Science.gov

Sample records for end-cap module prototype

  1. ROTOR END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1959-02-01

    An improved end cap is described for the cylindrical rotor or bowl of a high-speed centrifugal separator adapted to permit free and efficient continuous counter current flow of gas therethrough for isotope separation. The end cap design provides for securely mounting the same to the hollow central shaft and external wall of the centrifuge. Passageways are incorporated and so arranged as to provide for continuous counter current flow of the light and heavy portions of the gas fed to the centrifuge.

  2. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  3. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  4. Benzonorbornadiene end caps for PMR resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panigot, Michael J.; Waters, John F.; Varde, Uday; Sutter, James K.; Sukenik, Chaim N.

    1992-01-01

    Several ortho-disubstituted benzonorbornadiene derivatives are described. These molecules contain acid, ester, or anhydride functionality permitting their use as end caps in PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimide systems. The replacement of the currently used norbornenyl end caps with benzonorbornadienyl end caps affords resins of increased aromatic content. It also allows evaluation of some mechanistic aspects of PMR cross-linking. Initial testing of N-phenylimide model compounds and of actual resin formulations using the benzonorbornadienyl end cap reveals that they undergo efficient thermal crosslinking to give oligomers with physical properties and thermal stability comparable to commercial norbornene-end-capped PMR systems.

  5. Overlap Technique for End-Cap Seals on Cylindrical Magnetic Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkowski, S.; Adhikari, R. Y.; Boissevain, J.; Daurer, C.; Filippone, B. W.; Hona, B.; Plaster, B.; Woods, D.; Yan, H.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from studies of the effectiveness of an overlap technique for forming a magnetic seal across a gap at the boundary between a cylindrical magnetic shield and an end-cap. In this technique a thin foil of magnetic material overlaps the two surfaces, thereby spanning the gap across the cylinder and the end-cap, with the magnetic seal then formed by clamping the thin magnetic foil to the surfaces of the cylindrical shield and the end-cap on both sides of the gap. In studies with a prototype 31-cm diameter, 91-cm long, 0.16-cm thick cylindrical magnetic shield and flared end-cap, the magnetic shielding performance of our overlap technique is comparable to that obtained with the conventional method in which the end-cap is placed in direct lapped contact with the cylindrical shield via through bolts or screws.

  6. Better End-Cap Processing for Oxidation-Resistant Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2004-01-01

    A class of end-cap compounds that increase the thermo-oxidative stab ility of polyimides of the polymerization of monomeric reactants (PM R) type has been extended. In addition, an improved processing proto col for this class of end-cap compounds has been invented.

  7. Molecular-Weight-Controlled, End-Capped Polybenzimidazoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Novel molecular-weight-controlled end-capped poly(arylene ether benzimidazole)s (PAEBI's) prepared by nucleophilic displacement reaction of di(hydroxyl)benzimidazole monomers with activated aromatic dihalides. Polymers prepared at various molecular weights by upsetting stoichiometry of monomers and end-capped with monohydroxybenzimidazole. Exhibit favorable physical and mechanical properties, improved solubility in polar aprotic solvents and better compression moldability. Potential applications as adhesives, coatings, films, fibers, membranes, moldings, and composite matrix resins.

  8. Functional end-capped conducting poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, V.; Farina, H.; Ortenzi, Marco A.

    2016-05-01

    Methacrylate-terminated Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymers with controlled degree of polymerization were successfully prepared by direct oxidative polycondensation between Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and a cross-linkable methacrylate end-capper monomer, obtained via Friedel Crafts acylation starting from EDOT and Methacryloyl chloride. The new polymer was synthesized in order to overcome the well-known technical problems of PEDOT, i.e. difficult processability and patterning, due to its poor solubility in common organic and inorganic solvents. The chemical structure and the degree of polymerization of the end-capped polymers were determined by 1H NMR spectra. A new synthesis of Methacrylate end-capped PEDOT with controlled degree of polymerization, soluble in common organic and chlorinated solvents and with improved conductivity, 210 S/cm, was performed. This method includes: direct oxidative polycondensation of 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) in the presence of a cross-linkable end-capper, i.e. Methacrylate end-capped EDOT prepared via Friedel Crafts acylation with Methacryloyl chloride and oxidant species, i.e. ferric sulfate. Furthermore, the oxidative polycondensation of EDOT monomer and Methacrylate end-capped EDOT in the presence of Sulfonated Polyethersulfone (SPES)- characterized by different degree of Sulfonation (DS)- as dopant agent was performed, leading to functional end-capped conducting PEDOT, easy to process and pattern, with conductivity of 210 S/cm, 50 S/cm higher than the one of commercial PEDOT.

  9. Hadronic Shower Validation Experience for the ATLAS End-Cap Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryunin, A. E.; Salihagic, D.

    2007-03-19

    Validation of GEANT4 hadronic physics models is carried out by comparing experimental data from beam tests of modules of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters with GEANT4 based simulations. Two physics lists (LHEP and QGSP) for the simulation of hadronic showers are evaluated. Calorimeter performance parameters like the energy resolution and response for charged pions and shapes of showers are studied. Comparison with GEANT3 predictions is done as well.

  10. Processable Polyimides Containing APB and Reactive End Caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.

    2003-01-01

    Imide copolymers that contain 1,3- bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene (APB) and other diamines and dianhydrides and that are terminated with appropriate amounts of reactive end caps have been invented. The reactive end caps investigated thus far include 4-phenylethynyl phthalic anhydride (PEPA), 3- aminophenoxy-4-phenylethynylbenzop henone (3-APEB), maleic anhydride (MA), and 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic anhydride [also known as nadic anhydride (NA)]. The advantage of these copolyimides terminated with reactive groups, relative to other polyimides terminated with reactive groups, is a combination of (1) higher values of desired mechanical-property parameters and (2) greater ease of processing into useful parts.

  11. Reinforcement of silica aerogels using silane-end-capped polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yannan; Jana, Sadhan C; Lama, Bimala; Espe, Matthew P

    2013-05-21

    Proper selection of silane precursors and polymer reinforcements yields more durable and stronger silica aerogels. This paper focuses on the use of silane-end-capped urethane prepolymer and chain-extended polyurethane for reinforcement of silica aerogels. The silane end groups were expected to participate in silica network formation and uniquely determine the amounts of urethanes incorporated into the aerogel network as reinforcement. The aerogels were prepared by one-step sol-gel process from mixed silane precursors tetraethoxysilane, aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and APTES-end-capped polyurethanes. The morphology and mechanical and surface properties of the resultant aerogels were investigated in addition to elucidation of chemical structures by solid-state (13)C and (29)Si nuclear magnetic resonance. Modification by 10 wt % APTES-end-capped chain-extended polyurethane yielded a 5-fold increase in compressive modulus and 60% increase in density. APTES-end-capped chain-extended polyurethane was found to be more effective in enhancement of mechanical properties and reduction of polarity. PMID:23611433

  12. Characterization of geometric isomers of Norbornene end-capped imides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Chang, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    Three geometric isomers from the thermal isomerization of methylene-4,4' bis(endo-N-phenylbicyclo/2.2.1/hept-2-ene-5,6-di carboximide) (I) were chromatographically separated and isolated in order to investigate the thermal cure of norbornene end-capped imide oligomers, which display considerable promise for use in various aerospace adhesive and composite applications. Endo-endo (I), endo-exo (II), and exo-exo (III) configurations were assigned to each compound based on the results of NMR spectroscopy. Several chromatographic, spectroscopic, and thermal techniques were then used to characterize these three isomers which serve as model compounds for norbornene end-capped polyimides. It was found that each compound thermally isomerized to an equilibrium mixture of all three compounds prior to cure. It is proposed that these compounds react by different mechanisms in air and nitrogen.

  13. D-Zero End Cap Calorimeter Inner Vessel Heater Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1990-06-15

    There will be 48 finned strip heaters installed in each end cap calorimeter vessel. The strip heaters were specified and the lowest bid vendor submitted a sample heater which was tested. This engineering note will document specifications of the heater, test procedure used, and results of the test. The finned strip heaters were of stainless steel construction. The lowest bid was $45.00 per heater from TEMPCO Electric Heater Corporation. A sample heater from TEMPCO was inspected, cold shocked tested to -320 F, and found to be acceptable.

  14. The backward end-cap for the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozza, L.; Maas, F. E.; Noll, O.; Rodriguez Pineiro, D.; Valente, R.

    2015-02-01

    The PANDA experiment at the new FAIR facility will cover a broad experimental programme in hadron structure and spectroscopy. As a multipurpose detector, the PANDA spectrometer needs to ensure almost 4π coverage of the scattering solid angle, full and accurate multiple-particle event reconstruction and very good particle identification capabilities. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will be a key item for many of these aspects. Particle energies ranging from some MeVs to several GeVs have to be measured with a relative resolution of 1% ⊕ 2%/√E/GeV . It will be a homogeneous calorimeter made of PbWO4 crystals and will be operated at -25°C, in order to improve the scintillation light yield. With the exception of the very forward section, the light will be detected by large area avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The current pulses from the APDs will be integrated, amplified and shaped by ASIC chips which were developed for this purpose. The whole calorimeter has been designed in three sections: a forward end-cap, a central barrel and a backward end-cap (BWEC). In this contribution, a status report on the development of the BWEC is presented.

  15. A prototype automatic phase compensation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terry, John D.

    1992-01-01

    The growing demands for high gain and accurate satellite communication systems will necessitate the utilization of large reflector systems. One area of concern of reflector based satellite communication is large scale surface deformations due to thermal effects. These distortions, when present, can degrade the performance of the reflector system appreciable. This performance degradation is manifested by a decrease in peak gain, and increase in sidelobe level, and pointing errors. It is essential to compensate for these distortion effects and to maintain the required system performance in the operating space environment. For this reason the development of a technique to offset the degradation effects is highly desirable. Currently, most research is direct at developing better material for the reflector. These materials have a lower coefficient of linear expansion thereby reducing the surface errors. Alternatively, one can minimize the distortion effects of these large scale errors by adaptive phased array compensation. Adaptive phased array techniques have been studied extensively at NASA and elsewhere. Presented in this paper is a prototype automatic phase compensation module designed and built at NASA Lewis Research Center which is the first stage of development for an adaptive array compensation module.

  16. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Meissner, Helmuth E.; Beach, Raymond J.; Bibeau, Camille; Sutton, Steven B.; Mitchell, Scott; Bass, Isaac; Honea, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focussed by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod.

  17. Key Role of End-Capping Groups in Optoelectronic Properties of Poly-p-phenylene Cation Radicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly-p-phenylenes (PPs) are prototype systems for understanding the charge transport in π-conjugated polymers. In a combined computational and experimental study, we demonstrate that the smooth evolution of redox and optoelectronic properties of PP cation radicals toward the polymeric limit can be significantly altered by electron-donating iso-alkyl and iso-alkoxy end-capping groups. A multiparabolic model (MPM) developed and validated here rationalizes this unexpected effect by interplay of the two modes of hole stabilization: due to the framework of equivalent p-phenylene units and due to the electron-donating end-capping groups. A symmetric, bell-shaped hole in unsubstituted PPs becomes either slightly skewed and shifted toward an end of the molecule in iso-alkyl-capped PPs or highly deformed and concentrated on a terminal unit in PPs with strongly electron-donating iso-alkoxy capping groups. The MPM shows that the observed linear 1/n evolution of the PP cation radical properties toward the polymer limit originates from the hole stabilization due to the growing chain of p-phenylene units, while shifting of the hole toward electron-donating end-capping groups leads to early breakdown of these 1/n dependencies. These insights, along with the readily applicable and flexible multistate parabolic model, can guide studies of complex donor–spacer–acceptor systems and doped molecular wires to aid the design of the next generation materials for long-range charge transport and photovoltaic applications. PMID:25264475

  18. A study of the effects of end-cap molecular species on environmental characteristics of polimidesulfones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; St.clair, T. L.; Walker, S.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the environmental stability and mechanical properties of polyimidesulfone (PISO2), it was decided to investigate the effects of various types of end caps on its thermo-mechanical and related properties. It was noted that end caps are effective in reducing the environmental damage susceptibility of PISO2 samples, apparently due to their ability to react with free end groups which are believed to be moisture pickup sites. Phthalic anydride, aniline and aminobenzophenone were the end caps used in this study.

  19. Advanced photovoltaic concentrator system low-cost prototype module

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminar, N.R.; McEntee, J.; Curchod, D. )

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the continued development of an extruded lens and the development of a PV receiver, both of which will be used in the Solar Engineering Applications Corporation (SEA) 10X concentrator. These efforts were pare of a pre-Concentrator Initiative Program. The 10X concentrator consists of an inexpensive, extruded linear Fresnel lens which focuses on one-sun cells which are adhesive-bonded to an anodized aluminum heat sink. Module sides are planned to be molded along with the lens and are internally reflective for improved on- and off-track performance. End caps with molded-in bearings complete the module. Ten modules are mounted in a stationary frame for simple, single-axis tracking in the east-west direction. This configuration an array, is shipped completely assembled and requires only setting on a reasonably flat surface, installing 4 fasteners, and hooking up the wires. Development of the 10-inch wide extruded lens involved one new extrusion die and a series of modifications to this die. Over 76% lens transmission was measured which surpassed the program goal of 75%. One-foot long receiver sections were assembled and subjected to evaluation tests at Sandia National Laboratories. A first group had some problem with cell delamination and voids but a second group performed very well, indicating that a full size receiver would pass the full qualification test. Cost information was updated and presented in the report. The cost study indicated that the Solar Engineering Applications Corporation concentrator system can exceed the DOE electricity cost goals of less than 6cents per KW-hr. 33 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Advanced photovoltaic concentrator system low-cost prototype module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminar, N. R.; McEntee, J.; Curchod, D.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the continued development of an extruded lens and the development of a PV receiver, both of which will be used in the Solar Engineering Applications Corporation (SEA) 10X concentrator. These efforts were part of a pre-Concentrator Initiative Program. The 10X concentrator consists of an inexpensive, extruded linear Fresnel lens which focuses on one-sun cells which are adhesive-bonded to an anodized aluminum heat sink. Module sides are planned to be molded along with the lens and are internally reflective for improved on- and off-track performance. End caps with molded-in bearings complete the module. Ten modules are mounted in a stationary frame for simple, single-axis tracking in the east-west direction. This array configuration is shipped completely assembled and requires only setting on a reasonably flat surface, installing 4 fasteners, and hooking up the wires. Development of the 10-inch wide extruded lens involved one new extrusion die and a series of modifications to this die. Over 76 percent lens transmission was measured, which surpassed the program goal of 75 percent. One-foot long receiver sections were assembled and subjected to evaluation tests at Sandia National Laboratories. A first group had some problem with cell delamination and voids but a second group performed very well, indicating that a full size receiver would pass the full qualification test. Cost information was updated and presented in the report. The cost study indicated that the Solar Engineering Applications Corporation concentrator system can exceed the DOE electricity cost goals of less than 6 cents per KW-hr.

  1. Development of engineering prototype of Life Support Module (LSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The development of an engineering prototype of a life support system is discussed. The module consists of an electrocardiogram, a defibrillator, a resuscitator, and an aspirator, as well as body temperature and blood pressure measuring instruments. A drug kit is included.

  2. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Meissner, H.E.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.; Sutton, S.B.; Mitchell, S.; Bass, I.; Honea, E.

    1999-08-10

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focused by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod. 14 figs.

  3. Cementitious building material incorporating end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    A cementitious composition comprising a cementitious material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the compositions are useful in making pre-formed building materials such as concrete blocks, brick, dry wall and the like or in making poured structures such as walls or floor pads; the glycols can be encapsulated to reduce their tendency to retard set.

  4. HDU Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) Prototype Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Kennedy, Kriss; Tri, Terry; Toups, Larry; Howe, A. Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) project team constructed an analog prototype lunar surface laboratory called the Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM). The prototype unit subsystems were integrated in a short amount of time, utilizing a skunk-works approach that brought together over 20 habitation-related technologies from a variety of NASA centers. This paper describes the system integration strategies and lessons learned, that allowed the PEM to be brought from paper design to working field prototype using a multi-center team. The system integration process included establishment of design standards, negotiation of interfaces between subsystems, and scheduling fit checks and installation activities. A major tool used in integration was a coordinated effort to accurately model all the subsystems using CAD, so that conflicts were identified before physical components came together. Some of the major conclusions showed that up-front modularity that emerged as an artifact of construction, such as the eight 45 degree "pie slices" making up the module whose steel rib edges defined structural mounting and loading points, dictated much of the configurational interfaces between the major subsystems and workstations. Therefore, 'one of the lessons learned included the need to use modularity as a tool for organization in advance, and to work harder to prevent non-critical aspects of the platform from dictating the modularity that may eventually inform the fight system.

  5. Development and Testing of the NIF Prototype Module

    SciTech Connect

    Adcock, J.; Harjes, C.; Mowrer, G.; Wilson, M.

    1999-06-25

    The NIF Power Conditioning System (PCS) is required to deliver -68 kJ to each of the 3840 flashlamp pairs in the NIF laser in a current pulse with a peak of -500 kA and rise time of- 150 µs. The PCS will consist of 192 modules each of which drive 20 lamp-pairs. Each module will basically be a 6 rnF capacitor bank with a nominal charge voltage of 23.5 kV which is switched by a single pressurized air gas switch to 20 RG-220 cables that are connected to individual lamp loads. In addition each module will have a number of subsystems including; a lamp pre-ionization system, power supplies, isolation circuits, trigger systems, safety dump systems, gas system, and an embedded control system. A module will also include components whose primary function is to limit fault currents and thus minimize collateral damage in faults. In the Prototype Development and Testing effort at Sandia National Laboratories all of these were integrated into a single system and proper fimctionality was demonstrated. Extensive testing was done at nominal operating levels into resistive dummy loads and some testing in fault modes was also done. A description of the system and a summary of testing is given in this paper.

  6. Self-Assembly of Telechelic Tyrosine End-Capped PEO and Poly(alanine) Polymers in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Steven; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian William; Reza, Mehedi; Ruokolainen, Janne; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Bilalis, Panayiotis; Iatrou, Hermis

    2016-03-14

    The self-assembly in aqueous solution of three novel telechelic conjugates comprising a central hydrophilic polymer and short (trimeric or pentameric) tyrosine end-caps has been investigated. Two of the conjugates have a central poly(oxyethylene) (polyethylene oxide, PEO) central block with different molar masses. The other conjugate has a central poly(L-alanine) (PAla) sequence in a purely amino-acid based conjugate. All three conjugates self-assemble into β-sheet based fibrillar structures, although the fibrillar morphology revealed by cryogenic-TEM is distinct for the three polymers--in particular the Tyr5-PEO6k-Tyr5 forms a population of short straight fibrils in contrast to the more diffuse fibril aggregates observed for Tyr5-PEO2k-Tyr5 and Tyr3-PAla-Tyr3. Hydrogel formation was not observed for these samples (in contrast to prior work on related systems) up to quite high concentrations, showing that it is possible to prepare solutions of peptide-polymer-peptide conjugates with hydrophobic end-caps without conformational constraints associated with hydrogelation. The Tyr5-PEO6k-Tyr5 shows significant PEO crystallization upon drying in contrast to the Tyr5-PEO2k-Tyr5 conjugate. Our findings point to the remarkable ability of short hydrophobic peptide end groups to modulate the self-assembly properties of polymers in solution in model peptide-capped "associative polymers". Retention of fluidity at high conjugate concentration may be valuable in potential future applications of these conjugates as bioresponsive or biocompatible materials, for example exploiting the enzyme-responsiveness of the tyrosine end-groups. PMID:26867986

  7. Mixture of cholesterol end-capped polyethylene glycol with DSPC liposomal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Soheil

    2015-07-01

    The dynamic of network of self-assembled liposome by end-capped polymer was investigated using dynamic light scattering. The liposome network, physically cross-linked by mixed liposome solutions with three different length scale of cholesterol end-capped polyethylene glycol. The network of liposome is dependent on both the polymer concentration and length scale. In the pure liposome, one motion at low time scale is observed by DLS. In the higher concentration of polymer in liposome, several motion is observed that the fast motion is alpha relaxation and other two slow motion are beta and gamma relaxations. The distance between diffusion coefficient of fast and slow relaxation is increased with increase of length scale of endcapped polymers. The SAXS data is fitted with a Percus-Yevick hard sphere model and it shows that the size of liposome increasing with increase of polymer length scale in the mixture system.

  8. Monolithic fiber end cap collimator for high-power free-space fiber-fiber coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuanfeng; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Zefeng; Hou, Jing

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we present the design, construction, and testing of a monolithic fiber end cap collimator for high-power free-space fiber-fiber coupling applications. The collimator is based on a large-sized fiber end cap and a spherical lens design on the output facet. Values of the spot size and working distance are theoretically analyzed based on Gaussian approximation and ABCD transmission matrix. The free-space fiber-fiber coupling process is also analyzed for different lens curvature radii and coupling distances. In the experiment, a collimated laser beam is obtained with Rayleigh length of about 400 mm. A high-power laser with 1.1 kW output is tested on the end cap collimator, which only heats up by 7°C at the output facet without active cooling. Free-space fiber-fiber coupling between two 20/400 μm fibers is achieved based on these collimators, with measured coupling loss lower than 0.3 dB. PMID:27411125

  9. Lithium-end-capped polylactide thin films influence osteoblast progenitor cell differentiation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Gomillion, Cheryl T; Lakhman, Rubinder Kaur; Kasi, Rajeswari M; Weiss, R A; Kuhn, Liisa T; Goldberg, A Jon

    2015-02-01

    End-capping by covalently binding functional groups to the ends of polymer chains offers potential advantages for tissue engineering scaffolds, but the ability of such polymers to influence cell behavior has not been studied. As a demonstration, polylactide (PLA) was end-capped with lithium carboxylate ionic groups (hPLA13kLi) and evaluated. Thin films of the hPLA13kLi and PLA homopolymer were prepared with and without surface texturing. Murine osteoblast progenitor cells from collagen 1α1 transgenic reporter mice were used to assess cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization. Measurement of green fluorescent protein expressed by these cells and xylenol orange staining for mineral allowed quantitative analysis. The hPLA13kLi was biologically active, increasing initial cell attachment and enhancing differentiation, while reducing proliferation and strongly suppressing mineralization, relative to PLA. These effects of bound lithium ions (Li(+) ) had not been previously reported, and were generally consistent with the literature on soluble additions of lithium. The surface texturing generated here did not influence cell behavior. These results demonstrate that end-capping could be a useful approach in scaffold design, where a wide range of biologically active groups could be employed, while likely retaining the desirable characteristics associated with the unaltered homopolymer backbone. PMID:24733780

  10. On the Oxidative Degradation of Nadic End-Capped Polyimides. 3; Synthesis and Characterization of Model Compounds for End-Cap Degradation Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Gilinsky-Sharon, Pessia

    1999-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of PMR (for polymerization of monomeric reactants) polyimides at elevated temperatures was followed by cross-polarized magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) NMR. Labeling of selected sites in the polymers with C-13 allowed for direct observation of the transformations arising from oxidation processes. The formation of several degradation products has been proposed to be occurring in the cross-links derived from the nadic end caps on oxidation. Model compounds have been synthesized and characterized by CPMAS NMR with both normal and delayed decoupling to distinguish between protonated and unprotonated carbons. Comparison of these spectra to predicted chemical shifts of proposed products for the aged polymer provides further insight to degradation occurring in the cross-linked moieties.

  11. Efficient end-capping synthesis of neutral donor-acceptor [2]rotaxanes under additive-free and mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Domoto, Yuya; Sase, Shohei; Goto, Kei

    2014-11-24

    Efficient end-capping synthesis of neutral donor-acceptor (D-A) [2]rotaxanes without loading any catalysts or activating agents was achieved by utilizing high reactivity of a pentacoordinated hydrosilane toward salicylic acid derivatives. As components of [2]rotaxanes, an electron-deficient naphthalenediimide-containing axle with a salicylic acid terminus and several electron-rich bis(naphthocrown) ether macrocycles were employed. End-capping reactions with the pentacoordinated hydrosilane underwent smoothly even at low temperature to afford the corresponding [2]rotaxanes in good yields. A [2]rotaxane containing bis-1,5-(dinaphtho)-38-crown-10 ether as a wheel molecule was synthesized and isolated in 84% yield by the end-capping at -10 °C, presenting the highest yield ever reported for the end-capping synthesis of a neutral D-A [2]rotaxane. It was found that the yields of the [2]rotaxanes in the end-capping reactions were almost parallel to the formation ratios of the corresponding pseudo[2]rotaxanes estimated by utilizing model systems. These results indicate that the end-capping reaction using the pentacoordinated hydrosilane proceeded without perturbing the threading process, and most of the pseudo[2]rotaxanes underwent efficient end-capping reaction even at low temperature. PMID:25284148

  12. Characterization of initial cure reactions in propargyl and nadic end capped model compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    Imide model compounds containing propargyl and nadic groups were studied to obtain a fundamental understanding of the reaction of these groups attached to imide oligomers. The initial cure reactions were examined by a variety of characterization techniques including high pressure liquid chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses, and mass spectroscopy. The initial step in the cure of propargyl end capped model compounds probably involved the formation of a new terminal acetylenic group. Configurational changes involving endo/exo isomerism was found in the nadimide model compounds. Nadimide compounds heated in air and in nitrogen appeared to cure by different mechanisms.

  13. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the ATLAS Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Delruelle, N.; Haug, F.; Junker, S.; Passardi, G.; Pengo, R.; Pirotte, O.

    2004-06-23

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW at 4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requirements of the magnets in the various operating scenarios.

