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Sample records for endobronchial ultrasound-guided needle

  1. Recent advances in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takahiro; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Fujiwara, Taiki; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive modality for sampling of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes as well as pulmonary lesions adjacent to the airway. Guidelines for staging of lung cancer suggest that EBUS-TBNA should be considered the best first test of nodal staging for radiologically abnormal lymph nodes that are accessible by this approach. The application of EBUS-TBNA in pulmonary medicine and thoracic oncology is expanding with its role in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis, lymphoma, and tuberculosis. Especially for patients with early-stage sarcoidosis with adenopathy and minimal changes in the lung parenchyma, EBUS-TBNA has a significantly higher diagnostic yield compared to the conventional bronchoscopic modalities. Multidirectional analysis of samples obtained by EBUS-TBNA has allowed assessment of lymphoma and molecular analysis in lung cancer. Histological evaluation with immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and chromosome analysis can be performed if good-quality samples can be obtained. Molecular analyses such as identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene detection now are being performed routinely with good sampling. One of the advantages of EBUS-TBNA is the ability to perform repeat procedures in a minimally invasive way. Restaging of the mediastinum after induction therapy can be done safely and with ease compared to repeat surgical procedures. With improvement in molecular analysis technology, comprehensive gene expression analysis will become important in the management of patients with lung cancer. Further advances in EBUS technology and needles for tissue sampling likely will help bronchoscopists to acquire ideal tissue. PMID:27424821

  2. Intrapulmonary schwannoma diagnosed with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: case report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Shinkai, Masaharu; Shinoda, Masahiro; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for further examination of a lung tumor. CT of the chest revealed a round, well-defined 2.4-cm nodule in S2, adjacent to right superior lobe bronchus. Endobronchial ultrasonography showed a well-defined, hypoechoic tumor with echogenic capsule and posterior acoustic enhancement. Diagnosis of schwannoma was confirmed from the specimen obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. She underwent tumorectomy due to the possibility of obstructive pneumonia. Pathology diagnosis from the surgical specimen was also schwannoma. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration and findings with endobronchial ultrasonography might be helpful in the diagnosis of intrapulmonary schwannoma. PMID:24907227

  3. Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Caraway, Nancy P; Salina, Davide; Deavers, Michael T; Morice, Rodolfo; Landon, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare intraluminal malignant neoplasm that has an aggressive biological behavior, and early diagnosis may improve patient outcome. We describe a case of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed on cytologic material obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsy with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE). The aspirate showed loosely cohesive clusters of pleomorphic malignant spindled and epithelioid cells. An immunostain panel did not demonstrate any definitive mesenchymal or epithelial differentiation. The tumor's intraluminal origin was supported by radiographic imaging studies. Subsequently, the patient received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent tumor resection with reconstruction. This report describes the cytomorphologic features of this rare intravascular tumor and demonstrates how EBUS-TBNA with ROSE was instrumental in obtaining optimal cytologic sampling for ancillary studies, thus expediting the management. PMID:25745502

  4. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of pulmonary artery tumors: A systematic review (with video).

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Modi, Kush; Kumar, Abhishek; Dhillon, Samjot Singh

    2015-01-01

    Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS) was originally introduced as a diagnostic and staging tool for lung cancer and subsequently utilized for diagnosis of other malignant and benign mediastinal diseases such as melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoidosis. More recently, CP-EBUS has been successfully used for the visualization and diagnosis of pulmonary emboli and other vascular lesions including primary and metastatic pulmonary artery (PA) tumors. In this review, we will underline the role of EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial tumors such as sarcomas and tumor emboli. We will concisely discuss the clinical applications of EBUS-TBNA and the types of pulmonary arterial tumors and their different diagnostic modalities. We searched the Cochrane Library and PubMed from 2004 to 2014 to provide the most comprehensive review. Only 10 cases of EBUS-TBNA for intravascular lesions were identified in the literature. Although many cases of EBUS and EUS-guided transvascular tumor biopsies were described in the literature, there were no reported cases of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for intravascular tumor biopsies. Except for one paper, all cases were published as case reports. PMID:26374576

  5. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA): applications in chest disease.

    PubMed

    Medford, Andrew R L; Bennett, Jonathan A; Free, Catherine M; Agrawal, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) offers a minimally invasive option for staging the mediastinum in suspect lung cancer but also in the diagnosis of mediastinal lesions accessible from the airway. This review is aimed at centres considering establishing an EBUS service that may not be so familiar with the technique. It focuses primarily on technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA, training issues, cost considerations, indications, advantages and disadvantages compared with other mediastinal sampling techniques as well as some reference to its performance in clinical studies. In summary, EBUS-TBNA is primarily used for staging non-small cell lung cancer, especially for bulky mediastinal disease and discrete N2 or N3 disease on CT, but also used for the diagnosis of unexplained mediastinal lymphadenopathy. For radical treatment staging, mediastinoscopy is still used at many centres and negative EBUS-TBNA results should be corroborated by mediastinoscopy. In the future, EBUS-TBNA may be used for staging the radiologically normal mediastinum and in re-staging. It is a procedure that can be taught with ease by an experienced operator, has numerous advantages over mediastinoscopy and is potentially cost saving by reducing the number of mediastinoscopies and associated peri-operative support required. PMID:19895387

  6. Mediastinal abscess after endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Leong, Steven C; Marshall, Henry M; Bint, Michael; Yang, Ian A; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M

    2013-10-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive technique that allows lung cancer nodal staging and biopsy of parabronchial and paratracheal tissue. Its simplicity, high diagnostic yield, ability to diagnose both benign and malignant conditions, and exceedingly low complication rate has resulted in rapid widespread adoption by surgeons and physicians. EBUS-TBNA-related complications, however, do occur and need to be considered when assessing the risk-benefit profile of performing the procedure, and if the patient represents with unexpected symptoms after the procedure. We describe a 64-year-old woman who presented with a mediastinal abscess 5 days after EBUS-TBNA. This case demonstrates the importance of considering EBUS-TBNA-related complications to guide relevant imaging decisions and antibiotic choices. We review the published literature regarding infective complications of EBUS-TBNA and propose possible pathophysiologies. These complications are likely to increase in frequency as the technique is more widely adopted. PMID:24162119

  7. Diagnostic yield of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for mediastinal staging in lung cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bussy, Sebastián; Labarca, Gonzalo; Canals, Sofia; Caviedes, Iván; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive diagnostic test with a high diagnostic yield for suspicious central pulmonary lesions and for mediastinal lymph node staging. The main objective of this study was to describe the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging in patients with suspected lung cancer. METHODS: Prospective study of patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA for diagnosis. Patients ≥ 18 years of age were recruited between July of 2010 and August of 2013. We recorded demographic variables, radiological characteristics provided by axial CT of the chest, location of the lesion in the mediastinum as per the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification, and definitive diagnostic result (EBUS with a diagnostic biopsy or a definitive diagnostic method). RESULTS: Our analysis included 354 biopsies, from 145 patients. Of those 145 patients, 54.48% were male. The mean age was 63.75 years. The mean lymph node size was 15.03 mm, and 90 lymph nodes were smaller than 10.0 mm. The EBUS-TBNA method showed a sensitivity of 91.17%, a specificity of 100.0%, and a negative predictive value of 92.9%. The most common histological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: EBUS-TBNA is a diagnostic tool that yields satisfactory results in the staging of neoplastic mediastinal lesions. PMID:26176519

  8. Diagnostic value of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in various lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ortakoylu, Mediha Gonenc; Iliaz, Sinem; Bahadir, Ayse; Aslan, Asuman; Iliaz, Raim; Ozgul, Mehmet Akif; Urer, Halide Nur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a new method for the diagnosis and staging of lung disease, and its use is increasing worldwide. It has been used as a means of diagnosing lung cancer in its initial stages, and there are data supporting its use for the diagnosis of benign lung disease. The aim of this study was to share our experience with EBUS-TBNA and discuss its diagnostic value. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the results related to 159 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA at our pulmonary medicine clinic between 2010 and 2013. We recorded the location and size of lymph nodes seen during EBUS. Lymph nodes that appeared to be affected on EBUS were sampled at least twice. We recorded the diagnostic results of EBUS-TBNA and (for cases in which EBUS-TBNA yielded an inconclusive diagnosis) the final diagnoses after further investigation and follow-up. Results: We evaluated 159 patients, of whom 89 (56%) were male and 70 (44%) were female. The mean age was 54.6 ± 14.2 years among the male patients and 51.9 ± 11.3 years among the female patients. Of the 159 patients evaluated, 115 (84%) were correctly diagnosed by EBUS. The diagnostic accuracy of EBUS-TBNA was 83% for benign granulomatous diseases and 77% for malignant diseases. Conclusions: The diagnostic value of EBUS-TBNA is also high for benign pathologies, such as sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. In patients with mediastinal disorders, the use of EBUS-TBNA should be encouraged, primarily because it markedly reduces the need for mediastinoscopy. PMID:26578131

  9. Usefulness of High Suction Pressure for Sufficient Tissue Collection During Endobronchial Ultrasound Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Okamoto, Norio; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tamiya, Motohiro; Yamadori, Tadahiro; Morishita, Naoko; Otsuka, Tomoyuki; Morita, Satomu; Kurata, Kanako; Okimura, Akira; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Sasada, Shinji; Hirashima, Tomonori; Kawase, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The optimal suction pressure during endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to compare suction pressures for performance in collecting sufficient tissue specimens from mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes during EBUS-TBNA. Methods Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy who underwent EBUS-TBNA over a 3-year period. Results from patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA using a dedicated 20-mL VacLoc (Merit Medical Systems, Inc, South Jordan, UT) syringe (conventional method, group C) were compared with results from patients in whom a disposable 30-mL syringe (high pressure group, group H) was used. The yield for sufficient histologic specimen retrieval and amount of tissue obtained were compared between the 2 groups. Results Of 178 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA, 131 had lung cancer confirmed by EBUS-TBNA: 35 in group C and 96 in group H. There were 7 patients in group C and 6 in group H who received final diagnoses by cytology alone. There were 28 in group C and 90 in group H who were diagnosed by both cytology and histology. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of the rate of sufficient sampling for histological specimens (p = 0.04). The H group revealed a tissue area approximately twice that of the C group (p = 0.003). There were no major procedure-related complications in either group. Conclusion Higher suction pressures with larger syringe volumes during EBUS-TBNA may be useful for safely collecting sufficient tissue specimens. PMID:24340058

  10. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes detected on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Daisuke; Takigawa, Nagio; Oda, Naohiro; Ninomiya, Takashi; Kubo, Toshio; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Sato, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Kaji, Mitsumasa; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is of diagnostic value in hilar/mediastinal (N1/N2) lymph node staging. We assessed the utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in lung cancer patients with N1/N2 lymph nodes detected on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Methods Fifty lung cancer patients with N1/N2 disease on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography underwent endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for pathological lymph nodes between November 2012 and April 2015. The diagnostic performance of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, lymph node site and size, number of needle passes and complications were evaluated retrospectively from patients' medical records. Malignancy was defined as a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) >2.5. Results The median longest diameter of the 61 lymph nodes (29 subcarinal, 21 right lower paratracheal, 6 left lower paratracheal, 4 right hilar and 1 upper paratracheal) was 23.4 mm (range: 10.4–45.7); the median number of needle passes was 2 (range: 1–5). There were no severe complications. A definitive diagnosis was made by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in 39 patients (31 adenocarcinomas, 3 small-cell carcinomas, 2 squamous-cell carcinomas, 3 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas). In the remaining 11 patients, the diagnosis was indefinite: insufficient endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration material was collected in two patients and non-specific lymphadenopathy was confirmed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration or thoracotomy in the other nine patients. The mean lymph node SUVmax was 7.09 (range: 2.90–26.9) and was significantly higher in true-positive than in false-positive nodes (P < 0.05, t-test). Non-specific lymphadenopathy was

  11. Tension pneumothorax as a severe complication of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration of mediastinal lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Szlubowski, Artur; Gil, Tomasz; Kocoń, Piotr; Ziętkiewicz, Mirosław; Twardowska, Magdalena; Kużdżał, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a case report of a patient suffering from bullous emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, who was diagnosed with tension pneumothorax after undergoing endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). Tension pneumothorax is a severe but rare complication of EBUS-TBNA. It can result from lung injury caused by the biopsy needle or, in patients suffering from bullous emphysema, from spontaneous rupture of an emphysematous bulla resulting from increased pressure in the chest cavity during cough caused by bronchofiberoscope insertion. The authors emphasize that patients should be carefully monitored after the biopsy, and, in the case of complications, provided with treatment immediately in proper hospital conditions. Patients burdened with a high risk of complications should be identified before the procedure and monitored with extreme care after its completion. PMID:26855656

  12. A rare case of mediastinal metastasis of ovarian carcinoma diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA).

    PubMed

    Carbonari, Augusto; Camunha, Marco; Binato, Marcelo; Saieg, Mauro; Marioni, Fabio; Rossini, Lucio

    2015-10-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has become a minimally invasive tool with excellent diagnostic accuracy and low risk of complications in the diagnosis of thoracic diseases, including lung cancers and primary mediastinal lesions. Occasionally, EBUS-TBNA may be useful in identifying thoracic metastasis from distant tumors. Here we report an interesting and rare case of mediastinal metastasis of ovarian carcinoma diagnosed by EBUS-TBNA. PMID:26623131

  13. Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration versus Standard Bronchoscopic Modalities for Diagnosis of Sarcoidosis: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li-Xing; Chen, Ru-Xuan; Huang, Hui; Shao, Chi; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yong-Zhe; Xu, Zuo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is an effective technique used to precisely detect enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. The efficacy of EBUS-TBNA versus standard modalities for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis remains to be elucidated. In this meta-analysis, we compared the efficacies of these methods. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, Wanfang, Cpvip, CNKI, and the bibliographies of the relevant references. We analyzed the data obtained with Revman 5.2 (Nordic Cochrane Center, Copenhagen, Denmark) and Stata 12.0 software (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA). The Mantel-Haenszel method was used to calculate the pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Sixteen studies with a total of 1823 participants met the inclusion criteria, and data were extracted regarding the diagnostic yield of each approach. The ORs for EBUS-TBNA versus transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis ranged from 0.26 to 126.58, and the pooled OR was 5.89 (95% CI, 2.20–15.79, P = 0.0004). These findings indicated that EBUS-TBNA provided a much higher diagnostic yield than TBLB. The pooled OR for EBUS-TBNA + TBLB + endobronchial biopsy (EBB) versus TBNA + TBLB + EBB was 1.54 (95% CI, 0.61–3.93, P = 0.36), implying that there was no significant difference between their diagnostic yields. However, clinical heterogeneity was reflected in the nature of the studies and in the operative variables. Conclusions: The results of this meta-analysis suggest that EBUS-TBNA + TBLB + EBB could be used for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis, if available. At medical centers without EBUS-TBNA, TBNA + TBLB + EBB could be used instead. PMID:27364799

  14. Impact of Endobronchial Ultrasound Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration on Diagnostic Yield of Bronchoscopy in Patients with Mediastinal Lymph Node Enlargement.

    PubMed

    Osinka, K; Zielińska-Krawczyk, M; Korczyński, P; Górnicka, B; Krenke, R

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) had an enormous impact on the current advancement in diagnostic bronchoscopy. The aims of the present study were: (1) to evaluate the added value of EBUS-TBNA to routine diagnostic bronchoscopy performed in patients with mediastinal lymph node enlargement and (2) to identify factors that affect the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA. We retrospectively analyzed 712 EBUS-TBNA procedures out of the 4081 bronchoscopies performed in the years 2009-2014. The number of EBUS-TBNA procedures increased from 61 (8.8 % of all bronchoscopies) in 2009 to 160 (21.4 %) in 2014. In 625 (87.8 %) patients adequate cytological material was obtained. Based on cytological examination of EBUS-TBNA aspirates, specific diagnosis was made in 367 (51.5 %) patients. The forceps biopsy of endobronchial lesions provided specific diagnosis in only 204 (28.6 %) patients. The percentage of patients with EBUS-TBNA based diagnosis increased steadily from 34.4 % in 2009 to 65.0 % in 2014 (p < 0.0001). The median lymph node diameter in patients with positive EBUS-TBNA findings was 20 (IQR 15-30) mm and was significantly larger than that in patients with negative EBUS-TBNA results (15 (IQR 10-20) mm, p = 0.0001). The highest diagnostic yield (78.5 %) was found in patients with lymph node dimension between 31 mm and 40 mm. We conclude that EBUS-TBNA is a valuable diagnostic method in an unselected group of patients with mediastinal lymph node enlargement. The percentage of positive EBUS-TBNA diagnoses is related to lymph node dimensions. The overall efficacy of EBUS-TBNA improves with increasing years of experience. PMID:26987324

  15. Role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in the management of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Taiki; Chiyo, Masako; Iyoda, Akira; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Suzuki, Makoto; Sekine, Yasuo; Shibuya, Kiyoshi; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2008-06-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is a promising new modality first introduced during the early 1990s. The radial probe EBUS was initially developed seeking for high-resolution imaging of processes in the airway wall and outside the airways. The structure of special importance was lymph nodes, walls of the central airways, and the mediastinum. After the development of miniaturized radial probes with flexible catheters having a balloon at the tip, it has been applied to aid bronchoscopists during biopsy of patients with respiratory diseases. In particular, the role of EBUS in transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) has been established. Radial probe EBUS-guided TBNA has increased the yield of TBNA of mediastinal lymph nodes, although it was still not a real-time procedure with target visualization. New convex probe EBUS (CP-EBUS) with the ability to perform real-time EBUS-guided TBNA (EBUS-TBNA) has emerged to overcome these problems. Indications for EBUS-TBNA are (1) lymph node staging in lung cancer patients; (2) diagnosis of intrapulmonary tumors; (3) diagnosis of unknown hilar and/or mediastinal lymphadenopathy; and (4) diagnosis of mediastinal tumors. Case series using EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging in lung cancer have reported a high yield, ranging from 89% to 98% (average 94.5%). To date, there are no reports of major complications related to EBUS-TBNA. EBUS-TBNA is a novel approach with a high diagnostic yield that is safe. The aim of this article was to review the current role of EBUS-TBNA for the management of lung cancer patients. PMID:18563521

  16. Yield of new versus reused endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration needles: A retrospective analysis of 500 patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Gupta, Nalini; Ram, Babu; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) requires a dedicated needle for aspiration of mediastinal lesions. There is no data on reuse of these needles. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA with either new or reused EBUS-TBNA needles. The needles were reused after thorough cleaning with filtered water and organic cleaning solution, disinfection with 2.4% glutaraldehyde solution followed by ethylene oxide sterilization. The yield of EBUS-TBNA was compared between the two groups. Results: A total of 500 EBUS-TBNA procedures (351 new, 149 reused needles) were performed. The baseline characteristics were different in the two groups with suspected granulomatous disorders (sarcoidosis or tuberculosis) being significantly more common in the new compared to the reused needle group. Similarly, the median, interquartile range number of lymph node stations sampled, and the total number of passes were significantly higher in the new versus the reused needle group. The diagnostic yield was significantly higher with new needle as compared to reused needle (65.2% vs. 53.7%, P = 0.02). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, clinical suspicion of granulomatous disorders (odds ratio 1.86 [95% confidence interval, 1.20-2.87], P = 0.005) was the only predictor of diagnostic yield, after adjusting for the type of needle (new or reused), total number of passes and the number of lymph node stations sampled. No case of mediastinitis was encountered in either group. Conclusions: The yield of EBUS-TBNA might be similar with single reuse of needles as compared to new needles. However, reuse of needle should be performed only when absolutely necessary. PMID:27578927

  17. Comparison of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration and Video-Assisted Mediastinoscopy for Mediastinal Staging of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiahui; Guan, Wenbin; Han, Fengfeng; Guo, Xuejun; Jin, Zhichao

    2015-10-01

    Video-assisted mediastinoscopy (VAM) and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) are the two most commonly used invasive methods for mediastinal staging of lung cancer. The objective of this review is to assess and compare the overall diagnostic values of VAM and EBUS-TBNA. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies that evaluated EBUS-TBNA or VAM accuracy. Quantitative meta-analysis was used to pool sensitivity and specificity, and study quality was evaluated. Meta-regression was applied to indirectly compare EBUS-TBNA and VAM after adjusting quality score, study design, and station number. A total of ten studies with 999 EBUS-TBNA patients and seven studies with 915 VAM patients were included. Since the pooled specificity was 100% for both modalities, sensitivity was mainly analyzed. The pooled sensitivities for EBUS-TBNA and VAM were 0.84 (95% CI 0.79-0.88) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.82-0.90), respectively. Subgroup analyses of quality score, study design, station number and rapid on-site cytologic evaluation showed no significant influence on the overall sensitivity of the two modalities. After adjusting quality score, study design, and station number, the pooled sensitivities of VAM and EBUS-TBNA were not significantly different. However, more procedural complications and fewer false negatives (FN) were found with VAM than EBUS-TBNA. VAM and EBUS exhibited equally high diagnostic accuracy for mediastinal staging of lung cancer. Due to lower morbidity with EBUS-TBNA and fewer FN with VAM, EBUS-TBNA should be performed first, followed by VAM in the case of a negative needle result. PMID:26186887

  18. Usefulness of lymphoid granulomatous inflammation culture obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in a fungal endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Berger, John; Zamora, Felix; Podgaetz, Eitan; Andrade, Rafael; Dincer, H. Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is the procedure of choice for the evaluation of mediastinal/hilar lymph node enlargements. Granulomatous inflammation of the mediastinal/hilar lymph nodes is often identified on routine histology. In addition, mediastinal lymphadenopathy may be present with undiagnosed infection. We sought to determine the usefulness of routine cultures and histology for infectious etiologies in a fungal endemic area when granulomatous inflammation is identified. Materials and Methods: We identified 56 of 210 patients with granulomatous inflammation on EBUS-TBNA biopsies from October 2012 through October 2014. An onsite cytologist evaluated all biopsies and an additional TBNA pass for microbiologic stains and cultures were obtained in those with granulomatous inflammation. Results: Of the 56 patients with granulomatous inflammation, 20 patients had caseating (necrotizing) granulomas while noncaseating (nonnecrotizing) granulomas were detected in 36 of the remainder patients. In patients with caseating granulomas, fungal elements were identified in 6 of 20 (30%) patients (histoplasma; N = 5, blastomyces; N = 1) on Grocott methenamine silver (GMS) stain. Lymph node cultures identified 3 of 20 (20%) patients as being positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (N = 1), Histoplasma capsulatum (N = 1), and Blastomyces dermatitidis (N = 1). Among patients with noncaseating granulomas, only 2 out of 36 (5%) were positive for fungal elements on GMS stain, identified as Histoplasma, although the lymph node cultures remained negative. Conclusion: The incidence of granulomatous inflammation of mediastinal lymph nodes was 26.6% in our series. Of these patients, noncaseating granulomas were more common (64% vs. 36%). Infectious organisms, fungal or acid-fast bacilli (AFB), on either staining or lymph node culture were rarely identified in noncaseating granulomas, 5% and none, respectively

  19. Evaluation of the diagnostic utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for metastatic mediastinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Dariusz; Peryt, Adam; Szolkowska, Malgorzata; Langfort, Renata; Orlowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The mediastinum is a relatively uncommon site of distant metastases, which typically appear as peripheral lung nodules. We chose to assess the utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for the diagnosis of distant metastases to the mediastinum. Materials and Methods: Over the period 2008–2013, a total of 446 patients with concurrent or previously diagnosed and treated extrathoracic malignancies were evaluated. Results: Surgical treatment was carried out in 414 patients (156 women and 237 men aged 26–68 years, mean age of 56.5 years) presenting with distant metastases to the lungs: Thoracoscopic wedge resection was completed in 393 patients and lobectomy and segmentectomy were performed in 7 and 14 patients, respectively. The median time from primary tumor resection was 6.5 years (range: 4.5 months to 17 years). Thirty-two of these patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal manifestation of the underlying disease. EBUS-TBNA specimens were aspirated from the subcarinal or right paratracheal lymph node stations in 26 (81%) patients and from the hilar lymph nodes in 6 (18.8%) patients only. Metastases to lymph nodes were confirmed in 14 of these patients (43.8%). Primary lung cancer was diagnosed in seven patients. Mediastinoscopy was performed in two patients to reveal either lymph node metastasis or sarcoidosis. Thoracotomy for pulmonary metastases resection and mediastinal lymph node biopsy was performed in nine patients. Lymph node metastasis was confirmed in five patients (15.6%). The diagnostic efficacy, sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value (NPV) of EBUS-TBNA were 78.8%, 93.3%, 100%, and 87.5%, respectively. Conclusion: EBUS-TBNA is a valuable diagnostic tool in a selected group of patients with secondary tumors in the mediastinum and lungs. PMID:27386474

  20. Rapid on-site evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for the diagnosis of hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongbo; Liu, Sujing; Guo, Jun; Li, Bobo; Li, Wanhu; Lu, Zuowei; Sun, Jujie; Zhang, Baijiang; Yu, Jinming

    2016-02-28

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and the interpretation of its results. Based on the criterion of using ROSE or not, 236 patients with known or suspected lung cancer undergoing EBUS-TBNA were allocated into the ROSE group (122 patients with 252 lymph nodes) and non-ROSE group (114 patients with 260 lymph nodes). In the ROSE group, the percentages of the suspicious specimens on cytology and non-diagnostic specimens on pathology were both significantly lower than that in the non-ROSE group (8.7% vs. 14.6%, p = 0.038; and 0.9% vs. 4.4%, p = 0.018, respectively), and 13 out of 22 suspicious lesions on ROSE were confirmed with definite diagnoses on TBNA pathology. The diagnostic yield stratified by pathology was significantly higher in the ROSE group than that in the non-ROSE group (90.5% vs. 81.2%, p = 0.003). These results suggest that ROSE during EBUS-TBNA allows for a low rate of suspicious results and therefore improves the diagnostic yield stratified by pathology when sampling hilar or mediastinal lymphadenopathy in patients with lung cancer. PMID:26656954

  1. Rapid on-site evaluation with BIOEVALUATOR® during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for diagnosing pulmonary and mediastinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Daisuke; Takigawa, Nagio; Inoue, Hirofumi; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) is used widely during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). BIOEVALUATOR® is a device used for determining whether the tissues obtained by EBUS-TBNA are appropriate for a pathological diagnosis. This study describes our experience with ROSE using BIOEVALUATOR® during EBUS-TBNA for diagnosing pulmonary and mediastinal diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the results of 35 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA with BIOEVALUATOR® between December 2011 and February 2013. For the diagnosis, the tissue areas were appearing white and red through BIOEVALUATOR® are considered to be appropriate and inappropriate, respectively. We examined their medical records to obtain information concerning the examination of BIOEVALUATOR® results of the patient's materials (white/red), the diagnosis yield, site and size of lymph nodes and number of needle passes. RESULTS: The median longest diameter of 40 lymph nodes (21 #7, 13 #4R, 4 #4L and 2 #11) from 35 patients was 27.9 (range 12.4-50.6) mm and the median number of needle passes was 2 (range 1-5). The definitive diagnosis was made by EBUS-TBNA in 28 of 35 patients, by thoracotomy in one patient and BIOEVALUATOR® results were white and lymphocytes were seen in the rest six patients. The BIOEVALUATOR® results of other patients without accurate diagnosis were left indefinitive. Finally, the six patients were judged as having benign lymphadenopathy because the lymph node size on computed tomography decreased or remained stable after for at least 8 months. CONCLUSIONS: Checking aspirated samples using BIOEVALUATOR® appears useful for determining their adequacy for pathological diagnosis. PMID:24551012

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy ... Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During a fine needle aspiration ...

  3. Diagnostic Value of Convex Probe Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration in Mediastinal Tuberculous Lymphadenitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Yuqing; Liu, Chao; Peng, Wenjia

    2015-01-01

    Background Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has been widely used in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymphadenopathies. Here, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the diagnostic value of EBUS-TBNA in mediastinal tuberculous lymphadenopathy (TBLA). Material/Methods PubMed, EMBASE, and Sinoced were systematically searched for articles published in English or Chinese that reported the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA in mediastinal TBLA. The quality of studies was assessed using the QualSyst tool. Using 95% confidence intervals (CI), the diagnostic yields of EBUS-TBNA were calculated for the individual studies, and the results were then pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity and publication bias were also assessed. Results A total of 14 studies, consisting of 684 patients with mediastinal TBLA, were finally included. The pooled diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal TBLA was 80% (95% CI: 74–86%). Significant heterogeneity (I2=77.9%) and significant publication bias were detected (Begg’s test p=0.05 and Egger’s test p=0.02). From subgroup analyses, significant differences in the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA were associated with Asian vs. European (UK) studies, retrospective vs. prospective studies, those employing rapid on-site cytological evaluation vs. not, those employing different anesthetic types, and those employing smear vs. culture. However, microbiological examination and the number of lymph node passes did not have a significant effect on the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA. Fifteen minor complications for EBUS-TBNA were reported. Conclusions EBUS-TBNA appears to be an efficacious and safe procedure and should be used as an initial diagnostic tool for mediastinal TBLA. PMID:26177653

  4. Ultrasound guided spine needle insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Elvis C. S.; Mousavi, Parvin; Gill, Sean; Fichtinger, Gabor; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2010-02-01

    An ultrasound (US) guided, CT augmented, spine needle insertion navigational system is introduced. The system consists of an electromagnetic (EM) sensor, an US machine, and a preoperative CT volume of the patient anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) US volume is reconstructed intraoperatively from a set of two-dimensional (2D) freehand US slices, and is coregistered with the preoperative CT. This allows the preoperative CT volume to be used in the intraoperative clinical coordinate. The spatial relationship between the patient anatomy, surgical tools, and the US transducer are tracked using the EM sensor, and are displayed with respect to the CT volume. The pose of the US transducer is used to interpolate the CT volume, providing the physician with a 2D "x-ray vision" to guide the needle insertion. Many of the system software components are GPU-accelerated, allowing real-time performance of the guidance system in a clinical setting.

  5. A comparison of ketamine-midazolam and ketamine-propofol combinations used for sedation in the endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: a prospective, single-blind, randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Dal, Tülay; Sazak, Hilal; Şahin, Şaziye; Yılmaz, Aydın

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of ketamine-midazolam and ketamine-propofol combinations for procedural sedation in endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). Methods Sixty patients who were undergoing EBUS-TBNA were included in this study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 was given 0.25 mg/kg intravenous (iv) ketamine, 2 min later than 0.05 mg/kg iv midazolam. Group 2 received 0.125 mg/kg ketamine-propofol mixture (ketofol), 2 min subsequent to injection of 0.25 mg/kg each. Sedation was maintained with additional doses of ketamine 0.25 mg/kg, and ketofol 0.125 mg/kg each in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. Blood pressure, heart rate (HR), peripheral oxygen saturation, respiratory rate (RR), Ramsay Sedation Score (RSS), and severity of cough were recorded prior to and after administration of sedation agent in the beginning of fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) and every 5 min of the procedure. The consumption of the agents, the satisfactions of the bronchoscopist and the patients, and the recovery time were also recorded. Results HR in the 10th min and RSS value in the 35th min of induction in Group 1 were higher than the other group (P<0.05). The recovery time in Group 1 was statistically longer than Group 2 (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between groups with respect to other parameters (P>0.05). Conclusions It was concluded that both ketamine-midazolam and ketamine-propofol combinations for sedation during EBUS-TBNA were similarly effective and safe without remarkable side effects. PMID:24976998

  6. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongbae J.; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. Purpose To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Methods Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation + rotation. Results In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation + rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. Conclusion The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted. PMID:21642648

  7. Peripheral pulmonary carcinoid tumor diagnosed by endobronchial-ultrasound-guided bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ayaka; Akamatsu, Hiroaki; Kawabata, Hiroki; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    A 45-year-old Japanese woman complained of uncontrolled hypertension and face swelling. She was diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome with secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography revealed a 2 × 2 cm mass in her left lung, with high standardized maximum uptake value. She underwent bronchoscopy with endobronchial ultrasound via a guide-sheath. Surgical resection of her left upper lung was performed, and pathological examination showed a typical carcinoid tumor. After lung resection, she recovered from her subjective symptoms. Diagnosis of peripheral carcinoid tumor of the lung is generally difficult. Here, we introduce a case of peripheral pulmonary carcinoid tumor diagnosed by endobronchial-ultrasound-guided bronchoscopy. PMID:26839693

  8. Ultrasound-guided robot for flexible needle steering.

    PubMed

    Neubach, Zipi; Shoham, Moshe

    2010-04-01

    The success rate of medical procedures involving needle insertion is often directly related to needle placement accuracy. Due to inherent limitations of commonly used freehand needle placement techniques, there is a need for a system providing for controlled needle steering for procedures that demand high positional accuracy. This paper describes a robotic system developed for flexible needle steering inside soft tissues under real-time ultrasound imaging. An inverse kinematics algorithm based on a virtual spring model is applied to calculate needle base manipulations required for the tip to follow a curved trajectory while avoiding physiological obstacles. The needle tip position is derived from ultrasound images and is used in calculations to minimize the tracking error, enabling a closed-loop needle insertion. In addition, as tissue stiffness is a necessary input to the control algorithm, a novel method to classify tissue stiffness from localized tissue displacements is proposed and shown to successfully distinguish between soft and stiff tissue. The system performance was experimentally verified by robotic manipulation of the needle base inside a phantom with layers of varying stiffnesses. The closed-loop experiment with updated tissue stiffness parameters demonstrated a needle-tip tracking error of approximately 1 mm and proved to be significantly more accurate than the freehand method. PMID:19709957

  9. Ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy of early hepatocellular carcinoma complicating liver cirrhosis: a multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Caturelli, E; Solmi, L; Anti, M; Fusilli, S; Roselli, P; Andriulli, A; Fornari, F; Del Vecchio Blanco, C; de Sio, I

    2004-01-01

    Background: Because hepatic cirrhosis is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma, recent guidelines by the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) on clinical management of hepatocellular carcinoma recommend periodic ultrasound surveillance of cirrhotic patients with immediate workup for nodules >1 cm; an increase in the frequency of screening is considered sufficient for smaller lesions. Aims: To determine the actual risk of hepatocellular carcinoma associated with the latter lesions and to assess the role of ultrasound guided-fine needle biopsy in their diagnosis Patients and methods: Data were analysed for 294 new nodular lesions <20 mm, including 48 that were <10 mm, detected during a prospective multicentre study involving ultrasound surveillance of 4375 patients with hepatic cirrhosis. In the absence of α fetoprotein (AFP) levels diagnostic of hepatocellular carcinoma, ultrasound guided-fine needle biopsy was performed (n = 274). AFP and fine needle biopsy diagnoses of malignancies (hepatocellular carcinoma and lymphoma) were considered definitive. Non-malignant fine needle biopsy diagnoses (dysplastic or regenerative nodule) were verified by a second imaging study. Diagnoses of hepatocellular carcinoma based on this study were considered definitive; non-malignant imaging diagnoses were considered definitive after at least one year of clinical and ultrasound follow up. Results: Overall, 258/294 (87.6%) nodules proved to be hepatocellular carcinoma, including 33/48 (68.7%) of those ⩽10 mm. Overall typing accuracy of ultrasound guided-fine needle biopsy was 89.4%, and 88.6% for lesions ⩽10 mm. Conclusions: In a screening population, well over half of very small nodules arising in cirrhotic livers may prove to be hepatocellular carcinoma, and approximately 90% of these malignancies can be reliably identified with ultrasound guided-fine needle biopsy. PMID:15306600

  10. Treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy with ultrasound guided dry needling

    PubMed Central

    Settergren, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the treatment of a patient with tendinopathy using sonographically guided dry needling. Tendinopathies are a highly prevalent problem in musculoskeletal medicine, and no one form of treatment has gained universal acceptance as being superior to another. Clinical Features A 30-year-old woman with a 4-month history of anterolateral right shoulder pain was diagnosed with supraspinatus tendinopathy upon physical examination, which was confirmed with diagnostic sonography. Intervention and Outcome Sonography was used to guide an acupuncture needle into the pathologic tissue to induce a humoral healing response. Therapeutic exercise was also prescribed. At 10-day follow-up, increased echogenicity was found in the previously heterogenous hypoechoic areas. The patient also experienced a subjective resolution of her shoulder pain, which did not return with increased physical activity. Conclusions Sonographically guided dry needling was shown to be beneficial for this patient as evident by sonographic changes pre- and postprocedure. PMID:23997721

  11. "Dry" pleural mesothelioma successfully diagnosed on endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA).

