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Sample records for endogenous leukemia virus

  1. Insertional Polymorphisms of Endogenous Feline Leukemia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Alfred L.; Nash, William G.; Menninger, Joan C.; Murphy, William J.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    The number, chromosomal distribution, and insertional polymorphisms of endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) were determined in four domestic cats (Burmese, Egyptian Mau, Persian, and nonbreed) using fluorescent in situ hybridization and radiation hybrid mapping. Twenty-nine distinct enFeLV loci were detected across 12 of the 18 autosomes. Each cat carried enFeLV at only 9 to 16 of the loci, and many loci were heterozygous for presence of the provirus. Thus, an average of 19 autosomal copies of enFeLV were present per cat diploid genome. Only five of the autosomal enFeLV sites were present in all four cats, and at only one autosomal locus, B4q15, was enFeLV present in both homologues of all four cats. A single enFeLV occurred in the X chromosome of the Burmese cat, while three to five enFeLV proviruses occurred in each Y chromosome. The X chromosome and nine autosomal enFeLV loci were telomeric, suggesting that ectopic recombination between nonhomologous subtelomeres may contribute to enFeLV distribution. Since endogenous FeLVs may affect the infectiousness or pathogenicity of exogenous FeLVs, genomic variation in enFeLVs represents a candidate for genetic influences on FeLV leukemogenesis in cats. PMID:15767400

  2. Genomically intact endogenous feline leukemia viruses of recent origin.

    PubMed

    Roca, Alfred L; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2004-04-01

    We isolated and sequenced two complete endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs), designated enFeLV-AGTT and enFeLV-GGAG. In enFeLV-AGTT, the open reading frames are reminiscent of a functioning FeLV genome, and the 5' and 3' long terminal repeat sequences are identical. Neither endogenous provirus is genetically fixed in cats but polymorphic, with 8.9 and 15.2% prevalence for enFeLV-AGTT and enFeLV-GGAG, respectively, among a survey of domestic cats. Neither provirus was found in the genomes of related species of the Felis genus, previously shown to harbor enFeLVs. The absence of mutational divergence, polymorphic incidence in cats, and absence in related species suggest that these enFeLVs may have entered the germ line more recently than previously believed, perhaps coincident with domestication, and reopens the question of whether some enFeLVs might be replication competent. PMID:15047851

  3. Generation of mink cell focus-forming viruses by Friend murine leukemia virus: recombination with specific endogenous proviral sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, L H; Cloyd, M W

    1984-01-01

    A family of recombinant mink cell focus-forming viruses (MCF) was derived by inoculation of NFS mice with a Friend murine leukemia virus, and their genomes were analyzed by RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotide fingerprinting. The viruses were obtained from the thymuses and spleens of preleukemic and leukemic animals and were evaluated for dualtropism and oncogenicity. All these isolates induced cytopathic foci on mink cells but could be classified into two groups based on their relative infectivities for SC-1 (mouse) or mink (ATCC CCL64) cells. One group of Friend MCFs (F-MCFs) (group I) exhibited approximately equal infectivities for SC-1 and mink cells, whereas a second group (group II) infected mink cells 1,000- to 10,000-fold more efficiently than SC-1 cells. Structural analyses of the F-MCFs revealed that group I and group II viruses correlated with recombination of Friend murine leukemia virus with two distinct, but closely related, endogenous NFS proviral sequences. No correlation was found between the type of F-MCF and the tissue of origin or the disease state of the animal. Furthermore, none of the F-MCF isolates were found to be oncogenic in NFS/N or AKR/J mice. F-MCFs of both groups underwent extensive substitution of ecotropic sequences, involving much of the gag and env genes of group I F-MCFs and most of the gag, pol, and env genes of group II F-MCFs. All F-MCF isolates retained the 3' terminal U3 region of Friend murine leukemia virus. Comparison of the RNAs of the F-MCFs with RNAs of MCFs derived from NFS.Akv-1 or NFS.Akv-2 mice indicated that the F-MCFs were derived from NFS proviral sequences which are distinct from the sequences contained in NFS.Akv MCF isolates. This result suggested that recombination with particular endogenous proviral sequences to generate MCFs may be highly specific for a given murine leukemia virus. Images PMID:6422051

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage

    SciTech Connect

    Polani, Sagi; Roca, Alfred L.; Rosensteel, Bryan B.; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila

    2010-09-30

    Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

  5. A soluble envelope protein of endogenous retrovirus (FeLIX) present in serum of domestic cats mediates infection of a pathogenic variant of feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Shojima, Takayuki; Fukui, Daisuke; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    T-lymphotropic feline leukemia virus (FeLV-T), a highly pathogenic variant of FeLV, induces severe immunosuppression in cats. FeLV-T is fusion defective because in its PHQ motif, a gammaretroviral consensus motif in the N terminus of an envelope protein, histidine is replaced with aspartate. Infection by FeLV-T requires FeLIX, a truncated envelope protein encoded by an endogenous FeLV, for transactivation of infectivity and Pit1 for binding FeLIX. Although Pit1 is present in most tissues in cats, the expression of FeLIX is limited to certain cells in lymphoid organs. Therefore, the host cell range of FeLV-T was thought to be restricted to cells expressing FeLIX. However, because FeLIX is a soluble factor and is expressed constitutively in lymphoid organs, we presumed it to be present in blood and evaluated its activities in sera of various mammalian species using a pseudotype assay. We demonstrated that cat serum has FeLIX activity at a functional level, suggesting that FeLIX is present in the blood and that FeLV-T may be able to infect cells expressing Pit1 regardless of the expression of FeLIX in vivo. In addition, FeLIX activities in sera were detected only in domestic cats and not in other feline species tested. To our knowledge, this is the first report to prove that a large amount of truncated envelope protein of endogenous retrovirus is circulating in the blood to facilitate the infection of a pathogenic exogenous retrovirus. PMID:25395593

  6. Sequence heterogeneity of murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome virus: the role of endogenous virus.

    PubMed

    Gayama, S; Vaupel, B A; Kanagawa, O

    1995-05-01

    A defective murine leukemia virus is the causative agent of murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS). We have cloned cDNAs from both virus infected and non-infected cells using the PCR methods with primers corresponding to the franking sequence of the unique p12 gag gene. Sequence analysis of these cDNA clones revealed: (i) the presence of endogenous virus related to MAIDS virus in C57BL/6 mice, (ii) B cell lineage specific expression of endogenous virus and (iii) extensive heterogeneity of MAIDS virus recovered from virus infected cells due to the recombination of the related viruses (defective pathogenic virus, ecotropic virus and endogenous virus). These findings suggest that the creation of virus variants in infected cells may play an important role in virus pathogenesis and escape from immune attack during the development of MAIDS. PMID:7547712

  7. Endogenous HIV-1 Vpr-mediated apoptosis and proteome alteration of human T-cell leukemia virus-1 transformed C8166 cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang; Zeng, Yaoying; Wu, Xiaoping; Ji, Yuhua; He, Xianhui; Andrus, Thomas; Zhu, Tuofu; Wang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) can induce cell cycle arrest and cell death, and may be beneficial in cancer therapy to suppress malignantly proliferative cell types, such as adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells. In this study we examined the feasibility of employing the HIV-vpr gene, via targeted gene transfer, as a potential new therapy to kill ATL cells. We infected C8166 cells with a recombinant adenovirus carrying both vpr and GFP genes (rAd-vpr), as well as the vector control virus (rAd-vector). G2/M phase cell cycle arrest was observed in the rAd-vpr infected cells. Typical characteristics of apoptosis were detected in rAd-vpr infected cells, including sub-diploid peak exhibition in DNA content assay, the Hoechst 33342 accumulation, apoptotic body formation, mitochondrial membrane potential and plasma membrane integrity loss. The proteomic assay revealed apoptosis related protein changes, exhibiting the regulation of caspase-3 activity indicator proteins (vimentin and Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 2), mitochondrial protein (prohibitin) and other regulatory proteins. In addition, the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory redox protein, thioredoxin, was identified in the rAd-vpr infected group. Further supporting these findings, the increase of caspase 3&7 activity in the rAd-vpr infected group was observed. In conclusion, endogenous Vpr is able to kill HTLV-1 transformed C8166 cells, and may avoid the risks of inducing severe inflammatory responses through apoptosis-inducing and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:19655254

  8. Endogenous retrovirus and radiation-induced leukemia in the RMF mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.W.; Boone, L.R.; Lalley, P.; Yang, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of myeloid leukemia in irradiated RFM/Un mice has been associated with retrovirus infection. However, two characteristics of this strain complicate efforts to define the role of the virus. This strain possesses only one inducible host range class of endogenous virus and a unique gene, in addition to the Fv-1/sup n/ locus, which specifically restricts exogenous infection by endogenous viruses. These characteristics possibly account for absence of recombinant viruses in this strain, even though virus is amply expressed during most of the animal's life span. We have examined further the distribution of retrovirus sequences and the chromosomal locus of the inducible virus in this strain. This report describes evidence for additional viral sequences in cells of a radiation-induced myeloid leukemia line and discusses the possible origin of these added copies.

  9. A Linkage Map of Endogenous Murine Leukemia Proviruses

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, W. N.; Stoye, J. P.; Taylor, B. A.; Coffin, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty endogenous proviruses belonging to the modified polytropic (Mpmv) class of murine leukemia virus (MLV) were identified by proviral-cellular DNA junction fragment segregation in several sets of recombinant inbred mice. Twenty-six Mpmv loci were mapped to chromosomal regions by matching proviral strain distribution patterns to those of previously assigned genes. Like other endogenous nonecotropic MLVs, Mpmv loci were present on several chromosomes in all strains examined. We pooled recombinant inbred strain linkage data from 110 MLV loci and selected marker genes in order to construct a chromosomal linkage map. Every mouse chromosome was found to harbor at least one proviral insertion, and several regions contained multiple integrations. However, the overall distribution of the 110 mapped proviruses did not deviate significantly from a random distribution. Because of their polymorphism in inbred strains of mice, and the ability to score as many as 57 proviruses per strain using only three hybridization probes, the nonecotropic MLVs mapped in common strains of mice offer a significant advantage over older methods (e.g., biochemical or individual restriction fragment polymorphisms) as genetic markers. These endogenous insertion elements should also be useful for assessing strain purity, and for studying the relatedness of common and not-so-common inbred strains. PMID:2155154

  10. Negative regulatory element associated with potentially functional promoter and enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats of endogenous murine leukemia virus-related proviral sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Ch'ang, L Y; Yang, W K; Myer, F E; Yang, D M

    1989-01-01

    Three series of recombinant DNA clones were constructed, with the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a quantitative indicator, to examine the activities of promoter and enhancer sequence elements in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related proviral sequences isolated from the mouse genome. Transient CAT expression was determined in mouse NIH 3T3, human HT1080, and mink CCL64 cultured cells transfected with the LTR-CAT constructs. The 700-base-pair (bp) LTRs of three polytropic MuLV-related proviral clones and the 750-bp LTRs of four modified polytropic proviral clones, in complete structures either with or without the adjacent downstream sequences, all showed very little or negligible activities for CAT expression, while ecotropic MuLV LTRs were highly active. The MuLV-related LTRs were divided into three portions and examined separately. The 3' portion of the MuLV-related LTRs that contains the CCAAC and TATAA boxes was found to be a functional promoter, being about one-half to one-third as active as the corresponding portion of ecotropic MuLV LTRs. A MboI-Bg/II fragment, representing the distinct 190- to 200-bp inserted segment in the middle, was found to be a potential enhancer, especially when examined in combination with the simian virus 40 promoter in CCL64 cells. A PstI-MboI fragment of the 5' portion, which contains the protein-binding motifs of the enhancer segment as well as the upstream LTR sequences, showed moderate enhancer activities in CCL6 cells but was virtually inactive in NIH 3T3 cells and HT1080 cells; addition of this fragment to the ecotropic LTR-CAT constructs depressed CAT expression. Further analyses using chimeric LTR constructs located the presence of a strong negative regulatory element within the region containing the 5' portion of the enhancer and the immediate upstream sequences in the MuLV-related LTRs. Images PMID:2542587

  11. Comparative analysis of radiation- and virus-induced leukemias in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, E.W.; Binari, R.; Fleissner, E.

    1985-01-15

    Endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV) proviral copies were analyzed in thymomas induced in normal BALB/c (Fv-1b) and in Fv-1n congenic mice by X-irradiation. Both strains of mice developed leukemia with similar kinetics, indicating that N-tropism of endogenous MuLV was not a rate-limiting factor in development of disease. Southern blot analysis, using a probe specific for ecotropic virus and for ecotropic-specific sequences retained in pathogenic, env-recombinant viruses, showed that the majority of radiation leukemias lacked newly acquired, clonally integrated, proviruses. This was in contrast to virus-induced leukemias, which routinely exhibited several new proviral integration sites. When an internal proviral DNA restriction fragment was monitored, some radiation leukemias showed evidence of nonclonal infection, accounting for more frequent isolation of infectious virus from such leukemias. Differences in expression of T-cell surface antigens were found in X-ray-induced and virus-induced leukemias. All radiation leukemias were TL positive, whereas virus-induced leukemias were primarily negative for TL. Some differences were also found in Lyt-1 and Lyt-2 expression. The data as a whole suggest that, in the majority of cases, radiation leukemogenesis is not initiated by a viral route--that is, the sort of viral mechanism for which exogenous infection by known pathogenic MuLV is the paradigm.

  12. Selenium suppresses leukemia through the action of endogenous eicosanoids.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Ujjawal H; Kaushal, Naveen; Hegde, Shailaja; Finch, Emily R; Kudva, Avinash K; Kennett, Mary J; Jordan, Craig T; Paulson, Robert F; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2014-07-15

    Eradicating cancer stem-like cells (CSC) may be essential to fully eradicate cancer. Metabolic changes in CSC could hold a key to their targeting. Here, we report that the dietary micronutrient selenium can trigger apoptosis of CSC derived from chronic or acute myelogenous leukemias when administered at supraphysiologic but nontoxic doses. In leukemia CSC, selenium treatment activated ATM-p53-dependent apoptosis accompanied by increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species. Importantly, the same treatment did not trigger apoptosis in hematopoietic stem cells. Serial transplantation studies with BCR-ABL-expressing CSC revealed that the selenium status in mice was a key determinant of CSC survival. Selenium action relied upon the endogenous production of the cyclooxygenase-derived prostaglandins Δ(12)-PGJ2 and 15d-PGJ2. Accordingly, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and NADPH oxidase inhibitors abrogated the ability of selenium to trigger apoptosis in leukemia CSC. Our results reveal how selenium-dependent modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism can be directed to trigger apoptosis of primary human and murine CSC in leukemia. PMID:24872387

  13. Genotyping of feline leukemia virus in Mexican housecats.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Hugo; Autran, Marcela; García, M Martha; Carmona, M Ángel; Rodríguez, Cecilia; Martínez, H Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus with variable rates of infection globally. DNA was obtained from cats' peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and proviral DNA of pol and env genes was detected using PCR. Seventy-six percent of cats scored positive for FeLV using env-PCR; and 54 %, by pol-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of both regions identified sequences that correspond to a group that includes endogenous retroviruses. They form an independent branch and, therefore, a new group of endogenous viruses. Cat gender, age, outdoor access, and cohabitation with other cats were found to be significant risk factors associated with the disease. This strongly suggests that these FeLV genotypes are widely distributed in the studied feline population in Mexico. PMID:26747244

  14. Economics of bovine leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, K D

    1997-03-01

    A herd infected with bovine leukemia virus suffers a direct economic loss due to clinical lymphosarcoma. A major indirect cost associated with infection is restriction of the sale of animals and germplasma to foreign markets. Reports on the economic effects of infection on production have been variable and are reviewed in this article. In order to develop cost-effective bovine leukemia virus control programs, costs associated with the disease, the cost of prevention, and expected economic returns from a program need to be considered. PMID:9071750

  15. Genetic diversity in the feline leukemia virus gag gene.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Maki; Watanabe, Shinya; Odahara, Yuka; Nakagawa, So; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) belongs to the Gammaretrovirus genus and is horizontally transmitted among cats. FeLV is known to undergo recombination with endogenous retroviruses already present in the host during FeLV-subgroup A infection. Such recombinant FeLVs, designated FeLV-subgroup B or FeLV-subgroup D, can be generated by transduced endogenous retroviral env sequences encoding the viral envelope. These recombinant viruses have biologically distinct properties and may mediate different disease outcomes. The generation of such recombinant viruses resulted in structural diversity of the FeLV particle and genetic diversity of the virus itself. FeLV env diversity through mutation and recombination has been studied, while gag diversity and its possible effects are less well understood. In this study, we investigated recombination events in the gag genes of FeLVs isolated from naturally infected cats and reference isolates. Recombination and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the gag genes often contain endogenous FeLV sequences and were occasionally replaced by entire endogenous FeLV gag genes. Phylogenetic reconstructions of FeLV gag sequences allowed for classification into three distinct clusters, similar to those previously established for the env gene. Analysis of the recombination junctions in FeLV gag indicated that these variants have similar recombination patterns within the same genotypes, indicating that the recombinant viruses were horizontally transmitted among cats. It remains to be investigated whether the recombinant sequences affect the molecular mechanism of FeLV transmission. These findings extend our understanding of gammaretrovirus evolutionary patterns in the field. PMID:25892717

  16. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J.; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdcscid and Il2rgnull alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation. PMID:24912157

  17. Radioimmunoassay for intact Gross mouse leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yalow, R S; Gross, L

    1976-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for intact Gross leukemia virus has been developed using 125I-labeled Gross virus grown in tissue culture and guinea pig antisera to Gross virus grown either in tissue culture or harvested from leukemic C3H(f) mice. Separation of bound from free labeled virus was effected using the double antibody method. The assay can detect fewer than 10(8) virus particles and has been used to measure the viral content of individual organs from inoculated leukemic C3H(f) mice and from Ak mice with spontaneous leukemia. Organs from noninoculated healthy C3H(f) mice crossreacted poorly in the system, virus generally being detectable only in the thymus and spleen and at low concentration. In some of the inoculated C3H(f) leukemic mice the viral content of as little as 0.5 mul of plasma is measurable. That this assay is for intact virus and not for soluble antigens of the viral envelope was proven by the observation that the immunoreactive material of plasma and extracts from thymus and liver of leukemic mice has a buoyant denisty in sucrose of 1.17-1.18 g/ml, corresponding to that of intact virus grown in tissue culture. With this sensitivity it may now be possible to quantitate viral concentrations in tissue and body fluids from the time of inoculation through the development of obvious pathology. PMID:1066697

  18. Remarkable Diversity of Endogenous Viruses in a Crustacean Genome

    PubMed Central

    Thézé, Julien; Leclercq, Sébastien; Moumen, Bouziane; Cordaux, Richard; Gilbert, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in paleovirology have uncovered myriads of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) integrated in the genome of their eukaryotic hosts. These fragments result from endogenization, that is, integration of the viral genome into the host germline genome followed by vertical inheritance. So far, most studies have used a virus-centered approach, whereby endogenous copies of a particular group of viruses were searched in all available sequenced genomes. Here, we follow a host-centered approach whereby the genome of a given species is comprehensively screened for the presence of EVEs using all available complete viral genomes as queries. Our analyses revealed that 54 EVEs corresponding to 10 different viral lineages belonging to 5 viral families (Bunyaviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Totiviridae) and one viral order (Mononegavirales) became endogenized in the genome of the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare. We show that viral endogenization occurred recurrently during the evolution of isopods and that A. vulgare viral lineages were involved in multiple host switches that took place between widely divergent taxa. Furthermore, 30 A. vulgare EVEs have uninterrupted open reading frames, suggesting they result from recent endogenization of viruses likely to be currently infecting isopod populations. Overall, our work shows that isopods have been and are still infected by a large variety of viruses. It also extends the host range of several families of viruses and brings new insights into their evolution. More generally, our results underline the power of paleovirology in characterizing the viral diversity currently infecting eukaryotic taxa. PMID:25084787

  19. Remarkable diversity of endogenous viruses in a crustacean genome.

    PubMed

    Thézé, Julien; Leclercq, Sébastien; Moumen, Bouziane; Cordaux, Richard; Gilbert, Clément

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies in paleovirology have uncovered myriads of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) integrated in the genome of their eukaryotic hosts. These fragments result from endogenization, that is, integration of the viral genome into the host germline genome followed by vertical inheritance. So far, most studies have used a virus-centered approach, whereby endogenous copies of a particular group of viruses were searched in all available sequenced genomes. Here, we follow a host-centered approach whereby the genome of a given species is comprehensively screened for the presence of EVEs using all available complete viral genomes as queries. Our analyses revealed that 54 EVEs corresponding to 10 different viral lineages belonging to 5 viral families (Bunyaviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Totiviridae) and one viral order (Mononegavirales) became endogenized in the genome of the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare. We show that viral endogenization occurred recurrently during the evolution of isopods and that A. vulgare viral lineages were involved in multiple host switches that took place between widely divergent taxa. Furthermore, 30 A. vulgare EVEs have uninterrupted open reading frames, suggesting they result from recent endogenization of viruses likely to be currently infecting isopod populations. Overall, our work shows that isopods have been and are still infected by a large variety of viruses. It also extends the host range of several families of viruses and brings new insights into their evolution. More generally, our results underline the power of paleovirology in characterizing the viral diversity currently infecting eukaryotic taxa. PMID:25084787

  20. Investigation of the bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA in human leukemias and lung cancers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jehoon; Kim, Yonggoo; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Dae Hyun; Shin, Dong Hwan; Yum, Young Na; Oh, Jae Ho; Kim, Sheen Hee; Hwang, Myung Sil; Lim, Chul Joo; Yang, Ki Hwa; Han, Kyungja

    2005-08-01

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. This study investigated the presence of the BLV in leukemia (179 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 292 acute myeloid leukemia and 46 chronic myelogenous leukemia cases) and 162 lung cancer patients (139 adenocarcinoma, 23 squamous cell carcinoma) to determine if the BLV is a causative organism of leukemia and lung cancer in Koreans. A BLV infection was confirmed in human cells by PCR using a BLV-8 primer combination. All 517 cases of human leukemia and 162 lung cancer were negative for a PCR of the BLV proviral DNA. In conclusion, although meat has been imported from BLV endemic areas, the BLV infection does not appear to be the cause of human leukemia or lung cancer in Koreans. These results can be used as a control for further studies on the BLV in Koreans. PMID:16100451

  1. Oncogene Activation in Myeloid Leukemias by Graffi Murine Leukemia Virus Proviral Integration

    PubMed Central

    Denicourt, Catherine; Edouard, Elsy; Rassart, Eric

    1999-01-01

    The Graffi murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a nondefective retrovirus that induces granulocytic leukemia in BALB/c and NFS mice. To identify genes involved in Graffi MuLV-induced granulocytic leukemia, tumor cell DNAs were examined for genetic alterations at loci described as common proviral integration sites in MuLV-induced myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid leukemias. Southern blot analysis revealed rearrangements in c-myc, Fli-1, Pim-1, and Spi-1/PU.1 genes in 20, 10, 3.3, and 3.3% of the tumors tested, respectively. These results demonstrate for the first time the involvement of those genes in granulocytic leukemia. PMID:10196342

  2. Endogenous RNA viruses of plants in insect genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from RNA viruses with no DNA stage are rare, especially those where the parental viruses possess single-strand positive-sense (ssRNA+) genomes. Here we provide evidence that EVEs that share a sequence similarity to ssRNA+viruses of plants are integrated into the genomes of a number of insects, including mosquito, fruit flies, bees, ant, silkworm, pea aphid, Monarch butterfly, and wasps. A preliminary phylogenetic analysis places these EVEs as divergent relatives of the Virgaviridae and three currently unclassified plant viral species. PMID:22410578

  3. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  4. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release.