  14. Reevaluation of Tetrahydrophthalic Anhydride as an End Cap for Improved Oxidation Resistance in Addition Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Johnston, J. Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Several substituted 1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalic anhydride end caps - including the 3-phenyl, 3-methoxy, 3-trimethylsilyloxy, and 3,6-diphenyl analogs - were synthesized via the Diels-Alder condensation of the corresponding butadienes and maleic anhydride. These anhydrides, as well as the commercially available 3-hydro and 4-methyl analogs, were each ground together with methylenedianiline in a 2:1 ratio and heated gradually from 204 C to 371 C, with the thermolysis followed by NMR. Generally speaking, a transformation via monoimide to bisimide was observed in the lower temperature range, followed by competition between crosslinking and aromatization. We believe that this competition produces a substantial percentage of aromatic product, with the concomitant lowering of the relative amount of crosslinking and is responsible for improving both thermal oxidative stability of tetrahydrophthalic end capped polyimides and their substantial frangibility. The thermolysis of the tetrahydrophthalimides under inert atmosphere dramatically lowers the amount of aromatization hence, the mechanism for aromatization is an oxidative one.

  15. Failure Analysis of Cracked FS-85 Tubing and ASTAR-811C End Caps

    SciTech Connect

    ME Petrichek

    2006-02-09

    Failure analyses were performed on cracked FS-85 tubing and ASTAR-811C and caps which had been fabricated as components of biaxial creep specimens meant to support materials testing for the NR Space program. During the failure analyses of cracked FS-85 tubing, it was determined that the failure potentially could be due to two effects: possible copper contamination from the EDM (electro-discharge machined) recast layer and/or an insufficient solution anneal. to prevent similar failures in the future, a more formal analysis should be done after each processing step to ensure the quality of the material before further processing. During machining of the ASTAR-811FC rod to form end caps for biaxial creep specimens, linear defects were observed along the center portion of the end caps. These defects were only found in material that was processed from the top portion of the ingot. The linear defects were attributed to a probable residual ingot pipe that was not removed from the ingot. During the subsequent processing of the ingot to rod, the processing temperatures were not high enough to allow self healing of the ingot's residual pipe defect. To prevent this from occurring in the future, it is necessary to ensure that complete removal of the as-melted ingot pipe is verified by suitable non-destructive evaluation (NDE).

  16. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the ATLAS Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delruelle, N.; Haug, F.; Junker, S.; Passardi, G.; Pengo, R.; Pirotte, O.

    2004-06-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requirements of the magnets in the various operating scenarios.

  17. One-bead-one-compound library of end-capped dipeptides and deconvolution by microflow NMR.

    PubMed

    Simon, Rozalyn A; Schuresko, Laura; Dendukuri, Nagamani; Goers, Emily; Murphy, Brent; Lokey, R Scott

    2005-01-01

    As part of our program to identify novel small molecules with interesting biological activity, we have designed and synthesized a library of end-capped dipeptides with an emphasis on compound diversity, complexity, and membrane permeability. An approximately 1500-member library was synthesized manually on large polystyrene beads using the mix-and-split method. The final compounds were cleaved into 384-well plates to generate individual stock solutions for input into high-throughput biological screens. Individual compounds were decoded using a combination of mass spectrometry and microflow NMR spectroscopy. In principle, this approach to deconvolution obviates the need for complicated binary encoding-decoding strategies for one-bead-one-compound libraries. PMID:16153064

  18. Development of Prototype Outcomes-Based Training Modules for Aesthetic Dentistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andres, Maricar Joy T.; Borabo, Milagros L.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to know the essential components of Aesthetic Dentistry that will be a basis for prototype Outcomes-based training modules. Using a 5-point Likert scale, the researcher-made questionnaire assessed the different elements of Aesthetic Dentistry which are needed in the designing of the training module, the manner of…

  19. Study of a pure CsI crystal readout by APD for Belle II end cap ECL upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Aihara, H.; Borshchev, O. V.; Epifanov, D. A.; Ponomarenko, S. A.; Surin, N. M.

    2016-07-01

    A scintillation counter consisting of a pure CsI crystal and avalanche photodiodes (Hamamatsu APD S8664-55 and S8664-1010) has been studied for the upgrade of the end cap electromagnetic calorimeter of Belle II detector. An essential increase of the light output was achieved with wavelength shifters based on nanostructured organosilicon luminophores.

  20. Tetrahydrophthalic Anhydrides as Addition Curing Polyimide End Caps: Thermal Isomerization of Methylendianiline 3,6-Diphenyltetrahydrophthalic Bisimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Gilinsky-Sharon, Pessia; Gottlieb, Hugo E.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher

    2005-01-01

    In depth NMR studies confirm that heating a 1:2 mixture of cis, cis, cis 3,6-diphenyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride (end cap 9c) with methylenedianiline at 316 C initially yields the corresponding highly congested cis, cis, cis 3,6-diphenyltetrahydrophthalic bisimide 11, which is converted at this temperature to the observed product, the less hindered trans, cis, trans isomer 12.

  1. Surface reconstruction and hemocompatibility improvement of a phosphorylcholine end-capped poly(butylene succinate) coating.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ni; Wang, Yan-Bing; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Shi, Su-Qing; Nakashima, Kenichi; Gong, Yong-Kuan

    2014-09-01

    Control over cell-material surface interactions is the key to many new and improved biomedical devices. In this study, we present a simple yet effective surface modification method that allows for the surface reconstruction and formation of cell outer membrane mimetic structure on coatings that have significantly increased hemocompatibility. To achieve this, a phosphorylcholine end-capped poly(butylene succinate) (PBS-PC) was synthesized and dip-coated on coverslips. The surface structure of the amphiphilic PBS-PC film was reconstructed by heating in a vacuum oven to obtain the less hydrophilic surface and by immersing in hot water to obtain the more hydrophilic surface. Significant changes in the surface element concentration were observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and changes in surface wettability were measured by sensitive dynamic contact angle technique. Scanning electron microscope images showed different morphologies of the reconstructed surfaces. Interestingly, the reconstruction between the less hydrophilic and more hydrophilic surfaces is reversible. More importantly, both the reconstructed surfaces are stable in room condition for more than 6 months, and both the surfaces show significant improvement in hemocompatibility as revealed by protein adsorption and platelet adhesion measurements. This reversible surface reconstruction strategy and the interesting results may be significant for fabricating stable and hemocompatible surfaces on differently shaped biomedical devices. PMID:24115737

  2. Oxidative Degradation of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides. 2; Evidence for Reactions Occurring at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of PMR (for polymerization of monomeric reactants) polyimides at elevated temperatures was followed by cross-polarized magic angle spinning (Cp-MAS) NMR. C-13 labeling of selected sites in the polymers allowed for direct observation of the transformations arising from oxidation processes. As opposed to model compound studies, the reactions were followed directly in the polymer. The labeling experiments confirm the previously reported oxidation of the methylene carbon to ketone in the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer chain. They also show the formation of two other oxidized species, acid and ester, from this same carbon. In addition, the technique provides the first evidence of the kind of degradation reactions that are occurring in the nadic end caps. Several PMR formulations containing moieties determined to be present after oxidation, as suggested by the labeling study, were synthesized. Weight loss, FTIR, and natural abundance NMR of these derivatives were followed during aging. In this way, weight loss could be related to the observed transformations.

  3. Characterization of the selenotrisulfide formed by reaction of selenite with end-capped phytochelatin-2.

    PubMed

    Spain, Stephen M; Rabenstein, Dallas L

    2004-03-01

    The phytochelatins are a family of peptides synthesized by plants in response to exposure to heavy metals and metalloids, including selenium in the form of selenite. The amino acid sequence of the phytochelatin (PC) peptides is (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Gly, where n typically ranges from 2 to 5. In this paper, the products of the reaction of selenite with an end-capped analogue of PC2, Ac-(gamma-Glu-Cys)2-Gly-NH2, are characterized. Selenite reacts with Ac-(gamma-Glu-Cys)2-Gly-NH2 (Ac-PC2-NH2) to form a compound that contains an intramolecular selenotrisulfide (-SSeS-)-linkage (Se[Ac-PC2-NH2]) and oxidized Ac-PC2-NH2. Both Se[Ac-PC2-NH2] and oxidized Ac-PC2-NH2 were isolated by HPLC and were characterized by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, by two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR and, in the case of Se[Ac-PC2-NH2], by 77Se NMR. Using dihedral angles determined from vicinal 1H-1H coupling constants as constraints for the conformations around the Cys(CalphaH)-Cys(CbetaH) bonds, structures were predicted for the most abundant form of both compounds by Monte Carlo molecular mechanics simulations. PMID:15214417

  4. CO2 - and O2 -sensitive fluorophenyl end-capped poly(ethylene glycol).

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Yoon; Kim, Jin Young; Moon, Hyo Jung; Park, Min Hee; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2014-01-01

    Pentafluorophenyl end-capped poly(ethylene glycol) (PF-PEG-PF) aqueous solution shows a lower critical solution temperature (LCST), which is sensitive to the type of gases dissolved in the solution. LCST increases from 24.5 to 26 °C when dissolved carbon dioxide is replaced by oxygen. The transparent-to-turbid transition is reversibly observed when the dissolved carbon dioxide in the PF-PEG-PF aqueous solution is exchanged with oxygen, and vice versa, at 24.5 °C. (19) F NMR and (1) H NMR spectra of the PF-PEG-PF in D2 O suggest that 1) dehydration of PEG is the main reason of developing LCST of the PF-PEG-PF aqueous solution, 2) minute differences in the intermolecular interactions, as demonstrated by changes in the chemical shift of the PF-PEG-PF peaks, induce such a difference in LCST. This paper provides a new insight in designing a stimuli-responsive polymer in that fine tuning of a phase transition can be controlled by the type of dissolved gas. PMID:24272990

  5. Amplifiers Module Prototype for the Johnson Noise Thermometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Britton Jr, Charles L; Bull, Nora D; Roberts, Michael

    2013-06-01

    This document is intended to summarize the development and testing of the amplifier module portion of the Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) system developed at ORNL. The proposed system has been presented in an earlier report [1]. A more extensive project background including the project rationale is available in the initial project report [2].

  6. Elucidation of the Cross-Link Structure of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides Using NMR of C-13-Labeled Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Solid NMR of C-13 isotope-labeled samples of PMR-15 was used to follow the cross-linking reaction of the nadic end cap. Some samples were labeled on one of the carbon atoms of the nadic end cap, and others on the methylene carbon atom of the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer. NMR spectra were run on these samples both before and after cross-linking. In this way, direct evidence of the major products of cross-linking under normal cure conditions is provided. The majority (approximately 85%) of the cross-linking derives from olefin polymerization through the double bond of the end cap. Approximately 15% of the products could come from a pathway involving a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. However, all of the products could be explained by a biradical intermediate without a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. Evidence is also presented that the methylene moiety in the methylenedianiline part of the polymer chain also participates in the cross-linking, albeit to a small extent, by a radical transfer reaction. Different cure conditions (higher temperatures, longer times) could change the relative distribution of the products.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kelner; D. George; T. Morrow; T. Owen; M. Nored; R. Burkey; A. Minachi

    2005-05-01

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute began a multi-year project to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype energy meter in 2002-2003 included: (1) refinement of the algorithm used to infer properties of the natural gas stream, such as heating value; (2) evaluation of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen content, improvements in carbon dioxide measurements, and improvements in ultrasonic measurement technology and signal processing for improved speed of sound measurements; (3) design, fabrication and testing of a new prototype energy meter module incorporating these algorithm and sensor refinements; and (4) laboratory and field performance tests of the original and modified energy meter modules. Field tests of the original energy meter module have provided results in close agreement with an onsite gas chromatograph. The original algorithm has also been tested at a field site as a stand-alone application using measurements from in situ instruments, and has demonstrated its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. The algorithm has been revised to use measurement technologies existing in the module to measure the gas stream at multiple states and infer nitrogen content. The instrumentation module has also been modified to incorporate recent improvements in CO{sub 2} and sound speed sensing technology. Laboratory testing of the upgraded module has identified additional testing needed to attain the target accuracy in sound speed measurements and heating value.

  8. Development of a 150-GHz MMIC Module Prototype for Large-Scale CMB Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Soria, Mary M.; Lau, Judy M.; Sieth, Matthew M.; VanWinkle, Daniel; Tantawi, Sami

    2011-01-01

    HEMT-based receiver arrays with excellent noise and scalability are already starting to be manufactured at 100 GHz, but the advances in technology should make it possible to develop receiver modules with even greater operation frequency up to 200 GHz. A prototype heterodyne amplifier module has been developed for operation from 140 to 170 GHz using monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) low-noise InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. The compact, scalable module is centered on the 150-GHz atmospheric window using components known to operate well at these frequencies. Arrays equipped with hundreds of these modules can be optimized for many different astrophysical measurement techniques, including spectroscopy and interferometry. This module is a heterodyne receiver module that is extremely compact, and makes use of 35-nm InP HEMT technology, and which has been shown to have excellent noise temperatures when cooled cryogenically to 30 K. This reduction in system noise over prior art has been demonstrated in commercial mixers (uncooled) at frequencies of 160-180 GHz. The module is expected to achieve a system noise temperature of 60 K when cooled. An MMIC amplifier module has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of expanding heterodyne amplifier technology to the 140 to 170-GHz frequency range for astronomical observations. The miniaturization of many standard components and the refinement of RF interconnect technology have cleared the way to mass-production of heterodyne amplifier receivers, making it a feasible technology for many large-population arrays. This work furthers the recent research efforts in compact coherent receiver modules, including the development of the Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) modules centered at 40 and 90 GHz, and the production of heterodyne module prototypes at 90 GHz.

  9. Performance of the prototype module of the GlueX electromagnetic barrel calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Leverington, Blake; Lolos, George; Papandreou, Zisis; Hakobyan, Rafael; Huber, Garth; Janzen, Kathryn; Semenov, Andrei; Scott, Eric; Shepherd, Matthew; Carman, Daniel; Lawrence, David; Smith, Elton; Taylor, Simon; Wolin, Elliott; Klein, Franz; Santoro, Joseph; Sober, Daniel; Kourkoumeli, Christina

    2008-11-01

    A photon beam test of the 4 m long prototype lead/scintillating-fibre module for the GlueX electromagnetic barrel calorimeter was carried out in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility with the objective of measuring the energy and timing resolutions of the module as well as the number of photoelectrons generated. Data were collected over an energy range of 150 - â 650 MeV at multiple positions and angles along the module. Details of the analysis at the centre of and perpendicular to the module are shown herein; the results are View the MathML source, View the MathML source ps, and 660 photoelectrons for 1 GeV at each end of the module.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW-COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kelner; T.E. Owen; D.L. George; A. Minachi; M.G. Nored; C.J. Schwartz

    2004-03-01

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} began a multi-year project co-funded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy. The project goal is to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype retrofit natural gas energy flow meter in 2000-2001 included: (1) evaluation of the inferential gas energy analysis algorithm using supplemental gas databases and anticipated worst-case gas mixtures; (2) identification and feasibility review of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen diluent content; (3) experimental performance evaluation of infrared absorption sensors for carbon dioxide diluent content; and (4) procurement of a custom ultrasonic transducer and redesign of the ultrasonic pulse reflection correlation sensor for precision speed-of-sound measurements. A prototype energy meter module containing improved carbon dioxide and speed-of-sound sensors was constructed and tested in the GRI Metering Research Facility at SwRI. Performance of this module using transmission-quality natural gas and gas containing supplemental carbon dioxide up to 9 mol% resulted in gas energy determinations well within the inferential algorithm worst-case tolerance of {+-}2.4 Btu/scf (nitrogen diluent gas measured by gas chromatograph). A two-week field test was performed at a gas-fired power plant to evaluate the inferential algorithm and the data acquisition requirements needed to adapt the prototype energy meter module to practical field site conditions.

  11. Development, characterization and beam tests of a small-scale TORCH prototype module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Ros García, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-05-01

    Within the TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) R&D project, a small-scale TORCH prototype module is currently under study. Circular-shaped micro-channel plate photon detectors with finely segmented square anodes (32 × 32 channels) have been produced for TORCH requirements in industrial partnership. A new generation of custom multi-channel electronics based on the 32-channel NINO and HPTDC ASICs has been developed. The performance of the photon detector coupled to these customized electronics has been assessed in the laboratory and is reported on. A time resolution of 80 ps and a spatial resolution of 0.03 mm have been measured. Finally, tests of the TORCH prototype module illuminated with laser light and in a charged particle beam will be highlighted.

  12. Syntheses, phase behavior, supramolecular chirality, and field-effect carrier mobility of asymmetrically end-capped mesogenic oligothiophenes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingwei; Sun, Xiao-Hua; Lu, Zhengyu; Xia, Ping-Fang; Shi, Zehua; Chen, Dongzhong; Wong, Man Shing; Wakim, Salem; Lu, Jianping; Baribeau, Jean-Marc; Tao, Ye

    2009-01-01

    A novel series of asymmetrically end-capped mesogenic oligothiophenes, with various oligothiophene core lengths, alkoxy tail lengths, and molecular polarities through introducing alkylsulfanyl or alkylsulfonyl functionalities as the terminal group, have been synthesized by palladium-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling and Kumada cross-coupling reactions as key steps. For the single end-capped oligothiophenes, C(m)O-Ar-OT(4)-H in which m=10, 12, 14, 16, and 18, all of these oligomers exhibited a broad temperature range of highly ordered smectic E and enantiotropic nematic phases, apart from the one with the longest octadecyloxy tail. For the double end-capped series C(10)O-Ar-OT(n)-R, R=Ph-SC(6) or Ph-SO(2)C(6) in which n=1, 2, 3, and 4, oligomers with more than one thiophene ring exhibited smectic A and smectic C phases, various crystal polymorphs and/or unusual low-temperature condensed phases. In the nonpolar, alkylsulfanylphenyl-substituted oligothiophene series, both the crystal/solid melting point and mesogenic clear point increased significantly with an increasing oligothiophene conjugation length. In the polar, alkylsulfonylphenyl-substituted oligothiophene series, all the oligomers showed increased melting points, but decreased mesogenic temperature intervals than those of their corresponding alkylsulfanyl counterparts. Remarkably, two different helical structures showing distinct striated textures or striped patterns were observed with a pitch of several to tens of micrometers under a polarized optical microscope upon cooling from their preceding fluidic smectic phases. The unusual twisted smectic layer structures in the thin solid films exhibiting distinct supramolecular chirality of both handednesses, revealed by circular dichroism measurements, were further confirmed by XRD analyses characterized by a sharp layer reflection together with its higher orders and diffuse wide-angle scatterings. In addition, initial studies showed that the highly ordered smectic

  13. Lung counting: Comparison of a four detector array that has either metal or carbon fiber end caps, and the effect on array performance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbir Ahmed, Asm; H. Kramer, Gary

    2011-12-01

    This study described the performance of an array of HPGe detectors, made by ORTEC. In the existing system, a metal end cap was used in the detector construction. In general, the natural metal contains some radioactive materials, create high background noises and signals during in vivo counting. ORTEC proposed a novel carbon fiber to be used in end cap, without any radio active content. This paper described the methodology of developing a model of the given HPGe array-detectors, comparing the detection efficiency and cross talk among the detectors using two end cap materials: either metal or carbon fiber and to provide a recommendation about the end cap material. The detector's counting efficiency were studied using point and plane sources. The cross talk among the array detectors were studied using a homogeneous attenuating medium made of tissue equivalent material. The cross talk was significant when single or multiple point sources (simulated to heterogeneous hot spots) were embedded inside the attenuating medium. With carbon fiber, the cross talk increased about 100% for photon energy at about 100 keV. For a uniform distribution of radioactive material, the cross talk increased about 5-10% when the end cap was made of carbon instead of steel. Metal end cap was recommended for the array of HPGe detectors.

  14. Study of response nonuniformity for the LHCb calorimeter module and the prototype of the CBM calorimeter module

    SciTech Connect

    Korolko, I. E.; Prokudin, M. S.

    2009-02-15

    A spatial nonuniformity of the response to high-energy muons is studied in the modules of the LHCb electromagnetic calorimeter and the prototype of the calorimeter module with lead plates and scintillator tiles 0.5 mm thick. The nonuniformity of the response of the inner LHCb modules to 50-GeV electrons is also measured. Software is developed for a thorough simulation of light collection in scintillator plates of a shashlik calorimeter. A model is elaborated to describe light transmission from the initial scintillation to the wavelength-shifting fiber with a subsequent reradiation and propagation of light over the fiber to the photodetector. The results of the simulation are in good agreement with data.

  15. Crystal structure of the C-terminal half of tropomodulin and structural basis of actin filament pointed-end capping.

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Inna; Kostyukova, Alla; Yamashita, Atsuko; Nitanai, Yasushi; Maéda, Yuichiro

    2002-01-01

    Tropomodulin is the unique pointed-end capping protein of the actin-tropomyosin filament. By blocking elongation and depolymerization, tropomodulin regulates the architecture and the dynamics of the filament. Here we report the crystal structure at 1.45-A resolution of the C-terminal half of tropomodulin (C20), the actin-binding moiety of tropomodulin. C20 is a leucine-rich repeat domain, and this is the first actin-associated protein with a leucine-rich repeat. Binding assays suggested that C20 also interacts with the N-terminal fragment, M1-M2-M3, of nebulin. Based on the crystal structure, we propose a model for C20 docking to the actin subunit at the pointed end. Although speculative, the model is consistent with the idea that a tropomodulin molecule competes with an actin subunit for a pointed end. The model also suggests that interactions with tropomyosin, actin, and nebulin are all possible sources of influences on the dynamic properties of pointed-end capping by tropomodulin. PMID:12414704

  16. FSGS3/CD2AP is a barbed-end capping protein that stabilizes actin and strengthens adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Brieher, William M.

    2013-01-01

    By combining in vitro reconstitution biochemistry with a cross-linking approach, we have identified focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 3/CD2-associated protein (FSGS3/CD2AP) as a novel actin barbed-end capping protein responsible for actin stability at the adherens junction. FSGS3/CD2AP colocalizes with E-cadherin and α-actinin-4 at the apical junction in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised actin stability and decreased actin accumulation at the adherens junction. Using a novel apparatus to apply mechanical stress to cell–cell junctions, we showed that knockdown of FSGS3/CD2AP compromised adhesive strength, resulting in tearing between cells and disruption of barrier function. Our results reveal a novel function of FSGS3/CD2AP and a previously unrecognized role of barbed-end capping in junctional actin dynamics. Our study underscores the complexity of actin regulation at cell–cell contacts that involves actin activators, inhibitors, and stabilizers to control adhesive strength, epithelial behavior, and permeability barrier integrity. PMID:24322428

  17. Development of a multi-PMT optical module prototype for PINGU

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, Lew; Collaboration: IceCube-PINGU Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The multi-PMT digital optical module (mDOM) contains 41 three-inch{sup 2} PMTs in a cylindrical glass vessel. The design is based on the KM3NeT DOM. Among other advantages, this approach offers a significant increase of photocathode area per module and also per string length. As an R and D activity targeted at potential future extensions, this new type of optical modules will be tested in the framework of the PINGU project (Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade). PINGU will add denser instrumentation to the IceCube/DeepCore sub-volume aiming at a further decrease of the neutrino energy threshold (to a few GeV). The current status of the development and the prototype construction is presented.

  18. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ageron, M.; Aharonian, F.; Aiello, S.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; de Asmundis, R.; Balasi, K.; Band, H.; Barbarino, G.; Barbarito, E.; Barbato, F.; Baret, B.; Baron, S.; Belias, A.; Berbee, E.; van den Berg, A. M.; Berkien, A.; Bertin, V.; Beurthey, S.; van Beveren, V.; Beverini, N.; Biagi, S.; Bianucci, S.; Billault, M.; Birbas, A.; Boer Rookhuizen, H.; Bormuth, R.; Bouché, V.; Bouhadef, B.; Bourlis, G.; Bouwhuis, M.; Bozza, C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Cacopardo, G.; Caillat, L.; Calamai, M.; Calvo, D.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, F.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Cereseto, R.; Champion, C.; Château, F.; Chiarusi, T.; Christopoulou, B.; Circella, M.; Classen, L.; Cocimano, R.; Colonges, S.; Coniglione, R.; Cosquer, A.; Costa, M.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; Cuttone, G.; D'Amato, C.; D'Amico, A.; De Bonis, G.; De Rosa, G.; Deniskina, N.; Destelle, J.-J.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q.; Drakopoulou, E.; Drouhin, D.; Drury, L.; Durand, D.; Eberl, T.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fermani, P.; Fusco, L. A.; Gajana, D.; Gal, T.; Galatà, S.; Gallo, F.; Garufi, F.; Gebyehu, M.; Giordano, V.; Gizani, N.; Gracia Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Grasso, R.; Grella, G.; Grmek, A.; Habel, R.; van Haren, H.; Heid, T.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Henry, S.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hevinga, M. A.; van der Hoek, M.; Hofestädt, J.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hugon, C.; Hößl, J.; Imbesi, M.; James, C.; Jansweijer, P.; Jochum, J.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Kappos, E.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Keller, P.; Kieft, G.; Koffeman, E.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Koopstra, J.; Korporaal, A.; Kouchner, A.; Koutsoukos, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Le Provost, H.; Leisos, A.; Lenis, D.; Leonora, E.; Lindsey Clark, M.; Liolios, A.; Llorens Alvarez, C. D.; Löhner, H.; Lo Presti, D.; Louis, F.; Maccioni, E.; Mannheim, K.; Manolopoulos, K.; Margiotta, A.; Mariş, O.; Markou, C.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, A.; Masullo, R.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Mollo, C.; Mongelli, M.; Morganti, M.; Mos, S.; Moudden, Y.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Nicolaou, C.; Nicolau, C. A.; Orlando, A.; Orzelli, A.; Papageorgiou, K.; Papaikonomou, A.; Papaleo, R.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Peek, H.; Pellegrino, C.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrina, C.; Petridou, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pikounis, K.; Popa, V.; Pradier, Th.; Priede, M.; Pühlhofer, G.; Pulvirenti, S.; Racca, C.; Raffaelli, F.; Randazzo, N.; Rapidis, P. A.; Razis, P.; Real, D.; Resvanis, L.; Reubelt, J.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Royon, J.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Santangelo, A.; Sapienza, P.; Savvidis, I.; Schmelling, J.; Schnabel, J.; Sedita, M.; Seitz, T.; Sgura, I.; Simeone, F.; Siotis, I.; Sipala, V.; Solazzo, M.; Spitaleri, A.; Spurio, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steijger, J.; Stolarczyk, T.; Stransky, D.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Tézier, D.; Théraube, S.; Thompson, L. F.; Timmer, P.; Trapierakis, H. I.; Trasatti, L.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vermeulen, J.; Vernin, P.; Viola, S.; Vivolo, D.; Werneke, P.; Wiggers, L.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; van Wooning, R. H. L.; Yatkin, K.; Zachariadou, K.; Zonca, E.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Zwart, A.