    PubMed

    Lococo, Filippo; Rossi, Giulio; Agostini, Lorenzo; Filice, Angelina; Paci, Massimiliano; Rapicetta, Cristian; Ricchetti, Tommaso; Tenconi, Sara; Piro, Roberto; Sgarbi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of histologic material is obligatory in order to establish the diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In particular, tissue acquisition in cases of "dry" MPM (focal pleural thickening without pleural effusion or mediastinal lymph node involvement) is usually performed via a thoracoscopic pleural biopsy. In contrast, the techniques for performing echoendoscopic (transbronchial or transesophageal) needle aspiration of pleural lesions have only rarely been reported due to the theoretical limitations of tissue acquisition in such cases. We herein report the first case of "dry" MPM successfully diagnosed via endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) in a 73-year-old man presenting with a pleural mass in the right costovertebral recess, adjacent to the carina. The patient underwent radical resection, and a definitive pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of epithelioid MPM. PMID:24583437

  12. Retrieval of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) oocytes by ultrasound-guided needle aspiration: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Nancy A; Si, Wei; Emmi, Adelina M; Layman, Lawrence C; Eroglu, Ali

    2009-09-01

    Oocytes of nonhuman primates such as rhesus monkeys are excellent models for diverse studies on developmental biology, epigenetics, human reproduction, and assisted reproductive technologies, as well as on transgenics. Such studies require numerous oocytes that can be retrieved after controlled ovarian stimulation. Currently, most primate centers use laparoscopic aspiration or laparotomy followed by aspiration to collect rhesus oocytes, although the ultrasound-guided needle aspiration is more advantageous due to reduced infection risk, less injury, and a shorter recovery period. Yet, some initial difficulties associated with the ultrasound-guided needle aspiration limit its broader application. The objective of the present study was to address these obstacles. By presenting practical solutions to the initial difficulties, results from our study show that it is possible to collect a mean number of 38 +/- 10 rhesus oocytes per hormonally stimulated female. These results compare favorably to the average number of rhesus oocytes collected using the laparoscopic approach and suggest that when initial obstacles are overcome, the ultrasound-guided oocyte retrieval represents a good alternative to more invasive approaches. PMID:19504566

  13. Learning Ultrasound-Guided Needle Insertion Skills through an Edutainment Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Ni, Dong; Pang, Wai-Man; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Yu, Simon Chun-Ho; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is essential in many of minimally invasive surgeries or procedures, such as biopsy, drug delivery, spinal anaesthesia, etc. Accurate and safe needle insertion is a difficult task due to the high requirement of hand-eye coordination skills. Many proposed virtual reality (VR) based training systems put their emphasis on realistic simulation instead of pedagogical efficiency. The lack of schematic training scenario leads to boredom of repetitive operations. To solve this, we present our novel training system with the integration of game elements in order to retain the trainees' enthusiasm. Task-oriented scenarios, time attack scenarios and performance evaluation are introduced. Besides, some state-of-art technologies are also presented, including ultrasound simulation, needle haptic rendering as well as a mass-spring-based needle-tissue interaction simulation. These works are shown to be effective to keep the trainees up with learning.

  14. Using an abdominal phantom to teach urology residents ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle placement

    PubMed Central

    Filippou, Pauline; Odisho, Anobel; Ramaswamy, Krishna; Usawachintachit, Manint; Hu, Weiguo; Li, Jianxing; Chi, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: To assess the effect of a hands-on ultrasound training session to teach urologic trainees ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle placement. Materials and methods: University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) urology residents completed a time trial, placing a needle into a phantom model target under ultrasound guidance. Participants were randomized into three educational exposure groups: Group 1's time trial occurred prior to any teaching intervention, group 2's after experiencing a hands-on training module, and group 3's after exposure to both the training module and one-on-one attending feedback. Needle placement speed and accuracy as well as trainees' perceived confidence in utilizing ultrasound were measured. Results: The study cohort consisted of 15 resident trainees. Seven were randomized to group 1, three to group 2, and five to group 3. All residents reported minimal prior ultrasound experience. Their confidence in using ultrasound improved significantly after completing the training module with the most significant improvement seen among junior residents. Time to needle placement was fastest after receiving attending feedback (46.6sec in group 3 vs. 82.7sec in groups 1 and 2, p<0.01). Accuracy also improved with attending feedback, though the number of repositioning attempts did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusions: A hands-on training module and use of an abdominal phantom trainer increased resident confidence and skill in their use of ultrasound to guide percutaneous needle positioning. Attending feedback is critical for improving accuracy in needle guidance toward a target. Ultrasound-guided needle positioning is a teachable skill and can be applicable to multiple urologic procedures. PMID:27564282

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration with an echobronchoscope in undiagnosed mediastinal lymphadenopathy: First experience from India

    PubMed Central

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Singh, Navneet; Gupta, Dheeraj; Behera, Digamber; Gupta, Nalini; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Several studies have reported the performance of combining endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration with an echobronchoscope (EUS-B-FNA), with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA), for the diagnosis of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Herein we report our initial experience with this technique. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, we report the outcome of patients who underwent EUS-B-FNA with or without EBUS-TBNA during the same session. Details of the lymph nodes sampled, number of passes, duration of the procedure, results of the cytological examination, and the final diagnosis of all the patients are presented. Results: Eleven patients underwent EUS-B-FNA during the study period. EUS-B-FNA and EBUS-TBNA together yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 72.7 and 100%, respectively. The number of lymph nodes sampled per patient and the number of passes per lymph node were significantly higher with EBUS-TBNA compared to EUS-B-FNA. The mean duration of procedure was also significantly higher in the EBUS-TBNA group. The most common reason (five patients (45.5%)) for resorting to EUS-B-FNA was the patient being unfit for EBUS-TBNA or the inability of the operator to complete the procedure. Sarcoidosis was the most frequent final diagnosis in the study patients (four cases), followed by bronchogenic carcinoma (three cases). Conclusions: EUS-B-FNA is a useful additional tool for the diagnosis of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. In combination with EBUS-TBNA, it has a fairly good diagnostic yield and is a good alternative in situations where EBUS-TBNA is not feasible. PMID:25624588

  16. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration versus Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Focal Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Esmat, Serag; Naguib, Mohamed; Hassanein, Mohamed; Hassani, Mohamed; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Mahdy, Reem Ezzat; El-Gemeie, Emad; Farag, Ali Hassan; Foda, Ayman Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the leading cancer morbidity and mortality world-wide. Controversy has arisen about whether the percutaneous approach with computed tomography/ultrasonography-guidance fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred method to obtain diagnostic tissue. Our purpose of this study is to compare between the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and percutaneous US-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 197 patients with pancreatic masses were included in the study, 125 patients underwent US-FNA (Group 1) and 72 patients underwent EUS-FNA (Group 2). Results: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy (88.9%) as US-FNA (87.2%) in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for EUS-FNA was 84%, 100%, 100%, 73.3% respectively. It was 85.5%, 90.4%, 94.7%, 76% respectively for US-FNA. EUS-FNA had a lower complication rate (1.38%) than US-FNA (5.6%). Conclusion: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy as US-FNA of pancreatic masses with a lower complication rate. PMID:24949394

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: The wet suction technique

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nicolas A.; Berzosa, Manuel; Wallace, Michael B.; Raijman, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become a fundamental tool in obtaining cytopathological diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. When sampling solid lesions of the pancreas, the endosonographer can use two suction techniques to enhance tissue acquisition; the dry and the wet suction techniques. The standard dry suction technique relies on applying negative pressure suction on the proximal end of the needle after the stylet is removed with a pre-vacuum syringe. The wet suction technique relies on pre-flushing the needle with saline to replace the column of air with fluid followed by aspiration the proximal end by using a prefilled syringe with saline. A new modified wet suction technique (hybrid suction technique) relies on preloading the needle with saline, but having continuous negative pressure with a pre-vacuum syringe to avoid manual intermittent suction. Tissue acquisition can be enhanced by applying fluid dynamic principles to the current aspiration techniques, such as the column of water used in the needle of the wet technique. In this review, we will focus on EUS-FNA using the wet suction technique for sampling of pancreatic solid lesions. PMID:26879162

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: The wet suction technique.

    PubMed

    Villa, Nicolas A; Berzosa, Manuel; Wallace, Michael B; Raijman, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become a fundamental tool in obtaining cytopathological diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. When sampling solid lesions of the pancreas, the endosonographer can use two suction techniques to enhance tissue acquisition; the dry and the wet suction techniques. The standard dry suction technique relies on applying negative pressure suction on the proximal end of the needle after the stylet is removed with a pre-vacuum syringe. The wet suction technique relies on pre-flushing the needle with saline to replace the column of air with fluid followed by aspiration the proximal end by using a prefilled syringe with saline. A new modified wet suction technique (hybrid suction technique) relies on preloading the needle with saline, but having continuous negative pressure with a pre-vacuum syringe to avoid manual intermittent suction. Tissue acquisition can be enhanced by applying fluid dynamic principles to the current aspiration techniques, such as the column of water used in the needle of the wet technique. In this review, we will focus on EUS-FNA using the wet suction technique for sampling of pancreatic solid lesions. PMID:26879162

  19. Basic technique in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for solid lesions: How many passes?

    PubMed

    Petrone, Maria Chiara; Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has evolved to become an indispensable tool for tissue acquisition in patients with luminal and extra luminal gastrointestinal cancers. Despite the extensive use of EUS-FNA, there still exists a wide variation in the number of samples required to ensure acquisition of diagnostic material from different kind of lesions. There are several factors that may influence the number of fine needle passes made during EUS-FNA, but the main factor seems to be the presence of a Cytopathologist during the EUS procedure. The diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) in most studies exceeds 90%. Nevertheless, ROSE is not available in many centers. Various studies have investigated the adequate number of needle passes that should be performed if ROSE is not used. Differences exist based on the nature of the target lesion: Five to seven passes for pancreatic masses, three passes for lymphnodes, only one pass for pancreatic cystic lesions. Consider using a core biopsy needle or a 19-G FNA needle for histology could improve the diagnostic yield. Even though EUS-FNA is widely available, some patients still do not receive conclusive diagnoses upon initial EUS-FNA. One way to maximize the benefits for patients might be to centralize cases to several well-equipped, high-volume centers with experienced endosonographers that have universal availability of ROSE. PMID:24949407

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Miniscalpel-Needle Release versus Dry Needling for Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yongjun; Shi, Dongping; Wu, Xiaotong; Gu, Minghong; Ai, Zisheng; Tang, Kun; Ye, Le; Wang, Xiangrui

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To compare ultrasound-guided miniscalpel-needle (UG-MSN) release versus ultrasound-guided dry needling (UG-DN) for chronic neck pain. Methods. A total of 169 patients with chronic neck pain were randomized to receive either UG-MSN release or UG-DN. Before treatment and at 3 and 6 months posttreatment, pain was measured using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS). Neck function was examined using the neck disability index. Health-related quality of life was examined using the physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) of the SF-36 health status scale. Results. Patients in the UG-MSN release had greater improvement on the VAS (by 2 points at 3 months and 0.9 points at 6 months) versus in the UG-DN arm; (both P < 0.0001). Patients receiving UG-MSN release also showed significantly lower scores on the adjusted neck disability index, as well as significantly lower PCS. No severe complications were observed. Conclusion. UG-MSN release was superior to UG-DN in reducing pain intensity and neck disability in patients with chronic neck pain and was not associated with severe complications. The procedural aspects in the two arms were identical; however, we did not verify the blinding success. As such, the results need to be interpreted with caution. PMID:25386218

  1. Transcriptional Profiling of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Lymph Node Samples Aids Diagnosis of Mediastinal Lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Gillian S.; Thomas, Niclas; Chain, Benjamin M.; Best, Katharine; Simpson, Nandi; Hardavella, Georgia; Brown, James; Bhowmik, Angshu; Navani, Neal; Janes, Samuel M.; Miller, Robert F.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2016-01-01

    Background Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided biopsy is the mainstay for investigation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy for laboratory diagnosis of malignancy, sarcoidosis, or TB. However, improved methods for discriminating between TB and sarcoidosis and excluding malignancy are still needed. We sought to evaluate the role of genomewide transcriptional profiling to aid diagnostic processes in this setting. Methods Mediastinal lymph node samples from 88 individuals were obtained by EBUS-guided aspiration for investigation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and subjected to transcriptional profiling in addition to conventional laboratory assessments. Computational strategies were used to evaluate the potential for using the transcriptome to distinguish between diagnostic categories. Results Molecular signatures associated with granulomas or neoplastic and metastatic processes were clearly discernible in granulomatous and malignant lymph node samples, respectively. Support vector machine (SVM) learning using differentially expressed genes showed excellent sensitivity and specificity profiles in receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with area under curve values > 0.9 for discriminating between granulomatous and nongranulomatous disease, TB and sarcoidosis, and between cancer and reactive lymphadenopathy. A two-step decision tree using SVM to distinguish granulomatous and nongranulomatous disease, then between TB and sarcoidosis in granulomatous cases, and between cancer and reactive lymphadenopathy in nongranulomatous cases, achieved > 90% specificity for each diagnosis and afforded greater sensitivity than existing tests to detect TB and cancer. In some diagnostically ambiguous cases, computational classification predicted granulomatous disease or cancer before pathologic abnormalities were evident. Conclusions Machine learning analysis of transcriptional profiling in mediastinal lymphadenopathy may significantly improve the clinical utility of EBUS

  2. Endobronchial ultrasound-transbronchial needle aspiration and its practical application.

    PubMed

    Currie, G P; McKean, M E; Kerr, K M; Denison, A R; Chetty, M

    2011-08-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has emerged over the past decade as one of the most exciting and innovative developments in the field of respiratory medicine. This procedure allows sampling of mediastinal lymph nodes and masses in both malignant and benign disease and overcomes some of the disadvantages associated with mediastinoscopy and blind transbronchial needle aspiration. We describe the clinical use, indications for and limitations of EBUS-TBNA along with several illustrated clinical examples. PMID:21546452

  3. Pancreatic metastases from ovarian carcinoma--diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Hadzri, M Hasmoni; Rosemi, Salleh

    2012-04-01

    Pancreatic metastases are very uncommon and originate most commonly from lung, colon, breast and kidney cancer. Ovarian adenocarcinoma has been reported as a primary site of pancreatic metastasis, but its diagnosis has rarely being reported by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). We report a case of multiple metastases to the pancreas from ovarian carcinoma occurring four years after original resection of the primary tumour. Our patient presented with severe epigastric pain which was initially treated as acute pancreatitis. Further imaging modalities showed multiple large pseudocystic lesions in the pancreatic head and body. Subsequent EUS-FNA confirmed that the lesions were metastatic disease from an advanced ovarian carcinoma. She underwent palliative chemotherapy and the pancreatic lesion showed receding size. PMID:22822646

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A.; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury; Jamil, Laith H.

    2016-01-01

    The use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) appears to be a safe and feasible means of confirming or excluding malignancy in the adrenal glands. EUS-FNA with biopsy of suspicious masses in either adrenal gland allows for assessment of these lesions while keeping complications relatively rare. The main advantages of EUS-FNA are that it can be done as an outpatient procedure, with good results, minimal morbidity, and a short hospital stay. Nevertheless, EUS-FNA of adrenal masses should be indicated only in selected cases, in which there is potential to either decrease unnecessary treatment or guide therapy in cancer patients by aiding in either staging of malignancy or treatment of recurrence.v PMID:27366030

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury; Jamil, Laith H

    2016-01-01

    The use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) appears to be a safe and feasible means of confirming or excluding malignancy in the adrenal glands. EUS-FNA with biopsy of suspicious masses in either adrenal gland allows for assessment of these lesions while keeping complications relatively rare. The main advantages of EUS-FNA are that it can be done as an outpatient procedure, with good results, minimal morbidity, and a short hospital stay. Nevertheless, EUS-FNA of adrenal masses should be indicated only in selected cases, in which there is potential to either decrease unnecessary treatment or guide therapy in cancer patients by aiding in either staging of malignancy or treatment of recurrence.v. PMID:27366030

  6. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided sheath placement to guide transbronchial biopsy of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and lung mass: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Bessich, Jamie; Sterman, Daniel H

    2015-04-01

    A patient with a history of lung adenocarcinoma, which was treated with chemoradiation, presented to our interventional pulmonology clinic for suspicion of recurrent lung cancer. The patient had a PET-avid right upper-lobe mass and subcarinal lymphadenopathy. We performed a curvilinear endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS) with transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA), followed by transbronchial EBUS-guided biopsies (TBB) of the subcarinal lymph node using miniforceps. The EBUS needle sheath was inserted over the needle through the bronchial wall and advanced into the lymph node. The EBUS-guided placement of the transbronchial sheath facilitated the miniforcep insertion and the performance of multiple transbronchial biopsies. Given success with this method, we further developed this technique in a second patient with a right lower-lobe mass. In an effort to obtain adequate tissue and minimize repeated efforts at miniforcep guidance into the lesion, we inserted a radial EBUS guide sheath through the curvilinear EBUS scope and guided it into the lesion using the miniforceps. We therefore used the radial sheath as a placeholder while obtaining repeated TBB using miniforceps as described. These modifications of previously described techniques allow for maximal and expeditious sampling of target lymph nodes and masses, with sufficient material obtained for histopathologic analysis. PMID:25887015

  7. Novice performance of ultrasound-guided needle advancement: standard 38-mm transducer vs 25-mm hockey stick transducer.

    PubMed

    Davies, T; Townsley, P; Jlala, H; Dowling, M; Bedforth, N; Hardman, J G; McCahon, R A

    2012-08-01

    The optimal method to develop expertise in ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia is unknown. Studies of laryngoscopic expertise in novices demonstrate that the choice of laryngoscope affects performance. In this study, we aimed to compare the effect of two different linear array transducers (38-mm standard vs 25-mm hockey stick) on novice performance of ultrasound-guided needle advancement. Following randomisation, participants watched a video model of expert performance of ultrasound-guided needle advancement. Recruits performed the modelled task on a turkey breast model. The median (IQR [range]) composite error score was statistically significantly larger for participants in the hockey stick transducer group compared with the standard transducer group; 10.0 (7.3-14.3 [2.5-29.0]) vs 7.5 (4.5-10.0 [2.0-28.0]) respectively, (p = 0.01). This study has demonstrated that performance of ultrasound-guided needle advancement by novice operators after simple video instruction is better (as assessed using a composite error score) with a standard 38-mm transducer than with a 25-mm hockey stick transducer. PMID:22506607

  8. Black Endobronchial Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Samjot S; Harris, Kassem; Ylagan, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    The infrequent bronchoscopic finding of black airway pigmentation due to a variety of causes has been labeled as "Black Bronchoscopy." Black bronchioalveolar lavage has been sometimes described in tobacco, marijuana, and crack cocaine smokers. To add to this interesting panorama of bronchoscopic findings, we describe cases of black endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspirates due to metastatic melanoma and anthracotic lymph nodes. PMID:26348692

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for the diagnosis of kidney lesions: A review.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Moura, Renata Nobre; Artifon, Everson

    2015-03-16

    Traditionally, treatment of renal lesions is indicated based only on imaging features. Although controversy exists about tissue sampling from small renal masses, renal biopsy is indicated in some cases. In this review, we discuss the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and summarize the recent advances in this field, providing recommendations for the practicing clinician. The use of EUS-FNA appears to be a safe and feasible means of confirming or excluding malignancy. EUS allows assessment and biopsy of masses or lesions within both kidneys and related complications are rare. The main advantages of EUS-FNA are that it can be done as an outpatient procedure, with good results, minimal morbidity and a short hospital stay. Nevertheless, EUS-FNA of renal masses should be indicated only in selected cases, in which there is potential to decrease unnecessary treatment of small renal masses and to best select tumors for active surveillance and minimally invasive ablative therapies. Additionally, some renal lesions may be ineligible for EUS-guided biopsy because of anatomical limitations. EUS-FNA renal biopsy will probably be best applied to central anterior renal masses, while tumors on the posterior aspect of the kidney, percutaneous access will probably be superior. PMID:25789096

  10. Thyroid cancer detected by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Yokozawa, T; Fukata, S; Kuma, K; Matsuzuka, F; Kobayashi, A; Hirai, K; Miyauchi, A; Sugawara, M

    1996-09-01

    A greater percentage of thyroid cancers can be detected by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (UG-FNAB) than by ordinary FNAB. A group of 678 patients were selected sequentially as having been diagnosed with benign nodules by the conventional FNAB method. We reexamined these patients by UG-FNAB and investigated the types of thyroid cancer that were missed by the conventional FNAB. Of the 678 patients diagnosed with benign nodules (using conventional FNAB), 571 (84.2%) demonstrated the same diagnosis when UG-FNAB was used. The remaining 107 patients (15.8%) studied were suspected of having a malignancy after UG-FNAB had been performed. Surgical specimen histology proved thyroid cancer in 99 of the 107 patients: 93 had papillary carcinoma, 4 had follicular carcinoma, 1 had medullary carcinoma and 1 had anaplastic carcinoma. Two drawbacks were noted when conventional FNAB was used: (1) cancer lesions difficult to palpate (n = 55) (e.g., small cancers with or without benign lesions or cancers associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease); and (2) palpable cancers with insufficient cell material for analysis (n = 44) (e.g., cystic carcinoma and cancers with calcified lesions. UG-FNAB is a powerful technique for detecting microcancers, cystic carcinomas, cancers associated with benign nodules, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or coarse calcifications. PMID:8678961

  11. Clinically misinterpreted melanoma metastases can correctly be diagnosed by ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Schaefer-Hesterberg, Gregor; Akkooi, Alexander J C Van; Letsch, Anne; Roewert, Joachim; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Keilholz, Ulrich; Voit, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (US-guided FNAC) of regional nodal basins is increasingly incorporated into the national follow-up schemes of high risk melanoma patients. In this paper we describe an additional added value of US-guided FNAC in the detection and verification of subcutaneous/in-transit metastases. A patient presented with a long lasting, smooth, movable node, close to the scar of the primary melanoma, mimicking a lipoma in every clinical follow-up. Ultrasound at once suspected a metastasis. FNAC was performed within one day of sampling in an outpatient setting, without side effects. A hypothesis of an auto-vaccination in this case could not be proven by examining the T-cell response. Despite the clinically benign aspect of this metastasis, US-guided FNAC can provide diagnosis within 1 day. FNAC is a rapid, cost-effective method, free of complications, of great value in the diagnosis of putative metastases. PMID:21489911

  12. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of the Adrenal Glands: Analysis of 21 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Choudhary, Narendra S.; Kotecha, Hardik; Misra, Smruti Ranjan; Bhagat, Suraj; Paliwal, Manish; Madan, Kaushal; Saraf, Neeraj; Sarin, Haimanti; Guleria, Mridula; Sud, Randhir

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology of adrenal masses helps in etiological diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA of adrenal masses in cases where other imaging methods failed and/or were not feasible. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients with adrenal masses, in whom adrenal FNA was performed because conventional imaging modalities failed and/or were not feasible, were prospectively evaluated over a period of 3 years. Results Of the 21 patients (mean age, 56±12.2 years; male:female ratio, 2:1), 12 had pyrexia of unknown origin and the other nine underwent evaluation for metastasis. The median lesion size was 2.4×1.6 cm. Ten patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis (shown by the presence of caseating granulomas [n=10] and acid-fast bacilli [n=4]). Two patients had EUS-FNA results suggestive of histoplasmosis. The other patients had metastatic lung carcinoma (n=6), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=1), and adrenal lipoma (n=1) and adrenal myelolipoma (n=1). EUS results were not suggestive of any particular etiology. No procedure-related adverse events occurred. Conclusions EUS-FNA is a safe and effective method for evaluating adrenal masses, and it yields diagnosis in cases where tissue diagnosis is impossible or has failed using conventional imaging modalities. PMID:25844346

  13. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses

    PubMed Central

    Voss, M; Hammel, P; Molas, G; Palazzo, L; Dancour, A; O'Toole, D; Terris, B; Degott, C; Bernades, P; Ruszniewski, P

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To assess the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNAB) in patients with solid pancreatic masses.
METHODS—Ninety nine consecutive patients with pancreatic masses were studied. Histological findings obtained by EUS-FNAB were compared with the final diagnosis assessed by surgery, biopsy of other tumour site or at postmortem examination, or by using a combination of clinical course, imaging features, and tumour markers.
RESULTS—EUS-FNAB was feasible in 90 patients (adenocarcinomas, n = 59; neuroendocrine tumours, n = 15; various neoplasms, n = 6; pancreatitis, n = 10), and analysable material was obtained in 73. Tumour size (⩾ or < 25 mm in diameter) did not influence the ability to obtain informative biopsy samples. Diagnostic accuracy was 74.4% (adenocarcinomas, 81.4%; neuroendocrine tumours, 46.7%; other lesions, 75%; p<0.02). Overall, the diagnostic yield in all 99 patients was 68%. Successful biopsies were performed in six patients with portal hypertension. Minor complications (moderate bleeding or pain) occurred in 5% of cases.
CONCLUSIONS—EUS-FNAB is a useful and safe method for the investigation of pancreatic masses, with a high feasibility rate even when lesions are small. Overall diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNAB seems to depend on the tumour type.


Keywords: pancreas; tumour; endoscopic ultrasound; fine needle aspiration biopsy PMID:10644320

  14. Needle Fracture during Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Suspicious Thoracic Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Manière, Thibaut; Déry, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is used to make a cytopathologic diagnosis of suspicious lesions located around the gastrointestinal tract. It is a safe technique with few complications. The most common complications of EUS-FNA are related to pancreatic lesions (pancreatitis, bleeding, and abdominal pain). Rare complications have been noted such as stent malfunction, air embolism, infection, neural and vascular injuries, and tumor cell seeding. There are very few studies examining equipment malfunctions. We report a case of needle fracture during the EUS-FNA of suspicious thoracic lymph nodes in a 79-year-old man investigated for unexplained weight loss. PMID:27555874

  15. Needle Fracture during Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Suspicious Thoracic Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Bartosz; Manière, Thibaut; Déry, Vincent; Désilets, Étienne

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is used to make a cytopathologic diagnosis of suspicious lesions located around the gastrointestinal tract. It is a safe technique with few complications. The most common complications of EUS-FNA are related to pancreatic lesions (pancreatitis, bleeding, and abdominal pain). Rare complications have been noted such as stent malfunction, air embolism, infection, neural and vascular injuries, and tumor cell seeding. There are very few studies examining equipment malfunctions. We report a case of needle fracture during the EUS-FNA of suspicious thoracic lymph nodes in a 79-year-old man investigated for unexplained weight loss. PMID:27555874

  16. Clinical impact of preoperative endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Hideharu; Hara, Kazuo; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hijioka, Susumu; Imaoka, Hiroshi; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasumasa; Sasaki, Yutaka; Yamao, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To reveal the impact of preoperative endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 242 patients who underwent surgery for PDAC at our institution between January 1996 and July 2012. Among them, there were three patients with R2 resection and 30 patients with a follow-up period of less than 1 year, who were excluded because they did not meet the conditions for evaluating recurrence. Consequently, 209 patients were enrolled in the present study. The patients were divided into two groups: 126 patients who underwent preoperative EUS-FNA (FNA group) and 83 patients who did not (non-FNA group) undergo preoperative EUS-FNA. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between FNA and non-FNA groups except mean age (66.6 ± 8.9 years vs. 63.5 ± 8.9 years, respectively, P = 0.02) and the administration rate of gemcitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy (42.9% vs. 18.1%, P < 0.01). Sampling adequacy of preoperative EUS-FNA was 99.2% (125/126) and sensitivity for diagnosis was 92.9% (117/126). The rate of complications related to EUS-FNA was 1.6% (2/126); two patients experienced reduction in hemoglobin (≥2.0 g/dL). These two patients did not have any apparent bleeding and could be managed conservatively. No severe complications were seen. We evaluated long-term outcomes of preoperative EUS-FNA, especially disease-free survival, needle-track seeding and recurrence. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated no significant difference in disease-free survival between the two groups (P = 0.12). The site of recurrence was not significantly different between groups. Needle-track seeding was not observed in this study. Multivariate analysis of recurrence factors showed that preoperative EUS-FNA did not affect postoperative recurrence. Conclusion: Preoperative EUS-FNA for PDAC was shown to be a safe procedure with high diagnostic ability, and not a risk

  17. Evaluating the Minimal Specimens From Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration in Pancreatic Masses.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo Kyung; Kang, Ki Joo; Oh, Cho Rong; Lee, Jong Kyun; Lee, Kyu Taek; Jang, Kee Taek; Park, Sang-Mo; Lee, Kwang Hyuck

    2016-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become one of the most useful diagnostic modalities for the diagnosis of pancreatic mass. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of analyzing the minimal specimens obtained by EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of solid masses of pancreas.This study consisted of retrospective and prospective analyses. The retrospective study was performed on 116 patients who underwent EUS-FNA of solid masses for cytological smear, histological analysis, and combined analysis including immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. In the prospective study, 79 patients were enrolled to evaluate the quality and accuracy of EUS-FNA histological analysis and feasibility of IHC staining.The final diagnoses of all patients included pancreatic cancer (n = 126), nonpancreatic cancer (n = 21), other neoplasm (n = 27), and benign lesions (n = 21). In our retrospective study, the combined analysis was more sensitive than cytological analysis alone (P < 0.01). The overall sensitivity of cytology, histology, and combined analysis was 69.8%, 67.2%, and 81.8%, respectively. In the prospective analysis, 64.2% of all punctures were helpful for determining the diagnosis and 40.7% provided sufficient tissue for IHC staining. Histological analysis was helpful for diagnosis in 74.7% of patients. IHC staining was necessary for a definite diagnosis in 11.4% of patients, especially in the cases of nonmalignant pancreatic mass.Histological analysis and IHC study of EUS-FNA specimens was useful for the accurate diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic lesions. Combined analysis showed significantly higher sensitivity than cytology alone because IHC staining was helpful for a diagnosis in some patients. PMID:27227937

  18. Evaluating the Minimal Specimens From Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration in Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo Kyung; Kang, Ki Joo; Oh, Cho Rong; Lee, Jong Kyun; Lee, Kyu Taek; Jang, Kee Taek; Park, Sang-Mo; Lee, Kwang Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become one of the most useful diagnostic modalities for the diagnosis of pancreatic mass. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of analyzing the minimal specimens obtained by EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of solid masses of pancreas. This study consisted of retrospective and prospective analyses. The retrospective study was performed on 116 patients who underwent EUS-FNA of solid masses for cytological smear, histological analysis, and combined analysis including immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. In the prospective study, 79 patients were enrolled to evaluate the quality and accuracy of EUS-FNA histological analysis and feasibility of IHC staining. The final diagnoses of all patients included pancreatic cancer (n = 126), nonpancreatic cancer (n = 21), other neoplasm (n = 27), and benign lesions (n = 21). In our retrospective study, the combined analysis was more sensitive than cytological analysis alone (P < 0.01). The overall sensitivity of cytology, histology, and combined analysis was 69.8%, 67.2%, and 81.8%, respectively. In the prospective analysis, 64.2% of all punctures were helpful for determining the diagnosis and 40.7% provided sufficient tissue for IHC staining. Histological analysis was helpful for diagnosis in 74.7% of patients. IHC staining was necessary for a definite diagnosis in 11.4% of patients, especially in the cases of nonmalignant pancreatic mass. Histological analysis and IHC study of EUS-FNA specimens was useful for the accurate diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic lesions. Combined analysis showed significantly higher sensitivity than cytology alone because IHC staining was helpful for a diagnosis in some patients. PMID:27227937

  19. Real-time ultrasound-guided PCNL using a novel SonixGPS needle tracking system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Long, Qingzhi; Chen, Xingfa; He, Dalin; Dalin, He; He, Hui

    2014-08-01

    SonixGPS is a successful ultrasound guidance position system. It helps to improve accuracy in performing complex puncture operations. This study firstly used SonixGPS to perform kidney calyx access in PCNL to investigate its effectiveness and safety. This was a prospectively randomized controlled study performed from September 2011 to October 2012. A total of 97 patients were prospectively randomized into two groups using random number generated from SAS software. 47 Patients were enrolled in conventional ultrasound-guided (US-guided) group and 50 patients were classified into SonixGPS-guided group. Nine patients were lost during follow-up. Hence, a total of 88 patients were qualified and analyzed. Preoperative examinations included urine analysis, urine culture, kidney function, coagulation profile and routine analysis of blood. Ultrasonography was used to evaluate the degree of hydronephrosis. The intraoperative findings, including blood loss, operating time, time to successful puncture, the number of attempts for successful puncture and hospital stay were recorded. The stone clearance rate and complications were analyzed. The present study showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of demographic data, preoperative markers, stone clearance rate and the stone composition. However, the time to successful puncture, the number of trials for successful puncture, operating time and hospital length of stay were significantly decreased in the SonixGPS-guided group. Furthermore, the hemoglobin decrease was also obviously lower in the SonixGPS group than that in conventional US-guided group. SonixGPS needle tacking system guided PCNL is safe and effective in treating upper urinary tract stones. This novel technology makes puncturing more accuracy and can significantly decrease the incidence of relative hemorrhage and accelerate recovery. PMID:24965272

  20. Preoperative Ultrasound Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Ovarian Lesions- Is It a Rapid and Effective Diagnostic Modality?