    PubMed

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  5. Vaccination against δ-retroviruses: the bovine leukemia virus paradigm.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Rodríguez, Sabrina M; de Brogniez, Alix; Gillet, Nicolas; Golime, Ramarao; Burny, Arsène; Jaworski, Juan-Pablo; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2014-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are closely related d-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia). Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of d-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy. PMID:24956179

  6. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Enhances Endogenous Cardiomyocyte Regeneration after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Masato; Nagai, Toshio; Takahashi, Toshinao; Liu, Mei Lan; Kondou, Naomichi; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Sashida, Goro; Iwama, Atsushi; Komuro, Issei; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac stem cells or precursor cells regenerate cardiomyocytes; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. We generated CreLacZ mice in which more than 99.9% of the cardiomyocytes in the left ventricular field were positive for 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactoside (X-gal) staining immediately after tamoxifen injection. Three months after myocardial infarction (MI), the MI mice had more X-gal-negative (newly generated) cells than the control mice (3.04 ± 0.38/mm2, MI; 0.47 ± 0.16/mm2, sham; p < 0.05). The cardiac side population (CSP) cell fraction contained label-retaining cells, which differentiated into X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes after MI. We injected a leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-expression construct at the time of MI and identified a significant functional improvement in the LIF-treated group. At 1 month after MI, in the MI border and scar area, the LIF-injected mice had 31.41 ± 5.83 X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes/mm2, whereas the control mice had 12.34 ± 2.56 X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes/mm2 (p < 0.05). Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyurinide (EdU) administration after MI, the percentages of EdU-positive CSP cells in the LIF-treated and control mice were 29.4 ± 2.7% and 10.6 ± 3.7%, respectively, which suggests that LIF influenced CSP proliferation. Moreover, LIF activated the Janus kinase (JAK)signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK)extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)–AKT pathways in CSPs in vivo and in vitro. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-bone marrow-chimeric CreLacZ mouse results indicated that LIF did not stimulate cardiogenesis via circulating bone marrow-derived cells during the 4 weeks following MI. Thus, LIF stimulates, in part, stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte regeneration by activating cardiac stem or precursor cells. This approach may represent a novel therapeutic

  7. No Evidence of Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Viruses in Live Attenuated Human Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, William M.; Zheng, HaoQiang; Simmons, Graham; Zhou, Yanchen; Tang, Shaohua; Shankar, Anupama; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric L.; Heneine, Walid

    2011-01-01

    Background The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV) in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents. Results All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) (SA-14-14-2), varicella (Varivax), measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II), measles (Attenuvax), rubella (Meruvax-II), rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix), and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells. Conclusions We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans. PMID:22216219

  8. Dynamics of perinatal bovine leukemia virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is highly endemic in many countries, including Argentina. As prevention of the spread from infected animals is of primary importance in breaking the cycle of BLV transmission, it is important to know the pathophysiology of BLV infection in young animals, as they are the main source of animal movement. In this work, we determined the proviral load and antibody titers of infected newborn calves from birth to first parturition (36 months). Results All calves under study were born to infected dams with high proviral load (PVL) in blood and high antibody titers and detectable provirus in the colostrum. The PVL for five out of seven calves was low at birth. All animals reached PVLs of more than 1% infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), three at 3 months, one at 6 months, and one at 12 months. High PVLs persisted until the end of the study, and, in two animals, exceeded one BLV copy per cell. Two other calves maintained a high PVL from birth until the end of the study. Antibody titers were 32 or higher in the first sample from six out of seven calves. These decayed at 3–6 months to 16 or lower, and then increased again after this point. Conclusions Calves infected during the first week of life could play an active role in early propagation of BLV to susceptible animals, since their PVL raised up during the first 12 months and persist as high for years. Early elimination could help to prevent transmission to young susceptible animals and to their own offspring. To our knowledge, this is the first study of the kinetics of BLV proviral load and antibody titers in newborn infected calves. PMID:24708791

  9. Characterization of mouse cellular deoxyribonucleic acid homologous to Abelson murine leukemia virus-specific sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, B; Ozanne, B

    1981-01-01

    The genome of Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) consists of sequences derived from both BALB/c mouse deoxyribonucleic acid and the genome of Moloney murine leukemia virus. Using deoxyribonucleic acid linear intermediates as a source of retroviral deoxyribonucleic acid, we isolated a recombinant plasmid which contained 1.9 kilobases of the 3.5-kilobase mouse-derived sequences found in A-MuLV (A-MuLV-specific sequences). We used this clone, designated pSA-17, as a probe restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses to examine the arrangement of homologous sequences in BALB/c deoxyribonucleic acid (endogenous Abelson sequences). The endogenous Abelson sequences within the mouse genome were interrupted by noncoding regions, suggesting that a rearrangement of the cell sequences was required to produce the sequence found in the virus. Endogenous Abelson sequences were arranged similarly in mice that were susceptible to A-MuLV tumors and in mice that were resistant to A-MuLV tumors. An examination of three BALB/c plasmacytomas and a BALB/c early B-cell tumor likewise revealed no alteration in the arrangement of the endogenous Abelson sequences. Homology to pSA-17 was also observed in deoxyribonucleic acids prepared from rat, hamster, chicken, and human cells. An isolate of A-MuLV which encoded a 160,000-dalton transforming protein (P160) contained 700 more base pairs of mouse sequences than the standard A-MuLV isolate, which encoded a 120,000-dalton transforming protein (P120). Images PMID:9279386

  10. Human herpes virus 6 and endogenous biotin in salivary glands.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Sviland, L; Taylor, C E; Peiris, M; McCarthy, A L; Pearson, A D; Malcolm, A J

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To detect the presence of human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) and endogenous biotin in paraffin wax embedded and frozen salivary glands. METHODS: Two stage indirect and streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase techniques were used to visualise the antigens. RESULTS: HHV6 could not be shown in any of the tissues. However, considerable endogenous biotin antigenicity was detected in the glandular elements of the paraffin wax embedded material. CONCLUSIONS: Results obtained with avidin-biotin detection systems should be interpreted with caution, especially when glandular epithelium is being stained. This may apply to both immunoperoxidase and in situ hybridisation techniques. The use of an anti-biotin antibody as a standard control should be considered. Images PMID:1328329

  11. Characterization of a novel murine leukemia virus-related subgroup within mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Tristem, M; Kabat, P; Lieberman, L; Linde, S; Karpas, A; Hill, F

    1996-01-01

    The murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related retroviruses are one of seven genera which together constitute the family Retroviridae. They are widespread as both endogenous and exogenous agents within vertebrates and have been associated with a variety of malignancies and other disorders. We isolated and characterized 12 endogenous representatives of this genus from a number of mammalian hosts. Subsequent sequence analysis revealed that the isolated viruses cluster into two clearly distinct groups. All of the exogenous MuLV-related retroviruses which have been isolated to date, as well as several endogenous examples, fall into the first group, whereas the second group is represented solely by endogenous representatives, including human endogenous retrovirus type E (HERV.E). The two groups are widespread within mammals, with both often present within one animal species. Despite this, there is no evidence to date that recombination between members of the different groups has occurred. Genetic distances and several other properties of the HERV.E genome suggest that if exogenous members of this subgroup exist, they are likely to have biological properties different from those of the other exogenous viruses of this genus. Several of these viruses are known to have been integrated within their hosts' genomes for a long period of time, and a most recent divergence date for the MuLV and HERV.E subgroups can thus be proposed. This date, approximately 30 million years ago, is the most recent date possible, and it is probable that the actual period of time since their divergence is significantly longer. PMID:8892961

  12. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-associated leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This article summarizes the current pathophysiologic basis for human T cell lymphotropic virus-associated leukemia/lymphoma as well as past, present, and future therapeutic options. Recent findings New studies have been published on allogeneic stem cell transplantation, arsenic trioxide, and bortezomib for this condition. Summary Studies of the molecular biology of human T cell lymphotropic virus-1-induced T cell leukemia/lymphoma have defined a critical role for oncoprotein, Tax, and activation of nuclear factor κB transcription pathways, which have provided rational approaches to improved therapy for T cell leukemia/lymphoma as well as a model for other hematopoietic malignancies characterized by nuclear factor κB activation. PMID:16093798

  13. Replication of the Moloney murine sarcoma-leukemia virus in XC cells.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, S T; Benyesh-Melnick, M; Biswal, N

    1973-01-01

    The XC rat cell line was found to support the replication of a strain of the Moloney murine sarcoma-leukemia virus. In growth curve experiments cytopathology was paralleled by the production of murine sarcoma virus and leukemia virus progeny having the biologic, antigenic, and biophysical properties of the infecting virus. PMID:4346280

  14. Leukemia induction by a new strain of Friend mink cell focus-inducing virus: synergistic effect of Friend ecotropic murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chesebro, B; Wehrly, K; Nishio, J; Evans, L

    1984-01-01

    A new strain of Friend recombinant mink cell focus-inducing retrovirus, FMCF -1-E, was found to induce leukemias in NFS and IRW mice. Although the isolate was obtained from a stock of FMCF -1 ( Troxler et al., J. Exp. Med. 148:639-653, 1978), FMCF -1-E was distinguishable from FMCF -1 by oligonucleotide fingerprinting and antigenic analysis, using monoclonal antibodies. These analyses suggested that FMCF -1-E is a distinct FMCF isolate rather than a simple variant of FMCF -1. After neonatal inoculation, the latency for leukemia induction was 3 to 8 months. A similar long latency was also seen when Friend murine leukemia virus 57 was inoculated into adult (6-week-old) IRW mice. However, sequential inoculation of FMCF -1-E at birth followed by Friend murine leukemia 57 at 6 weeks of age led to a shortened latency period (2.5 to 4 months). Only neonatal inoculation of Friend murine leukemia virus 57 was able to induce a more rapid appearance of leukemia. The leukemia cell type in the majority of cases, regardless of virus inoculation protocol, was erythroid, but occasional myeloid, lymphoid, and mixed leukemias were also observed. In contrast to NFS and IRW mice, BALB/c mice were resistant to leukemia induction by FMCF -1-E and also showed some transient resistance to leukemia induction by Friend murine leukemia virus 57. Images PMID:6202886

  15. Removal of xenotropic murine leukemia virus by nanocellulose based filter paper.

    PubMed

    Asper, M; Hanrieder, T; Quellmalz, A; Mihranyan, A

    2015-11-01

    The removal of xenotrpic murine leukemia virus (xMuLV) by size-exclusion filter paper composed of 100% naturally derived cellulose was validated. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. algae. The filter paper was characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, helium pycnometry, and model tracer (100 nm latex beads and 50 nm gold nanoparticles) retention tests. Following the filtration of xMuLV spiked solutions, LRV ≥5.25 log10 TCID50 was observed, as limited by the virus titre in the feed solution and sensitivity of the tissue infectivity test. The results of the validation study suggest that the nanocellulose filter paper is useful for removal of endogenous rodent retroviruses and retrovirus-like particles during the production of recombinant proteins. PMID:26328471

  16. Properties of feline leukemia virus. III. Analysis of the RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Brian, D A; Thomason, A R; Rottman, F M; Velicer, L F

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of virus labeling was used to study the maturation of viral RNA in the Rickard strain of feline leukemia virus. Viral RNA labeled over differing intervals was characterized by gel electrophoresis and velocity sedimentation in sucrose gradients made up in aqueous buffer and 99% dimethyl sulfoxide. Labeled virus was found within 30 min after adding radioactive uridine to the cells and production of labeled virus reached a maximum at 4 to 5 h after pulse labeling. Native RNA from feline leukemia virus resolved into three size classes when analyzed by electrophoresis on 2.0% polyacrylamide-0.5% agarose gels: a 6.2 x 10(6) to 7.1 x 10(6) mol wt (50 to 60S) class, an 8.7 x 10(4) mol wt (approximately 8S) class, and a 2.5 x 10(4) mol wt (4 to 5S) class. From two experiments during which RNA degradation appeared minimal, these made up to 57 to 76%, 2 to 5%, and 6 to 12%, respectively, of the total RNA. The 8S RNA in feline leukemia virus has not previously been reported. The 50 to 60S RNA from virus harvested after 4 h of labeling electrophoretically migrated faster and sedimented more slowly in sucrose gradients than did the same RNA species harvested after 20 h of labeling. This argues for an intravirion modification of the high-molecular-weight RNA. The large subunits of denatured viral RNA from both 4- and 20-h labeled-viral RNA electrophoretically migrated with an estimated molecular weight of 3.2 x 10(6) but sedimented with 28S ribosomal RNA (1.8 X 10(6) mol wt) when analyzed by velocity sedimentation through 99% dimethyl sulfoxide. PMID:169389

  17. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  18. Bovine Leukemia Virus DNA in Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Choi, K. Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease. PMID:24750974

  19. Mechanisms of pathogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus as a model for human T-cell leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Yoko; Murakami, Hironobu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke

    2013-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) make up a unique retrovirus family. Both viruses induce chronic lymphoproliferative diseases with BLV affecting the B-cell lineage and HTLV-1 affecting the T-cell lineage. The pathologies of BLV- and HTLV-induced infections are notably similar, with an absence of chronic viraemia and a long latency period. These viruses encode at least two regulatory proteins, namely, Tax and Rex, in the pX region located between the env gene and the 3′ long terminal repeat. The Tax protein is a key contributor to the oncogenic potential of the virus, and is also the key protein involved in viral replication. However, BLV infection is not sufficient for leukemogenesis, and additional events such as gene mutations must take place. In this review, we first summarize the similarities between the two viruses in terms of genomic organization, virology, and pathology. We then describe the current knowledge of the BLV model, which may also be relevant for the understanding of leukemogenesis caused by HTLV-1. In addition, we address our improved understanding of Tax functions through the newly identified BLV Tax mutants, which have a substitution between amino acids 240 and 265. PMID:24265629

  20. Isolation of Naturally Occurring Viruses of the Murine Leukemia Virus Group in Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Janet W.; Rowe, Wallace P.; Capps, Worth I.; Huebner, Robert J.

    1969-01-01

    A tissue culture cell system for isolation and identification of members of the murine leukemia virus group (the complement fixation for murine leukemia test) was modified to permit the isolation of naturally occurring virus from leukemic and normal mice. The important factors for increasing the sensitivity of the test were the use of National Institutes of Health (NIH) strain Webster Swiss embryo cell cultures and the selection of rat-immune sera having complement-fixing antibodies to tissue culture antigens of both the Gross and FMR subgroups. In all, 163 strains of mouse leukemia virus, from 11 inbred mouse strains, have been isolated. Representative virus isolates were shown to possess the properties of the murine leukemia virus group; i.e., they were chloroform-sensitive, noncytopathic agents which replicated in mouse embryo tissue culture and produced group-reactive, complement-fixing antigen and budding C-type particles visible by electron microscopy. These viruses could serve as helpers in the rescue of Moloney sarcoma virus genome from non-producer hamster sarcoma cells, yielding pseudotypes. All of the 19 field isolates tested were neutralized by Gross passage A antiserum but not by potent antisera to the Moloney, Rauscher, and Friend strains. Virus was recovered regularly from embryos and from the plasma and spleen of adult mice of high leukemic strains. In low leukemic mouse strains, different patterns of virus detection were observed. In C3H/He mice, virus was occasionally present in embryos and was found in 40% of adult spleens. BALB/c mice were virus-negative as fetuses or weanlings, but spleens of more than half of the mice over 6 months of age yielded virus. NIH mice have never yielded virus. In reciprocal matings between AKR and BALB/c mice, virus recovery from embryos was maternally determined. The development of tissue culture isolation procedures made possible for the first time the application of classical infectious disease methods to the

  1. Endogenous viruses: insights into viral evolution and impact on host biology.

    PubMed

    Feschotte, Cédric; Gilbert, Clément

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have uncovered myriad viral sequences that are integrated or 'endogenized' in the genomes of various eukaryotes. Surprisingly, it appears that not just retroviruses but almost all types of viruses can become endogenous. We review how these genomic 'fossils' offer fresh insights into the origin, evolutionary dynamics and structural evolution of viruses, which are giving rise to the burgeoning field of palaeovirology. We also examine the multitude of ways through which endogenous viruses have influenced, for better or worse, the biology of their hosts. We argue that the conflict between hosts and viruses has led to the invention and diversification of molecular arsenals, which, in turn, promote the cellular co-option of endogenous viruses. PMID:22421730

  2. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  3. Role of mink cell focus-inducing virus in leukemias induced by Friend ecotropic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, J

    1984-01-01

    Recombinant viruses have been implicated in the pathogenesis of murine leukemias induced by a variety of long-latency retroviruses. Neonatal mice of several strains were inoculated with Friend ecotropic virus (F-Eco) and analyzed for the presence of mink cell focus-inducing (MCF) virus or DNA restriction enzyme fragments which were specific for Friend MCF virus (F-MCF). MCF virus was detected within 2 weeks of inoculation in NFS /N mice and at about 2 months after inoculation in BALB/c mice. Both of these strains developed erythroblastosis after inoculation with F-Eco. In contrast, MCF virus was not detected in F-Eco-inoculated C57BL mice. These mice were resistant to erythroblastosis but developed lymphoma or myelogenous leukemia or both at about 5 months after inoculation. Thus, although MCF viruses were associated with F-Eco erythroblastosis in NFS /N and BALB/c mice, they were not necessary for F-Eco-induced lymphoid or myeloid leukemias in C57BL mice. To investigate the association between resistance to erythroblastosis and absence of MCF virus, C57BL mice were inoculated with pseudotypic mixtures of F-Eco plus F-MCF; MCF virus replicated well in these mice, but the mice remained resistant to erythroblastosis. Furthermore, in genetic crosses between C57BL and NFS /N or BALB/c, some mice inherited resistance to F-Eco erythroblastosis without inheriting the C57BL resistance to the generation of MCF viruses. These results indicate that C57BL mice carry a gene for resistance to F-Eco erythroblastosis which is distinct from the C57BL genes which interfere with the generation of MCF viruses. Images PMID:6726889

  4. Expression of mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia virus-related transcripts in AKR mice

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.S.; Laigret, F.; Rodi, C.P.

    1987-03-01

    The authors used a synthetic 16-base-pair mink cell focus-forming (MCF) env-specific oligomer as radiolabeled probe to study MCF murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related transcripts in brain, kidney, liver, spleen, and thymus tissues of AKR mice ranging from 5 weeks to 6 months (mo) of age. Tissue-specific expression of poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs was seen. In addition, all the tissues tested contained 3.0-kb messages. The transcription of these MCF-related mRNAs was independent of the presence of ecotropic and xenotropic MuLVs. In general, expression of the MCF env-related transcripts appeared to peak at 2 mo of age; these messages were barely detectable in brain, kidney, liver, and spleen tissues after 2 mo and in thymus tissue after 4 mo of age. All of the subgenomic MCF env-related mRNAs appeared to contain the 190-base-pair cellular DNA insert, characteristic of the long terminal repeats associated with endogenous MCF env-related proviruses. No genomic-size (8.4-kb) transcripts corresponding to endogenous MCF-related proviruses were detected. An 8.4-kb MCF env-related mRNA was first seen at 3 mo of age, exclusively in thymus tissue. This species most likely represents the first appearance of a recombinant MCF-related MuLV genome. The transcripts which were detected in thymus tissue might be involved in the generation of leukemogenic MCF viruses.

  5. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Dirofilaria immitis infections in Egyptian cats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevalen...

  6. An Endogenous Foamy Virus in the Aye-Aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery and analysis of an endogenous foamy virus (PSFVaye) within the genome of the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), a strepsirrhine primate from Madagascar. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that PSFVaye is divergent from all known simian foamy viruses, suggesting an association between foamy viruses and primates since the haplorrhine-strepsirrhine split. The discovery of PSFVaye indicates that primate foamy virus might be more broadly distributed than previously thought. PMID:22573860

  7. Replication of Many Human Viruses Is Refractory to Inhibition by Endogenous Cellular MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Skalsky, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Furuse, Yuki; Whisnant, Adam W.; Flores, Omar; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Putnam, Nicole; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Sherry, Barbara; Scholle, Frank; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Griffin, Diane E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The issue of whether viruses are subject to restriction by endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) and/or by virus-induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in infected human somatic cells has been controversial. Here, we address this question in two ways. First, using deep sequencing, we demonstrate that infection of human cells by the RNA virus dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV) does not result in the production of any virus-derived siRNAs or viral miRNAs. Second, to more globally assess the potential of small regulatory RNAs to inhibit virus replication, we used gene editing to derive human cell lines that lack a functional Dicer enzyme and that therefore are unable to produce miRNAs or siRNAs. Infection of these cells with a wide range of viruses, including DENV, WNV, yellow fever virus, Sindbis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, reovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), failed to reveal any enhancement in the replication of any of these viruses, although HSV-1, which encodes at least eight Dicer-dependent viral miRNAs, did replicate somewhat more slowly in the absence of Dicer. We conclude that most, and perhaps all, human viruses have evolved to be resistant to inhibition by endogenous human miRNAs during productive replication and that dependence on a cellular miRNA, as seen with hepatitis C virus, is rare. How viruses have evolved to avoid inhibition by endogenous cellular miRNAs, which are generally highly conserved during metazoan evolution, remains to be determined. IMPORTANCE Eukaryotic cells express a wide range of small regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, that have the potential to inhibit the expression of mRNAs that show sequence complementarity. Indeed, previous work has suggested that endogenous miRNAs have the potential to inhibit viral gene expression and replication. Here, we demonstrate that the replication of a wide range of

  8. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related Virus (XMRV) Backgrounder

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have not found evidence that XMRV causes any diseases in humans or in animals. The presence of an infectious agent, such as a virus, in diseased tissue does not mean that the agent causes the disease.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Particles: Effect of Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kol, Nitzan; Gladnikoff, Micha; Barlam, David; Shneck, Roni Z.; Rein, Alan; Rousso, Itay

    2006-01-01

    After budding from the host cell, retroviruses undergo a process of internal reorganization called maturation, which is prerequisite to infectivity. Viral maturation is accompanied by dramatic morphological changes, which are poorly understood in physical/mechanistic terms. Here, we study the mechanical properties of live mature and immature murine leukemia virus particles by indentation-type experiments conducted with an atomic force microscope tip. We find that both mature and immature particles have an elastic shell. Strikingly, the virus shell is twofold stiffer in the immature (0.68 N/m) than the mature (0.31 N/m) form. However, finite-element simulation shows that the average Young's modulus of the immature form is more than fourfold lower than that of the mature form. This finding suggests that per length unit, the protein-protein interactions in the mature shell are stronger than those in the immature shell. We also show that the mature virus shell is brittle, since it can be broken by application of large loading forces, by firm attachment to a substrate, or by repeated application of force. Our results are the first analysis of the mechanical properties of an animal virus, and demonstrate a linkage between virus morphology and mechanical properties. PMID:16632508

  10. Seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in shelter cats on the island of Newfoundland, Canada.

    PubMed

    Munro, Hannah J; Berghuis, Lesley; Lang, Andrew S; Rogers, Laura; Whitney, Hugh

    2014-04-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are retroviruses found within domestic and wild cat populations. These viruses cause severe illnesses that eventually lead to death. Housing cats communally for long periods of time makes shelters at high risk for virus transmission among cats. We tested 548 cats from 5 different sites across the island of Newfoundland for FIV and FeLV. The overall seroprevalence was 2.2% and 6.2% for FIV and FeLV, respectively. Two sites had significantly higher seroprevalence of FeLV infection than the other 3 sites. Analysis of sequences from the FeLV env gene (envelope gene) from 6 positive cats showed that 4 fell within the FeLV subtype-A, while 2 sequences were most closely related to FeLV subtype-B and endogenous feline leukemia virus (en FeLV). Varying seroprevalence and the variation in sequences at different sites demonstrate that some shelters are at greater risk of FeLV infections and recombination can occur at sites of high seroprevalence. PMID:24688176

  11. A Multicenter Blinded Analysis Indicates No Association between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and either Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus or Polytropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Harvey J.; Mikovits, Judy A.; Switzer, William M.; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Lo, Shyh-Ching; Klimas, Nancy; Komaroff, Anthony L.; Montoya, Jose G.; Bateman, Lucinda; Levine, Susan; Peterson, Daniel; Levin, Bruce; Hanson, Maureen R.; Genfi, Afia; Bhat, Meera; Zheng, HaoQiang; Wang, Richard; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lee, Li Ling; Sameroff, Stephen; Heneine, Walid; Coffin, John; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disabling disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) has been linked in two independent studies to infection with xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and polytropic murine leukemia virus (pMLV). Although the associations were not confirmed in subsequent studies by other investigators, patients continue to question the consensus of the scientific community in rejecting the validity of the association. Here we report blinded analysis of peripheral blood from a rigorously characterized, geographically diverse population of 147 patients with CFS/ME and 146 healthy subjects by the investigators describing the original association. This analysis reveals no evidence of either XMRV or pMLV infection. PMID:22991430

  12. Envelope polypeptides of Friend leukemia virus: purification and structural analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, J; Falk, H; Hunsmann, G