    2014-09-01

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  19. Progress with the Single-Sided Module Prototypes for the ATLAS Tracket Upgrade Stave

    SciTech Connect

    Allport, P.P.; Li, Z.; Affolder, A.A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Bates, R. et al.

    2010-06-04

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for the planned luminosity upgrade of the LHC (the super-luminous LHC or sLHC) with a programme of development for tracking able to withstand an order of greater magnitude radiation fluence and much greater hit occupancy rates than the current detector. This has led to the concept of an all-silicon tracker with an enhanced performance pixel-based inner region and short-strips for much of the higher radii. Both sub-systems employ many common technologies, including the proposed 'stave' concept for integrated cooling and support. For the short-strip region, use of this integrated stave concept requires single-sided modules mounted on either side of a thin central lightweight support. Each sensor is divided into four rows of 23.82 mm length strips; within each row, there are 1280 strips of 74.5 {mu}m pitch. Well over a hundred prototype sensors are being delivered by Hamamatsu Photonics (HPK) to Japan, Europe and the US. We present results of the first 20 chip ABCN25 ASIC hybrids for these sensors, results of the first prototype 5120 strip module built with 40 ABCN25 read-out ASICs, and the status of the hybrids and modules being developed for the ATLAS tracker upgradestave programme.

  20. (Photo)physical Properties of New Molecular Glasses End-Capped with Thiophene Rings Composed of Diimide and Imine Units

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    New symmetrical arylene bisimide derivatives formed by using electron-donating–electron-accepting systems were synthesized. They consist of a phthalic diimide or naphthalenediimide core and imine linkages and are end-capped with thiophene, bithiophene, and (ethylenedioxy)thiophene units. Moreover, polymers were obtained from a new diamine, N,N′-bis(5-aminonaphthalenyl)naphthalene-1,4,5,8-dicarboximide and 2,5-thiophenedicarboxaldehyde or 2,2′-bithiophene-5,5′-dicarboxaldehyde. The prepared azomethine diimides exhibited glass-forming properties. The obtained compounds emitted blue light with the emission maximum at 470 nm. The value of the absorption coefficient was determined as a function of the photon energy using spectroscopic ellipsometry. All compounds are electrochemically active and undergo reversible electrochemical reduction and irreversible oxidation processes as was found in cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) studies. They exhibited a low electrochemically (DPV) calculated energy band gap (Eg) from 1.14 to 1.70 eV. The highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and Eg were additionally calculated theoretically by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. The photovoltaic properties of two model compounds as the active layer in organic solar cells in the configuration indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-(ethylenedioxy)thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/active layer/Al under an illumination of 1.3 mW/cm2 were studied. The device comprising poly(3-hexylthiophene) with the compound end-capped with bithiophene rings showed the highest value of Voc (above 1 V). The conversion efficiency of the fabricated solar cell was in the range of 0.69–0.90%. PMID:24966893

  1. (Photo)physical Properties of New Molecular Glasses End-Capped with Thiophene Rings Composed of Diimide and Imine Units.

    PubMed

    Grucela-Zajac, Marzena; Bijak, Katarzyna; Kula, Slawomir; Filapek, Michal; Wiacek, Malgorzata; Janeczek, Henryk; Skorka, Lukasz; Gasiorowski, Jacek; Hingerl, Kurt; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Nosidlak, Natalia; Lewinska, Gabriela; Sanetra, Jerzy; Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa

    2014-06-19

    New symmetrical arylene bisimide derivatives formed by using electron-donating-electron-accepting systems were synthesized. They consist of a phthalic diimide or naphthalenediimide core and imine linkages and are end-capped with thiophene, bithiophene, and (ethylenedioxy)thiophene units. Moreover, polymers were obtained from a new diamine, N,N'-bis(5-aminonaphthalenyl)naphthalene-1,4,5,8-dicarboximide and 2,5-thiophenedicarboxaldehyde or 2,2'-bithiophene-5,5'-dicarboxaldehyde. The prepared azomethine diimides exhibited glass-forming properties. The obtained compounds emitted blue light with the emission maximum at 470 nm. The value of the absorption coefficient was determined as a function of the photon energy using spectroscopic ellipsometry. All compounds are electrochemically active and undergo reversible electrochemical reduction and irreversible oxidation processes as was found in cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) studies. They exhibited a low electrochemically (DPV) calculated energy band gap (E g) from 1.14 to 1.70 eV. The highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels and E g were additionally calculated theoretically by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. The photovoltaic properties of two model compounds as the active layer in organic solar cells in the configuration indium tin oxide/poly(3,4-(ethylenedioxy)thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/active layer/Al under an illumination of 1.3 mW/cm(2) were studied. The device comprising poly(3-hexylthiophene) with the compound end-capped with bithiophene rings showed the highest value of V oc (above 1 V). The conversion efficiency of the fabricated solar cell was in the range of 0.69-0.90%. PMID:24966893

  2. Prototype adaptive bow-tie filter based on spatial exposure time modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badal, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the development of dynamic bow-tie filters that are able to provide patient-specific x-ray beam shaping. We introduce the first physical prototype of a new adaptive bow-tie filter design based on the concept of "spatial exposure time modulation." While most existing bow-tie filters operate by attenuating the radiation beam differently in different locations using partially attenuating objects, the presented filter shapes the radiation field using two movable completely radio-opaque collimators. The aperture and speed of the collimators is modulated in synchrony with the x-ray exposure to selectively block the radiation emitted to different parts of the object. This mode of operation does not allow the reproduction of every possible attenuation profile, but it can reproduce the profile of any object with an attenuation profile monotonically decreasing from the center to the periphery, such as an object with an elliptical cross section. Therefore, the new adaptive filter provides the same advantages as the currently existing static bow-tie filters, which are typically designed to work for a pre-determined cylindrical object at a fixed distance from the source, and provides the additional capability to adapt its performance at image acquisition time to better compensate for the actual diameter and location of the imaged object. A detailed description of the prototype filter, the implemented control methods, and a preliminary experimental validation of its performance are presented.

  3. Development of a silicon-microstrip super module prototype for the high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, A.; Barbier, G.; Cadoux, F.; Endo, M.; Favre, Y.; Ferrere, D.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Hanagaki, K.; Hara, K.; Iacobucci, G.; Ikegami, Y.; Koriki, T.; La Marra, D.; Pohl, M.; Takubo, Y.; Terada, S.; Unno, Y.; Weber, M.

    2013-01-01

    Following the Phase II upgrade of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) currently foreseen in 2022-2023, the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is expected to deliver a peak luminosity in excess of 5×1034 cm-2 s-1 and an integrated luminosity of order 3000 fb-1 until 2033. The ATLAS Collaboration plans to replace the existing Inner Tracking Detector by a new tracker, with readout electronics as well as silicon pixel and strip sensor technology capable of maintaining the excellent tracking performance of the existing tracker in the severe radiation and high collision rate environment of the HL-LHC. The promising super-module integration concept extends the proven design of the existing barrel silicon strip tracker to the HL-LHC, with double-sided stereo silicon micro-strip modules assembled into a low mass local support structure. The Super-Module R&D program is described, with reference to HL-LHC requirements, and key prototype results are summarized.

  4. Assembly and maintenance of full scale NIF amplifiers in the amplifier module prototype laboratory (AMPLAB)

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J. A.

    1998-07-16

    Mechanical assembly and maintenance of the prototype National Ignition Facility amplifiers in the Amplifier Module Prototype Laboratory (AMPLAB) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory requires specialized equipment designed to manipulate large and delicate amplifier components in a safe and clean manner. Observations made during the operation of this assembly and maintenance equipment in AMPLAB provide design guidance for similar tools being built for the National Ignition Facility. Fixtures used for amplifier frame installation, laser slab and flashlamp cassette assembly, transport, and installation, and in-situ blastshield exchange are presented. Examples include a vacuum slab gripper, slab handling clean crane, slab cassette assembly fixture, sealed transport vehicle for slab cassette movement between the cleanroom and amplifier, slab cassette transfer fixture between the cleanroom and transport vehicle, and equipment needed for frame assembly unit, blastshield, an d flashlamp cassette installation and removal. The use of these tools for amplifier assembly, system reconfiguration, reflector replacement, and recovery from an abnormal occurrence such as a flashlamp explosion is described. Observations are made on the design and operation of these tools and their contribution to the final design.

  5. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Cryogenic and Safety Considerations for Moving the South End Cap Calorimeter to the Sidewalk

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1996-09-25

    The south end cap calorimeter (ECS) will need to be moved off of the detector platform to allow for the installation of new central tracking components. This engineering note documents the cryogenic and safety issues associated with the planned move. Because of the difficulty involved in building a temporary vent line out of the building, we plan to vent the ECS condenser flow, 6 scfm N2 into the assembly hall atmosphere. Information contained herein proves that this is safe even for failure/relief conditions. The details regarding the cryogenic and safety aspects of the ECS move have been thought out and planned. The cryogenic operation of the ECS calorimeter will be limited to maintaining it's pressure by keeping it cold and isolated while it is in it's temporary position off the platform. The 4 gph liquid nitrogen flow required for this operation is easily absorbed into the DZero assembly building atmosphere without any safety concerns. Emergency or failure scenarios have been addressed on a conservative basis and also pose little threat. Other safety features built into the system such as the liquid nitrogen excess flow switch, vent line liquid sensor, and monitored ODH heads provide additional assurance that an unexpected hazard would be identified and contained.

  6. Electronic structures and second hyperpolarizabilities of alkaline earth metal complexes end-capped with NA2 (A = H, Li, Na).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Paramita; Nandi, Prasanta K

    2016-05-14

    The ground state structures and NLO properties of a number of alkaline earth metal complexes end-capped with NA2 groups (A = H, Li, Na) are calculated by employing the CAM-B3LYP, wB97XD and B2PLYP functionals along with MP2 and CCSD(T) for 6-311++G(d,p), 6-311++G(3df,3pd), aug-cc-pVTZ, aug-pc-2 and Hypol basis sets. The complexes are found to be significantly stable. The magnitude of second hyperpolarizability enhances appreciably with increase in the number of magnesium and calcium atoms in the chain, which has been indicated by the power law dependence γ = a + bn(c) with c values ranging from 2.4-4.3 for Mg and 2.4-3.7 for Ca complexes, respectively. The largest second-hyperpolarizability (10(9) au) is obtained for the complex Ca7(NNa2)2 at the CAM-B3LYP level. The two state model has been used to explain the variation of hyperpolarizabilities. PMID:27088138

  7. Free-free and fixed base modal survey tests of the Space Station Common Module Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driskill, T. C.; Anderson, J. B.; Coleman, A. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the testing aspects and the problems encountered during the free-free and fixed base modal surveys completed on the original Space Station Common Module Prototype (CMP). The CMP is a 40-ft long by 14.5-ft diameter 'waffle-grid' cylinder built by the Boeing Company and housed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) near Huntsville, AL. The CMP modal survey tests were conducted at MSFC by the Dynamics Test Branch. The free-free modal survey tests (June '90 to Sept. '90) included interface verification tests (IFVT), often referred to as impedance measurements, mass-additive testing and linearity studies. The fixed base modal survey tests (Feb. '91 to April '91), including linearity studies, were conducted in a fixture designed to constrain the CMP in 7 total degrees-of-freedom at five trunnion interfaces (two primary, two secondary, and the keel). The fixture also incorporated an airbag off-load system designed to alleviate the non-linear effects of friction in the primary and secondary trunnion interfaces. Numerous test configurations were performed with the objective of providing a modal data base for evaluating the various testing methodologies to verify dynamic finite element models used for input to coupled load analysis.

  8. Free-free and fixed base modal survey tests of the Space Station Common Module Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driskill, T. C.; Anderson, J. B.; Coleman, A. D.

    This paper describes the testing aspects and the problems encountered during the free-free and fixed base modal surveys completed on the original Space Station Common Module Prototype (CMP). The CMP is a 40-ft long by 14.5-ft diameter 'waffle-grid' cylinder built by the Boeing Company and housed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) near Huntsville, AL. The CMP modal survey tests were conducted at MSFC by the Dynamics Test Branch. The free-free modal survey tests (June '90 to Sept. '90) included interface verification tests (IFVT), often referred to as impedance measurements, mass-additive testing and linearity studies. The fixed base modal survey tests (Feb. '91 to April '91), including linearity studies, were conducted in a fixture designed to constrain the CMP in 7 total degrees-of-freedom at five trunnion interfaces (two primary, two secondary, and the keel). The fixture also incorporated an airbag off-load system designed to alleviate the non-linear effects of friction in the primary and secondary trunnion interfaces. Numerous test configurations were performed with the objective of providing a modal data base for evaluating the various testing methodologies to verify dynamic finite element models used for input to coupled load analysis.

  9. Redox-responsive nanocarrier based on heparin end-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted tumor therapy in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dai, Liangliang; Li, Jinghua; Zhang, Beilu; Liu, Junjie; Luo, Zhong; Cai, Kaiyong

    2014-07-01

    This study reports a smart controlled drug release system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for targeted drug delivery. The system was fabricated by employing heparin as an end-capping agent to seal the mesopores of MSNs via disulfide bonds as intermediate linkers for intracellular glutathione triggered drug release. Lactobionic acid molecules were then coupled to heparin end-capped MSNs that serve as targeting motifs for facilitating the uptake of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded MSNs by HepG2 cells and tumors, respectively. Detailed investigations demonstrated that the fabricated drug delivery systems could deliver DOX to cancer cells to induce cell apoptosis in vitro and tumor tissue for the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo with minimal side effects. The study affords a promising nanocarrier for redox-responsive cargo delivery with high curative efficiency for cancer therapy. PMID:24933090

  10. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time.

  11. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time. PMID:26931898

  12. Acceptor End-Capped Oligomeric Conjugated Molecules with Broadened Absorption and Enhanced Extinction Coefficients for High-Efficiency Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liu; Lu, Kun; Xia, Benzheng; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zaiyu; Deng, Dan; Fang, Jin; Zhu, Lingyun; Wei, Zhixiang

    2016-07-01

    Acceptor end-capping of oligomeric conjugated molecules is found to be an effective strategy for simultaneous spectral broadening, extinction coefficient enhancement, and energy level optimization, resulting in profoundly enhanced power conversion efficiencies (of 9.25% and 8.91%) compared to the original oligomers. This strategy is effective in overcoming the absorption disadvantage of oligomers and small molecules due to conjugation limitation. PMID:27172541

  13. Increasing dose gradient and uniformity in small fields using modulation: Theory and prototypes for cone-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Edward T.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the theoretical limits to the tradeoff between dose gradient and uniformity when modulation is used in the context of cone based SRS, and to design a prototype collimation device that allows for steeper dose gradients and/or higher target uniformity as compared to a standard circular collimator. Methods: An inverse planning optimization is performed in the context of idealized phantom geometry to determine the ideal fluence pattern that best approximates a “rect function” dose distribution. Ideal fluence patterns were approximated in a prototype device and radiochromic film dosimetry was utilized to compare the prototype device to a standard circular collimator. Results: For choices of prescription isodose lines above approximately 50%, utilizing modulation allows for an improved tradeoff between dose gradient index and dose heterogeneity index. Compensators placed within the circular collimator can achieve the necessary modulation. Conclusions: Using modulation with features on a submillimeter distance scale, it is possible to increase the dose gradient and/or uniformity in small fields.

  14. Actin filament barbed-end capping activity in neutrophil lysates: the role of capping protein-beta 2.

    PubMed

    DiNubile, M J; Cassimeris, L; Joyce, M; Zigmond, S H

    1995-12-01

    A barbed-end capping activity was found in high speed supernates of neutrophils lysed in submicromolar calcium. In dilute supernate (> or = 100-fold dilution of cytoplasm), this activity accounted for most of the inhibition of barbed-end elongation of pyrenyl-G-actin from spectrin-F-actin seeds. Pointed-end elongation from gelsolin-capped F-actin seeds was not inhibited at comparable concentrations of supernate, thus excluding actin monomer sequestration as a cause of the observed inhibition. Most of the capping activity was due to capping protein-beta 2 (a homologue of cap Z). Thus, while immunoadsorption of > or = 95% of the gelsolin in the supernate did not decrease capping activity, immunoadsorption of capping protein-beta 2 reduced capping activity proportionally to the amount of capping protein-beta 2 adsorbed. Depletion of > 90% of capping protein-beta 2 from the supernate removed 90% of its capping activity. The functional properties of the capping activity were defined. The dissociation constant for binding to barbed ends (determined by steady state and kinetic analyses) was approximately 1-2 nM; the on-rate of capping was between 7 x 10(5) and 5 x 10(6) M-1 s-1; and the off-rate was approximately 2 x 10(-3) s-1. The concentration of capper free in the intact cell (determined by adsorption of supernate with spectrin-actin seeds) was estimated to be approximately 1-2 microM. Thus, there appeared to be enough high affinity capper to cap all the barbed ends in vivo. Nevertheless, immediately after lysis with detergent, neutrophils contained sites that nucleate barbed-end elongation of pyrenyl-G-actin. These barbed ends subsequently become capped with a time course and concentration dependence similar to that of spectrin-F-actin seeds in high speed supernates. These observations suggest that, despite the excess of high affinity capper, some ends either are not capped in vivo or are transiently uncapped upon lysis and dilution. PMID:8590796

  15. Sensitivity, Efficiency, and Transaxial Resolution Measurements of a Prototype PET Module Incorporating Plastic Scintillating Fibers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory Scott

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity, efficiency and transaxial resolutions of a prototype positron emission tomography module incorporating plastic scintillating fibers coupled to position sensitive photomultipliers were determined using three sets of detectors constructed from 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm diameter Kyowa/Kuraray plastic scintillating fibers with and without an extra mural absorber. Two detectors were assembled from 0.5 mm diameter fiber; one with an extra mural absorber and the other without an extra mural absorber. The third detector was assembled from 1.0 mm diameter fiber with an extra mural absorber. The positron source was a 0.5 mm diameter spherical pellet of ^{22}Na with an activity of 0.75 muCi. At nine different locations within the detector field of view, this source was positioned in air and in a 15 cm diameter water filled glass beaker. At these locations, the sensitivity, efficiency and transaxial resolutions of the source were measured for each of the three detectors. The sensitivity and efficiency of the detectors with the source at the center of the field of view in air, and a separation distance of 20 cm is 19 c.p.s./ muCi-1.9%, 29 c.p.s./mu Ci-2.7%, 5 c.p.s./mu-0.6% for the 1.0 mm detector with an extra mural absorber, 0.5 mm detector with no extra mural absorber, and 0.5 mm detector with an extra mural absorber, respectively. The resolution at the center of the field of view is 2.6 mm, 2.6 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively. With the source in a 15 cm diameter water cylinder the efficiency of the 1.0 mm detector and the 0.5 mm detector with no extra mural absorber is 0.6% and 1.0%, respectively. The center of field of view resolution is 2.5 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively. These resolutions are better than current commercial inorganic crystal PET systems, and comparable to some of the more sophisticated, expensive and exotic experimental systems.

  16. Microphase separation induced in the melt of Pluronic copolymers by blending with a hydrogen bonding urea-urethane end-capped supramolecular polymer.

    PubMed

    Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Newby, Gemma E; Hamley, Ian W; Hayes, Wayne; Slark, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Blending with a hydrogen-bonding supramolecular polymer is shown to be a successful novel strategy to induce microphase-separation in the melt of a Pluronic polyether block copolymer. The supramolecular polymer is a polybutadiene derivative with urea-urethane end caps. Microphase separation is analysed using small-angle X-ray scattering and its influence on the macroscopic rheological properties is analysed. FTIR spectroscopy provides a detailed picture of the inter-molecular interactions between the polymer chains that induces conformational changes leading to microphase separation. PMID:26151722

  17. Synthesis and self-assembly of terpyridine end-capped poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-block-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Brassinne, Jérémy; Poggi, Elio; Fustin, Charles-André; Gohy, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    At the basis of smart self-assembled materials are lying small building blocks that can hierarchically assemble in response to stimuli, e.g., temperature or chemical species. In this context, the synthesis of terpyridine end-capped poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) diblock copolymers via controlled radical copolymerization is reported here. The self-assembly of those copolymers is investigated in dilute aqueous solutions while varying temperature or adding transition metal ions, respectively, leading to the formation of micellar nanostructures or metallosupramolecular triblock copolymers. PMID:25491079

  18. SU-E-T-508: End to End Testing of a Prototype Eclipse Module for Planning Modulated Arc Therapy On the Siemens Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L; Sarkar, V; Spiessens, S; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Salter, B; Zhao, H; Szegedi, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The latest clinical implementation of the Siemens Artiste linac allows for delivery of modulated arcs (mARC) using full-field flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. The maximum doserate of 2000 MU/min is well suited for high dose treatments such as SBRT. We tested and report on the performance of a prototype Eclipse TPS module supporting mARC capability on the Artiste platform. Method: our spine SBRT patients originally treated with 12/13 field static-gantry IMRT (SGIMRT) were chosen for this study. These plans were designed to satisfy RTOG0631 guidelines with a prescription of 16Gy in a single fraction. The cases were re-planned as mARC plans in the prototype Eclipse module using the 7MV FFF beam and required to satisfy RTOG0631 requirements. All plans were transferred from Eclipse, delivered on a Siemens Artiste linac and dose-validated using the Delta4 system. Results: All treatment plans were straightforwardly developed, in timely fashion, without challenge or inefficiency using the prototype module. Due to the limited number of segments in a single arc, mARC plans required 2-3 full arcs to yield plan quality comparable to SGIMRT plans containing over 250 total segments. The average (3%/3mm) gamma pass-rate for all arcs was 98.5±1.1%, thus demonstrating both excellent dose prediction by the AAA dose algorithm and excellent delivery fidelity. Mean delivery times for the mARC plans(10.5±1.7min) were 50-70% lower than the SGIMRT plans(26±2min), with both delivered at 2000 MU/min. Conclusion: A prototype Eclipse module capable of planning for Burst Mode modulated arc delivery on the Artiste platform has been tested and found to perform efficiently and accurately for treatment plan development and delivered-dose prediction. Further investigation of more treatment sites is being carried out and data will be presented.

  19. Effects of end-capped acceptors subject to subtle structural changes on solution-processable small molecules for organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dan; Zhang, Yajie; Zhu, Lingyun; Zhang, Jianqi; Lu, Kun; Wei, Zhixiang

    2015-04-14

    Self-assembly is crucial for small molecular organic solar cells, which are extremely sensitive to the molecular structure. In this work, three subtle structural changed end-capped acceptors with increased electron withdrawing ability, named octyl 2-cyanoacetate (=CNCOOC8H17), 3-oxoundecanenitrile (=CNCOC8H17), and 2-(octylsulfonyl) acetonitrile (=CNSOOC8H17), were synthesized and introduced into a planar conjugated backbone using ethylhexyl-thiophene substituted benzodithiophene (TBDT) as a core and trithiophene as a π-bridge (labelled M1, M2 and M3, respectively). Their effects on absorption, thermal properties, and morphologies were studied and compared. In particular, the molecular packing of the three materials varied significantly, and the hole mobilities differed by orders of magnitude. As a result, the fill factors of devices varied from 52% to 72%. Combining the effects of electron-withdrawing capability and molecular packing, the power conversion efficiencies of the optimized devices increased from 3.0% for M3 to 6.4% for M1 and M2. The relationship between end-capped acceptors and photovoltaic properties would generate valuable insights into further producing more efficient solution-processable organic solar cells. PMID:25742902

  20. Status Update on the Second-Generation ILC Marx Modulator Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Mark A.; Benwell, Andrew; Burkhart, Craig; Larsen, Ray; MacNair, David; Nguyen, Minh; Olsen, Jeff; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    This paper is a status update of the SLAC P2 Marx. This Marx-topology klystron modulator is a second-generation modulator which builds upon experience gained from the SLAC P1 Marx. There are several fundamental differences between these modulators including the correction scheme, bus voltages, and the control system architecture. These differences, along with preliminary experimental results and the schedule for further development, are detailed in this paper.

  1. Five-cell superconducting RF module with a PBG coupler cell: design and cold testing of the copper prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenyev, Sergey Andreyevich; Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna; Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Boulware, Chase; Grimm, Terry; Rogacki, Adam

    2015-04-29

    We report the design and experimental data for a copper prototype of a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerator module. The five-cell module has an incorporated photonic band gap (PBG) cell with couplers. The purpose of the PBG cell is to achieve better higher order mode (HOM) damping, which is vital for preserving the quality of high-current electron beams. Better HOM damping raises the current threshold for beam instabilities in novel SRF accelerators. The PBG design also increases the real-estate gradient of the linac because both HOM damping and the fundamental power coupling can be done through the PBG cell instead of on the beam pipe via complicated end assemblies. First, we will discuss the design and accelerating properties of the structure. The five-cell module was optimized to provide good HOM damping while maintaining the same accelerating properties as conventional elliptical-cell modules. We will then discuss the process of tuning the structure to obtain the desired accelerating gradient profile. Finally, we will list measured quality factors for the accelerating mode and the most dangerous HOMs.

  2. Development of prototype PET scanner using dual-sided readout DOI-PET modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Kurei, Y.; Nishiyama, T.; Ohshima, T.; Taya, T.