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Saikat; Chaudhuri, Snehamay; Paul, Prabir Chandra; Khandakar, Binny; Mandal, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The deep seated ovarian lesions unapproachable by unguided aspiration cytology were easily done under ultrasound guidance. It gave a before hand cytological diagnosis of the lesion to the surgeon determining the modality of treatment for the patient. Aim To find the diagnostic accuracy of the method of ultrasound guided cytological assessment of ovarian lesion. Materials and Methods The study was conducted as a prospective observational study over a period of one year, in hospital setting, where ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration had been used to aspirate ovarian lesions, giving a rapid cytological diagnosis. In 43 sample cases, aspiration of fluid done from ovarian lesions were followed by cyto-centrifugation and staining by May-Grunwald-Giemsa (MGG) and Papanicolaou (Pap) stain providing a cytological opinion regarding benign/malignant nature of the lesion and further categorization. Later the cytological diagnosis was compared with final histopathological diagnosis, taking it as a gold standard. Results The overall sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound guided aspiration and cytological analysis were high, 96%, 76.92% and 89.47% respectively as calculated by comparing the cytological diagnosis with histological diagnosis, taking it as gold standard. Conclusion This method has evolved as a highly sensitive, rapid, simple and effective modality for screening and as well as accurate preoperative diagnosis of ovarian lesions. PMID:27134878

  1. Efforts to improve the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for pancreatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Shibukawa, Goro; Fujisawa, Mariko; Sato, Ai; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Igarashi, Ryo; Maki, Takumi; Yamamoto, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is widely used to obtain a definitive diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Good results have been reported for its diagnostic accuracy, with high sensitivity and specificity of around 90%; however, technological developments and adaptations to improve it still further are currently underway. The endosonographic technique can be improved when several tips and tricks useful to overcome challenges of EUS-FNA are known. This review provides various techniques and equipment for improvement in the diagnostic accuracy in EUS-FNA. PMID:27503153

  2. Ultrasound-Guided, Percutaneous Needle Fascial Fenestration for the Treatment of Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Rajasekaran, Sathish

    2016-03-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) involves a painful increase in compartment pressure caused by exercise and relieved by rest. The most common site for CECS in the lower extremity is the anterior leg compartment. We report a case of a collegiate athlete with bilateral anterior and lateral leg compartment CECS who was successfully treated with an ultrasound-guided, percutaneous needle fascial fenestration of the affected compartments in both legs and was able to return to full, unrestricted activity within 1 week of the procedure. This case highlights the potential application of this procedure for the treatment of anterior and lateral leg CECS. PMID:26344477

  3. Role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of mass lesions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chaoqun; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jun; Ding, Zhen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an accurate technique for sampling the pancreas and mediastinum; however, limited data are available for other mass lesions. The aim of this study was to explore the value of EUS-FNA in the differential diagnosis of all mass lesions. Data from patients who underwent EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of mass lesions, including pancreatic, mediastinal, celiac and retroperitoneal lesions were retrospectively analyzed. The accuracy was calculated by comparing the results of FNA with the results of pathological examination or follow-up surveillances in non-operated cases. A total of 150 cases were included. The location of the mass varied from the pancreas (n=62) to the mediastinum (n=29), gastrointestinal tract (n=36), celiac cavity and retroperitoneum (n=23). The sensitivity and Youdens index of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of all lesions were 92.97% and 0.93 respectively. The accuracy of diagnosis of pancreatic, mediastinal, gastrointestinal, celiac and retroperitoneal lesions was 85.48, 89.66, 83.33 and 78.23%, respectively. Masses were categorized into parenchymal organs (n=66), luminal organs (n=36) and enlarged lymph nodes (n=33). Lesions in parenchymal organs were likely to be bigger than those in luminal organs (P=0.03) and enlarged lymph nodes (P=0.01). For solid and cystic masses, which constituted 63.3 and 14.7% of the total masses, no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was observed (P=0.56); however, lesion sizes were significantly different between these two groups (P=0.04) and the majority of cystic masses were identified in women (P=0.03). Malignant lesions were more common in older (P=0.01) and male (P=0.03) patients. In conclusion, EUS-FNA is an effective tool in the diagnosis of unexplained mass lesions; it influences the management of patients by enabling the appropriate treatment to be identified. PMID:27446324

  4. Performance characteristic of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration is unaffected by pancreatic mass size

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Jayapal; Kim, Hwasoon; Reddy, Kartika; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Despite a well-established tool for diagnosis of pancreatic masses, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) studies have shown suboptimal diagnostic performance at divergent mass sizes. Since the impact of gold standard follow-up and presence of on-site evaluation on this observation is unknown, we aimed to study the performance characteristics of EUS-FNA under these strict conditions. Patients and methods: EUS-FNA results from pancreatic mass lesions performed between July 2000 and March 2013 were evaluated. All patients with histological follow-up were then stratified into four groups: Group A ( ≤ 10 mm), Group B (11 – 20 mm), Group C (21 – 40 mm), and Group D (> 40 mm). Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy were calculated for each group and compared. Results: A total of 612 /3832 (16 %) patients with pancreatic masses who underwent EUS-FNA had histology confirmation. Of these, 81 were excluded due to unavailable lesion size, while the rest formed the study cohort. Mean age (SD) was 65.8 years (9.3) with 51.2 % female. The mean number of passes for the entire cohort was 2.9 (SD 1.9; range 1 – 12); patients in group D had a significantly higher number of passes for on-site diagnosis (P = 0.0124). There was no significant difference between the groups for sensitivity (P = 0.1134) or diagnostic accuracy (P = 0.2111). Proportional trend analysis revealed no significant correlation between size and sensitivity (P = 0.6192). The size of lesion measured by EUS was not associated with sensitivity or specificity after adjusting for age, sex, and pancreatic location. Conclusion: In the presence of rapid on-site cytopathology and when final histology is taken as the gold standard, pancreatic mass size does not affect the performance characteristics of EUS-FNA. PMID:27092323

  5. A new needle on the block: EchoTip ProCore endobronchial ultrasound needle

    PubMed Central

    Dincer, H Erhan; Andrade, Rafael; Zamora, Felix; Podgaetz, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound has become the first choice standard of care procedure to diagnose benign or malignant lesions involving mediastinum and lung parenchyma adjacent to the airways owing to its characteristics of being real-time and minimally invasive. Although the incidence of lung cancer has been decreasing, it is and will be the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the next few decades. When compared to other cancers, lung cancer kills more females than breast and colon cancers combined and more males than colon and prostate cancers combined. The type of lung cancer has changed in recent decades and adenocarcinoma has become the most frequent cell type. Prognosis of lung cancer depends upon the cell type and the staging at the time of diagnosis. The cell type and molecular characteristics of adenocarcinoma may allow individualized targeted treatment. Other malignant conditions in the mediastinum and lung (eg, metastatic lung cancers and lymphoma) can be biopsied using endobronchial ultrasound needles. Endobronchial ultrasound needle biopsies provides mostly cytology specimens due to its small sizes of needles (22 gauge or larger) which may not give enough tissue to make a definitive diagnosis in malignant (eg, lymphoma) or benign conditions (eg, sarcoidosis). EchoTip ProCore endobronchial needle released in early 2014 provides histologic biopsy material. Larger tissue biopsies may potentially provide a higher diagnostic yield and it eliminates mediastinoscopy or other surgical interventions. Here we aim to review bronchoscopic approach in the diagnosis of mediastinal lesions with emphasis of EchoTip ProCore needles. PMID:27099535

  6. Comparison of ultrasound-guided core biopsy versus fine-needle aspiration biopsy in the evaluation of salivary gland lesions.

    PubMed

    Douville, Nicholas J; Bradford, Carol R

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound-guided core biopsy provides many benefits compared with fine-needle aspiration cytology and has begun to emerge as part of the diagnostic work-up for a salivary gland lesion. Although the increased potential for tumor-seeding and capsule rupture has been extensively discussed, the safety of this procedure is widely accepted based on infrequent reports of tumor-seeding. In fact, a review of the literature shows only 2 cases of salivary tumor seeding following biopsy with larger-gauge needle characteristics, with 2 reported cases of salivary tumor seeding following fine-needle aspiration cytology. However, the follow-up interval of such studies (<7 years) is substantially less than the 20-year follow-up typically necessary to detect remote recurrence. Studies on tumor recurrence of pleomorphic adenoma, the most common salivary gland lesion, suggest that as many as 16% of tumor recurrences occur at least 10 years following initial surgery, with average time to recurrence ranging anywhere from 6.1 to 11.8 years postoperatively. Despite the benefits of ultrasound-guided core biopsy over fine-needle aspiration biopsy, which include both improved consistency and diagnostic accuracy, current studies lack adequate patient numbers and follow-up duration to confirm comparable safety profile to currently accepted fine-needle aspiration cytology. In this report we: (1) compare the relative benefits of each procedure, (2) review evidence regarding tumor seeding in each procedure, (3) discuss time course and patient numbers necessary to detect tumor recurrence, and (4) describe how these uncertainties should be factored into clinical considerations. PMID:23109044

  7. Needle localization using a moving stylet/catheter in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Parmida; Rohling, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Despite the wide range and long history of ultrasound guided needle insertions, an unresolved issue in many cases is clear needle visibility. A well-known ad hoc technique to detect the needle is to move the stylet and look for changes in the needle appearance. We present a new method to automatically locate a moving stylet/catheter within a stationary cannula using motion detection. We then use this information to detect the needle trajectory and the tip. The differences between the current frame and the previous frame are detected and localized, to minimize the influence of tissue global motions. A polynomial fit based on the detected needle axis determines the estimated stylet shaft trajectory, and the extent of the differences along the needle axis represents the tip. Over a few periodic movements of the stylet including its full insertion into the cannula to the tip, a combination of polynomial fits determines the needle trajectory and the last detected point represents the needle tip. Experiments are conducted in water bath and bovine muscle tissue for several stylet/catheter materials. Results show that a plastic stylet has the best needle shaft and tip localization accuracy in the water bath with RMSE = 0:16 mm and RMSE = 0:51 mm, respectively. In the bovine tissue, the needle tip was best localized with the plastic catheter with RMSE = 0:33 mm. The stylet tip localization was most accurate with the steel stylet, with RMSE = 2:81 mm and the shaft was best localized with the plastic catheter, with RMSE = 0:32 mm.

  8. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy in the diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bulakci, Mesut; Ilhan, Mehmet; Bademler, Suleyman; Yilmaz, Erdem; Gulluoglu, Mine; Bayraktar, Adem; Asik, Murat; Guloglu, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study retrospectively analyzed the clinical data, laboratory results, imaging findings, and histopathological features of 28 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy from a hepatic lesion and were diagnosed with alveolar echinococcosis. Results: Among 28 patients included in the study, 16 were females and 12 were males. The mean age of the studied population was 53 ± 16 years, and the age range was 18–79 years. The most common presenting symptom was abdominal pain, which was observed in 14 patients. A total of 36 lesions were detected in the patients’ livers, out of which 7 had a cystic appearance. Hepatic vascular involvement, bile duct involvement, and other organ involvement were depicted in 14, 5, and 7 patients, respectively. The average number of cores taken from the lesions was 2.7, ranging between 2 and 5. In histopathological evaluation, PAS+ parasitic membrane structures were visualized on a necrotic background in all cases. Regarding seven patients, who were operated, the pathological findings of preoperative percutaneous biopsies were in perfect agreement with the pathological examinations after surgical resections. None of the patients developed major complications after biopsy. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy is a minimally invasive, reliable, and effective diagnostic tool for the definitive diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis. PMID:27101838

  9. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of portal vein thrombosis in liver cirrhosis: results in 15 patients.

    PubMed

    De Sio, I; Castellano, L; Calandra, M; Romano, M; Persico, M; Del Vecchio-Blanco, C

    1995-01-01

    Between 1988 and 1992 ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsies of thromboses in the main branches of the portal vein were carried out in 15 patients with liver cirrhosis. The aims of the study were to evaluate the usefulness, feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of this procedure in cirrhotics with known or suspected hepatocellular carcinoma. The procedure was carried out only in patients with a platelet count > or = 40,000/microL and prothrombin activity > or = 40%. A single pass, with a 22 gauge spinal needle, was performed in the portal vein lumen. Diagnosis of the aetiology of the portal vein thrombosis was obtained in all 15 cases. In 12 cases, a cytological diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma was made. In one case, the neoplastic cells aspirated were compatible with adenocarcinoma, and a subsequent colonoscopy confirmed the presence of colonic cancer. The material aspirated was compatible with chemically-induced thrombosis in one patient who had undergone several percutaneous ethanol injection sessions for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, and in the last case only blood was aspirated, thus ruling out the coexistence of hepatic cancer. We conclude that fine needle aspiration biopsy of portal vein thrombosis is a feasible, low risk procedure that facilitates the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma when fine needle biopsy of focal liver lesions fails. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of portal vein thrombosis is also useful in excluding neoplastic aetiology of portal vein thrombosis. PMID:8580410

  10. Randomized Trial Comparing the Flexible 19G and 25G Needles for Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration of Solid Pancreatic Mass Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Jayapal; Bang, Ji Young; Hebert-Magee, Shantel; Trevino, Jessica; Eltoum, Isam; Frost, Andra; Hasan, Muhammad K.; Logue, Amy; Hawes, Robert; Varadarajulu, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although a large gauge needle can procure more tissue at endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), its advantage over smaller needles is unclear. This study compared flexible 19G and 25G needles for EUS-FNA of solid pancreatic masses. Methods This was a randomized trial of patients undergoing EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Main outcome measure was to compare median number of passes for on-site diagnosis. Secondary measures were to compare specimen bloodiness, complications, technical failures, and histological core tissue procurement. Results One hundred patients were randomized to EUS-FNA using flexible 19G or 25G needle. Median of 1 pass was required to achieve on-site diagnosis of 96% and 92% (P = 0.68) in 19G and 25G cohorts. There was no significant difference in technical failure (0% vs 2%, P = 0.99) or adverse events (2% vs 0%, P = 0.99) between 19G and 25G cohorts. Although histological core tissue procurement was significantly better with flexible 19G needle (88% vs 44%, P < 0.001), specimens were bloodier (severe bloodiness, 36% vs 4%; P < 0.001). Conclusions As there is no significant difference in the performance of flexible 19G and 25G needles, needle choice for sampling pancreatic masses should be based on endoscopist preference and need for histology. PMID:25232713

  11. A Case of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor That Underwent Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration with a 25-Gauge Biopsy Needle

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is performed to obtain specimens for pathological analysis. For this procedure, 19-gauge (19G), 22-guage (22G), and 25-guage (25G) needles are available. The needles are classified into aspiration type and biopsy type. A 56-year-old woman underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that showed a 38-mm-diameter submucosal tumor. The elevated lesion was diagnosed as a submucosal tumor of the stomach. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a low-density area on the luminal surface of the gastric wall, which was covered with a thin layer of gastric mucosa. EUS showed a hypoechoic lesion in the submucosal layer. Color Doppler image showed a pulsating vascular signal extending into the center of the hypoechoic lesion from the periphery. EUS-FNA was performed with a 25G biopsy needle. The specimen tissue consisted of spindle-shaped cells. The cells were positive for CD117 and CD34. The submucosal tumor was diagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  12. Systematic Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Mediastinal Staging Versus Positron Emission Tomography for Comprehensive Mediastinal Staging in NSCLC Before Radical Radiotherapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Steinfort, Daniel P; Siva, Shankar; Leong, Tracy L; Rose, Morgan; Herath, Dishan; Antippa, Phillip; Ball, David L; Irving, Louis B

    2016-02-01

    Despite known limitations of positron emission tomography (PET) for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiation treatment fields are generally based on PET-identified disease extent. However, no studies have examined the accuracy of FDG-PET/CT on a per-node basis in patients being considered for curative-intent radiotherapy in NSCLC.In a prospective trial, patients with NSCLC being considered for definitive thoracic radiotherapy (± systemic chemotherapy) underwent minimally invasive systematic mediastinal evaluation with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) following noninvasive staging with integrated PET-CT.Thirty patients underwent EBUS-TBNA, with TBNA performed from a mean 2.5 lymph node (LN) stations per patient (median 3, range 1-5). Discordant findings between PET-CT and EBUS-TBNA were observed in 10 patients (33%, 95% CI 19%-51%). PET-occult LN metastases were demonstrated by EBUS in 4 patients, whereas a lesser extent of mediastinal involvement, compared with FDG-PET, was demonstrated by EBUS in 6 patients, including 2 patients downstaged from cN3 to pN2. LNs upstaged by EBUS were significantly smaller than nodes downstaged by EBUS, 7.5 mm (range 7-9) versus 12 mm (range 6-21), P = 0.005.A significant proportion of patients considered for definitive radiotherapy (+/-chemotherapy) undergoing systematic mediastinal evaluation with EBUS-TBNA in this study have an extent of mediastinal NSCLC involvement discordant with that indicated by PET-CT. Systematic EBUS-TBNA may aid in defining the extent of mediastinal involvement in NSCLC patients undergoing radiotherapy. Systematic EBUS-TBNA has the potential to contribute significantly to radiotherapy planning and delivery, by either identifying occult nodal metastases, or demonstrating FDG-avid LNs to be disease-free. PMID:26937894

  13. Pancreatic Hepatoid Carcinoma Mimicking a Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm: A Challenging Case on Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine-needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yutaka; Kato, Hironari; Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Harada, Ryo; Oda, Shinsuke; Fushimi, Soichiro; Mizukawa, Shou; Yabe, Shuntaro; Uchida, Daisuke; Seki, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Yagi, Takahito; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of a 45 mm pancreatic mass found during a medical examination. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology showed polygonal cells with pseudopapillary structures. The tumor cells were positive for nuclear/cytoplasmic β-catenin and CD10, and negative for chromogranin A. After a tentative diagnosis of a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm, middle pancreatectomy was performed. Histologically, polygonal cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm formed in the trabeculae and were immunohistochemically positive for HepPar1 and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II. The tumor was finally diagnosed to be pancreatic hepatoid carcinoma. No recurrence occurred for 12 months, even without adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27580541

  14. Peripancreatic Tuberculous Lymphadenitis with Biliary Obstruction Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine-needle Aspiration Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Reiko; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Naohiko; Kitade, Takashi; Tano, Shunsuke; Sakuno, Takashi; Harada, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Misaki; Katsurahara, Masaki; Hamada, Yasuhiko; Tanaka, Kyosuke; Horiki, Noriyuki; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with a history of tuberculosis (TB) was found to have a pancreatic head mass, accompanied by stenosis of the common bile duct. Due to the inherent difficulty in differentiating pancreatic carcinoma from an inflammatory mass, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNAB) was thus performed. The pathological findings confirmed granuloma with caseous necrosis, and the results of the QuantiFERON TB2G test were positive. Accordingly, the patient was diagnosed with peripancreatic TB and thereafter was successfully treated with anti-TB therapy. Based on the findings of this case, we conclude that EUS-FNAB is a useful modality for the diagnosis of pancreatic TB. PMID:27086805

  15. Cell-block procedure in endoscopic ultrasound-guided-fine-needle-aspiration of gastrointestinal solid neoplastic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; Todaro, Paolo; Caruso, Rosario Alberto; Tuccari, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In the present review we have analyzed the clinical applications of endoscopic ultrasound-guided-fine-needle-aspiration (EUS-FNA) and the methodological aspects obtained by cell-block procedure (CBP) in the diagnostic approach to the gastrointestinal neoplastic pathology. CBP showed numerous advantages in comparison to the cytologic routine smears; in particular, better preservation of cell architecture, achievement of routine haematoxylin-eosin staining equivalent to histological slides and possibility to perform immunohistochemistry or molecular analyses represented the most evident reasons to choose this method. Moreover, by this approach, the differential diagnosis of solid gastrointestinal neoplasias may be more easily achieved and the background of contaminant non-neoplastic gastrointestinal avoided. Finally, biological samples collected by EUS-FNA CBP-assisted should be investigated in order to identify and quantify further potential molecular markers. PMID:26322154

  16. Modeling, Production, and Testing of an Echogenic Needle for Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Blocks.

    PubMed

    Bigeleisen, Paul E; Hess, Aaron; Zhu, Richard; Krediet, Annelot

    2016-06-01

    We have designed, produced, and tested an echogenic needle based on a sawtooth pattern where the height of the tooth was 1.25 times the wavelength of the ultrasound transducer. A numeric solution to the time-independent wave equation (Helmholtz equation) was used to create a model of backscattering from a needle. A 21-gauge stainless steel prototype was manufactured and tested in a water bath. Backscattering from the needle was compared to theoretical predications from our model. Based on these results, an 18-gauge prototype needle was fabricated from stainless steel and tested in a pig cadaver. This needle was compared to a commercial 18-gauge echogenic needle (Pajunk Medical Systems, Tucker, GA) by measuring the brightness of the needle relative to the background of sonograms of a needle in a pig cadaver. The backscattering from the 21-gauge prototype needle reproduced the qualitative predictions of our model. At 30° and 45° of insonation, our prototype performed equivalently to the Pajunk needle. At 60°, our prototype was significantly brighter than the Pajunk needle (P = .017). In conclusion, we chose a model for the design of an echogenic needle and modeled it on the basis of a solution to the Helmholtz equation. A prototype needle was tested in a water bath and compared to the model prediction. After verification of our model, we designed an 18-gauge needle, which performed better than an existing echogenic needle (Pajunk) at 60° of insonation. Our needle will require further testing in human trials. PMID:27162281

  17. Biomechanics-Based Curvature Estimation for Ultrasound-guided Flexible Needle Steering in Biological Tissues.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Misra, Sarthak

    2015-08-01

    Needle-based procedures are commonly performed during minimally invasive surgery for treatment and diagnosis. Accurate needle tip placement is important for the success of the procedures. Misplacement of the needle tip might cause unsuccessful treatment or misdiagnosis. Robot-assisted needle insertion systems have been developed in order to steer flexible bevel-tipped needles. However, current systems depend on the information of maximum needle curvature, which is estimated by performing prior insertions. This work presents a new three-dimensional flexible needle steering system which integrates an optimal steering control, ultrasound-based needle tracking system, needle deflection model, online needle curvature estimation and offline curvature estimation based on biomechanics properties. The online and the offline curvature estimations are used to update the steering control in real time. The system is evaluated by experiments in gelatin phantoms and biological tissues (chicken breast tissues). The average targeting error in gelatin phantoms is 0.42 ± 0.17 mm, and in biological tissues is 1.63 ± 0.29 mm. The system is able to accurately steer a flexible needle in multi-layer phantoms and biological tissues without performing prior insertions to estimate the maximum needle curvature. PMID:25465619

  18. Role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Ashry, Mahmoud; Imam, Hala M. K.; Ezzat, Reem; Naguib, Mohamed; Farag, Ali H.; Gemeie, Emad H.; Khattab, Hani M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The addition of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) to different imaging modalities has raised the accuracy for diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions. We aim to differentiate benign from neoplastic pancreatic cysts by evaluating cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (CA19-9), and amylase levels and cytopathological examination, including mucin stain. Patients and Methods: This prospective study included 77 patients with pancreatic cystic lesions. Ultrasound-FNA (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-FNA (EUS-FNA) was done according to the accessibility of the lesion. The aspirated specimens were subjected to cytopathological examination (including mucin staining), tumor markers (CEA, CA19-9), and amylase level. Results: Cyst CEA value of 279 or more showed high statistical significance in differentiating mucinous from nonmucinous lesions with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of 73%, 60%, 50%, 80%, and 65%, respectively. Cyst amylase could differentiate between neoplastic and nonneoplastic cysts at a level of 1043 with sensitivity of 58%, specificity of 75%, PPV of 73%, NPV of 60%, and accuracy of 66%. CA19-9 could not differentiate between neoplastic and nonneoplastic cysts. Mucin examination showed a sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 95%, PPV of 92%, NPV of 91%, and accuracy of 91% in differentiating mucinous from non-mucinous lesions. Cytopathological examination showed a sensitivity of 81%, specificity of 94%, PPV of 94%, NPV of 83%, and accuracy of 88%. Conclusion: US or EUS-FNA with analysis of cyst CEA level, CA19-9, amylase, mucin stain, and cytopathological examination increases the diagnostic accuracy of cystic pancreatic lesions. PMID:26020048

  19. Assessment of Factors Affecting the Usefulness and Diagnostic Yield of Core Biopsy Needles with a Side Hole in Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tadahisa; Okumura, Fumihiro; Mizushima, Takashi; Nishie, Hirotada; Iwasaki, Hiroyasu; Anbe, Kaiki; Ozeki, Takanori; Kachi, Kenta; Fukusada, Shigeki; Suzuki, Yuta; Sano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims A barbed puncture needle with a side hole was recently developed to improve sample quality and quantity in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we retrospectively assessed the usefulness of this puncture needle. Methods Factors affecting diagnostic yield, safety, and diagnostic accuracy were investigated in 76 patients who consecutively underwent EUS-FNA for neoplastic lesions at our hospital between January and December 2013. Results The procedure was successful in all cases; the rates of sample collection and determination of the correct diagnosis were 92.1% and 89.5%, respectively. The mean number of needle passes required for diagnosis was 1.1. Complications included mild intraluminal bleeding in two patients (2.6%). Multivariate analysis revealed that lesion size (≤20 mm) was significantly associated with a decreased chance of determining the correct diagnosis. Conclusions Core biopsy needles with a side hole are safe and provide a satisfactory diagnostic yield. However, the side hole may potentially reduce the rate of making the correct diagnosis in small lesions. PMID:25963081

  20. Single-Camera Closed-Form Real-Time Needle Tracking for Ultrasound-Guided Needle Insertion.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mohammad; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Rohling, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Many common needle intervention procedures are performed with ultrasound guidance because it is a flexible, cost-effective and widely available intra-operative imaging modality. In a needle insertion procedure with ultrasound guidance, real-time calculation and visualization of the needle trajectory can help to guide the choice of puncture site and needle angle to reach the target depicted in the ultrasound image. We found that it is feasible to calculate the needle trajectory with a single camera mounted directly on the ultrasound transducer by using the needle markings. Higher accuracy is achieved compared with other similar transducer-mounted needle trackers. We used an inexpensive, real-time and easy-to-use tracking method based on an automatic feature extraction algorithm and a closed-form method for pose estimation of the needle. The overall accuracy was 0.94 ± 0.46 mm. PMID:26215491

  1. Ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy of the spleen: high clinical efficacy and low risk in a multicenter Italian study.

    PubMed

    Civardi, G; Vallisa, D; Bertè, R; Giorgio, A; Filice, C; Caremani, M; Caturelli, E; Pompili, M; De Sio, I; Buscarini, E; Cavanna, L

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of the ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (UG-FNB) of the spleen in a large population of patients. We collected retrospectively the findings concerning the application of UG-FNB of the spleen from eight Italian clinical centers that utilized this technique for at least ten years. A data schedule was sent to all centers to collect information about techniques, results, and complications of UG-FNB of the spleen. We analyzed 398 biopsy procedures both on focal lesions (257 cases) and on splenic parenchyma (141 cases). The overall accuracy was 90.9% for the series as a whole, 84.9% for cytological sampling, 88.3% for microhistological sampling, and 90.3% for both cytological and histological sampling (double biopsy). Tissue core biopsy yielded better overall accuracy in patients with suspected splenic involvement by lymphoma (90.9% vs. 68.5% for cytology). The complication rate was low (no death cases, less than 1% for major complications, and 5.2% for all complications). No predictive factors were able to detect high-risk situations. The operator's skill (higher number of performed procedures) was significantly related to better overall accuracy. Conversely, the complication rate was not affected. UG-FNB of the spleen is a very effective diagnostic procedure with low risk for the patient. Aspiration cytology and core needle biopsy showed similar diagnostic yields, except for the diagnosis of splenic lymphoma, in which core needle biopsy obtained better results. PMID:11343380

  2. Characterization of tissue-simulating phantom materials for ultrasound-guided needle procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Susan; Moore, John; Lammers, Deanna; Baxter, John; Peters, Terry

    2012-02-01

    Needle biopsies are standard protocols that are commonly performed under ultrasound (US) guidance or computed tomography (CT)1. Vascular access such as central line insertions, and many spinal needle therapies also rely on US guidance. Phantoms for these procedures are crucial as both training tools for clinicians and research tools for developing new guidance systems. Realistic imaging properties and material longevity are critical qualities for needle guidance phantoms. However, current commercially available phantoms for use with US guidance have many limitations, the most detrimental of which include harsh needle tracks obfuscating US images and a membrane comparable to human skin that does not allow seepage of inner media. To overcome these difficulties, we tested a variety of readily available media and membranes to evaluate optimal materials to fit our current needs. It was concluded that liquid hand soap was the best medium, as it instantly left no needle tracks, had an acceptable depth of US penetration and portrayed realistic imaging conditions, while because of its low leakage, low cost, acceptable durability and transparency, the optimal membrane was 10 gauge vinyl.

  3. Three-dimensional ultrasound-guided robotic needle placement: an experimental evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Boctor, Emad M.; Choti, Michael A.; Burdette, Everette C.; Webster III, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical use of image-guided needle placement robots has lagged behind laboratory-demonstrated robotic capability. Bridging this gap requires reliable and easy-to-use robotic systems. Methods Our system for image-guided needle placement requires only simple, low-cost components and minimal, entirely off-line calibration. It rapidly aligns needles to planned entry paths using 3D ultrasound (US) reconstructed from freehand 2D scans. We compare system accuracy against clinical standard manual needle placement. Results The US-guided robotic system is significantly more accurate than single manual insertions. When several manual withdrawals and reinsertions are allowed, accuracy becomes equivalent. In ex vivo experiments, robotic repeatability was 1.56 mm, compared to 3.19 and 4.63 mm for two sets of manual insertions. In an in vivo experiment with heartbeat and respiratory effects, robotic system accuracy was 5.5 mm. Conclusions A 3D US-guided robot can eliminate error bias and reduce invasiveness (the number of insertions required) compared to manual needle insertion. Remaining future challenges include target motion compensation. PMID:18433079

  4. Endobronchial ultrasound echoic image of pulmonary hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Shigehisa; Imai, Naoyuki; Takashima, Kouji; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-06-01

    A 62-year-old man with an indicated chest radiographic abnormality was referred to our hospital for more thorough examinations. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration was performed because of a mass at the left hilum. Endobronchial ultrasound images showed scattered high-density spots in a low echoic and mosaic density. The pathological findings revealed pulmonary hamartoma. Subsequently, the mass was resected and comparison of ultrasound findings and pathological findings indicated that the scattered high echoic spots appeared to reflect cartilaginous tissues and bronchial epithelium inside the tumor. PMID:25473576

  5. Recurrence of renal cell carcinoma diagnosed using contralateral adrenal biopsy with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    TANIMOTO, AZUSA; TAKEUCHI, SHINJI; YAEGASHI, HIROSHI; KOTANI, HIROSHI; KITAI, HIDENORI; NANJO, SHIGEKI; EBI, HIROMICHI; YAMASHITA, KANAME; MOURI, HISATSUGU; OHTSUBO, KOUSHIRO; IKEDA, HIROKO; YANO, SEIJI

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old female in whom a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) lesion was resected 19 years previously presented to our hospital with cognitive dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed nodules in the brain, lung, adrenal gland and a pelvic osteolytic lesion. To identify the primary cancer site, the present study performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of the left adrenal lesion. Consequently, the pathological findings of the tissue obtained by EUS-FNA were similar to those of the previous nephrectomy specimen, revealing that the adrenal lesion was the recurrence of RCC. The majority of the metastatic lesions in the patient were reduced in size by the multiple kinase inhibitor, pazopanib. Contralateral adrenal metastasis of RCC is rare and the use of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions remains to be elucidated. This is a rare case of adrenal lesion, diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Therefore, EUS-FNA is considered to be a useful diagnostic modality of adrenal metastases from unidentified primary tumor types. PMID:27073657

  6. Modelling and characterisation of a ultrasound-actuated needle for improved visibility in ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Y; Hilgers, A; Sadiq, M; Cochran, S; Corner, G; Huang, Z

    2016-07-01

    Clear needle visualisation is recognised as an unmet need for ultrasound guided percutaneous needle procedures including regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy. With inadequate needle visibility, these procedures may result in serious complications or a failed operation. This paper reports analysis of the modal behaviour of a previously proposed ultrasound-actuated needle configuration, which may overcome this problem by improving needle visibility in colour Doppler imaging. It uses a piezoelectric transducer to actuate longitudinal resonant modes in needles (outer diameter 0.8-1.2mm, length>65mm). The factors that affect the needle's vibration mode are identified, including the needle length, the transducer's resonance frequency and the gripping position. Their effects are investigated using finite element modelling, with the conclusions validated experimentally. The actuated needle was inserted into porcine tissue up to 30mm depth and its visibility was observed under colour Doppler imaging. The piezoelectric transducer is able to generate longitudinal vibration with peak-to-peak amplitude up to 4μm at the needle tip with an actuating voltage of 20Vpp. Actuated in longitudinal vibration modes (distal mode at 27.6kHz and transducer mode at 42.2kHz) with a drive amplitude of 12-14Vpp, a 120mm needle is delineated as a coloured line in colour Doppler images, with both needle tip and shaft visualised. The improved needle visibility is maintained while the needle is advanced into the tissue, thus allowing tracking of the needle position in real time. Moreover, the needle tip is highlighted by strong coloured artefacts around the actuated needle generated by its flexural vibration. A limitation of the technique is that the transducer mode requires needles of specific lengths so that the needle's resonance frequency matches the transducer. This may restrict the choice of needle lengths in clinical applications. PMID:27022669

  7. Ultrasound-guided procedures in the emergency department-needle guidance and localization.

    PubMed

    Tirado, Alfredo; Nagdev, Arun; Henningsen, Charlotte; Breckon, Pav; Chiles, Kris

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound has rapidly become an essential tool in the emergency department, specifically in procedural guidance. Its use has been demonstrated to improve the success rate of procedures, while decreasing complications. In this article, we explore some of these specific procedures involving needle guidance and structure localization with ultrasound. PMID:23200330

  8. Accidental fracture of EBUS-TBNA needle during sampling of an enlarged mediastinal lymph node

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Syed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasounded-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for sampling enlarged hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, and mediastinal tumours is a safe procedure and can be performed under sedation and local anaesthesia. Rare complications of this procedure include haemorrhage, pneumothorax, pneumonia, mediastinitis and pericarditis (Asano F et al., Complications associated with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: a nationwide survey by the Japan Society for Respiratory Endoscopy. Respir Res 2013;14:50). I report an unexpected fracture of the tip of the EBUS-TBNA needle as it hit a bronchial cartilage ring during attempted insertion into a subcarinal node. PMID:27099769

  9. A new sensor technology for 2D ultrasound-guided needle tracking.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huanxiang; Li, Junbo; Lu, Qiang; Bharat, Shyam; Erkamp, Ramon; Chen, Bin; Drysdale, Jeremy; Vignon, Francois; Jain, Ameet

    2014-01-01

    2D Ultrasound (US) is becoming the preferred modality for image-guided interventions due to its low cost and portability. However, the main limitation is the limited visibility of surgical tools. We present a new sensor technology that can easily be embedded on needles that are used for US-guided interventions. Two different types of materials are proposed to be used as sensor--co-polymer and PZT. The co-polymer technology is particularly attractive due to its plasticity, allowing very thin depositions (10-20 μm) on a variety of needle shapes. Both sensors receive acoustic energy and convert it to an electrical signal. The precise location of the needle can then be estimated from this signal, to provide real-time feedback to the clinician. We evaluated the feasibility of this new technology using (i) a 4DOF robot in a water tank; (ii) extensive ex vivo experiments; and (iii) in vivo studies. Quantitative robotic studies indicated that the co-polymer is more robust and stable when compared to PZT. In quantitative experiments, the technology achieved a tracking accuracy of 0.14 ± 0.03mm, significantly superior to competing technologies. The technology also proved success in near-real clinical studies on tissue data. This sensor technology is non-disruptive of existing clinical workflows, highly accurate, and is cost-effective. Initial clinician feedback shows great potential for large scale clinical impact. PMID:25485403

  10. Multiple pancreatic metastases from malignant melanoma: Conclusive diagnosis with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Jana, Tanima; Caraway, Nancy P; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases are rare, ranging from 2% to 5% of pancreatic malignancies. Differentiating a primary pancreatic malignancy from a metastasis can be difficult due to similarities on imaging findings, but is crucial to ensure proper treatment. Although transabdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provide useful images, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine needle aspiration (FNA) is often needed to provide a cytologic diagnosis. Here, we present a unique case of malignant melanoma with pancreatic metastases. It is important for clinicians to recognize the possibility of melanoma metastasizing to the pancreas and the role of EUS with FNA in providing cytological confirmation. PMID:26020050

  11. Multiple pancreatic metastases from malignant melanoma: Conclusive diagnosis with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Tanima; Caraway, Nancy P.; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases are rare, ranging from 2% to 5% of pancreatic malignancies. Differentiating a primary pancreatic malignancy from a metastasis can be difficult due to similarities on imaging findings, but is crucial to ensure proper treatment. Although transabdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging provide useful images, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine needle aspiration (FNA) is often needed to provide a cytologic diagnosis. Here, we present a unique case of malignant melanoma with pancreatic metastases. It is important for clinicians to recognize the possibility of melanoma metastasizing to the pancreas and the role of EUS with FNA in providing cytological confirmation. PMID:26020050

  12. Secondary tumors of the pancreas diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration: a 10-year experience.