    1980-01-01

    Roughly 10% of surface glycoproteins in the envelope of mature Friend murine leukemia virus are coupled to membrane polypeptides by disulfide bridges. The remaining 90% of these glycoproteins are associated noncovalently. However, they could also be linked to membrane polypeptides by the treatment of purified Friend murine leukemia virus with 2,2'dithiobis(m-nitropyridine). These amphiphilic heterodimer polypeptides, gp84/86, were recovered almost quantitatively in the form of aggregates, termed rosettes, when prepared by solubilization of the viral membrane with Triton X-100 and subsequent velocity sedimentation. gp69/71 and p12(E)/15(E) were purified from these protein micelles after reduction of the disulfide bonds by gel chromatography. Electron micrographs of rosettes, as well as of purified p12(E)/15(E), showed structures different from native viral knobs. Isolated gp84/86 could be reassociated and then displayed more similarity to these viral surface projections. As shown by peptide mapping, the primary structures of the glycoproteins gp69/71 are highly related as are those of the membrane polypeptides p12(E) and p15(E). Furthermore, it was shown by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and re-electrophoresis of purified gp84/86 that the larger component, gp86, was composed of gp71 associated with p15(E) and p12(E), whereas the smaller component, gp84, was formed by gp69 bound only to p12(E). Images PMID:7411688

  13. Rice genomes recorded ancient pararetrovirus activities: Virus genealogy and multiple origins of endogenization during rice speciation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sunlu; Liu, Ruifang; Koyanagi, Kanako O; Kishima, Yuji

    2014-12-01

    Viral fossils in rice genomes are a best entity to understand ancient pararetrovirus activities through host plant history because of our advanced knowledge of the genomes and evolutionary history with rice and its related species. Here, we explored organization, geographic origins and genealogy of rice pararetroviruses, which were turned into endogenous rice tungro bacilliform virus-like (eRTBVL) sequences. About 300 eRTBVL sequences from three representative rice genomes were clearly classified into six families. Most of the endogenization events of the eRTBVLs were initiated before differentiation of the rice progenitor (> 160,000 years ago). We successfully followed the genealogy of old relic viruses during rice speciation, and inferred the geographical origins for these viruses. Possible virus genomic sequences were explained mostly by recombinations between different virus families. Interestingly, we discovered that only a few recombination events among the numerous occasions had determined the virus genealogy. PMID:25461539

  14. Study of the Associations Between TT Virus Single and Mixed Infections With Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shaheli, Marjan; Yaghobi, Ramin; Rezaeian, Abbasali; Iravani Saadi, Mahdiyar; Ramzi, Mani

    2015-01-01

    Background: The pathogenic association of Transfusion Transmitted Virus or Torque teno Virus (TT Virus) single and mixed infections with leukemia was under evaluation in these years but confront with controversies. This hypothesis is based on the higher prevalence of TT Virus infection in patients with leukemia compared with controls. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of TT Virus, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infections in patients with leukemia and healthy controls. Patients and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 95 patients with leukemia and 100 healthy controls who were admitted to the Namazi Hospital affiliated to the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, were enrolled between years 2012 and 2013. Blood samples treated with EDTA were collected from each patient with leukemia and controls. The existence of TT Virus infection was analyzed using the semi-nested PCR method. The immunological prevalence of HBV and HCV infections were evaluated using HBs-Ag and HCV-Ab ELISA based protocols, respectively. Active CMV infection was also evaluated using an immunofluorescence method. Also risk factors of leukemia and viral infections were statistically analyzed in patients with leukemia. Results: The TT Virus infection was significantly found in 40 of 95 (42.1%) and 12 of 100 (12%) patients with leukemia and controls, respectively. The HBs-Ag and HCV-Ab were detected in 27 of 95 (28.4%) and 18 of 69 (26.1%) patients with leukemia but were not found in the controls. Active CMV infection was also found in 11 of 69 (16%) patients and none of the controls. Significant co-infection of TT Virus was found with HBV (15 of 40; 37.5%), HCV (14 of 40; 35%) and CMV (7 of 40; 17.5%) in patients with leukemia. Conclusions: Confirmation of the significantly higher frequency of TT Virus, HBV, HCV and CMV single infection and their co-infection in patients with leukemia compared with healthy

  15. Genomic stability of murine leukemia viruses containing insertions at the Env-3' untranslated region boundary.

    PubMed

    Logg, C R; Logg, A; Tai, C K; Cannon, P M; Kasahara, N

    2001-08-01

    Retroviruses containing inserts of exogenous sequences frequently eliminate the inserted sequences upon spread in susceptible cells. We have constructed replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV) vectors containing internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-transgene cassettes at the env-3' untranslated region boundary in order to examine the effects of insert sequence and size on the loss of inserts during viral replication. A virus containing an insertion of 1.6 kb replicated with greatly attenuated kinetics relative to wild-type virus and lost the inserted sequences in a single infection cycle. In contrast, MLVs containing inserts of 1.15 to 1.30 kb replicated with kinetics only slightly attenuated compared to wild-type MLV and exhibited much greater stability, maintaining their genomic integrity over multiple serial infection cycles. Eventually, multiple species of deletion mutants were detected simultaneously in later infection cycles; once detected, these variants rapidly dominated the population and thereafter appeared to be maintained at a relative equilibrium. Sequence analysis of these variants identified preferred sites of recombination in the parental viruses, including both short direct repeats and inverted repeats. One instance of insert deletion through recombination with an endogenous retrovirus was also observed. When specific sequences involved in these recombination events were eliminated, deletion variants still arose with the same kinetics upon virus passage and by apparently similar mechanisms, although at different locations in the vectors. Our results suggest that while lengthened, insert-containing genomes can be maintained over multiple replication cycles, preferential deletions resulting in loss of the inserted sequences confer a strong selective advantage. PMID:11435579

  16. Biochemical analysis of murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced leukemias of strain BALB/c

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.W.; Hopkins, N.; Fleissner, E.

    1980-02-01

    Murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced BALB/c leukemias were characterized with respect to viral proteins and RNA. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral structural proteins revealed that for p12, p15, p30, and gp70, three to four electrophoretic variants of each could be detected. There was no correlation found between any of these mobilities and N- or B-tropism of the viruses. Proteins of all xenotropic viral isolates were identical in their gel electrophoretic profiles. The similar phenotypes of multiple viral clones from individual leukemias and of isolates grown in different cells suggest that the polymorphism of ecotropic viruses was generated in vivo rather than during in vitro virus growth. By two-dimensional fingerprinting of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides from 70S viral RNA, the previously reported association of N- and B-tropism with two distinct oligonucleotides was confirmed. The presence of two other oligonucleotides was correlated with positive and negative phenotypes of the virus-coded G/sub IX/ cell surface antigen. The RNAs of two B-tropic isolates with distinctive p15 and p12 phenotypes differed from the RNA of a prototype N-tropic virus by the absence of three oligonucleotides mapping in the 5' portion (gag region) of the prototype RNA. In addition, one small-plaque B-tropic virus displayed extensive changes in the RNA sequences associated with the env region of the prototype.

  17. Effect of caffeine on induction of endogenous type C virus in mouse cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Niwa, O.; Sugahara, T.

    1981-08-01

    The effect of caffeine on the expression of murine endogenous virus in mouse cells induced by radiation and chemicals was studied. Postirradiation treatment of K-BALB cells with caffeine enhanced cell killing as well as the induction of xenotropic virus after ultraviolet light irradiation. The degree of enhancement for the virus induction was comparable to that for cell killing. On the other hand, colony-forming ability and the expression of xenotropic virus of K-BALB cells after X-irradiation were unaffected by caffeine. These data suggest a linear relationship between the degree of endogenous virus expression and the amount of lethal damages after irradiation. For induction by halogenated pyrimidines, a 24-hr incubation of AKR2B cells with caffeine after 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine treatment resulted in marked suppression of the expression of ecotropic virus. On the contrary, in K-BALB cells, caffeine exerted only a small effect on 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-induced expression of ecotropic and xenotropic viruses. These results indicate that, although using the same inducing agent, the pathway of endogenous virus induction may be different for AKR2B cells and for K-BALB cells.

  18. Murine leukemia virus in organs of senescence-prone and -resistant mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Carp, R I; Meeker, H C; Chung, R; Kozak, C A; Hosokawa, M; Fujisawa, H

    2002-03-31

    A series of inbred strains of mice have been developed that are either prone (SAMP) or resistant (SAMR) to accelerated senescence. All of these strains originated from an inadvertent cross or crosses between the AKR/J mouse strain and an unknown strain(s). The characteristics of the nine senescence-prone lines differ, with all strains showing generalized aspects of accelerated aging but with each line having a specific aging-related change that is emphasized, e.g. learning and memory deficits, osteoporosis and senile amyloidosis. The senescence-resistant strains have normal patterns of aging and do not show the specific aging-related changes seen in SAMP strains. The fact that AKR mice have high levels of endogenous, ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) prompted an examination of the expression levels of MuLV in SAM strains. Analysis of brain, spleen and thymus samples revealed that seven of nine SAMP strains had high levels of MuLV and contained the Emv11 provirus (previously termed Akv1) that encodes the predominant MuLV found in AKR mice. In contrast, none of the SAMR strains had Emv11 or significant amounts of virus. The current findings represent an initial step in determining the role of MuLV in the accelerated senescence seen in SAMP strains. PMID:11850021

  19. Detection of a unique antigen on radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemia B6RV2

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, E.; Uenaka, A.; Stockert, E.; Obata, Y.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemia of a male C57BL/6 mouse, B6RV2, is immunogenic to female BALB/c X C57BL/6 F1 mice. In these mice, B6RV2 tumors regressed after initial growth, and after tumor regression the mice were resistant to repeated inocula of up to 10(8) B6RV2 cells. Serum from these mice reacted with B6RV2 in mixed hemadsorption or protein A assays, and absorption analysis indicated that the antigen was restricted to B6RV2; it could not be detected in normal thymocytes or spleen concanavalin A blasts from different inbred strains, nor in 16 C57BL/6 or BALB/c leukemias. Spleen cells from mice in which the tumor had regressed were cytotoxic to B6RV2 after in vitro stimulation with B6RV2, as shown by /sup 51/chromium release assay. This cytotoxicity was eliminated by pretreatment of the cells with anti-Thy-1.2, anti-Lyt-2.2, anti-Lyt-3.2, and complement, indicating that the effector cells were T-cells. The specificity of T-cell killing of B6RV2 was examined by competitive inhibition assays with unlabeled cells; only B6RV2 inhibited killing, while eight other C57BL/6 leukemias did not inhibit. Thus, the antigen on B6RV2 defined serologically and by cytotoxic T-cells is a unique antigen. However, it was not revealed by antibody-blocking test whether the unique determinant defined serologically was related to that recognized by T-cells; B6RV2 antiserum did not block lytic activity in the absence of added complement, irrespective of whether the target cells were untreated or anti-H-2b-treated B6RV2. H-2Kb antisera, but not H-2Db antisera, blocked lysis. This indicated that the H-2Kb molecule was exclusively involved in recognition of B6RV2 by cytotoxic T-cell.

  20. An epidemiological study of natural in utero infection with bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, M C; Carter, R L; Puhr, D M; Burridge, M J; Miller, J M; Schmerr, M J; Van der Maaten, M J

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine rates of natural in utero infection with bovine leukemia virus for association with breed, sex, dam age, dam parity and time of maternal seroconversion. Analyses conducted for breed and sex, dam age and parity and time of maternal seroconversion were the FUNCAT procedure for categorical data, Wilcoxon Rank Sums test and Fisher's exact test, respectively. A total of 223 calves born between July 1979, and September 1980, to cows infected with bovine leukemia virus in the University of Florida Dairy Research Unit herd were tested for detectable bovine leukemia virus antibodies prior to the consumption of colostrum. Sera were tested for antibodies by agar-gel immunodiffusion and radioimmunoprecipitation using the glycoprotein-51 antigen. In a group of 125 calves in which in utero infection could be confirmed through serological follow-up (group A), eight calves (6.4%) had precolostral bovine leukemia virus antibodies. For all 223 calves (group B), 18 (8.1%) had detectable bovine leukemia virus antibodies. For calves in group A, no associations were detected between precolostral bovine leukemia virus antibodies and breed (p = 0.66), dam age (p = 0.86), dam parity (p = 0.83), or time of maternal seroconversion to bovine leukemia virus (p = 0.50). However, precolostral bovine leukemia virus antibodies were found in 17.4% of the males and 3.6% of the females in group A (p = 0.11) and in 12.4% of the males and 3.6% of the females in group B (p = 0.04). PMID:6315199

  1. Monoclonal antibody to the amino-terminal L sequence of murine leukemia virus glycosylated gag polyproteins demonstrates their unusual orientation in the cell membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Pillemer, E A; Kooistra, D A; Witte, O N; Weissman, I L

    1986-01-01

    To analyze cell surface murine leukemia virus gag protein expression, we have prepared monoclonal antibodies against the spontaneous AKR T lymphoma KKT-2. One of these antibodies, 43-13, detects an AKR-specific viral p12 determinant. A second monoclonal antibody, 43-17, detects a novel murine leukemia virus-related antigen found on glycosylated gag polyproteins (gp95gag, gp85gag, and gp55gag) on the surface of cells infected with and producing ecotropic endogenous viruses, but does not detect antigens within these virions. The 43-17 antibody immunoprecipitates the precursor of the cell surface gag protein whether in its glycosylated or unglycosylated state, but does not detect the cytoplasmic precursor of the virion gag proteins (Pr65gag). Based on these findings, we have localized the 43-17 determinant to the unique amino-terminal part of the glycosylated gag polyprotein (the L domain). We have determined that gp95gag contains L-p15-p12-p30-p10 determinants, whereas gp85gag lacks the carboxyterminal p10 determinant, and gp55gag lacks both p30 and p10 carboxy terminal determinants. Analysis of cell surface gag expression with the 43-17 antibody leads us to propose that the L domain plays a crucial role in (i) the insertion and orientation of murine leukemia virus gag polyproteins in the cell membrane and (ii) the relative abundance of expression of AKR leukemia virus versus Moloney murine leukemia virus glycosylated gag polyproteins in infected cells. Images PMID:2418213

  2. Cellular Genes in the Mouse Regulate IN TRANS the Expression of Endogenous Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Traina-Dorge, Vicki L.; Carr, Jean K.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Elston, Robert C.; Taylor, Benjamin A.; Cohen, J. Craig

    1985-01-01

    The transcriptional activities of the eleven mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviruses endogenous to two sets of recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains, BXD and BXH, were characterized. Comparison of the levels of virus-specific RNA quantitated in each strain showed no direct relationship between the presence of a particular endogenous provirus or with increasing numbers of proviruses. Association of specific genetic markers with the level of MMTV-specific RNA was examined by using multiple regression analysis. Several cellular loci as well as proviral loci were identified that were significantly associated with viral expression. Importantly, these cellular loci associated with MMTV expression segregated independently of viral sequences. PMID:2996982

  3. Discovery of drugs that possess activity against feline leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Greggs, Willie M.; Clouser, Christine L.; Patterson, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a gammaretrovirus that is a significant cause of neoplastic-related disorders affecting cats worldwide. Treatment options for FeLV are limited, associated with serious side effects, and can be cost-prohibitive. The development of drugs used to treat a related retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has been rapid, leading to the approval of five drug classes. Although structural differences affect the susceptibility of gammaretroviruses to anti-HIV drugs, the similarities in mechanism of replication suggest that some anti-HIV-1 drugs may also inhibit FeLV. This study demonstrates the anti-FeLV activity of four drugs approved by the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration) at non-toxic concentrations. Of these, tenofovir and raltegravir are anti-HIV-1 drugs, while decitabine and gemcitabine are approved to treat myelodysplastic syndromes and pancreatic cancer, respectively, but also have anti-HIV-1 activity in cell culture. Our results indicate that these drugs may be useful for FeLV treatment and should be investigated for mechanism of action and suitability for veterinary use. PMID:22258856

  4. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Melanie; Schnierle, Barbara S. . E-mail: schba@pei.de

    2005-06-20

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles.

  5. An improved syncytia infectivity assay for the bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Diglio, C A; Piper, C E; Ferrer, J F

    1978-06-01

    Several factors that influence the sensitivity of the syncytia infectivity assay for the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and BLV-infected lymphocytes have been examined. The use of early-passage indicator bovine embryonic spleen (BESP) cells and their pretreatment with diethylamino-ethyl-dextran (DEAE-D) was essential for optimal sensitivity. Polybrene was less effective than DEAE-D. The combination of DEAE-D and polybrene was more effective than DEAE-D alone when BLV-infected leukocytes were used as the inoculum, but not when the inoculum was a cell-free BLV preparation. Using BESP cell passages 4 to 11 as indicators, reproducible titers were obtained when aliquots of the same virus stock were assayed at different times after freezer storage. When assaying peripheral blood lymphocytes from infected cattle, optimal syncytia responses were observed consistently by inoculating 5 X 10(6) viable lymphocytes per 60-mm Falcon dish. Centrifugation of peripheral blood leukocytes from BLV-infected cattle in discontinuous bovine serum albumin gradients can be used to separate a subpopulation of infected lymphocytes. Use of this subpopulation as the inoculum, rather than unseparated buffy-coat leukocytes, greatly increases the sensitivity of the syncytia infectivity assay. PMID:210107

  6. Tightly bound zinc in human immunodeficiency virus type 1, human T-cell leukemia virus type I, and other retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Bess, J W; Powell, P J; Issaq, H J; Schumack, L J; Grimes, M K; Henderson, L E; Arthur, L O

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation in the presence of 1 mM EDTA. Pelleted gradient fractions were analyzed for total protein, total Gag capsid protein, and total zinc. Zinc was found to copurify and concentrate with the virus particles. Through successive cycles of resuspending in buffer containing EDTA and repelleting, the zinc content remained constant at about 1.7 mol of zinc per mol of Gag protein. Proteins from purified virus (HIV-1 and HTLV-I) were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, blotted to polyvinylidene fluoride paper, and probed with 65ZnCl2. Viral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins (HIV-1 p7NC and HTLV-I p15NC) bound 65Zn2+. Other retroviruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus, equine infectious anemia virus, bovine leukemia virus, Moloney murine leukemia virus, mouse mammary tumor virus, and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, were found to contain amounts of zinc per milligram of total protein similar to those found in HIV-1 and HTLV-I. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that retroviral NC proteins function as zinc finger proteins in mature viruses. Images PMID:1731111

  7. Vaccination against δ−Retroviruses: The Bovine Leukemia Virus Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Rodríguez, Sabrina M.; de Brogniez, Alix; Gillet, Nicolas; Golime, Ramarao; Burny, Arsène; Jaworski, Juan-Pablo; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are closely related δ-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia). Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of δ-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy. PMID:24956179

  8. Anemia associated with feline leukemia virus infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Mackey, L; Jarrett, W; Jarrett, O; Laird, H

    1975-01-01

    The types of anemia associated with natural and experimental feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection in cats were investigated. In one experiment, 10 kittens were inoculated neonatally with Jarrett FeLV-1, an isolate of subgroup A; 6 developed anemia a few weeks later. This anemia was characterized by macrocytosis, normoblastosis, increased erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, and extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen. Anemia was transient and nonfatal and occurred before the onset of lympoid malignancy. The same type of anemia was also seen in 9 of 24 kittens inoculated with Jarrett FeLV-9 of subgroups A and B. A different form of anemai occurred in another experiment in which 10 kittens were inoculated with FeLV-C of subgroup C only. All 10 kittens developed a profound aplastic or erythroblastopenic anemia in which the bone marrow became depleted of erythroid tissue; all kittens died within 16 weeks, most as a direct result of anemia. In an experiment in which kittens were inoculated with FeLV-B of subgroup B only, no kitten showed anemia. Cats with naturally acquired, nonleukemic lymphosarcoma were also studied. Of 33 lymphosarcomas in which myelophthisis was excluded as a cause, 54% of the affected cats had anemia, the features of which were consistent with hemolytic origin. When virus could be grown from these lymphosarcomas, it was of subgroup A alone or a combination of A and B. With one exception, anemic cats had low or negative titers to feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigens. Until more isolates have been tested, it is not known if the various hematologic changes reflected differences in the pathogenic effects of the subgroups of the virus or of types of strains within them. PMID:163317

  9. Endogenization of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-like elements in genomes of pikas (Ochotona sp.).

    PubMed

    Lemos de Matos, Ana; de Sousa-Pereira, Patrícia; Lissovsky, Andrey A; van der Loo, Wessel; Melo-Ferreira, José; Cui, Jie; Esteves, Pedro J

    2015-12-01

    Despite the finding in European rabbit and other leporid genomes of the first ever described endogenous lentivirus and of a European rabbit exclusive endogenous gammaretrovirus, until now no exogenous retroviruses have been isolated in Lagomorpha species. Nevertheless, looking for the presence of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in the species genomes could lead to the discovery of retroviral lineages yet to be found in Lagomorpha. Different mammalian genomes harbor endogenous viral sequences phylogenetically close to the betaretrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), propelling us to look for such retroviral "fossil" in American pika (Ochotona princeps) and European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) genomes. By performing genomic mining using MMTV gag and LTR as query sequences, we found that such viral elements were absent from the European rabbit genome. Oppositely, significant matches were found in American pika, and more importantly, a nearly complete MMTV-like virus (Pika-BERV) was identified. Using Pika-BERV gag and LTR as templates, we found similar sequences endogenized in different pika (Ochotona sp.) species. The orthology of the LTR flanking region between some pika species supported shared ancestry of specific endogenous betaretroviruses, while in other pika species similar sequences, but not orthologous, should have resulted from independent insertions. Our study supports the possible existence of infecting exogenous betaretroviruses for a long term, after the divergence of Ochotonidae from Leporidae, but yet to be identified. PMID:26151606

  10. Activation of enhancer sequences in type II human T-cell leukemia virus and bovine leukemia virus long terminal repeats by virus-associated trans-acting regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, C A; Sodroski, J G; Kettman, R; Haseltine, W A

    1986-01-01

    The ability of the sequences present in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of human T-cell leukemia viruses type I and II (HTLV-I and HTLV-II) and of bovine leukemia virus to function as enhancer elements was investigated. Recombinant plasmids that contained the HTLV-I, HTLV-II, and bovine leukemia virus LTRs at a distance from a simian virus 40 promoter element located 5' to the bacterial gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.28) were constructed. We report that all three LTR sequences contain enhancer elements capable of increasing the level of gene expression directed from a distal heterologous promoter. The enhancer present in the HTLV-I LTR was active in uninfected cells of lymphoid and nonlymphoid origin. In contrast, the enhancer activity of the HTLV-II and bovine leukemia virus LTR sequences was evident only in virus-infected cells. This activity is likely due to virus-associated trans-acting transcriptional factors previously shown to be present in HTLV- and bovine leukemia virus-infected cells. The implication of these observations for virus replication and transforming activity are discussed. Images PMID:3005624

  11. Endogenous Murine BST-2/Tetherin Is Not a Major Restriction Factor of Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Job, Emma R.; Moffat, Jessica M.; Wakim, Linda M.; Gonelli, Christopher A.; Purcell, Damien F. J.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Villadangos, Jose A.; Reading, Patrick C.; Mintern, Justine D.

