrane properties such as surface membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, surface membrane polarity, inner membrane polarity, and inner membrane fluidity were investigated using fluorescent probes, including 1-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, 6-propionyl-2-(dimethylamino) naphthalene, 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene, and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. The results indicated that each sterol derivative could regulate the membrane properties in different ways. Specifically, Chl successfully increased the packing of the DOPC/Chl membrane proportional to its concentration, and lanosterol and ergosterol showed lower efficiencies in ordering the membrane in hydrophobic regions. Given the different binding positions of the probes in the membranes, the differences in membrane properties reflected the relationship between sterol derivatives and their locations in the membrane. PMID:27158923

  9. Cyclopropyl Sterol and Phospholipid Composition of Membrane Fractions from Maize Roots Treated with Fenpropimorph

    PubMed Central

    Grandmougin, Anne; Bouvier-Navé, Pierrette; Ullmann, Pascaline; Benveniste, Pierre; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée

    1989-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) caryopses were grown in the presence of fenpropimorph, a systemic fungicide, for 7 days in the dark. Membrane fractions enriched, respectively, in endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, and mitochondria were isolated from control and treated maize roots and analyzed for their free sterol, phospholipid, and fatty acid composition. In treated plants, the intracellular distribution of free sterols was dramatically modified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The normally occurring Δ5-sterols disappeared almost completely and were replaced by 9β, 19-cyclopropyl sterols, mainly cycloeucalenol and 24-methyl pollinastanol. These new compounds were found to accumulate in all the membrane fractions in such a way that the endoplasmic reticulum-rich fraction became the richest one in free sterols instead of the plasma membrane. In contrast, the fenpropimorph treatment of maize roots was shown not to affect either the relative proportions or the amounts of the individual phospholipids, but an increase in the unsaturation index of phospholipid-fatty acyl chains of the endoplasmic reticulum-rich fraction was observed. The present data suggest that, in higher plant membranes, cyclopropyl sterols could play a structural role similar to that of the bulk of Δ5-sterols. PMID:16666813

  10. Cell-free transfer of sterols by plant fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Morre, D.J.; Wilkinson, F.E.; Morre, D.M. ); Moreau, P. ); Sandelius, A.S. ); Penel, C.; Greppin, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Microsomes from etiolated hypocotyls of soybean or leaves of light-grown spinach radiolabeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)acetate or in vitro with ({sup 3}H)squalene or ({sup 3}H)cholesterol as donor transferred radioactivity to unlabeled acceptor membranes immobilized on nitrocellulose. Most efficient transfer was with plasma membrane or tonoplast as the acceptor. The latter were highly purified by aqueous two-phase partition (plasma membrane) and preparative free-flow electrophoresis (tonoplast and plasma membrane). Plasma membrane- and tonoplast-free microsomes and purified mitochondria were less efficient acceptors. Sterol transfer was verified by thin-layer chromatography of extracted lipids. Transfer was time- and temperature-dependent, required ATP but was not promoted by cytosol. The nature of the donor (endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus or both) and of the transfer mechanism is under investigation.

  11. Sterols and triterpenes in cell culture of Hyssopus officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Zuzanna; Wysokińska, Halina

    2003-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures from hypocotyl-derived callus of Hyssopus officinalis were found to produce two sterols i. e. beta-sitosterol (1) and stigmasterol (2), as well as several known pentacyclic triterpenes with an oleanene and ursene skeleton. The triterpenes were identified as oleanolic acid (3), ursolic acid (4), 2alpha,3beta-dihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (5), 2alpha,3beta-dihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (6), 2alpha,3beta,24-trihydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid (7), and 2alpha,3beta,24-trihydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid (8). Compounds 5-8 were isolated as their acetates (6, 8) or bromolactone acetates (5, 7). PMID:12872919

  12. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry study of sterols from Pinus elliotti tissues.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Evans, R.; Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    A comparative study of the sterol components of slash pine (Pinus elliotti) callus tissue cultures, seeds, and seedlings was carried out using GC-MS techniques. Cholesterol, desmosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol and cycloeucalenol were identified in all tissues while lophenol and 24-methylenelophenol were identified in only the seed and seedlings. 24-Ethylidenelophenol was detected in trace concentrations in only the seedlings. Sitosterol was the predominant sterol component, i.e., 80.8, 38.1 and 47.8% of the tissue culture, seed and seedling sterols, respectively.