    PubMed

    Waters, Lindsay; Si, Quisheng; Caraway, Nancy; Mody, Dina; Staerkel, Gregg; Sneige, Nour

    2014-09-01

    Determining whether a pancreatic mass is a primary or secondary neoplasm is necessary for appropriate treatment. We reviewed our experience using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosis of pancreatic tumors to identify clinical and cytopathologic characteristics of metastatic disease. We reviewed all cases of tumors metastatic to the pancreas evaluated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas during the period from 2002 to 2012. The review included cytologic specimens, clinical history, radiologic findings, primary tumor type, and clinical follow-up. We identified 66 patients with disease metastatic to the pancreas for which cytologic material was available: 38 (58%) men and 28 (42%) women, with an average age of 63 years (range, 40-89 years). Most metastases (98%) were single lesions, and nearly half were located in the head of the pancreas (30/66). The most common site of origin for these metastases was kidney (27 [41%] cases). Follow-up information was available for 65 (98%) patients, and duration of follow-up ranged from <1 to 10 years (mean, 2.3 years). Thirty-three patients (50%) were alive at the time of the most recent follow-up contact. Of the 25 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, clear cell type, 19 (76%) were alive at the time of the most recent follow-up. It was concluded that metastases may mimic primary pancreatic carcinomas both clinically and cytologically. Ancillary studies in conjunction with clinical history are necessary for the accurate diagnosis of FNAs of secondary pancreatic tumors. PMID:24554612

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of secondary tumors involving the pancreas: An institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Almed K.; Ustun, Berrin; Aslanian, Harry R.; Ge, Xinquan; Chhieng, David; Cai, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic masses may seldom represent a metastasis or secondary involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders. Recognition of this uncommon occurrence may help render an accurate diagnosis and avoid diagnostic pitfalls during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we review our experience in diagnosing secondary tumors involving the pancreas. Materials and Methods: The electronic database of cytopathology archives was searched for cases of secondary tumors involving the pancreas at our institution and a total of 31 cases were identified. The corresponding clinical presentations, imaging study findings, cytological diagnoses, the results of ancillary studies, and surgical follow-up, if available, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen of the patients were male and 12 female, with a mean age of 66 years. Twenty-three patients (74%) had a prior history of malignancy, with the latency ranging from 6 months to 19 years. The secondary tumors involving the pancreas included metastatic carcinoma (24 cases), metastatic sarcoma (3 cases), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (2 cases), and plasma cell neoplasm (2 cases). The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell carcinoma (8 cases) and lung carcinoma (7 cases). Correct diagnoses were rendered in 29 cases (94%). The remaining two cases were misclassified as primary pancreatic carcinoma. In both cases, the patients had no known history of malignancy, and no ancillary studies were performed. Conclusions: Secondary tumors involving the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Recognizing uncommon cytomorphologic features, knowing prior history of malignancy, and performing ancillary studies are the keys to improve diagnostic performance and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26955395

  14. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thoracoabdominal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ojalehto, M; Tikkakoski, T; Rissanen, T; Apaja-Sarkkinen, M

    2002-03-01

    This review will discuss the benefits and disadvantages of ultrasound-guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration and cutting needle biopsies. Clinical efficacy, cost-effectiveness, some controversies and safety will be reviewed. PMID:12010294

  15. The effects of twisting and type of aspiration needle on the efficiency of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Yoshihiko; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Katagiri, Seiji; Yamada, Yutaka; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2003-10-01

    The effects of twisting and type (single- or double-lumen) of aspiration needle on the efficiency of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up (US-guided OPU) were investigated in cattle. The first study using slaughterhouse ovaries revealed that twisting of the needle during follicle aspiration improved the oocyte recovery rate without deleterious effects on the attachment of cumulus layers. Vacuum pressure affected the oocyte recovery and cumulus attachment, regardless of the needle type. The needle type did not affect the oocyte recovery or cumulus attachment with an optimized vacuum pressure. In the second study, US-guided OPU was performed in live cows using two types of needles with a vacuum pressure of 75 mmHg. The needle type did not affect the oocyte recovery or cumulus attachment of the recovered oocytes. The results revealed that twisting of the needle is effective in follicle aspiration, and suggested that a single-lumen needle is as useful as a double-lumen needle for US-guided OPU in cattle. PMID:14600345

  16. Ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of parathyroid gland and lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dimashkieh, Haytham; Krishnamurthy, Savitri

    2006-01-01

    Background Parathyroid gland and their tumors comprise a small proportion of non-palpable neck masses that are investigated by ultrasound (US) guided fine needle aspiration biopsy. We reviewed our institution's cases of US guided FNAB of parathyroid gland and their lesions to determine the role of cytology for the preoperative diagnosis of parathyroid gland and their lesions. Method All cases of FNAB of parathyroid gland and lesions in the last 10 years were reviewed in detail with respect to clinical history and correlated with the histopathologic findings in available cases. The cytologic parameters that were evaluated included cellularity assessed semiquantitatively as scant, intermediate or abundant (<50, 51–500 or >500 cells), cellular distribution (loose clusters, single cells/naked nuclei, rounded clusters, two- and three-dimensional clusters, and presence of prominent vascular proliferation), cellular characteristics (cell size, nuclear shape, presence/absence of a nucleolus, degree of mitosis, amount of cytoplasm, and appearance of nuclear chromatin), and background (colloid-like material and macrophages). Immunostaining for parathyroid hormone (PTH) was performed on selected cases using either destained Pap smears or cell block sections. Results Twenty cases of US-guided FNAB of parathyroid glands and their lesions including 13 in the expected locations in the neck, 3 in intrathyroid region, 3 in thyroid bed, and 1 metastatic to liver were studied. Majority of the cases showed intermediate cellularity (51–500 cells) with round to oval cells that exhibited a stippled nuclear chromatin, without significant pleomorphism or mitotic activity. The cells were arranged in loose two dimensional groups with many single cells/naked nuclei around the groups. Occasionally macrophages and colloid like material was also encountered. There was no significant difference in the cytomorphologic features between normal gland, hyperplasia adenoma, or carcinoma

  17. Successful treatment of athletic pubalgia in a lacrosse player with ultrasound-guided needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma injection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Paul M; Massimi, Stephen; Dahmen, Nick; Diamond, Joanne; Wyss, James

    2015-01-01

    Athletic pubalgia is a syndrome of persistent groin pain due to chronic repetitive trauma or stress involving the pelvic joints and many musculotendinous structures that cross the anterior pelvis. As a result, the differential diagnosis can be complex, but insertional tendinopathies are the most common. This case report describes a novel approach to the treatment of distal rectus abdominis tendinopathies with ultrasound-guided needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. After injection, the patient returned to pain-free play at his previous level of intensity. This suggests that PRP may be a useful treatment for this diagnosis. PMID:25134854

  18. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  19. Non-surgical management of thyroid abscess with ultrasound-guided fine-needle application of an antibiotic followed by sclerotization with absolute alcohol.

    PubMed

    Halenka, M

    2013-09-01

    Thyroid abscess is a relatively rare yet dramatic condition of the thyroid gland requiring immediate therapeutic intervention. Traditionally, more or less aggressive surgical approaches and administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics have been used. Clinically less severe disease allows non-surgical treatment as well. The case report describes successful treatment of a large abscess of iatrogenic origin after biopsy of a cystic cavity. A combination of broad-spectrum antibiotics was used based on culture results, administered both orally and by repeated application directly into the abscess cavity using an ultrasound-guided fine-needle approach. Concurrent repeated evacuation of the cavity replaced drainage. Ultimately, a small residual cavity with sterile contents was managed by sclerotization with absolute alcohol. Clinical condition permitting, thyroid abscess may be successfully treated by repeated application of a targeted antibiotic, using a fine needle and ultrasound guidance, directly into the abscess cavity, with repeated evacuation replacing drainage. PMID:24126548

  20. [A Case of Intra-abdominal Paragonimiasis Mimicking Metastasis of Lung Cancer Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine Needle Aspiration].

    PubMed

    Oh, Cho Rong; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Kwang Hyuck

    2015-07-01

    Paragonimiasis has been continuously decreasing in Korea. However, it still occurs by ingesting raw or incompletely cooked fresh water crab or crayfish. The diagnosis of paragonimiasis is challenging because of its rarity. It may be confused with other inflammatory disease or carcinomatosis. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has lower risk of complications such as bleeding, perforation than percutaneous fine needle aspiration. EUS-FNA is more accurate and popular method to find mucosal or submucosal tumors and the lesions of several organs. Benign and malignant tumors, infectious diseases have been diagnosed by EUS-FNA, but there was no report describing the use of EUS-FNA for diagnosing paragonimiasis. Herein, we present a 47-year-old male patient with paragonimiasis diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Imaging studies revealed mass lesions in the lung and peritoneal cavity, which was eventually confirmed as paragonimiasis using EUS-FNA. PMID:26194128

  1. How to learn and to perform endoscopic ultrasound and endobronchial ultrasound for lung cancer staging: A structured guide and review

    PubMed Central

    Konge, Lars; Colella, Sara; Vilmann, Peter; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2015-01-01

    The learning of transesophageal ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) (endoscopic ultrasound-FNA), and endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle aspiration (endosonography) should be based on the following steps: Acquiring theoretical knowledge, training on simulators, and supervised performance on patients. Each step should be completed by passing a validated exam before proceeding to the next step. This approach will assure basic competency on all levels, and testing also facilitates learning and improves retention. Competence in endosonography can be based on a systematic an easy principle consisting of 2 times six anatomical landmarks. PMID:25789278

  2. Regional lymph node staging in breast cancer: the increasing role of imaging and ultrasound-guided axillary lymph node fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Mainiero, Martha B

    2010-09-01

    The status of axillary lymph nodes is a key prognostic indicator in patients with breast cancer and helps guide patient management. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is increasingly being used as a less morbid alternative to axillary lymph node dissection. However, when sentinel lymph node biopsy is positive, axillary dissection is typically performed for complete staging and local control. Axillary ultrasound and ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (USFNA) are useful for detecting axillary nodal metastasis preoperatively and can spare patients sentinel node biopsy, because those with positive cytology on USFNA can proceed directly to axillary dissection or neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Internal mammary nodes are not routinely evaluated, but when the appearance of these nodes is abnormal on imaging, further treatment or metastatic evaluation may be necessary. PMID:20868896

  3. Clinical implications of granulomatous inflammation detected by endobronchial ultrasound transbronchial needle aspiration in patients with suspected cancer recurrence in the mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Marcus P; Jimenez, Carlos A; Mhatre, Ashwini D; Morice, Rodolfo C; Eapen, Georgie A

    2008-01-01

    Background Granulomatous inflammation has been previously reported in association with cancer. Endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a new minimally invasive test for investigating mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The identification of granulomatous inflammation by EBUS-TBNA and the clinical implications of such detection in a series of patients with previously treated cancer and new mediastinal lymphadenopathy has not previously been performed. Methods All 153 consecutive patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA in an academic cancer institution for suspected cancer in the mediastinum (mediastinal lymphadenopathy by CT imaging) were reviewed. Patients with non-caseating granuloma identified by EBUS-TBNA were included. Results EBUS-TBNA identified non-caseating granuloma in 17/153 (11%) patients. A subset of 8/153 (5.2%) had sarcoid like lymphadenopathy mimicking cancer recurrence (5/5 PET positive). Another 8/153 (5.2%) patients with new mediastinal lymphadenopathy and no prior history of cancer had a clinical syndrome consistent with sarcoidosis. One other patient with a history of breast cancer was diagnosed with non-tuberculous mycobacteria infection. No patient required mediastinoscopy and there were no complications. Conclusion In an academic cancer institute, at least 5% of patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA have sarcoid-like lymphadenopathy mimicking cancer recurrence. Further studies to define the precise etiology, natural history and prognosis of this phenomenon are warranted. PMID:18298864

  4. Focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative parathormone monitoring: The value of PTH assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration washout

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Fatih; Arpaci, Dilek; Cakmak, Guldeniz Karadeniz; Emre, Ali Ugur; Elri, Tarik; Ilikhan, Sevil Uygun; Bahadir, Burak; Bayraktaoglu, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate identification of hyperfunctioning parathyroid (HP) gland is the only issue for definitive surgical treatment in primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). Various imaging and operative techniques have been proposed to confirm the localization of the diseased gland. Nevertheless, none of these methods proved to be the gold standard. The presented study aimed to assess the value of parathyroid hormone assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (FNA)-PTH washout fluid to verify the correct localisation for focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative PTH monitoring. Material and Methods The retrospective analysis of 57 patients with pHPT who underwent FNA-PTH was conducted from a prospective database. Biochemical assessment together with radiological (ultrasonography) and nuclear (MIBI scan) imaging was reviewed. Associations between FNA-PTH washout values and localization technics were evaluated and compared in terms of operative findings. Results Focused parathyroidectomy without intraoperative PTH monitoring was performed to 45 patients with high FNA-PTH values. The median largest diameter of the target parathyroid lesion identified by ultrasonography was 13 mm (range, 6 to 36). The median serum PTH level was 190 pg/mL (range, 78 to 1709; reference range, 15 to 65) whereas the median washout PTH was 2500 pg/mL (range, 480 to 3389). According to operative findings high FNA-PTH levels correctly identified parathyroid adenoma in 40 cases (89% of sensitivity and 100% of specificity and positive predictive value) whereas MIBI scan localized the lesion in 36 of these cases (80% of sensitivity). Conclusions The higher level of PTH in preoperative ultrasound guided FNA washout is a considerable data to predict the correct localization of HP, particularly in circumstances of greater values than the serum PTH level. However, although its specificity is high, in cases of coexisting nodular thyroid disease, associated additional HP

  5. Phase grouping-based needle segmentation in 3-D trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate trans-perineal therapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wu; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2014-04-01

    A robust and efficient needle segmentation method used to localize and track the needle in 3-D trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate therapy is proposed. The algorithmic procedure begins by cropping the 3-D US image containing a needle; then all voxels in the cropped 3-D image are grouped into different line support regions (LSRs) based on the outer product of the adjacent voxels' gradient vector. Two different needle axis extraction methods in the candidate LSR are presented: least-squares fitting and 3-D randomized Hough transform. Subsequent local optimization refines the position of the needle axis. Finally, the needle endpoint is localized by finding an intensity drop along the needle axis. The proposed methods were validated with 3-D TRUS tissue-mimicking agar phantom images, chicken breast phantom images and patient images obtained during prostate cryotherapy. The results of the in vivo test indicate that our method can localize the needle accurately and robustly with a needle endpoint localization accuracy <1.43 mm and detection accuracy >84%, which are favorable for 3-D TRUS-guided prostate trans-perineal therapy. PMID:24462163

  6. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Needle-Based Probe Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (nCLE) of Intrapancreatic Ectopic Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Bastidas, Amanda B.; Holloman, David; Lankarani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Accessory spleens and splenosis represent the congenital and acquired type of ectopic splenic tissue. Generally, they are asymptomatic entities posing as solid hypervascular masses at the splenic hilum or in other organs, such as the pancreas. Intrapancreatic ectopic spleen mimics pancreatic neoplasms on imaging studies, and due to the lack of radiological diagnostic criteria, patients undergo unnecessary distal pancreatectomy. We present the first case of intrapancreatic ectopic spleen in which the concomitant use of needle-based probe confocal laser endomicroscopy and fine-needle aspiration supported the final diagnosis. PMID:27144203

  7. Two Cases of Lethal Complications Following Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Biopsy of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Drinkovic, Ivan; Brkljacic, Boris

    1996-09-15

    Two cases with lethal complications are reported among 1750 ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous fine-needle liver biopsies performed in our department. The first patient had angiosarcoma of the liver which was not suspected after computed tomography (CT) and US studies had been performed. The other patient had hepatocellular carcinoma in advanced hepatic cirrhosis. Death was due to bleeding in both cases. Pre-procedure laboratory tests did not reveal the existence of major bleeding disorders in either case. Normal liver tissue was interposed in the needle track between the liver capsule and the lesions which were targeted.

  8. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Needle-Based Probe Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (nCLE) of Intrapancreatic Ectopic Spleen.

    PubMed

    Bastidas, Amanda B; Holloman, David; Lankarani, Ali; Nieto, Jose M

    2016-04-01

    Accessory spleens and splenosis represent the congenital and acquired type of ectopic splenic tissue. Generally, they are asymptomatic entities posing as solid hypervascular masses at the splenic hilum or in other organs, such as the pancreas. Intrapancreatic ectopic spleen mimics pancreatic neoplasms on imaging studies, and due to the lack of radiological diagnostic criteria, patients undergo unnecessary distal pancreatectomy. We present the first case of intrapancreatic ectopic spleen in which the concomitant use of needle-based probe confocal laser endomicroscopy and fine-needle aspiration supported the final diagnosis. PMID:27144203

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy for the diagnosis of pancreatic malignant lesions: a systematic review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongtao; Li, Lianyong; Qu, Changmin; Liang, Shuwen; Zeng, Bolun; Luo, Zhiwen

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy (EUS-FNB) has been used as an effective method of diagnosing pancreatic malignant lesions. It has the advantage of providing well preserved tissue for histologic grading and subsequent molecular biological analysis. In order to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNB for pancreatic malignant lesions, studies assessing EUS-FNB to diagnose solid pancreatic masses were selected via Medline. Sixteen articles published between 2005 and 2015, covering 828 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for EUS-FNB differentiating malignant from benign solid pancreatic masses were: sensitivity 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.87); specificity 0.98 (95% CI, 0.93–1.00); positive likelihood ratio 8.0 (95% CI 4.5–14.4); negative likelihood ratio 0.17 (95% CI 0.10–0.26); and DOR 64 (95% CI 30.4–134.8). The area under the sROC curve was 0.96. Subgroup analysis did not identify other factors that could substantially affect the diagnostic accuracy, such as the study design, location of study, number of centers, location of lesion, whether or not a cytopathologist was present, and so on. EUS-FNB is a reliable diagnostic tool for solid pancreatic masses and should be especially considered for pathology where histologic morphology is preferred for diagnosis. PMID:26960914

  10. Real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy with needle guide by nephrologists decreases post-biopsy complications

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Kumar, Shashi; Manjunath, Revanasiddappa; Bhadauria, Dharmendra; Kaul, Anupama; Sharma, Raj K; Gupta, Amit; Lal, Hira; Jain, Manoj; Agrawal, Vinita

    2015-01-01

    Background Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) can result in serious complications. The study is aimed to compare the biopsy yield and complications rate of the real-time ultrasonagram (USG)-guided PRB and needle tracking with and without needle guide in two different study periods. Methods We compared the yield and complications of 2138 kidney biopsies performed in two different periods, 1510 biopsies during the first period from April 2004–December 2010 and 628 biopsies during second period from January 2011–March 2013. All biopsies in both periods were performed by nephrologists. Radiologists provided the real-time image without needle guide during the first period while nephrologists performed both imaging and biopsy with needle guide during the second period. Results Of all the 2138 patients, 226 (10.5%) patients developed 118 minor and 108 major complications. Only 13 (2.1%) major complications occurred in the second period and 95 (6.7%) in the first period (P < 0.001). The relative risk of developing a major complication without guide was 3.04 times greater than that of the biopsies performed with use of the guide. The mean number of glomeruli per biopsy obtained during the second period (17.98 ± 6.75) was significantly greater than that of the first period (14.14 ± 6.01) (P = 0.004). The number of passes to acquire adequate tissue (P = 0.001) and percentage of cortex on biopsy (P = 0.001) were also significantly better in the second period. The optimal observation period post biopsy is 24 h. Conclusions Real-time USG imaging supported by needle guide device is associated with better biopsy yield and fewer complications. PMID:25815170

  11. Evolution of transbronchial needle aspiration technique

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing-Hua; Ben, Su-Qin; Xia, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) is an established technique to collect cell and tissue specimens from lesions outside the airway wall, generally guided by flexible bronchoscope under the direct visualization of the puncture site. TBNA has been utilized for 30 years, and now there is renewed interest in utilizing it in conjunction with endobronchial ultrasound. Although the basic operational principles have remained the same, conventional TBNA (cTBNA) and endobronchial ultrasound-guided TBNA (EBUS-TBNA) have been greatly improved over the years with the increased application in clinic and the advance of new technology. In this article we briefly discussed the evolution of TBNA technique and its future. PMID:26807269

  12. The value of combined application of ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology and thyroglobulin measurement for the diagnosis of cervical lymph node metastases from thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia-hong; Xu, Ying-ying; Pan, Qi-zheng; Sui, Guo-qing; Zhou, Jian-ping; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic value of ultrasound-guided (US-guided) fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), thyroglobulin measurement on fine-needle aspiration (FNA-Tg), combined US-guided FNAC, and the ratio between FNA-Tg and serum Tg (FNA-Tg/serum Tg) for patients with cervical lymph node (CLN) metastases from thyroid carcinoma. Methods: We selected 148 patients with thyroid cancer with suspicious CLN metastases who met the inclusion criteria. FNAC findings, FNA-Tg levels, and serum Tg levels were evaluated before surgical treatment. The results of FNAC and FNA-Tg from CLNs were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Ninety-four of 148 cases were metastatic and 54 were benign. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FNAC were 68.1%, 100.0%, and 79.7%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FNA-Tg/serum Tg were 91.5%, 88.9%, and 90.5%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FNA-Tg [10 ng/mL] were 98.9%, 68.5%, and 87.8%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of combined US-guided FNAC and FNA-Tg/serum Tg were 95.7%, 96.3%, and 95.9%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between FNAC and combined US-guided FNAC and FNA-Tg/serum Tg for sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The method of FNA-Tg/serum Tg is sensitive enough for diagnosing CLN metastases from thyroid cancer. The combined application of US-guided FNAC and FNA-Tg/serum Tg contributes to improving the accuracy of diagnosing CLN metastases in patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:26649004

  13. How to improve the success of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of pancreatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Gimeno-García, Antonio Z; Elwassief, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is highly accurate for assessing the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system. Currently, it is the most sensitive imaging procedure for detecting small solid pancreatic masses. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (EUS-FNA) is a safe and highly accurate tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic malignancy. Prior to perform an EUS-FNA one should wonder whether the benefits outweigh the potential risks of the procedure. Therefore, it is important to take into account whether the procedure will influence patient management. The diagnostic yield and success rate of EUS-FNA in pancreatic lesions varies greatly depending on many factors including: the characteristics of the lesion itself (location of the mass and consistency of the lesion), technical factors (type of needle size, use of stylet, use of suction and number of needle passes performed) and the availability of immediate cytological assessment of the specimen. The aim of this review is to analyze all these factors for optimizing specimen collection and diagnostic efficiency in dealing with solid pancreatic masses. PMID:22586548

  14. CT differentiation of enlarged mediastinal lymph node due to anthracosis from metastatic lymphadenopathy: a comparative study proven by endobronchial US-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Johannes; Broll, Michael; Müller, Phillip; Pomjanski, Natalia; Biesterfeld, Stepfan; Liermann, Dieter; Kickuth, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Anthracosis often results in mediastinal nodal enlargement. The aim of this comparative study was to evaluate if it is possible to differentiate endobronchial ultrasound-guided trans-bronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) proven anthracotic lymph nodes from malignant lymph node enlargement by means of multislice computed tomography (MSCT). METHODS We compared the MSCT findings of 89 enlarged lymph nodes due to anthracosis with 54 malignant lymph nodes (non-small cell lung cancer 75.9%, small cell lung cancer 18.5%, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma 5.6%). The lymph nodes were assessed for density (calcification, fat, and necrosis), shape (oval, round), contrast enhancement, and contour (sharp, ill-defined). RESULTS Malignant lymph nodes showed significantly greater axis diameters (P < 0.001). Both anthracotic and malignant nodes were most often oval (86.5% of all malignant nodes vs. 81.5% of all anthracotic nodes, P = 0.420) and showed confluence in a remarkable percentage (28.1% vs. 42.6%, P = 0.075). Anthracotic nodes showed calcifications more often (18% vs. 0%, P < 0.001). Malignant lymph nodes showed a significantly greater short and long axis diameter (P < 0.001), and they had a higher frequency of ill-defined contours (27.8% vs. 2.2%, P < 0.001) and contrast enhancement (27.8% vs. 5.6%, P < 0.001). Nodal necrosis, which appeared in one third of the malignant nodes, was not observed in anthracosis (35.2% vs. 0%, P < 0.001). Confluence of enlarged lymph nodes was seen in malignant lymph nodes (42.6%), as well as in lymph node enlargement due to anthracosis (28.1%, P = 0.075). CONCLUSION Our results show that there are significant differences in MSCT findings of malignant enlarged lymph nodes and benign lymph node enlargement due to anthracosis. PMID:25616268

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration of Thyroid Nodules: A Consensus Statement by the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jung Hwan; Jung, So Lyung; Kwak, Jin Young; Kim, Ji-hoon; Shin, Jung Hee

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) has played a crucial role in managing patients with thyroid nodules, owing to its safety and accuracy. However, even with US guidance, nondiagnostic sampling and infrequent complications still occur after FNA. Accordingly, the Task Force on US-FNA of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has provided consensus recommendations for the US-FNA technique and related issues to improve diagnostic yield. These detailed procedures are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature and from the consensus of experts. PMID:25741201

  16. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Pancreatic Lesions: A Systematic Review of Technical and Procedural Variables

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Bhairvi S.; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Lim, Diego; Rastogi, Amit; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition has emerged over the last decade as an invaluable diagnostic tool in approaching the different pancreatic lesions. Given the safety and minimal invasiveness of this approach combined with the high diagnostic yield, it became the standard of care when dealing with different pancreatic pathologies. However, some variables regarding this procedure remain not fully understood. These can influence the diagnostic yield of the procedure and include the presence of the on-site cytopathologist, the type and size of the needle used as well as obtaining aspiration versus core biopsy, the number of passes and the sampling technique, and the role of suction and stylet use among others. We performed a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, Google Scholar, and Embase for studies that assessed these variables. Eligible studies were analyzed using several parameters such as technique and procedure, with the aim of reviewing results from an evidence-based standpoint. PMID:27011940

  17. Basic techniques in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for solid lesions: Adverse events and avoiding them

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Larissa L.; Levy, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is often the preferred technique for tissue acquisition in the diagnosis of suspected intrathoracic and intraabdominal pathology. Although EUS FNA is a safe and accurate procedure, it has been associated with a low risk of adverse events. The unique properties of the echoendoscope and its ability to acquire tissue outside of the gastrointestinal lumen impart risks that are not associated with routine endoscopic procedures. In this review, we discuss the risk of perforation related to the echoendoscope itself and adverse events related to FNA of solid masses including infections, bleeding, pancreatitis and pancreatic duct leak, bile duct leak and tumor seeding. We also provide tips on how to avoid the most common adverse events related to EUS-FNA. PMID:24949409

  18. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis in chronic lateral epicondylitis: short-term and long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Valera-Garrido, Fermín; Minaya-Muñoz, Francisco; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is a novel minimally invasive approach which consists of the application of a galvanic current through an acupuncture needle. Objective To evaluate the clinical and ultrasonographic effectiveness of a multimodal programme (PNE, eccentric exercise (EccEx) and stretching) in the short term for patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, and to determine whether the clinical outcomes achieved decline over time. Methods A one-way repeated measures study was performed in a clinical setting in 36 patients presenting with lateral epicondylitis. The patients received one session of US-guided PNE per week over 4–6 weeks, associated with a home programme of EccEx and stretching. The main outcome measures were severity of pain, disability (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire), structural tendon changes (US), hypervascularity and patients’ perceptions of overall outcome. Measurements at 6, 26 and 52 weeks follow-up included recurrence rates (increase in severity of pain or disability compared with discharge), perception of overall outcome and success rates. Results All outcome measures registered significant improvements between pre-intervention and discharge. Most patients (n=30, 83.3%) rated the overall outcome as ‘successful’ at 6 weeks. The ultrasonographic findings showed that the hypoechoic regions and hypervascularity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis changed significantly. At 26 and 52 weeks, all participants (n=32) perceived a ‘successful’ outcome. Recurrence rates were null after discharge and at follow-up at 6, 26 and 52 weeks. Conclusions Symptoms and degenerative structural changes of chronic lateral epicondylitis are reduced after US-guided PNE associated with EccEx and stretching, with encouragingly low recurrences in the mid to long term. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02085928. PMID:25122629

  19. Endobronchial ultrasound for mediastinal staging in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Guarize, Juliana; Pardolesi, Alessandro; Donghi, Stefano; Filippi, Niccolò; Casadio, Chiara; Midolo, Valeria; Petrella, Francesco; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has changed the way mediastinal staging is performed in lung cancer patients. EBUS-TBNA is probably the most important non-invasive procedure for mediastinal staging and the currently preferred approach in many reference cancer centres worldwide. EBUS-TBNA is a less invasive technique than mediastinoscopy with low morbidity and no mortality and can be performed in an outpatient setting with excellent results. This study describes the technical aspects of EBUS-TBNA and our personal experience with the procedure. PMID:25332380

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Salla, Charitini; Chatzipantelis, Paschalis; Konstantinou, Panagiotis; Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Pantazopoulou, Akrivi; Dappola, Victoria

    2007-10-14

    We describe the clinical, imaging and cytopathological features of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas (SPTP) diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided (EUS-guided) fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 17-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of an unexplained episodic abdominal pain for 2 mo and a short history of hypertension in the endocrinology clinic. Clinical laboratory examinations revealed polycystic ovary syndrome, splenomegaly and low serum amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Computed tomography (CT) analysis revealed a mass of the pancreatic tail with solid and cystic consistency. EUS confirmed the mass, both in body and tail of the pancreas, with distinct borders, which caused dilation of the peripheral part of the pancreatic duct (major diameter 3.7 mm). The patient underwent EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA cytology specimens consisted of single cells and aggregates of uniform malignant cells, forming microadenoid structures, branching, papillary clusters with delicate fibrovascular cores and nuclear overlapping. Naked capillaries were also seen. The nuclei of malignant cells were round or oval, eccentric with fine granular chromatin, small nucleoli and nuclear grooves in some of them. The malignant cells were periodic acid Schiff (PAS)-Alcian blue (+) and immunocytochemically they were vimentin (+), CA 19.9 (+), synaptophysin (+), chromogranin (-), neuro-specific enolase (-), a1-antitrypsin and a1-antichymotrypsin focal positive. Cytologic findings were strongly suggestive of SPTP. Biopsy confirmed the above cytologic diagnosis. EUS-guided FNA diagnosis of SPTP is accurate. EUS findings, cytomorphologic features and immunostains of cell block help distinguish SPTP from pancreatic endocrine tumors, acinar cell carcinoma and papillary mucinous carcinoma. PMID:17876886

  1. The Effect of Radiotherapy on Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy and the Ultrasound Characteristics of Neck Lymph Nodes in Oral Cancer Patients after Primary Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wu-Chia; Cheng, Po-Wen; Wang, Chi-Te; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Chang, Yih-Leong; Liao, Li-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of radiotherapy (RT) on ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (USgFNA) and sonographic characteristics in the assessment of cervical lymph nodes (LNs) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients after primary treatment. Materials and Methods 88 treated OSCC patients underwent 111 USgFNAs of the neck LNs after US evaluation. Among them, 48 USgFNAs were performed on 40 patients following RT and 63 USgFNAs on 48 patients without previous RT. The results of USgFNA and the US characteristics were compared between these two groups. Results USgFNA had a sensitivity of 88.0%, specificity of 91.4%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 88.0%, negative predictive value (NPV) of 91.4% and accuracy of 90.0% in patients without previous RT, and a sensitivity of 97.1%, specificity of 83.3%, PPV of 94.3%, NPV of 90.9% and accuracy of 93.5% in those with previous neck RT. The ranges of the short-axis and long-axis length were 13.3 ± 8.0 mm (mean ± SD) versus 17.8 ± 9.1 mm, and 18.6 ± 9.0 mm versus 24.4 ± 10.9 mm for recurrent LNs from patients with, versus without, previous RT (both ps < 0.05), respectively. 76.5% (26/34) of the recurrent nodes after RT and 48% (12/25) of the recurrent nodes without previous RT exhibited an irregular margin (p < 0.05). Additionally, irradiated recurrent LNs had a significantly decreased percentage of discernable calcification compared with non-irradiated recurrent nodes (48% versus 20.6%, p < 0.05). Conclusions RT had influence on sonographic characteristics but no influence on USgFNA in diagnosing recurrent LNs in treated OSCC patients. PMID:26954569

  2. Rapid on-site evaluation with dynamic telecytopathology for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of head and neck nonthyroid lesions

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Kamal K.; Xu, Weisheng; Wang, Dongliang; Swarnkar, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) at the time of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (USGFNA) of head and neck lesion is essential for obtaining adequate samples and providing the preliminary diagnosis. We summarize our experience with ROSE of USGFNA on head and neck nonthyroid lesions using telecytopathology. Materials and Methods: Real-time images of Diff-Quik stained cytology smears were obtained at ultrasound suite with an Olympus DP-70 digital camera attached to an Olympus CX41 microscope, and transmitted via ethernet by a cytotechnologist to a cytopathologist in cytopathology laboratory who rendered a preliminary diagnosis. Live communication was conducted with Vocera voice communication system. The ultrasound suite was located on different floor from the cytopathology laboratory. Accuracy of ROSE via telecytopathology was compared with an equal number of cases that received ROSE, prior to introduction of telecytopathology, via conventional microscopy. Results: Rapid on-site evaluation was performed on a total of 116 USGFNA of head and neck nonthyroid lesions. The telecytopathology system and conventional microscopy was used to evaluate equal number of cases (58 each). Preliminary diagnoses of benign, atypical/suspicious for malignancy, and positive for malignancy were 72.4%, 17.2% and 10.3% for telecytopathology, and 69.0%, 10.3% and 20.7% for conventional microscopy. None of the cases were deemed unsatisfactory. The overall concordance between the preliminary and final diagnoses was 94.8% for telecytopathology and 98.3% for conventional microscopy and was not statistically significant (P = 0.309). The causes of discordant preliminary and final diagnoses were mainly attributed to availability of cell block and Papanicolaou-stained slides for review or flow cytometry results for lymphoma cases at the time of final sign out. Conclusions: Telecytopathology is comparable with conventional microscopy in ROSE of USGFNA of head and neck nonthyroid