    2015-01-01

    BST-2 (tetherin, CD317, HM1.24) restricts virus growth by tethering enveloped viruses to the cell surface. The role of BST-2 during influenza A virus infection (IAV) is controversial. Here, we assessed the capacity of endogenous BST-2 to restrict IAV in primary murine cells. IAV infection increased BST-2 surface expression by primary macrophages, but not alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). BST-2-deficient AEC and macrophages displayed no difference in susceptibility to IAV infection relative to wild type cells. Furthermore, BST-2 played little role in infectious IAV release from either AEC or macrophages. To examine BST-2 during IAV infection in vivo, we infected BST-2-deficient mice. No difference in weight loss or in viral loads in the lungs and/or nasal tissues were detected between BST-2-deficient and wild type animals. This study rules out a major role for endogenous BST-2 in modulating IAV in the mouse model of infection. PMID:26566124

  12. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus (XMRV) and the Safety of the Blood Supply.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew D; Cohn, Claudia S

    2016-10-01

    In 2006, a new virus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), was discovered in a cohort of U.S. men with prostate cancer. Soon after this initial finding, XMRV was also detected in samples from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The blood community, which is highly sensitive to the threat of emerging infectious diseases since the HIV/AIDS crisis, recommended indefinite deferral of all blood donors with a history of CFS. As XMRV research progressed, conflicting results emerged regarding the importance of this virus in the pathophysiology of prostate cancer and/or CFS. Molecular biologists traced the development of XMRV to a recombination event in a laboratory mouse that likely occurred circa 1993. The virus was propagated via cell lines derived from a tumor present in this mouse and spread through contamination of laboratory samples. Well-controlled experiments showed that detection of XMRV was due to contaminated samples and was not a marker of or a causal factor in prostate cancer or CFS. This paper traces the development of XMRV in the prostate and CFS scientific communities and explores the effect it had on the blood community. PMID:27358491

  13. Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  14. Identification of a new genotype of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Balić, Davor; Lojkić, Ivana; Periškić, Marin; Bedeković, Tomislav; Jungić, Andreja; Lemo, Nina; Roić, Besi; Cač, Zeljko; Barbić, Ljubo; Madić, Josip

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the degree of genetic variability of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) strains circulating in Croatia, 29 isolates from the six largest dairy farms were examined by PCR for a segment of the gp51 env gene, followed by DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The nucleotide sequences were compared with other previously characterized BLV strains from different geographical areas, comprising all seven known BLV genotypes. The Croatian sequences showed six to eight nucleotide substitutions: six silent substitutions and two amino acid changes. Four of those substitutions were within epitopes. In comparison to the sequences of other BLV genotypes, our isolates showed the closest relationship to genotype 1 isolates PL-3252 (FJ808585) and AL-148 (FJ808573) from Argentina. The degree of variation between our sequences and those of genotype 1 was 0.2- 4.6 %. In phylogenetic trees based on 400-nt and 519-nt sequences, all of the Croatian sequences clustered separately from the other sequences, revealing a new genotype. PMID:22488472

  15. Managing the future: the Special Virus Leukemia Program and the acceleration of biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Robin Wolfe

    2014-12-01

    After the end of the Second World War, cancer virus research experienced a remarkable revival, culminating in the creation in 1964 of the United States National Cancer Institute's Special Virus Leukemia Program (SVLP), an ambitious program of directed biomedical research to accelerate the development of a leukemia vaccine. Studies of cancer viruses soon became the second most highly funded area of research at the Institute, and by far the most generously funded area of biological research. Remarkably, this vast infrastructure for cancer vaccine production came into being before a human leukemia virus was shown to exist. The origins of the SVLP were rooted in as much as shifts in American society as laboratory science. The revival of cancer virus studies was a function of the success advocates and administrators achieved in associating cancer viruses with campaigns against childhood diseases such as polio and leukemia. To address the urgency borne of this new association, the SVLP's architects sought to lessen the power of peer review in favor of centralized Cold War management methods, fashioning viruses as "administrative objects" in order to accelerate the tempo of biomedical research and discovery. PMID:25459347

  16. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  17. Endogenous non-retroviral RNA virus elements evidence a novel type of antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate genomes contain many virus-related sequences derived from both retroviruses and non-retroviral RNA and DNA viruses. Such non-retroviral RNA sequences are possibly produced by reverse-transcription and integration of viral mRNAs of ancient RNA viruses using retrotransposon machineries. We refer to this process as transcript reversion. During an ancient bornavirus infection, transcript reversion may have left bornavirus-related sequences, known as endogenous bornavirus-like nucleoproteins (EBLNs), in the genome. We have recently demonstrated that all Homo sapiens EBLNs are expressed in at least one tissue. Because species with EBLNs appear relatively protected against infection by a current bornavirus, Borna disease virus, it is speculated that EBLNs play some roles in antiviral immunity, as seen with some endogenous retroviruses. EBLNs can function as dominant negative forms of viral proteins, small RNAs targeting viral sequences, or DNA or RNA elements modulating the gene expression. Growing evidence reveals that various RNA viruses are reverse-transcribed and integrated into the genome of infected cells, suggesting transcript reversion generally occurs during ongoing infection. Considering this, transcript reversion-mediated interference with related viruses may be a novel type of antiviral immunity in vertebrates. Understanding the biological significance of transcript reversion will provide novel insights into host defenses against viral infections. PMID:27510928

  18. Endogenous New World primate type C viruses isolated from owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus) kidney cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Todaro, G J; Sherr, C J; Sen, A; King, N; Daniel, M D; Fleckenstein, B

    1978-01-01

    A type C virus (OMC-1) detected in a culture of owl monkey kidney cells resembled typical type C viruses morphologically, but was slightly larger than previously characterized mammalian type C viruses. OMC-1 can be transmitted to bat lung cells and cat embryo fibroblasts. The virions band at a density of 1.16 g/ml in isopycnic sucrose density gradients and contain reverse transcriptase and a 60-65S RNA genome composed of approximately 32S subunits. The reverse transcriptase is immunologically and biochemically distinct from the polymerases of othe retroviruses. Radioimmunoassays directed to the interspecies antigenic determinants of the major structure proteins of other type C viruses do not detect a related antigen in OMC-1. Nucleic acid hybridization experiments using labeled viral genomic RNA or proviral cDNA transcripts to normal cellular DNA of different species show that OMC-1 is an endogenous virus with multiple virogene copies (20-50 per haploid genome) present in normal owl monkey cells and is distinct from previously isolated type C and D viruses. Sequences related to the OMC-1 genome can be detected in other New World monkeys. Thus, similar to the Old World primates (e.g., baboons as a prototype), the New World monkeys contain endogenous type C viral genes that appear to have been transmitted in the primate germ line. Images PMID:76312

  19. Endogenous non-retroviral RNA virus elements evidence a novel type of antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vertebrate genomes contain many virus-related sequences derived from both retroviruses and non-retroviral RNA and DNA viruses. Such non-retroviral RNA sequences are possibly produced by reverse-transcription and integration of viral mRNAs of ancient RNA viruses using retrotransposon machineries. We refer to this process as transcript reversion. During an ancient bornavirus infection, transcript reversion may have left bornavirus-related sequences, known as endogenous bornavirus-like nucleoproteins (EBLNs), in the genome. We have recently demonstrated that all Homo sapiens EBLNs are expressed in at least one tissue. Because species with EBLNs appear relatively protected against infection by a current bornavirus, Borna disease virus, it is speculated that EBLNs play some roles in antiviral immunity, as seen with some endogenous retroviruses. EBLNs can function as dominant negative forms of viral proteins, small RNAs targeting viral sequences, or DNA or RNA elements modulating the gene expression. Growing evidence reveals that various RNA viruses are reverse-transcribed and integrated into the genome of infected cells, suggesting transcript reversion generally occurs during ongoing infection. Considering this, transcript reversion-mediated interference with related viruses may be a novel type of antiviral immunity in vertebrates. Understanding the biological significance of transcript reversion will provide novel insights into host defenses against viral infections. PMID:27510928

  20. Adoptive Immunotherapy of Disseminated Leukemia With TCR-transduced, CD8+ T Cells Expressing a Known Endogenous TCR

    PubMed Central

    Dossett, Michelle L; Teague, Ryan M; Schmitt, Thomas M; Tan, Xiaoxia; Cooper, Laurence JN; Pinzon, Cristina; Greenberg, Philip D

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy has shown promise in the treatment of human malignancies, but the challenge of isolating T cells with high avidity for tumor antigens in each patient has limited application of this approach. The transfer into T cells of T-cell receptor (TCR) genes encoding high-affinity TCRs recognizing defined tumor-associated antigens can potentially circumvent this obstacle. Using a well-characterized murine model of adoptive T-cell immunotherapy for widely disseminated leukemia, we demonstrate that TCR gene–modified T cells can cure mice of disseminated tumor. One goal of such adoptive therapy is to establish a persistent memory response to prevent recurrence; however, long-term function of transferred TCR-transduced T cells is limited due to reduced expression of the introduced TCR in vivo in quiescent resting T cells. However, by introducing the TCR into a cell with a known endogenous specificity, activation of these T cells by stimulation through the endogenous TCR can be used to increase expression of the introduced TCR, potentially providing a strategy to increase the total number of tumor-reactive T cells in the host and restore more potent antitumor activity. PMID:19209146

  1. Disruption of Thiamine Uptake and Growth of Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus Subgroup A

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Ramon; Miller, A. Dusty

    2013-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in domestic cats and some wild cats despite the availability of relatively effective vaccines against the virus. FeLV subgroup A (FeLV-A) is transmitted in natural infections, and FeLV subgroups B, C, and T can evolve directly from FeLV-A by mutation and/or recombination with endogenous retroviruses in domestic cats, resulting in a variety of pathogenic outcomes. The cell surface entry receptor for FeLV-A is a putative thiamine transporter (THTR1). Here, we have addressed whether FeLV-A infection might disrupt thiamine uptake into cells and, because thiamine is an essential nutrient, whether this disruption might have pathological consequences. First, we cloned the cat ortholog of the other of the two known thiamine transporters in mammals, THTR2, and we show that feline THTR1 (feTHTR1) and feTHTR2 both mediate thiamine uptake, but feTHTR2 does not function as a receptor for FeLV-A. We found that feTHTR1 is widely expressed in cat tissues and in cell lines, while expression of feTHTR2 is restricted. Thiamine uptake mediated by feTHTR1 was indeed blocked by FeLV-A infection, and in feline fibroblasts that naturally express feTHTR1 and not feTHTR2, this blockade resulted in a growth arrest at physiological concentrations of extracellular thiamine. The growth arrest was reversed at high extracellular concentrations of thiamine. Our results show that FeLV-A infection can indeed disrupt thiamine uptake with pathological consequences. A prediction of these experiments is that raising the plasma levels of thiamine in FeLV-infected cats may ameliorate the pathogenic effects of infection. PMID:23269813

  2. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, and feline leukemia infections in cats from Grenada, West Indies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Iimmunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevale...

  3. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a γ retrovirus that has been associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and prostate cancer. The search for viral causes of these syndromes was reignited by the finding that RNase L activity was low in hereditary prostate cancer and some CFS patients. The six strains of XMRV that have been sequenced have greater than 99% identity, indicating a new human infection rather than laboratory contamination. DNA, RNA, and proteins from XMRV have been detected in 50% to 67% of CFS patients and in about 3.7% of healthy controls. XMRV infections could be transmitted to permissive cell lines from CFS plasma, suggesting the potential for communicable and blood-borne spread of the virus and potentially CFS. This troubling concept is currently under intense evaluation. The most important steps now are to independently confirm the initial findings; develop reliable assays of biomarkers; and to move on to investigations of XMRV pathophysiology and treatment in CFS, prostate cancer, and potentially other virus-related syndromes, if they exist. PMID:20425007

  4. Unstable resistance of G mouse fibroblasts to ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikura, H; Naito, Y; Moriwaki, K

    1979-01-01

    G mouse cells were resistant to N- and NB-tropic Friend leukemia viruses and to B-tropic WN 1802B. Though the cells were resistant to focus formation by the Moloney isolate of murine sarcoma virus, they were relatively sensitive to helper component murine leukemia virus. To amphotropic murine leukemia virus and to focus formation by amphotropic murine sarcoma virus, G mouse cells were fully permissive. When the cell lines were established starting from the individual embryos, most cell lines were not resistant to the murine leukemia viruses. Only one resistant line was established. Cloning of this cell line indicated that the resistant cells constantly segregated sensitive cells during the culture; i.e., the G mouse cell cultures were probably always mixtures of sensitive and resistant cells. Among the sensitive cell clones, some were devoid of Fv-1 restriction. Such dually permissive cells, and also feral mouse-derived SC-1 cells, retained glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-1 and apparently normal number 4 chromosomes. The loss of Fv-1 restriction in these mouse cells was not brought about by any gross structural changes in the vicinity of Fv-1 on number 4 chromosomes. Images PMID:221667

  5. Endogenous florendoviruses are major components of plant genomes and hallmarks of virus evolution

    PubMed Central

    Geering, Andrew D. W.; Maumus, Florian; Copetti, Dario; Choisne, Nathalie; Zwickl, Derrick J.; Zytnicki, Matthias; McTaggart, Alistair R.; Scalabrin, Simone; Vezzulli, Silvia; Wing, Rod A.; Quesneville, Hadi; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    The extent and importance of endogenous viral elements have been extensively described in animals but are much less well understood in plants. Here we describe a new genus of Caulimoviridae called ‘Florendovirus’, members of which have colonized the genomes of a large diversity of flowering plants, sometimes at very high copy numbers (>0.5% total genome content). The genome invasion of Oryza is dated to over 1.8 million years ago (MYA) but phylogeographic evidence points to an even older age of 20–34 MYA for this virus group. Some appear to have had a bipartite genome organization, a unique characteristic among viral retroelements. In Vitis vinifera, 9% of the endogenous florendovirus loci are located within introns and therefore may influence host gene expression. The frequent colocation of endogenous florendovirus loci with TA simple sequence repeats, which are associated with chromosome fragility, suggests sequence capture during repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. PMID:25381880

  6. Endogenous florendoviruses are major components of plant genomes and hallmarks of virus evolution.

    PubMed

    Geering, Andrew D W; Maumus, Florian; Copetti, Dario; Choisne, Nathalie; Zwickl, Derrick J; Zytnicki, Matthias; McTaggart, Alistair R; Scalabrin, Simone; Vezzulli, Silvia; Wing, Rod A; Quesneville, Hadi; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    The extent and importance of endogenous viral elements have been extensively described in animals but are much less well understood in plants. Here we describe a new genus of Caulimoviridae called 'Florendovirus', members of which have colonized the genomes of a large diversity of flowering plants, sometimes at very high copy numbers (>0.5% total genome content). The genome invasion of Oryza is dated to over 1.8 million years ago (MYA) but phylogeographic evidence points to an even older age of 20-34 MYA for this virus group. Some appear to have had a bipartite genome organization, a unique characteristic among viral retroelements. In Vitis vinifera, 9% of the endogenous florendovirus loci are located within introns and therefore may influence host gene expression. The frequent colocation of endogenous florendovirus loci with TA simple sequence repeats, which are associated with chromosome fragility, suggests sequence capture during repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. PMID:25381880

  7. Endogenous changes in citokinin activity in systemically virus-infected plants.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, S; Roggero, P

    1998-10-01

    Viral diseases may alter cytokinin activity in plants, an effect associated with morphological and physiological changes. Experimental evidence indicates that the level of cytokinins may be both reduced or increased depending on different viral diseases. Circumstantial evidence suggests a change in virus-diseased plants showing specific alterations such as tumors and disorders in carbon partitioning and chlorophyll metabolism. The knowledge reached on cytokinin changes is not yet adequate to the importance of their role during viral pathogenesis. Furthermore, unclear results are available on the effect of cytokinins on virus replication. There is little information on how systemic virus infection alters cytokinin metabolism and no information on how this alteration can affect plant metabolism. Nevertheless, a possible control of some viral diseases by biomanipulation of plants to modify the endogenous levels of such hormone may be suggested, provided that higher levels of cytokinins do not increase the rate of virus replication. PMID:9812325

  8. Human adult T-cell leukemia virus: complete nucleotide sequence of the provirus genome integrated in leukemia cell DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Seiki, M; Hattori, S; Hirayama, Y; Yoshida, M

    1983-01-01

    Human retrovirus adult T-cell leukemia virus (ATLV) has been shown to be closely associated with human adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) [Yoshida, M., Miyoshi, I. & Hinuma, Y. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 2031-2035]. The provirus of ATLV integrated in DNA of leukemia T cells from a patient with ATL was molecularly cloned and the complete nucleotide sequence of 9,032 bases of the proviral genome was determined. The provirus DNA contains two long terminal repeats (LTRs) consisting of 755 bases, one at each end, which are flanked by a 6-base direct repeat of the cellular DNA sequence. The nucleotides in the LTR could be arranged into a unique secondary structure, which could explain transcriptional termination within the 3' LTR but not in the 5' LTR. The nucleotide sequence of the provirus contains three large open reading frames, which are capable of coding for proteins of 48,000, 99,000, and 54,000 daltons. The three open frames are in this order from the 5' end of the viral genome and the predicted 48,000-dalton polypeptide is a precursor of gag proteins, because it has an identical amino acid sequence to that of the NH2 terminus of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) p24. The open frames coding for 99,000- and 54,000-dalton polypeptides are thought to be the pol and env genes, respectively. On the 3' side of these three open frames, the ATLV sequence has four smaller open frames in various phases; these frames may code for 10,000-, 11,000-, 12,000-, and 27,000-dalton polypeptides. Although one or some of these open frames could be the transforming gene of this virus, in preliminary analysis, DNA of this region has no homology with the normal human genome. PMID:6304725

  9. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  10. Genetic susceptibility to and presence of endogenous avian leukosis viruses impose no significant impact on survival days of chickens challenged with very virulent plus Marek's disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicks of distinct genotypes at the tumor virus B locus (TVB) in combination with presence or absence of endogenous avian leukosis virus ev21 gene in their genomes were examined for survival day patterns after challenge with very virulent plus Marek’s disease virus (vv+MDV) in three consecutive tria...

  11. In Vitro Assembly of Virus-Like Particles of a Gammaretrovirus, the Murine Leukemia Virus XMRV

    PubMed Central

    Hadravová, Romana; de Marco, Alex; Ulbrich, Pavel; Štokrová, Jitka; Doležal, Michal; Pichová, Iva; Ruml, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Immature retroviral particles are assembled by self-association of the structural polyprotein precursor Gag. During maturation the Gag polyprotein is proteolytically cleaved, yielding mature structural proteins, matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC), that reassemble into a mature viral particle. Proteolytic cleavage causes the N terminus of CA to fold back to form a β-hairpin, anchored by an internal salt bridge between the N-terminal proline and the inner aspartate. Using an in vitro assembly system of capsid-nucleocapsid protein (CANC), we studied the formation of virus-like particles (VLP) of a gammaretrovirus, the xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV). We show here that, unlike other retroviruses, XMRV CA and CANC do not assemble tubular particles characteristic of mature assembly. The prevention of β-hairpin formation by the deletion of either the N-terminal proline or 10 initial amino acids enabled the assembly of ΔProCANC or Δ10CANC into immature-like spherical particles. Detailed three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis of these particles revealed that below a disordered N-terminal CA layer, the C terminus of CA assembles a typical immature lattice, which is linked by rod-like densities with the RNP. PMID:22090120

  12. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu; Morishita, Ryo; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially {sup 15}N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [{sup 1}H, {sup 15}N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has

  13. Endogenous Hepatitis C Virus Homolog Fragments in European Rabbit and Hare Genomes Replicate in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Eliane; Marques, Sara; Osório, Hugo; Carvalheira, Júlio; Thompson, Gertrude

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses, non-retroviral RNA viruses and DNA viruses have been found in the mammalian genomes. The origin of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans, remains unclear since its discovery. Here we show that fragments homologous to HCV structural and non-structural (NS) proteins present in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and hare (Lepus europaeus) genomes replicate in bovine cell cultures. The HCV genomic homolog fragments were demonstrated by RT-PCR, PCR, mass spectrometry, and replication in bovine cell cultures by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunogold electron microscopy (IEM) using specific MAbs for HCV NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins. These findings may lead to novel research approaches on the HCV origin, genesis, evolution and diversity. PMID:23185448

  14. Frequency and significance of feline leukemia virus infection in necropsied cats.

    PubMed

    Reinacher, M; Theilen, G

    1987-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection was diagnosed immunohistologically on paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from 1,095 necropsied cats. Significant association of FeLV infection was demonstrated by chi 2 and Fisher's tests with various conditions and diseases (ie, anemia, tumors of the leukemia/lymphoma complex, feline infectious peritonitis, bacterial infections, emaciation, FeLV-associated enteritis, lymphatic hyperplasia, and hemorrhage). Unexpected findings associated with FeLV infection were icterus, several types of hepatitis, and liver degeneration. A negative association with FeLV infection was found for most parasitic and viral infections, including feline panleukopenia. Neither positive nor negative associations were established for FeLV infection and most forms of nephritis, including severe glomerulonephritis. Feline leukemia virus-infected cats were significantly (Kruskal-Wallis test) older than were FeLV-negative cats with the same nonneoplastic FeLV-associated diseases. PMID:3037951

  15. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-03-31

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary. PMID:27034390

  16. Virus-Specific Messenger RNA and Nascent Polypeptides in Polyribosomes of Cells Replicating Murine Sarcoma-Leukemia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, G.; Tsuchida, N.; Shanmugam, G.; Green, M.

    1973-01-01

    We present evidence that virus-specific RNA is present in polyribosomes of transformed cells replicating the murine sarcoma-leukemia virus complex and that it serves as messenger RNA for the synthesis of viral-coded proteins. Both virus-specific RNA (detected by hybridization with the [3H]DNA product of the viral RNA-directed DNA polymerase) and nascent viral polypeptides (measured by precipitation with antiserum to purified virus) were found in membrane-bound and free polyribosomes. Membrane-bound polyribosomes contained a higher content of both virus-specific RNA and nascent viral polypeptides. From 60 to 70% of viral RNA sequences were released from polyribosomes with EDTA, consistent with a function as messenger RNA. Maximum amounts of both virus-specific RNA and nascent viral polypeptides were found in the polyribosome region sedimenting at about 350 S. PMID:4352969

  17. Expression of murine leukemia viruses in the highly lymphomatous BXH-2 recombinant inbred mouse strain.

    PubMed Central

    Bedigian, H G; Taylor, B A; Meier, H

    1981-01-01

    Among 12 recombinant inbred strains of mice derived from crossing two strains, C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ, which have a low incidence of neoplastic disease, one strain (BXH-2) has been found to have a high incidence of lymphoma, of non-T-cell origin, at an early age. The BXH-2 strain carries the Fv-1b allele and spontaneously expresses a B-tropic murine leukemia virus beginning at as early as 10 days of gestation and continuing throughout their life. No significant differences in ecotropic virus titers were observed at any age tested (16 to 17 days of gestation through 7 months), whereas xenotropic virus was first detected in lymphoid tissues of 2-month-old mice and virus titers increased with age. Dual tropic virus(es), which induced cytopathic changes on mink lung cells, was isolated from BXH-2 lymphomatous tissues. Unlike AKR mink lung focus-forming virus (N-tropic recombinant), BXH-2 dual tropic virus is B tropic and induces cytopathic changes in mouse fibroblast cultures as well. The BXH-2 mouse provides a model system for studying the role of replication-competent viruses in spontaneously occurring leukemias of non-T-cell lineage and neurological disease. Images PMID:6268848

  18. Bovine Leukemia Virus Seroprevalence Among Cattle Presented for Slaughter in the United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection with bovine leukemia virus (BLV) results in economic loss due reduced productivity, especially the reduction of milk production and early culling. In the USA.,USA, previous studies in 1996, 1999 and 2007 showed BLV infections widespread, especially in the dairy herds. The goal of this stud...