  13. Genetic deletion of low density lipoprotein receptor impairs sterol-induced mouse macrophage ABCA1 expression. A new SREBP1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoye; He, Wei; Huang, Zhiping; Gotto, Antonio M; Hajjar, David P; Han, Jihong

    2008-01-25

    Low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mutations cause familial hypercholesterolemia and early atherosclerosis. ABCA1 facilitates free cholesterol efflux from peripheral tissues. We investigated the effects of LDLR deletion (LDLR(-/-)) on ABCA1 expression. LDLR(-/-) macrophages had reduced basal levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux. A high fat diet increased cholesterol in LDLR(-/-) macrophages but not wild type cells. A liver X receptor (LXR) agonist induced expression of ABCA1, ABCG1, and cholesterol efflux in both LDLR(-/-) and wild type macrophages, whereas expression of LXRalpha or LXRbeta was similar. Interestingly, oxidized LDL induced more ABCA1 in wild type macrophages than LDLR(-/-) cells. LDL induced ABCA1 expression in wild type cells but inhibited it in LDLR(-/-) macrophages in a concentration-dependent manner. However, lipoproteins regulated ABCG1 expression similarly in LDLR(-/-) and wild type macrophages. Cholesterol or oxysterols induced ABCA1 expression in wild type macrophages but had little or inhibitory effects on ABCA1 expression in LDLR(-/-) macrophages. Active sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1a (SREBP1a) inhibited ABCA1 promoter activity in an LXRE-dependent manner and decreased both macrophage ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. Expression of ABCA1 in animal tissues was inversely correlated to active SREBP1. Oxysterols inactivated SREBP1 in wild type macrophages but not in LDLR(-/-) cells. Oxysterol synergized with nonsteroid LXR ligand induced ABCA1 expression in wild type macrophages but blocked induction in LDLR(-/-) cells. Taken together, our studies suggest that LDLR is critical in the regulation of cholesterol efflux and ABCA1 expression in macrophage. Lack of the LDLR impairs sterol-induced macrophage ABCA1 expression by a sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1-dependent mechanism that can result in reduced cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in macrophages under hypercholesterolemic conditions

  14. An SREBP-responsive microRNA operon contributes to a regulatory loop for intracellular lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Tae-Il; Esquejo, Ryan M; Roqueta-Rivera, Manuel; Phelan, Peter E; Moon, Young-Ah; Govindarajan, Subramaniam S; Esau, Christine C; Osborne, Timothy F

    2013-07-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) have evolved as a focal point for linking lipid synthesis with other pathways that regulate cell growth and survival. Here, we have uncovered a polycistrionic microRNA (miRNA) locus that is activated directly by SREBP-2. Two of the encoded miRNAs, miR-182 and miR-96, negatively regulate the expression of Fbxw7 and Insig-2, respectively, and both are known to negatively affect nuclear SREBP accumulation. Direct manipulation of this miRNA pathway alters nuclear SREBP levels and endogenous lipid synthesis. Thus, we have uncovered a mechanism for the regulation of intracellular lipid metabolism mediated by the concerted action of a pair of miRNAs that are expressed from the same SREBP-2-regulated miRNA locus, and each targets a different protein of the multistep pathway that regulates SREBP function. These studies reveal an miRNA "operon" analogous to the classic model for genetic control in bacterial regulatory systems. PMID:23823476

  15. Mutations in UDP-Glucose:sterol glucosyltransferase in Arabidopsis cause transparent testa phenotype and suberization defect in seeds.