  3. Efficacy of two-time prophylactic intravenous administration of tazobactam/piperacillin for transrectal ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Hiroaki; Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Miyagi, Tohru; Nakashima, Takao; Shimamura, Masayoshi; Namiki, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Background Prevalence of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli has been recently increasing worldwide. We analyzed the incidence and characteristics of acute bacterial prostatitis after transrectal ultrasound-guided needle prostate biopsy (TRUSP-Bx) with prophylactic tazobactam/piperacillin (TAZ/PIPC) treatment as an alternative regimen. Methods A total of 391 patients who underwent TRUSP-Bx were included in the study. All patients received intravenous TAZ/PIPC (4.5 g) 30 minutes before and 6 hours after TRUSP-Bx. Results Acute bacterial prostatitis developed in six patients (1.5%); the frequency of its occurrence was significantly higher in patients in whom rectal disinfection was not performed (P < 0.05). These six patients developed clinical symptoms of acute bacterial prostatitis a median of 24 hours after the biopsy. Escherichia coli was isolated in urine or blood bacterial cultures in four cases, and Klebsiella pneumoniae in two cases. All of the isolated organisms showed excellent sensitivity to TAZ/PIPC. Conclusions The incidence rate of acute prostatitis with prophylactic TAZ/PIPC was consistent with those reported previously with FQ-based regimens, despite the favorable sensitivity of isolated organisms. Two-time regimen of TAZ/PIPC may not always prevent the post-TRUSP-Bx infection, possibly due to the pharmacokinetic characteristics of TAZ/PIPC. However, if each case was considered individually to select the best setting and frequency of dosage of TAZ/PIPC, this can be an optimal prophylaxis in the era of widespread FQ-resistant microorganisms. PMID:26473153

  4. Ultrasonographic Findings in Patients with Benign and Malignant Thyroid Nodules who underwent Ultrasound Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Majstorov, Venjamin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with thyroid nodules represent common problem in daily routine of thyroidologists as well as other medical specialties. Fortunately only small number of thyroid nodules turns out to be malignant. Ultrasound is most frequently used imaging modality in the evaluation of thyroid nodules and certain ultrasonographic features are associated with greater risk for malignancy. AIM: The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of various ultrasonographic findings regarding thyroid malignancy. METHODS: Between September 2012 and August 2013 a total of 592 patients with 694 nodules were included in the present study. They were evaluated for thyroid nodules as a part of routine work up at outpatient’s unit of Institute of Pathophysiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, UKIM Skopje. In all patients thyroid ultrasound and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) were performed. Surgically were removed 84 nodules and ultrasonography and cytology data were compared to histology results. RESULTS: From all examined ultrasonographic features, significant association with malignancy has been found for hypoechogenecity, marked central vascularisation, ultrasound suspicious nodules (including at least two suspicious features) and marginal for presence of microcalcifications. Highest sensitivity was obtained for hypoechogenecity, and highest specificity for microcalcifications and marked central vascularisation. CONCLUSION: Awareness of the suspicious ultrasound features is mandatory in order to optimize diagnostic and therapeutic approach to the vast number of patients with thyroid nodules. PMID:27275309

  5. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: a 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusion: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients. PMID:25767776

  6. Interobserver agreement among cytopathologists in the evaluation of pancreatic endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology specimens*

    PubMed Central

    Mounzer, Rawad; Yen, Roy; Marshall, Carrie; Sams, Sharon; Mehrotra, Sanjana; Said, Mohamed Sherif; Obuch, Joshua C.; Brauer, Brian; Attwell, Augustin; Fukami, Norio; Shah, Raj; Amateau, Stuart; Hall, Matthew; Hosford, Lindsay; Wilson, Robert; Rastogi, Amit; Wani, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become the standard of care in the evaluation of solid pancreatic lesions. Limited data exist on interobserver agreement (IOA) among cytopathologists in assessing solid pancreatic EUS-FNA specimens. This study aimed to evaluate IOA among cytopathologists in assessing EUS-FNA cytology specimens of solid pancreatic lesions using a novel standardized scoring system and to assess individual clinical and cytologic predictors of IOA. Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent EUS-FNA of solid pancreatic lesions at a tertiary care referral center were included. EUS-FNA slides were evaluated by four blinded cytopathologists using a standardized scoring system that assessed final cytologic diagnosis and quantitative (number of nucleated/diagnostic cells) and qualitative (bloodiness, inflammation/necrosis, contamination, artifact) cytologic parameters. Final clinical diagnosis was based on final cytology, surgical pathology, or 1-year clinical follow-up. IOA was calculated using multi-rater kappa (κ) statistics. Bivariate analyses were performed comparing cases with and without uniform agreement among the cytopathologists followed by logistic regression with backward elimination to model likelihood of uniform agreement. Results: Ninety-nine patients were included (49 % males, mean age 64 years, mean lesion size 26 mm). IOA for final diagnosis was moderate (κ = 0.45, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.4 – 0.49) with minimal improvement when combining suspicious and malignant diagnoses (κ = 0.54, 95 %CI 0.49 – 0.6). The weighted kappa value for overall diagnosis was 0.65 (95 %CI 0.54 – 0.76). IOA was slight to fair (κ = 0.04 – 0.32) for individual cytologic parameters. A final clinical diagnosis of malignancy was the most significant predictor of agreement [OR 3.99 (CI 1.52 – 10.49)]. Conclusions: Interobserver agreement among

  7. Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound: applications beyond conventional indications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is maturing and gaining acceptance by more and more clinicians for lymph node staging of lung cancer and diagnosis of mediastinal and hilar masses or lymph node enlargement by convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS). The application of CP-EBUS, however, is not limited to conventional indications. Diagnostically, elastography is a new technology for the differentiation of benign and malignant lymph nodes before aspiration. CP-EBUS can also be used for pulmonary vascular diseases, such as pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-thrombotic endovascular lesions (NELs). Therapeutically, CP-EBUS can be used for cyst drainage and drug injections. CP-EBUS is not limited to observation and aspiration of mediastinal masses and lymph nodes, but is also suitable for exploration of other tissues external to the central airway, which necessitates unprecedented skills for the bronchoscopist. PMID:26543618

  8. Endobronchial Ultrasound-Transbronchial Needle Aspiration of Mediastinal and Hilar Lymphadenopathy Learning Curve.

    PubMed

    Kheir, Fayez; Alokla, Khalid; Myers, Leann; Palomino, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) has become a widely available tool that allows sampling of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes with comparable accuracy as compared with the gold standard procedure, mediastinoscopy. The goal of this study was to evaluate the competence accuracy of this technique in academic medical center in patients with and without malignant disease. This was a retrospective chart review of the first 150 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA at our institution with an operator not previously trained or supervised while performing the procedure. All nondiagnostic results were confirmed with mediastinoscopy. The cumulative sum analysis is a method used to continuously monitor performance against an established standard to attain competence in the procedure performed. Learning curve was assessed using cumulative sum method. Procedures were divided into sextiles (1-25, 26-50, 51-75, 76-100, 101-125, and 126-150). The technique's diagnostic accuracy was calculated for each of the 6 categories and trend toward improved accuracy was assessed using Cochran-Armitage trend test. Operator competency was achieved between 55th and 60th procedures. The diagnostic accuracy increased from 72% to 88% (from the first to third sextile) but remained stable afterwards at 88% (C-A trend test P = 0.091). The overall diagnostic accuracy was 84%. Trainees' learning rate varies while acquiring adequate knowledge. We suggest that a learning curve for each operator be used to assess competence in EBUS-TBNA procedure before physicians perform it without supervision. PMID:24621644

  9. Endoscopic ultrasonography/fine-needle aspiration and endobronchial ultrasonography/fine-needle aspiration for lung cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Lankarani, Ali; Wallace, Michael B

    2012-04-01

    This article reviews different techniques available for diagnosis and staging of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The advantages and disadvantages of each staging method are highlighted. The role of the gastroenterologist in NSCLC staging is explored. A new algorithm is proposed for the staging of NSCLC that incorporates endoscopic and endobronchial ultrasonography for mediastinal staging in patients with intrathoracic disease. PMID:22632944

  10. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:25807772

  11. Clinical utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma with signet-ring cells of the pancreas: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Kiichiro; Seishima, Jun; Yamato, Masatoshi; Miyazawa, Masaki; Komura, Takuya; Marukawa, Yohei; Ohta, Hajime; Kasashima, Satomi; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Yano, Masaaki; Unoura, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    A man in his 60s visited our hospital because of a pancreatic head tumor. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) revealed that the tumor consisted of a neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) and adenocarcinoma, including signet-ring cell carcinoma, and that the ratio of these components was approximately 50:50. Therefore, he was diagnosed with mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Because of liver and lymph node metastases, systemic chemotherapy was initiated using a regimen for the NEC component based on an increase in neuron-specific enolase (NSE). Although the patient achieved stable disease after two chemotherapy cycles, the tumor increased in size after three cycles, which was associated with a gradual increase in carcinoembryonic antigen and a decrease in NSE level. An EUS-FNA reexamination revealed that the adenocarcinoma component accounted for 90 % of the tumor. Thus, an adenocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen was started, and a slight reduction in tumor size was observed. Here, we report an extremely rare and remarkable case of MANEC of the pancreas that demonstrates the effectiveness of EUS-FNA for helping to decide the chemotherapy regimen. PMID:26848585

  12. An indigenous model for learning ultrasound-guided interventions

    PubMed Central

    Khera, Pushpinder S; Keshava, Shyamkumar N

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided interventions require good hand–eye coordination with respect to probe control and needle orientation. We describe a method of making an ultrasound phantom for practice purpose using an edible jelly mixture. The phantom is easy to make, reproducible, cheap, and simulates in vivo target. PMID:25024521

  13. The negative predictive value of ultrasound-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of breast masses: a validation study of 339 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Darrell R.; Nasute, Paola; Hayes, Malcolm; Warren, Linda J.; Gordon, Paula B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine the negative predictive value of sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of breast masses, with detailed analysis of any false-negative cases. Materials and methods: We reviewed 669 cases of sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsies that had benign pathologic findings. Given a benign pathology on core biopsy, true-negatives had either benign pathology on surgical excision or at least 2 years of stable imaging and/or clinical follow-up; false-negatives had malignant histology on surgical excision. Results: Follow-up was available for 339 breast lesions; 117 were confirmed to be benign via surgical excision, and 220 were stable after 2 years or more of imaging or clinical follow-up (mean follow-up time 33.1 months, range 24–64 months). The negative predictive value was determined to be 99.4%. There were 2 false-negative cases, giving a false-negative rate of 0.1%. There was no delay in diagnosis in either case because the radiologist noted discordance between imaging and core biopsy pathology, and recommended surgical excision despite the benign core biopsy pathology. Conclusions: Sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy provides a high negative predictive value in assessing breast lesions. Radiologic/pathologic correlation should be performed to avoid delay in the diagnosis of carcinoma. PMID:23113970

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration with on-site cytopathology versus core biopsy: a comparison of both techniques performed at the same endoscopic session

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michael; Hair, Clark D.; Green, Linda K.; Vela, Stacie A.; Patel, Kalpesh K.; Qureshi, Waqar A.; Shaib, Yasser H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) with bedside cytopathology is the gold standard for assessment of pancreatic, subepithelial, and other lesions in close proximity to the gastrointestinal tract, but it is time-consuming, has certain diagnostic limitations, and bedside cytopathology is not widely available. Aims: The goal of this study is to compare the diagnostic yield of EUS-guided FNA with on-site cytopathology and EUS-guided core biopsy. Methods: Twenty-six patients with gastrointestinal mass lesions requiring biopsy at a tertiary medical center were included in this retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort. Two core biopsies were taken using a 22 gauge needle followed by FNA guided by a bedside cytopathologist at the same endoscopic session. The diagnostic yield and test characteristics of EUS core biopsy and EUS FNA with bedside cytopathology were examined. Results: The mean number of passes was 3.2 for FNA, and the mean procedure time was 39.4 minutes. The final diagnosis was malignant in 92.3 %. Sensitivity and specificity were 83 % and 100 %, respectively, for FNA, and 91.7 % and 100 %, respectively, for core biopsy. Diagnostic accuracy was 92.3 % for FNA and 84.6 % for core biopsy. The two approaches were in agreement in 88.4 % with a kappa statistic of 0.66 (95 % confidence interval 0.33 – 0.99). Conclusions: An approach using two passes with a core biopsy needle is comparable to the current gold standard of FNA with bedside cytopathology. The performance of two core biopsies is time-efficient and could represent a good alternative to FNA with bedside cytopathology. PMID:26135096

  15. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy for salivary gland lesions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert L; Hall, Brian J; Layfield, Lester J

    2011-10-01

    Core needle biopsy (CNB) of salivary gland lesions is a relatively new technique that may offer benefits for diagnosis of the lesions. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify studies published between January 1, 1985, and March 15, 2011. Summary estimates of sensitivity and specificity were obtained by using a summary receiver-operating characteristic (SROC) curve. Study quality was assessed by using the QUADAS survey. We identified 5 studies (277 cases) for inclusion. The area under the SROC for CNB was 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-1.00). Based on histologically verified cases, the sensitivity of CNB is 0.92 (95% CI, 0.77-0.98) and the specificity is 1.00 (95% CI, 0.76-1.00). We conclude that CNB has high accuracy and a low (1.2%) inadequacy rate. CNB is more accurate than fine-needle aspiration, at least in some settings, but the best selection of which test to use for an individual patient and setting remains to be defined. PMID:21917673

  16. Establishing an accurate diagnosis of a parotid lump: evaluation of the current biopsy methods - fine needle aspiration cytology, ultrasound-guided core biopsy, and intraoperative frozen section.

    PubMed

    Howlett, D C; Skelton, E; Moody, A B

    2015-09-01

    The optimum technique for histological confirmation of the nature of a parotid mass remains controversial. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), which has traditionally been used, is associated with high non-diagnostic and false negative rates, and ultrasound (US)-guided core biopsy and frozen section have been explored as alternatives. US-guided core biopsy is more invasive than FNAC, but is safe, well-tolerated, and associated with improved diagnostic performance. Although frozen section offers better specificity than FNAC, it has a number of important drawbacks and cannot be considered as a primary diagnostic tool. US-guided core biopsy should be considered as the initial diagnostic technique of choice, and in units where the accuracy of FNAC is good it can be used when FNAC is equivocal or non-diagnostic. PMID:25886878

  17. The integration of single fiber reflectance (SFR) spectroscopy during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations (EUS-FNA) in pancreatic masses: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegehuis, Paulien L.; Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Inderson, Akin; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Amelink, Arjen; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2016-03-01

    EUS-FNA can be used for pathological confirmation of a suspicious pancreatic mass. However, performance depends on an on-site cytologist and time between punction and final pathology results can be long. SFR spectroscopy is capable of extracting biologically relevant parameters (e.g. oxygenation and blood volume) in real-time from a very small tissue volume at difficult locations. In this study we determined feasibility of the integration of SFR spectroscopy during EUSFNA procedures in pancreatic masses. Patients with benign and malignant pancreatic masses who were scheduled for an EUS-FNA were included. The working guide wire inside the 19 gauge endoscopic biopsy needle was removed and the sterile single fiber (300 μm core and 700 μm outer diameter, wide-angle beam, NA 0.22) inserted through the needle. Spectroscopy measurements in the visiblenear infrared wavelength region (400-900 nm) and autofluorescence measurements (excitation at 405 nm) were taken three times, and subsequently cytology was obtained. Wavelength dependent optical properties were compared to cytology results. We took measurements in 13 patients with corresponding cytology results (including mucinous tumor, ductal adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumor, and pancreatitis). In this paper we show the first analyzed results comparing normal pancreatic tissue with cancerous tissue in the same patient. We found a large difference in blood volume fraction, and blood oxygenation was higher in normal tissue. Integration of SFR spectroscopy is feasible in EUS-FNA procedures, the workflow hardly requires changes and it takes little time. The first results differentiating normal from tumor tissue are promising.

  18. Value of radial probe endobronchial ultrasound-guided localization of solitary pulmonary nodules with the combination of ultrathin bronchoscopy and methylene blue prior to video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chun-Hua; Yu, Li-Ke; Cao, Lan; Yang, Rusong; Yan, Jun; Liu, Zheng-Cheng; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of radial probe endobronchial ultrasound (RP-EBUS)-guided localization of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) with the combination of ultrathin bronchoscopy and methylene blue prior to video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). An ultrathin bronchoscope was used to localize the lesions under RP-EBUS guidance in 48 patients (18 men and 30 women; age range, 41–72 years; mean age, 54 years), who subsequently underwent VATS resection. The lesion size, distance from the parietal pleura, localization time and complications were evaluated. The RP-EBUS-guided localization success rate was 72.9%. The lesion size ± standard deviation was 12.8±4.2 mm and the mean distance from the parietal pleura was 11.2±9.7 mm. The mean localization time was 15.7±8.3 min. The major complication of RP-EBUS-guided localization was asymptomatic hemorrhage in 4 patients (8.3%). The VATS resection success rate was 95.8%. In terms of pathological type, the 48 lesions included atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (n=4), adenocarcinoma in situ (n=5), minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (n=7), adenocarcinoma (n=18), squamous cell carcinoma (n=1), inflammation (n=6), hamartoma (n=4) and tuberculosis (n=3). Therefore, RP-EBUS-guided localization with the combination of an ultrathin bronchoscope and methylene blue prior to VATS resection is a promising technique for SPNs, it plays an important role in the accurate localization of SPNs and it is an effective and safe technique to assist VATS resection of such nodules.

  19. The usefulness of S100P, mesothelin, fascin, prostate stem cell antigen, and 14-3-3 sigma in diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma in cytological specimens obtained by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Dim, Daniel C; Jiang, Feng; Qiu, Qi; Li, Ting; Darwin, Peter; Rodgers, William H; Peng, Hong Qi

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of the pancreas is an efficient and minimally invasive procedure for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Because of some limitations of EUS-FNA in diagnosis of well-differentiated or early stage cancers, the purpose of this study is to assess the added benefit of immunohistochemistry. We studied five proteins overexpressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, namely, prostate stem cell antigen, fascin, 14-3-3 sigma, mesothelin and S100P utilizing immunohistochemistry on paraffin sections from cellblocks obtained by EUS-FNA. Sixty-two cases of EUS-FNA of the pancreas that had follow-up histological and/or clinical diagnosis and sufficient material in cell blocks were included. Using histological diagnosis and/or clinical outcome as the reference standard, EUS-FNA shows the highest sensitivity (95%) and specificity (91%) and is superior to any marker in this study. Among five antibodies, S100P reveals the best diagnostic characters showing 90% of sensitivity and 67% of specificity. Fascin shows high specificity (92%) but low sensitivity (38%). Mesothelin has a moderate sensitivity (74%) and low specificity (33%), PSCA and 14-3-3 show high sensitivity but zero specificity. S100P and mesothelin were useful in nine indeterminate cases. S100P correctly predicted six of seven cancers and one of one without cancer and mesothelin correctly diagnosed five of seven cancers and one of two noncancers in this group. EUS-FNA cytomorphology is superior to any of the immunohistochemical markers used in this study. Use of S100P and mesothelin in cytologically borderline cases can increase the diagnostic accuracy in this group. PMID:21538952

  20. [Analgesic effect of oral tramadol on transrectal ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of the prostate in a randomized double-blind study].

    PubMed

    Nomi, Hayahito; Azuma, Haruhito; Segawa, Naoki; Inamoto, Teruo; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Komura, Kazumasa; Koyama, Kohei; Ubai, Takanobu; Katsuoka, Yoji

    2011-08-01

    A total of 121 Japanese patients scheduled for prostate biopsy were randomly and double-blindly assigned to be given a single oral dose of 100 mg Tramadol mixed with 20 ml of sugar syrup or placebo, 30 minutes before the procedure. Pain severity was measured by verbal rating scale (VRS) and visual analog scales (VAS). We also analyzed cardio-respiratory parameters and complications. Of 121 patients, 117 replied validly to VRS and VAS ; and 91 of 117 patients replied to the cohort questionnaire for analysis of the late disorder, patient's impression, prolonged pain and past history of hemorrhoid treatment. Tramadol showed no significant effect on pain severity indicated by VRS and VAS, and no change in cardiorespiratory parameters. Furthermore, 70 patients without a history of hemorrhoid treatment, showed no significant analgesic benefits of Tramadol during the biopsy. In total, 3 patients had side effects of vomiting (CTCAE : grade 1)6), which subsided spontaneously. The oral administration of a single dose of 100 mg Tramadol 30 minutes before a transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was safe, but was not effective to calm down the pain severity. PMID:21894078

  1. Is Pre-Operative Axillary Staging with Ultrasound and Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Reliable in Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast?

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-06-01

    Axillary ultrasound (US) with US-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-FNA) for suspicious lymph nodes is important for pre-operative staging and planning of surgical management. Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) metastases were previously thought to be difficult to detect, but with a limited amount of evidence. This study investigated the ability of US and US-FNA to detect ILC metastases by assessing 142 patients with ILC. The sensitivity of US in detection of metastasis was 52.3%, and US was able to exclude 96% of N2 and N3 axillary metastases. The false-negative rate of US-FNA in detection of metastasis for suspicious lymph nodes on US was 34.8%, and lymph nodes with longer maximal dimensions were associated with false-negative US-FNA results. Multiplicity of breast lesions and maximal cortical thickness ≥3.1 mm of lymph nodes were independently associated with metastasis. Although pre-operative US in ILC can reliably exclude advanced axillary nodal disease, US-FNA results should be carefully interpreted. PMID:26988417

  2. In-Plane Ultrasound-Guided Lumbar Plexus Block Using Catheter-Over-Needle Technique in a 14-Month-Old Baby.

    PubMed

    Tognù, Andrea; Cauli, Veronica; de Simone, Nicola; Aurini, Lucia; Manfrini, Marco; Bonarelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    This case report details the feasibility of a continuous lumbar plexus block obtained with a paramedian transverse scan of the lumbar paravertebral region, using a catheter-over-needle system, as a main postoperative orthopedic analgesia, in a 14-month-old patient undergoing surgical treatment of a localized Ewing family tumor of the right proximal femur. After surgery, the patient remained in the intensive care unit for 3 days; pain was assessed regularly using the Children's and Infants' Postoperative Pain Scale, and comfort was monitored. Analgesia was provided with continuous levobupivacaine 0.2% infusion 0.2 mL kg h, rectal paracetamol 15 mg kg, and oral ibuprofen 60 mg twice per day, with a dose of morphine 0.05 mg kg intravenously as rescue. Pain relief was excellent, and no additional morphine was needed during the postoperative course. Nausea, vomiting, and disturbed sleep were not reported. Oral diet was resumed on the first postoperative day. In conclusion, this case represents successful postoperative management of orthopedic pain in a child using continuous posterior lumbar plexus infusion. PMID:27281724

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each

  4. Effect of the time of day and queue position in the endoscopic schedule on the performance characteristics of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for diagnosing pancreatic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Korenblit, Jason; Tholey, Danielle M.; Tolin, Joanna; Loren, David; Kowalski, Thomas; Adler, Douglas G.; Davolos, Julie; Siddiqui, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Recent reports have indicated that the time of day may impact the detection rate of abnormal cytology on gynecologic cytology samples. The aim of this study was to determine if procedure time or queue position affected the performance characteristics of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosing solid pancreatic malignancies. Patients and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study evaluating patients with solid pancreatic lesions in whom EUS-FNA was performed. Three timing variables were evaluated as surrogate markers for endoscopist fatigue: Procedure start times, morning versus afternoon procedures, and endoscopy queue position. Statistical analyses were performed to determine whether the timing variables predicted performance characteristics of EUS-FNA. Results: We identified 609 patients (mean age: 65.8 years, 52.1% males) with solid pancreatic lesions who underwent EUS-FNA. The sensitivity of EUS-FNA was 100% for procedures that started at 7 AM while cases that started at 4 PM had a sensitivity of 81%. Using start time on a continuous scale, each elapsed hour was associated with a 1.9% decrease in EUS-FNA sensitivity (P = 0.003). Similarly, a 10% reduction in EUS-FNA sensitivity was detected between morning and afternoon procedures (92% vs. 82% respectively, P = 0.0006). A linear regression comparing the procedure start time and diagnostic accuracy revealed a decrease of approximately 1.7% in procedure accuracy for every hour later a procedure was started. A 16% reduction in EUS-FNA accuracy was detected between morning and afternoon procedures (100% vs. 84% respectively, P = 0.0009). When the queue position was assessed, a 2.4% reduction in accuracy was noted for each increase in the queue position (P = 0.013). Conclusion: Sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA for solid pancreatic lesions decline with progressively later EUS starting times and increasing numbers of procedures before a

  5. Transbronchial needle aspiration: development history, current status and future perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huizhen; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Ko-Pen

    2015-01-01

    Background Transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) technology was underutilized by clinicians because it is “blind”. Recent development of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) renewed the interest and confident of TBNA. TBNA without EBUS is referred as conventional transbronchial needle aspiration (C-TBNA). Methods This paper focuses on C-TBNA technology development history, present situation and future development to do a detailed introduction. Results TBNA is a simple, cost effective and minimally invasive technique for diagnosing disease of the mediastinum and lung in adult as well as children patients. Conclusions More improvements of TBNA technology should be made, including employing technological advances to perfect the instruments and techniques, focusing on patient comfort, optimizing yield, simplifying instruments, maximizing ease of use and minimizing training requirements for the pulmonologist. The ideal TBNA scope deserves further evaluation and study. PMID:26807275

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Hip Procedures.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the techniques for performing ultrasound-guided procedures in the hip region, including intra-articular hip injection, iliopsoas bursa injection, greater trochanter bursa injection, ischial bursa injection, and piriformis muscle injection. The common indications, pitfalls, accuracy, and efficacy of these procedures are also addressed. PMID:27468669

  7. Strategies for prevention of ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy infections

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Diane D; Raman, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male patients and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in males. To confirm the diagnosis of prostate cancer, an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy is necessary to obtain prostate tissue sufficient for histologic analysis by pathologists. Ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy can be accomplished via a transperineal or transrectal approach. The latter biopsy technique involves placing an ultrasound probe into the rectum, visualizing the prostate located just anterior to it, and then obtaining 12–14 biopsies. Each biopsy core requires piercing of the rectal mucosa which can inherently contribute to infection. The increasing infectious risk of prostate needle biopsy requires refinement and re-evaluation of the process in which the technique is performed. Such processes include (but are not limited to) prebiopsy risk stratification, antibiotic prophylaxis, use of rectal preparations, and equipment processing. In the subsequent review, we highlight the current available information on different strategies to reduce the risk of infection following prostate needle biopsy. PMID:27468242

  8. Simulator training for endobronchial ultrasound: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Konge, Lars; Clementsen, Paul Frost; Ringsted, Charlotte; Minddal, Valentina; Larsen, Klaus Richter; Annema, Jouke T

    2015-10-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is very operator dependent and has a long learning curve. Simulation-based training might shorten the learning curve, and an assessment tool with solid validity evidence could ensure basic competency before unsupervised performance.A total of 16 respiratory physicians, without EBUS experience, were randomised to either virtual-reality simulator training or traditional apprenticeship training on patients, and then each physician performed EBUS-TBNA procedures on three patients. Three blinded, independent assessor assessed the video recordings of the procedures using a newly developed EBUS assessment tool (EBUSAT).The internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α=0.95); the generalisability coefficient was good (0.86), and the tool had discriminatory ability (p<0.001). Procedures performed by simulator-trained novices were rated higher than procedures performed by apprenticeship-trained novices: mean±sd are 24.2±7.9 points and 20.2±9.4 points, respectively; p=0.006. A pass/fail standard of 28.9 points was established using the contrasting groups method, resulting in 16 (67%) and 20 (83%) procedures performed by simulator-trained novices and apprenticeship-trained novices failing the test, respectively; p<0.001.The endobronchial ultrasound assessment tool could be used to provide reliable and valid assessment of competence in EBUS-TBNA, and act as an aid in certification. Virtual-reality simulator training was shown to be more effective than traditional apprenticeship training. PMID:26160875

  9. New platform for evaluating ultrasound-guided interventional technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle tracking systems are frequently used in surgical procedures. Various needle tracking technologies have been developed using ultrasound, electromagnetic sensors, and optical sensors. To evaluate these new needle tracking technologies, 3D volume information is often acquired to compute the actual distance from the needle tip to the target object. The image-guidance conditions for comparison are often inconsistent due to the ultrasound beam-thickness. Since 3D volumes are necessary, there is often some time delay between the surgical procedure and the evaluation. These evaluation methods will generally only measure the final needle location because they interrupt the surgical procedure. The main contribution of this work is a new platform for evaluating needle tracking systems in real-time, resolving the problems stated above. We developed new tools to evaluate the precise distance between the needle tip and the target object. A PZT element transmitting unit is designed as needle introducer shape so that it can be inserted in the needle. We have collected time of flight and amplitude information in real-time. We propose two systems to collect ultrasound signals. We demonstrate this platform on an ultrasound DAQ system and a cost-effective FPGA board. The results of a chicken breast experiment show the feasibility of tracking a time series of needle tip distances. We performed validation experiments with a plastisol phantom and have shown that the preliminary data fits a linear regression model with a RMSE of less than 0.6mm. Our platform can be applied to more general needle tracking methods using other forms of guidance.

  10. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anuj; Tarsin, Rajab; Elhabbash, Basma; Zagan, Nuri; Markus, Rabia; Drebeka, Sawsen; Abdelmola, Khaled; Shawish, Taib; Shebani, Abdulhafidh; Abdelmola, Tamer; Elusta, Ahmad; Ehtuish, Ehtuish Faraj

    2011-07-01

    This study was done to assess the safety and efficacy of real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and to determine the optimal period of observation required as well as to ascertain the risk factors for any ensuing complications. Between 1 st February 2006 and 31 st January 2008, a total of 86 PRBs were performed by the radiologist using an automated biopsy gun with 16-gauge needle at the National Organ Transplant Centre, Central Hospital, Tripoli, Libya. Prior to the procedure coagulation profile was done in all the patients. All patients were kept on strict bed rest for 6-hours post-procedure. Of the 86 renal biopsies performed, 78 patients were referred from Rheumatology Department and 8 were post-kidney transplant recipients. There were 23 males with age ranging from 15 to 56 years and 63 females with age ranging from 16 to 66 years. A mean of 17.5 glomeruli were present in each specimen. A glomerular yield of less than five glomeruli was seen in only four biopsies. Class I lupus nephritis (LN) was seen in one patient, class II LN in seven patients, class III LN in 13 patients and class IV LN in 29 patients. All the eight renal allografts were diagnosed as either acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial rejection. The overall complication rate was 5.8% and these complications were observed within 6 hours of biopsy. No late complications were seen. PRB under real-time ultra-sound guidance is a safe and efficacious procedure to establish the histological diagnosis of the renal disease and may be done as an out-patient procedure. A post-biopsy observation time of 6 hours appears to be optimal. PMID:21743221

  11. Ultrasound-guided joint and soft tissue interventions.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta

    2014-06-01

    Minor procedures with an injection needle are frequently performed in orthopedic clinics. They may be of a diagnostic, diagnostic and therapeutic or purely therapeutic nature. Ultrasound guidance while inserting the needle allows for a safe medicine administration and evacuation of fluid contents. It improves the efficacy of such procedures by ensuring accurate needle insertion in the target site. Ultrasound-guided procedures reduce the duration of treatment (e.g. medicines reach the target site directly; all fluid collections are removed, even multilocular ones) and minimize pain (by the selection of optimal access sites omitting tendons, vessels and peripheral nerves). This paper presents the principles of performing ultrasound-guided interventions. A detailed description of such a technique is provided and the most commonly injected medicines as well as their adverse reactions and contraindications are discussed. Attention is also paid to image optimization and the role of procedure site selection with the exclusion of other pathologies in the puncture site (such as tumors, foreign bodies and vascular or nerve pathologies). What is more, the author also discusses the principles of needle length and thickness selection as well as the manners of its insertion in relation to the transducer. Moreover, the principles of aseptics that are mandatory during such interventions are also presented and the way to protect transducers from the effects of chemical disinfectants is discussed. Furthermore, the paper contains numerous photographs of performed interventions. It is addressed to clinical practitioners and its aim is to facilitate and improve the efficacy of the procedures which are commonly performed in orthopedics. Ultrasound guidance of joint and soft tissue interventions should become a gold standard in all orthopedic clinics. PMID:26672495

  12. Endobronchial Ultrasound Bronchoscopy to the Heart of the Matter.

    PubMed

    Palamidas, Anastasios F; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Shah, Pallav L

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound has been one of the success stories of the last decade, and the utility of the procedure continues to expand. Originally, it was developed for the staging and diagnosis of lung cancer, but its use rapidly expanded to other malignancies and even benign disease. We present the case of a patient originally referred with suspected endocarditis who was found to have a mass involving the right ventricle and the pulmonary outflow tract. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided biopsy was used to obtain a tissue diagnosis from the cardiac mass. PMID:27548703

  13. The utility of ROSE (rapid on-site evaluation) in endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA): Is the picture rosy?