    2014-12-01

    In our previous work, we proposed a novel design for a gamma-ray detector module capable of measuring the depth of interaction (DOI). In this paper, we further developed DOI-PET detector modules and a data acquisition system, and evaluated its performance. Each detector module was composed of a 3-D scintillator array and two large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays coupled to both ends of the 3-D scintillator array, leading to only 8-ch signal outputs from a module. The 3-D scintillator array was composed of 9 × 9 × 7 matrices of 1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm3 Ce:GAGG crystals. The detector module showed good energy resolution of 10.6% as measured at 511 keV and a high average peak to valley ratio higher than 8 for each pixel crystal identified in the X-Y-Z directions. Moreover, we evaluated the spatial resolution of a virtual 18-ch PET gantry simulated by using two detector modules that were flexibly controlled using both the X-stage and θ-stage in 20-degree steps. By measuring a 22Na point source (0.25 mm in diameter), we showed that spatial resolution substantially degrades from 1.0 mm to 7.8 mm (FWHM; as measured at 0 mm and 28 mm off-center) with a non-DOI configuration, whereas the corresponding values for the DOI configuration were 0.9 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively (FWHM; as measured at 0 mm and 28 mm off-center). This preliminary study confirms that our DOI-PET module is useful for future high spatial resolution and compact small-animal PET scanners without radial image distortions at the peripheral regions of the field of view (FOV).

  3. Reducing, by pulse width modulation, the curing temperature of a prototype high-power LED light curing unit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ta-Ko; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Tsai, Chi-Cheng

    2006-06-01

    Third-generation LEDs have high irradiance and efficiency, but the associated temperature rise is potentially hazardous to the pulp of teeth. We evaluated, during composite polymerization, the irradiance and temperature rise of a prototype high-power LED light curing unit (LCU) with optimal pulse width modulation (PWM), and then compared the results with four off-the-shelf high-power LCUs. A cavity was prepared in a tooth, and a composite resin layer was applied and cured. For each LCU, the irradiance and temperature changes at the pulp-dentin junction were measured. Microhardness (Vickers hardness) of cured composite samples was measured for each LCU. Our prototype had a final temperature of 36.4 +/- 1.3 degrees C and irradiance of 1,182 +/- 1 mW/cm2. The unit with the highest temperature had a temperature of 48.7 +/- 1.2 degrees C and an irradiance of 1,194 +/- 1 mW/cm2. Based on the results of the present study, it was shown that PWM technology reduced the curing temperature while retaining the polymerization effectiveness of a high-power LED LCU. PMID:16916235

  4. Characterization and validation tests on Ecosole C-modules first prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancro, Carmine; Graditi, Giorgio; Fucci, Raffaele; Ciniglio, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Michele; Borriello, Aniello; Romano, Antonio; Carpanelli, Maurizio; Borelli, Gianni; Verdilio, Daniele; De Nardis, Davide; Migali, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    ECOSOLE is an European collaborative Project started in August 2012 that involves several industrial and institutional partners with the aim to develop a complete and innovative concentrating photovoltaic system. During the first two years of activity, several specific components as cells, optics, modules and tracker have been designed and developed. This work reports the description of these devices and the main results of the characterization campaigns carried out to define their technical features.

  5. Assembly and maintenance of full-scale NIF amplifiers in the Amplifier Module Prototype Laboratory (AMPLAB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, John A.

    1999-07-01

    Mechanical assembly and maintenance of the prototype NIF amplifiers in the AMPLAB at LLNL requires specialized equipment designed to manipulate large and delicate component in a safe and clean manner. Observations made during the operation of this assembly and maintenance equipment in AMPLAB provide design guidance for similar tools being built for the NIF. Fixtures used for amplifier frame installation, laser slab and flashlamp cassette assembly, transport, and installation, and in-situ blastshield exchange are presented. Examples include a vacuum slab gripper, slab handling clean crane, slab cassette assembly fixture, sealed transport vehicle for slab cassette movement between the cleanroom and amplifier, slab cassette transfer fixture between the cleanroom and transport vehicle, and equipment needed for frame assembly unit, blastshield, and flashlamp cassette installation and removal. The use of these tools for amplifier assembly , system reconfiguration, reflector replacement, and recovery from an abnormal occurrence such as a flashlamp explosion is described. Observations are made on the design and operation of these tools and their contribution to the final design of their NIF counterparts.

  6. A Prototype TOF PET Detector Module Using a Micro-Channel Plate Photomultiplier Tube with Waveform Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Frisch, H.; Tang, F.; Kao, C.-M.

    2011-01-01

    We are exploring a large area flat panel micro-channel plate photomultiplier tube (MCP PMT) under development for an application to time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET). High speed waveform sampling with transmission-lines is adopted for reading out the signal with precise time and space information with a small number of low-power channels. As a demonstration of the concept, detector modules have been built using 2″×2″ Photonis Planacon MCP PMTs (XP85022) and prototype transmission-line (TL) boards. The signals from the MCP PMT through the transmission-lines are sampled by DRS4 evaluation boards running at 5 giga-samples per second (GS/s). The event information is extracted by processing the digitized waveforms. For experimental tests, a single 3×3×10 mm3 LYSO crystal is optically coupled to each MCP PMT; the detector responses to 511 keV annihilation photon from a 22Na source are measured using the data taken in coincidence mode. As a preliminary result, we obtain a position resolution of ∼2.8 mm (0.3 mm) (FWHM) along (perpendicular to) the transmission-line, ∼309 ps (FWHM) for coincidence time resolution, and ∼14% (FWHM) of energy resolution at 511 keV. This initial result gives a promise that the large area MCP PMT is applicable to TOF PET. PMID:22347762

  7. Preparation and Surface Property of Fluoroalkyl End-Capped Vinyltrimethoxysilane Oligomer/Talc Composite-Encapsulated Organic Compounds: Application for the Separation of Oil and Water.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Yuri; Saito, Tomoya; Yamada, Satoshi; Sugiya, Masashi; Sawada, Hideo

    2015-07-01

    Fluoroalkyl end-capped vinyltrimethoxysilane oligomer [R(F)-(CH2-CHSi(OMe)3)n-R(F); n = 2, 3; R(F) = CF(CF3)OC3F7 (R(F)-VM oligomer)] can undergo the sol-gel reaction in the presence of talc particles under alkaline conditions at room temperature to provide the corresponding fluorinated oligomeric silica/talc nanocomposites (RF-VM-SiO2/Talc). A variety of guest molecules such as 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone (HMB), bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol AF, 3-(hydroxysilyl)-1-propanesulfonic acid (THSP), and perfluoro-2-methyl-3-oxahexanoic acid (R(F)-COOH) are effectively encapsulated into the R(F)-VM-SiO2/Talc composite cores to afford the corresponding fluorinated nanocomposites-encapsulated these guest molecules. The R(F)-VM-SiO2/Talc composites encapsulated low molecular weight aromatic compounds such as HMB and BPA can exhibit a superoleophilic-superhydrophobic characteristic on the surfaces; however, the R(F)-VM-SiO2/Talc composite-encapsulated THSP and R(F)-COOH exhibit a superoleophobic-superhydrophilic characteristic on the modified surfaces. In these nanocomposites, the R(F)-VM-SiO2/Talc/THSP composites are applicable to the surface modification of polyester fabric, and the modified polyester fabric possessing a superoleophobic-superhydrophilic characteristic on the surface can be used for the membrane for oil (dodecane)/water separation. In addition, the R(F)-VM-SiO2/Talc composites-encapsulated micrometer-size controlled cross-linked polystyrene particles can be also prepared under similar conditions, and the obtained composite white-colored particle powders are applied to the packing material for the column chromatography to separate water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. PMID:26042807

  8. Identification of in vitro cytochrome P450 modulators to detect induction by prototype inducers in the mallard duckling (Anas platyrhynchos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renauld, A.E.; Melancon, M.J.; Sordillo, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    Seven modulators of mammalian monooxygenase activity were evaluated for their ability to selectively stimulate or inhibit in vitro monooxygenase activities of hepatic microsomes from mallard ducklings treated with phenobarbital, ?-naphthoflavone, 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl or vehicle. Microsomes were assayed fluorometrically for four monooxygenases: benzyloxy, ethoxy, methoxy, and pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase, in combination with each of the seven modulators. Four combinations: ?-naphthoflavone and 2-methylbenzimidazole with benzyloxyresorufin, and Proadifen with methoxy- and ethoxyresorufin, respectively, were evaluated further. ?-naphthoflavone-treated groups were clearly distinguished from the corn oil vehicle control group by all of the assays and by the effects of the modulators in three of the four assay/modulator combinations. Enzyme activities of the phenobarbital and saline groups were statistically similar (P ?.05) when assayed without modulator added, but each assay/modulator combination distinguished between these groups. The PCB-treated group was distinguished from the corn oil vehicle control group only for BROD activity, with or without the presence of modulator. Graphing of per cent modulation of BROD activity versus initial BROD activity provided the clearest distinction between all of the study groups. Identification of these selective in vitro modulators may improve detection and measurement of low level cytochrome P450 induction in avian species.

  9. Prototyping user displays using CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosta, Charles P.; Miller, Ross; Krolak, Patrick; Vesty, Matt

    1990-01-01

    CLIPS is being used as an integral module of a rapid prototyping system. The prototyping system consists of a display manager for object browsing, a graph program for displaying line and bar charts, and a communications server for routing messages between modules. A CLIPS simulation of a physical model provides dynamic control of the user's display. Currently, a project is well underway to prototype the Advanced Automation System (AAS) for the Federal Aviation Administration.

  10. Design and the parametric testing of the space station prototype integrated vapor compression distillation water recovery module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, W. F.; Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    Potable water for the Space Station Prototype life support system is generated by the vapor compression technique of vacuum distillation. A description of a complete three-man modular vapor compression water renovation loop that was built and tested is presented; included are all of the pumps, tankage, chemical post-treatment, instrumentation, and controls necessary to make the loop representative of an automatic, self-monitoring, null gravity system. The design rationale is given and the evolved configuration is described. Presented next are the results of an extensive parametric test during which distilled water was generated from urine and urinal flush water with concentration of solids in the evaporating liquid increasing progressively to 60 percent. Water quality, quantity and production rate are shown together with measured energy consumption rate in terms of watt-hours per kilogram of distilled water produced.

  11. SU-E-T-214: Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Based On Passively Scattered Protons and Multi-Leaf Collimation: Prototype TPS and Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Carabe-Fernandez, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose. Intensity-modulated proton therapy is usually implemented with multi-field optimization of pencil-beam scanning (PBS) proton fields. However, at the view of the experience with photon-IMRT, proton facilities equipped with double-scattering (DS) delivery and multi-leaf collimation (MLC) could produce highly conformal dose distributions (and possibly eliminate the need for patient-specific compensators) with a clever use of their MLC field shaping, provided that an optimal inverse TPS is developed. Methods. A prototype TPS was developed in MATLAB. The dose calculation process was based on a fluence-dose algorithm on an adaptive divergent grid. A database of dose kernels was precalculated in order to allow for fast variations of the field range and modulation during optimization. The inverse planning process was based on the adaptive simulated annealing approach, with direct aperture optimization of the MLC leaves. A dosimetry study was performed on a phantom formed by three concentrical semicylinders separated by 5 mm, of which the inner-most and outer-most were regarded as organs at risk (OARs), and the middle one as the PTV. We chose a concave target (which is not treatable with conventional DS fields) to show the potential of our technique. The optimizer was configured to minimize the mean dose to the OARs while keeping a good coverage of the target. Results. The plan produced by the prototype TPS achieved a conformity index of 1.34, with the mean doses to the OARs below 78% of the prescribed dose. This Result is hardly achievable with traditional conformal DS technique with compensators, and it compares to what can be obtained with PBS. Conclusion. It is certainly feasible to produce IMPT fields with MLC passive scattering fields. With a fully developed treatment planning system, the produced plans can be superior to traditional DS plans in terms of plan conformity and dose to organs at risk.

  12. Rapid prototyping, astronaut training, and experiment control and supervision: distributed virtual worlds for COLUMBUS, the European Space Laboratory module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Juergen

    2002-02-01

    In 2004, the European COLUMBUS Module is to be attached to the International Space Station. On the way to the successful planning, deployment and operation of the module, computer generated and animated models are being used to optimize performance. Under contract of the German Space Agency DLR, it has become IRF's task to provide a Projective Virtual Reality System to provide a virtual world built after the planned layout of the COLUMBUS module let astronauts and experimentators practice operational procedures and the handling of experiments. The key features of the system currently being realized comprise the possibility for distributed multi-user access to the virtual lab and the visualization of real-world experiment data. Through the capabilities to share the virtual world, cooperative operations can be practiced easily, but also trainers and trainees can work together more effectively sharing the virtual environment. The capability to visualize real-world data will be used to introduce measured data of experiments into the virtual world online in order to realistically interact with the science-reference model hardware: The user's actions in the virtual world are translated into corresponding changes of the inputs of the science reference model hardware; the measured data is than in turn fed back into the virtual world. During the operation of COLUMBUS, the capabilities for distributed access and the capabilities to visualize measured data through the use of metaphors and augmentations of the virtual world may be used to provide virtual access to the COLUMBUS module, e.g. via Internet. Currently, finishing touches are being put to the system. In November 2001 the virtual world shall be operational, so that besides the design and the key ideas, first experimental results can be presented.

  13. Biosphere 2 test module: A ground-based sunlight-driven prototype of a closed ecological life support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Leigh, Linda; Alling, Abigail; MacCallum, Taber; Allen, John; Alvarez-Romo, Norberto

    Constructed in 1986, the Biosphere 2 Test Module has been used since the end of that year for closed ecological systems experiments. It is the largest closed ecological facility ever built, with a sealed variable volume of some 480 cubic meters. It is built with a skin of steel spaceframes with double-laminated glass panels admitting about 65 percent Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR). The floor is of welded steel and there is an underground atmospheric connection via an air duct to a variable volume chamber (``lung'') permitting expansion and contraction of the Test Module's air volume caused by changes in temperature and barometric pressure, which causes a slight positive pressure from inside the closed system to the outside thereby insuring that the very small leakage rate is outward. Several series of closed ecological system investigations have been carried out in this facility. One series of experiments investigated the dynamics of higher plants and associated soils with the atmosphere under varying light and temperature conditions. Another series of experiments included one human in the closed system for three, five and twenty-one days. During these experiments the Test Module had subsystems which completely recycled its water and atmosphere; all the human dietary needs were produced within the facility, and all wastes were recycled using a marsh plant/microbe system. Other experiments have examined the capability of individual component systems used, such as the soil bed reactors, to eliminate experimentally introduced trace gases. Analytic systems developed for these experiments include continuous monitors of eleven atmospheric gases in addition to the complete gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) examinations of potable, waste system and irrigation water quality.

  14. Greenbrier Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-18

    This case study describes a prototype home that is the model home for the Homes at Greenbrier in Oakdale, Connecticut, and demonstrates the builder's concept of “attainable sustainable” of offering high performance homes at mid-market prices.

  15. Self-assembly behavior of amphiphilic C₆₀-end-capped poly(vinyl ether)s in water and dissociation of the aggregates by the complexing of the C₆₀ moieties with externally added γ-cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Motoyanagi, Jin; Kurata, Akihiro; Minoda, Masahiko

    2015-03-01

    C60-end-capped polymers consisting of an amphiphilic poly(2-methoxyethyl vinyl ether) (PMOVE) main chain were synthesized by living cationic polymerization using a C60-functionalized initiator (C60VE-TFA) in the presence of EtAlCl2 as an activator and dioxane as an added base. The obtained polymers (C60-PMOVE) dissolved in a wide range of solvents including water and exhibited solvatochromism depending on the polarity of the media employed. This phenomenon was attributed to self-assembly in polar media due to hydrophobicity of the C60 moieties at the terminus of the amphiphilic polymer chain. Furthermore, the addition of γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD), a strong host molecule for fullerenes, to the self-assembled system brought about the dissociation of the aggregates into molecularly dispersed free polymer chains. Titration of the aqueous solution of the self-assembly of C60-PMOVE with γ-CD indicated the possible formation of inclusion complexes of C60-PMOVE and γ-CD, and this binding process occurs in a positive cooperative manner. PMID:25658224

  16. SMIILE Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakić, Gordana; Budimac, Zoran

    2011-09-01

    In this paper the prototype of SMIILE tool (currently stands for: Software Metrics—Independent of Input LanguagE) will be described. Crucial characteristic of this tool is its independency of input programming language for supported software metrics. This characteristic is based on usage of newly introduced type of syntax trees—enriched Concrete Syntax Trees (eCST) for source code representation. MSCI: 68N30 Mathematical aspects of software engineering (specification, verification, metrics, requirements, etc.)

  17. Rapid Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Javelin, a Lone Peak Engineering Inc. Company has introduced the SteamRoller(TM) System as a commercial product. The system was designed by Javelin during a Phase II NASA funded small commercial product. The purpose of the invention was to allow automated-feed of flexible ceramic tapes to the Laminated Object Manufacturing rapid prototyping equipment. The ceramic material that Javelin was working with during the Phase II project is silicon nitride. This engineered ceramic material is of interest for space-based component.

  18. Electronic prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopcroft, J.

    1987-01-01

    The potential benefits of automation in space are significant. The science base needed to support this automation not only will help control costs and reduce lead-time in the earth-based design and construction of space stations, but also will advance the nation's capability for computer design, simulation, testing, and debugging of sophisticated objects electronically. Progress in automation will require the ability to electronically represent, reason about, and manipulate objects. Discussed here is the development of representations, languages, editors, and model-driven simulation systems to support electronic prototyping. In particular, it identifies areas where basic research is needed before further progress can be made.

  19. Measurement and simulation of two-phase CO2 cooling in Micromegas modules for a Large Prototype of Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D. S.; Attié, D.; Colas, P.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Majumdar, N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Sarkar, S.; Bhattacharya, A.; Ganjour, S.

    2015-08-01

    The readout electronics of a Micromegas (MM) module consume nearly 26 W of electric power, which causes the temperature of electronic board to increase upto 70 oC. Increase in temperature results in damage of electronics. Development of temperature gradient in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) may affect precise measurement as well. Two-phase CO2 cooling has been applied to remove heat from the MM modules during two test beam experiments at DESY, Hamburg. Following the experimental procedure, a comprehensive study of the cooling technique has been accomplished for a single MM module by means of numerical simulation. This paper is focused to discuss the application of two-phase CO2 cooling to keep the temperature below 30 oC and stabilized within 0.2 oC.

  20. Frequency modulation spectroscopy at 1.3microm using InGaAsP lasers: a prototype field instrument for atmospheric chemistry research.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T J; Wienhold, F G; Burrows, J P; Harris, G W

    1991-02-01

    Two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy has been used in conjunction with InGaAsP lasers in the 1.3-microm region to monitor weak water vapor absorptions in a long path White cell. Detection electronics that reduce the effect of Johnson noise are described. The system was capable of detecting optical densities corresponding to <1.7 x 10(-6) in a 1-Hz bandwidth. Factors limiting the difference between observed and shot noise limited performance for these types of laser and condition are discussed. PMID:20582006

  1. Rapid prototype and test

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  2. EUSO-TA prototype telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisconti, Francesca

    2016-07-01

    EUSO-TA is one of the prototypes developed for the JEM-EUSO project, a space-based large field-of-view telescope to observe the fluorescence light emitted by cosmic ray air showers in the atmosphere. EUSO-TA is a ground-based prototype located at the Telescope Array (TA) site in Utah, USA, where an Electron Light Source and a Central Laser Facility are installed. The purpose of the EUSO-TA project is to calibrate the prototype with the TA fluorescence detector in presence of well-known light sources and cosmic ray air showers. In 2015, the detector started the first measurements and tests using the mentioned light sources have been performed successfully. A first cosmic ray candidate has been observed, as well as stars of different magnitude and color index. Since Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are very promising for fluorescence telescopes of next generation, they are under consideration for the realization of a new prototype of EUSO Photo Detector Module (PDM). The response of this sensor type is under investigation through simulations and laboratory experimentation.

  3. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  4. PyTrilinos Rapid Prototyping Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-01

    PyTrilinos provides access to selected Trilinos packages from the python scripting language. This allows interactive and dynamic creation of Trilinos objects, rapid prototyping that does not require compilation, and "gluing" Trilinos scripts to other python modules, such as plotting, etc. The currently supported packages are Epetra, EpetraExt, and NOX.

  5. PRMS Data Warehousing Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruvadoo, Eranna K.

    2002-01-01

    Project and Resource Management System (PRMS) is a web-based, mid-level management tool developed at KSC to provide a unified enterprise framework for Project and Mission management. The addition of a data warehouse as a strategic component to the PRMS is investigated through the analysis, design and implementation processes of a data warehouse prototype. As a proof of concept, a demonstration of the prototype with its OLAP's technology for multidimensional data analysis is made. The results of the data analysis and the design constraints are discussed. The prototype can be used to motivate interest and support for an operational data warehouse.

  6. PRMS Data Warehousing Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruvadoo, Eranna K.

    2001-01-01

    Project and Resource Management System (PRMS) is a web-based, mid-level management tool developed at KSC to provide a unified enterprise framework for Project and Mission management. The addition of a data warehouse as a strategic component to the PRMS is investigated through the analysis design and implementation processes of a data warehouse prototype. As a proof of concept, a demonstration of the prototype with its OLAP's technology for multidimensional data analysis is made. The results of the data analysis and the design constraints are discussed. The prototype can be used to motivate interest and support for an operational data warehouse.

  7. LENS: Prototyping Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, S. Derek

    2013-04-01

    The Low-Energy Neutrino Spectrometer (LENS) prototyping program is broken into two phases. The first of these is μLENS, a small prototype to study the light transmission in the as built LENS scintillation lattice--- a novel detector method of high segmentation in a large liquid scintillation detector. The μLENS prototype is currently deployed and taking data at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) near Virginia Tech. I will discuss the Scintillation Lattice construction methods and schemes of the μLENS program for running with minimal channels instrumented to date ˜41 compared to full coverage 216). The second phase of prototyping is the miniLENS detector for which construction is under way. I will discuss the overall design from the miniLENS Scintillation Lattice to the shielding.

  8. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  9. ICI Showcase House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-16

    Building Science Corporation collaborated with ICI Homes in Daytona Beach, FL on a 2008 prototype Showcase House that demonstrates the energy efficiency and durability upgrades that ICI currently promotes through its in-house efficiency program called EFactor.

  10. Colleyville Eco House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-16

    This case study describes the construction of a prototype high-performance home that includes a high efficiency ground source heat pump, unvented roof with low density spray foam insulation, and supplemental dehumidification.

  11. Prototype resupply scheduler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Steve; Hughes, Angi; Byrd, Jim

    1987-01-01

    Resupply scheduling for the Space Station presents some formidable logistics problems. One of the most basic problems is assigning supplies to a series of shuttle resupply missions. A prototype logistics expert system which constructs resupply schedules was developed. This prototype is able to reconstruct feasible resupply plans. In addition, analysts can use the system to evaluate the impact of adding, deleting or modifying launches, cargo space, experiments, etc.

  12. A Primer on Prototyping.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Dylan; Biron, David

    2015-01-01

    Standard mechanical components, such as adapters or mounts, are ubiquitous in research laboratories, C. elegans labs included. Recently, in-house prototyping and fabricating both standard and custom mechanical parts has become simple and cost effective. Here we describe the basic steps, equipment, and considerations required for rapid prototyping of a handful of simple yet useful designs. These examples were chosen for their simplicity, as well as for demonstrating specific practicalities. They are thus appropriate as training exercises. PMID:26423979

  13. D-0 North End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J.; /Fermilab

    1990-08-02

    The North endcap calorimeter vessel was recieved on July 1, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on July 10-11 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN107, and 3740.210-EN-110 for information about the CC cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 210 microns. Pumping on the vacuum space for the next 15 hours showed no progress and a leak detector was connected to the pumping line. A leak check showed a leak in a thermocouple feedthru on the vacuum space relief plate. After fixing the leak, the pressure dropped to 16 microns in less than one hour. A rate of rise test was performed starting at a pressure of 13 microns. The pressure rose to 39 microns within 8 minutes and then only rose to 43 microns in 2.5 hours (1.6 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. The lowest pressure achieved after 2 days of pumping was 80 microns. Valving out the pump for 30 minutes resulted in a 5 micron per minute rate of rise. The rate of rise was considered acceptable since there were known leak paths through the bolts of the signal ports. The EC North vessel was rolled outside of Lab A in preparation for a 5000 gallon liquid nitrogen trailer which arrived July, 10 at 8:00am. Before filling the vessel, the vacuum space pump was valved off. The pressure in the vacuum space was 12 microns at that point. During the next 24 hours of the test, the vacuum space pressure decreased to 5 microns. A plot of the vacuum space pressure with time is included at the end of this note. The liquid nitrogen was pressure transferred from the trailer at 29 psig to the pressure vessel at 1 psig for ten hours. At that time there was sufficient (16-inch) of liquid nitrogen in the vessel to turn the LN2 trailer delivery pump on. Thirteen and one half hours after starting the fill, the vessel had 50-inch of LN2 collected. During the latter part of the filling, about twelve loud metallic bangs were heard. The noises came at random intervals with sometimes five minutes between and other times an hour between. The best way to describe the sound is to imagine the sound made if someone was trapped inside the vessel with a baseball bat and took a good swing. The trailer was disconnected and the the vessel was left overnight for ten hours. Due to the slow LN2 fill rate, the temperature gradient in the pressure vessel shell was not very large, only about 25 kelvin difference was found from a RTD in the warm-up nozzle of the vessel and the resistors of the liquid level probe. A temperature versus time graph is included at the end of this note.

  14. Process of end-capping a polyimide system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, T. L.; Burks, H. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process of endcapping a polyimide system with an endcapping agent in order to achieve a controlled decrease in molecular weight and melt viscosity along with predictable fracture resistance of the molded products is disclosed. The uncapped system is formed by combining an equimolar ratio of 4,4'-bis (3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy) diphenylsulfide dianhydride (BDSDA) and 1,-bis (aminophenoxy) benzene (APB) dissolved in bis (2-methoxyethyl)ether. The endcapped system is formed by dissolving APB in bis-(2-methoxyethyl)ether, adding the BDSDA. By varying the amount of endcapping from 0 to 4%, molecular weight is decreased from 13,900 to 8660. At a processing temperature of 250 C, there is a linear relationship between molecular weight and viscosity, with the viscosity decreasing by two orders of magnitude as the molecular weight decreased from 13,900 to 8660.