  19. From molecular interaction to acute promyelocytic leukemia: Calculating leukemogenesis and remission from endogenous molecular-cellular network.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ruoshi; Zhu, Xiaomei; Radich, Jerald P; Ao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) remains the best example of a malignancy that can be cured clinically by differentiation therapy. We demonstrate that APL may emerge from a dynamical endogenous molecular-cellular network obtained from normal, non-cancerous molecular interactions such as signal transduction and translational regulation under physiological conditions. This unifying framework, which reproduces APL, normal progenitor, and differentiated granulocytic phenotypes as different robust states from the network dynamics, has the advantage to study transition between these states, i.e. critical drivers for leukemogenesis and targets for differentiation. The simulation results quantitatively reproduce microarray profiles of NB4 and HL60 cell lines in response to treatment and normal neutrophil differentiation, and lead to new findings such as biomarkers for APL and additional molecular targets for arsenic trioxide therapy. The modeling shows APL and normal states mutually suppress each other, both in "wiring" and in dynamical cooperation. Leukemogenesis and recovery under treatment may be a consequence of spontaneous or induced transitions between robust states, through "passes" or "dragging" by drug effects. Our approach rationalizes leukemic complexity and constructs a platform towards extending differentiation therapy by performing "dry" molecular biology experiments. PMID:27098097

  20. From molecular interaction to acute promyelocytic leukemia: Calculating leukemogenesis and remission from endogenous molecular-cellular network

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ruoshi; Zhu, Xiaomei; Radich, Jerald P.; Ao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) remains the best example of a malignancy that can be cured clinically by differentiation therapy. We demonstrate that APL may emerge from a dynamical endogenous molecular-cellular network obtained from normal, non-cancerous molecular interactions such as signal transduction and translational regulation under physiological conditions. This unifying framework, which reproduces APL, normal progenitor, and differentiated granulocytic phenotypes as different robust states from the network dynamics, has the advantage to study transition between these states, i.e. critical drivers for leukemogenesis and targets for differentiation. The simulation results quantitatively reproduce microarray profiles of NB4 and HL60 cell lines in response to treatment and normal neutrophil differentiation, and lead to new findings such as biomarkers for APL and additional molecular targets for arsenic trioxide therapy. The modeling shows APL and normal states mutually suppress each other, both in “wiring” and in dynamical cooperation. Leukemogenesis and recovery under treatment may be a consequence of spontaneous or induced transitions between robust states, through “passes” or “dragging” by drug effects. Our approach rationalizes leukemic complexity and constructs a platform towards extending differentiation therapy by performing “dry” molecular biology experiments. PMID:27098097

  1. Seroprevalence of bovine immunodeficiency virus and bovine leukemia virus in draught animals in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Meas, S; Ohashi, K; Tum, S; Chhin, M; Te, K; Miura, K; Sugimoto, C; Onuma, M

    2000-07-01

    Since bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV), known as bovine lentivirus, has been detected in dairy and beef cattle in various countries around the world, a prevalence study of antibodies to BIV and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was conducted in draught animals in five provinces in Cambodia, where protozoan parasite infections were suspected in some animals. To clarify the status of draught animals including Haryana, Brahman, mixed-breed, local breed cattle and muscle water buffaloes, a total of 544 cattle and 42 buffaloes were tested, and 26.3 and 16.7%, respectively, were found positive for anti-BIV p26 antibodies determined by Western blotting. There were 5.3% positive for anti-BLV antibodies detected by immunodiffusion test among the cattle, but no reactors among buffaloes and no dual infection for both BIV and BLV was determined in this study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from BIV-seropositive cattle were found to have BIV-provirus DNA, as detected by polymerase chain reaction and subsequent Southern blot hybridization. This is the first evidence for the presence of BIV and BLV infections in draught animals in tropical countries such as Cambodia. This wide distribution of BIV suggests its association with problems in animal health as reported worldwide, and that a primary BIV infection can predispose death of affected animals by other aggressive pathogens or stresses. PMID:10945301

  2. Detection of virus-specific RNA in simian sarcoma-leukemia virus-infected cells in in situ hybridization to viral complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, S L; Gallo, R C; Miller, N R

    1979-01-01

    An in situ molecular hybridization system which will detect retrovirus RNA in the cytoplasm of individual virus-infected cells has been developed. The technique was applied to cells infected with simian sarcoma-leukemia virus, where the virus-specific RNA was detected by hybridization to simian sarcoma-leukemia virus 3H-labeled complementary DNA. The system is useful for detecting viral RNA-containing cells in the presence of an excess of virus-negative cells and for determining which type of cell in a heterogenous population is expressing viral RNA. Images PMID:224220

  3. Endogenous viral sequences and their potential contribution to heritable virus resistance in plants

    PubMed Central

    Mette, M.F.; Kanno, T.; Aufsatz, W.; Jakowitsch, J.; van der Winden, J.; Matzke, M.A.; Matzke, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Tobacco endogenous pararetroviruses (TEPRVs) represent the first virus-derived repetitive sequence family found in plants. The sequence conservation of TEPRVs and the lack of an exogenous form of the virus suggest that TEPRVs serve a beneficial function, perhaps by furnishing virus resistance via homologous sequence interactions. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that TEPRVs are methylated and negligibly transcribed. Moreover, transgenes driven by the TEPRV enhancer are silenced and methylated when introduced into tobacco, but remain active and unmethylated in non-host species devoid of sequences homologous to TEPRVs. In transgenic Arabidopsis, the TEPRV enhancer is active primarily in shoot meristems. This suggests that the virus giving rise to TEPRVs could infect germ cell precursors, a prerequisite for meiotically heritable insertions into host chromosomes. The copy number, organization and methylation of TEPRVs in tetraploid tobacco and one of its diploid ancestors, Nicotiana sylvestris, the presumed original host for the virus, have remained constant since polyploid formation. The remarkable conservation of these features in two independently evolving species further supports a role for TEPRVs in viral immunity. PMID:11823438

  4. Modes of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transmission, Replication and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Barez, Pierre-Yves; Hamaidia, Malik; Gazon, Hélène; de Brogniez, Alix; Perike, Srikanth; Gillet, Nicolas; Willems, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that causes cancer (Adult T cell Leukemia, ATL) and a spectrum of inflammatory diseases (mainly HTLV-associated myelopathy—tropical spastic paraparesis, HAM/TSP). Since virions are particularly unstable, HTLV-1 transmission primarily occurs by transfer of a cell carrying an integrated provirus. After transcription, the viral genomic RNA undergoes reverse transcription and integration into the chromosomal DNA of a cell from the newly infected host. The virus then replicates by either one of two modes: (i) an infectious cycle by virus budding and infection of new targets and (ii) mitotic division of cells harboring an integrated provirus. HTLV-1 replication initiates a series of mechanisms in the host including antiviral immunity and checkpoint control of cell proliferation. HTLV-1 has elaborated strategies to counteract these defense mechanisms allowing continuous persistence in humans. PMID:26198240

  5. A paradigm for virus-host coevolution: sequential counter-adaptations between endogenous and exogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Frederick; Caporale, Marco; Varela, Mariana; Biek, Roman; Chessa, Bernardo; Alberti, Alberto; Golder, Matthew; Mura, Manuela; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Yu, Li; Pereira, Filipe; Demartini, James C; Leymaster, Kreg; Spencer, Thomas E; Palmarini, Massimo

    2007-11-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of the host germline transmitted vertically from generation to generation. It is hypothesized that some ERVs are used by the host as restriction factors to block the infection of pathogenic retroviruses. Indeed, some ERVs efficiently interfere with the replication of related exogenous retroviruses. However, data suggesting that these mechanisms have influenced the coevolution of endogenous and/or exogenous retroviruses and their hosts have been more difficult to obtain. Sheep are an interesting model system to study retrovirus-host coevolution because of the coexistence in this animal species of two exogenous (i.e., horizontally transmitted) oncogenic retroviruses, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus and Enzootic nasal tumor virus, with highly related and biologically active endogenous retroviruses (enJSRVs). Here, we isolated and characterized the evolutionary history and molecular virology of 27 enJSRV proviruses. enJSRVs have been integrating in the host genome for the last 5-7 million y. Two enJSRV proviruses (enJS56A1 and enJSRV-20), which entered the host genome within the last 3 million y (before and during speciation within the genus Ovis), acquired in two temporally distinct events a defective Gag polyprotein resulting in a transdominant phenotype able to block late replication steps of related exogenous retroviruses. Both transdominant proviruses became fixed in the host genome before or around sheep domestication (approximately 9,000 y ago). Interestingly, a provirus escaping the transdominant enJSRVs has emerged very recently, most likely within the last 200 y. Thus, we determined sequentially distinct events during evolution that are indicative of an evolutionary antagonism between endogenous and exogenous retroviruses. This study strongly suggests that endogenization and selection of ERVs acting as restriction factors is a mechanism used by the host to fight retroviral infections

  6. Analysis of intracellular feline leukemia virus proteins. I. Identification of a 60,000-dalton precursor of feline leukemia virus p30.

    PubMed Central

    Okasinki, G F; Velicer, L F

    1976-01-01

    The synthesis and release of feline leukemia virus p30 was studied using a permanently infected feline thymus tumor cell line. Disrupted cells were divided into two subcellular fractions, a cytoplasmic extract (CE) representing cellular material soluble in 0.5% NP-40 and a particulate fraction (PF) insoluble in 0.5% NP-40 but soluble in 0.2% deoxycholate and 0.5% NP-40. Intracellular feline leukemia virus p30 was isolated from infected cells by immune precipitation with antiserum to p30 and subsequent sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the precipitated proteins. Cells labeled for 3 h with [35S]methionine contained equal amounts of p30 in both the CE and the PF. p30 synthesis was estimated to be 0.8% of the total host cell protein synthesis. Immune precipitates from cell pulse labeled for 2.5 min contained a labeled 60,000-dalton polypeptide (Pp60) in the PF and a polypeptide in the CE that comigrated with feline leukemia virus p30 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When cells were chased after a pulse label, there was a rapid loss of Pp60 in the PF and an accumulation of p30 in the CE within 30 min followed by distribution of p30 in both the PF and the CE. Estimation of intracellular and extracellular p30 levels during a 0.5- to 24-h chase period suggested that most of the newly synthesized p30 was incorporated into extracellular virus. Typtic peptide analysis of labeled Pp60 and p30 demonstrated the presence of 13 of 15 p30 peptides within the Pp60 molecule. The tryptic peptide analysis in concert with the pulse-chase labeling data provides strong evidence that Pp60 is a precursor of p30. Images PMID:185422

  7. Feline Leukemia Virus Infection Requires a Post-Receptor Binding Envelope-Dependent Cellular Component▿

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R.; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S.

    2011-01-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (101 to 102 CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (104 to 106 CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells. PMID:21917946

  8. Role of endogenous avian leukosis virus and serotype 2 Marek’s disease virus in enhancement of spontaneous lymphoid-leukosis-like tumors in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of endogenous subgroup E avian Leukosis virus (ALV-E) and strain SB-1 of serotype 2 Marek’s disease virus (MDV) on the enhancement of spontaneous lymphoid leukosis (LL)-like tumors was studied in chickens of Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory (ADOL) line named 0.TVB*S1, or RFS. This...

  9. Endogenous tick viruses and modulation of tick-borne pathogen growth

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2013-01-01

    Ticks transmit a wide range of viral, bacterial and protozoan pathogens, many of which can establish persistent infections of lifelong duration in the vector tick and in some cases are transmitted transovarially to the next generation. In addition many ixodid and argasid tick cell lines and, by inference the parent ticks from which they were derived, harbor endogenous viruses (ETV) of which almost nothing is known. In general, low level persistent infections with viral pathogens (arboviruses) are not known to have a deleterious effect on tick survival and fitness, suggesting that they can strike a balance with the tick innate immune response. This tolerance of arbovirus infection may be modulated by the permanent presence of ETV in the host cell. In mosquito cells, temporary or permanent silencing of the genes of an endogenous virus by RNA interference can result in changes in replication rate of a co-infecting arbovirus. We propose that tick cell lines offer a useful model system for in vitro investigation of the modulatory effect of ETV on superinfecting pathogen survival and replication in ticks, using the molecular manipulation techniques applied to insect cells. PMID:23875176

  10. Genomic complexities of murine leukemia and sarcoma, reticuloendotheliosis, and visna viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Beemon, K L; Faras, A J; Hasse, A T; Duesberg, P H; Maisel, J E

    1976-01-01

    The genetic complexities of several ribodeoxyviruses were measured by quantitative analysis of unique RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides from 60-70S viral RNAs. Moloney murine leukemia virus was found to have an RNA complexity of 3.5 x 10(6) daltons, whereas Moloney murine sarcoma virus had a significantly smaller genome size of 2.3 x 10(6). Reticuleondotheliosis and visna virus RNAs had complexities of 3.9 x 10(6), respectively. Analysis of RNase A-resistant oligonucleotides of Rous sarcoma virus RNA gave a complexity of 3.6 x 10(6), similar to that previously obtained with RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides. Since each of these viruses was found to have a unique sequence genomic complexity near the molecular weight of a single 30-40S viral RNA subunit, it was concluded that ribodeoxyvirus genomes are at least largely polyploid. Images PMID:176429

  11. Endogenous retroviruses and human cancer: is there anything to the rumors?

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Neeru; Coffin, John M

    2014-03-12

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) infection was incorrectly associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in recent years. In this forum, we discuss the story of XMRV and how we can apply lessons learned here to inform the debate surrounding cancers associated with human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). PMID:24629332

  12. Inhibition of Borna disease virus replication by an endogenous bornavirus-like element in the ground squirrel genome.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Kan; Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Merriman, Dana K; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2014-09-01

    Animal genomes contain endogenous viral sequences, such as endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposons. Recently, we and others discovered that nonretroviral viruses also have been endogenized in many vertebrate genomes. Bornaviruses belong to the Mononegavirales and have left endogenous fragments, called "endogenous bornavirus-like elements" (EBLs), in the genomes of many mammals. The striking features of EBLs are that they contain relatively long ORFs which have high sequence homology to the extant bornavirus proteins. Furthermore, some EBLs derived from bornavirus nucleoprotein (EBLNs) have been shown to be transcribed as mRNA and probably are translated into proteins. These features lead us to speculate that EBLs may function as cellular coopted genes. An EBLN element in the genome of the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), itEBLN, encodes an ORF with 77% amino acid sequence identity to the current bornavirus nucleoprotein. In this study, we cloned itEBLN from the ground squirrel genome and investigated its involvement in Borna disease virus (BDV) replication. Interestingly, itEBLN, but not a human EBLN, colocalized with the viral factory in the nucleus and appeared to affect BDV polymerase activity by being incorporated into the viral ribonucleoprotein. Our data show that, as do certain endogenous retroviruses, itEBLN potentially may inhibit infection by related exogenous viruses in vivo. PMID:25157155

  13. Immunotherapy of murine leukemia. Efficacy of passive serum therapy of Friend leukemia virus-induced disease in immunocompromised mice

    SciTech Connect

    Genovesi, E.V.; Livnat, D.; Collins, J.J.

    1983-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the passive therapy of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced disease with chimpanzee anti-F-MuLV serum is accompanied by the development of host antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, the latter measurable in adoptive transfer protocols and by the ability of serum-protected mice to resist virus rechallenge. The present study was designed to further examine the contribution of various compartments of the host immune system to serum therapy itself, as well as to the acquired antiviral immunity that develops in serum-protected mice, through the use of naturally immunocompromised animals (e.g., nude athymic mice and natural killer (NK)-deficient beige mutant mice) or mice treated with immunoabrogating agents such as sublethal irradiation, cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan (Cy)), cortisone, and /sup 89/Sr. The studies in nude mice indicate that while mature T-cells are not needed for effective serum therapy, they do appear to be necessary for the long-term resistance of serum-protected mice to virus rechallenge and for the generation of the cell population(s) responsible for adoptive transfer of antiviral immunity. Furthermore, this acquired resistance is not due to virus neutralization by serum antibodies since antibody-negative, Cy-treated, serum-protected mice still reject the secondary virus infection. Lastly, while the immunocompromise systems examined did effect various host antiviral immune responses, none of them, including the NK-deficient beige mutation, significantly diminished the efficacy of the passive serum therapy of F-MuLV-induced disease.

  14. Regulation of the hepatitis C virus RNA replicase by endogenous lipid peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Daisuke; McGivern, David R.; Wauthier, Eliane; Yi, MinKyung; Madden, Victoria J.; Welsch, Christoph; Antes, Iris; Wen, Yahong; Chugh, Pauline E.; McGee, Charles E.; Widman, Douglas G.; Misumi, Ichiro; Bandyopadhyay, Sibali; Kim, Seungtaek; Shimakami, Tetsuro; Oikawa, Tsunekazu; Whitmire, Jason K.; Heise, Mark T.; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Kao, C. Cheng; Pitson, Stuart M; Merrill, Alfred H.; Reid, Lola M.; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2014-01-01

    Although oxidative tissue injury often accompanies viral infection, there is little understanding of how it influences virus replication. We show that multiple hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes are exquisitely sensitive to oxidative membrane damage, a property distinguishing them from other pathogenic RNA viruses. Lipid peroxidation, regulated in part through sphingosine kinase 2, severely restricts HCV replication in Huh-7 cells and primary human hepatoblasts. Endogenous oxidative membrane damage lowers the 50% effective concentration of direct-acting antivirals, suggesting critical regulation of the conformation of the NS3/4A protease and NS5B polymerase, membrane-bound HCV replicase components. Resistance to lipid peroxidation maps genetically to trans-membrane and membrane-proximal residues within these proteins, and is essential for robust replication in cell culture, as exemplified by the atypical JFH1 strain. Thus, the typical, wild-type HCV replicase is uniquely regulated by lipid peroxidation, providing a novel mechanism for attenuating replication in stressed tissue and possibly facilitating long-term viral persistence. PMID:25064127

  15. [Culture and control of cells producing bovine leukemia virus].

    PubMed

    Granátová, M

    1987-10-01

    In the field surveys of the occurrence of enzootic bovine leucosis caused by the bovine leucosis virus (BLV), the identification of positive animals is based on the detection of specific antiviral antibodies by serological methods. The reliability of these tests (particularly their sensitivity and specificity) depends on the quality of the virus antigen. The preparation of the antigen is based on the cultivation of BLV virus in cultures of the FLS cell line. A modified procedure of preparing the BLV antigen in the FLS cell culture is described, along with the control of its production by the immunoperoxidase test. PMID:2827363

  16. Quantitation, in vitro propagation, and characterization of preleukemic cells induced by radiation leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Yefenof, E.; Epszteyn, S.; Kotler, M. )

    1991-04-15

    Intrathymic (i.t.) inoculation of radiation leukemia virus into C57BL/6 mice induces a population of preleukemic (PL) cells that can progress into mature thymic lymphomas upon transfer into syngeneic recipients. A minimum of 10(3) PL thymic cells are required to induce lymphomas in the recipient. Most of the individual lymphomas developed in mice which were inoculated with cells of a single PL thymus, derived from different T-cell precursors. PL thymic cells could be grown in vitro on a feeder layer consisting of splenic stromal cells. Growth medium was supplemented with supernatant harvested from an established radiation leukemia virus-induced lymphoma cell line (SR4). The in vitro-grown PL cells were characterized as Thy-1+, CD4+, CD8- T-cells, most of which expressed radiation leukemia virus antigens. Cultured PL cells were found to be nontumorigenic, based on their inability to form s.c. tumors. However, these cells could develop into thymic lymphomas if inoculated i.t. into syngeneic recipients. A culture of PL cells, maintained for 2 mo, showed clonal T-cell receptor arrangement. Lymphomas which developed in several recipient mice upon injection with these PL cells were found to possess the same T-cell receptor arrangement. These results indicate that PL cells can be adapted for in vitro growth while maintaining their preleukemic character.

  17. Novel Feline Leukemia Virus Interference Group Based on the env Gene.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ariko; Watanabe, Shinya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Ito, Jumpei; Ngo, Minh Ha; Makundi, Isaac; Kawasaki, Junna; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) subgroups have emerged in infected cats via the mutation or recombination of theenvgene of subgroup A FeLV (FeLV-A), the primary virus. We report the isolation and characterization of a novelenvgene, TG35-2, and report that the TG35-2 pseudotype can be categorized as a novel FeLV subgroup. The TG35-2 envelope protein displays strong sequence identity to FeLV-A Env, suggesting that selection pressure in cats causes novel FeLV subgroups to emerge. PMID:26889025

  18. Detection of bovine leukemia virus and identification of its genotype in Mongolian cattle.

    PubMed

    Ochirkhuu, Nyamsuren; Konnai, Satoru; Odbileg, Raadan; Nishimori, Asami; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection is globally distributed. However, no information regarding the disease and genetic diversity of the virus in the cattle of Mongolia is currently available. In this study, the prevalence of BLV was assessed using PCR, and the genetic diversity was analyzed through DNA sequencing. Of the 517 samples tested, 20 positives were identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that six, one, and four isolates were classified into genotype 4, 7, and 1, respectively. Most isolates were clustered with isolates from Eastern Europe and Russia. This study is the first to investigate the BLV genotype in Mongolia. PMID:26711456

  19. Purification of the Moloney and Rauscher Murine Leukemia Viruses by Use of Zonal Ultracentrifuge Systems

    PubMed Central

    Toplin, I.

    1967-01-01

    The B-IV and B-IX zonal ultracentrifuge rotors were applied to the concentration and purification of the Moloney and Rauscher murine leukemia viruses from large volumes of infected tissue culture fluids and animal materials. Potassium tartrate, potassium citrate and sucrose gradients were used to obtain viral concentrates from the density 1.16 to 1.18 zone. Proteolytic enzyme digestion of tissue culture preparations prior to zonal ultracentrifuge processing was effective in releasing virus from cell debris and producing highly purified, though nonleukemogenic, viral concentrates. Infected Rauscher mouse plasma was processed to give highly purified infectious virus fractions. A single centrifugation of crude Rauscher mouse spleen homogenates resulted in partially purified infectious concentrates with high virus particle counts. Images Fig. 4 PMID:6035050

  20. The Icsbp locus is a common proviral insertion site in mature B-cell lymphomas/plasmacytomas induced by exogenous murine leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Shiliang; Sorensen, Annette Balle; Kunder, Sandra; Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Morris, David W.; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou . E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

    2006-09-01

    ICSBP (interferon consensus sequence binding protein)/IRF8 (interferon regulatory factor 8) is an interferon gamma-inducible transcription factor expressed predominantly in hematopoietic cells, and down-regulation of this factor has been observed in chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia in man. By screening about 1200 murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced lymphomas, we found proviral insertions at the Icsbp locus in 14 tumors, 13 of which were mature B-cell lymphomas or plasmacytomas. Only one was a T-cell lymphoma, although such tumors constituted about half of the samples screened. This indicates that the Icsbp locus can play a specific role in the development of mature B-lineage malignancies. Two proviral insertions in the last Icsbp exon were found to act by a poly(A)-insertion mechanism. The remaining insertions were found within or outside Icsbp. Since our results showed expression of Icsbp RNA and protein in all end-stage tumor samples, a simple tumor suppressor function of ICSBP is not likely. Interestingly, proviral insertions at Icsbp have not been reported from previous extensive screenings of mature B-cell lymphomas induced by endogenous MLVs. We propose that ICSBP might be involved in an early modulation of an immune response to exogenous MLVs that might also play a role in proliferation of the mature B-cell lymphomas.

  1. Preclinical activity of the novel B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 inhibitor PTC-209 in acute myeloid leukemia: Implications for leukemia therapy.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yuki; Maeda, Aya; Chachad, Dhruv; Ishizawa, Jo; Qiu, Yi Hua; Kornblau, Steven M; Kimura, Shinya; Andreeff, Michael; Kojima, Kensuke

    2015-12-01

    Curing patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a therapeutic challenge. The polycomb complex protein B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI-1) is required for the self-renewal and maintenance of leukemia stem cells. We investigated the prognostic significance of BMI-1 in AML and the effects of a novel small molecule selective inhibitor of BMI-1, PTC-209. BMI-1 protein expression was determined in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients together with 207 other proteins using reverse-phase protein array technology. Patients with unfavorable cytogenetics according to Southwest Oncology Group criteria had higher levels of BMI-1 compared to those with favorable (P = 0.0006) or intermediate cytogenetics (P = 0.0061), and patients with higher levels of BMI-1 had worse overall survival (55.3 weeks vs. 42.8 weeks, P = 0.046). Treatment with PTC-209 reduced protein level of BMI-1 and its downstream target mono-ubiquitinated histone H2A and triggered several molecular events consistent with the induction of apoptosis, this is, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 cleavage, BAX activation, and phosphatidylserine externalization. PTC-209 induced apoptosis in patient-derived CD34(+)CD38(low/-) AML cells and, less prominently, in CD34(-) differentiated AML cells. BMI-1 reduction by PTC-209 directly correlated with apoptosis induction in CD34(+) primary AML cells (r = 0.71, P = 0.022). However, basal BMI-1 expression was not a determinant of AML sensitivity. BMI-1 inhibition, which targets a primitive AML cell population, might offer a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26450753

  2. Widespread Endogenization of Genome Sequences of Non-Retroviral RNA Viruses into Plant Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Akio; Saisho, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Wataru; Kanematsu, Satoko; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Non-retroviral RNA virus sequences (NRVSs) have been found in the chromosomes of vertebrates and fungi, but not plants. Here we report similarly endogenized NRVSs derived from plus-, negative-, and double-stranded RNA viruses in plant chromosomes. These sequences were found by searching public genomic sequence databases, and, importantly, most NRVSs were subsequently detected by direct molecular analyses of plant DNAs. The most widespread NRVSs were related to the coat protein (CP) genes of the family Partitiviridae which have bisegmented dsRNA genomes, and included plant- and fungus-infecting members. The CP of a novel fungal virus (Rosellinia necatrix partitivirus 2, RnPV2) had the greatest sequence similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana ILR2, which is thought to regulate the activities of the phytohormone auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Furthermore, partitivirus CP-like sequences much more closely related to plant partitiviruses than to RnPV2 were identified in a wide range of plant species. In addition, the nucleocapsid protein genes of cytorhabdoviruses and varicosaviruses were found in species of over 9 plant families, including Brassicaceae and Solanaceae. A replicase-like sequence of a betaflexivirus was identified in the cucumber genome. The pattern of occurrence of NRVSs and the phylogenetic analyses of NRVSs and related viruses indicate that multiple independent integrations into many plant lineages may have occurred. For example, one of the NRVSs was retained in Ar. thaliana but not in Ar. lyrata or other related Camelina species, whereas another NRVS displayed the reverse pattern. Our study has shown that single- and double-stranded RNA viral sequences are widespread in plant genomes, and shows the potential of genome integrated NRVSs to contribute to resolve unclear phylogenetic relationships of plant species. PMID:21779172

  3. Characterization of the endogenous protein kinase activity of the hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kann, M; Thomssen, R; Köchel, H G; Gerlich, W H

    1993-01-01

    During the assembly of the nucleocapsid of the hepatitis B virus a protein kinase, probably of cellular origin, is encapsidated. This enzyme phosphorylates serine residue(s) localized within the lumen of the particle. By using purified, liver-derived core particles, we characterized the protein kinase activity in the presence of different ions and inhibitors. Controls were performed with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) and recombinant core particles. We showed that the endogenous protein kinase of the core particles was not inhibited by H89, a specific inhibitor of PKA. Staurosporine, a selective inhibitor of PKC inhibited the endogenous kinase activity only within the first minutes of the reaction. In contrast, quercetine, a selective inhibitor of the protein kinase M (PKM) did not inhibit during the first minutes but inhibited efficiently during later phases of incubation. PKM represents an enzymatically active proteolytic fragment of PKC. These results suggest that PKC is encapsidated into human core particles and is converted to PKM during the in vitro reaction. This conclusion implies the association of a protease activity localized with the HBV nucleocapsid inside liver-derived core particles. PMID:8260877

  4. Capsid is an important determinant for functional complementation of murine leukemia virus and spleen necrosis virus Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Boyko, Vitaly; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2007-04-10

    In this report, we examined the abilities and requirements of heterologous Gag proteins to functionally complement each other to support viral replication. Two distantly related gammaretroviruses, murine leukemia virus (MLV) and spleen necrosis virus (SNV), were used as a model system because SNV proteins can support MLV vector replication. Using chimeric or mutant Gag proteins that could not efficiently support MLV vector replication, we determined that a homologous capsid (CA) domain was necessary for the functional complementation of MLV and SNV Gag proteins. Findings from the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay revealed that MLV and SNV Gag proteins were capable of colocalizing and interacting in cells. Taken together, our results indicated that MLV and SNV Gag proteins can interact in cells; however, a homologous CA domain is needed for functional complementation of MLV and SNV Gag proteins to complete virus replication. This requirement of homologous Gag most likely occurs at a postassembly step(s) of the viral replication. PMID:17156810

  5. Serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) infections in pet cats in Bangkok and vicinities, Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infections was examined using serum or plasma samples from 746 pet cats collected between May and July 2009 from clinics and hospitals located in and around ...