    PubMed Central

    Mallya, Varuna; Kumar, Sandeep P; Meganathan, Prabhu; Shivkumar, Swarna; Mehta, Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mediastinal lymphadenopathy (ML) presents a diagnostic challenge. The technique to sample the lymph nodes has evolved from conventional “blind” transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) to the present day endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided procedure that improves the accuracy of sampling. Objective: This study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of “rapid on-site evaluation” (ROSE) in EBUS-guided TBNA (EBUS-TBNA) for the diagnosis of ML. Patients and Methods: This prospective study included 80 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA for computed tomography/positron emission tomography (CT/PET) diagnosed ML over a 4-month period at a single tertiary care center. All 80 of these patients underwent histopathological evaluation (HPE) in addition to cytology. Three out of these 80 (3.7%) patients were excluded in view of inadequate material on EBUS-TBNA. After the sampling of nodes was done, the slides were stained with rapid hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and then on-site evaluation was done. The tissue derived was also processed for HPE in all cases. Results: ROSE revealed granuloma in 27 patients and malignancy in 14 patients, and the remaining patients showed nonspecific inflammation. Concomitant histopathology revealed granuloma in 34 patients and malignancy in 14 patients. Considering HPE as gold standard, the overall sensitivity and specificity of EBUS-TBNA for diagnosis were 85.4% and 89.6%, respectively. For malignancy alone, the sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 98.4%, respectively. Conclusion: This novel approach is safe, has good diagnostic yield, and has an excellent potential in assisting safe and accurate diagnostic interventional bronchoscope. PMID:26811569

  14. Utility of conventional transbronchial needle aspiration with rapid on-site evaluation (c-TBNA-ROSE) at a tertiary care center with endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) facility

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Neha Kawatra; Madan, Karan; Jain, Deepali; Walia, Ritika; Mohan, Anant; Hadda, Vijay; Mathur, Sandeep; Iyer, Venkateswaran K; Khilnani, Gopi C; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conventional transbronchial needle aspiration (c-TBNA) is an underutilized bronchoscopic modality. Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) guided-TBNA though efficacious is an expensive modality, facilities of which are available at only limited centers. c-TBNA is cost-effective and has potential for wide utilization especially in resource-limited settings. Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) improves the yield of c-TBNA. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the bronchoscopy records (May 2012 to July 2014) was performed. The patients who underwent c-TBNA with ROSE were included in the study and their clinical details were extracted. Convex probe EBUS-TBNA was being regularly performed during the study period by the operators performing c-TBNA. Results: c-TBNA with ROSE was performed in 41 patients with mean age of 42.4 (16.2) years. The most frequently sampled node stations (>90% patients) were the subcarinal and lower right paratracheal. Representative samples could be obtained in 33 out of the 41 patients (80.4%). c-TBNA was diagnostic in 32 [tuberculosis (TB)-8, sarcoidosis-9, and malignancy-15] patients out of the 41 patients. The overall diagnostic yield (sensitivity) of c-TBNA with ROSE was 78%. Mean procedure duration was 18.4 (3.1) min and there were no procedural complications. Conclusion: c-TBNA with ROSE is a safe, efficacious, and cost-effective bronchoscopic modality. When it was performed by operators routinely performing EBUS-TBNA, diagnostic yields similar to that of EBUS-TBNA can be obtained. Even at the centers where EBUS facilities are available, c-TBNA should be routinely performed. PMID:27011437

  15. Impact of Endobronchial Ultrasound (EBUS) Training on the Diagnostic Yield of Conventional Transbronchial Needle Aspiration for Lymph Node Stations 4R and 7

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Gupta, Nalini; Bal, Amanjit; Ram, Babu; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Background There is sparse literature on whether training in endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) improves the diagnostic yield of conventional TBNA (cTBNA). Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of cTBNA before and after the introduction of EBUS. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent cTBNA at our center. The study was divided into two periods, before and after the introduction of EBUS at our facility. The diagnostic yield of cTBNA was compared between the study periods. Rapid on-site cytological examination was not available. Results A total of 1,050 patients (61.6% men; mean age 45.6 years) underwent cTBNA during the study period (849 before EBUS; 201 after EBUS). Sarcoidosis (n = 527) followed by bronchogenic carcinoma (n = 222) formed the most common indications for performing cTBNA. There was a significant increase in both the success of obtaining a representative sample (from 71% to 85%), and the diagnostic yield (from 33% to 49.5%) of cTBNA, after the introduction of EBUS. The increase in the diagnostic yield of cTBNA after introduction of EBUS remained significant even after adjusting for years of performing cTBNA and the type of anesthesia (topical vs. sedation and topical) on a multivariate analysis. Conclusion The diagnostic yield of cTBNA at our facility increased after the introduction of EBUS-TBNA. However, given the retrospective nature of the study, prospective studies are required to confirm our findings. PMID:27083009

  16. Endobronchial ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Jenssen, Christian; Herth, Felix J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques have recently become available as advanced diagnostic tools for tissue characterization. Strain elastography is a real-time technique used with transcutaneous ultrasound (US) and endoscopic US. Convincing evidence is available demonstrating a significant value of strain elastography for the discrimination of benign and malignant lymph nodes (LNs). This paper reviews preliminary data demonstrating the feasibility of performing real-time elastography during endobronchial US (EBUS) and a potential application of this technique for selection of LNs for EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in patients with lung cancer and extrathoracic malignancies. PMID:27503154

  17. [A New Teaching Model for Practicing Ultrasound-guided Regional Anesthesia Techniques].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Maiko; Inomata, Shinichi; Fujikura, Ai; Ogawa, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    We developed a simulator using "slime" composed of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and borax to evaluate this new ultrasound-guided nerve block training model. Seventeen subjects used the training model in the present study. They had no previous experience in performing ultrasound-guided nerve block. A plastic case measuring 25 x 18 x 12 cm was filled with 8 cm of slime. Three pieces of gauze were placed between the slime layers at 2 cm intervals. An in-plane approach was used to visualize the needle for the nerve block, and the amount of time required to stop the needle on the second gauze was measured 5 times for each subject. Significant differences were observed between the times for the first experiment and those for the third experiment to the fifth experiment In the fourth and fifth experiments, all subjects visualized the nerve block needle clearly above the target layer and were able to stop the needle at the target layer. The present simulation using our proposed ultrasound-guided nerve block training model was useful in terms of the amount of time required to perform the procedure and as well as in terms of its safety. PMID:26437564

  18. Ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block: safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer

    2014-06-01

    Cervical sympathetic and stellate ganglion blocks (SGB) provide a valuable diagnostic and therapeutic benefit to sympathetically maintained pain syndromes in the head, neck, and upper extremity. With the ongoing efforts to improve the safety of the procedure, the techniques for SGB have evolved over time, from the use of the standard blind technique, to fluoroscopy, and recently to the ultrasound (US)-guided approach. Over the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the ultrasound-guided technique and the many advantages that it might offer. Fluoroscopy is a reliable method for identifying bony surfaces, which facilitates identifying the C6 and C7 transverse processes. However, this is only a surrogate marker for the cervical sympathetic trunk. The ideal placement of the needle tip should be anterolateral to the longus colli muscle, deep to the prevertebral fascia (to avoid spread along the carotid sheath) but superficial to the fascia investing the longus colli muscle (to avoid injecting into the muscle substance). Identifying the correct fascial plane can be achieved with ultrasound guidance, thus facilitating the caudal spread of the injectate to reach the stellate ganglion at C7-T1 level, even if the needle is placed at C6 level. This allows for a more effective and precise sympathetic block with the use of a small injectate volume. Ultrasound-guided SGB may also improve the safety of the procedure by direct visualization of vascular structures (inferior thyroidal, cervical, vertebral, and carotid arteries) and soft tissue structures (thyroid, esophagus, and nerve roots). Accordingly, the risk of vascular and soft tissue injury may be minimized. PMID:24760493

  19. [Ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrostomy].

    PubMed

    Martino, P

    2000-12-01

    Percutaneous nephrostomy is a mini-invasive technique that creates an external outlet from the renal excretory tract through a catheter inserted through the flank. Indications for this procedure are of both diagnostic and therapeutic type. The nephrostomic catheter is generally positioned under ultrasound guidance, which has the advantages of showing the localization of the renal cavities and the depth of the kidney, and can be used during pregnancy and in subjects with allergy to contrast medium or with reduced renal function. When possible, it is best to associate US with fluoroscopic guidance, as this association has been found to guarantee a success rate exceeding 98%. Within the kidney, the zone known as Broedel's avascular plane, where the terminal branches of the posterior and anterior arterial systems meet, is the safest place to pass the nephrostomic catheter through, as there is little vascularization in this zone. Access is generally posterior and at the level of the inferior calyx, by means of Seldinger's, the one step or a mixed access technique involving a catheter sheathing a metal cannula. Seldinger's access technique is most commonly used, entailing explorative puncture of the renal cavity with a 22 G needle. We prefer to puncture the kidney direct, under US guidance and using an 18 G needle: a metal wire is passed through the needle and then after withdrawing the needle, the fascia dilators are inserted, of scaled widths increasing up to 2 G wider than the nephrostomic catheter. Care must be taken not to go beyond the curve of the guide wire to avoid trauma to the renal parenchyma. The most critical moment is when the catheter is inserted along the wire at the point of passage through the peri-renal fat: the catheter tends to deflect the point of the guide wire away from the desired direction as the peri-renal fat offers less resistance. The metal wire may be of variable rigidity and length, hydrophilic. The catheter may also be made of various

  20. Evaluation of the eZono 4000 with eZGuide for ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Jeff; Latmore, Malikah; Levine, Daniel M

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures are increasingly common in a variety of acute care settings, such as the operating room, critical care unit and emergency room. However, accurate judgment of needle tip position using traditional ultrasound technology is frequently difficult, and serious injury can result from inadvertently advancing beyond or through the target. Needle navigation is a recent innovation that allows the clinician to visualize the needle position and trajectory in real time as it approaches the target. A novel ultrasound machine has recently been introduced that is portable and designed for procedural guidance. The eZono 4000™ features an innovative needle navigation technology that is simple to use and permits the use of a wide range of commercially available needles, avoiding the inconvenience and cost of proprietary equipment. This article discusses this new ultrasound machine in the context of other currently available ultrasound machines featuring needle navigation. PMID:25543816

  1. [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation: an alternative option for the treatment of pancreatic insulinoma].

    PubMed

    Bor, Renáta; Farkas, Klaudia; Bálint, Anita; Molnár, Tamás; Nagy, Ferenc; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Sepp, Krisztián; Tiszlavicz, László; Hamar, Sándor; Szepes, Zoltán

    2014-10-12

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate imaging modality for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle injection has already been used for palliative interventions. Surgical resection is currently the standard treatment for pancreatic insulinoma. Medical treatment may be necessary for symptomatic patients with unresectable disease. Case reports have been published about the success of endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcoholic ablation, but it has not been reported previously in Hungarian literature. The authors present the history of an 83-year-old woman who was evaluated because of repeated hypoglycemic coma occurring during the night. Endosonographic image and laboratory findings (elevated serum insulin and chromogranin A) revealed pancreatic insulinoma. Because of severe comorbidities and high risk of surgical resection, the decision was made to ablate the insulinoma by endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcohol injection. A total of 3 mL 95% ethanol was injected into the tumor. Despite the discontinuation of the diazoxide therapy the hypoglycemic episodes disappeared. This case history confirms that endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcoholic ablation is a novel, minimal invasive alternative treatment for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in whom surgery is not feasible. PMID:25282110

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound guided antitumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, M S

    2003-08-01

    This paper will review the possibilities of EUS guided anti-tumor therapy. Ablative energy may be delivered to a tumor under EUS guidance to destruct tumor cells by ultrasound itself, radiofrequency or radiation. Pilot results of endoscopic high intensity focused ultrasound in a human trial have been reported. The feasibility of performing EUS guided radiofrequency ablation has been reported in a swine model. An EUS bases radiation target simulation method has been developed for anal cancer therapy. Targeted delivery of an anti-cancer agent into a tumor under EUS guidance is possible as reported in an early clinical trial of local immunotherapy (Cytoimplant) or modified viruses delivered by EUS guided fine needle injection in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Image guided injection of alcohol is another approach used for local tumor ablation. Application of other ablation therapies such as laser, microwave and cryo is also conceptually feasible. We will have to wait and see where these initial and ongoing attempts for applying EUS against cancer take us. PMID:12929056

  3. Effectiveness and Complications of Ultrasound Guided Fine Needle Aspiration for Primary Liver Cancer in a Chinese Population with Serum α-Fetoprotein Levels ≤200 ng/ml - A Study Based on 4,312 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-yan; Vargulick, Sonya; Shen, Ye-hua; Hua, Yong-qiang; Xie, Jing; Shi, Wei-dong; Gao, Hui-feng; Xu, Li-tao; Feng, Lan-yun; Lin, Jun-hua; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Lu-ming; Ping, Bo; Meng, Zhi-qiang

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be diagnosed by noninvasive approaches with serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels >200 ng/ml and/or a radiological imaging study of tumor mass >2 cm in patients with chronic liver disease. Percutaneous fine needle aspiration (FNA) under ultrasound (US) guidance has a diagnostic specificity of 95% and is superior to radiological imaging studies. Aim The aim of this study is to elucidate the effectiveness and complications of fine needle aspiration in a Chinese population with primary liver cancer and AFP levels ≤200 ng/ml. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted over a period of 28 years. This selection period included patients with a suspected diagnosis of primary liver cancer whose AFP levels were ≤200 ng/ml and who underwent US-FNA. This data was then analyzed with cytomorphological features correlating with medical history, radiological imaging, AFP, and follow-up information. Results Of the 1,929 cases with AFP ≤200 mg/ml, 1,756 underwent FNA. Of these, 1,590 cases were determined malignant and the remaining 166 were determined benign. Further, 1,478 malignant cases were diagnosed by FNA alone, and of these, 1,138 were diagnosed as PLC. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy of the diagnoses were 92.96%, 100%, 100%, 59.71%, and 93.62% respectively. There was no significant difference in the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV between the subgroups with tumor size<2 cm and ≥2 cm. Major complications included implantation metastasis and hemorrhage. Conclusion Patients with PLC, especially those who present with an AFP ≤200 ng/ml, should undergo FNA. If negative results are obtained by FNA, it still could be HCC and repeated FNA procedure may be needed if highly suspicious of HCC on imaging study. The superiority of FNA in overall accuracy may outweigh its potential complications, such like hemorrhage and implantation metastasis

  4. Endobronchial Ultrasound Bronchoscope Damage.

    PubMed

    Patil, Monali; Harris, Kassem; Krishnan, Amita; Alraiyes, Abdul H; Dhillon, Samjot S

    2016-07-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is an effective, safe, and cost-effective diagnostic bronchoscopy technique for the work-up of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Concern has been raised, however, about the high cost of convex-probe EBUS bronchoscope repairs. The damage is usually due to breakage of the insertion tube (the flexible part that is advanced into the airways), moisture invasion and damages to the working channel, image guide bundle, or umbilical cord. Understanding the root cause of EBUS scope damage is important for its prevention. We describe 2 unusual cases of EBUS scope damage. In the first case, the distal black rubber covering of the EBUS scope insertion tube was damaged due to friction with the edge of an endotracheal tube and in the second case, the EBUS scope insertion tube was angulating laterally instead of vertically during the flexion maneuver, probably due to scope manipulation while wedged tightly in a segmental bronchus. PMID:27077640

  5. Ten Years of Linear Endobronchial Ultrasound: Evidence of Efficacy, Safety and Cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Villar, Alberto; Mouronte-Roibás, Cecilia; Botana-Rial, Maribel; Ruano-Raviña, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Real-time endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is one of the major landmarks in the history of bronchoscopy. In the 10 years since it was introduced, a vast body of literature on the procedure and its results support the use of this technique in the study of various mediastinal and pulmonary lesions. This article is a comprehensive, systematic review of all the available scientific evidence on the more general indications for this technique. Results of specific studies on efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness available to date are examined. The analysis shows that EBUS-TBNA is a safe, cost-effective technique with a high grade of evidence that is a valuable tool in the diagnosis and mediastinal staging of patients with suspected or confirmed lung cancer. However, more studies are needed to guide decision-making in the case of a negative result. Evidence on the role of EBUS-TBNA in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and extrathoracic malignancies is also high, but much lower when used in the study of tuberculosis, lymphoma and for the re-staging of lung cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Nevertheless, due to its good safety record and lack of invasiveness compared to surgical techniques, the grade of evidence for recommending EBUS-TBNA as the initial diagnostic test in patients with these diseases is very high in most cases. PMID:26565072

  6. Ultrasound guided robotic biopsy using augmented reality and human-robot cooperative control.

    PubMed

    Freschi, C; Troia, E; Ferrari, V; Megali, G; Pietrabissa, A; Mosca, F

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided biopsy is a proficient mininvasive approach for tumors staging but requires very long training and particular manual and 3D space perception abilities of the physician, for the planning of the needle trajectory and the execution of the procedure. In order to simplify this difficult task, we have developed an integrated system that provides the clinician two types of assistance: an augmented reality visualization allows accurate and easy planning of needle trajectory and target reaching verification; a robot arm with a six-degree-of-freedom force sensor allows the precise positioning of the needle holder and allows the clinician to adjust the planned trajectory (cooperative control) to overcome needle deflection and target motion. Preliminary tests have been executed on an ultrasound phantom showing high precision of the system in static conditions and the utility and usability of the cooperative control in simulated no-rigid conditions. PMID:19963882

  7. Hematoma-Directed Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, LaNette F.; Henry-Tillman, Ronda; Harms, Steve; Hronas, Theodore; Mancino, Anne T.; Westbrook, Kent C.; Korourian, Sohelia; Jones, Mary P.; Klimberg, V. Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    Objective and Summary Background Data The standard technique for removal of nonpalpable breast lesions is needle localization breast biopsy. Because traumatic hematomas can often be seen with ultrasound, the authors hypothesized that iatrogenically induced hematomas could be used to guide the excision of nonpalpable lesions using ultrasound. Methods Twenty patients with nonpalpable breast lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging only were enrolled in this single-institution trial, approved by the institutional review board. A hematoma consisting of 2 to 5 mL of the patient’s own blood was injected into the breast to target the nonpalpable lesion. Intraoperative ultrasound of the hematoma was used to direct the excisional biopsy. Results The average age of women was 53.8 ± 10 years. Ninety-five percent of lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging were localized by hematoma injection. All the hematomas used to recognize targeted lesions were identified at surgery by ultrasound and removed without complication. Eight (40%) of the lesions were malignant, with an average tumor size of 12 ± 6 mm (range 4–25). The remaining 12 lesions (60%) comprised papillomas, sclerosing adenosis, radial scar, fibroadenoma, and areas of atypical ductal hyperplasia. Conclusion The results of this pilot study show the effectiveness of hematoma-directed ultrasound-guided breast biopsy for nonpalpable lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging. This new procedure is potentially more comfortable for the patient because no wire or needle is left in the breast. It is technically faster and easier because ultrasound is used to visualize directly the location of the hematoma at surgery and to confirm lesion removal in the operating room by specimen ultrasound. The hematoma can be placed several days before biopsy, easing scheduling, and without fear of the migration that may occur with needle localization. This method may have ready application to mammographically detected

  8. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Busoni, Valeria; Carrozzo, Maria Valentina; Sandersen, Charlotte; Gabriel, Annick; Bolen, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine. PMID:25187175

  9. Models to teach lung sonopathology and ultrasound-guided thoracentesis.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, Jacek A

    2014-12-01

    Lung sonography allows rapid diagnosis of lung emergencies such as pulmonary edema, hemothorax or pneumothorax. The ability to timely diagnose an intraoperative pneumothorax is an important skill for the anesthesiologist. However, lung ultrasound exams require an interpretation of not only real images but also complex acoustic artifacts such as A-lines and B-lines. Therefore, appropriate training to gain proficiency is important. Simulated environment using ultrasound phantom models allows controlled, supervised learning. We have developed hybrid models that combine dry or wet polyurethane foams, porcine rib cages and human hand simulating a rib cage. These models simulate fairly accurately pulmonary sonopathology and allow supervised teaching of lung sonography with the immediate feedback. In-vitro models can also facilitate learning of procedural skills, improving transducer and needle positioning and movement, rapid recognition of thoracic anatomy and hand - eye coordination skills. We described a new model to teach an ultrasound guided thoracentesis. This model consists of the experimenter's hand placed on top of the water-filled container with a wet foam. Metacarpal bones of the human hand simulate a rib cage and a wet foam simulates a diseased lung immersed in the pleural fluid. Positive fluid flow offers users feedback when a simulated pleural effusion is accurately assessed. PMID:26672739

  10. Can Doppler ultrasound-guided oocyte retrieval improve IVF safety?

    PubMed

    Rísquez, Francisco; Confino, Edmond

    2010-10-01

    Transvaginal ultrasound-guided oocyte retrieval has gained universal acceptance with an excellent safety record overall. However, even with contemporary ultrasound resolution, the aspiration needle can injure adjacent pelvic organs and blood vessels and result in external and internal bleeding. Although the idea that Doppler ultrasound might reduce the risk of blood vessel injury during follicular aspiration seems to be plausable, measurement of peritoneal blood loss and the validity of this opinion has never been appropriately tested. Using a proposed classification method in an IVF programme, it was estimated that a significant peritoneal bleeding occurred in 56/898 (6%) of IVF patients. Although Doppler ultrasound was routinely used in all patients, it did not predict 24/53 (45%) of the patients with moderate peritoneal bleeding. In 8/53 cases (15%) with moderate peritoneal bleeding, vaginal bleeding was also detected and correctly predicted during oocyte aspiration using colour Doppler vaginal vessel imaging. Colour Doppler ultrasound guidance is an easily accessible technology with a theoretical promise to improve IVF safety and, with proper usage, has the potential to reduce haemorrhagic complications. PMID:20800546

  11. Ultrasound-guided central cluster approach for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block: a case series.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Geum; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kim, Hong Soon; Park, Seol Ju; Suh, Young Je; Shin, Hyeon Ju

    2015-12-01

    There are many different approaches to ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block (US-SCBPB), and each has a different success rate and complications. The most commonly performed US-SCBPB is the corner pocket approach in which the needle is advanced very close to the subclavian artery and pleura. Therefore, it may be associated with a risk of subclavian artery puncture or pneumothorax. We advanced the needle into the central part of the neural cluster after penetrating the sheath of the brachial plexus in US-SCBPB. We refer to this new method as the "central cluster approach." In this approach, the needle does not have to advance close to the subclavian artery or pleura. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of the central cluster approach in US-SCBPB. PMID:26634085

  12. Ultrasound-guided central cluster approach for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Geum; Lee, Kyung Cheon; Kim, Hong Soon; Park, Seol Ju; Suh, Young Je

    2015-01-01

    There are many different approaches to ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block (US-SCBPB), and each has a different success rate and complications. The most commonly performed US-SCBPB is the corner pocket approach in which the needle is advanced very close to the subclavian artery and pleura. Therefore, it may be associated with a risk of subclavian artery puncture or pneumothorax. We advanced the needle into the central part of the neural cluster after penetrating the sheath of the brachial plexus in US-SCBPB. We refer to this new method as the "central cluster approach." In this approach, the needle does not have to advance close to the subclavian artery or pleura. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of the central cluster approach in US-SCBPB. PMID:26634085

  13. Ultrasound-Guided Scraping for Chronic Patellar Tendinopathy: A Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mederic M; Rajasekaran, Sathish

    2016-06-01

    Chronic patellar tendinopathy is a common complaint among athletes who repetitively stress the extensor mechanism of the knee. Multiple treatment options have been described, but evidence is lacking, specifically when eccentric loading has failed. Debate continues regarding the patho-etiology of chronic patellar tendon pain. There has been recent interest regarding the neurogenic influences involved in chronic tendinopathy, and interventions targeting neovessels and accompanying neonerves have shown promise. This is the first description of an ultrasound-guided technique in which the neovessels and accompanying neonerves in patellar tendinopathy were targeted using a needle scraping technique of the posterior surface of the patellar tendon. PMID:26548965

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Pain Interventions - A Review of Techniques for Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Soneji, Neilesh

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound has emerged to become a commonly used modality in the performance of chronic pain interventions. It allows direct visualization of tissue structure while allowing real time guidance of needle placement and medication administration. Ultrasound is a relatively affordable imaging tool and does not subject the practitioner or patient to radiation exposure. This review focuses on the anatomy and sonoanatomy of peripheral non-axial structures commonly involved in chronic pain conditions including the stellate ganglion, suprascapular, ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, genitofemoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves. Additionally, the review discusses ultrasound guided intervention techniques applicable to these structures. PMID:23614071

  15. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion-clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder. PMID:26313499

  16. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Newell, Mary S; Mahoney, Mary C

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tissue sampling of the breast has positively altered the management of breast lesions, both benign and malignant, since its inception in the 1980s and subsequent widespread acceptance in the 1990s. Its safety, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness have been validated in several studies. However, percutaneous biopsy serves a patient best when performed by an operator with full awareness of patient׳s salient imaging findings; a knowledge of the benefits, limitations, and technical requirements of breast ultrasound; and a thorough understanding of what constitutes an adequate and concordant pathologic specimen. This article outlines a general approach to ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous breast biopsy and discusses indications, potential complications, and technical aspects of the procedure. PMID:24636328

  17. Focused ultrasound guided relocation of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    Abrol, Nitin; Kekre, Nitin S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Complete removal of all fragments is the goal of any intervention for urinary stones. This is more important in lower pole stones where gravity and spatial orientation of lower pole infundibulum may hinder spontaneous passage of fragments. Various adjuvant therapies (inversion, diuresis, percussion, oral citrate, etc.) are described to enhance stone-free rate but are not widely accepted. Focused ultrasound-guided relocation of fragments is a recently described technique aimed at improving results of intervention for stone disease. Purpose of this review is to discuss development of this technology and its potential clinical applications. Materials and Methods: Pubmed search was made using key words “Focused ultrasound” and “kidney stone”. All English language articles were reviewed by title. Relevant studies describing development and application of focused ultrasound in renal stones were selected for review. Results: Focused ultrasound has proven its efficacy in successfully relocating up to 8 mm stone fragments in vitro and in pigs. Relocation is independent of stone composition. The latest model allows imaging and therapy with a single handheld probe facilitating its use by single operator. The acoustic energy delivered by the new prototype is even less than that used for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Therapeutic exposure has not caused thermal injury in pig kidneys. Conclusion: Focused ultrasound-guided relocation of stones is feasible. Though it is safe in application in pigs, technology is awaiting approval for clinical testing in human beings. This technology has many potential clinical applications in the management of stone disease. PMID:25624572

  18. Effectiveness of single-session ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy in simple breast cysts

    PubMed Central

    Özgen, Ali

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of single-session ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy in simple breast cysts. METHODS From January 2002 to January 2014, 35 simple breast cysts (mean volume, 8.2 mL; range, 4–33 mL) in 28 females (mean age, 39 years) were evaluated. In a single session, all cysts were aspirated using 20G needles, refilled with 99% ethanol (90% of the volume of the aspirated fluid), and reaspirated completely after 10 minutes of exposure under ultrasound guidance. Follow-up ultrasonography examinations were performed at one week, one month, three months, and six months for all patients and 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months for available patients. Follow-up duration varied between 6 and 24 months (mean, 15 months). RESULTS The technical success rate of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy was 97%. The needle tip was dislocated and ethanol was given into the breast parenchyma in one patient (3%). One cyst (3%) was reaspirated at the first week follow-up due to intracystic hemorrhage. Of the 34 cysts treated, 25 (74%) completely responded to therapy and were no longer detectable on follow-up examinations. Eight cysts (24%) significantly decreased in size and then completely disappeared at six months. At the end of the follow-up period, the clinical success rate reached 100%, and none of the cysts were visible. Except mild to moderate sensation of burning or pain which disappeared or subsided significantly in a couple of minutes, no other complications were observed in patients. CONCLUSION Ultrasound-guided ethanol sclerotherapy is a fast, safe, and highly effective method in the treatment of simple breast cysts. PMID:27087190

  19. Intrarectal Lidocaine-Diltiazem-Meperidine Gel for Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Moghaddam, Yasaman; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: TRUS-guided needle biopsy of the prostate gland is the current standard method used for diagnosis of prostate cancer. Pain control during this procedure is through the use of i.v. sedation or local anaesthetic (LA), depending on clinician preference. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intrarectal lidocaine, lidocaine-diltiazem and lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel for anesthetizing transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Patients and Methods: In a randomized double-blind clinical trial, 100 consecutive patients were divided into three groups. The patients received one of the gels before transrectal ultrasound guided prostate needle biopsy: group A, intrarectal and perianal lidocaine, gel 1 g; group B, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + perianal diltiazem, 1 g; group C, intrarectal lidocaine gel, 1 g, + meperidine, 25 mg, and perianal diltiazem, 1 g. Visual analog pain scale was used to estimate pain during probe insertion and biopsy. Heart rate and blood pressure during probe insertion and biopsy were recorded too. Results: The mean of visual analog pain scale was 4.5 in group A, 3.5 in group B, and 2.0 in group C during probe insertion (P value = 0.01). The mean of visual analog pain scale was 5.1 in group A, 3.5 group B, and 2.5 in group C during biopsy (P value = 0.001). The groups were comparable for patients' age, weight, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate size (P > 0.05). No side effects of meperidine and lidocaine including drowsiness, dizziness, tinnitus and light-headedness or requiring assistance for activity were noted. Conclusions: Lidocaine-meperidine-diltiazem gel provides significantly better pain control than lidocaine-diltiazem gel and lidocaine gel alone during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy and probe insertion. This mixture gel is safe, easy to administer and well accepted by patients. PMID:26161317

  20. Endocoil placement after endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage may prevent a bile leak

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Schalk Willem; Omoshoro-Jones, Jones; Sanyika, Charles

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To further reduce the risk of bleeding or bile leakage. METHODS: We performed endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage in 6 patients in whom endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) had failed. Biliary access of a dilated segment 2 or 3 duct was achieved from the stomach using a 19G needle. After radiologically confirming access a guide wire was placed, a transhepatic tract created using a 6 Fr cystotome followed by balloon dilation of the stricture and antegrade metallic stent placement across the malignant obstruction. This was followed by placement of an endocoil in the transhepatic tract. RESULTS: Dilated segmental ducts were observed in all patients with the linear endoscopic ultrasound scope from the proximal stomach. Transgastric biliary access was obtained using a 19G needle in all patients. Biliary drainage was achieved in all patients. Placement of an endocoil was possible in 5/6 patients. All patients responded to biliary drainage and no complications occurred. CONCLUSION: We show that placing endocoils at the time of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary stenting is feasible and may reduce the risk of bleeding or bile leakage. PMID:23678378

  1. Rapid KRAS, EGFR, BRAF and PIK3CA Mutation Analysis of Fine Needle Aspirates from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using Allele-Specific qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Schrumpf, Melanie; Talebian Yazdi, Mehrdad; Ruano, Dina; Forte, Giusi I.; Nederlof, Petra M.; Veselic, Maud; Rabe, Klaus F.; Annema, Jouke T.; Smit, Vincent; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Endobronchial Ultrasound Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and Trans-esophageal Ultrasound Scanning with Fine Needle Aspiration (EUS-FNA) are important, novel techniques for the diagnosis and staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that have been incorporated into lung cancer staging guidelines. To guide and optimize treatment decisions, especially for NSCLC patients in stage III and IV, EGFR and KRAS mutation status is often required. The concordance rate of the mutation analysis between these cytological aspirates and histological samples obtained by surgical staging is unknown. Therefore, we studied the extent to which allele-specific quantitative real-time PCR with hydrolysis probes could be reliably performed on EBUS and EUS fine needle aspirates by comparing the results with histological material from the same patient. We analyzed a series of 43 NSCLC patients for whom cytological and histological material was available. We demonstrated that these standard molecular techniques can be accurately applied on fine needle cytological aspirates from NSCLC patients. Importantly, we show that all mutations detected in the histological material of primary tumor were also identified in the cytological samples. We conclude that molecular profiling can be reliably performed on fine needle cytology aspirates from NSCLC patients. PMID:21408138

  2. Ultrasound-guided Pulsed Radiofrequency of the Third Occipital Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung Don; Kim, Young Hoon; Park, Chong Min; Kwak, Jung Ah

    2013-01-01

    A C2-3 zygapophygeal joint is a major source of cervicogenic headache. Radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy is preformed widely for zygapophygeal joint pain. Conventional RF denervation technique is generally performed under fluoroscopic control. Recently, ultrasound-guided radiofrequency on zygapophygeal joint has emerged as an alternative method. We report our experiences of two successful ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequencies on 39-year-old and 42-year-old males, who complained occipital headache and posterior neck pain. PMID:23614084

  3. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy: A Libyan experience

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, A.; Tarsin, R.; ElHabbash, B.; Zagan, N.; Markus, R.; Drebeka, S.; AbdElmola, K.; Shawish, T.; Shebani, A.; AbdElmola, T.; ElUsta, A.; Ehtuish, E. F.