    PubMed

    DeBolt, Seth; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Schrick, Kathrin; Auer, Manfred; Beisson, Fred; Bischoff, Volker; Bouvier-Navé, Pierrette; Carroll, Andrew; Hematy, Kian; Li, Yonghua; Milne, Jennifer; Nair, Meera; Schaller, Hubert; Zemla, Marcin; Somerville, Chris

    2009-09-01

    In higher plants, the most abundant sterol derivatives are steryl glycosides (SGs) and acyl SGs. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains two genes, UGT80A2 and UGT80B1, that encode UDP-Glc:sterol glycosyltransferases, enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of SGs. Lines having mutations in UGT80A2, UGT80B1, or both UGT80A2 and UGT8B1 were identified and characterized. The ugt80A2 lines were viable and exhibited relatively minor effects on plant growth. Conversely, ugt80B1 mutants displayed an array of phenotypes that were pronounced in the embryo and seed. Most notable was the finding that ugt80B1 was allelic to transparent testa15 and displayed a transparent testa phenotype and a reduction in seed size. In addition to the role of UGT80B1 in the deposition of flavanoids, a loss of suberization of the seed was apparent in ugt80B1 by the lack of autofluorescence at the hilum region. Moreover, in ugt80B1, scanning and transmission electron microscopy reveals that the outer integument of the seed coat lost the electron-dense cuticle layer at its surface and displayed altered cell morphology. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of lipid polyester monomers confirmed a drastic decrease in aliphatic suberin and cutin-like polymers that was associated with an inability to limit tetrazolium salt uptake. The findings suggest a membrane function for SGs and acyl SGs in trafficking of lipid polyester precursors. An ancillary observation was that cellulose biosynthesis was unaffected in the double mutant, inconsistent with a predicted role for SGs in priming cellulose synthesis. PMID:19641030

  16. Sterol Carrier Protein-2, a Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein, in Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking in Testicular Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nancy C.; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2), also called nonspecific lipid-transfer protein, is thought to play a major role in intracellular lipid transport and metabolism, and it has been associated with diseases involving abnormalities in lipid trafficking, such as Zellweger syndrome. The Scp2 gene encodes the 58 kDa sterol carrier protein-x (SCPX) and 15 kDa pro-SCP2 proteins, both of which contain a 13 kDa SCP2 domain in their C-termini. We found that 22-NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol and a preferred SCP2 ligands, was not localized in the peroxisomes. This raises questions about previous reports on the localization of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins and their relationship to peroxisomes and mitochondria in intracellular cholesterol transport. Immunofluorescent staining of cryosections of mouse testis and of MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells showed that SCPX and SCP2 are present in both mouse testicular interstitial tissue and in MA-10 cells. Fluorescent fusion proteins of SCPX and SCP2, as well as confocal live-cell imaging, were used to investigate the subcellular targeting of these proteins and the function of the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence. The results showed that SCPX and SCP2 are targeted to the peroxisomes by the C-terminal PTS1 domain, but the putative N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence alone is not potent enough to localize SCPX and SCP2 to the mitochondria. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies indicated that the SCP2 domain binds cholesterol, but lacks specificity of the binding and/or transport. These findings further our understanding of the role of SCPX and SCP2 in intracellular cholesterol transport, and present a new point of view on the role of these proteins in cholesterol trafficking. PMID:26901662

  17. Sterol Carrier Protein-2, a Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein, in Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking in Testicular Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nancy C; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2), also called nonspecific lipid-transfer protein, is thought to play a major role in intracellular lipid transport and metabolism, and it has been associated with diseases involving abnormalities in lipid trafficking, such as Zellweger syndrome. The Scp2 gene encodes the 58 kDa sterol carrier protein-x (SCPX) and 15 kDa pro-SCP2 proteins, both of which contain a 13 kDa SCP2 domain in their C-termini. We found that 22-NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol and a preferred SCP2 ligands, was not localized in the peroxisomes. This raises questions about previous reports on the localization of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins and their relationship to peroxisomes and mitochondria in intracellular cholesterol transport. Immunofluorescent staining of cryosections of mouse testis and of MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells showed that SCPX and SCP2 are present in both mouse testicular interstitial tissue and in MA-10 cells. Fluorescent fusion proteins of SCPX and SCP2, as well as confocal live-cell imaging, were used to investigate the subcellular targeting of these proteins and the function of the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence. The results showed that SCPX and SCP2 are targeted to the peroxisomes by the C-terminal PTS1 domain, but the putative N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence alone is not potent enough to localize SCPX and SCP2 to the mitochondria. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies indicated that the SCP2 domain binds cholesterol, but lacks specificity of the binding and/or transport. These findings further our understanding of the role of SCPX and SCP2 in intracellular cholesterol transport, and present a new point of view on the role of these proteins in cholesterol trafficking. PMID:26901662