  6. Survey of endogenous virus and TVB* receptor status of commercial chicken stocks supplying specific-pathogen-free eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ALVE endogenous virus and the ALVE receptor status of six commercial lines supplying specific pathogen free eggs were analyzed. Commercial lines A, E and F contained replication competent ALVE inserts. Line A was fixed for ALVE21 and lines E and F were segregating for ALVE10. In addition ALVE1 ...

  7. Biochemical characterization of endogenous type C virus information in differentiated and undifferentiated murine teratocarcinoma-derived cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Emanoil-Ravicovitch, R; Hojman-Montes-de-Oca, F; Robert, J; Garcette, M; Callahan, R; Peries, J; Boiron, M

    1980-01-01

    Undifferentiated teratocarcinoma cells express sixfold-higher levels of endogenous xenotropic type C virus-related RNA than differentiated cells. Three species of polyadenylated viral RNA (35S, 24S, and 14S) have been identified in the undifferentiated teratocarcinoma cells. Paradoxically, neither viral particles nor viral proteins have been detected in these cells. PMID:6246284

  8. In vitro transmission and propagation of the bovine leukemia virus in monolayer cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Graves, D C; Ferrer, J F

    1976-11-01

    This study demonstrates that the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) can infect in vitro cells of human, simian, bovine, canine, caprine, ovine, and bat origin. Cultures of these cells, cocultivated with BLV-infected cells or inoculated with cell-free BLV preparations, continuoously showed the presence of cells with the internal BLV antigen as well as BLV-induced syncytia. Virus replication was abundant and increased with passage in bat lung cells and was moderate but constant in fetal canine thymus cells. The amounts of virus released by the simian DBS-FRhL-1 and caprine S-743 cultures were low to moderate during the first 4 to 8 weeks and decreased thereafter. In the infected fetal lamb spleen cell cultures, virus production was low and declined further with passage. Bovine embryonic spleen and human diploid embryonic lung WI-38 cell cultures produced very small amounts of virus only during the first two passages after inoculation despite the fact that they remained infected, as determined by the continuous presence of cell BLV antigen and syncytia. Morphologically and antigenically, the virus particles released by the monolayer cell cultures were indistinguishable from those found in short-term and long-term cultures of BLV-infected bovine lymphoid cells. Repeated electron microscopic examinations and serological tests showed that all the BLV-infected cultures, including those from which the infecting inocula were obtained, were free of the foamy-like bovine syncytial virus, parainfluenza 3 virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, and the maedi-like bovine R-29 virus. PMID:61801

  9. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kakoki, Katsura; Kamiyama, Haruka; Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  10. Short communication: Relationship between the level of bovine leukemia virus antibody and provirus in blood and milk of cows from a naturally infected herd.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Juan P; Porta, Natalia G; Gutierrez, Geronimo; Politzki, Romina P; Álvarez, Irene; Galarza, Roxana; Abdala, Alejandro; Calvinho, Luis; Trono, Karina G

    2016-07-01

    We explored the relationship between the level of bovine leukemia virus antibodies and provirus load during natural infection. For that purpose, a set of 50 blood and milk paired samples were analyzed for the presence of bovine leukemia virus provirus and antibodies. Additionally, provirus load and antibody titers were measured and the relationship between these variables was investigated. Bovine leukemia provirus was detected in 59% of milk samples and a negative correlation was observed between the level of milk provirus load and milk antibody titers. By the consumption of raw milk, calves might be exposed to bovine leukemia virus favoring the perinatal transmission of this disease. PMID:27132093

  11. Comparisons of the immunological properties of two structural polypeptides of type C RNA viruses endogenous to old world monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, J R; Reynolds, R K; Aaronson, S A

    1976-01-01

    Immunologically very closely related type C RNA viruses are endogenous to the domestic cat and to an old world primate, the baboon. In the present studies, radioimmunological techniques have been developed for detection of the 15,000 and 30,000 molecular weight (MW) polypeptides of each virus. The much more pronounced type-specific antigenic determinants of the lower MW polypeptides made it possible to readily differentiate these viruses from each other as well as from a type C virus isolate from a second baboon species. Normal rhesus monkey tissues were partially purified and shown to contain a reactivity with MW and immunological properties similar to that of the baboon virus 30,000 MW polypeptide. Despite a similar degree of purification, antigenic reactivity like that of the baboon virus 15,000 MW polypeptide was undetectable even in the brodest immunological tests available for this polypeptide. The present findings indicate that the immunological properties of two structural polypeptides of closely related viruses endogenous to primate and feline species have undergone different rates of antigenic change in the course of evolution within their respective host cell genome. PMID:56455

  12. Preventive and Therapeutic Strategies for Bovine Leukemia Virus: Lessons for HTLV

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Sabrina M.; Florins, Arnaud; Gillet, Nicolas; de Brogniez, Alix; Sánchez-Alcaraz, María Teresa; Boxus, Mathieu; Boulanger, Fanny; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Trono, Karina; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Willems, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a retrovirus closely related to the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). BLV is a major animal health problem worldwide causing important economic losses. A series of attempts were developed to reduce prevalence, chiefly by eradication of infected cattle, segregation of BLV-free animals and vaccination. Although having been instrumental in regions such as the EU, these strategies were unsuccessful elsewhere mainly due to economic costs, management restrictions and lack of an efficient vaccine. This review, which summarizes the different attempts previously developed to decrease seroprevalence of BLV, may be informative for management of HTLV-1 infection. We also propose a new approach based on competitive infection with virus deletants aiming at reducing proviral loads. PMID:21994777

  13. Preventive and therapeutic strategies for bovine leukemia virus: lessons for HTLV.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Sabrina M; Florins, Arnaud; Gillet, Nicolas; de Brogniez, Alix; Sánchez-Alcaraz, María Teresa; Boxus, Mathieu; Boulanger, Fanny; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Trono, Karina; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Willems, Luc

    2011-07-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a retrovirus closely related to the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). BLV is a major animal health problem worldwide causing important economic losses. A series of attempts were developed to reduce prevalence, chiefly by eradication of infected cattle, segregation of BLV-free animals and vaccination. Although having been instrumental in regions such as the EU, these strategies were unsuccessful elsewhere mainly due to economic costs, management restrictions and lack of an efficient vaccine. This review, which summarizes the different attempts previously developed to decrease seroprevalence of BLV, may be informative for management of HTLV-1 infection. We also propose a new approach based on competitive infection with virus deletants aiming at reducing proviral loads. PMID:21994777

  14. Virus infection triggers widespread silencing of host genes by a distinct class of endogenous siRNAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mengji; Du, Peng; Wang, Xianbing; Yu, Yun-Qi; Qiu, Yan-Hong; Li, Wanxiang; Gal-On, Amit; Zhou, Changyong; Li, Yi; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral immunity controlled by RNA interference (RNAi) in plants and animals is thought to specifically target only viral RNAs by the virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Here we show that activation of antiviral RNAi in Arabidopsis plants is accompanied by the production of an abundant class of endogenous siRNAs mapped to the exon regions of more than 1,000 host genes and rRNA. These virus-activated siRNAs (vasiRNAs) are predominantly 21 nucleotides long with an approximately equal ratio of sense and antisense strands. Genetically, vasiRNAs are distinct from the known plant endogenous siRNAs characterized to date and instead resemble viral siRNAs by requiring Dicer-like 4 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 (RDR1) for biogenesis. However, loss of EXORIBONUCLEASE4/THYLENE-INSENSITIVE5 enhances vasiRNA biogenesis and virus resistance without altering the biogenesis of viral siRNAs. We show that vasiRNAs are active in directing widespread silencing of the target host genes and that Argonaute-2 binds to and is essential for the silencing activity of vasiRNAs. Production of vasiRNAs is readily detectable in Arabidopsis after infection by viruses from two distinct supergroups of plant RNA virus families and is targeted for inhibition by the silencing suppressor protein 2b of Cucumber mosaic virus. These findings reveal RDR1 production of Arabidopsis endogenous siRNAs and identify production of vasiRNAs to direct widespread silencing of host genes as a conserved response of plants to infection by diverse viruses. A possible function for vasiRNAs to confer broad-spectrum antiviral activity distinct to the virus-specific antiviral RNAi by viral siRNAs is discussed. PMID:25201959

  15. Crystal structures of inhibitor complexes of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) protease

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-28

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  16. Crystal Structures of Inhibitir Complexes of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus (HTLV-1) Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-17

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  17. Efficient Expression and Rapid Purification of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Y. Shirley; Owen, Sherry M.; Lal, Renu B.; Ikeda, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncovirus that is clinically associated with adult T-cell leukemia. We report here the construction of a pET19-based expression clone containing HTLV-1 protease fused to a decahistidine-containing leader peptide. The recombinant protein is efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli, and the fusion protein can be easily purified by affinity chromatography. Active mature protease in yields in excess of 3 mg/liter of culture can then be obtained by a novel two-step refolding and autoprocessing procedure. The purified enzyme exhibited Km and Kcat values of 0.3 mM and 0.143 sec−1 at pH 5.3 and was inhibited by pepstatin A. PMID:9525666

  18. Infectious complications of human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I infection.

    PubMed

    Marsh, B J

    1996-07-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) has been etiologically associated with two diseases: adult T cell leukemia and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Increasing evidence suggests that HTLV-I infection may be associated with immunosuppression and, as a consequence, affect the risk and expression of several other infectious diseases, of which the best studied are strongyloidiasis, tuberculosis, and leprosy. In strongyloidiasis, coinfection with HTLV-I appears to result in a higher rate of chronic carriage, an increased parasite load, and a risk of more severe infection. In tuberculosis, a decrease in delayed-type hypersensitivity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been established, but whether this decrease is clinically significant has yet to be determined. In leprosy, an increased risk of disease is suggested, but the published studies are all too poorly controlled to draw definite conclusions. PMID:8816143

  19. Isolation and characterization of simian T-cell leukemia virus type II from New World monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y M; Jang, Y J; Kanki, P J; Yu, Q C; Wang, J J; Montali, R J; Samuel, K P; Papas, T S

    1994-01-01

    Since the description of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) and its simian counterpart, simian T-cell leukemia virus type I (STLV-I), the possible existence of other related simian retroviruses has been raised. Here, we report a new retrovirus, STLV-II, which we have identified in spider monkeys (Ateles fusciceps), a New World primate species. Initially, a recombinant HTLV-II envelope protein (RP-IIB) was used to identify anti-STLV-II antibodies in New World monkeys by Western blot (immunoblot) assays. Subsequently, the virus was characterized by Southern blot hybridization, which showed that STLV-II and HTLV-II have a high degree of nucleotide sequence homology but have different restriction enzyme patterns. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the pX-II region of STLV-II provirus revealed 3% variation with the corresponding region of HTLV-II. Electron micrographic studies revealed HTLV-like, type C retrovirus particles outside the cell membranes of STLV-II-infected cells. This study describes the first link between HTLV-II and a simian reservoir in the New World. Further molecular studies of STLV-II infection in different species of New World monkeys, especially from the wild, may provide valuable information about the origin and intragroup relationships of South American monkeys. Spider monkeys infected with STLV-II may serve as an important animal model for HTLV-II infection in humans. Images PMID:7507178

  20. Pseudotypes of human T-cell leukemia virus types 1 and 2: neutralization by patients' sera.

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, P; Nagy, K; Weiss, R A

    1984-01-01

    Pseudotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) bearing envelope antigens of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) types 1 and 2 were prepared by propagating VSV in cells lines productively infected with HTLV. Plaque assays of VSV (HTLV) pseudotypes were employed to determine the presence of (i) HTLV receptors on cells and (ii) neutralizing antibodies in the serum of patients with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL). Cell surface receptors for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 were found on nonlymphoid cells of human and mammalian origin. Neutralizing antibodies specific to VSV(HTLV-1) were found in sera of ATLL patients in titers varying from 1:50 to 1:30,000 and did not correlate closely with antibody titers for internal viral antigens. Sera from ATLL patients in the United Kingdom (Caribbean immigrants), United States, and Japan completely neutralized VSV (HTLV-1), indicating that the HTLV isolates from these distinct geographic regions represent a single envelope serotype. Neutralization of VSV (HTLV-1) was more specific and more sensitive than assays of syncytium inhibition. No cross-neutralization was observed between bovine leukosis virus and HTLV, and only limited cross-reaction was found for envelope antigens of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. These studies show that VSV (HTLV) pseudotypes can be readily used to screen for neutralizing antibodies in patients' sera and to distinguish HTLV envelope serotypes. PMID:6326149

  1. Viral genome RNA serves as messenger early in the infectious cycle of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, R; Dolev, S; Aboud, M; Salzberg, S

    1979-01-01

    When NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were infected with the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus, part of the viral genome RNA molecules were detected in polyribosomes of the infected cells early in the infectious cycle. The binding appears to be specific, since we could demonstrate the release of viral RNA from polyribosomes with EDTA. Moreover, when infection occurred in the presence of cycloheximide, most viral RNA molecules were detected in the free cytoplasm. Size analysis on polyribosomal viral RNA molecules indicated that two size class molecules, 38S and 23S, are present in polyribosomes at 3 h after infection. Analysis of the polyriboadenylate [poly(rA)] content of viral RNA extracted from infected polyribosomes demonstrated that such molecules bind with greatest abundance at 3 h after infection, as has been detected with total viral RNA. No molecules lacking poly(rA) stretches could be detected in polyribosomes. Furthermore, when a similar analysis was performed on unbound molecules present in the free cytoplasm, identical results were obtained. We conclude that no selection towards poly(rA)-containing viral molecules is evident on binding to polyribosomes. These findings suggest that the incoming viral genome of the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus may serve as a messenger for the synthesis of one or more virus-specific proteins early after infection of mouse fibroblasts. PMID:117118

  2. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Danner, Raymond M; Goltz, Daniel M; Hess, Steven C; Banko, Paul C

    2007-04-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands. PMID:17495320

  3. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danner, R.M.; Goltz, Dan M.; Hess, S.C.; Banko, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  4. Fatal course of an autochthonous hepatitis E virus infection in a patient with leukemia in Germany.

    PubMed

    Pfefferle, S; Frickmann, H; Gabriel, M; Schmitz, N; Günther, S; Schmidt-Chanasit, J

    2012-08-01

    An acute infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 subtype c was diagnosed in a patient with chronic lymphatic B-cell leukemia 6 weeks after the infusion of donor lymphocytes. Despite intensive care the patient died 39 days after admission due to pericardial effusion that was related to acute liver failure. We suggest that diagnostic procedures for detection of HEV infection should be seriously considered for the immunocompromised patient with elevated liver enzymes in the absence of a travel history to HEV endemic countries. PMID:22086667

  5. No association found between the detection of either xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus or polytropic murine leukemia virus and chronic fatigue syndrome in a blinded, multi-site, prospective study by the establishment and use of the SolveCFS BioBank

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2009, a retrospective study reported the detection of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) in clinical isolates derived from individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS). While many efforts to confirm this observation failed, one report detected polytropic murine leukemia virus (pMLV), instead of XMRV. In both studies, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based methods were employed which could provide the basis for the development of a practical diagnostic tool. To confirm these studies, we hypothesized that the ability to detect these viruses will not only depend upon the technical details of the methods employed but also on the criteria used to diagnose CFS and the availability of well characterized clinical isolates. Methods A repository of clinical isolates from geographically distinct sites was generated by the collection of fresh blood samples from well characterized CFS and healthy subjects. Molecular techniques were used to generate assay positive controls and to determine the lower limit of detection (LLOD) for murine retroviral and Intracisternal A particle (Cell 12(4):963-72, 1977) detection methods. Results We report the establishment of a repository of well-defined, clinical isolates from five, geographically distinct regions of the US, the comparative determination of the LLODs and validation efforts for the previously reported detection methods and the results of an effort to confirm the association of these retroviral signatures in isolates from individuals with CFS in a blinded, multi-site, prospective study. We detected various, murine retroviral DNA signatures but were unable to resolve a difference in the incidence of their detection between isolates from CFS (5/72; 6.7%) and healthy (2/37; 5.4%) subjects (Fisher’s Exact Test, p-value = 1). The observed sequences appeared to reflect the detection of endogenous murine retroviral DNA, which was not identical to either XMRV or p

  6. Mechanisms of leukemogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus: prospects for novel anti-retroviral therapies in human

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Nicolas; Florins, Arnaud; Boxus, Mathieu; Burteau, Catherine; Nigro, Annamaria; Vandermeers, Fabian; Balon, Hervé; Bouzar, Amel-Baya; Defoiche, Julien; Burny, Arsène; Reichert, Michal; Kettmann, Richard; Willems, Luc

    2007-01-01

    In 1871, the observation of yellowish nodules in the enlarged spleen of a cow was considered to be the first reported case of bovine leukemia. The etiological agent of this lymphoproliferative disease, bovine leukemia virus (BLV), belongs to the deltaretrovirus genus which also includes the related human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). This review summarizes current knowledge of this viral system, which is important as a model for leukemogenesis. Recently, the BLV model has also cast light onto novel prospects for therapies of HTLV induced diseases, for which no satisfactory treatment exists so far. PMID:17362524

  7. Variable regions A and B in the envelope glycoproteins of feline leukemia virus subgroup B and amphotropic murine leukemia virus interact with discrete receptor domains.

    PubMed Central

    Tailor, C S; Kabat, D

    1997-01-01

    The surface (SU) envelope glycoproteins of feline leukemia virus subgroup B (FeLV-B) and amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV) are highly related, even in the variable regions VRA and VRB that have been shown to be required for receptor recognition. However, FeLV-B and A-MLV use different sodium-dependent phosphate symporters, Pit1 and Pit2, respectively, as receptors for infection. Pit1 and Pit2 are predicted to have 10 membrane-spanning domains and five extracellular loops. The close relationship of the retroviral envelopes enabled us to generate pseudotype virions carrying chimeric FeLV-B/A-MLV envelope glycoproteins. We found that some of the pseudotype viruses could not use Pit1 or Pit2 proteins but could efficiently utilize specific chimeric Pit1/Pit2 proteins as receptors. By studying Mus dunni tail fibroblasts expressing chimeric Pit1/Pit2 proteins and pseudotype virions carrying chimeric FeLV-B/A-MLV envelopes, we show that FeLV-B and A-MLV VRA and VRB interact in a modular manner with specific receptor domains. Our results suggest that FeLV-B VRA interacts with Pit1 extracellular loops 4 and 5 and that residues Phe-60 and Pro-61 of FeLV-B VRA are essential for receptor choice. However, this interaction is insufficient for infection, and an additional interaction between FeLV-B VRB and Pit1 loop 2 is essential. Similarly, A-MLV infection requires interaction of A-MLV VRA with Pit2 loops 4 and 5 and VRB with Pit2 loop 2, with residues Tyr-60 and Val-61 of A-MLV VRA being critical for receptor recognition. Together, our results suggest that FeLV-B and A-MLV infections require two major discrete interactions between the viral SU envelope glycoproteins and their respective receptors. We propose a common two-step mechanism for interaction between retroviral envelope glycoproteins and cell surface receptors. PMID:9371598

  8. Detection of Feline leukemia virus in the endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Luaces, Inés; Doménech, Ana; García-Montijano, Marino; Collado, Victorio M; Sánchez, Celia; Tejerizo, J German; Galka, Margarita; Fernández, Pilar; Gómez-Lucía, Esperanza

    2008-05-01

    Feline retroviruses are rarely reported in lynx species. Twenty-one Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) blood and tissue samples collected from Doñana National Park and Los Villares (Sierra Morena) in southern Spain during 1993-2003 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction to amplify nucleic acids from feline retroviruses. Six samples were positive for Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), but no samples tested positive for Feline immunodeficiency virus. The BLAST analysis indicated that 5 of the 6 sequences were closely related to FeLV strain Rickard subgroup A, whereas 1 sequence was identical to FeLV. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of FeLV in the endangered Iberian lynx. PMID:18460634

  9. [Typing of cattle leukemia virus circulating in the Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Limanskiĭ, A P; Geue, L; Limanskaia, O Iu; Beier, D

    2004-01-01

    Bovine leucosis virus (BLV), circulating in the Ukrainian territory, was characterized through the definition of its subspecies affiliation. The pro-viral BLV DNA was isolated from peripheral-blood lymphocytes of naturally-HIV-infected black-variegate animals taken from leucosis-affected farms in the Kharkov Region. The env-gene fragment of pro-viral DNA was amplified, sequenced and analyzed after the amplicon had been treated by three restriction enzymes, i.e. BamH I, Bcl I and Pvu II. According to the analysis of restriction-fragments' length polymorphism, the Ukrainian BLV isolate can be classified as belonging to the Australian subspecies, i.e. to one of the 3 known subspecies. Multiple alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the env-gene fragment of BLV isolates from the EMBL database showed that evolutionally the Ukrainian isolate is distantly located from the isolates' clusters of the Belgian, Japanese and Australian subspecie and has the biggest quantity (4) of non-coinciding nucleotides for the analyzed highly conservative locus of the BLV env-gene with a length of 444 pair of nucleotides. PMID:15017853

  10. Episodic Diversifying Selection Shaped the Genomes of Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus and Related Gammaretroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Niccolò; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Roca, Alfred L.; Xu, Wenqin; Eiden, Maribeth V.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gibbon ape leukemia viruses (GALVs) are part of a larger group of pathogenic gammaretroviruses present across phylogenetically diverse host species of Australasian mammals. Despite the biomedical utility of GALVs as viral vectors and in cancer gene therapy, full genome sequences have not been determined for all of the five identified GALV strains, nor has a comprehensive evolutionary analysis been performed. We therefore generated complete genomic sequences for each GALV strain using hybridization capture and high-throughput sequencing. The four strains of GALV isolated from gibbons formed a monophyletic clade that was closely related to the woolly monkey virus (WMV), which is a GALV strain that likely originated in a gibbon host. The GALV-WMV clade in turn formed a sister group to the koala retroviruses (KoRVs). Genomic signatures of episodic diversifying selection were detected among the gammaretroviruses with concentration in the env gene across the GALV strains that were particularly oncogenic and KoRV strains that were potentially exogenous, likely reflecting their adaptation to the host immune system. In vitro studies involving vectors chimeric between GALV and KoRV-B established that variable regions A and B of the surface unit of the envelope determine which receptor is used by a viral strain to enter host cells. IMPORTANCE The gibbon ape leukemia viruses (GALVs) are among the most medically relevant retroviruses due to their use as viral vectors for gene transfer and in cancer gene therapy. Despite their importance, full genome sequences have not been determined for the majority of primate isolates, nor has comprehensive evolutionary analysis been performed, despite evidence that the viruses are facing complex selective pressures associated with cross-species transmission. Using hybridization capture and high-throughput sequencing, we report here the full genome sequences of all the GALV strains and demonstrate that diversifying selection is