    2010-01-01

    This study was done to assess the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB), to ascertain the risk factors for complications and determine the optimal period of observation. The radiologist (A.M.) at the National Organ Transplant Centre, Central Hospital, Tripoli, Libya, performed 86 PRBs between February 1, 2006, and January 31, 2008, using an automated biopsy gun with 16-gauge needle. Coagulation profile was done in all the patients. All patients were kept on strict bed rest for six hours post-procedure. Eighty six renal biopsies were performed on 78 patients referred from rheumatology department and eight post-kidney transplant recipients; 23 were males with age range 15 – 56 years and 63 females with age range 16 – 66 years. A mean of 17.5 glomeruli were present in each specimen. A glomerular yield of less than five glomeruli was seen in four biopsies. Class I lupus nephritis (LN) was seen in 1 patient, class II lupus nephritis in 7 patients, class III LN in 13 patients and class IV LN in 29 patients. All the eight renal allografts were diagnosed as acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial rejection. The risk of post-biopsy bleeding was higher in women, older patients and higher PTT. The overall complication rate was 5.8%. Three complications were observed within six hours of biopsy. No late complication was seen. PRB under real-time ultrasound-guidance is a safe and efficacious procedure to establish the histological diagnosis and should be done as out-patient procedure. Observation time of six hours post-biopsy is optimal. PMID:20835320

  4. Unintentional epidural placement of a thoracic paravertebral catheter inserted using an ultrasound-guided technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Shimizu, Hiroki; Furutani, Kenta; Baba, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    This is the first case report describing the epidural misplacement of an infusion catheter, which was intended to be located in the thoracic paravertebral space using an ultrasound-guided technique. The patient was a 57-year-old female undergoing a laparoscopy-assisted left partial nephrectomy. Before surgery, a Tuohy needle was inserted into the paravertebral space at the left ninth intercostal space using an in-plane transverse ultrasound-guided approach in the lateral-to-medial direction. A catheter was then threaded into the paravertebral space through the needle. Subsequently, the catheter position was secured, although ultrasound-guided confirmation of air injected through the catheter into the paravertebral space was not obtained. Twenty milliliters of 0.5 % levobupivacaine was administered through the catheter at both the initiation and conclusion of surgery. A neurologic examination following surgery revealed paraplegia, along with sensory deficits in the bilateral T3-S5 dermatome. The motor dysfunction in the lower extremities lasted 7 h, and the sensory block lasted 13.5 h. Postoperative radiologic confirmation of the catheter position concomitant with the spread of radiopaque dye revealed that the tip of the catheter was lying in the epidural space. Unless precise attention is paid to detection of the catheter tip location, a thoracic paravertebral catheter can enter into the epidural space even under ultrasound guidance. PMID:27040105

  5. Advanced Ultrasound-Guided Interventions for Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Peck, Evan; Jelsing, Elena; Onishi, Kentaro

    2016-08-01

    Tendinopathy is increasingly recognized as an important cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. Tendinopathy is thought to be principally a degenerative process, rather than inflammatory as was traditionally believed. Consequently, traditional tendinopathy treatments focused solely on decreasing inflammation have often been ineffective or even harmful. The advancement of ultrasonography as for guidance of outpatient musculoskeletal procedures has facilitated the development of novel percutaneous procedures for the treatment of tendinopathy, mostly by using mechanical intervention to stimulate regeneration. Several of these techniques, including percutaneous needle tenotomy, percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy, high-volume injection, and percutaneous needle scraping, are reviewed in this article. PMID:27468675

  6. The technique of ultrasound guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Romics, Imre

    2004-11-01

    This article discusses the preparations for ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, the conditions used and the process of performing a biopsy. The first step in preparing the patient is a cleansing enema before biopsy. Every author proposes the use of a preoperative antibiotic based prophylaxis. Differences may be found in the type, dosage and the duration of this preoperative application, which can last from 2 h to 2 days. For anaesthesia, lidocaine has been proposed, which may be used as a gel applied in the rectum or in the form of a prostate infiltrate. Quite a few colleagues administer a brief intravenous narcosis. A major debate goes on in respect of defining the number of biopsy samples needed. Hodge proposed sextant biopsy in 1989, for which we had false negative findings in 20% of all cases. Because of this, it has recently been suggested that eight or rather ten samples be taken. There are some who question even this. Twelve biopsy samples do offer an advantage compared to six, although in the case of eight this is not the case. We shall present an in depth discussion of the various opinions on the different numbers of biopsies samples required. For the sample site, the apex, the base and the middle part are proposed, and (completing the process) two additional samples can also be taken from the transition zone (TZ), since 20% of all prostate cancers originate from TZ. In case of a palpable nodule or any lesion made visible by TRUS, an additional, targeted, biopsy has to be performed. Certain new techniques like the 3-D Doppler, contrast, intermittent and others shall also be presented. The control of the full length of samples taken by a gun, as well as the proper conservation of the samples, are parts of pathological processing and of the technical tasks. A repeated biopsy is necessary in the case of PIN atypia, beyond which the author also discusses other indications for a repeated biopsy. We may expect the occurrence of direct postoperative complications

  7. Ultrasound-guided dorsal penile nerve block for ED paraphimosis reduction.

    PubMed

    Flores, Stefan; Herring, Andrew A

    2015-06-01

    Adequate anesthesia for emergency department management of painful penile conditions such as paraphimosis or priapism is often both technically challenging and inconsistent using traditional landmark-based techniques of the dorsal penile block (DPB). The pudendal nerves branch to form the paired dorsal nerves of the penis providing sensory innervation to the skin of both the dorsal and ventral aspects of the penis. "Blind" DPB techniques tend to rely on subtle tactile feedback from the needle and visual landmark approximation to identify the appropriate subpubic fascial compartment for injection. The landmark-based DPB is not standardized with options including “10 o'clock and 2 o'clock” infrapubic injections with or without ventral infiltration or a ring block. Given the lack of standardization and inherent technical imprecision with the landmark-based DPB, large volumes of local anesthetic (up to 50 mL) are sometimes required to achieve a clinically adequate block. In addition, inadvertent injection into the corpora cavernosa may occur. More recently, an ultrasound-guided approach has been developed. Using ultrasound, the dorsal penile nerves can be precisely targeted in the fascial compartment just deep to Buck fascia, potentially increasing block success rate and reducing the need for large local anesthetic volumes. Herein, we report the first adult case of an ultrasound-guided dorsal penile nerve block performed in the emergency department for the reduction of a paraphimosis and review the relevant penile anatomy and technical details of the procedure. PMID:25605058

  8. Feasibility of eye-tracking technology to quantify expertise in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, T Kyle; Kim, T Edward; Kou, Alex; Shum, Cynthia; Mariano, Edward R; Howard, Steven K

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) requires an advanced procedural skill set that incorporates both sonographic knowledge of relevant anatomy as well as technical proficiency in needle manipulation in order to achieve a successful outcome. Understanding how to differentiate a novice from an expert in UGRA using a quantifiable tool may be useful for comparing educational interventions that could improve the rate at which one develops expertise. Exploring the gaze pattern of individuals performing a task has been used to evaluate expertise in many different disciplines, including medicine. However, the use of eye-tracking technology has not been previously applied to UGRA. The purpose of this preliminary study is to establish the feasibility of applying such technology as a measurement tool for comparing procedural expertise in UGRA. eye-tracking data were collected from one expert and one novice utilizing Tobii Glasses 2 while performing a simulated ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block in a gel phantom model. Area of interest fixations were recorded and heat maps of gaze fixations were created. Results suggest a potential application of eye-tracking technology in the assessment of UGRA learning and performance. PMID:26980475

  9. Musculoskeletal Sonopathology and Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Alan J. R.; Sites, Brian D.; Sites, Vincent R.; Naraghi, Ali M.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Singh, Mandeep; Antonakakis, John G.

    2010-01-01

    The use of real-time ultrasound guidance has revolutionized the practice of regional anesthesia. Ultrasound is rapidly becoming the technique of choice for nerve blockade due to increased success rates, faster onset, and potentially improved safety. In the course of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, unexpected pathology may be encountered. Such anomalous or pathological findings may alter the choice of nerve block and occasionally affect surgical management. This case series presents a variety of musculoskeletal conditions that may be encountered during ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia practice. PMID:22294960

  10. Endobronchial Tuberculosis Mimicking Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Argun Baris, Serap; Onyilmaz, Tuğba; Basyigit, Ilknur; Boyaci, Hasim

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) is defined as tuberculosis infection of the tracheobronchial tree with microbial and histopathological evidence. The clinical symptoms of the diseases are nonspecific. Chronic cough is the major symptom of the disease. The diagnosis is often delayed due to its nonspecific presentation and misdiagnosed as bronchial asthma. This case is presented to recall the notion that the endobronchial tuberculosis can mimic asthma and the importance of bronchoscopic evaluation in a patient with chronic cough and treatment resistant asthma. PMID:26798513

  11. ULTRASOUND-GUIDED INJECTIONS IN HORSES WITH CRANIOVENTRAL DISTENSION OF THE COXOFEMORAL JOINT CAPSULE: FEASIBILITY FOR A CRANIOVENTRAL APPROACH.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Mary Beth; Vaughan, Betsy; Katzman, Scott; Hersman, Jake

    2016-03-01

    Intrasynovial access to the equine coxofemoral joint (CFJ) is inherently challenging. Blind injection techniques rely upon inconsistently palpable landmarks, and ultrasound guidance requires expertise for needle placement into the coxofemoral articulation. Aspiration is recommended to confirm intrasynovial placement and avoid sciatic nerve anesthesia. The aim of this observational, descriptive, retrospective study was to evaluate the feasibility for an alternative ultrasound-guided approach in horses with cranioventral distention of the CFJ identified during pelvic ultrasound. Thirteen horses with cranioventral CFJ distention, including 12 with severe pathology, were recruited from 2009 to 2014. Seven were excluded as they were not injected or underwent ultrasound-guided injection using a dorsal approach. The remaining six horses underwent a total of nine injections into the cranioventral recess. With the exception of one foal, all were aged horses (15-29 years) of varying breeds and uses, with prominent lameness due to subluxation (three), luxation (two), and severe osteoarthritis (one). The cranioventral recess was imaged adjacent to the proximal femur using a low-frequency curvilinear transducer placed ventral to the cranial joint margins. Using aseptic technique, spinal needles were placed cranial to the transducer and advanced caudomedially into the distended cranioventral recess. Synovial fluid was retrieved in all cases with one needle placement. Findings indicated that, when distended, ultrasound-guided access to the cranioventral CFJ recess is a feasible alternative approach and may reduce the potential for extra-synovial placement. Distention in this sample of horses was accompanied by severe pathology, also supporting the use of this approach for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26748616

  12. A novel technique of ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block in calves.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jiro; Yamagishi, Norio; Sasaki, Kouya; Kim, Danil; Devkota, Bhuminand; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2012-12-01

    An interventional ultrasound technique to increase the safety of surgical treatment of the calf forelimb was tested. First, the brachial plexus was evaluated using ultrasonography and then 2% lidocaine was injected under ultrasound guidance. Ultrasonically, the brachial plexus appeared as multiple hypoechoic areas surrounded by a hyperechoic rim or a hyperechoic structure characterised by multiple discontinuous lines. It was located between the omotransverse muscle and axillary artery and vein. The sensitive effect in the forelimb was seen mainly in the area supplied by the musculocutaneous nerve, indicating successful blockage in the nerve plexus. Out of the eight forelimbs, the motor effect was observed in seven forelimbs. These results suggest the clinical feasibility of ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block in bovine medicine, although further studies are needed to examine various approaches, including the sites of needle insertion and the appropriate volume and dosage of anaesthetic. PMID:22682007

  13. Ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand: how to do.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo; Silvestri, Enzo; Serafini, Giovanni; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Mauri, Giovanni; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound has emerged as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to detect joint abnormalities and to guide percutaneous procedures. Being superficial, wrist and hand tendons and joints represent a good target to perform such procedures using ultrasound guidance. This kind of approach allows for a clear and real-time visualization of the needles during their whole path. In this setting, the knowledge of technical aspects and tips is essential to act in the most accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. The aim of this review is to summarize the local treatments of inflammatory and degenerative disease described in literature (such as treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, trigger finger, trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis, etc.), emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand. PMID:24813531

  14. Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicating Liver Cirrhosis: Utility of Repeat Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy after Unsuccessful First Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Caturelli, Eugenio; Biasini, Elisabetta; Bartolucci, Francesca; Facciorusso, Domenico; Decembrino, Francesco; Attino, Vito; Bisceglia, Michele

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a second ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules thought to be hepatocellular carcinoma when the original biopsy has failed to provide a reliable diagnosis. Methods: Thirty-seven cirrhotic patients underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules that were subsequently diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma. Each biopsy involved a single puncture with a 20 G cutting needle, which yielded pathologic material used both for cytologic and histologic studies. In 23 cases (mean diameter of nodules 48 mm) the biopsy furnished exclusively necrotic material (non-diagnostic subgroup); in the other 14 cases (mean diameter 26 mm) the biopsy yielded no neoplastic elements (false-negative subgroup). All 37 nodules were subjected to repeat biopsies performed in the same manner. Results: The repeat biopsies provided a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in six of the 23 patients from the non-diagnostic subgroup and in seven of the 14 in the false-negative subgroup. Overall, repeat biopsy produced a diagnostic gain of 35.1%. Conclusion: The chance of success with repeat biopsy of hepatocellular carcinoma is limited and may depend to some extent on the characteristics of the lesions (i.e., areas of necrosis in large nodules, well-differentiated cellular populations in small ones)

  15. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser-induced prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, Richard K.; Roth, Robert A.

    1991-07-01

    A transurethral ultrasound-guided Nd:YAG laser delivery system has been developed for use as an alternative approach to the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The TULIP system has been extensively tested in canine models and is currently undergoing FDA trials in humans.

  16. Ultrasound-guided interventional radiology in critical care.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Savvas; Talsky, Aaron; Khashoggi, Khalid; Venu, Vicnays

    2007-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided intervention is becoming an increasingly popular and valuable tool in the critical care setting. In general, image-guided procedures can expedite wait times and increase the accuracy, safety, and efficacy of many procedures commonly performed within intensive care units. In the intensive care unit setting, ultrasound has particular advantages over other imaging modalities such as computed tomography and fluoroscopy, including real-time visualization, portability permitting bedside procedures, and reduced exposure to nephrotoxic contrast agents. We review the technical and procedural aspects of a number of ultrasound-guided interventions appropriate for critical care patients. These include central venous catheter deployment, thoracentesis, paracentesis, and drainage of a wide variety of abscesses, and percutaneous nephrostomy, percutaneous cholecystectomy, and inferior vena cava filter placement. Although we believe ultrasound is significantly underutilized in critical care today, we anticipate that with the improvement of ultrasound technology and the innovation of new ultrasound-guided procedures, the role of ultrasound in the intensive care unit will continue to expand, with bedside ultrasound-guided interventions increasingly becoming the norm. PMID:17446778

  17. Virtual reality, ultrasound-guided liver biopsy simulator: development and performance discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S J; Hunt, C M; Woolnough, H M; Crawshaw, M; Kilkenny, C; Gould, D A; England, A; Sinha, A; Villard, P F

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this article was to identify and prospectively investigate simulated ultrasound-guided targeted liver biopsy performance metrics as differentiators between levels of expertise in interventional radiology. Methods Task analysis produced detailed procedural step documentation allowing identification of critical procedure steps and performance metrics for use in a virtual reality ultrasound-guided targeted liver biopsy procedure. Consultant (n=14; male=11, female=3) and trainee (n=26; male=19, female=7) scores on the performance metrics were compared. Ethical approval was granted by the Liverpool Research Ethics Committee (UK). Independent t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) investigated differences between groups. Results Independent t-tests revealed significant differences between trainees and consultants on three performance metrics: targeting, p=0.018, t=−2.487 (−2.040 to −0.207); probe usage time, p = 0.040, t=2.132 (11.064 to 427.983); mean needle length in beam, p=0.029, t=−2.272 (−0.028 to −0.002). ANOVA reported significant differences across years of experience (0–1, 1–2, 3+ years) on seven performance metrics: no-go area touched, p=0.012; targeting, p=0.025; length of session, p=0.024; probe usage time, p=0.025; total needle distance moved, p=0.038; number of skin contacts, p<0.001; total time in no-go area, p=0.008. More experienced participants consistently received better performance scores on all 19 performance metrics. Conclusion It is possible to measure and monitor performance using simulation, with performance metrics providing feedback on skill level and differentiating levels of expertise. However, a transfer of training study is required. PMID:21304005

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Nerve Procedures.

    PubMed

    Strakowski, Jeffrey A

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound guidance allows real-time visualization of the needle in peripheral nerve procedures, improving accuracy and safety. Sonographic visualization of the peripheral nerve and surrounding anatomy can provide valuable information for diagnostic purposes and procedure enhancement. Common procedures discussed are the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular notch, deep branch of the radial nerve at the supinator, median nerve at the pronator teres and carpal tunnel, lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, superficial fibular nerve at the leg, tibial nerve at the ankle, and interdigital neuroma. For each procedure, the indications, relevant anatomy, preprocedural scanning technique, and injection procedure itself are detailed. PMID:27468673

  19. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  20. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral regional anesthesia : placement and dosage of local anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Gorsewski, G; Dinse-Lambracht, A; Tugtekin, I; Gauss, A

    2012-08-01

    Ever since the use of ultrasound guidance in regional anesthesia became more and more popular in recent years, it seemed obvious that so-called intraneural puncture and injection of local anesthetics was much more common than previously assumed. However, neurologic damage was not seen very often. The ultrasound-guided imaging of the nerves showed that intraneural injection has to be seen as an overall term. This term must be characterized in more detail in accordance with nerve anatomy and morphology. Various studies demonstrated that if intraneural puncture occured the needle usually took a path away from the fascicles (intraneural perifascicular), while intraneural transfascicular puncture seemed relatively rare and intraneural intrafascicular placement of the needle even more uncommon. As long as the needle is placed intraneurally but in an extrafascicular fashion a safe injection and the absence of neurologic damage can be assumed. However, if nerve fascicles are affected neurologic dysfunction can occur. In studies investigating the minimal effective local anesthetic volume needed for successful nerve block, a relevant reduction of injected volume was still achieved by intentionally applying the local anesthetic circumferentially around the outermost nerve layer rather than injecting it into neural structures. As an intraneural -intrafascicular injection carries the risk of nerve injury associated with a decrease in quality of life, the potential of ultrasound guidance in regional anesthesia should be considered. Circumferential administration of local anesthetic rather than creating a single point injection appears to be advantageous. PMID:22790475

  1. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3D Ultrasound-guided Biopsy System

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions. PMID:24392206

  2. Ultrasound guided chronic pain interventions (Part II).

    PubMed

    Akkaya, Taylan; Alptekin, Alp; Özkan, Derya

    2016-04-01

    Henceforth, ultrasonography (US) is an indispensible imaging technique in regional anesthesia practice. With the guidance of US, various invasive interventions in chronic pain pathologies of the musculoskeletal system, peripheral and neuroaxial pathologies has become possible. The management includes diagnostic blocks as weel as radiofrequency ablation and institution of neurolythic agents. During these algologic interventions we are able to see the target tissue, the dispersion of the drug and all nearby vascular structures. Besides these the US also protects the team from ionic radiation that one encounters when using flouroscopy of computed tomography. Latest publication in this field show that applicability of US in chronic pain syndromes is rapidly expanding with a good future. The additional equipment (echogenic needles, 3-D US etc.) will also expands its applications in algology practice. This review highlights different applications of US in chronic pain conditions. PMID:27225734

  3. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injection technique for the iliopsoas muscle.

    PubMed

    Westhoff, Bettina; Seller, Konrad; Wild, Alexander; Jaeger, Marcus; Krauspe, Ruediger

    2003-12-01

    Intramuscular botulinum toxin A injections are beneficial for the treatment of functional shortening of the iliopsoas muscle, but it is difficult to achieve precise needle positioning and injection. As a solution to this we present an ultrasound-guided injection technique for the iliopsoas muscle using an anterior approach from the groin. The procedure was performed 26 times in 13 patients (seven males, six females; mean age 11 years, SD 9 years 8 months; age range 4 to 31 years), 10 times bilaterally. Indications were functional iliopsoas shortening due to cerebral palsy (17 hips), hereditary spastic paraplegia (four hips), and Perthes disease (five hips). In all cases the iliopsoas muscle was identified easily by ultrasound; the placement of the injection needle and injection into the site of interest were observed during real time. No complications were encountered. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injections have become established as a standard procedure for the treatment of functional shortening of different muscles in persons with spasticity or dystonia (Kessler et al. 1999, Bakheit et al. 2001, Kirschner et al. 2001). Optimal needle placement is essential to avoid severe side effects and to assess lack of response to the drug or incorrect region of injection. While injection into superficial, very palpable muscles is quite easy, the approach to other muscles such as the iliopsoas muscle may be more difficult and the placement of the needle for an optimal injection site is harder to control. As a solution to this, we present an ultrasound-guided injection technique. The main indications for BTX-A injections in the iliopsoas muscle are dynamic hip flexion deformities mostly due to spastic conditions which may compromise walking (increased anterior pelvic tilt during the whole gait cycle, decreased hip extension at terminal stance, increased peak hip flexion during swing; Molenaers et al. 1999. Another indication might be decentration of the femoral head (as part of

  4. Longstanding Endobronchial Foreign Body

    PubMed Central

    Trisolini, R.; Dore, R.; Bertolini, R.; Pasturenzi, L.; Catania, A. Fede; Gualtieri, G.; Torre, M.

    1999-01-01

    There are many circumstances in which the diagnosis of endobronchial inhalation of a foreign body (FB) can be missed. Generally, in such cases, within weeks or at most months from the event, clinical bronchopulmonary symptoms develop which allow a correct diagnosis to be made and significant complications to be avoided. We report the case of a patient in whom an endobronchial FB remained undiagnosed, because of lack of symptoms, for almost three years, and then caused signifiicant complications before being identified and removed. Problems related to diagnosis and therapy are discussed. PMID:18493510

  5. [Ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation: procedure description and literature review].

    PubMed

    Carmona Monge, F J; Martínez Lareo, M; Núñez Reiz, A

    2011-01-01

    Arterial catheterization is the second most common invasive procedure performed in critical care units. These devices are essential in certain types of patients (the hemodinamically unstable or those who require regular evaluation of the gasometric values). Complications related to arterial cannulation are relatively scarce. However, there are no reliable indicators to predict the occurrence of radial artery occlusions or ischemic lesions in the hand after a radial cannulation procedure has been performed. Ultrasound-guided catheter insertion has been used for years to guide central venous cannulation in critical care, but its use has been more limited for arterial catheterization. This paper aims to describe the technique of ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization and reviews the most important research papers that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of this procedure in the adult population. PMID:21256787

  6. Analgesic Efficacy of Ultrasound Guided FICB in Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hooda, Sarla; Kiran, Shashi; Devi, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hip fractures are often encountered in the elderly and present special problems to the anaesthesiologist. Fascia iliaca compartment block is another technique with the intent to block all the three nerves like 3-in-1 nerve block. Aim To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound guided fascia iliaca compartment block to facilitate positioning of patients with hip fracture for spinal anaesthesia. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted in 50 patients aged between 40-80 years, belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I-III undergoing surgery for hip fracture. All 50 patients received an ultrasound guided Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block (FICB) in the premedication room with 30 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine by 23G spinal needle. Sensory blockade was evaluated 5, 10 and 20 minutes after ropivacaine administration using loss of perception to cold in the lateral, anterior and medial part of the thigh. Visual analogue scale scores were noted before the block, 20 minutes after block and during positioning for spinal anaesthesia. Patient’s acceptance for FICB was evaluated 24 hour after arriving back to the orthopaedics ward using a two-point score. Any episode of hypotension or bradycardia was noted and managed accordingly. Results In lateral part of thigh, at 5 minutes sensory blockade was present in 33 patients (66%) and at 10 minutes sensory blockade was present in 45 cases (90%). In anterior part of thigh, sensory blockade was present in 34 cases (68%) at 5 minutes time interval and at 10 minutes sensory blockade was present in 48 cases (96%). In medial part of thigh, 28 cases (56%) had sensory blockade at 5 minutes and at 10 minutes in 43 cases (86%). Sensory blockage was same at 20 minutes as on 10 minutes interval in all thigh parts. Before FIC block average VAS was 7.5 which was decreased to average of 2.94 at 20 minutes after block which was statistically significant (p<0.01). During positioning for

  7. Ultrasound guided percutaneous treatment for splenic abscesses: The significance in treatment of critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Zerem, Enver; Bergsland, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the results of ultrasound guided percu-taneous needle aspiration (PNA) and percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in the treatment of splenic abscess. METHODS: Thirty-six patients (14 females and 22 males, with an average age of 54.1 ± 14.1 years) with splenic abscess were treated with ultrasound guided PNA and/or PCD. Patients with splenic abscess < 50 mm in diameter were initially treated by PNA and those with abscess ≥ 50 mm and bilocular abscesses were initially treated by an 8-French catheter drainage. The clinical characteristics, underlying diseases, organism spectra, therapeutic methods, and mortality rates were analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients had unilocular and 9 bilocular abscess. PNA was performed in 19 patients (52.8%), and 8 of them (42.1%) required PCD because of recurrence of abscess. In 17 patients (47.2%), PCD was performed initially. PCD was performed twice in six patients and three times in two. PNA was definitive treatment for 10 and PCD for 21 patients. One patient with PCD was referred for splenectomy, with successful outcome. In all 4 deceased patients, malignancy was the underlying condition. Twenty-one patients (58.3%) underwent 33 surgical interventions on abdomen before treatment. Cultures were positive in 30 patients (83.3%). Gram-negative bacillus predominated (46.7%). There were no complications related to the procedure. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous treatmnet of splenic abscess is an effective alternative to surgery, allowing preservation of the spleen. This treatment is especially indicative for the patients in critical condition postoperatively. We recommend PNA as primary treatment for splenic abscesses < 50 mm, and PCD for those ≥ 50 mm in diameter and for bilocular abscesses. PMID:17143953

  8. Evaluation of new approach to ultrasound guided stellate ganglion block

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Anju; Kaushik, Teshi; Kundu, Zile Singh; Wadhera, Sarthak; Wadhera, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound imaging is an ideal tool for stellate ganglion block (SGB) due to clarity, portability, lack of radiation, and low cost. Ultrasound guided anterior approach requires the application of pressure to the anterior neck and is associated with more risk of injury to inferior thyroid artery, vertebral artery, and esophagus. The lateral approach does not interfere with nerve or vascular structures. Blockade at the C6 vertebral level results in more successful sympathetic blockade of the head and neck with less sympathetic blockade of the upper extremity compared to sympathetic blockade at C7 vertebral level, which produces successful sympathetic blockade of upper extremity. This is helpful in patients of complex regional pain syndrome of the upper limb. Hence, we conducted a study using the lateral approach at C7 level. Materials and Methods: Ultrasound guided SGBs using lateral in-plane technique at C7 level were given in 20 patients suffering from chronic pain patients of upper extremity, head, and neck using 4 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine and 1 ml of 40 mg triamcinolone. The patients were assessed for a numeric pain intensity score (NPIS), the rise in axillary temperature, the range of motion of joints of upper extremity, and resolution of edema at various time intervals up to 3 months. Results: NPIS showed a statistically significant decrease from baseline at 30 min, which was sustained till 3rd month. The rise in axillary temperature after the block was statistically significant, which was sustained till 2nd week. The edema score decreased significantly at all-time intervals (P ≤ 0.001). The restriction of motion in all joints of upper limb decreased from 13 to 3 patients. Conclusion: There is a significant variation in the anatomy of stellate ganglion at the level of C6 and C7. Ultrasound guided lateral approach increases the efficacy of SGB by deposition of drug subfascially with real-time imaging. PMID:27051366

  9. Feasibility of percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Seoyeoun; Jung, Sunyoung; Kim, Boeun; Jung, Joohyun; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Mincheol

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating hepatocellular disease versus biliary obstruction can be challenging in dogs presented for icterus. The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the feasibility of percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography in dogs. Ten normal dogs weighing 7.6-13.0 kg (median 9.8 kg) were recruited. All dogs were considered normal based on complete blood count, serum chemistry profile, ultrasound examination, and percutaneous radiographic cholecystography. Percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography was performed using 0.5 ml of commercially available contrast agent and two conventional ultrasound machines for simultaneous scanning at two different locations. Two observers independently evaluated the time to initial detection of contrast in the proximal duodenum and duration of contrast enhancement via visual monitoring. Dynamic contrast enhancement was calculated using time-intensity curves. Mean (± SD) and median (range) of time to initial detection were 8.60 s (± 3.35) and 8.0 s (2.0-11.0), respectively, and mean and median duration were 50.45 s (± 23.24) and 53.0 s (20.0 - 70.0), respectively. Mean, median, and range of peak intensity were 114.1 mean pixel value (MPV) (SD ± 30.7), 109.2 MPV, and 79.7-166.7, respectively, and mean, median, and range of time to peak intensity were 26.1 s (SD ± 7.1 s), 24.0 s, and 19.0-41.0 s, respectively. Findings indicated that percutaneous contrast ultrasound-guided cholecystography is a feasible technique for detecting and quantifying patency of the bile duct in normal dogs. Future studies are needed to assess the diagnostic utility of this technique for dogs with biliary obstruction. PMID:25403172

  10. Effectiveness of Blind & Ultrasound Guided Corticosteroid Injection in Impingement Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat, Shila; Taheri, Parisa; Banimehdi, Mohsen; Taghavi, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Local steroid injections are common for treatment of impingement syndrome. Corticosteroid injections methods are basically in two formats, blind or with image guidance. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of ultrasound-guided in comparison with blind corticosteroid injections in patients with impingement syndrome. This study is a randomized clinical trial study undertaken in patients with diagnosis of impingement syndrome done in Isfahan University of Medical Science clinics from February 2014 to February 2015. The number of all patients registered in the study is 48; and then 40 patients were allocated to either control group randomly which received blind steroid injection or case group that underwent ultrasound-guided steroid injection. The clinical symptoms were assessed using Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) questionnaire, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and shoulder range of motion (ROM) using goniometer at baseline and six weeks after the injection. Data analysis revealed a significant difference in the mean of the VAS, SPADI and shoulder ROM in both groups 6 weeks after intervention (P < 0.05). Patients with ultrasound guided corticosteroid injection had statistically significant improvements in function and shoulder ROM (abduction, flexion) compared to blind injection group after 6 weeks (P<0.05). There was not significant differences in pain (VAS) and internal and external rotation between these two groups (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that US image guided can improve the shoulder function of patients with impingement syndrome, and thus can be considered in comprehensive care programs of these patients for fast speed of rehabilitation.

  11. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy for acute neonatal biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Helin, Radley; Bhat, Rama; Rao, Bhaskara

    2007-01-01

    Use of a percutaneously-inserted cholecystostomy drainage tube is an effective therapeutic option for acute hyperbilirubinemia in severely-ill adult patients, but to our knowledge has not been previously reported in infants. We describe an infant who developed acute extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction with marked conjugated (direct) hyperbilirubinemia, and who was determined to be an unsuitable surgical candidate. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy was performed and resulted in prompt, significant, and sustained decline in serum bilirubin levels. Potential risks and benefits, as well as suggested indications for the procedure are discussed. PMID:17568158

  12. Ultrasound-guided removal of foreign bodies: personal experience.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Leonardo; Leonardi, Anna; Bini, Amedeo; Sabato, Chiara; Nicotera, Paolo; Spano', Emanuela; Mariani, Davide; Genovese, Eugenio A; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2009-05-01

    Foreign bodies (FBs) retained in the soft tissues are a common reason for medical consultation, and usually consist of wooden or metal splinters or glass shards. Failure to remove foreign bodies is likely to give rise to acute or late complications, such as allergies, inflammation or infection, that may be severe. The surgical removal of an FB is invasive, costly and technically challenging. The procedure may fail in some cases and carries the risk of complications. Our study describes a technique for the ultrasound-guided removal of an FB, devised from our experience, and demonstrates its advantages over the standard surgical procedure. Sixty-two patients (43 males and 19 females aged from 9 to 65 years, median age 31 years) presented at our institution between October 2005 and June 2008 with suspected foreign bodies retained in the soft tissues of various body districts. Radiographic and/or ultrasound diagnosis was established by a radiologist expert in musculoskeletal sonography. The same radiologist helped by a nurse subsequently undertook the ultrasound-guided removal in the outpatient's clinic according to the technique described in the paper. ATL 5000 and PHILIPS iu22 ultrasound systems were used with high-frequency linear-array probes, sterile material, local anaesthetic (lidocaine 2%), scapels and surgical forceps. Antibiotic prophylaxis with amoxicillin and clavulanic acid were prescribed to all patients for 7 days after the procedure. Ninety-five FBs (39 glass, 35 metal, 17 vegetable, 2 plastic, 2 stone) were successfully removed under ultrasound guidance in all patients and the procedure took between 15 and 30 min. No complications arose either during or after the procedure. Seventy-five skin incisions were made and the wounds closed with Steri-Strips in 73/75 cases, whereas skin sutures were used in 2/75 cases. No complications arose either during or after the procedure. Ultrasound-guided removal of an FB retained in the soft tissues is a good

  13. Infection after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ju

    2015-05-01

    Infectious complications after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-Bx) appear to be increasing, which reflects the high prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of Enterobacteriaceae. Identifying patients at high risk for antibiotic resistance with history taking is an important initial step. Targeted prophylaxis with a prebiopsy rectal swab culture or augmented antibiotic prophylaxis can be considered for patients at high risk of antibiotic resistance. If infectious complications are suspected, the presence of urosepsis should be evaluated and adequate antibiotic treatment should be started immediately. PMID:25964834

  14. Peripheral arterial pseudoaneurysm treated by ultrasound-guided compression.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y C; Wan, Y L

    1997-10-01

    Ultrasound-guided compression repair of a pseudoaneurysm is a simple, safe and effective therapy, and has been proposed as a first-line treatment for pseudoaneurysms caused by catheterization. Herein, we report a case of a pseudoaneurysm arising from a sport injury which was treated by this method. Obliteration of the track of the pseudoaneurysm induced manual thrombosis and successfully converted the pseudoaneurysm to haematoma. Understanding the mechanism and the procedure is the basis of success in the use of this treatment. PMID:9497979

  15. [Benign endobronchial tumors].