  18. Inhibition of sterol but not fatty acid synthesis by valproate in developing rat brain in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños, J P; Medina, J M; Williamson, D H

    1990-01-01

    The effect of administration of valproate on lipogenesis in the developing rat brain in vivo was studied. Valproate inhibited by 21-38% the rate of 3H2O incorporation into brain sterols, without significantly affecting fatty acid synthesis. Similarly, R-[2-14C]mevalonate incorporation into sterols was inhibited by 33-54%; the low rate of fatty acid synthesis under these conditions was not affected by valproate. Plasma ketone bodies decreased after treatment with valproate. Valproate inhibited (about 50%) both sterol and fatty acid synthesis in livers of weanling rats. It is concluded that valproate can specifically inhibit sterol synthesis in the brain during development, in part at a stage after mevalonate formation, and also by decreased exogenous precursor supply. PMID:2264830

  19. Reminiscences of research on the chemistry and biology of natural sterols in insects, plants and humans

    PubMed Central

    IKEKAWA, Nobuo; FUJIMOTO, Yoshinori; ISHIGURO, Masaji

    2013-01-01

    Natural sterols often occur as a heterogeneous mixture of homologs, which had disturbed the progress of steroid research. Development and application of GC methodology overcame this difficulty and enabled us to obtain detailed sterol profiles. Together, fine synthesis of stereo-defined isomers and homologs of steroids having oxygenated side chains allowed us to compare them with natural samples as well as to investigate structure-activity relationship. Advance of HPLC technology also facilitated the determination of the stereochemical structure of naturally occurring steroidal compounds, which were obtained only in minute amounts. This review highlights three topics out of our steroid research that have been performed mainly at Tokyo Institute of Technology around 1970–1990. These are sterol metabolism in insects focusing on the mechanism of the conversion of plant sterols to cholesterol and ecdysone biosynthesis, the synthesis and biochemical research of active forms of vitamin D3 derivatives, and the synthesis and microanalysis of plant hormone brassinosteroids. PMID:24126284

  20. Major Sterol Fluxes in Sinking Particles and Surface Sediments in the Cariaco Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodworth, M. P.; Goni, M. A.; Thunell, R.; Tappa, E.; Astor, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Sterols in sediments are used to trace past ecosystem dynamics in the upper ocean. It is therefore important to know what factors control the creation of sterol fluxes, degradation of sterols in the water column and eventual burial in the sediments. To this end we examined the major sterols fluxes in sediment traps during 1996-1997 (at depths of 275, 455 and 975m) and surface sediments in the Cariaco Basin. Sterol flux data in the sediment traps were compared with hydrographic data collected as part of the CARIACO Project. Diatom sterols 24-methylcholesta-5,22-dien-3b-ol (brassicasterol), 24-methylcholesta-5,24(28)-dien-3b-ol (24methlyene-cholesterol) fluxes were greatest during upwelling. 24methlyene-cholesterol was well correlated with biogenic opal flux (r2 = 0.88) suggesting that 24methlyene-cholesterol is an excellent biomarker for diatom production. 4a,23,24-trimethyl-5a(H)-cholest-22-en-3b-ol (dinosterol) exhibited a post upwelling maximum indicating that fluxes of dinoflagellate-derived materials were dominant during stratified conditions. Sterols were degraded with depth but the relative composition of the major sterols remained fairly constant. There is a sharp decrease in the magnitude of total sterol fluxes between the sediment traps (955m; 143 ug m-2 d-1) and the surface sediments (core depth 460m; 11.7 ug m-2 -1) indicating that a large portion of the flux is lost at the sediment water interface. It is at this transition in which the relative compositions of the sterols are also altered. Dinosterol, which is a minor component of the sediment trap fluxes, is 3 to 4 times greater than that of cholesterol in the sediment. While the ratio of dinosterol to cholesterol changed significantly, the ratio between the two diatom sterol fluxes, brassicasterol and 24methlyene-cholesterol, and cholesterol remained within the range of values observed in the sediment traps.

  1. Excretion of sterols from the skin of normal and hypercholesterolemic humans

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Ashim K.; Connor, William E.; Spector, Arthur A.