  15. D-0 South End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1990-11-26

    The South endcap calorimeter vessel was moved into Lab A on Sept. 18, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on Sept. 26 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. The test of the ECS was performed in the same manner using the same equipment as the ECN cold test. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN-I07, and 3740.210-EN-II0 for information about the CC cold test. Reference EN-260 for the results of the ECN cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 40 microns. The pumping continued overnight (another 16 hours). In the morning the pressure was 11.5 microns. A rate of rise test was performed. With the pump valved off, the pressure rose to 14 microns within 5 minutes and then rose to 16 microns in 6 hours (0.33 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. After 18 hours, the pressure vessel was down to 270 microns. An additional day of pumping took the pressure down to only 250 microns. A leak was then found and fixed around the seal of the rupture disc. The pump was put on line again. The pressure vessel with pump on line was 27 microns after 16.5 hours. A rate of rise was then conducted. The pressure was 90 microns after valving out the pump. After 30 minutes the pressure increased to 107 microns. (34 microns/hr).

  16. Ion-trapping and end-capping in ionic polymerizations

    SciTech Connect

    Penczek, S.

    1993-12-31

    Ion-trapping, developed in this laboratory, involves both vinyl and ring-opening polymerizations, anionic and cationic. Originally it was elaborated for cationic ring-opening polymerization and involved reaction of phosphines (mostly triphenylphosphine) with onium ions, like oxonium ions in the polymerization of cyclic ethers. The same method has more recently been used for the cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers, allowing not only to determine the total concentration of the growing species by {sup 31}P-NMR but also to study the stereochemistry of the chain end by the same method. In the anionic ring-opening polymerization diphenylchlorophosphate was applied. It reacts quantitatively with alcoholate, thiolate, and carboxylate anions. More recently diphenylchlorophosphine was successfully used to determine the concentration and structure of the chain ends in the anionic polymerization of styrene, butadiene, isoprene as well as their mixtures.

  17. Software wrappers for rapid prototyping JAUS-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smuda, Bill

    2005-05-01

    Recent experiences with robots in Iraq have proven that robotic technology is useful to the warfighter, but tools are needed to rapidly respond to evolving missions. This paper details a methodology for generation of software wrappers using JAUS to simplify prototyping and development of robotic systems (distributed, embedded and real-time system software modules). Software wrappers will allow insertion of modules into a visual prototyping environment. The wrappers will intercept module functions and bind them with functions needed to exercise the modules outside of the native environment. Generation of JAUS wrappers will enhance the development environment by reducing rote work and producing consistently behaving module interfaces. The resulting methodology will provide a rapid prototyping environment for use in sensor integration, Operator Control Unit (OCU) development and autonomous vehicle control.

  18. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  19. Power API Prototype

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-12-04

    The software serves two purposes. The first purpose of the software is to prototype the Sandia High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification effort. The specification can be found at http://powerapi.sandia.gov . Prototypes of the specification were developed in parallel with the development of the specification. Release of the prototype will be instructive to anyone who intends to implement the specification. More specifically, our vendor collaborators will benefit from the availability of the prototype.more » The second is in direct support of the PowerInsight power measurement device, which was co-developed with Penguin Computing. The software provides a cluster wide measurement capability enabled by the PowerInsight device. The software can be used by anyone who purchases a PowerInsight device. The software will allow the user to easily collect power and energy information of a node that is instrumented with PowerInsight. The software can also be used as an example prototype implementation of the High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification.« less

  20. Power API Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-04

    The software serves two purposes. The first purpose of the software is to prototype the Sandia High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification effort. The specification can be found at http://powerapi.sandia.gov . Prototypes of the specification were developed in parallel with the development of the specification. Release of the prototype will be instructive to anyone who intends to implement the specification. More specifically, our vendor collaborators will benefit from the availability of the prototype. The second is in direct support of the PowerInsight power measurement device, which was co-developed with Penguin Computing. The software provides a cluster wide measurement capability enabled by the PowerInsight device. The software can be used by anyone who purchases a PowerInsight device. The software will allow the user to easily collect power and energy information of a node that is instrumented with PowerInsight. The software can also be used as an example prototype implementation of the High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

  1. ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter prototype test

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry; /Oak Ridge

    2005-09-01

    This Memorandum of Understanding between the Test Beam collaborators and Fermilab is for the use of beam time at Fermilab during the Fall, 2005 Meson Test Beam Run. The experimenters plan to measure the energy, position, and time resolution of prototype modules of a large electromagnetic calorimeter proposed to be installed in the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The ALICE experiment is one of the three large approved LHC experiments, with ALICE placing special emphasis on the LHC heavy-ion program. The large electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a US initiative that is endorsed by the ALICE collaboration and is currently in the early stages of review by the Nuclear Physics Division of the DOE. The installation in the test beam at FNAL and test beam measurements will be carried out by the US members of the ALICE collaboration (ALICE-USA). The overall design of the ALICE EMCal is heavily influenced by its location within the ALICE L3 magnet. The EMCal is to be located inside the large room temperature magnet within a cylindrical integration volume approximately l12cm deep, by 5.6m in length, sandwiched between the ALICE TPC space frame and the L3 magnet coils. The chosen technology is a layered Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter with a longitudinal pitch of 1.6mm Pb and 1.6mm scintillator. The full detector spans {eta} = -0.7 to {eta} = 0.7 with an azimuthal acceptance of {Delta}{phi} = 120{sup o}. The EMCal readout is of a ''Shish-Kabob'' type similar to the PHENIX Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter in which the scintillation light is collected via wavelength shifting fibers running through the Pb-scintillator tiles perpendicular to the front surface. The detector is segmented into {approx}14000 towers. The basic structural units of the calorimeter are supermodules, each subtending approximately {approx}20{sup o} in {Delta}{phi} and 0.7 units in {Delta}{eta}. Supermodules are assembled from individual modules. The modules are further segmented into 2 x 2

  2. Prototyping the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Advanced Ceramics Research (ACR) of Tucson, Arizona, researches transforming scientific concepts into technological achievement. Through the SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) program, ACR developed a high pressure and temperature fused deposition system, a prototyping system that is known as extrusion freeform fabrication. This system is useful in manufacturing prosthetics. ACR also developed a three-dimensional rapid prototyping process in which physical models are quickly created directly from computer generated models. Marshall Space Flight Center also contracted ACR to fabricate a set of ceramic engines to be appraised for a solar thermal rocket engine test program.

  3. Laboratory prototype flash evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A laboratory prototype flash evaporator that is being developed as a candidate for the space shuttle environmental control system expendable heat sink is described. The single evaporator configuration uses water as an evaporant to accommodate reentry and on-orbit peak heat loads, and Freon 22 for terrestrial flight phases below 120,000 feet altitude. The design features, fabrication techniques used for the prototype unit, redundancy considerations, and the fluid temperature control arrangement are reported in detail. The results of an extensive test program to determine the evaporator operational characteristics under a wide variety of conditions are presented.

  4. MIND performance and prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Cervera-Villanueva, A.

    2008-02-21

    The performance of MIND (Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector) at a neutrino factory has been revisited in a new analysis. In particular, the low neutrino energy region is studied, obtaining an efficiency plateau around 5 GeV for a background level below 10{sup -3}. A first look has been given into the detector optimisation and prototyping.

  5. Prototype Facility Educational Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Div. of Professional-Technical Education, Boise.

    This document presents prototypical educational specifications to guide the building and renovation of Idaho vocational schools so they can help communities meet the advanced, professional-technical programs of the future. The specifications start with points to consider when determining school site suitability. The document then sets forth…

  6. Rapid Prototyping in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    PVSio is a conservative extension to the PVS prelude library that provides basic input/output capabilities to the PVS ground evaluator. It supports rapid prototyping in PVS by enhancing the specification language with built-in constructs for string manipulation, floating point arithmetic, and input/output operations.

  7. Prompt and Precise Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For Sanders Design International, Inc., of Wilton, New Hampshire, every passing second between the concept and realization of a product is essential to succeed in the rapid prototyping industry where amongst heavy competition, faster time-to-market means more business. To separate itself from its rivals, Sanders Design aligned with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop what it considers to be the most accurate rapid prototyping machine for fabrication of extremely precise tooling prototypes. The company's Rapid ToolMaker System has revolutionized production of high quality, small-to-medium sized prototype patterns and tooling molds with an exactness that surpasses that of computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machining devices. Created with funding and support from Marshall under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Rapid ToolMaker is a dual-use technology with applications in both commercial and military aerospace fields. The advanced technology provides cost savings in the design and manufacturing of automotive, electronic, and medical parts, as well as in other areas of consumer interest, such as jewelry and toys. For aerospace applications, the Rapid ToolMaker enables fabrication of high-quality turbine and compressor blades for jet engines on unmanned air vehicles, aircraft, and missiles.

  8. Cost Effective Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickman, Jerry L.; Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1996-01-01

    This laboratory exercise seeks to develop a cost effective prototype development. The exercise has the potential of linking part design, CAD, mold development, quality control, metrology, mold flow, materials testing, fixture design, automation, limited parts production and other issues as related to plastics manufacturing.

  9. Advances in rapid prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{trademark} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. Sandia uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype parts in support of a Sandia National Laboratories managed program called FASTCAST. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{trademark} resin and software, they experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible, using this technology, to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable firs article and small lots size production parts. They use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster, with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This presentation will focus on the successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes.

  10. Fresnel Interferometric Imager: ground-based prototype.

    PubMed

    Serre, Denis; Deba, Paul; Koechlin, Laurent

    2009-05-20

    The Fresnel Interferometric Imager is a space-based astronomical telescope project yielding milli-arcsecond angular resolution and high contrast images with loose manufacturing constraints. This optical concept involves diffractive focusing and formation flying: a first "primary optics" space module holds a large binary Fresnel array, and a second "focal module" holds optical elements and focal instruments that allow for chromatic dispersion correction. We have designed a reduced-size Fresnel Interferometric Imager prototype and made optical tests in our laboratory in order to validate the concept for future space missions. The primary module of this prototype consists of a square, 8 cm side, 23 m focal length Fresnel array. The focal module is composed of a diaphragmed small telescope used as "field lens," a small cophased diverging Fresnel zone lens that cancels the dispersion, and a detector. An additional module collimates the artificial targets of various shapes, sizes, and dynamic ranges to be imaged. We describe the experimental setup, different designs of the primary Fresnel array, and the cophased Fresnel zone lens that achieves rigorous chromatic correction. We give quantitative measurements of the diffraction limited performances and dynamic range on double sources. The tests have been performed in the visible domain, lambda = 400-700 nm. In addition, we present computer simulations of the prototype optics based on Fresnel propagation that corroborate the optical tests. This numerical tool has been used to simulate the large aperture Fresnel arrays that could be sent to space with diameters of 3 to 30 m, foreseen to operate from Lyman alpha (121 nm) to mid IR (25 microm). PMID:19458729

  11. The Galileo PPS expert monitoring and diagnostic prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Khosrow

    1989-01-01

    The Galileo PPS Expert Monitoring Module (EMM) is a prototype system implemented on the SUN workstation that will demonstrate a knowledge-based approach to monitoring and diagnosis for the Galileo spacecraft Power/Pyro subsystems. The prototype will simulate an analysis module functioning within the SFOC Engineering Analysis Subsystem Environment (EASE). This document describes the implementation of a prototype EMM for the Galileo spacecraft Power Pyro Subsystem. Section 2 of this document provides an overview of the issues in monitoring and diagnosis and comparison between traditional and knowledge-based solutions to this problem. Section 3 describes various tradeoffs which must be considered when designing a knowledge-based approach to monitoring and diagnosis, and section 4 discusses how these issues were resolved in constructing the prototype. Section 5 presents conclusions and recommendations for constructing a full-scale demonstration of the EMM. A Glossary provides definitions of terms used in this text.

  12. Mars Spark Source Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; Weiland, Karen J.; VanderWal, Randall L.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware has been developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma that will allow their identification and quantification. Trace metal measurements are vital for the assessment of the potential toxicity of the Martian environment for human exploration. The current method of X-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations only of major species. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. This paper describes the Mars Spark Source Prototype hardware, the results of the characterization tests, and future plans for hardware development.

  13. Prototype Slide Stainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The prototype slide staining system capable of performing both one-component Wright's staining of blood smears and eight-step Gram staining of heat fixed slides of microorganisms is described. Attention was given to liquid containment, waste handling, absence of contamination from previous staining, and stability of the staining reagents. The unit is self-contained, capable of independent operation under one- or zero-g conditions, and compatible with Skylab A.

  14. Wet chemistry instrument prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A wet chemistry instrument prototype for detecting amino acids in planetary soil samples was developed. The importance of amino acids and their condensation products to the development of life forms is explained. The characteristics of the instrument and the tests which were conducted to determine the materials compatibility are described. Diagrams are provided to show the construction of the instrument. Data obtained from the performance tests are reported.

  15. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  16. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Douglas J.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Munley, John T.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the experimental setup of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR thermosyphon prototype cooling system. A nitrogen thermosyphon prototype of such a system has been built and tested at PNNL. This document presents the experimental setup of the prototype that successfully demonstrated the heat transfer performance of the system.

  17. MAPMT H7546B anode current response study for ILC SiD muon system prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Blazey, G.; Francis, K.; Hedin, D.; Zutshi, V.; Fisk, H.; Milstene, C.; Abrams, R.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-01

    The proposed Silicon Detector (SiD) concept for the ILC has barrel and end cap muon systems. An SiD scintillator based muon system prototype has 256 strips and was constructed from extruded strips, WLS fibers, clear fibers, and multianode photo multiplier tubes (MAPMT) Hamamatsu H7546B. Six MAPMTs were used. As a first step to understand strip output, the response of every anode to a given brightness of light and applied voltage must be measured. For the test, a custom made light source was used. Each MAPMT output was measured independently. The anode currents were measured at constant (green) input light brightness and the same photocathode to anode voltage (800V). The anode currents have a wide spread; for all tubes the maximum value is 5.23 times larger than the minimum value. The MAPMT cross talk was measured for one of the central inputs. The maximum cross talk value is about 4.9%. The average cross talk for the nearest four neighboring channels is 3.9%, for the farthest four is 1%. To assure the reproducibility and repeatability of the measurements, the double reference method was used.

  18. Loadable Hypervisor Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Naughton, III, Thomas J; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Scott, Stephen L; Aderholdt, Ferrol

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of a new hypervisor mechanism for loading dynamic shared objects (modules) at runtime. These loadable hypervisor modules (LHM) are modeled after the loadable kernel modules used in Linux. We detail the current LHM implementation based on the Xen hypervisor. Potential use cases for this LHM mechanism include dynamic hypervisor instrumentation for debug tracing or performance analysis. We discuss the initial LHM prototype and future plans.

  19. Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Initiated in January, 1997, under NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, the Wireless Augmented Reality Prototype (WARP) is a means to leverage recent advances in communications, displays, imaging sensors, biosensors, voice recognition and microelectronics to develop a hands-free, tetherless system capable of real-time personal display and control of computer system resources. Using WARP, an astronaut may efficiently operate and monitor any computer-controllable activity inside or outside the vehicle or station. The WARP concept is a lightweight, unobtrusive heads-up display with a wireless wearable control unit. Connectivity to the external system is achieved through a high-rate radio link from the WARP personal unit to a base station unit installed into any system PC. The radio link has been specially engineered to operate within the high- interference, high-multipath environment of a space shuttle or space station module. Through this virtual terminal, the astronaut will be able to view and manipulate imagery, text or video, using voice commands to control the terminal operations. WARP's hands-free access to computer-based instruction texts, diagrams and checklists replaces juggling manuals and clipboards, and tetherless computer system access allows free motion throughout a cabin while monitoring and operating equipment.

  20. The STAR EM calorimeter design and small prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    The basis for several design features of The STAR Electromagnetic Calorimeter and Shower Maximum Detector is presented. This includes some of the tile-fiber optical design. The authors describe both the barrel and the end cap. Some preliminary analysis of electron acceptance vs pion rejection in test beam data is also discussed.

  1. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  2. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  3. Current Sharing Analysis of Arm Prototype for ITER PF Converter Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinchao; Song, Zhiquan; Xu, Liuwei; Fu, Peng; Guo, Bin; Li, Sen; Dong, Lin; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    A bridge arm prototype of ITER poloidal field (PF) converter modules has been designed and fabricated. Non-cophase counter parallel connection is chosen as the arm structure of the prototype. Among all factors affecting current sharing, arm structure is the main one. During the design of the arm prototype, a novel method based on inductance matrixes is employed to improve the current sharing of the bridge arm. The test results on the prototype show that the current sharing performance of the arm prototype is much better than relevant design requirement, and that the matrix method is very effective to analyze and solve the current sharing problems of thyristor converters.

  4. Design of a prototype tri-electrode ion-chamber for megavoltage X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Gopal, Arun; Jain, Jinesh; Xia, Junyi; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2007-04-01

    High-energy (megavoltage) X-ray imaging is widely used in industry (e.g., aerospace, construction, material sciences) as well as in health care (radiation therapy). One of the fundamental problems with megavoltage imaging is poor contrast and spatial resolution in the detected images due to the dominance of Compton scattering at megavoltage X-ray energies. Therefore, although megavoltage X-rays can be used to image highly attenuating objects that cannot be imaged at kilovoltage energies, the former does not provide the high image quality that is associated with the latter. A high contrast and spatial resolution detector for high-energy X-ray fields called the kinestatic charge detector (KCD) is presented here. The KCD is a tri-electrode ion-chamber based on highly pressurized noble gas. The KCD operates in conjunction with a strip-collimated X-ray beam (for high scatter rejection) to scan across the imaging field. Its thick detector design and unique operating principle provides enhanced charge signal integration for high quality imaging (quantum efficiency ˜50%) despite the unfavorable implications of high-energy X-ray interactions on image quality. The proposed design for a large-field prototype KCD includes a cylindrical pressure chamber along with 576 signal-collecting electrodes capable of resolving at 2 mm -1. The collecting electrodes are routed out of the chamber through the flat end-cap, thereby optimizing the mechanical strength of the chamber. This article highlights the simplified design of the chamber using minimal components for simple assembly. In addition, fundamental imaging measurements and estimates of ion recombination that were performed on a proof-of-principle test chamber are presented. The imaging performance of the prototype KCD was found to be an order-of-magnitude greater than commercial phosphor screen based flat-panel systems, demonstrating the potential for high-quality megavoltage imaging for a variety of industrial applications.

  5. PERFORMANCE OF THE CEBAF PROTOTYPE CRYOMODULE RENASCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece; Edward Daly; G. Davis; Michael Drury; William Hicks; Joseph Preble; Haipeng Wang

    2008-02-12

    The prototype cryomodule Renascence was constructed as an energy building block for securing 6 GeV operation of CEBAF and to validate design elements for future CEBAF upgrade modules. These elements include the new “HG” and “LL” 7-cell cavity designs and a new tuner design.[1,2] Issues were identified during initial testing in 2005. The module has been reworked to address the issues with thermal stability, component breakage, and tuner motion. In addition, opportunity was taken to employ upgraded cleaning and assembly techniques for the cavity string. The HOM coupler heating issue was resolved, and seven of the eight cavities in the cryomodule have run stably at an average of 20 MV/m CW. The cryogenic, rf, and mechanical performance of the cryomodule are presented. Commissioning in CEBAF has just been completed in October 2007.

  6. Cyberinfrastructure for Rapid Prototyping Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, T. A.; Kalyanasundaram, A.; Zhuk, I.; Goli, V.

    2007-12-01

    The overall goal of the NASA Rapid Prototyping Capability is to speed the evaluation of potential uses of NASA research products and technologies to improve future operational systems by reducing the time to access, configure, and assess the effectiveness of NASA products and technologies. The infrastructure to support the RPC is thus expected to provide the capability to rapidly evaluate innovative methods of linking science observations. The RPC infrastructure supports two major categories of experiments (and subsequent analysis): comparing results of a particular model as fed with data coming from different sources, and comparing different models using the data coming from the same source. In spite of being conceptually simple, two use cases in fact entail a significant technical challenge. Enabling RPC experiments requires thus a radical simplification of access to both actual and simulated data, as well as tools for data pre- and post-processing. The tools must be interoperable, allowing the user to create computational workflows with the data seamlessly transferred as needed, including third-party transfers to high-performance computing platforms. In addition, the provenance of the data must be preserved in order to document results of different what-if scenarios and to enable collaboration and data sharing between users. The functionality of the RPC splits into several independent modules such as interactive Web site, data server, tool's interfaces, or monitoring service. Each such module is implemented as an independent portlet. The RPC Portal aggregates the different contents provided by the portlets into a single interface employing a popular GridSphere portlet container. The RPC data access is based on Unidata's THREDDS Data server (TDS) extended to support, among others, interactive creation of containers for new data collections and uploading new data sets, downloading the data either to the user desktop or transferring it to a remote location using

  7. Prototype space fabrication platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessel, James A.; Ceney, James M.; Crean, David M.; Ingham, Edward A.; Pabst, David J.

    1993-12-01

    Current plans for constructing large structures in space entail fabricating the primary components, such as truss segments, on the ground and assembling them in space. This process requires an exorbitant number of support missions, and methods to minimize the number must be considered. Whenever the space shuttle is launched, its external tank is jettisoned and destroyed prior to reaching orbit. This aerospace grade aluminum structure can be carried into orbit and utilized extrusively. The Prototype Space Fabrication Platform (SFP) fabricates aluminum materials, reduced from external tanks, into functional trusses. The trusses are strong and can be used as the primary components for future structures in space. The fabrication process produces a continuous truss allowing the end user to determine the length. The SFP can fabricate the same amount of truss from one external tank as four dedicated shuttle missions can deliver in the cargo bay. The SFP utilizes electrodynamic propulsion, via shielded coils, for maneuvering. The novel propulsion system facilitates a versatile payload transportation and delivery capability. The SFP can continuously track a target from all directions. The tracking system is ideal for docking since plume impingement is not a concern. With the assistance of remote manipulators, the SFP can deliver a payload in a wide variety of orientations. Under most conditions, the remote manipulator and maneuvering commands originate from ground workstations. Required manned presence is greatly reduced, and the time when the space shuttle is off station is effectively utilized. The logistical complications, currently inhibiting advancement in space, can be eliminated.

  8. Helios Prototype on Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Helios Prototype is an enlarged version of the Centurion flying wing, which flew a series of test flights at Dryden in late 1998. The craft has a wingspan of 247 feet, 41 feet greater than the Centurion, 2 1/2 times that of its solar-powered Pathfinder flying wing and longer than either the Boeing 747 jetliner or Lockheed C-5 transport aircraft. It is one of several remotely-piloted aircraft-also known as uninhabited aerial vehicles or UAV's-being developed as technology demonstrators by several small airframe manufacturers under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., of Monrovia, Calif., the unique craft is intended to demonstrate two key missions: the ability to reach and sustain horizontal flight at 100,000 feet altitude on a single-day flight, and to maintain flight above 50,000 feet altitude for at least four days, both on electrical power derived from non-polluting solar energy. During later flights, AeroVironment's flight test team will evaluate new motor-control software which may allow the pitch of the aircraft (the nose-up or nose-down attitude in relation to the horizon) to be controlled entirely by the motors. If successful, production versions of the Helios could eliminate the elevators on the wing's trailing edge now used for pitch control, saving weight and increasing the area of the wing available for installation of solar cells.

  9. Virtual Prototyping at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaro, Silvano De

    The VENUS (Virtual Environment Navigation in the Underground Sites) project is probably the largest Virtual Reality application to Engineering design in the world. VENUS is just over one year old and offers a fully immersive and stereoscopic "flythru" of the LHC pits for the proposed experiments, including the experimental area equipment and the surface models that are being prepared for a territorial impact study. VENUS' Virtual Prototypes are an ideal replacement for the wooden models traditionally build for the past CERN machines, as they are generated directly from the EUCLID CAD files, therefore they are totally reliable, they can be updated in a matter of minutes, and they allow designers to explore them from inside, in a one-to-one scale. Navigation can be performed on the computer screen, on a stereoscopic large projection screen, or in immersive conditions, with an helmet and 3D mouse. By using specialised collision detection software, the computer can find optimal paths to lower each detector part into the pits and position it to destination, letting us visualize the whole assembly probess. During construction, these paths can be fed to a robot controller, which can operate the bridge cranes and build LHC almost without human intervention. VENUS is currently developing a multiplatform VR browser that will let the whole HEP community access LHC's Virtual Protoypes over the web. Many interesting things took place during the conference on Virtual Reality. For more information please refer to the Virtual Reality section.

  10. Bubble memory module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohning, O. D.; Becker, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Design, fabrication and test of partially populated prototype recorder using 100 kilobit serial chips is described. Electrical interface, operating modes, and mechanical design of several module configurations are discussed. Fabrication and test of the module demonstrated the practicality of multiplexing resulting in lower power, weight, and volume. This effort resulted in the completion of a module consisting of a fully engineered printed circuit storage board populated with 5 of 8 possible cells and a wire wrapped electronics board. Interface of the module is 16 bits parallel at a maximum of 1.33 megabits per second data rate on either of two interface buses.