    PubMed

    Nikhtianov, Kh

    1980-01-01

    Endobronchial localizations of benign neoplasms are met with in 24.5 per cent of the cases. Right lung localizations are more frequent. More than half of them are broadly based (57.5 per cent). In most of the cases it is a matter of nonepithelial tumours of which a greater intensity is displayed by hamartomas /7/, vascular /4/ and neurogenic /3/ neoformations. The size of endobronchial tumours varies from 1 to 10 cm. Cases measuring 1-3 cm are the most numerous. Those of the "iceberg" type appear to be larger. The size per se has a relative importance for the clinical picture. Endobronchial tumours exhibit a clear cut clinical picture, and run a clinical course in three stages, determined by the degree of bronchial obturation and longstanding of the condition. The most common symptoms are coughing /80.7 per cent/, expectoration /50.0 per cent/, rales /57.6 per cent/, dullness /38.4 per cent/ and lacking respiration /38.4 per cent/. The nosological entity by itself is less conclusive for the clinical course. The X-ray data have orientation and by no means decisive significance for the diagnosis. The "crab pincers" sign in the bronchial lumen during bronchography has a definite importance. Bronchoscopy in conjunction with biopsy is a dependable method of preoperative diagnosing. It contributes greatly to the nosological diagnosis. Even nowadays, the diagnosis of endobronchial tumours is difficult. A rather exact diagnosis can be made intraoperatively, whereas the most accurate diagnosis is established only after histological study. The treatment of endobronchial benign neoplasms is operative. The number of medium /lobectomies/ and extensive /pulmonectomies/ pulmonary resections is considerable. In case of early diagnosis and intervention, sparing resection is the naturally indicated size of operation - mainly resection and plasty of the bronchi without lobectomy. The advantages of circular resection are substantial. Reconstructive operations of "clarinet" and

  16. Interventional ultrasound: a critical overview on ultrasound-guided injections and biopsies.

    PubMed

    Epis, Oscar; Bruschi, Eleonora

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades ultrasound-guided procedures have become increasingly diffused in rheumatology, mainly thanks to the technical advances achieved in the ultrasound (US) field, combined with the greater availability, good portability and reduced cost of US devices, compared to other imaging techniques already used in rheumatology units. The direct visualisation of the tissue under analysis and the real-time imaging performance enabled by US-guidance account for an improved accuracy and directness in needle placement in a number of rheumatology interventions such as tendon and intra-articular injections. Compared with blind procedures, US-guided injections are more accurate and safe and they result in better clinical outcome in terms of joints improvement in function and decreased risk of damages caused by needle misplacement. The accuracy in needle placement of US-guided injections has proven to be important not only in common intra-articular injections, but especially in case of complex anatomical areas like the hip, facet and atlanto-occipital joints, where blinded injections are deemed poorly accurate and thus highly risky. Moreover US guidance can be successfully employed in more complex procedures such as synovial biopsy, portal establishment or arthroscopy, where US can also be combined with other imaging techniques. Overall the employment of US-guided procedures is considered to be safe and well-tolerated, and increases the accuracy and therapeutic effectiveness of the interventions performed. This may pave the way for a more widespread employment of US-guidance in rheumatology units, and new studies could further explore the therapeutic advantages of these procedures. PMID:24529311

  17. Ultrasonographic anatomy of the sacrococcygeal region and ultrasound-guided epidural injection at the sacrococcygeal space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gregori, T; Viscasillas, J; Benigni, L

    2014-07-19

    Sacrococcygeal epidural anaesthesia allows selective desensitisation of the sacral plexus. Ultrasound is used for guidance in human anaesthesia to facilitate sacrococcygeal epidural injections. The aims of this study were to describe the sonographic appearance of the sacrococcygeal region in dogs and a technique for performing epidural injection at this location under ultrasound guidance. In the preliminary part of the study four cadavers were used to describe the sonoanatomy of the sacrococcygeal space and to develop the ultrasound-guided puncture technique. In the second phase of the study this technique was repeated in four dogs under general anaesthesia. In all dogs the sacrococcygeal space appeared as a circular hypoechoic region, located caudal to the sacral caudal articular processes, delimited by bony hyperechoic structures such as body and arch of the first caudal vertebra. Ultrasound guidance allowed the operator to visualise and position the spinal needle into the sacrococcygeal epidural space. No complications were reported during this procedure. Preliminary results indicate that ultrasound-guided sacrococcygeal epidural anaesthesia may be considered as an alternative to a blind approach technique. PMID:24821855

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors: How We Do It Safely and Completely.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Heo, Suk Hee; Hong, Jun Hyung; Lim, Hyo Soon; Seon, Hyun Ju; Hur, Young Hoe; Park, Chang Hwan; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become one of the most promising local cancer therapies for both resectable and nonresectable hepatic tumors. Although RF ablation is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of liver tumors, the outcome of treatment can be closely related to the location and shape of the tumors. There may be difficulties with RF ablation of tumors that are adjacent to large vessels or extrahepatic heat-vulnerable organs and tumors in the caudate lobe, possibly resulting in major complications or treatment failure. Thus, a number of strategies have been developed to overcome these challenges, which include artificial ascites, needle track ablation, fusion imaging guidance, parallel targeting, bypass targeting, etc. Operators need to use the right strategy in the right situation to avoid the possibility of complications and incomplete thermal tissue destruction; with the right strategy, RF ablation can be performed successfully, even for hepatic tumors in high-risk locations. This article offers technical strategies that can be used to effectively perform RF ablation as well as to minimize possible complications related to the procedure with representative cases and schematic illustrations. PMID:26576111

  19. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided TOPAZ Radiofrequency Coblation: A Novel Coaxial Technique for the Treatment of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis-Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit; Best, Alistair J; Rennie, Winston J

    2016-06-01

    Various therapeutic options are available for treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Studies using TOPAZ coblation (ArthroCare, Sunnyvale, CA) have had good early results. The current coblation technique involves a surgical incision or breach of the highly specialized plantar fat pad, which can be associated with risks. We describe a novel technique of ultrasound-guided percutaneous coblation with a lateral heel approach. Advantages include precise targeting of the plantar fascia by direct dynamic visualization of the coblation tip, a true percutaneous approach with a needle skin puncture (<5 mm), and preservation of the plantar fat pad by using a lateral heel approach. PMID:27162283

  20. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  1. Sonoanatomical Change of Phrenic Nerve According to Posture During Ultrasound-Guided Stellate Ganglion Block

    PubMed Central

    Joeng, Eui Soo; Jeong, Young Cheol; Park, Bum Jun; Kang, Seok; Yang, Seung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the risk of phrenic nerve injury during ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block (US-SGB) according to sonoanatomy of the phrenic nerve, and determine a safer posture for needle insertion by assessing its relationship with surrounding structure according to positional change. Methods Twenty-nine healthy volunteers were recruited and underwent ultrasound in two postures, i.e., supine position with the neck extension and head rotation, and lateral decubitus position. The transducer was placed at the anterior tubercle of the C6 level to identify phrenic nerve. The cross-sectional area (CSA), depth from skin, distance between phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle of C6 transverse process, and the angle formed by anterior tubercle, posterior tubercle and phrenic nerve were measured. Results The phrenic nerve was clearly identified in the intermuscular fascia layer between the anterior scalene and sternocleidomastoid muscles. The distance between the phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle was 10.33±3.20 mm with the supine position and 9.20±3.31 mm with the lateral decubitus position, respectively. The mean CSA and skin depth of phrenic nerve were not statistically different between the two positions. The angle with the supine position was 48.37°±27.43°, and 58.89°±30.02° with the lateral decubitus position. The difference of angle between the two positions was statistically significant. Conclusion Ultrasound is a useful tool for assessing the phrenic nerve and its anatomical relation with other cervical structures. In addition, lateral decubitus position seems to be safer by providing wider angle for needle insertion than the supine position in US-SGB. PMID:27152274

  2. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser prostatectomy: initial Luebeck experince

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Stephen; Spitzenpfeil, Elisabeth; Knipper, Ansgar; Jocham, Dieter

    1994-02-01

    Transurethral ultrasound guided laser prostatectomy is one of the most promising alternative invasive treatment modalities for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The principle feature is an on- line 3-D controlling of Nd:YAG laser denaturation of the periurethral tissue. Necrotic tissue is not removed, but sloughs away with the urinary stream within weeks. The bleeding hazard during and after the operation is minimal. By leaving the bladder neck untouched, sexual function is not endangered. Thirty-one patients with symptomatic BPH were treated with the TULIP system and followed up for at least 12 weeks. Suprapubic bladder drainage had to be maintained for a mean time of 37 days. Conventional TURP was performed in four patients due to chronic infection, recurrent bleeding, and poor results. Our initial experience with the TULIP system shows it to be very efficient and safe. A longer follow up of a larger patient population is necessary to compare the therapeutic efficiency to conventional transurethral resection.

  3. An ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography system: design and specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Torosean, Sason; Davis, Scott C.; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    An ultrasound-guided fluorescence molecular tomography system is under development for in vivo quantification of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Aminolevulinic Acid - Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT) of Basal Cell Carcinoma. The system is designed to combine fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with co-registered ultrasound images to quantify local fluorophore concentration. A single white light source is used to provide an estimate of the bulk optical properties of tissue. Optical data is obtained by sequential illumination of a 633nm laser source at 4 linear locations with parallel detection at 5 locations interspersed between the sources. Tissue regions from segmented ultrasound images, optical boundary data, white light-informed optical properties and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorophore concentration in these regions. Our system and methods allow interrogation of both superficial and deep tissue locations up to PpIX concentrations of 0.025ug/ml.

  4. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization in prone position

    PubMed Central

    Sofi, Khalid; Arab, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is a commonly performed intraoperative procedure. Traditionally, CVC placement is performed blindly using anatomic landmarks as a guide to vessel position. Real-time ultrasound provides the operator the benefit of visualizing the target vein and the surrounding anatomic structures prior to and during the catheter insertion, thereby minimizing complications and increasing speed of placement. A 22-year-old male underwent open reduction and internal fixation of acetabulum fracture in prone position. Excessive continuous bleeding intraoperatively warranted placement of CVC in right internal jugular vein (IJV), which was not possible in prone position without the help of ultrasound. Best view of right IJV was obtained and CVC was placed using real-time ultrasound without complications. Ultrasound-guided CVC placement can be done in atypical patient positions where traditional anatomic landmark technique has no role. Use of ultrasound not only increases the speed of placement but also reduces complications known with the traditional blind technique. PMID:20668564

  5. Laparoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Milic, Andrea; Asch, Murray R. Hawrylyshyn, Peter A.; Allen, Lisa M.; Colgan, Terence J.; Kachura, John R.; Hayeems, Eran B.

    2006-08-15

    Four patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids measuring less than 6 cm underwent laparoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using multiprobe-array electrodes. Follow-up of the treated fibroids was performed with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and patients' symptoms were assessed by telephone interviews. The procedure was initially technically successful in 3 of the 4 patients and MRI studies at 1 month demonstrated complete fibroid ablation. Symptom improvement, including a decrease in menstrual bleeding and pain, was achieved in 2 patients at 3 months. At 7 months, 1 of these 2 patients experienced symptom worsening which correlated with recurrent fibroid on MRI. The third, initially technically successfully treated patient did not experience any symptom relief after the procedure and was ultimately diagnosed with adenomyosis. Our preliminary results suggest that RFA is a technically feasible treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroids in appropriately selected patients.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Management of Splenic Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Python, Johanne L; Wakefield, Brian W; Kondo, Kimi L; Bang, Tami J; Stamm, Elizabeth R; Hurt, K Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Splenic ectopic pregnancies are a rare cause of abdominal pain in reproductive-age women. A 21-year-old woman with worsening abdominal pain and a positive pregnancy test presented with hemoperitoneum and no intrauterine pregnancy on transvaginal ultrasound. After 2 nondiagnostic laparoscopies, a splenic pregnancy was diagnosed by computed tomography scan and abdominal ultrasound. Currently, diagnosis and treatment of splenic pregnancies involve exploratory surgery and splenectomy. We report the successful treatment of this splenic ectopic pregnancy with combined intramuscular plus ultrasound-guided percutaneous methotrexate injection, with preservation of the patient's spleen. Abdominal implantation must be considered in patients with pregnancy of unknown location, and in carefully selected patients splenic ectopic pregnancy can be successfully managed by minimally invasive methods. PMID:27221066

  7. Accuracy of Core Needle Biopsy Versus Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology for Diagnosing Salivary Gland Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Song, In Hye; Song, Joon Seon; Sung, Chang Ohk; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Baek, Jung Hwan; Cho, Kyung-Ja

    2015-01-01

    Background: Core needle biopsy is a relatively new technique used to diagnose salivary gland lesions, and its role in comparison with fine needle aspiration cytology needs to be refined. Methods: We compared the results of 228 ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy and 371 fine needle aspiration procedures performed on major salivary gland tumors with their postoperative histological diagnoses. Results: Core needle biopsy resulted in significantly higher sensitivity and more accurate tumor subtyping, especially for malignant tumors, than fine needle aspiration. No patient developed major complications after core needle biopsy. Conclusions: We recommend ultrasoundguided core needle biopsy as the primary diagnostic tool for the preoperative evaluation of patients with salivary gland lesions, especially when malignancy is suspected. PMID:26148740

  8. Endobronchial metastases of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosado Dawid, Natalia-Zuberoa; Villegas Fernández, Francisco Ramón; Rodríguez Cruz, María Del Mar; Ramos Meca, Asunción

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal metastases affecting trachea or bronchi are highly unusual. Up to 26% of endotracheal/endobronchial metastases are due to colorectal cancer. Treatment and palliative management rely on a multidisciplinary team to improve their quality of life. PMID:26856850

  9. Is Long Axis View Superior to Short Axis View in Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheterization?

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jody A.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Erickson, Catherine L.; Liao, Michael M.; Theoret, Jonathan; Sanz, Geoffrey E.; Kendall, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether using long axis (LA) or short axis (SA) view during ultrasound-guided internal jugular (IJ) and subclavian (SC) central venous catheterization (CVC) results in fewer skin breaks, decreased time to cannulation, and fewer posterior wall penetrations (PWP). Design Prospective, randomized crossover study. Setting Urban emergency department with approximate annual census of 60,000. Subjects Emergency medicine resident physicians at the Denver Health Residency in Emergency Medicine, a PGY 1-4 training program. Interventions Resident physicians blinded to the study hypothesis used ultrasound guidance to cannulate the IJ and SC of a human torso mannequin using the LA and SA views at each site. Measurements An ultrasound fellow recorded skin breaks, redirections, and time to cannulation. An experienced ultrasound fellow or attending used a convex 8–4 MHz transducer during cannulation to monitor the needle path and determine PWP. Generalized linear mixed models with a random subject effect were used to compare time to cannulation, number of skin breaks and redirections, and PWP of the LA and SA at each cannulation site. Results 28 resident physicians participated: 8 PGY-1, 8 PGY-2, 5 PGY-3, and 7 PGY-4. The median [interquartile range (IQR)] number of total IJ central venous catheters placed was 27 (IQR 9-42) and SC was 6 (IQR 2-20) catheters. The median number of previous ultrasound-guided IJ catheters was 25 (IQR 9-40), and ultrasound-guided SC catheters was 3 (IQR 0-5). The LA view was associated with a significant decrease in the number of redirections at the IJ and SC sites, relative risk (RR) 0.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.2-0.9), and RR 0.5 (95% CI 0.3-0.7), respectively. There was no significant difference in the number of skin breaks between the LA and SA at the SC and IJ sites. The LA view for SC was associated with decreased time to cannulation; there was no significant difference in time between the SA and LA views at the IJ

  10. [The efficacy of ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block with hockey stick typed probe].

    PubMed

    Iwase, Naoto; Fukui, Hidekimi; Yuunaiyama, Youko; Kaneko, Kouki; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block with a hockey stick typed probe in plane approach. Individual difference of infraorbital anatomy makes it difficult to puncture the infraorbital for a man, and the risks include bleeding, double vision and paranasal sinus puncture. The advantage of ultrasound-guided nerve block has been reported. Compared with conventional land mark method approach, ultrasound technique is thought to be easy to perform, more quickly and safely without any complications. From our results, we have demonstrated that ultrasound-guided infraorbital nerve block assisted by hockey stick typed probe could become one of the safe methods for this purpose. PMID:24228458

  11. Biological characteristics of HCC by ultrasound-guided aspiration biopsy and its clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Wu; Lin, Xue-Ying; He, Yi-Mi; Gao, Shang-Da; Lin, Xiao-Dong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To probe the pathological biological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by the ultrasound-guided aspiration biopsy and assess the clinical application value of this method. METHODS: The biopsy and DNA analysis by flow cytometry (FCM) were taken in 46 cases with HCC nodules, including 26 cases and 20 cases with nodules ≤ 3 cm and > 3 cm in diameters respectively, and 12 cases with intrahepatic benign hyperplastic nodules. They were taken in 22 cases of 46 cases with HCC before and after the therapy. Fine-needles and automatic histological incised biopsy needles were used. The fresh biopsy tissue was produced into the single cell suspension, which was sent for DNA detection and ratio analysis of cell period. The ratio of each DNA period of cell proliferation of each group was calculated and compared with each other. The DNA aneuploid (AN) and apoptosis cell peak were observed and their percentages were calculated. RESULTS: The ratios of S and G2/M periods of DNA, which reflect cell hyperproliferation, in the group with HCC tumors > 3 cm in diameter were markedly higher than those of the group with HCC nodules ≤ 3 cm in diameter and the group with the benign hyperplastic nodules (P < 0.01 except A:B of S period, P < 0.05). The ratios of the middle group were also apparently higher than those of the latter group (P < 0.01). The ratio of DNA AN of 46 cases with HCC nodules was 34.8% (16/46). None of the cases with the intrahepatic hyperplastic nodules appeared AN. The DNA AN appeared more apparently with the growth of the tumors. The AN ratio of the group with tumors > 3 cm in diameter was 55% (11/20), markedly higher than that of the group with tumors ≤ 3 cm in diameter which was 19.2% (5/26) (P < 0.01). The FCM DNA analysis of 22 specimens of hepatic carcinoma tissue before therapy showed that the aneuploid peaks appeared in 5 cases (22.7%). The ratio of G1 period rose after therapy while the S period and G2/M ratios fell (P < 0.01). The

  12. The emerging role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided core biopsy for the evaluation of solid pancreatic masses.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, M; Koduru, P; Lanke, G; Bruno, M; Maitra, A; Giovannini, M

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal cancer with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection is the only curative treatment but only 20% are eligible for resection at the time of diagnosis. Early detection of cancer is of paramount importance in the management. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred modality for obtaining tissue diagnosis of pancreatic masses. However, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA may be limited by several factors like availability of onsite cytopathology, adequacy of tissue core for histology, location of the mass, presence of underlying chronic pancreatitis, and experience of the endoscopist. Modern oncology is focusing on personalizing treatment based on tissue analysis of genetic aberrations and molecular biomarkers which are now available. Core tissue also aids in the diagnosis of disease entities like lymphoma, metastatic tumors, neuroendocrine tumors and autoimmune pancreatitis whose diagnosis rely on preserved tissue architecture and immunohistochemistry. Making accurate diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses is critical to avoid unnecessary resections in patients with benign lesions like focal lesions of chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis which mimic cancer. To overcome the limitations of FNA and to obtain adequate core tissue, a Tru-Cut biopsy needle was developed which met with variable success due to stiffness, cumbersome operation and technical failure using it in the duodenum/pancreatic head. More recently fine needle biopsy needles, with reverse bevel technology have become available in different sizes (19, 22, 25-gauge). The aim of this article was to review the emerging role of core biopsy needles in acquiring tissue in solid pancreatic masses and discuss its potential role in personalized medicine. PMID:25675155

  13. Endoscopic and endosonography guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Antillon, M R; Chang, K J

    2000-10-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration is emerging as the preferred technique for the cytologic diagnosis of various gastrointestinal lesions. This technique may not be routinely available, but there is still a role for endoscopic or endoscopic ultrasound-assisted fine-needle aspiration. This article provides an overview of the evolution of these various techniques and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of each. PMID:11036536

  14. Diagnosis of Columnar Cell Lesions and Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia by Ultrasound-Guided Core Biopsy: Findings Associated with Underestimation of Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hye Shin; Jang, Mijung; Kim, Sun Mi; Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eun Young; Park, So Yeon

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study described here was to determine underestimation rates and identify radiologic predictors of underestimation for columnar cell lesions (CCLs) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) detected by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy. A total of 103 CCLs and ADH lesions in 100 patients diagnosed by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy were evaluated. Breast sonographic and mammographic findings were reviewed, and underestimation rates were determined by surgical excision, percutaneous vacuum-assisted excision or 2-y imaging follow-up. All underestimated lesions were ductal carcinoma in situ, and the underestimation rates of flat epithelial atypia (FEA), FEA + ADH and ADH were 5.9% (1/17), 44.4% (4/9) and 27.3% (12/44), respectively. There was no underestimation of CCLs without atypia. The presence of calcifications on ultrasound was significantly associated with underestimation (p = 0.010). Therefore, except for CCLs without atypia, all other lesions may require excision, especially when calcification is present on ultrasound or when FEA + ADH is found. PMID:27067419

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Carlo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Maimone, Antonella; Polifemo, Anna Maria; Tarantino, Ilaria; Cennamo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) develop secondary to either fluid leakage or liquefaction of pancreatic necrosis following acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, surgery or abdominal trauma. Pancreatic fluid collections include acute fluid collections, acute and chronic pancreatic pseudocysts, pancreatic abscesses and pancreatic necrosis. Before the introduction of linear endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the 1990s and the subsequent development of endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage (EUS-GD) procedures, the available options for drainage in symptomatic PFCs included surgical drainage, percutaneous drainage using radiological guidance and conventional endoscopic transmural drainage. In recent years, it has gradually been recognized that, due to its lower morbidity rate compared to the surgical and percutaneous approaches, endoscopic treatment may be the preferred first-line approach for managing symptomatic PFCs. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage has the following advantages, when compared to other alternatives such as surgical, percutaneous and non-EUS-guided endoscopic drainage. EUS-GD is less invasive than surgery and therefore does not require general anesthesia. The morbidity rate is lower, recovery is faster and the costs are lower. EUS-GD can avoid local complications related to percutaneous drainage. Because the endoscope is placed adjacent to the fluid collection, it can have direct access to the fluid cavity, unlike percutaneous drainage which traverses the abdominal wall. Complications such as bleeding, inadvertent puncture of adjacent viscera, secondary infection and prolonged periods of drainage with resultant pancreatico-cutaneous fistulae may be avoided. The only difference between EUS and non-EUS drainage is the initial step, namely, gaining access to the pancreatic fluid collection. All the subsequent steps are similar, i.e., insertion of guide-wires with fluoroscopic guidance, balloon dilatation of the cystogastrostomy and insertion of

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy using a 6-F cystotome and 12-cm covered metal stent

    PubMed Central

    Mandai, Koichiro; Uno, Koji; Okada, Yusuke; Suzuki, Azumi; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: An iincreasing number of reports describe endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy for malignant biliary obstruction in patients with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failure. However, this procedure has not yet been standardized; as a result, the rate of adverse events, including bile leakage and stent migration, is relatively high. Here, we report our experience with four cases of endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy performed according to our institutional procedure. PMID:27004245

  17. Transvaginal Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy of Deep Pelvic Masses: How We Do It.

    PubMed

    Plett, Sara K; Poder, Liina; Brooks, Rebecca A; Morgan, Tara A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the rationale and indications for transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy can be a helpful tool for diagnosis and treatment planning in the evaluation of pelvic masses, particularly when the anatomy precludes a transabdominal or posterior transgluteal percutaneous biopsy approach. A step-by-step summary of the technique with preprocedure and postprocedure considerations is included. PMID:27091918

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Bilateral Greater Occipital Nerve Block for Mass Excision

    PubMed Central

    Binici, Orhan; Kuyrukluyıldız, Ufuk; Şahin, Murat; Alagöl, Ayşin; Yılmaz, İsmayil

    2015-01-01

    Anaesthesiologists must always prefer the safest method to minimize the risk for patients. At present, ultrasound-guided blockage of the greater occipital nerve can be performed in a safe manner. In this report, we presented our experience of ultrasound-guided blockage of the greater occipital nerve that we performed in a patient with a mass at the back of the neck who had risk of general anaesthesia because of comorbidities. PMID:27366544

  19. Ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block, a comparison with the conventional technique: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Khedkar, Sunita Milind; Bhalerao, Pradnya Milind; Yemul-Golhar, Shweta Rahul; Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Background: The conventional technique of ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block may be associated with drug toxicity, block failure and needs large drug volume. The ultrasound-guided (USG) nerve block enables accurate needle positioning that may reduce the chances of drug toxicity, drug dose and block failure. Aim: In this study, we compared the onset and duration of the motor and sensory nerve block, the drug volume required and time to rescue analgesic between USG and conventional technique. Settings and Design: Sixty male patients aged between 18 and 60 years, belonging to American society of Anesthesiology I-II, scheduled for inguinal hernia repair were enrolled in this prospective study and were randomly allocated into two groups of thirty each by computerized method. Materials and Methods: Group A patients received hernia block by conventional method using 0.75% ropivacaine 15 ml, and Group B patients were given the block guided by ultrasound using 0.75% ropivacaine, till the nerves were surrounded on all sides by the drug. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using two independent sample t-tests for demographic and hemodynamic parameters. Nonparametric test (Mann-Whitney U-test) was used to find the significance between visual analog scale. Results: There was significantly early onset of sensory block in Group B 14.03 ± 2.82 min as compared to Group A 15.57 ± 1.52 min (P = 0.047). The onset of motor block was also earlier in Group B 19.40 ± 2.85 min as compared to Group A 20.67 ± 1.90 min. The time to rescue analgesia was more in Group B 7.22 ± 0.97 h as compared to Group A 6.80 ± 0.70 h (P = 0.062). The volume of drug required was less with ultrasound guided block. Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided hernia block thus has the advantage of early onset, less dose requirement and increase in time to rescue analgesia. PMID:26240549

  20. Endobronchial ultrasound EBUS--a new method for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marioara; Baldea, Luminiţa; Pop, Bogdan; Crişan, Doiniţa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method, endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS), which appeared recently among the tools of the pulmonologist for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. Endobronchial ultrasound transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) provides the opportunity for obtaining tissue samples required for the histologic and cytologic diagnosis of lung cancer. The advantages of EBUS have to be made popular as it is a minimally invasive method, safe, simple, fast, also with a superior cost/benefit ratio compared to any previously used methods. PMID:26506670

  1. Clonidine as an adjuvant for ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper extremity surgeries under tourniquet: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kumkum; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Gupta, Prashant K; Pandey, Mahesh Narayan; Singhal, Apoorva B; Shubham, Garg

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Clonidine has been used as an adjuvant to local anesthetic to extend the duration of block. The present study was aimed to compare the onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade of 0.75% ropivacaine alone or in combination with clonidine during ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper extremity surgeries under tourniquet. Materials and Methods: Sixty four adult American Society of Anesthesiologist grade 1 and 2 patients, scheduled for upper extremity surgeries were randomized to receive either 19.8 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine with 0.2 mL of normal saline (Group R) or 0.2 mL (30 μg) of clonidine (Group RC) in supraclavicular block. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade was compared. The hemodynamic variability, sedation, respiratory adequacy and any other adverse effects were also recorded. Result: Ultrasound helped to visualize the nerves, needle and spread of local anesthetic at the brachial plexus block site. There was no statistically significant difference in the onset of sensory and motor blockade between the groups. Surgical anesthesia was achieved at the mean time of 20 min in all patients. Prolonged post-operative analgesia (mean duration 956 min) was observed in RC group as compared with R group (736 min). No complication of technique or adverse effect of ropivacaine and clonidine was reported. Conclusion: Clonidine as an adjuvant to ropivacaine for ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus enhanced duration of post-operative analgesia. There was no incidence of vessel puncture or pneumothorax. PMID:25425780

  2. A randomised controlled trial comparing meat-based with human cadaveric models for teaching ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chuan, A; Lim, Y C; Aneja, H; Duce, N A; Appleyard, R; Forrest, K; Royse, C F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this prospective, blinded, randomised controlled study was to compare novices' acquisition of the technical skills of ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia using either a meat phantom model or fresh-frozen human cadavers. The primary outcome was the time taken to successfully perform an ultrasound-guided sciatic nerve block on a cadaver; secondary outcomes were the cumulative score of errors, and best image quality of the sciatic nerve achieved. After training, the median (IQR [range]) time taken to perform the block was 311(164-390 [68-600]) s in the meat model trained group and 210 (174-354 [85-600]) s in the fresh-frozen cadaver trained group (p = 0.24). Participants made a median (IQR [range]) of 18 (14-33 [8-55]) and 15 (12-22 [8-44]) errors in the two groups respectively (p = 0.39). The image quality score was also not different, with a median (IQR [range]) of 62.5 (59.4-65.6 [25.0-100.0])% vs 62.5 (62.5-75.0 [25.0-87.5])% respectively (p = 0.58). The training and deliberate feedback improved all participants' block performance, the median (IQR [range]) times being 310 (206-532 [110-600]) s before and 240 (174-354 [85-600]) s after training (p = 0.02). We conclude that novices taught ultrasound scanning and needle guidance skills using an inexpensive and easily constructed meat model perform similarly to those trained on a cadaveric model. PMID:26993374

  3. The optimal volume of 0.2% ropivacaine required for an ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Gul; Kim, Bum Soo; Shin, Kyung-Bae; Park, Ki-Bum; Kim, Sae Yeon

    2011-01-01

    Background This study was performed to find the optimal volume of local anesthetics needed for a successful ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block (SGB) to treat head and neck pathology. Methods Fifteen female and fourteen male sensory-neural hearing loss patients received 4 times SGBs with 0.2% ropivacaine in volumes of 6, 4, 3 and 2 ml at 1 to 3 day intervals. Using the transverse short-axis view of the neck that showed Chassaignac's tubercle at the C6 level, a 25-gauge, and 4 cm needle was inserted via the lateral paracarotid approach with out-of-plane targeting between the prevertebral fascia and the ventral surface of longus colli muscle (subfascial injection). A successful block was confirmed with the onset of ptosis (Horner's syndrome). Results There were no significant statistical differences between the presence of Horner's syndrome and the volume of local anesthetics given. However, Horner's syndrome was present in all trials for the 4 ml and 6 ml groups. Six (20.7%) and three out (10.4%) of twenty-nine trials in the 2 ml and 3 ml groups, respectively, failed to elicit Horner's syndrome. The duration of action was significantly different in the 2 ml group compared to that of the 6 ml group, but there was no significant difference between the other groups, including the 4 ml vs. 6 ml groups. The side effects were not different between the groups. Conclusions This data suggests that the optimal volume of 0.2% ropivacaine for ultrasound-guided SGB to treat the head and neck pathology in daily practice is 4 ml. PMID:21490819

  4. Ultrasound-guided implantation techniques in treatment of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.S.; Torp-Pedersen, S.T.; Holm, H.H. )

    1989-11-01

    Percutaneous ultrasound-guided interstitial radiotherapy is an attractive and elegant technique for the administration of high-dose local radiotherapy to the prostate. The complications of seed implantation are those associated with the radiation rather than with the technique of implantation. However, radiotherapy has not provided impressive local control of the disease or prolonged survival. The poor disease control was not attributed to poor seed placement, but rather to the inadequacy of {sup 125}I in controlling the cancer. The essence of nonsurgical treatment for prostate cancer is the use of effective imaging. Experience in the field of minimally invasive surgery has shown that ultrasound is the ideal imaging system for targeting treatments because of its ease of use and the absence of adverse effects. As the newer techniques of implantation come to be accepted, it is hoped that the complications of rectal and bladder radiation injury will decrease and the therapeutic benefits increase. The clinical trials required to define the precise role of each of the modalities of treatment must take nodal staging into account and must be compared with the gold standard of radical prostatectomy in the treatment of early confined disease.

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Reduction of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali; Manouchehrifar, Mohammad; Asadi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Distal radius fractures are a common traumatic injury, particularly in the elderly population. In the present study we examined the effectiveness of ultrasound guidance in the reduction of distal radius fractures in adult patients presenting to emergency department (ED). Methods: In this prospective case control study, eligible patients were adults older than 18 years who presented to the ED with distal radius fractures. 130 consecutive patient consisted of two group of Sixty-Five patients were prospectively enrolled for around 1 years. The first group underwent ultrasound-guided reduction and the second (control group) underwent blind reduction. All procedures were performed by two trained emergency residents under supervision of senior emergency physicians. Results: Baseline characteristics between two groups were similar. The rate of repeat reduction was reduced in the ultrasound group (9.2% vs 24.6%; P = .019). The post reduction radiographic indices were similar between the two groups, although the ultrasound group had improved volar tilt (mean, 7.6° vs 3.7°; P = .000). The operative rate was reduced in the ultrasound groups (10.8% vs 27.7%; P = .014). Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance is effective and recommended for routine use in the reduction of distal radius fractures. PMID:27299141

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage of hilar biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Park, Do Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Only 20-30% of patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) are candidates for potentially curative resection. However, even after curative (R0) resection, these patients have a disease recurrence rate of up to 76%. The prognosis of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is limited by tumor spread along the biliary tree leading to obstructive jaundice, cholangitis, and liver failure. Therefore, palliative biliary drainage may be a major goal for patients with hilar CC. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is an established method for palliation of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. However, there are patients for whom endoscopic stent placement is not possible because of failed biliary cannulation or tumor infiltration that limits transpapillary access. In this situation, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is an alternative method. However, PTBD has a relatively high rate of complications and is frequently associated with patient discomfort related to external drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage has therefore been introduced as an alternative to PTBD in cases of biliary obstruction when ERCP is unsuccessful. In this review, the indications, technical tips, outcomes, and the future role of EUS-guided intrahepatic biliary drainage, such as hepaticogastrostomy or hepaticoduodenostomy, for hilar biliary obstruction will be summarized. PMID:26178753

  7. DEVELOPING A TECHNIQUE FOR ULTRASOUND-GUIDED INJECTION OF THE ADULT CANINE HIP.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, Chiara; Etienne, Anne-Laure; Busoni, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    An accurate method for guiding injections into the canine hip would facilitate diagnostic localization of lameness and targeted treatments. Ultrasound-guided hip injections are commonly used in humans and large animals. Aims of this prospective study were to describe ultrasound (US) anatomy of the adult canine hip and determine the feasibility and accuracy of intra-articular placement of injectate using US-guidance. Seven adult dogs were used to describe US anatomy, five dog cadavers were used to assess the feasibility of the injection technique and 11 dog cadavers were used to assess accuracy of injections. For the accuracy test, 22 joints were injected with iodinated contrast medium by three operators with different experience. With dogs in lateral recumbency, the hyperechoic femoral head surface was identified by following the femoral neck from the greater trochanter or the acetabular rim was localized by following caudally the ilium from the iliac wing. An anechoic gap between the femoral head and acetabular surface represented the joint. The capsule was visible as a triangular echoic structure and the femoral head articular cartilage appeared as an anechoic band. The needle was inserted axial to the greater trochanter and directed in a dorsolateral-ventromedial direction toward the joint space and then pushed through the capsule. Based on postinjection radiography, accuracy was 81.8% at first attempt and 100% at second attempt. This study indicated that US-guided injection is a feasible and accurate technique for injecting the adult canine hip. Future studies in live dogs are needed to assess safety and efficacy. PMID:25619481

  8. Endobronchial ultrasound: an unusual diagnostic tool for pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sariaydin, Muzaffer; Günay, Sibel; Günay, Ersin; Sarinc Ulasli, Sevinc

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is an emergent and common pulmonary vascular disease. The most common diagnostic method for PTE is computer-aided tomography angiography. Endobronchial ultrasonography (EBUS) is used in diagnosis and staging of lung cancer via transbronchial needle aspiration from mediastinal lymphadenopathies and central masses. Diagnosis of PTE with EBUS is not common, although this technique helps to monitor pulmonary vasculature. The present case, a 60-year-old female patient to whom EBUS was applied because of mediastinal lymphadenopathy, was diagnosed as incidental PTE. PMID:26992367

  9. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Hydrodissection of a Symptomatic Sural Neuroma.

    PubMed

    Fader, Ryan R; Mitchell, Justin J; Chadayammuri, Vivek P; Hill, John; Wolcott, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Symptomatic neuromas of the sural nerve are a rare but significant cause of pain and debilitation in athletes. Presentation is usually in the form of chronic pain and dysesthesias or paresthesias of the lateral foot and ankle. Treatment traditionally ranges from conservative measures, such as removing all external compressive forces, to administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin B6, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, or topical anesthetics. This article reports a case of sural nerve entrapment in a 34-year-old male triathlete with a history of recurrent training-induced right-sided gastrocnemius strains. The patient presented with numbness in the right lateral foot and ankle that had persisted for 3 months, after he was treated unsuccessfully with extensive nonoperative measures, including anti-inflammatory drugs, activity modification, and a dedicated physical therapy program of stretching and strengthening. Orthopedic assessment showed worsening pain with forced passive dorsiflexion and manual pressure applied over the distal aspect of the gastrocnemius. Plain radiographs showed normal findings, but in-office ultrasound imaging showed evidence of sural nerve entrapment with edema and neuromatous scar formation in the absence of gastrocnemius or soleus pathology. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided hydrodissection of the sural nerve at the area of symptomatic neuroma and neural edema was performed the same day. The patient had complete relief of symptoms and full return to the preinjury level of participation in competitive sports. This case report shows that hydrodissection, when performed by an experienced physician, can be an effective, minimally invasive technique for neurolysis in the setting of sural nerve entrapment, resulting in improvement in clinical symptoms. PMID:26558670

  10. Ultrasound-guided interventional PDT of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chaoying; Yang, Dong; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Muyin; Chen, Ji; Lu, Guorong

    1996-09-01

    Thirty patients with advanced liver cancer were treated by interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). These included 28 hepatocellular carcinoma and two adenocarcinoma, 19 primary tumors and 11 recurred follow other treatments. The diameter of tumors were 7-10cm in 13 cases and 10-16cm in 17 cases. In this study, an argon laser pumped dye laser system was used to give a CW laser beam at 630 nm which was split and coupled into there optical fibers. The patients were injected intravenously with photosensitizer hematoporphyrin derivative at a dose of 5mg/kg body weight 48 hours before PDT. Then the fibers were inserted into tumor by ultrasound- guided percutaneous puncture. The inserted irradiation points were spaced in entire tumor with the light release power 300mW and the irradiation time 12 minutes per point. Total 52 treatments were performed in 30 patients. Among them, 14 cases were treated only one time and 16 cases via 2-3 times. The follow-up was carried out in 25 cases for 12- 24 months. The results show that significant remission was 22 percent in those patients by only one treatment and 62 percent in those via 2 to 3 treatments. The shrink rate of tumor size was over 90 percent in five of six cases after treatment 3. The survival time has been over one year in 12 cases. No obvious change to be found for all patients in liver function test, renal function test and blood routine examination. The level of AFP indicated a descending trend after PDT. This work indicate that PDT is effective and safe for the treatment of large liver cancers including those recurred follow hepatic resection and those failed in hepatic artery infusion embolic chemotherapy.