    1972-01-01

    The 24 hr sterol excretion from the entire skin surface was determined in six normal and five hypercholesterolemic (Type II) patients fed a controlled, eucaloric diet containing 400 mg of plant sterols. All subjects received radiolabeled cholesterol intravenously in order to measure cholesterol turnover and exchange. The 24 hr skin surface lipids were collected subsequently at intervals of 7-10 days. Sterols were quantified and identified by a combination of thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatographic methods. The mean 24 hr excretion of cholesterol in milligrams was 82.6 in the normal subjects and 82.7 in the hypercholesterolemic patients. Cholesterol constituted 89% of the total sterol excretion through the skin surface in both groups. The specific radioactivity of cholesterol in the skin surface lipids increased gradually after the intravenous administration of the isotope. Within 4-5 wk the specific activity equaled and then remained higher than that of the plasma up to 10 wk. These specific activity curves suggested that, for at least some of skin surface cholesterol, there was a precursor-product relationship between the plasma cholesterol and the skin cholesterol. The presence of plant sterols, β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol in the skin surface lipids of man has not been reported previously. We identified these sterols in the skin surface lipids of all of our subjects. They constituted about 7% of the total skin surface sterols. The occurrence of plant sterols in the skin surface lipids suggested that plasma sterols were transferred from the plasma into the skin. 1-2% of the skin surface sterols were tentatively identified as lathosterol and lanosterol. The present study documented that a significant amount of cholesterol was excreted from the skin surface and that probably there was a net transfer of plasma cholesterol into the skin surface lipids. Both normal subjects and hypercholesterolemic patients excreted similar amounts of cholesterol per

  2. Expression and purification of two recombinant sterol-carrier proteins: SCPX and SCP2.

    PubMed

    Manfra, D J; Baum, C L; Reschley, E; Lundell, D; Zavodny, P; Dalie, B

    1995-04-01

    We report the cloning, expression, and purification of the rat sterol carrier proteins SCPX and SCP2. The cDNA's encoding rat SCPX and SCP2 were isolated from a lambda gt11 rat liver cDNA library. To maximize expression and to facilitate the purification of the recombinant proteins, the SCPX and SCP2 proteins were expressed as carboxy-terminal fusion proteins to the glutathione S-transferase (GST). The GST-SCPX and GST-SCP2 fusion proteins contained a thrombin recognition site between the GST and SCPX or SCP2 polypeptides. The expression of the fusion proteins was controlled by the inducible tac promoter. Under optimal conditions, the approximately 85-kDa GST-SCPX and the approximately 41-kDa GST-SCP2 proteins represented approximately 1-2% of the total cell lysate. Both fusion proteins were easily purified under nondenaturing conditions from the soluble fraction of total cell lysate by glutathione-Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography. Thrombin cleavage resulted in the release of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins from the GST-SCPX and GST-SCP2 fusions, respectively. Amino terminal protein sequencing confirmed the authenticity of the recombinant proteins. Furthermore, functional assay revealed that recombinant SCP2 is highly active in facilitating the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol. Recombinant SCPX is also active in this assay but only 50% as active as SCP2. We anticipate that the preparation and purification techniques described in this study will facilitate further biochemical characterization of these proteins. PMID:7606169

  3. Identification of ergosterol and inhibition of sterol synthesis by. Delta. sup 5 -sterols in GL7, an auxotrophic mutant of yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanuka, I.C.

    1988-01-01

    Synthesis of ergosterol was demonstrated in the GL7 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This sterol auxotroph has been thought to lack the ability to synthesize sterols due both to the absence of 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclase and to a heme deficiency eliminating cytochrome P-450 which is required in demethylation at C-14. However, when the exogenous sterol was 5{alpha}-cholestan-3{beta}-ol, 5{alpha}-cholest-8(14)-en-3{beta}-ol, or 24{beta}-methyl-5{alpha}-cholest-8(14)-en-3{beta}-ol, sterol synthesis was found to proceed yielding 1-3 fg/cell of ergosterol. Ergosterol was identified by mass spectroscopy, gas and high performance liquid chromatography, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and radioactive labelling from ({sup 3}H)acetate. Except for some cholest-5-en-3{beta}-ol (cholesterol) which was derived from the 5{alpha}-cholestan-3{beta}-ol, the stanol and the two 8(14)-stenols were not significantly metabolized confirming the absence of an isomerase for migration of the double bond from C-8(14) to C-7. Drastic reduction of ergosterol synthesis to not more than 0.06 fg/cell was observed when the exogenous sterol either had a double bond at C-5, as in the case of cholesterol, or could be metabolized to a sterol with such a bond. Thus, both 5{alpha}-cholest-8(9)-en-3{beta}-ol and 5{alpha}-cholest-7-en-3{beta}-ol (lathosterol) were converted to cholesta-5,7-dien-3{beta}-ol (7-dehydrocholesterol), and the presence of the latter dienol depressed the level of ergosterol.