  11. Small Thermophotovoltaic Prototype Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durisch, Wilhelm; Bitnar, Bernd; von Roth, Fritz; Palfinger, Günther

    2003-01-01

    In an earlier paper [1], we reported on a small grid-connected thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system consisting of an ytterbia mantle emitter and silicon solar cells with 16 % efficiency (under solar irradiance at Standard Test Conditions, STC). The emitter was heated up using a butane burner with a rated thermal power of 1.35 kW (referring to the lower heating value). This system produced an electrical output of 15 W, which corresponds to a thermal to electric (direct current) conversion efficiency of 1.1 %. In the interim, further progress has been made, and significantly higher efficiencies have been achieved. The most important development steps are: 1) The infrared radiation-absorbing water filter between emitter and silicon cells (to protect the cells against overheating and against contact with flue gasses) has been replaced by a suitable glass tube. By doing this, it has been possible to prevent losses of convertible radiation in water. 2) Cell cooling has been significantly improved, in order to reduce cell temperature, and therefore increase conversion efficiency. 3) The shape of the emitter has been changed from spherical to a quasi-cylindrical geometry, in order to obtain a more homogeneous irradiation of the cells. 4) The metallic burner tube, on which the ytterbia emitter was fixed in the initial prototypes, has been replaced by a heat-resistant metallic rod, carrying ceramic discs as emitter holders. This has prevented the oxidation and clogging of the perforated burner tube. 5) Larger reflectors have been used to reduce losses in useful infrared radiation. 6) Smaller cells have been used, to reduce electrical series resistance losses. Applying all these improvements to the basic 1.35 kW prototype, we attained a system efficiency of 1.5 %. By using preheated air for combustion (at approximately 370 °C), 1.8 % was achieved. In a subsequent step, a photocell generator was constructed, consisting of high-efficiency silicon cells (21% STC efficiency). In this

  12. Foraging search: Prototypical intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobus, George

    2000-05-01

    We think because we eat. Or as Descartes might have said, on a little more reflection, "I need to eat, therefore I think." Animals that forage for a living repeatedly face the problem of searching for a sparsely distributed resource in a vast space. Furthermore, the resource may occur sporadically and episodically under conditions of true uncertainty (nonstationary, complex and non-linear dynamics). I assert that this problem is the canonical problem solved by intelligence. It's solution is the basis for the evolution of more advanced intelligence in which the space of search includes that of concepts (objects and relations) encoded in cortical structures. In humans the conscious experience of searching through concept space we call thinking. The foraging search model is based upon a higher-order autopoeitic system (the forager) employing anticipatory processing to enhance its success at finding food while avoiding becoming food or having accidents in a hostile world. I present a semi-formal description of the general foraging search problem and an approach to its solution. The latter is a brain-like structure employing dynamically adaptive neurons. A physical robot, MAVRIC, embodies some principles of foraging. It learns cues that lead to improvements in finding targets in a dynamic and nonstationary environment. This capability is based on a unique learning mechanism that encodes causal relations in the neural-like processing element. An argument is advanced that searching for resources in the physical world, as per the foraging model, is a prototype for generalized search for conceptual resources as when we think. A problem represents a conceptual disturbance in a homeostatic sense. The finding of a solution restores the homeostatic balance. The establishment of links between conceptual cues and solutions (resources) and the later use of those cues to think through to solutions of quasi-isomorphic problems is, essentially, foraging for ideas. It is a quite

  13. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype tests results

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lopes, Mauricio L.; G. Ambrosio; DiMarco, J.; Evbota, D.; Feher, S.; Friedsam, H.; Galt, A.; Hays, S.; Hocker, J.; Kim, M. J.; et al

    2016-02-08

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment has been developed to search for evidence of charged lepton flavor violation through the direct conversion of muons into electrons. The transport solenoid is an s-shaped magnet which guides the muons from the source to the stopping target. It consists of fifty-two superconducting coils arranged in twenty-seven coil modules. A full-size prototype coil module, with all the features of a typical module of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured by a collaboration between INFN-Genoa and Fermilab. The prototype contains two coils that can be powered independently. In order to validate the design, the magnet went throughmore » an extensive test campaign. Warm tests included magnetic measurements with a vibrating stretched wire, electrical and dimensional checks. As a result, the cold performance was evaluated by a series of power tests as well as temperature dependence and minimum quench energy studies.« less

  14. A Computuerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Tom Ulrich; Richard Villim

    2013-11-01

    on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment.

  15. A Computuerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Tom Ulrich; Richard Villim

    2013-08-01

    on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment.

  16. Fuelcell Prototype Locomotive

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Barnes

    2007-09-28

    An international industry-government consortium is developing a fuelcell hybrid switcher locomotive for commercial railway applications and power-to-grid generation applications. The current phase of this on-going project addresses the practicalities of on-board hydrogen storage, fuelcell technology, and hybridity, all with an emphasis on commercially available products. Through practical evaluation using designs from Vehicle Projects’ Fuelcell-Powered Underground Mine Loader Project, the configuration of the fuelcell switcher locomotive changed from using metal-hydride hydrogen storage and a pure fuelcell power plant to using compressed hydrogen storage, a fuelcell-battery hybrid power plant, and fuelcell stack modules from Ballard Power Systems that have been extensively used in the Citaro bus program in Europe. The new overall design will now use a RailPower battery hybrid Green Goat™ as the locomotive platform. Keeping the existing lead-acid batteries, we will replace the 205 kW diesel gen-set with 225 kW of net fuelcell power, remove the diesel fuel tank, and place 14 compressed hydrogen cylinders, capable of storing 70 kg of hydrogen at 350 bar, on the roof. A detailed design with associated CAD models will allow a complete build of the fuelcell-battery hybrid switcher locomotive in the next funded phase.

  17. Energy saver prototype accelerating resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; May, M.; Miller, H.W.; Reid, J.; Turkot, F.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1981-06-01

    A fixed frequency rf accelerating resonator has been built and tested for the Fermilab Energy Saver. The design parameters and prototype resonator test results are given. The resonator features a high permeability nickel alloy resistor which damps unwanted modes and corona rolls designed with the aid of the computer code SUPERFISH. In bench measurements, the prototype resonator has achieved peak accelerating voltages of 500 kV for a 1% duty cycle and cw operation at 360 kV. 4 refs.

  18. Characterization of Prototype LSST CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    OCONNOR,P.; FRANK, J.; GEARY, J.C.; GILMORE, D.K.; KOTOV, I.; RADEKA, V.; TAKACS, P.; TYSON, J.A.

    2008-06-23

    The ambitious science goals of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be achieved in part by a wide-field imager that will achieve a new level of performance in terms of area, speed, and sensitivity. The instrument performance is dominated by the focal plane sensors, which are now in development. These new-generation sensors will make use of advanced semiconductor technology and will be complemented by a highly integrated electronics package located inside the cryostat. A test laboratory has been set up at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to characterize prototype sensors and to develop test and assembly techniques for eventual integration of production sensors and electronics into modules that will form the final focal plane. As described in [1], the key requirements for LSST sensors are wideband quantum efficiency (QE) extending beyond lpm in the red, control of point spread function (PSF), and fast readout using multiple amplifiers per chip operated in parallel. In addition, LSST's fast optical system (f71.25) places severe constraints on focal plane flatness. At the chip level this involves packaging techniques to minimize warpage of the silicon die, and at the mosaic level careful assembly and metrology to achieve a high coplanarity of the sensor tiles. In view of the long lead time to develop the needed sensor technology, LSST undertook a study program with several vendors to fabricate and test devices which address the most critical performance features [2]. The remainder of this paper presents key results of this study program. Section 2 summarizes the sensor requirements and the results of design optimization studies, and Section 3 presents the sensor development plan. In Section 4 we describe the test bench at BNL. Section 5 reports measurement results obtained to date oh devices fabricated by several vendors. Section 6 presents a summary of the paper and an outlook for the future work. We present characterization methods and results on a

  19. Energy performance analysis of prototype electrochromic windows

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.; Rubin, M.; Selkowitz, S.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a study investigating the energy performance of three newly developed prototype electrochromic devices. The DOE-2.1 E energy simulation program was used to analyze the annual cooling, lighting, and total electric energy use and peak demand as a function of window type and size. The authors simulated a prototypical commercial office building module located in the cooling-dominated locations of Phoenix, AZ and Miami, FL. Heating energy use was also studied in the heating-dominated location of Madison, WI. Daylight illuminance was used to control electrochromic state-switching. Two types of window systems were analyzed; i.e., the outer pane electrochromic glazing was combined with either a conventional low-E or a spectrally selective inner pane. The properties of the electrochromic glazings are based on measured data of new prototypes developed as part of a cooperative DOE-industry program. The results show the largest difference in annual electric energy performance between the different window types occurs in Phoenix and is about 6.5 kWh/m{sup 2} floor area (0.60 kWh/ft{sup 2}) which can represent a cost of about $.52/m{sup 2} ($.05/ft{sup 2}) using electricity costing $.08/kWh. In heating-dominated locations, the electrochromic should be maintained in its bleached state during the heating season to take advantage of beneficial solar heat gain which would reduce the amount of required heating. This also means that the electrochromic window with the largest solar heat gain coefficient is best.

  20. Thermal stability of the prototypical Mn porphyrin-based superoxide dismutase mimic and potent oxidative-stress redox modulator Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride, MnTE-2-PyP5+

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Victor H. A.; CarvalhoDa-Silva, Dayse; Santos, Jonas L. M. S.; Weitner, Tin; Fonseca, Maria Gardênnia; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Idemori, Ynara M.; Batinić-Haberle, Ines; Rebouças, Júlio S.

    2012-01-01

    Cationic Mn porphyrins are among the most potent catalytic antioxidants and/or cellular redox modulators. Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride (MnTE-2-PyPCl5) is the Mn porphyrin most studied in vivo and has successfully rescued animal models of a variety of oxidative stress-related diseases. The stability of an authentic MnTE-2-PyPCl5 sample was investigated hereon by thermogravimetric, derivative thermogravimetric, and differential thermal analyses (TG/DTG/DTA), under dynamic air, followed by studies at selected temperatures to evaluate the decomposition path and appropriate conditions for storage and handling of these materials. All residues were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Three thermal processes were observed by TG/DTG. The first event (endothermic) corresponded to dehydration, and did not alter the MnTE-2-PyPCl5 moiety. The second event (endothermic) corresponded to the loss of EtCl (dealkylation), which was characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The residue at 279 °C had UV-vis and TLC data consistent with those of the authentic, completely dealkylated analogue, MnT-2-PyPCl. The final, multi-step event corresponded to the loss of the remaining organic matter to yield Mn3O4 which was characterized by IR spectroscopy. Isothermal treatment at 188 °C under static air for 3 h yielded a mixture of partially dealkylated MnPs and traces of the free-base, dealkylated ligand, H2T-2-PyP, which reveals that dealkylation is accompanied by thermal demetallation under static air conditions. Dealkylation was not observed if the sample was heated as a solid or in aqueous solution up to ∼100 °C. Whereas moderate heating changes sample composition by loss of H2O, the dehydrated sample is indistinguishable from the original sample upon dissolution in water, which indicates that catalytic activity (on Mn basis) remains unaltered. Evidently, dealkylation at high temperature compromises sample

  1. Recognition system rapid application prototyping tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Stuart A.; Karins, James P.; Dydyk, Robert B.

    1997-03-01

    The recognition system rapid application prototyping tool (RSRAPT) was developed to evaluate various potential configurations of miniature ruggedized optical correlator (MROC) modules and to rapidly assess the feasibility of their use within systems such as missile seekers. RSRAPT is a simulation environment for rapidly prototyping, developing, and evaluating recognition systems that incorporate MROC technology. It is designed to interface to OLE compliant Windows applications using standard OLE interfaces. The system consists of nine key functional elements: sensor, detection, segmentation, pre-processor, filter selection, correlator, post-processor, identifier, and controller. The RSRAPT is a collection of object oriented server components, a client user interface and a recognitions system image and image sensor database. The server components are implemented to encapsulate processes that are typical to any optical-correlator based pattern recognition system. All the servers are implemented as Microsoft component object model objects. In addition to the system servers there are two key 'helper servers.' The first is the image server, which encapsulates all 'images'. This includes gray scale images and even complex images. The other supporting server is the filter generation server. This server trains the system on user data by calculating filters for user selected image types. The system hosts a library of standard image processing routines such as convolution, edge operators, clustering algorithms, median filtering, morphological operators such as erosion and dilation, connected components, region growing, and adaptive thresholding. In this paper we describe the simulator and show sample results from diverse applications.

  2. Rapid prototyping fabrication of focused ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Cain, Charles A

    2014-09-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) fabrication techniques are currently widely used in diverse industrial and medical fields, providing substantial advantages in development time and costs in comparison to more traditional manufacturing processes. This paper presents a new method for the fabrication of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducers using RP technology. The construction of a large-aperture hemispherical transducer designed by computer software is described to demonstrate the process. The transducer was conceived as a modular design consisting of 32 individually focused 50.8-mm (2-in) PZT-8 element modules distributed in a 300-mm hemispherical scaffold with a geometric focus of 150 mm. The entire structure of the array, including the module housings and the hemispherical scaffold was fabricated through a stereolithography (SLA) system using a proprietary photopolymer. The PZT elements were bonded to the lenses through a quarter-wave tungsten-epoxy matching layer developed in-house specifically for this purpose. Modules constructed in this manner displayed a high degree of electroacoustic consistency, with an electrical impedance mean and standard deviation of 109 ± 10.2 Ω for the 32 elements. Time-of-flight measurements for individually pulsed modules mounted on the hemispherical scaffold showed that all pulses arrived at the focus within a 350 ns range, indicating a good degree of element alignment. Pressure profile measurements of the fully assembled transducer also showed close agreement with simulated results. The measured focal beam FWHM dimensions were 1.9 × 4.0 mm (1.9 × 3.9 mm simulated) in the transversal and axial directions respectively. Total material expenses associated with the construction of the transducer were approximately 5000 USD (as of 2011). The versatility and lower fabrication costs afforded by RP methods may be beneficial in the development of complex transducer geometries suitable for a variety of research and clinical applications

  3. Application Evaluation of Air-Sparging and Aerobic Bioremediation in PAM(Physical Aquifer Model) with Advanced and Integrated Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, U.; Ko, J.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.; Kwon, S.; Ha, J.; Lim, J.; Han, K.

    2010-12-01

    It is generally difficult for a single process to remediate contaminated soil and groundwater contaminated with various organic compounds such as total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) because those contaminants show different chemical properties in two phases (e.g. soil and groundwater). Therefore, it is necessary to design an in-situ remediation system which can remove various contaminants simultaneously. For the purpose, we constructed integrated well module which can apply several remediation process such as air sparging, soil vapor extraction, and bioventing. The advanced integrated module consisted of three main parts such as head, body, and end cap. First of all, head part has three 3.6-cm-diameter stainless lines and can simultaneously inject air or extract NAPL, respectively. Secondly, body part has two 10-cm-height screen intervals with 100-mesh stainless inserts for unsaturated and smear zone. Lastly, we constructed three different sizes of end caps for injection and extraction from a saturated zone. We assumed that the integrated module can play bioremediation, air sparging, cometabolic sparging, chemical oxidation. In this study, we examined application of air sparing and aerobic bioremediation of toluene in Physical Aquifer Model (PAM) with an integrated well module. During air sparging experiments, toluene concentration decreased by injection of air. In addition, we accomplished bioremediation experiment to evaluate removal of toluene by indigenous microbes in PAM with continuous air injection. From the two experiments result, we confirmed that air sparging and aerobic bioremediation processes can be simultaneously carried out by an intergrated well module.

  4. OTF Mission Operations Prototype Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Walter F.; Lucord, Steven A.; Stevens, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Reports on the progress of the JSC/OTF prototype of a CCSDS SM&C protocol based communications link between two space flight operations control centers. Varied implementations using software architectures from current web enterprise venues are presented. The AMS protocol (CCSDS Blue Book standard 735.1) was used for messaging and link communications.

  5. Prototypes for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presented are brief descriptions of the winning entries in this magazine's contest for existing programs to serve as prototypes for wide-scale use in elementary schools of the 1980s. Top prizes went to computer literacy, energy education, and nutrition projects. Twenty runners-up are also described. Project addresses are included. (SJL)

  6. Rapid Prototyping Enters Mainstream Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winek, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Explains rapid prototyping, a process that uses computer-assisted design files to create a three-dimensional object automatically, speeding the industrial design process. Five commercially available systems and two emerging types--the 3-D printing process and repetitive masking and depositing--are described. (SK)

  7. GM Prototype Moon Buggy Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Under the direction of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration missions. During the development process, LRV prototype wheels underwent soil tests in building 4481 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Pictured is the GM wheel design.

  8. ROVER: A prototype active vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, David J.; Marsh, Brian D.

    1987-08-01

    The Roving Eyes project is an experiment in active vision. We present the design and implementation of a prototype that tracks colored balls in images from an on-line charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Rover is designed to keep up with its rapidly changing environment by handling best and average case conditions and ignoring the worst case. This allows Rover's techniques to be less sophisticated and consequently faster. Each of Rover's major functional units is relatively isolated from the others, and an executive which knows all the functional units directs the computation by deciding which jobs would be most effective to run. This organization is realized with a priority queue of jobs and their arguments. Rover's structure not only allows it to adapt its strategy to the environment, but also makes the system extensible. A capability can be added to the system by adding a functional module with a well defined interface and by modifying the executive to make use of the new module. The current implementation is discussed in the appendices.

  9. Universal stowage module for future space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Descamp, V. A.; Hussey, M. W.; Garber, P.; Mandras, W.; Mckinney, D.

    1974-01-01

    The design effort to develop, design, and fabricate a prototype Universal Stowage Module with universal restraints that are readily adaptable for most sizes and shapes of items that would be launched into space and returned aboard shuttle payloads is presented.

  10. Engineering evaluation of a sodium hydroxide thermal energy storage module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. G.; Gordon, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    An engineering evaluation of thermal energy storage prototypes was performed in order to assess the development status of latent heat storage media. The testing and the evaluation of a prototype sodium hydroxide module is described. This module stored off-peak electrical energy as heat for later conversion to domestic hot water needs.

  11. A failure management prototype: DR/Rx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammen, David G.; Baker, Carolyn G.; Kelly, Christine M.; Marsh, Christopher A.

    1991-01-01

    This failure management prototype performs failure diagnosis and recovery management of hierarchical, distributed systems. The prototype, which evolved from a series of previous prototypes following a spiral model for development, focuses on two functions: (1) the diagnostic reasoner (DR) performs integrated failure diagnosis in distributed systems; and (2) the recovery expert (Rx) develops plans to recover from the failure. Issues related to expert system prototype design and the previous history of this prototype are discussed. The architecture of the current prototype is described in terms of the knowledge representation and functionality of its components.

  12. Prototype Biology-Based Radiation Risk Module Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald G.; Patel, Zarana; Hu, Shaowen; Huff, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of space radiation and risk mitigation are strategic knowledge gaps for the Evolvable Mars Campaign. The current epidemiology-based NASA Space Cancer Risk (NSCR) model contains large uncertainties (HAT #6.5a) due to lack of information on the radiobiology of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and lack of human data. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. Our proposed study will compare DNA damage, histological, and cell kinetic parameters after irradiation in normal 2D human cells versus 3D tissue models, and it will use a multi-scale computational model (CHASTE) to investigate various biological processes that may contribute to carcinogenesis, including radiation-induced cellular signaling pathways. This cross-disciplinary work, with biological validation of an evolvable mathematical computational model, will help reduce uncertainties within NSCR and aid risk mitigation for radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  13. Prototyping the PANDA Barrel DIRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, C.; Kalicy, G.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The design of the Barrel DIRC detector for the future PANDA experiment at FAIR contains several important improvements compared to the successful BABAR DIRC, such as focusing and fast timing. To test those improvements as well as other design options a prototype was build and successfully tested in 2012 with particle beams at CERN. The prototype comprises a radiator bar, focusing lens, mirror, and a prism shaped expansion volume made of synthetic fused silica. An array of micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes measures the location and arrival time of the Cherenkov photons with sub-nanosecond resolution. The development of a fast reconstruction algorithm allowed to tune construction details of the detector setup with test beam data and Monte-Carlo simulations.

  14. Customer-experienced rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu; Li, Anbo

    2008-12-01

    In order to describe accurately and comprehend quickly the perfect GIS requirements, this article will integrate the ideas of QFD (Quality Function Deployment) and UML (Unified Modeling Language), and analyze the deficiency of prototype development model, and will propose the idea of the Customer-Experienced Rapid Prototyping (CE-RP) and describe in detail the process and framework of the CE-RP, from the angle of the characteristics of Modern-GIS. The CE-RP is mainly composed of Customer Tool-Sets (CTS), Developer Tool-Sets (DTS) and Barrier-Free Semantic Interpreter (BF-SI) and performed by two roles of customer and developer. The main purpose of the CE-RP is to produce the unified and authorized requirements data models between customer and software developer.

  15. Prototype Morphing Fan Nozzle Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun; Song, Gang-Bing

    2004-01-01

    Ongoing research in NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch to develop smart materials technologies for aeropropulsion structural components has resulted in the design of the prototype morphing fan nozzle shown in the photograph. This prototype exploits the potential of smart materials to significantly improve the performance of existing aircraft engines by introducing new inherent capabilities for shape control, vibration damping, noise reduction, health monitoring, and flow manipulation. The novel design employs two different smart materials, a shape-memory alloy and magnetorheological fluids, to reduce the nozzle area by up to 30 percent. The prototype of the variable-area fan nozzle implements an overlapping spring leaf assembly to simplify the initial design and to provide ease of structural control. A single bundle of shape memory alloy wire actuators is used to reduce the nozzle geometry. The nozzle is subsequently held in the reduced-area configuration by using magnetorheological fluid brakes. This prototype uses the inherent advantages of shape memory alloys in providing large induced strains and of magnetorheological fluids in generating large resistive forces. In addition, the spring leaf design also functions as a return spring, once the magnetorheological fluid brakes are released, to help force the shape memory alloy wires to return to their original position. A computerized real-time control system uses the derivative-gain and proportional-gain algorithms to operate the system. This design represents a novel approach to the active control of high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Researchers have estimated that such engines will reduce thrust specific fuel consumption by 9 percent over that of fixed-geometry fan nozzles. This research was conducted under a cooperative agreement (NCC3-839) at the University of Akron.

  16. Haptic device for virtual prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, Takashi; Sasaki, Ken; Miyatake, Hideki; Itoh, Michimasa

    2007-12-01

    In determining the quality of a car, switch feeling is one of the important factors. Designing switches is time consuming because the relationships between characteristics of a desired switch and design parameters such as spring stiffness or stroke are not very clear, and furthermore, physical evaluation requires prototypes. A haptic Virtual Prototyping Environment (VPE), in which CAE (Computer-Aided Engineering) and haptic interface work together to display virtual feelings of mechanisms designed by CAD (Computer-Aided Design) will enable designers to feel the motions of the designed switches without prototypes. This paper presents design and quantitative evaluation of a haptic VPE for power window switches. We compared relationship between displacement and static reaction force, and acceleration during clicking motion. The similarity in the force vs stroke curve (FS curve) suggests the overall similarity in the feeling of the whole switch stroke. The acceleration showed some differences, which was felt as somewhat softer clicking effect. The lower frequency of the residual vibration of the haptic device indicates that the equivalent inertia of the haptic device is larger than that of the real switch. Although the overall motion of the switch stroke felt similar, quality of reality needs further refinement. Introduction of acceleration feedback for reducing the equivalent inertia is discussed.

  17. Infrared eye: an operational prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrette, Paul C.; Fortin, Jean; St-Germain, Daniel; Delisle, Jean

    1998-09-01

    A new concept of surveillance system called Wide Area Coverage Infrared Surveillance System (WACISS), based on the human vision, was developed and a first laboratory prototype was demonstrated recently. A second prototype, more operational, is named the Infrared Eye is being built and will be tested in cooperation with the NRCC Flight Research Laboratory. The Infrared Eye will use the new pixel-less quantum well infrared photodetector sensors, coupled to light emitting diodes (QWIP/LED), currently being developed at NRCC Institute for Microstructural Science under DREV sponsorship. The multiple advantages of the pixel-less QWIP/LED over conventional sensors will considerably simplify the design of the system. As the WACISS, the IR Eye will integrate two cameras: the first, with a wide field-of- view, will be used for detection while the second camera, with a narrower field with higher resolution for identification, will be mobile within the WFOV and slaved to the operator's line-of-sight by means of an eye-tracking system. The images from both cameras will be fused and shown simultaneously on a standard high resolution CRT display unit, interfaced with the eye-tracking unit. The basic concepts pertaining to the project and the design constraints of this second prototype are presented.

  18. Results from the NEXT prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C. A. B.; NEXT Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    NEXT-100 is an electroluminescent high pressure Time Projection Chamber currently under construction. It will search for the neutrino-less double beta decay in 136Xe at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. NEXT-100 aims to achieve nearly intrinsic energy resolution and to highly suppress background events by taking advantage of the unique properties of xenon in the gaseous phase as the detection medium. In order to prove the principle of operation and to study which are the best operational conditions, two prototypes were constructed: NEXT-DEMO and NEXT-DBDM. In this paper we present the latest results from both prototypes. We report the improvement in terms of light collection (~ 3×) achieved by coating the walls of NEXT-DEMO with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB), the outstanding energy resolution of 1 % (Full Width Half Maximum) from NEXT-DBDM as well as the tracking capabilities of this prototype (2.1 mm RMS error for point-like depositions) achieved by using a square array of 8 × 8 SiPMs.

  19. Robotic Lander Prototype Completes Initial Tests

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Robotic Lunar Lander Development Project at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., completed an initial series of integrated tests on a new lander prototype. The prototype lander ...

  20. The MARX Modulator Development Program for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Leyh, G.E.; /SLAC

    2006-06-12

    The ILC Marx Modulator Development Program at SLAC is working towards developing a full-scale ILC Marx ''Reference Design'' modulator prototype, with the goal of significantly reducing the size and cost of the ILC modulator while improving overall modulator efficiency and availability. The ILC Reference Design prototype will provide a proof-of-concept model to industry in advance of Phase II SBIR funding, and also allow operation of the new 10MW L-Band Klystron prototypes immediately upon their arrival at SLAC.

  1. An approach for assessing software prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, V. E.; Card, D. N.; Agresti, W. W.; Jordan, Q. L.

    1986-01-01

    A procedure for evaluating a software prototype is presented. The need to assess the prototype itself arises from the use of prototyping to demonstrate the feasibility of a design or development stategy. The assessment procedure can also be of use in deciding whether to evolve a prototype into a complete system. The procedure consists of identifying evaluations criteria, defining alterative design approaches, and ranking the alternatives according to the criteria.