  11. Receptor choice determinants in the envelope glycoproteins of amphotropic, xenotropic, and polytropic murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Battini, J L; Heard, J M; Danos, O

    1992-01-01

    The envelope glycoproteins (SU) of mammalian type C retroviruses possess an amino-terminal domain of about 200 residues, which is involved in binding a cell surface receptor. In this domain, highly conserved amino acid sequences are interrupted by two segments of variable length and sequence, VRA and VRB. We have studied the role of these variable regions in receptor recognition and binding by constructing chimeric molecules in which portions of the amino-terminal domains from amphotropic (4070A), xenotropic (NZB), and polytropic (MCF 247) murine leukemia virus SU proteins were permuted. These chimeras, which exchanged either one or two variable regions, were expressed at the surface of replication-defective viral particles by a pseudotyping assay. Wild-type or recombinant env genes were transfected into a cell line producing Moloney murine leukemia virus particles devoid of envelope glycoproteins in which a retrovirus vector genome carrying an Escherichia coli lacZ gene was packaged. The host range and sensitivity to interference of pseudotyped virions were assayed, and we observed which permutations resulted in receptor switch or loss of function. Our results indicate that the determinants of receptor choice are found within the just 120 amino acids of SU proteins. Downstream sequences contribute to the stabilization of the receptor-specific structure. PMID:1310758

  12. Potential role of natural killer cells in controlling tumorigenesis by human T-cell leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, G; Stewart, S A; Baird, S M; Lee, F; Feuer, R; Chen, I S

    1995-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a malignancy of T lymphocytes that is characterized by a long latency period after virus exposure. Intraperitoneal inoculation of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with HTLV-transformed cell lines and ATL tumor cells was employed to investigate the tumorigenic potential of HTLV type I (HTLV-I)-infected cells. In contrast to inoculation of ATL (RV-ATL) cells into SCID mice, which resulted in the formation of lymphomas, inoculation of HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-transformed cell lines (SLB-I and JLB-II cells, respectively) did not result in tumor formation. Immunosuppression of SCID mice, either by whole-body irradiation or by treatment with an antiserum, anti-asialo GM1 (alpha-AGM1), which transiently abrogates natural killer cell activity in vivo, was necessary to establish the growth of tumors derived from HTLV-transformed cell lines. PCR and flow cytometric studies reveal that HTLV-I-transformed cells are eliminated from the peritoneal cavities of inoculated mice by 3 days postinoculation; in contrast, RV-ATL cells persist and are detected until the mice succumb to lymphoma development. The differing behaviors of HTLV-infected cell lines and ATL tumor cells in SCID mice suggest that ATL cells have a higher tumorigenic potential in vivo than do HTLV-infected cell lines because of their ability to evade natural killer cell-mediated cytolysis. PMID:7815516

  13. Bovine leukemia virus-induced clinical signs and morphological changes of encephalitozoonosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Levkut, M; Lesník, F; Bálent, P; Zajac, V; Korim, P; Sláviková, K

    1997-01-01

    Fourteen three-month-old rabbits spontaneously-infected with the microsporidium Encephalitozoon cuniculi Levaditi, Nicolau et Schoen, 1923 were inoculated intravenously with lymphocytes (Ly) from seropositive bovine leukemia virus infected cattle (Ly/BLV) or with fetal lamb kidney cells infected with bovine fetal leukemia (FLK/BLV). Thirteen rabbits were seropositive to BLV at least for a period of three months. Six rabbits died of pulmonary lesions. Chronic inflammatory lesions of encephalitozoonosis were found in six rabbits killed between 454 and 548 days of the observation period. Five animals bore subcutaneous granulomas. Immunohistochemically, E. cuniculi was demonstrated in the inflammatory lesions of rabbits studied. Control animals also spontaneously infected with E. cuniculi did not show clinical signs of encephalitozoonosis. Morphological changes were found incidentally in the form of small glial foci and focal interstitial nephritis in these animals. The combined action of BLV-E. cuniculi on the bodies of rabbits is proposed as a suitable model for the study of encephalitozoonosis in man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. PMID:9437837

  14. Chemoresistance to Valproate Treatment of Bovine Leukemia Virus-Infected Sheep; Identification of Improved HDAC Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Nicolas; Vandermeers, Fabian; de Brogniez, Alix; Florins, Arnaud; Nigro, Annamaria; François, Carole; Bouzar, Amel-Baya; Verlaeten, Olivier; Stern, Eric; Lambert, Didier M.; Wouters, Johan; Willems, Luc

    2012-01-01

    We previously proved that a histone deacetylase inhibitor (valproate, VPA) decreases the number of leukemic cells in bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected sheep. Here, we characterize the mechanisms initiated upon interruption of treatment. We observed that VPA treatment is followed by a decrease of the B cell counts and proviral loads (copies per blood volume). However, all sheep eventually relapsed after different periods of time and became refractory to further VPA treatment. Sheep remained persistently infected with BLV. B lymphocytes isolated throughout treatment and relapse were responsive to VPA-induced apoptosis in cell culture. B cell proliferation is only marginally affected by VPA ex vivo. Interestingly, in four out of five sheep, ex vivo viral expression was nearly undetectable at the time of relapse. In two sheep, a new tumoral clone arose, most likely revealing a selection process exerted by VPA in vivo. We conclude that the interruption of VPA treatment leads to the resurgence of the leukemia in BLV-infected sheep and hypothesize that resistance to further treatment might be due to the failure of viral expression induction. The development of more potent HDAC inhibitors and/or the combination with other compounds can overcome chemoresistance. These observations in the BLV model may be important for therapies against the related Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1. PMID:25436765

  15. Variant Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1c and Adult T-cell Leukemia, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Cassar, Olivier; Bardy, Peter; Kearney, Daniel; Gessain, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 is endemic to central Australia among Indigenous Australians. However, virologic and clinical aspects of infection remain poorly understood. No attempt has been made to control transmission to indigenous children. We report 3 fatal cases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Australo-Melanesian subtype c. PMID:24047544

  16. Feline Leukemia Virus and Other Pathogens as Important Threats to the Survival of the Critically Endangered Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus)

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Marina L.; Cattori, Valentino; Martínez, Fernando; López, Guillermo; Vargas, Astrid; Simón, Miguel A.; Zorrilla, Irene; Muñoz, Alvaro; Palomares, Francisco; López-Bao, Jose V.; Pastor, Josep; Tandon, Ravi; Willi, Barbara; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is considered the most endangered felid species in the world. In order to save this species, the Spanish authorities implemented a captive breeding program recruiting lynxes from the wild. In this context, a retrospective survey on prevalence of selected feline pathogens in free-ranging lynxes was initiated. Methodology/ Principal Findings We systematically analyzed the prevalence and importance of seven viral, one protozoan (Cytauxzoon felis), and several bacterial (e.g., hemotropic mycoplasma) infections in 77 of approximately 200 remaining free-ranging Iberian lynxes of the Doñana and Sierra Morena areas, in Southern Spain, between 2003 and 2007. With the exception of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), evidence of infection by all tested feline pathogens was found in Iberian lynxes. Fourteen lynxes were feline leukemia virus (FeLV) provirus-positive; eleven of these were antigenemic (FeLV p27 positive). All 14 animals tested negative for other viral infections. During a six-month period in 2007, six of the provirus-positive antigenemic lynxes died. Infection with FeLV but not with other infectious agents was associated with mortality (p<0.001). Sequencing of the FeLV surface glycoprotein gene revealed a common origin for ten of the eleven samples. The ten sequences were closely related to FeLV-A/61E, originally isolated from cats in the USA. Endogenous FeLV sequences were not detected. Conclusions/Significance It was concluded that the FeLV infection most likely originated from domestic cats invading the lynx's habitats. Data available regarding the time frame, co-infections, and outcome of FeLV-infections suggest that, in contrast to the domestic cat, the FeLV strain affecting the lynxes in 2007 is highly virulent to this species. Our data argue strongly for vaccination of lynxes and domestic cats in and around lynx's habitats in order to prevent further spread of the virus as well as reduction the domestic cat

  17. Murine leukemia virus-based Tat-inducible long terminal repeat replacement vectors: a new system for anti-human immunodeficiency virus gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, P M; Kim, N; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have constructed new murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors (TIN vectors) which, following integration, contain human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 U3 and R sequences in place of the MLV U3 and R regions. This provides, for the first time, single transcriptional unit retroviral vectors under the control of Tat. TIN vectors have several advantages for anti-HIV gene therapy applications. PMID:8892960

  18. Murine leukemia virus-based Tat-inducible long terminal repeat replacement vectors: a new system for anti-human immunodeficiency virus gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cannon, P M; Kim, N; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-11-01

    We have constructed new murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors (TIN vectors) which, following integration, contain human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 U3 and R sequences in place of the MLV U3 and R regions. This provides, for the first time, single transcriptional unit retroviral vectors under the control of Tat. TIN vectors have several advantages for anti-HIV gene therapy applications. PMID:8892960

  19. Effect of internal genomic sequences of the Moloney murine leukemia virus on replication

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, I.K.; Lobanova, A.B.; Voitenok, N.N.

    1995-11-01

    Construction and use of retrovirus vectors derived from the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) are described. These vectors, designated minimal vectors, contain the left and right long terminal repeats (LTRs), a binding site for proline tRNA, a polypurine tract (PPT), and a dominant marker for selective introduction of vectors into a packaging cell line, but lack the internal sequences of the virus genome. The experiments showed that the minimal vectors can be replicated and that their titer was approximately 1500-fold lower than that of wild-type vectors. The minimal vectors were shown to contain all the cis-acting sequences necessary for correct reverse transcription. One infectious virion, like wild-type viruses, produced only one provirus. Unlike the avian reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), {Psi}{sup +} and {Psi}{sup {minus}} genomes of MoMuLV did not compete for virion proteins in the {Psi}2 packaging cell line. When an insert was introduced into a central part of the LTR U5 region, the titer of the minimal vector remained the same, while the titer of the wild-type vector decreased approximately 40-fold. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Cellular Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Is an Important Dengue Virus Restriction Factor

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Federico; Damonte, Elsa B.; García, Cybele C.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic antiviral defense is based on cellular restriction factors that are constitutively expressed and, thus, active even before a pathogen enters the cell. The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) are discrete nuclear foci that contain several cellular proteins involved in intrinsic antiviral responses against a number of viruses. Accumulating reports have shown the importance of PML as a DNA virus restriction factor and how these pathogens evade this antiviral activity. However, very little information is available regarding the antiviral role of PML against RNA viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) is an RNA emerging mosquito-borne human pathogen affecting millions of individuals each year by causing severe and potentially fatal syndromes. Since no licensed antiviral drug against DENV infection is currently available, it is of great importance to understand the factors mediating intrinsic immunity that may lead to the development of new pharmacological agents that can boost their potency and thereby lead to treatments for this viral disease. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antiviral role of PML in DENV-2 A549 infected cells. PMID:25962098

  1. Murine leukemia virus envelope gp70 is a shared biomarker for the high-sensitivity quantification of murine tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Scrimieri, Francesca; Askew, David; Corn, David J; Eid, Saada; Bobanga, Iuliana D; Bjelac, Jaclyn A; Tsao, Matthew L; Allen, Frederick; Othman, Youmna S; Wang, Shih-Chung G; Huang, Alex Y

    2013-01-01

    The preclinical development of anticancer drugs including immunotherapeutics and targeted agents relies on the ability to detect minimal residual tumor burden as a measure of therapeutic efficacy. Real-time quantitative (qPCR) represents an exquisitely sensitive method to perform such an assessment. However, qPCR-based applications are limited by the availability of a genetic defect associated with each tumor model under investigation. Here, we describe an off-the-shelf qPCR-based approach to detect a broad array of commonly used preclinical murine tumor models. In particular, we report that the mRNA coding for the envelope glycoprotein 70 (gp70) encoded by the endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is universally expressed in 22 murine cancer cell lines of disparate histological origin but is silent in 20 out of 22 normal mouse tissues. Further, we detected the presence of as few as 100 tumor cells in whole lung extracts using qPCR specific for gp70, supporting the notion that this detection approach has a higher sensitivity as compared with traditional tissue histology methods. Although gp70 is expressed in a wide variety of tumor cell lines, it was absent in inflamed tissues, non-transformed cell lines, or pre-cancerous lesions. Having a high-sensitivity biomarker for the detection of a wide range of murine tumor cells that does not require additional genetic manipulations or the knowledge of specific genetic alterations present in a given neoplasm represents a unique experimental tool for investigating metastasis, assessing antitumor therapeutic interventions, and further determining tumor recurrence or minimal residual disease. PMID:24482753

  2. Infectious Entry by Amphotropic as well as Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Viruses Occurs through an Endocytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Katen, Louis J.; Januszeski, Michael M.; Anderson, W. French; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Evans, Leonard H.

    2001-01-01

    Infectious entry of enveloped viruses is thought to proceed by one of two mechanisms. pH-dependent viruses enter the cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and are inhibited by transient treatment with agents that prevent acidification of vesicles in the endocytic pathway, while pH-independent viruses are not inhibited by such agents and are thought to enter the cell by direct fusion with the plasma membrane. Nearly all retroviruses, including amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1, are classified as pH independent. However, ecotropic MuLV is considered to be a pH-dependent virus. We have examined the infectious entry of ecotropic and amphotropic MuLVs and found that they were equally inhibited by NH4Cl and bafilomycin A. These agents inhibited both viruses only partially over the course of the experiments. Agents that block the acidification of endocytic vesicles also arrest vesicular trafficking. Thus, partial inhibition of the MuLVs could be the result of virus inactivation during arrest in this pathway. In support of this contention, we found that that the loss of infectivity of the MuLVs during treatment of target cells with the drugs closely corresponded to the loss of activity due to spontaneous inactivation at 37°C in the same period of time. Furthermore, the drugs had no effect on the efficiency of infection under conditions in which the duration of infection was held to a very short period to minimize the effects of spontaneous inactivation. These results indicate that the infectious processes of both ecotropic and amphotropic MuLVs were arrested rather than aborted by transient treatment of the cells with the drugs. We also found that infectious viruses were efficiently internalized during treatment. This indicated that the arrest occurred in an intracellular compartment and that the infectious process of both the amphotropic and ecotropic MuLVs very likely involved endocytosis. An important aspect of this study

  3. Genetic heterogeneity in human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type II.

    PubMed Central

    Dube, D K; Sherman, M P; Saksena, N K; Bryz-Gornia, V; Mendelson, J; Love, J; Arnold, C B; Spicer, T; Dube, S; Glaser, J B

    1993-01-01

    DNA from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 17 different individuals infected with human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type II (HTLV-II) was successfully amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the primer pair SK110/SK111. This primer pair is conserved among the pol genes of all primate T-cell lymphoma viruses (PTLV) and flanks a 140-bp fragment of DNA which, when used in comparative analyses, reflects the relative degree of diversity among PTLV genomes. Cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic comparisons of these amplified 140-bp pol fragments indicated that there are at least two distinct genetic substrains of HTLV-II in the Western Hemisphere. These data were confirmed for selected isolates by performing PCR, cloning, and sequencing with to 10 additional primer pair-probe sets specific for different regions throughout the PTLV genome. HTLV-II isolates from Seminole, Guaymi, and Tobas Indians belong in the new substrain of HTLV-II, while the prototype MoT isolate defines the original substrain. There was greater diversity among HTLV-II New World strains than among HTLV-I New World strains. In fact, the heterogeneity among HTLV-II strains from the Western Hemisphere was similar to that observed in HTLV-I and simian T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type I isolates from around the world, including Japan, Africa, and Papua New Guinea. Given these geographic and anthropological considerations and assuming similar mutation rates and selective forces among the PTLV, these data suggest either that HTLV-II has existed for a long time in the indigenous Amerindian population or that HTLV-II isolates introduced into the New World were more heterogeneous than the HTLV-I strains introduced into the New World. PMID:8437209

  4. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Qualley, Dominic F. Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  5. Free and integrated recombinant murine leukemia virus DNAs appear in preleukemic thymuses of AKR/J mice.

    PubMed Central

    Herr, W; Gilbert, W

    1984-01-01

    We studied the appearance and structure of murine leukemia viral genomes in preleukemic AKR/J mice by Southern hybridization. Up to an average of one to two copies per thymocyte of unintegrated murine leukemia virus DNA appears in the thymuses of preleukemic mice beginning at 4 to 5 months of age and disappears in leukemic thymuses. The free viral genomes are absent in the spleens, livers, and brains of preleukemic mice. Using a series of ecotropic and nonecotropic murine leukemia virus hybridization probes, we showed that the unintegrated viral genomes are structurally analogous to those of recombinant mink cell focus-forming viruses that appear as proviruses in leukemic AKR thymocytes, suggesting that these free viral DNAs are the direct precursors to the leukemia-specific proviruses. The mosaic of ecotropic and nonecotropic sequences within these unintegrated viral DNAs varies from one preleukemic thymus to another but often appears structurally homogeneous within individual thymuses, indicating that often each thymus was being infected by a unique mink cell focus-forming virus. Analysis of high-molecular-weight DNA shows that recombinant proviruses reside in the chromosomal DNA of thymocytes within the preleukemic thymus, with the number rising to an average of several copies per thymocyte, but we do not detect any preferred integration sites. These results suggest that, in general, before the development of thymic leukemias in AKR mice there is a massive infection by a unique mink cell focus-forming virus which then integrates into many different sites of individual thymocytes, one of which grows out to become a tumor. Images PMID:6321787

  6. New class of leukemogenic ecotropic recombinant murine leukemia virus isolated from radiation-induced thymomas of C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rassart, E.; Sankar-Mistry, P.; Lemay, G.; DesGroseillers, L.; Jalicoeur, P.

    1983-02-01

    We previously reported the establishment of several lymphoid cell lines from X-ray-induced thymomas of C57BL/Ka mice, and all, except one, produce retroviruses. Biological characterization of five of these new primary radiation leukemia viruses (RadLVs) indicated that they had a B-tropic, fibrotropic, and ecotropic host range and were leukemogenic when reinjected into C57BL/Ka newborn mice. The leukemogenic potential of one isolate (G/sub 6/T/sub 2/) was further assessed and shown to be retained after prolonged passaging on fibroblasts in vitro. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA of four of our new RadLV isolates (G/sub 6/T/sub 2/, Ti-7, Ti-8, and Ti-9) revealed that G/sub 6/T/sub 2/ and Ti-7 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) genomes had identical restriction maps, whereas Ti-8 and Ti-9 genomes were different from each other and from the G/sub 6/T/sub 2/ and Ti-7 genomes. The physical maps of these genomes were similar to that of known ecotropic MuLV genomes (including the C57BL/Ka endogenous ecotropic MuLV) within their long terminal repeats, env, the right portion of pol, and the left portion of gag. However, a region covering the end of gag and the beginning of pol was different and showed several similarities with xenotropic MuLV genomes of BALB/c, AKR, and C58 mice previously mapped. Our results suggest that these primary RadLV genomes are recombinants between the parental ecotropic MuLV genome and a nonecotropic (xenotropic) sequence. To further study the leukemic potential of these RadLVs, the genome of one of them (G/sub 6/T/sub 2/) was cloned in Charon 21A as an infectious molecule.

  7. Serum-dependent expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein suppresses propagation of influenza virus

    SciTech Connect

    Iki, Shigeo; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Yokosawa, Noriko; Nagata, Kyosuke; Fujii, Nobuhiro . E-mail: fujii@sapmed.ac.jp

    2005-12-05

    The rate of propagation of influenza virus in human adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells was found to negatively correlate with the concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in the culture medium. Virus replicated more rapidly at lower FBS concentrations (0 or 2%) than at higher concentrations (10 or 20%) during an early stage of infection. Basal and interferon (IFN)-induced levels of typical IFN-inducible anti-viral proteins, such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, dsRNA-activated protein kinase and MxA, were unaffected by variation in FBS concentrations. But promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was expressed in a serum-dependent manner. In particular, the 65 to 70 kDa isoform of PML was markedly upregulated following the addition of serum. In contrast, other isoforms were induced by IFN treatment, and weakly induced by FBS concentrations. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that PML was mainly formed nuclear bodies in Caco-2 cells at various FBS concentrations, and the levels of the PML-nuclear bodies were upregulated by FBS. Overexpression of PML isoform consisting of 560 or 633 amino acid residues by transfection of expression plasmid results in significantly delayed viral replication rate in Caco-2 cells. On the other hand, downregulation of PML expression by RNAi enhanced viral replication. These results indicate that PML isoforms which are expressed in a serum-dependent manner suppress the propagation of influenza virus at an early stage of infection.

  8. The BET family of proteins targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus integration near transcription start sites

    PubMed Central

    De Rijck, Jan; de Kogel, Christine; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vets, Sofie; Ashkar, Sara El; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D; Landuyt, Bart; Husson, Steven J.; Busschots, Katrien; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Summary A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome in the host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4) and MLV integrase specifically interact and co-localize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75, retargets MLV integration away from TSS and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conform to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration pattern. Together these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors. PMID:24183673

  9. Distinct Morphology of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, José O.; Cao, Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The Gag polyprotein is the main retroviral structural protein and is essential for the assembly and release of virus particles. In this study, we have analyzed the morphology and Gag stoichiometry of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-like particles and authentic, mature HTLV-1 particles by using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). HTLV-1-like particles mimicked the morphology of immature authentic HTLV-1 virions. Importantly, we have observed for the first time that the morphology of these virus-like particles (VLPs) has the unique local feature of a flat Gag lattice that does not follow the curvature of the viral membrane, resulting in an enlarged distance between the Gag lattice and the viral membrane. Other morphological features that have been previously observed with other retroviruses include: (1) a Gag lattice with multiple discontinuities; (2) membrane regions associated with the Gag lattice that exhibited a string of bead-like densities at the inner leaflet; and (3) an arrangement of the Gag lattice resembling a railroad track. Measurement of the average size and mass of VLPs and authentic HTLV-1 particles suggested a consistent range of size and Gag copy numbers in these two groups of particles. The unique local flat Gag lattice morphological feature observed suggests that HTLV-1 Gag could be arranged in a lattice structure that is distinct from that of other retroviruses characterized to date. PMID:27187442

  10. Distinct Morphology of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, José O; Cao, Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M

    2016-01-01

    The Gag polyprotein is the main retroviral structural protein and is essential for the assembly and release of virus particles. In this study, we have analyzed the morphology and Gag stoichiometry of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-like particles and authentic, mature HTLV-1 particles by using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). HTLV-1-like particles mimicked the morphology of immature authentic HTLV-1 virions. Importantly, we have observed for the first time that the morphology of these virus-like particles (VLPs) has the unique local feature of a flat Gag lattice that does not follow the curvature of the viral membrane, resulting in an enlarged distance between the Gag lattice and the viral membrane. Other morphological features that have been previously observed with other retroviruses include: (1) a Gag lattice with multiple discontinuities; (2) membrane regions associated with the Gag lattice that exhibited a string of bead-like densities at the inner leaflet; and (3) an arrangement of the Gag lattice resembling a railroad track. Measurement of the average size and mass of VLPs and authentic HTLV-1 particles suggested a consistent range of size and Gag copy numbers in these two groups of particles. The unique local flat Gag lattice morphological feature observed suggests that HTLV-1 Gag could be arranged in a lattice structure that is distinct from that of other retroviruses characterized to date. PMID:27187442

  11. Diseases associated with spontaneous feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Reinacher, M

    1989-05-01

    More than 2000 cats sent for necropsy in order to provide a diagnosis were investigated immunohistologically using paraffin sections for the presence of a persistent infection with feline leukemia virus (FeLV). The spectrum of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases associated significantly with FeLV infection was determined statistically. Three-quarters of the cats with persistent FeLV infections died of non-neoplastic diseases and about 23% died of tumors, nearly exclusively those of the leukemia/lymphoma disease complex. A strong association with liver degeneration, icterus and a FeLV-associated enteritis was found in addition to the known association with non-neoplastic diseases and conditions such as anemia, bacterial secondary infections and respiratory tract inflammations due to the immunosuppressive effect of FeLV, hemorrhages and feline infectious peritonitis. Surprisingly, diseases and conditions like feline infectious panleukopenia, enteritis (of other types than FeLV-associated enteritis and feline infectious panleukopenia), glomerulonephritis, uremia and hemorrhagic cystitis were not associated with persistent FeLV infection. Another unexpected finding was that most pathogenic infectious agents demonstrated in the cats were not FeLV-associated either. Thus, immunosuppression due to FeLV infection seems to make the animals susceptible to certain pathogenic infectious agents, but not to the majority. PMID:2549696