  4. Influence of salinity and natural organic matter on the solid phase extraction of sterols and stanols: application to the determination of the human sterol fingerprint in aqueous matrices.

    PubMed

    Jeanneau, L; Jardé, E; Gruau, G

    2011-05-01

    Faecal sterols have been proposed as direct chemical markers for the determination of faecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. In this study, we assess the impact of (a) the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), (b) the nature of DOC, (c) the salinity and (d) the concentration of sterols and stanols on their solid phase extraction. When natural organic matter (NOM) is modelled by humic acid, increasing DOC concentration from 2.7 to 15.4 mg/L has no significant impact on the recovery of sterols and stanols. The modelling of NOM by a mixture of humic acid and succinoglycan induces a significant (24%) decrease in the recovery of sterols and stanols. For all concentrations of target compounds, no significant increase in recovery is associated with increasing the salinity. Moreover, an increase in the recovery of target compounds is induced by an increase in their concentration. The nine target compounds and the recovery standard (RS) exhibit the same behaviour during the extraction step. Thus, we propose that (a) the concentration of target compounds can be corrected by the RS to calculate more realistic concentrations without modifying their profile and (b) the sterol fingerprint can be investigated in the colloidal fraction of aqueous samples without altering the information it could provide about the source. The application of this analytical method to waste water treatment plant influent and effluents yields results in agreement with previous studies concerning the use of those compounds to differentiate between sources of faecal contamination. We conclude that this analytical method is fully applicable to the determination of sterol fingerprints in the dissolved phase (<0.7 μm) of natural aqueous samples. PMID:21420686

  5. Foliar Sterols in Soybeans Exposed to Chronic Levels of Ozone 1

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Claus; Endress, Anton G.

    1985-01-01

    Soybeans (Glycine max) exposed to chronic levels of ozone showed a linear decrease in biomass with increasing concentration. The foliar free sterols increased while the steryl ester, and the steryl glycosides, a minor component, decreased with increasing pollutant concentration. Of the free sterols, stigmasterol showed the largest increase, followed by sitosterol; campesterol, however, decreased. All steryl esters decreased; sitosterol showed the largest decrease and campesterol the least. PMID:16664020

  6. Integrating sequence, evolution and functional genomics in regulatory genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vingron, Martin; Brazma, Alvis; Coulson, Richard; van Helden, Jacques; Manke, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Sand, Olivier; Ukkonen, Esko

    2009-01-01

    With genome analysis expanding from the study of genes to the study of gene regulation, 'regulatory genomics' utilizes sequence information, evolution and functional genomics measurements to unravel how regulatory information is encoded in the genome. PMID:19226437

  7. The role of regulatory genes nifA, vnfA, anfA, nfrX, ntrC, and rpoN in expression of genes encoding the three nitrogenases of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, J; Toukdarian, A; Kennedy, C