  2. Prototype Abstraction by Monkeys ("Macaca Mulatta")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. David; Redford, Joshua S.; Haas, Sarah M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors analyze the shape categorization of rhesus monkeys ("Macaca mulatta") and the role of prototype- and exemplar-based comparison processes in monkeys' category learning. Prototype and exemplar theories make contrasting predictions regarding performance on the Posner-Homa dot-distortion categorization task. Prototype theory--which…

  3. Demonstration of MMACE prototype system for helix TWT design

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    This poster will demonstrate the key capabilities and new features of the MMACE prototype system for designing helix TWT`s. MMACE (Microwave and Millimeter-wave Advanced Computational Environment) is a software framework for integrating microwave design tools into a cohesive, productive whole. While the first phase of the MMACE Program collected vacuum electronics design requirements and constructed a prototype design environment, the second phase has refined that prototype and is generalizing the software framework to accept other types of design and analysis. MMACE has focused on five key areas: (1) project-based management of design data and codes; (2) common master geometry for all codes; (3) sharing of common data by all codes; (4) a smooth integration of geometry-driven codes with parametric codes; and (5) a consistent graphical user interface across codes. The prototype design system includes codes from all phases of TWT design, such as gun, magnetostatic, and thermomechanical codes; a parametric collector design tool, a grid generation tool, and others have recently been added. The graphical user interface (GUI) has been refined to allow easy customization by the user. Also, a data dictionary manager has been added to help build new device data models for other devices, such as klystrons, and complete systems, such as microwave power modules (MPM`s).

  4. Ada software productivity prototypes: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus M.; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Malhotra, Shan

    1988-01-01

    A case study of the impact of Ada on a Command and Control project completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is given. The data for this study was collected as part of a general survey of software costs and productivity at JPL and other NASA sites. The task analyzed is a successful example of the use of rapid prototyping as applied to command and control for the U.S. Air Force and provides the U.S. Air Force Military Airlift Command with the ability to track aircraft, air crews and payloads worldwide. The task consists of a replicated database at several globally distributed sites. The local databases at each site can be updated within seconds after changes are entered at any one site. The system must be able to handle up to 400,000 activities per day. There are currently seven sites, each with a local area network of computers and a variety of user displays; the local area networks are tied together into a single wide area network. Using data obtained for eight modules, totaling approximately 500,000 source lines of code, researchers analyze the differences in productivities between subtasks. Factors considered are percentage of Ada used in coding, years of programmer experience, and the use of Ada tools and modern programming practices. The principle findings are the following. Productivity is very sensitive to programmer experience. The use of Ada software tools and the use of modern programming practices are important; without such use Ada is just a large complex language which can cause productivity to decrease. The impact of Ada on development effort phases is consistent with earlier reports at the project level but not at the module level.

  5. Mechanical Prototyping and Manufacturing Internship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenfell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The internship was located at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Innovation Design Center (IDC), which is a facility where the JSC workforce can meet and conduct hands-on innovative design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of ideas and concepts relevant to NASA's mission. The tasks of the internship included mechanical prototyping design and manufacturing projects in service of research and development as well as assisting the users of the IDC in completing their manufacturing projects. The first project was to manufacture hatch mechanisms for a team in the Systems Engineering and Project Advancement Program (SETMAP) hexacopter competition. These mechanisms were intended to improve the performance of the servomotors and offer an access point that would also seal to prevent cross-contamination. I also assisted other teams as they were constructing and modifying their hexacopters. The success of this competition demonstrated a proof of concept for aerial reconnaissance and sample return to be potentially used in future NASA missions. I also worked with Dr. Kumar Krishen to prototype an improved thermos and a novel, portable solar array. Computer-aided design (CAD) software was used to model the parts for both of these projects. Then, 3D printing as well as conventional techniques were used to produce the parts. These prototypes were then subjected to trials to determine the success of the designs. The solar array is intended to work in a cluster that is easy to set up and take down and doesn't require powered servomechanisms. It could be used terrestrially in areas not serviced by power grids. Both projects improve planetary exploration capabilities to future astronauts. Other projects included manufacturing custom rail brackets for EG-2, assisting engineers working on underwater instrument and tool cases for the NEEMO project, and helping to create mock-up parts for Space Center Houston. The use of the IDC enabled efficient completion of these projects at

  6. A plastic scintillation counter prototype.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Kawano, Takao

    2015-10-01

    A new prototype device for beta-ray measurement, a plastic scintillation counter, was assembled as an alternative device to liquid scintillation counters. This device uses plastic scintillation sheets (PS sheets) as a sample applicator without the use of a liquid scintillator. The performance was evaluated using tritium labeled compounds, and good linearity was observed between the activity and net count rate. The calculated detection limit of the device was 0.01 Bq mL(-1) after 10 h measurement for 2 mL sample. PMID:26164628

  7. A prototype Distributed Audit System

    SciTech Connect

    Banning, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    Security auditing systems are used to detect and assess unauthorized or abusive system usage. Historically, security audits were confined to a single computer system. Recent work examines ways of extending auditing to include heterogeneous groups of computers (distributed system). This paper describes the design and prototype development of a Distributed Audit System (DAS) which was developed with funding received from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and through the Master`s thesis effort performed by the author at California State University, Long Beach. The DAS is intended to provide collection, transfer, and control of audit data on distributed, heterogeneous hosts.

  8. Engineering Prototype for a Compact Medical Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zografos, Anthony; Hening, Andy; Joshkin, Vladimir; Leung, Kevin; Pearson, Dave; Pearce-Percy, Henry; Rougieri, Mario; Parker, Yoko; Weir, John; Blackfield, Donald; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Falabella, Steven; Guethlein, Gary; Poole, Brian; Hamm, Robert W.; Becker, Reinard

    2011-12-01

    A compact accelerator system architecture based on the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) for medical proton beam therapy has been developed by the Compact Particle Acceleration Corporation (CPAC). The major subsystems are a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) injector linac, a pulsed kicker to select the desired proton bunches, and a DWA linear accelerator incorporating a high gradient insulator (HGI) with stacked Blumleins to produce the required acceleration energy. The Blumleins are switched with solid state laser-driven optical switches integrated into the Blumlein assemblies. Other subsystems include a high power pulsed laser, fiber optic distribution system, electrical charging system, and beam diagnostics. An engineering prototype has been constructed and characterized, and these results will be used within the next three years to develop an extremely compact 150 MeV system capable of modulating energy, beam current, and spot size on a shot-to-shot basis. This paper presents the details the engineering prototype, experimental results, and commercialization plans.

  9. Development of a prototype regeneration carbon dioxide absorber. [for use in EVA conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, P. S.; Baker, B. S.

    1977-01-01

    A prototype regenerable carbon dioxide absorber was developed to maintain the environmental quality of the portable life support system. The absorber works on the alkali metal carbonate-bicarbonate solid-gas reaction to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The prototype sorber module was designed, fabricated, and tested at simulated extravehicular activity conditions to arrive at optimum design. The unit maintains sorber outlet concentration below 5 mm Hg. An optimization study was made with respect to heat transfer, temperature control, sorbent utilization, sorber life and regenerability, and final size of the module. Important parameters influencing the capacity of the final absorber unit were identified and recommendations for improvement were made.

  10. CALIFA Barrel prototype detector characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietras, B.; Gascón, M.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Bendel, M.; Bloch, T.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Durán, I.; Fiori, E.; Gernhäuser, R.; González, D.; Kröll, T.; Le Bleis, T.; Montes, N.; Nácher, E.; Robles, M.; Perea, A.; Vilán, J. A.; Winkel, M.

    2013-11-01

    Well established in the field of scintillator detection, Caesium Iodide remains at the forefront of scintillators for use in modern calorimeters. Recent developments in photosensor technology have lead to the production of Large Area Avalanche Photo Diodes (LAAPDs), a huge advancement on traditional photosensors in terms of high internal gain, dynamic range, magnetic field insensitivity, high quantum efficiency and fast recovery time. The R3B physics programme has a number of requirements for its calorimeter, one of the most challenging being the dual functionality as both a calorimeter and a spectrometer. This involves the simultaneous detection of ∼300 MeV protons and gamma rays ranging from 0.1 to 20 MeV. This scintillator - photosensor coupling provides an excellent solution in this capacity, in part due to the near perfect match of the LAAPD quantum efficiency peak to the light output wavelength of CsI(Tl). Modern detector development is guided by use of Monte Carlo simulations to predict detector performance, nonetheless it is essential to benchmark these simulations against real data taken with prototype detector arrays. Here follows an account of the performance of two such prototypes representing different polar regions of the Barrel section of the forthcoming CALIFA calorimeter. Measurements were taken for gamma-ray energies up to 15.1 MeV (Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Garching, Germany) and for direct irradiation with a 180 MeV proton beam (The Svedberg Laboratoriet, Uppsala, Sweden). Results are discussed in light of complementary GEANT4 simulations.

  11. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  12. Human Factors and Technical Considerations for a Computerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas Anthony; Lew, Roger Thomas; Medema, Heather Dawne; Boring, Ronald Laurids; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-09-01

    A prototype computerized operator support system (COSS) has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment. A COSS demonstration scenario has been developed for the prototype involving the Chemical & Volume Control System (CVCS) of the PWR simulator. It involves a primary coolant leak outside of containment that would require tripping the reactor if not mitigated in a very short timeframe. The COSS prototype presents a series of operator screens that provide the needed information and soft controls to successfully mitigate the event.

  13. Indoor Free Space Optic: a new prototype, realization and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Olivier; Besnard, Pascal; Mihaescu, Adrian

    2008-08-01

    The Free Space Optic (FSO) communication is a daily reality used by an increasing number of companies. For indoor environment, optical wireless communication becomes a good alternative with respect to radio proposals. For both technologies, the architecture is similar: emission/reception base station (Gateway or Bridge) are installed to cover zones, which are defined to ensure a quality of service. The customers may be connected to the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) with an adapter or module that emits and receives on this network. But due to its specific characteristics, wireless optical technology could present important advantages such as: Transmitted data security, medical immunity, high data rate, etc... Nevertheless, the optical system may have a limit on the network management aspect and link budget. The scope of this paper is to present a proposal at crossroads between optical fibre telecom system and data processing. In this document, we will present a prototype developed in Brittany during a regional collaborative project (Techim@ges). In order to answer to the management aspect and the link budget, this prototype uses an optical multiplexing technique in 1550 nm band: the Wavelength Division Multiple Access (WDMA). Moreover it also proposes a new class 1 high power emission solution. This full duplex system transmits these various wavelengths in free space, by using optical Multiplexer/Demultiplexer and optical modules. Each module has a defined and personal wavelength associated to the terminal identification (addresses MAC or IP). This approach permits a data rate at a minimum of a ten's Mbit/s per customer and potentially hundred Mbps for a line of sight system. The application field for the achieved and proposed prototype is potentially investigated from WLAN to WPAN.

  14. Results of the Cryogenic Testing of the SNS Prototype Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    I.E. Campisi; G. Ciovati; E. Daly; K. Davis; J.R. Delayen; M. Drury; P. Kneisel; J. Mammosser; T. Powers; J. Preble; C.E. Reece; M. Stirbet; H. Wang; K. Wilson; S. Smee

    2002-08-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed a prototype of the medium beta SNS cryomodule. Tests were recently performed on the module, which includes three 805 MHz cavities of beta=0.61, with coaxial power couplers and frequency tuners (mechanical and piezoelectric). The cavities exceeded accelerating gradients of 16 MV/m (design value 10.5 MV/m) with Q{sub 0}'s of about 10{sup 10} at the design field. One of the power couplers has been tested up to peak powers of over 700 kW. Results of the tests are reported in this paper.

  15. Prototype performance of novel muon telescope detector at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan,L.; Ames, V.

    2008-02-04

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design [l]. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRF'C. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution.

  16. Prototype Performance of Novel Muon Telescope Detector at STAR.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan,L.

    2008-04-05

    Research on a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) has been carried out for RHIC and for next generation detectors at future QCD Lab. We utilize state-of-the-art multi-gap resistive plate chambers with large modules and long readout strips in detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam test will be presented to address intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a Long-MRPC. The prototype performance of a novel muon telescope detector at STAR will be reported, including muon identification capability, timing and spatial resolution.

  17. Tracking the Galileo spacecraft with the DSCC Galileo Telemetry prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, T. T.; Shambayati, S.; Hardi, D. E.; Finley, S. G.

    1994-01-01

    On day of the year 062, 1994, a prototype of the Deep Space Communications Complex Galileo Telemetry subsystem successfully tracked and processed signals from the Galileo spacecraft, under fully suppressed-carrier modulation. The demonstration took place at Goldstone, employing the 70-m antenna and the 34-m high-efficiency antenna. This article presents the findings from that demonstration. Specific issues are the system performance in terms of signal-to-noise (SNR) degradation and the arraying gain. Validation of the test results is via symbol-error-rate measurement and the standard symbol SNR. The analysis is also extended to include characterization of the signal received from Galileo.

  18. Hadron therapy information sharing prototype

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Faustin Laurentiu; Abler, Daniel; Kanellopoulos, Vassiliki; Amoros, Gabriel; Davies, Jim; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jena, Raj; Kirkby, Norman; Peach, Ken; Salt, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The European PARTNER project developed a prototypical system for sharing hadron therapy data. This system allows doctors and patients to record and report treatment-related events during and after hadron therapy. It presents doctors and statisticians with an integrated view of adverse events across institutions, using open-source components for data federation, semantics, and analysis. There is a particular emphasis upon semantic consistency, achieved through intelligent, annotated form designs. The system as presented is ready for use in a clinical setting, and amenable to further customization. The essential contribution of the work reported here lies in the novel data integration and reporting methods, as well as the approach to software sustainability achieved through the use of community-supported open-source components. PMID:23824127

  19. MMT adaptive secondary prototype development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele

    1998-09-01

    We designed and manufacture dan 'Adaptive Secondary Mirror 30 Actuators Prototype' that represents as much as possible the final MMT adaptive optics unit for what concerns mechanical, electronic and cooling system issues. Moreover, different actuator designs have been tested by using the same test bench. The adaptive secondary is based on a thin continuous facesheet mirror moved by electromagnetic actuators. Permanent magnets are glued on the mirror, while voice coils are connected to the support structure by cold fingers. A capacitive sensor co-located with each actuator measures the local gap between the mirror and a reference back plate. Voice coil motors allow to perform chopping and tip-tilt correction by using directly the deformable mirror. Actuators pitch is set to achieve high order correction in the visible wavelength.

  20. The EUROMEDIES EDI prototype system.

    PubMed

    Pramataris, K; Doukidis, G; Giaglis, G; Raptakis, J

    1996-01-01

    EDI is expected to be the dominant form of business communication between organisations moving to the Electronic Commerce era of 2000. The healthcare sector is already using EDI in the hospital supply function as well as in the clinical area and the reimbursement process. In this paper, we examine the use of EDI in the healthcare administration sector and move specifically its application to the Medical Devices Vigilance System. At a first place, the potential of this approach is examined, after an initial brief presentation of the EDI concept and its application in healthcare. This presentation is followed by an overall description of the EDI prototype system, which was developed in the context of the EUROMEDIES Concerted Action, in order to facilitate the requirements definition phase. PMID:10172831

  1. IMMR Phase 1 Prototyping Plan Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vowell, C. W.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Smith, Bryon; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the phase I plan of the prototype of the IMMR by the Multilateral Medical Operations Panel (MMOP) Medical Informatics & Technology (MIT) Working Group. It reviews the Purpose of IMMR Prototype Phase 1 (IPP1); the IPP1 Plan Overview, the IMMR Prototype Phase 1 Plan for PDDs and MIC and MIC-DDs, Plan for MICs, a nd the IPP1 objectives

  2. Universal stowage module for future space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seccamp, V. A.; Hussex, M. W.; Garber, P.; Mandras, W.; Mckinney, D.

    1973-01-01

    The development, design, and fabrication of a prototype storage module, with internal restraints, for the stowage of items that are normally launched to support a space mission are discussed. The primary design criteria was that the storage module be universal in accomodating most sizes and shapes of items that could be launched and returned in a shuttle payload. Mechanical drawings of various types of storage modules are provided.

  3. Design and implementation of a prototype micropositioning and fusion of optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Fabio; Torres, Cesar; Mattos, Lorenzo

    2011-09-01

    We developed an automated system in micro and optical fiber fusion, using stepper motors of 3.6 ° (1.8 ° Medium step) with a threaded system for displacements in the order of microns, a LM016 LCD for User message management, a PIC16F877A microcontroller to control the prototype. We also used internal modules: TMR0, EEPROM, PWM (pulse width modulation) control using a pulse opto-cupped the discharge circuit high voltage (20 to 35 kilovolt transformer for FLYBACK fusion) The USART (Universal Synchronous Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter) for serial interface with the PC. The software platform developed under Visual Basic 6.0, which lets you manipulate the prototype from the PC. The entire program is optimized for microcontroller interrupt, macro-functions and is written in MPLAB 7.31. The prototype is now finished.

  4. The 384-channel prototype of DM Electronics for ELT AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputa, Kris; Atwood, Jenny; Herriot, Glen; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Spanò, Paolo; Zielinski, Adam

    2014-08-01

    High order AO subsystems of the ELT require technological advancements in the Deformable Mirror (DM) construction and corresponding improvements in the drive electronics. Advanced prototyping is currently under way at NSI-Herzberg to reduce risks of deploying untried technology in the TMT AO subsystem NFIRAOS. We have developed a 96-channel output module and constructed a sub-scale DM Electronics prototype NDME384 with 384 output channels based on 4 such modules. French DM vendor Cilas has fabricated the NFIRAOS DM Breadoboard with 360 piezoelectric actuators in a 60×6 matrix, to demonstrate the DM technology to be deployed in NFIRAOS wavefront correctors. We present the results of testing our NDME384 prototype while driving the NFIRAOS DM Breadoboard.

  5. FAST-Net optical interconnection prototype demonstration program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Michael W.; Christensen, Marc P.; Milojkovik, P.; Ekman, Jeremy T.; Chandramani, Premanand; Rozier, Richard G.; Kiamilev, Fouad E.; Liu, Yue; Hibbs-Brenner, Mary K.; Nohava, Jim; Kalweit, Edith; Bounnak, Sommy; Marta, Terry; Walterson, B.

    1998-05-01

    This paper reports progress toward the experimental demonstration of a smart pixel based optical interconnection prototype currently being developed under the Free-space Accelerator for Switching Terabit Networks (FAST-Net) project. The prototype system incorporates 2D arrays of monolithically integrated high- bandwidth vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photodetectors (PDs). A key aspect of the FAST-Net concept is that all smart pixels are distributed across a single multi-chip plane. This plane is connected to itself via an optical system that consists of an array of matched lenses (one for each smart pixel chip position) and a mirror. The optical interconnect system implements a global point-to-point shuffle pattern. The interleaved 2D arrays of VCSELs and PDs in the prototype are arranged on a clustered self-similar grid pattern with a closest element pitch of 100 micrometers . The circular VCSEL elements have a diameter of 10 micrometers and the square PDs have an active region that is 50 micrometers wide. These arrays are packaged and mounted on circuit boards along with the CMOS driver, receiver, and FPGA controller chips. Micro-positioning mounts are used to effect alignment that is consistent with current MCM chip placement accuracy. Shuffled optical data links between the multiple ICs have been demonstrated in preliminary evaluation of this system. These results suggest that a multi-Terabit optically interconnected MCM module is feasible.

  6. Prototype Combined Heater/Thermoelectric Power Generator for Remote Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champier, D.; Favarel, C.; Bédécarrats, J. P.; Kousksou, T.; Rozis, J. F.

    2013-07-01

    This study presents a prototype thermoelectric generator (TEG) developed for remote applications in villages that are not connected to the electrical power grid. For ecological and economic reasons, there is growing interest in harvesting waste heat from biomass stoves to produce some electricity. Because regular maintenance is not required, TEGs are an attractive choice for small-scale power generation in inaccessible areas. The prototype developed in our laboratory is especially designed to be implemented in stoves that are also used for domestic hot water heating. The aim of this system is to provide a few watts to householders, so they have the ability to charge cellular phones and radios, and to get some light at night. A complete prototype TEG using commercial (bismuth telluride) thermoelectric modules has been built, including system integration with an electric DC/DC converter. The DC/DC converter has a maximum power point tracker (MPPT) driven by an MC9SO8 microcontroller, which optimizes the electrical energy stored in a valve-regulated lead-acid battery. Physical models were used to study the behavior of the thermoelectric system and to optimize the performance of the MPPT. Experiments using a hot gas generator to simulate the exhaust of the combustion chamber of a stove are used to evaluate the system. Additionally, potential uses of such generators are presented.

  7. Development of prototype polychromator system for KSTAR Thomson scattering diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Lee, S. H.; Son, S. H.; Ko, W. H.; Seo, D. C.; Yamada, I.; Her, K. H.; Jeon, J. S.; Bog, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    A polychromator is widely used by the Thomson scattering system for measuring the electron temperature and density. This type of spectrometer includes optic elements such as band-pass filters, focusing lens, collimating lens, and avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The characteristics of band-pass filters in the polychromator are determined by the measuring range of the Thomson system. KSTAR edge polychromators were developed by co-works at NIFS in Japan, and the KSTAR core polychromators were developed by NFRI in Korea. The power supply system of these polychromators is connected only to one power supply module and can manually control the APD's voltage at the front side of the power supply by using a potentiometer. In this paper, a prototype polychromator is introduced at the KSTAR. The prototype polychromator system has a built-in power supply unit that includes high voltage for the APD and ± 5 V for an op-amp IC. The high voltage for the APD is finely controlled and monitored using a PC with the LabView software. One out of the six band pass-filters has a center wavelength of 523.5 nm with 2-nm bandwidth, which can measure Zeff, and the other five band-pass filters can simultaneously measure the Thomson signal. In addition, we will show the test result of this prototype polychromator system during the KSTAR experiment campaign (2015).

  8. A translational platform for prototyping closed-loop neuromodulation systems

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Pedram; Khambhati, Ankit; Stanslaski, Scott; Carlson, David; Jensen, Randy; Linde, Dave; Dani, Siddharth; Lazarewicz, Maciej; Cong, Peng; Giftakis, Jon; Stypulkowski, Paul; Denison, Tim

    2013-01-01

    While modulating neural activity through stimulation is an effective treatment for neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, an opportunity for improving neuromodulation therapy remains in automatically adjusting therapy to continuously optimize patient outcomes. Practical issues associated with achieving this include the paucity of human data related to disease states, poorly validated estimators of patient state, and unknown dynamic mappings of optimal stimulation parameters based on estimated states. To overcome these challenges, we present an investigational platform including: an implanted sensing and stimulation device to collect data and run automated closed-loop algorithms; an external tool to prototype classifier and control-policy algorithms; and real-time telemetry to update the implanted device firmware and monitor its state. The prototyping system was demonstrated in a chronic large animal model studying hippocampal dynamics. We used the platform to find biomarkers of the observed states and transfer functions of different stimulation amplitudes. Data showed that moderate levels of stimulation suppress hippocampal beta activity, while high levels of stimulation produce seizure-like after-discharge activity. The biomarker and transfer function observations were mapped into classifier and control-policy algorithms, which were downloaded to the implanted device to continuously titrate stimulation amplitude for the desired network effect. The platform is designed to be a flexible prototyping tool and could be used to develop improved mechanistic models and automated closed-loop systems for a variety of neurological disorders. PMID:23346048

  9. A Comparison of Two Prototype Laser-Optical Firing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg L. Morelli; Michelle R. Bright

    2008-08-11

    The design and characterization of small, ruggedized laser-optical subsystems is required for the continued development of robust laser-optical firing systems. Typically, these subsystems must be capable of generating the needed laser optical energy, delivering that energy via fiber-optical cables while taking up occupying a volume as small as possible. A novel beam splitting and fiber injection scheme has been proposed which utilizes two diffractive optical components. These components were utilized to reduce the volume of a previously designed system. A laser-optical prototype system was assembled and tested which utilized this beam splitting and fiber injection scheme along other modifications to the laser module and the power supply. This prototype was based on earlier designs that utilized environmentally proven opto-mechanical sub-assemblies. The system was tested to characterize the laser performance, the splitter-coupler transmission efficiency, channel-to-channel energy balance and fiber interchangeability. The results obtained for this design will be compared to the performance of a prototype system based on a more traditional beam splitting and fiber injection scheme. The traditional design utilized partially reflecting mirrors for beam splitting and plano-convex lenses for fiber injection. These results will be discussed as will their ultimate impact on future designs and packaging strategies.

  10. Nearly steady flows in GONG prototype data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1993-01-01

    Doppler velocity images obtained with the GONG prototype instrument were analyzed to measure the nearly steady photospheric flows. The data consists of 88 images each of velocity, intensity, and modulation obtained at 20:00 UT on 88 days from July 1992 to February 1994. Each velocity image was temporally filtered to remove the p-mode oscillations, masked to exclude active regions, and then analyzed using spherical harmonics and orthogonal functions as described by Hathaway (1992). The spectral coefficients show very consistent results for the entire time interval with some evidence of year-to-year variations. The rotation profile agrees well with previous results and exhibits a north-south asymmetry that reverses sign during the 20 month interval. The residual rotation velocities exhibit structures with amplitudes of approximately 5 m/s that may be related to torsional oscillations. The meridional circulation is directed from the equator toward the poles with a peak velocity in the photosphere of approximately 50 m/s. The higher order components are very weak but indicate a divergent flow from the mid-latitudes (opposite that found for the June 1989 data). The convective limb shift is well fit by a 3rd order polynomial. The convection spectrum has a prominent peak at spherical harmonic degrees of l approximately 150 with very little signal in the low degree modes. Analysis of this signal shows that there is no evidence for giant cell convection at the level of approximately 10 m/s for all modes up to l = 32.

  11. Dissipative Prototyping Methods: A Manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beesley, P.

    Taking a designer's unique perspective using examples of practice in experimental installation and digital protoyping, this manifesto acts as provocation for change and unlocking new potential by encouraging changes of perspective about the material realm. Diffusive form-language is proposed as a paradigm for architectural design. This method of design is applied through 3D printing and related digital fabrication methods, offering new qualities that can be implemented in design of realms including present earth and future interplanetary environments. A paradigm shift is encouraged by questioning conventional notions of geometry that minimize interfaces and by proposing the alternatives of maximized interfaces formed by effusive kinds of formal composition. A series of projects from the Canadian research studio of the Hylozoic Architecture group are described, providing examples of component design methods employing diffusive forms within combinations of tension-integrity structural systems integrated with hybrid metabolisms employing synthetic biology. Cultural implications are also discussed, drawing from architectural theory and natural philosophy. The conclusion of this paper suggests that the practice of diffusive prototyping can offer formative strategies contributing to design of future living systems.

  12. Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This contract and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and demonstration of a different technology for construction of lightweight mirrors. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities; Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (less than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or quaternary mirror into a quasi-continuous surface with individual subapertures phased so that near diffraction limited imaging in the visible wavelength region is achieved. Continuous compensation of optical wavefront due to perturbations caused by imperfections, natural disturbances, and equipment induced vibrations/deflections to provide near diffraction limited imaging performance in the visible wavelength region. Demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating such systems with reduced mass and cost compared to past approaches. While the SSD could not be expected to satisfy all of the above capabilities, the intent was to start identifying and understanding new technologies that might be applicable to these goals.

  13. Mars Spark Source Prototype Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Lindamood, Glenn R.; VanderWal, Randall L.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Spark Source Prototype (MSSP) hardware was developed as part of a proof of concept system for the detection of trace metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic in Martian dusts and soils. A spark discharge produces plasma from a soil sample, and detectors measure the optical emission from metals in the plasma to identify and quantify them. Trace metal measurements are vital in assessing whether or not the Martian environment will be toxic to human explorers. The current method of x-ray fluorescence can yield concentrations of major species only. Other instruments are incompatible with the volume, weight, and power constraints for a Mars mission. The new instrument will be developed primarily for use in the Martian environment, but it would be adaptable for terrestrial use in environmental monitoring. The NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field initiated the development of the MSSP as part of Glenn's Director's Discretionary Fund project for the Spark Analysis Detection of Trace Metal Species in Martian Dusts and Soils. The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a compact, sensitive optical instrument for the detection of trace hazardous metals in Martian dusts and soils.

  14. Sonification Prototype for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candey, R. M.; Schertenleib, A. M.; Diaz Merced, W. L.

    2005-12-01

    As an alternative and adjunct to visual displays, auditory exploration of data via sonification (data controlled sound) and audification (audible playback of data samples) is promising for complex or rapidly/temporally changing visualizations, for data exploration of large datasets (particularly multi-dimensional datasets), and for exploring datasets in frequency rather than spatial dimensions (see also International Conferences on Auditory Display ). Besides improving data exploration and analysis for most researchers, the use of sound is especially valuable as an assistive technology for visually-impaired people and can make science and math more exciting for high school and college students. Only recently have the hardware and software come together to make a cross-platform open-source sonification tool feasible. We have developed a prototype sonification data analysis tool using the JavaSound API and NASA GSFC's ViSBARD software . Wanda Diaz Merced, a blind astrophysicist from Puerto Rico, is instrumental in advising on and testing the tool.

  15. dE/dx prototype test

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.; Rust, D.

    1980-10-01

    A small prototype of a multiwire dE/dx detector was tested in SLAC's test beam. The basic concept of the detector was similar to the JADE drift cell design. The purpose of the test was to decide on some design parameters for a full size prototype, which is now in construction.

  16. Software Prototyping: Designing Systems for Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spies, Phyllis Bova

    1983-01-01

    Reports on major change in computer software development process--the prototype model, i.e., implementation of skeletal system that is enhanced during interaction with users. Expensive and unreliable software, software design errors, traditional development approach, resources required for prototyping, success stories, and systems designer's role…

  17. In Search of the Prototypical Fraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Vince

    2013-01-01

    Vince Wright makes a convincing argument for presenting children with a different "prototype" of a fraction to the typical one-half. Consider how the prototype that Wright mentions may be applied to a variety of fraction concepts. We are sure that you will never look at a doughnut in quite the same way.

  18. Rapid Prototyping of Mobile Learning Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federley, Maija; Sorsa, Timo; Paavilainen, Janne; Boissonnier, Kimo; Seisto, Anu

    2014-01-01

    This position paper presents the first results of an on-going project, in which we explore rapid prototyping method to efficiently produce digital learning solutions that are commercially viable. In this first phase, rapid game prototyping and an iterative approach was tested as a quick and efficient way to create learning games and to evaluate…

  19. A prototype space flight intravenous injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    Medical emergencies, especially those resulting from accidents, frequently require the administration of intravenous fluids to replace lost body liquids. The development of a prototype space flight intravenous injection system is presented. The definition of requirements, injectable concentrates development, water polisher, reconstitution hardware development, administration hardware development, and prototype fabrication and testing are discussed.

  20. RAMGEN ROTOR CARTRIDGE FOR THE PRE-PROTOTYPE RAMGEN ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron Koopman

    2003-09-01

    The research and development of a unique combustion engine is presented. The engine converts the thrust from ramjet modules located on the rim of a disk into shaft torque, which in turn can be used for electrical power generation or mechanical drive applications. A test program was undertaken that included evaluation of the pre-prototype engine and incorporation of improvements to the thrust modules and supporting systems. Fuel mixing studies with vortex generators and bluff body flame holders demonstrated the importance of increasing the shear-layer area and spreading angle to augment flame volume. Evaluation of flame-holding configurations (with variable fuel injection methods) concluded that the heat release zone, and therefore combustion efficiency, could be manipulated by judicious selection of bluff body geometry, and is less influenced by fuel injection distribution. Finally, successful operation of novel fuel and cooling air delivery systems have resolved issues of gas (fuel and air) delivery to the individual rotor segments. The lessons learned from the pre-prototype engine are currently being applied to the development of a 2.8MW engine.

  1. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype design and manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fabbricatore, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Cheban, S.; Evbota, D.; Farinon, S.; Lamm, M.; Lopes, M.; Musenich, R.; Wands, R.; Masullo, G.

    2016-02-08

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid consists of 52 coils arranged in 27 coil modules that form the S-shaped cold mass. Each coil is wound from Al-stabilized NbTi superconductor. The coils are supported by an external structural aluminum shell machined from a forged billet. Most of the coil modules house two coils, with the axis of each coil oriented at an angle of approximately 5° with respect to each other. The coils are indirectly cooled with LHe circulating in tubes welded on the shell. In order to enhance the cooling capacity, pure aluminum sheets connect the inner bore of the coils tomore » the cooling tubes. The coils are placed inside the shell by the means of a shrink-fit procedure. A full-size prototype, with all the features of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured in a collaboration between INFN Genova and Fermilab. In order to ensure an optimal mechanical prestress at the coil-shell interface, the coils are inserted into the shell through a shrink-fitting process. We present the details of the prototype with the design choices as validated by the structural analysis. In conclusion, the fabrication steps are described as well.« less

  2. Liquid scintillating fiber calorimetry prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, M.; Brookes, D.; David, A.

    1995-08-01

    A full size liquid scintillating fiber spaghetti-hadronic calorimeter has been constructed and tested using cosmic rays at Texas A and M University. The purpose of this research is to find practical solutions for detectors to be used in extremely high radiation environments. The details of design and construction of this module are presented. The advantages of using liquid scintillating materials were investigated. Relevant subjects are addressed. Cosmic ray test results are compared with that of GEANT Monte Carlo simulations. Over all, they agree well with each other. The conclusion is that calorimeters utilizing this technique can be used in high radiation environments such as SSC colliding area.

  3. Phase-Controlled Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Novak, G.; Moseley, S. H.; Pisano, G.; Krejny, M.; U-Yen, K.

    2012-01-01

    We report technology development of millimeter/submillimeter polarization modulators that operate by introducing a a variable, controlled phase delay between two orthogonal polarization states. The variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) operates via the introduction of a variable phase delay between two linear orthogonal polarization states, resulting in a variable mapping of a single linear polarization into a combination of that Stokes parameter and circular (Stokes V) polarization. Characterization of a prototype VPM is presented at 350 and 3000 microns. We also describe a modulator in which a variable phase delay is introduced between right- and left- circular polarization states. In this architecture, linear polarization is fully modulated. Each of these devices consists of a polarization diplexer parallel to and in front of a movable mirror. Modulation involves sub-wavelength translations of the mirror that change the magnitude of the phase delay.

  4. Prototype Formation in Autism: Can Individuals with Autism Abstract Facial Prototypes?

    PubMed Central

    Gastgeb, Holly Zajac; Rump, Keiran M.; Best, Catherine A.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Strauss, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Prototype formation is a critical skill for category learning. Research suggests that individuals with autism may have a deficit in prototype formation of some objects; however, results are mixed. The current study used a natural category, faces, to further examine prototype formation in high-functioning individuals with autism. High-functioning children (age 8–13 years) and adults with autism (age 17–53 years) and matched controls were tested in a facial prototype formation task that has been used to test prototype formation abilities in typically developing infants and adults (Strauss, 1979). Participants were familiarized to a series of faces depicting subtle variations in the spatial distance of facial features, and were then given a forced choice familiarity test between the mean prototype and the mode prototype. Overall, individuals in the autism group were significantly less likely to select the mean prototype face. Even though the children with autism showed this difference in prototype formation, this pattern was driven primarily by the adults, because the adults with autism were approximately 4 times less likely to select the mean prototype than were the control adults. These results provide further evidence that individuals with autism have difficulty abstracting subtle spatial information that is necessary not only for the formation of a mean prototype, but also for categorizing faces and objects. PMID:19877157

  5. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.; Lambert, J.

    1999-04-06

    A capsule is disclosed containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispherical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor. 3 figs.

  6. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny; Lambert, John

    1999-01-01

    A capsule containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor.

  7. End-Capping Effect of a Narrow Bandgap Conjugated Polymer on Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Kuen; Jo, Jang; Seo, Jung Hwa; Moon, Ji Seo; Park, Yeong Don; Lee, Kwanghee; Heeger, Alan J.; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2011-04-20

    Device performances of BHJ solar cells based on poly[(4,4-didodecyldithieno[3,2-b:2’,3’-d]silole)-2,6-diyl-alt-(2,1,3-benzoxadiazole)-4,7-diyl]and PC₇₁BM improve by capping the chain ends with thiophene fragments. This structural modification yields materials that are more thermally robust and that can be used in devices with thicker films – important considerations for enabling the mass production of plastic solar cells.

  8. F-18 SRA in flight with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is using this modified F/A-18 aircraft as a testbed to validate a number of technical innovations in aircraft control and data systems. A recent experiment flown aboard Dryden's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) involved a new 'Smart Skin' antenna mounted in the tip of the right vertical fin of the highly-modified aircraft (shown here). The recent flight tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on the aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  9. F-18 SRA with Smart Skin Antenna replacing right tail fin end cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The vertical stabilizers in NASA's F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft are no longer mirror images of each other. A new 'Smart Skin' antenna mounted on the tip of the right vertical fin of the modified F/A-18 aircraft showed remarkable results in its first flight tests at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The recent tests of the new antenna system demonstrated a five-fold increase in voice communications range and a substantial improvement in the pattern of radiation and quality of transmission compared to the standard dorsal blade antenna on Dryden's F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft. The Smart Skin antenna system is electrically as well as physically connected to the airframe, making the aircraft skin operate as an antenna along with the antenna itself. The concept was developed by TRW Avionics Systems Division and integrated into the F/A-18's vertical fin by Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  10. Development Status of the ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2008-06-16

    The ILC Marx Modulator is under development as a lower cost alternative to the 'Baseline Conceptual Design' (BCD) klystron modulator. Construction of a prototype Marx is complete and testing is underway at SLAC. The Marx employs solid state elements, IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the modules. The prototype is based on a stack of sixteen modules, each initially charged to {approx}11 kV, which are arranged in a Marx topology. Initially, eleven modules combine to produce the 120 kV output pulse. The remaining modules are switched in after appropriate delays to compensate for the voltage droop that results from the discharge of the energy storage capacitors. Additional elements will further regulate the output voltage to {+-} 0.5%. The Marx presents several advantages over the conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at these parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. This paper outlines the current developmental status of the prototype Marx. It presents a detailed electrical and mechanical description of the modulator and operational test results. It will discuss electrical efficiency measurements, fault testing, and output voltage regulation.

  11. Development Status of The ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2010-06-07

    The ILC Marx Modulator is under development as a lower cost alternative to the 'Baseline Conceptual Design' (BCD) klystron modulator. Construction of a prototype Marx is complete and testing is underway at SLAC. The Marx employs solid state elements, IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the modules. The prototype is based on a stack of sixteen modules, each initially charged to {approx}11 kV, which are arranged in a Marx topology. Initially, eleven modules combine to produce the 120 kV output pulse. The remaining modules are switched in after appropriate delays to compensate for the voltage droop that results from the discharge of the energy storage capacitors. Additional elements will further regulate the output voltage to {+-}0.5%. The Marx presents several advantages over the conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at these parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. This paper outlines the current developmental status of the prototype Marx. It presents a detailed electrical and mechanical description of the modulator and operational test results. It will discuss electrical efficiency measurements, fault testing, and output voltage regulation.

  12. A Prototype of Energy Saving System for Office Lighting by Using PSO and WSN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Wa; Ogai, Harutoshi; Hirai, Katsumi; Takahashi, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Masatoshi

    The purpose of this study is to develop a wireless networked lighting system for office buildings, which can reduce the energy consumption while meeting users' lighting preferences. By using particle swarm optimization, the system is able to optimize the dimming ratio of luminaires according to the real time natural illumination and occupancy condition. In this paper we make a prototype system and test the feasibility and efficiency of the system. The prototype consists of one wireless control module, three illumination sensors and four fluorescent lamps with dimming capacity. The illumination sensors collect and send the data to the control module. After the process of PSO (Particle Swarm Optimization), the module finally sets the power of the lamps according to the PSO result. After real experiments in a certain designed office, it was proved that the system can successfully control the illuminations, and can save considerable energy.

  13. A prototype of wireless power and data acquisition system for large detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lurgio, P.; Djurcic, Z.; Drake, G.; Hashemian, R.; Kreps, A.; Oberling, M.; Pearson, T.; Sahoo, H.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a prototype detector and data acquisition module that incorporates wireless power and wireless data transmission techniques. The module has no electrical connections. It receives power using photovoltaic devices, and communicates control, timing, trigger, and data using the 802.11n wireless communication standard. The work is part of a study for building a large detector having many readout channels, where it is desirable to reduce the cable plant and infrastructure. The system could also be deployed in smaller detectors that require mobility or are difficult to cable due to extreme conditions. We describe the design and operation of the prototype module, including benchmark performance measurements, and discuss aspect and issues in extrapolating to a large detector system.

  14. Rapid prototyping and stereolithography in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan, S.; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    The word rapid prototyping (RP) was first used in mechanical engineering field in the early 1980s to describe the act of producing a prototype, a unique product, the first product, or a reference model. In the past, prototypes were handmade by sculpting or casting, and their fabrication demanded a long time. Any and every prototype should undergo evaluation, correction of defects, and approval before the beginning of its mass or large scale production. Prototypes may also be used for specific or restricted purposes, in which case they are usually called a preseries model. With the development of information technology, three-dimensional models can be devised and built based on virtual prototypes. Computers can now be used to create accurately detailed projects that can be assessed from different perspectives in a process known as computer aided design (CAD). To materialize virtual objects using CAD, a computer aided manufacture (CAM) process has been developed. To transform a virtual file into a real object, CAM operates using a machine connected to a computer, similar to a printer or peripheral device. In 1987, Brix and Lambrecht used, for the first time, a prototype in health care. It was a three-dimensional model manufactured using a computer numerical control device, a type of machine that was the predecessor of RP. In 1991, human anatomy models produced with a technology called stereolithography were first used in a maxillofacial surgery clinic in Viena. PMID:26015715

  15. Rapid prototyping and stereolithography in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan, S; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-04-01

    The word rapid prototyping (RP) was first used in mechanical engineering field in the early 1980s to describe the act of producing a prototype, a unique product, the first product, or a reference model. In the past, prototypes were handmade by sculpting or casting, and their fabrication demanded a long time. Any and every prototype should undergo evaluation, correction of defects, and approval before the beginning of its mass or large scale production. Prototypes may also be used for specific or restricted purposes, in which case they are usually called a preseries model. With the development of information technology, three-dimensional models can be devised and built based on virtual prototypes. Computers can now be used to create accurately detailed projects that can be assessed from different perspectives in a process known as computer aided design (CAD). To materialize virtual objects using CAD, a computer aided manufacture (CAM) process has been developed. To transform a virtual file into a real object, CAM operates using a machine connected to a computer, similar to a printer or peripheral device. In 1987, Brix and Lambrecht used, for the first time, a prototype in health care. It was a three-dimensional model manufactured using a computer numerical control device, a type of machine that was the predecessor of RP. In 1991, human anatomy models produced with a technology called stereolithography were first used in a maxillofacial surgery clinic in Viena. PMID:26015715

  16. Review on CNC-Rapid Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Z, M. Nafis O.; Y, Nafrizuan M.; A, Munira M.; J, Kartina

    2012-09-01

    This article reviewed developments of Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) technology in rapid prototyping process. Rapid prototyping (RP) can be classified into three major groups; subtractive, additive and virtual. CNC rapid prototyping is grouped under the subtractive category which involves material removal from the workpiece that is larger than the final part. Richard Wysk established the use of CNC machines for rapid prototyping using sets of 2½-D tool paths from various orientations about a rotary axis to machine parts without refixturing. Since then, there are few developments on this process mainly aimed to optimized the operation and increase the process capabilities to stand equal with common additive type of RP. These developments include the integration between machining and deposition process (hybrid RP), adoption of RP to the conventional machine and optimization of the CNC rapid prototyping process based on controlled parameters. The article ended by concluding that the CNC rapid prototyping research area has a vast space for improvement as in the conventional machining processes. Further developments and findings will enhance the usage of this method and minimize the limitation of current approach in building a prototype.

  17. A prototype stationary Fourier transform spectrometer for near-infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyang; Lu, Dan-feng; Qi, Zhi-mei

    2015-09-01

    A prototype stationary Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) was constructed with a fiber-coupled lithium niobate (LiNbO3) waveguide Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) for the purpose of rapid on-site spectroscopy of biological and chemical measurands. The MZI contains push-pull electrodes for electro-optic modulation, and its interferogram as a plot of intensity against voltage was obtained by scanning the modulating voltage from -60 to +60 V in 50 ms. The power spectrum of input signal was retrieved by Fourier transform processing of the interferogram combined with the wavelength dispersion of half-wave voltage determined for the MZI used. The prototype FTS operates in the single-mode wavelength range from 1200 to 1700 nm and allows for reproducible spectroscopy. A linear concentration dependence of the absorbance at λmax = 1451 nm for water in ethanolic solution was obtained using the prototype FTS. The near-infrared spectroscopy of solid samples was also implemented, and the different spectra obtained with different materials evidenced the chemical recognition capability of the prototype FTS. To make this prototype FTS practically applicable, work on improving its spectral resolution by increasing the maximum optical path length difference is in progress. PMID:26414526

  18. The four INTA-300 rocket prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calero, J. S.

    1985-03-01

    A development history and performance capability assessment is presented for the INTA-300 'Flamenco' sounding rocket prototype specimens. The Flamenco is a two-stage solid fuel rocket, based on British sounding rocket technology, that can lift 50 km payloads to altitudes of about 300 km. The flight of the first two prototypes, in 1974 and 1975, pointed to vibration problems which reduced the achievable apogee, and the third prototype's flight was marred by a premature detonation that destroyed the rocket. The fourth Flamenco flight, however, yielded much reliable data.

  19. VO for Education: Archive Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella, M.; Iafrate, G.; De Marco, M.; Molinaro, M.; Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.; Cepparo, F.

    2014-05-01

    The number of remote control telescopes dedicated to education is increasing in many countries, leading to correspondingly larger and larger amount of stored educational data that are usually available only to local observers. Here we present the project for a new infrastructure that will allow teachers using educational telescopes to archive their data and easily publish them within the Virtual Observatory (VO) avoiding the complexity of professional tools. Students and teachers anywhere will be able to access these data with obvious benefits for the realization of grander scale collaborative projects. Educational VO data will also be an important resource for teachers not having direct access to any educational telescopes. We will use the educational telescope at our observatory in Trieste as a prototype for the future VO educational data archive resource. The publishing infrastructure will include: user authentication, content and curation validation, data validation and ingestion, VO compliant resource generation. All of these parts will be performed by means of server side applications accessible through a web graphical user interface (web GUI). Apart from user registration, that will be validated by a natural person responsible for the archive (after having verified the reliability of the user and inspected one or more test files), all the subsequent steps will be automated. This means that at the very first data submission through the webGUI, a complete resource including archive and published VO service will be generated, ready to be registered to the VO. The efforts required to the registered user will consist only in describing herself/himself at registration step and submitting the data she/he selects for publishing after each observation sessions. The infrastructure will be file format independent and the underlying data model will use a minimal set of standard VO keywords, some of which will be specific for outreach and education, possibly including VO

  20. Vapor compression distillation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuccio, P. P.

    1975-01-01

    A Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) module was developed and evaluated as part of a Space Station Prototype (SSP) environmental control and life support system. The VCD module includes the waste tankage, pumps, post-treatment cells, automatic controls and fault detection instrumentation. Development problems were encountered with two components: the liquid pumps, and the waste tank and quantity gauge. Peristaltic pumps were selected instead of gear pumps, and a sub-program of materials and design optimization was undertaken leading to a projected life greater than 10,000 hours of continuous operation. A bladder tank was designed and built to contain the waste liquids and deliver it to the processor. A detrimental pressure pattern imposed upon the bladder by a force-operated quantity gauge was corrected by rearranging the force application, and design goals were achieved. System testing has demonstrated that all performance goals have been fulfilled.

  1. Modulated Elliptical Slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abou-Khousa, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    A novel modulated slot design has been proposed and tested. The proposed slot is aimed to replace the inefficient small dipoles used in conventional MST-based imaging systems. The developed slot is very attractive as MST array element due to its small size and high efficiency/modulation depth. In fact, the developed slot has been successfully used to implement the first prototype of a microwave camera operating at 24 GHZ. It is also being used in the design of the second generation of the camera. Finally, the designed elliptical slot can be used as an electronically controlled waveguide iris for many other purposes (for instance in constructing waveguide reflective phase shifters and multiplexers/switches).

  2. Photovoltaic concentrator module improvements study

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.L.; Kerschen, K.A. ); Hutchison, G. ); Nowlan, M.J. )

    1991-08-01

    This report presents results of a project to design and fabricate an improved photovoltaic concentrator module. Using previous work as a baseline, this study conducted analyses and testing to select major module components and design features. The lens parquet and concentrator solar cell were selected from the highest performing, available components. A single 185X point-focus module was fabricated by the project team and tested at Sandia. Major module characteristics include a 6 by 4 compression-molded acrylic lens parquet (0.737 m{sup 2} area), twenty-four 0.2 ohms-cm, FZ, p-Si solar cells (1.56 cm{sup 2} area) soldered to ceramic substrates and copper heat spreaders, and an aluminized steel housing with corrugated bottom. This project marked the first attempt to use prismatic covers on solar cells in a high-concentration, point-focus application. Cells with 15 percent metallization were obtained, but problems with the fabrication and placement of prismatic covers on these cells lead to the decision not to use covers in the prototype module. Cell assembly fabrication, module fabrication, and module optical design activities are presented here. Test results are also presented for bare cells, cell assemblies, and module. At operating conditions of 981 watts/m{sup 2} DNI and an estimated cell temperature of 65{degrees}C, the module demonstrated an efficiency of 13.9 percent prior to stressed environmental exposure. 12 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Characterization of HIRF Susceptibility Threshold for a Prototype Implementation of an Onboard Data Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to characterize the effects of HIRF-induced upsets on a prototype onboard data network. The experiment was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center s High Intensity Radiation Field Laboratory and used a generic distributed system prototyping platform to realize the data network. This report presents the results of the hardware susceptibility threshold characterization which examined the dependence of measured susceptibility on factors like the frequency and modulation of the radiation, layout of the physical nodes and position of the nodes in the test chamber. The report also includes lessons learned during the development and execution of the experiment.

  4. SpaceX Test Fires Engine Prototype

    NASA Video Gallery

    One of NASA's industry partners, SpaceX, fires its new SuperDraco engine prototype in preparation for the ninth milestone to be completed under SpaceX's funded Space Act Agreement (SAA) with NASA's...

  5. GreenCraft Greenspoint House Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-16

    This case study describes a prototype house demonstrating energy efficiency and durability upgrades including an unvented roof with low density spray foam insulation and supplemental dehumidification, along with high performance windows and HVAC system.

  6. Prototype solar-heating system - installation manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Manual for prototype solar-heating system gives detailed installation procedures for each of seven subsystems. Procedures for operation and maintenance are also included. It discusses architectural considerations, building construction considerations, and checkout-test procedures.

  7. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Eight prototype systems were developed. The systems are 3, 25, and 75-ton size units. The manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation of the systems is described. Size activities for the various systems are included.

  8. Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final evaluation results.

  9. Rapid Production of Composite Prototype Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, T. K.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this research was to provide a mechanism to cost-effectively produce composite hardware prototypes. The task was to take a hands-on approach to developing new technologies that could benefit multiple future programs.

  10. Preliminary Component Integration Using Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken; Salvail, Pat; Gordon, Gail (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rapid prototyping is a very important tool that should be used by both design and manufacturing disciplines during the development of elements for the aerospace industry. It helps prevent lack of adequate communication between design and manufacturing engineers (which could lead to costly errors) through mutual consideration of functional models generated from drawings. Rapid prototyping techniques are used to test hardware for design and material compatibility at Marshall Space Flight Center.