    1994-01-01

    Several regulatory gene mutants of Azotobacter vinelandii were tested for ability to synthesize functional nitrogenase-1 (Nif phenotype), nitrogenase-2 (Vnf), or nitrogenase-3 (Anf). While nifA mutants were Nif-, Vnf+, and Anf+/-, and ntrC mutants were Nif+, Vnf+, and Anf+, nifA ntrC double mutants were Nif-, Vnf-, and Anf-. A vnfA mutant was Nif+, Vnf+/-, and Anf+/-, and an anfA strain was Nif+, Vnf+, and Anf-. lacZ fusions in the nifH, vnfH, vnfD, anfH, and nifM genes of Azotobacter vinelandii were constructed and introduced into wild-type and regulatory mutants of A. vinelandii. Expression of these operons correlated with the growth phenotype of the regulatory mutants. Apparently either NifA or NtrC can activate expression of nifM. Also, expression of the anf operon required the NifA transcriptional activator, although there are no NifA binding sites at appropriate locations upstream of anfH (or anfA). The results confirm previous reports that VnfA and AnfA are required for expression of vnf and anf genes, respectively, and that VnfA is involved in repression of the nifHDK operon in the absence of molybdenum and of the anfHDGK operon in the presence of vanadium. PMID:7872838

  8. Sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki has features that resemble both fungi and animals

    PubMed Central

    Molina, María Celeste; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Uttaro, Antonio D.

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential for several physiological processes in most eukaryotes. Sterols regulate membrane homeostasis and participate in different signalling pathways not only as precursors of steroid hormones and vitamins, but also through its role in the formation of lipid rafts. Two major types of sterols, cholesterol and ergosterol, have been described so far in the opisthokonts, the clade that comprise animals, fungi and their unicellular relatives. Cholesterol predominates in derived bilaterians, whereas ergosterol is what generally defines fungi. We here characterize, by a combination of bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, the sterol metabolism in the filasterean Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of animals that is becoming a model organism. We found that C. owczarzaki sterol metabolism combines enzymatic activities that are usually considered either characteristic of fungi or exclusive to metazoans. Moreover, we observe a differential transcriptional regulation of this metabolism across its life cycle. Thus, C. owczarzaki alternates between synthesizing 7-dehydrocholesterol de novo, which happens at the cystic stage, and the partial conversion—via a novel pathway—of incorporated cholesterol into ergosterol, the characteristic fungal sterol, in the filopodial and aggregative stages. PMID:27383626

  9. Quantitation of fatty acids, sterols, and tocopherols in turpentine (Pistacia terebinthus Chia) growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Mehmet Musa

    2006-10-01

    The chemical composition (fatty acids, tocopherols, and sterols) of the oil from 14 samples of turpentine (Pistacia terebinthus L.) fruits is presented in this study. The oil content of the samples varied in a relatively small range between 38.4 g/100 g and 45.1 g/100 g. The dominating fatty acid of the oil is oleic acid, which accounted for 43.0 to 51.3% of the total fatty acids. The total content of vitamin E active compounds in the oils ranged between 396.8 and 517.7 mg/kg. The predominant isomers were alpha- and gamma-tocopherol, with approximate equal amounts between about 110 and 150 mg/kg. The seed oil of P. terebinthus also contained different tocotrienols, with gamma-tocotrienol as the dominate compound of this group, which amounted to between 79 and 114 mg/kg. The total content of sterols of the oils was determined to be between 1341.3 and 1802.5 mg/kg, with beta-sitosterol as the predominent sterol that accounted for more than 80% of the total amount of sterols. Other sterols in noteworthy amounts were campesterol, Delta5-avenasterol, and stigmasterol, which came to about 3-5% of the total sterols. PMID:17002437

  10. Sterol homeostasis requires regulated degradation of squalene monooxygenase by the ubiquitin ligase Doa10/Teb4

    PubMed Central

    Foresti, Ombretta; Ruggiano, Annamaria; Hannibal-Bach, Hans K; Ejsing, Christer S; Carvalho, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Sterol homeostasis is essential for the function of cellular membranes and requires feedback inhibition of HMGR, a rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. As HMGR acts at the beginning of the pathway, its regulation affects the synthesis of sterols and of other essential mevalonate-derived metabolites, such as ubiquinone or dolichol. Here, we describe a novel, evolutionarily conserved feedback system operating at a sterol-specific step of the mevalonate pathway. This involves the sterol-dependent degradation of squalene monooxygenase mediated by the yeast Doa10 or mammalian Teb4, a ubiquitin ligase implicated in a branch of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway. Since the other branch of ERAD is required for HMGR regulation, our results reveal a fundamental role for ERAD in sterol homeostasis, with the two branches of this pathway acting together to control sterol biosynthesis at different levels and thereby allowing independent regulation of multiple products of the mevalonate pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00953.001 PMID:23898401