  12. Epidemiology, Treatment, and Prevention of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Proietti, Fernando Augusto; Ribas, João Gabriel Ramos; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Pinheiro, Sônia Regina; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus to be discovered, is present in diverse regions of the world, where its infection is usually neglected in health care settings and by public health authorities. Since it is usually asymptomatic in the beginning of the infection and disease typically manifests later in life, silent transmission occurs, which is associated with sexual relations, breastfeeding, and blood transfusions. There are no prospects of vaccines, and screening of blood banks and in prenatal care settings is not universal. Therefore, its transmission is active in many areas such as parts of Africa, South and Central America, the Caribbean region, Asia, and Melanesia. It causes serious diseases in humans, including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and an incapacitating neurological disease (HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis [HAM/TSP]) besides other afflictions such as uveitis, rheumatic syndromes, and predisposition to helminthic and bacterial infections, among others. These diseases are not curable as yet, and current treatments as well as new perspectives are discussed in the present review. PMID:20610824

  13. Genome structure of mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia virus in epithelial mink lung cells transformed vitro by iododeoxyuridine-induced C3H/MuLV cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, U R; Birkenmeier, E; Bonner, T I; Gonda, M A; Gunnell, M

    1983-01-01

    We characterized mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia viruses that were isolated from C3H/MCA-5 cells after induction with 5-iododeoxyuridine in culture. Mink lung epithelial cells malignantly transformed in vitro by induced virus were the source of four molecular clones of mink cell focus-forming virus. CI-1, CI-2, CI-3, and CI-4. Three clones, CI-1, CI-2, and CI-3, had full-length mink cell focus-forming viral genomes, one of which (CI-3) was infectious. In addition, we obtained a defective viral genome (CI-4) which had a deletion in the envelope gene. A comparison between the envelope genes of CI-4 and those of spleen focus-forming virus by heteroduplex mapping showed close homology in the substitution region and defined the deletion as being identical to the p15E deletion of spleen focus-forming virus. The recombinant mink cell focus-forming genomes are not endogenous in C3H/MCA-5 cells and therefore must have been formed in culture after induction by 5-iododeoxyuridine. CI-3, the infectious clone of mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia virus, was dualtropic, and mink cells infected with CI-3 were altered in their response to epidermal growth factor. In the presence of epidermal growth factor at 10 ng/ml, uninfected mink cells retained their epithelial morphology in monolayer culture and did not form colonies in soft agar. In contrast, CI-3 virus-infected mink cells grew with fibroblastic morphology in monolayer culture and showed an increased growth rate in soft agar in the presence of epidermal growth factor. Images PMID:6300431

  14. Notch2 transduction by feline leukemia virus in a naturally infected cat.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Ito, Jumpei; Baba, Takuya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Kuse, Kyohei; Ochi, Haruyo; Anai, Yukari; Hisasue, Masaharu; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2014-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) induces neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases in cats. The transduction of cellular genes by FeLV is sometimes observed and associated with neoplastic diseases including lymphoma and sarcoma. Here, we report the first natural case of feline Notch2 transduction by FeLV in an infected cat with multicentric lymphoma and hypercalcemia. We cloned recombinant FeLVs harboring Notch2 in the env gene. Notch2 was able to activate expression of a reporter gene, similar to what was previously reported in cats with experimental FeLV-induced thymic lymphoma. Our findings suggest that the transduction of Notch2 strongly correlates with FeLV-induced lymphoma. PMID:24317268

  15. Targeting of a Nuclease to Murine Leukemia Virus Capsids Inhibits Viral Multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsoulis, Georges; Seshaiah, Partha; Federspiel, Mark J.; Rein, Alan; Hughes, Stephen H.; Boeke, Jef D.

    1995-01-01

    Capsid-targeted viral inactivation is an antiviral strategy in which toxic fusion proteins are targeted to virions, where they inhibit viral multiplication by destroying viral components. These fusion proteins consist of a virion structural protein moiety and an enzymatic moiety such as a nuclease. Such fusion proteins can severely inhibit transposition of yeast retrotransposon Ty1, an element whose transposition mechanistically resembles retroviral multiplication. We demonstrate that expression of a murine retrovirus capsid-staphylococcal nuclease fusion protein inhibits multiplication of the corresponding murine leukemia virus by 30- to 100-fold. Staphylococcal nuclease is apparently inactive intracellularly and hence nontoxic to the host cell, but it is active extracellularly because of its requirement for high concentrations of Ca2+ ions. Virions assembled in and shed from cells expressing the fusion protein contain very small amounts of intact viral RNA, as would be predicted for nuclease-mediated inhibition of viral multiplication.

  16. The role of neighboring infected cattle in bovine leukemia virus transmission risk

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, Sota; TSUTSUI, Toshiyuki; YAMAMOTO, Takehisa; HAYAMA, Yoko; MUROGA, Norihiko; KONISHI, Misako; KAMEYAMA, Ken-ichiro; MURAKAMI, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) transmission to uninfected cattle by adjacent infected cattle in 6 dairy farms. Animals were initially tested in 2010–2011 using a commercial ELISA kit. Uninfected cattle were repeatedly tested every 4 to 6 months until fall of 2012. The Cox proportional hazard model with frailty showed that uninfected cattle neighboring to infected cattle (n=53) had a significant higher risk of seroconversion than those without any infected neighbors (n=81) (hazard ratio: 12.4, P=0.001), implying that neighboring infected cattle were a significant risk factor for BLV transmission. This finding provides scientific support for animal health authorities and farmers to segregate infected cattle on farms to prevent spread of BLV. PMID:25754652

  17. Partial molecular characterization of different proviral strains of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Juliarena, Marcela A; Lendez, Pamela A; Gutierrez, Silvina E; Forletti, Agustina; Rensetti, Daniel E; Ceriani, Maria Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV)-infected cattle were classified by their proviral load into low and high proviral load profiles (LPL and HPL, respectively). Blood from these animals was used to infect sheep to obtain multiple identical copies of integrated provirus. An env fragment of BLV was amplified from all infected sheep and sequenced. The sequences that were obtained were compared to already published BLV genome sequence, resulting in three clusters. Mutations could not be attributed to the passage of provirus from cattle to sheep and subsequent amplification and sequencing. The description of two different proviral load profiles, the association of the BoLA-DRB3.2 0902 allele with the LPL profile, the availability of complete BLV sequences, and the comparison of a variable region of the env gene from carefully characterized cattle are still not enough to explain the presence of animals in every herd that are resistant to BLV dissemination. PMID:22965577

  18. Milk and fat yields decline in bovine leukemia virus-infected Holstein cattle with persistent lymphocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Da, Y; Shanks, R D; Stewart, J A; Lewin, H A

    1993-01-01

    Effects of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection on milk and fat yields were studied by using data collected from Holstein cows over a 6-year period. Milk and fat yields in BLV-infected cows with persistent lymphocytosis (PL) declined significantly relative to their BLV-infected non-PL herdmates. Declines were most pronounced in cows older than 6 years. The estimated loss to the dairy industry due to PL is more than $42 million annually. A major histocompatibility complex class I (BoLA-A) allele that has been previously associated with resistance to PL was associated with longevity and realization of milk production potentials, indicating that genetic resistance to PL will have an economic benefit in herds where BLV is endemic. PMID:8341665

  19. Milk and fat yields decline in bovine leukemia virus-infected Holstein cattle with persistent lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Da, Y; Shanks, R D; Stewart, J A; Lewin, H A

    1993-07-15

    Effects of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection on milk and fat yields were studied by using data collected from Holstein cows over a 6-year period. Milk and fat yields in BLV-infected cows with persistent lymphocytosis (PL) declined significantly relative to their BLV-infected non-PL herdmates. Declines were most pronounced in cows older than 6 years. The estimated loss to the dairy industry due to PL is more than $42 million annually. A major histocompatibility complex class I (BoLA-A) allele that has been previously associated with resistance to PL was associated with longevity and realization of milk production potentials, indicating that genetic resistance to PL will have an economic benefit in herds where BLV is endemic. PMID:8341665

  20. Determination of the minimal fusion peptide of bovine leukemia virus gp30

    SciTech Connect

    Lorin, Aurelien; Lins, Laurence; Stroobant, Vincent; Brasseur, Robert . E-mail: brasseur.r@fsagx.ac.be; Charloteaux, Benoit

    2007-04-13

    In this study, we determined the minimal N-terminal fusion peptide of the gp30 of the bovine leukemia virus on the basis of the tilted peptide theory. We first used molecular modelling to predict that the gp30 minimal fusion peptide corresponds to the 15 first residues. Liposome lipid-mixing and leakage assays confirmed that the 15-residue long peptide induces fusion in vitro and that it is the shortest peptide inducing optimal fusion since longer peptides destabilize liposomes to the same extent but not shorter ones. The 15-residue long peptide can thus be considered as the minimal fusion peptide. The effect of mutations reported in the literature was also investigated. Interestingly, mutations related to glycoproteins unable to induce syncytia in cell-cell fusion assays correspond to peptides predicted as non-tilted. The relationship between obliquity and fusogenicity was also confirmed in vitro for one tilted and one non-tilted mutant peptide.

  1. Intersubunit disulfide isomerization controls membrane fusion of human T-cell leukemia virus Env.

    PubMed

    Li, Kejun; Zhang, Shujing; Kronqvist, Malin; Wallin, Michael; Ekström, Maria; Derse, David; Garoff, Henrik

    2008-07-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) Env carries a typical disulfide isomerization motif, C(225)XXC, in the C-terminal domain SU. Here we have tested whether this motif is used for isomerization of the intersubunit disulfide of Env and whether this rearrangement is required for membrane fusion. We introduced the C225A and C228A mutations into Env and found that the former but not the latter mutant matured into covalently linked SU-TM complexes in transfected cells. Next, we constructed a secreted Env ectodomain and showed that it underwent incubation-dependent intersubunit disulfide isomerization on target cells. However, the rearrangement was blocked by the C225A mutation, suggesting that C(225) carried the isomerization-active thiol. Still, it was possible to reduce the intersubunit disulfide of the native C225A ectodomain mutant with dithiothreitol (DTT). The importance of the CXXC-mediated disulfide isomerization for infection was studied using murine leukemia virus vectors pseudotyped with wild-type or C225A HTLV-1 Env. We found that the mutant Env blocked infection, but this could be rescued with DTT. The fusion activity was tested in a fusion-from-within assay using a coculture of rat XC target and transfected BHK-21 effector cells. We found that the mutation blocked polykaryon formation, but this could be reversed with DTT. Similar DTT-reversible inhibition of infection and fusion was observed when a membrane-impermeable alkylator was present during the infection/fusion incubation. We conclude that the fusion activity of HTLV-1 Env is controlled by an SU CXXC-mediated isomerization of the intersubunit disulfide. Thus, this extends the applicability of the isomerization model from gammaretroviruses to deltaretroviruses. PMID:18480461

  2. Presence of 5'-terminal cap structures in virus-specific RNA from feline leukemia virus-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, A R; Friderici, K H; Velicer, L F; Rottman, F

    1978-01-01

    The F-422 line of feline thymus tumor cells, chronically infected with the Rickard strain of feline leukemia virus (R-FeLV), was labeled with 32P, and the total cytoplasmic RNA was isolated. The RNA was centrifuged through sucrose gradients, and R-FeLV virus-specific RNA (vRNA) was located by hybridization of portions of the gradient fractions to R-FeLV complementary DNA. vRNA classes with average sedimentation coefficients of approximately 36S, 28S, 23S, and 15S were identified. Each class of RNA was recovered by hybridized with mercurated R-FeLV complementary DNA, and the hybrids were chromatographed on columns of sulfhydryl-Sepharose to separate them from unhybridized cellular RNA. Although insufficient amount of 36S and 28S vRNA were obtained for further analysis, the 23S and 15S VRNA classes were analyzed to determine the nature of their 5' termini. Each of these vRNA classes was found to contain stoichiometric amounts of cap structures per unit length of RNA, consistent with the presence of one cap per molecule. The structure of the 23S vRNA cap was found to be m7G5'ppp5'GmpAp, whereas that of the 15S vRNA cap was m7G5'ppp5'GmpGp. PMID:207884

  3. Seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus and heartworm infection among owned cats in tropical Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Pacheco, Antonio; Aguilar-Caballero, Armando J; Colin-Flores, Rafael F; Acosta-Viana, Karla Y; Guzman-Marin, Eugenia; Jimenez-Coello, Matilde

    2014-06-01

    Several infectious agents may be distributed within a healthy population of cats where diverse risk factors predispose them to come into contact with pathogens. Blood samples from 227 owned cats in Merida, Mexico, were collected with the objective of determining the seroprevalence and associated risk factors of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and Dirofilaria immitis antigen, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibody. Serological detection of FeLV and D immitis antigens, and FIV antibodies was performed using the commercial kit SNAP Feline Triple Test. The prevalence was found to be 7.5% for FeLV, 2.5% for FIV and 0% for D immitis. Adult cats were at a higher risk of coming into contact with FeLV (P <0.01) than younger cats. Owing to its low prevalence, a risk factor analysis was not performed for FIV. The prevalence of retroviral infections found in this study was low, but within the limits reported in the different geographical areas of the world. Cases of filariosis in the domestic cats of Merida, Mexico, may be absent or very low; however, the low sample size may have influenced these results. PMID:24196568

  4. Crystal structures of the reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia-virus related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dongwen; Chung, Suhman; Miller, Maria; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-06-19

    The ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain of retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a critical role in the life cycle by degrading the RNA strands of DNA/RNA hybrids. In addition, RNase H activity is required to precisely remove the RNA primers from nascent (-) and (+) strand DNA. We report here three crystal structures of the RNase H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) RT, namely (i) the previously identified construct from which helix C was deleted, (ii) the intact domain, and (iii) the intact domain complexed with an active site {alpha}-hydroxytropolone inhibitor. Enzymatic assays showed that the intact RNase H domain retained catalytic activity, whereas the variant lacking helix C was only marginally active, corroborating the importance of this helix for enzymatic activity. Modeling of the enzyme-substrate complex elucidated the essential role of helix C in binding a DNA/RNA hybrid and its likely mode of recognition. The crystal structure of the RNase H domain complexed with {beta}-thujaplicinol clearly showed that coordination by two divalent cations mediates recognition of the inhibitor.

  5. Genome-wide association study for host response to bovine leukemia virus in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Brym, P; Bojarojć-Nosowicz, B; Oleński, K; Hering, D M; Ruść, A; Kaczmarczyk, E; Kamiński, S

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms of leukemogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and the processes underlying the phenomenon of differential host response to BLV infection still remain poorly understood. The aim of the study was to screen the entire cattle genome to identify markers and candidate genes that might be involved in host response to bovine leukemia virus infection. A genome-wide association study was performed using Holstein cows naturally infected by BLV. A data set included 43 cows (BLV positive) and 30 cows (BLV negative) genotyped for 54,609 SNP markers (Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip). The BLV status of cows was determined by serum ELISA, nested-PCR and hematological counts. Linear Regression Analysis with a False Discovery Rate and kinship matrix (computed on the autosomal SNPs) was calculated to find out which SNP markers significantly differentiate BLV-positive and BLV-negative cows. Nine markers reached genome-wide significance. The most significant SNPs were located on chromosomes 23 (rs41583098), 3 (rs109405425, rs110785500) and 8 (rs43564499) in close vicinity of a patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 1 (PNPLA1); adaptor-related protein complex 4, beta 1 subunit (AP4B1); tripartite motif-containing 45 (TRIM45) and cell division cycle associated 2 (CDCA2) genes, respectively. Furthermore, a list of 41 candidate genes was composed based on their proximity to significant markers (within a distance of ca. 1 Mb) and functional involvement in processes potentially underlying BLV-induced pathogenesis. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that host response to BLV infection involves nine sub-regions of the cattle genome (represented by 9 SNP markers), containing many genes which, based on the literature, could be involved to enzootic bovine leukemia progression. New group of promising candidate genes associated with the host response to BLV infection were identified and could therefore be a target for future studies. The functions of candidate genes

  6. CD123 redirected multiple virus-specific T cells for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Liu, Xin; Wang, Xingbing; Sun, Zimin; Song, Xiao-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been increasingly used as a curative treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, relapse rates after HSCT in complete remission (CR) are reported between 30% and 70%. In addition, numerous studies suggested that secondary viral infection from a variety of viruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), adenovirus (Adv), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are among the most common causes of death post-HSCT. Currently, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T cells have been developed to treat AML in clinical studies, while virus-specific cytotoxic T cells (VST) have been proven to be able to effectively prevent or treat viral infection after HSCT. Thus it would be desirable to develop T cells with the ability of simultaneously targeting AML relapse and viral infection. In this article, we now describe the generation of VST cells that are engineered to express CAR for a specific AML cell-surface antigen CD123 (CD123-CAR-VST). Using Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with EBV, Adv, and CMV peptides as sources of viral antigens, we generated VST from A2 donor peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC). VST were then transduced with retroviral vector encoding CD123-CAR to generate CD123-CAR-VST. We demonstrated that CD123-CAR-VST recognized EBV, Adv, and CMV epitopes and had HLA-restricted virus-specific cytotoxic effector function against EBV target. In addition, CD123-CAR-VST retained the specificity against CD123-positive AML cell lines such as MOLM13 and THP-1 in vitro. Thus our results suggested that CD123-CAR-VST might be a valuable candidate to simultaneously prevent or treat relapse and viral infection in AML HSCT recipients. PMID:26740053

  7. L233P mutation of the Tax protein strongly correlated with leukemogenicity of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Emi; Matsumura, Keiko; Soma, Norihiko; Hirasawa, Shintaro; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Arakaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2013-12-27

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) Tax protein is believed to play a crucial role in leukemogenesis by the virus. BLV usually causes asymptomatic infections in cattle, but only one-third develop persistent lymphocytosis that rarely progress after a long incubation period to lymphoid tumors, namely enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL). In the present study, we demonstrated that the BLV tax genes could be divided into two alleles and developed multiplex PCR detecting an L233P mutation of the Tax protein. Then, in order to define the relationship between the Tax protein and leukemogenicity, we examined 360 tumor samples randomly collected from dairy or breeding cattle in Japan, of which Tax proteins were categorized, for age at the time of diagnosis of EBL. The ages of 288 animals (80.0%) associated with L233-Tax and those of 70 animals (19.4%) with P233-Tax individually followed log-normal distributions. Only the two earliest cases (0.6%) with L233-Tax disobeyed the log-normal distribution. These findings suggest that the animals affected by EBL were infected with the virus at a particular point in life, probably less than a few months after birth. Median age of those with P233-Tax was 22 months older than that with L233-Tax and geometric means exhibited a significant difference (P<0.01). It is also quite unlikely that viruses carrying the particular Tax protein infect older cattle. Here, we conclude that BLV could be divided into two categories on the basis of amino acid at position 233 of the Tax protein, which strongly correlated with leukemogenicity. PMID:24139177

  8. Downregulation of endogenous STAT3 augments tumoricidal activity of interleukin 15 activated dendritic cell against lymphoma and leukemia via TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Hira, Sumit Kumar; Mondal, Indrani; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Manna, Partha Pratim

    2014-10-01

    Effector functions in tumor resistance by dendritic cells (DCs) are less well characterized. In this study, we describe that the murine DCs upon stimulation with recombinant IL-15 in vitro or in vivo, expresses TNF superfamily member TRAIL which mediates cytotoxicity and growth inhibition against a murine lymphoma called Dalton lymphoma (DL) via apoptosis. Presence of tumor lysate or intact tumor cells significantly reduces the DC mediated tumoricidal effect, possibly via masking and down-regulating TRAIL in DCs. The antitumor effect of DC derived TRAIL was further augmented by deactivation of STAT3 in tumor cells by cucurbitacin I, which makes it more susceptible to DC derived TRAIL Treatment of tumor cells with cucurbitacin I upregulates TRAIL receptor expression in addition to activation of caspases. Compared to naïve DCs, DCs from tumor bearing mice are significantly impaired in TRAIL expression and consequent antitumor functions against DL which was partially restored by activation with IL-15 or LPS. Priming with recombinant IL-15 prolongs the survival of tumor bearing mice treated with cucurbitacin I. Naïve peripheral blood DCs derived from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients have significant impairment in expression of TRAIL and consequent tumoricidal properties against TRAIL sensitive lymphoma cell lines and primary tumor cells compared to normal control. PMID:25139620

  9. Blocking Endogenous Leukemia Inhibitory Factor During Placental Development in Mice Leads to Abnormal Placentation and Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Amy; Correia, Jeanne; Krishnan, Tara; Menkhorst, Ellen; Cuman, Carly; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulation and is critical for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. Specialized trophoblast cells derived from the embryonic trophectoderm play a pivotal role in the establishment of the placenta. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is one of the predominant cytokines present in the placenta during early pregnancy. LIF has been shown to regulate trophoblast adhesion and invasion in vitro, however its precise role in vivo is unknown. We hypothesized that LIF would be required for normal placental development in mice. LIF and LIFRα were immunolocalized to placental trophoblasts and fetal vessels in mouse implantation sites during mid-gestation. Temporally blocking LIF action during specific periods of placental development via intraperitoneal administration of our specific LIFRα antagonist, PEGLA, resulted in abnormal placental trophoblast and vascular morphology and reduced activated STAT3 but not ERK. Numerous genes regulating angiogenesis and oxidative stress were altered in the placenta in response to LIF inhibition. Pregnancy viability was also significantly compromised in PEGLA treated mice. Our data suggest that LIF plays an important role in placentation in vivo and the maintenance of healthy pregnancy. PMID:26272398

  10. Characterization of an infectious molecular clone of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, T M; Robinson, M A; Bowers, F S; Kindt, T J

    1995-01-01

    An infectious molecular clone of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) was derived from an HTLV-I-transformed rabbit T-cell line, RH/K30, obtained by coculture of rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with the human HTLV-I-transformed cell line MT-2. The RH/K30 cell line contained two integrated proviruses, an intact HTLV-I genome and an apparently defective provirus with an in-frame stop codon in the env gene. A genomic DNA fragment containing the intact HTLV-I provirus was cloned into bacteriophage lambda (K30 phi) and subcloned into a plasmid vector (K30p). HTLV-I p24gag protein was detected in culture supernatants of human and rabbit T-cell and fibroblast lines transfected with these clones, at levels comparable to those of the parental cell line RH/K30. Persistent expression of virus was observed in one of these lines, RL-5/K30p, for more than 24 months. Biologic characterization of this cell line revealed the presence of integrated HTLV-I provirus, spliced and unspliced mRNA transcripts, and typical extracellular type C retrovirus particles. As expected, these virus particles contained HTLV-I RNA and reverse transcriptase activity. The transfected cells also expressed surface major histocompatibility complex class II, whereas no expression of this molecule was detected in the parental RL-5 cell line. Virus was passaged by cocultivation of irradiated RL-5/K30p cells with either rabbit PBMC or human cord blood mononuclear cells, demonstrating in vitro infectivity. The virus produced in these cells was also infectious in vivo, since rabbits injected with RL-5/K30p cells became productively infected, as evidenced by seroconversion, amplification of HTLV-I-specific sequences by PCR from PBMC DNA, and virus isolation from PBMC. Availability of infectious molecular clones will facilitate functional studies of HTLV-I genes and gene products. PMID:7884847

  11. EPIZOOTIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF FELINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS IN THE FLORIDA PUMA

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Mark W.; Brown, Meredith A.; Shindle, David B.; Terrell, Scott P.; Hayes, Kathleen A.; Ferree, Bambi C.; McBride, R. T.; Blankenship, Emmett L.; Jansen, Deborah; Citino, Scott B.; Roelke, Melody E.; Kiltie, Richard A.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) was not detected in Florida pumas (Puma concolor coryi) in almost 20 yr of surveillance; however, the finding of two FeLV antigen-positive pumas during the 2002–2003 capture season led to an investigation of FeLV in the population. Between January 1990 and April 2007, the proportion of pumas testing FeLV antibody positive increased, with antibody-positive pumas concentrated in the northern portion of puma range. Five of 131 (4%) pumas sampled between July 2000 and April 2007 were viremic, with all cases clustered in Okaloacoochee Slough (OKS). Clinical signs and clinical pathology at capture were absent or included lymphadenopathy, moderate-to-severe anemia, and lymphopenia. All viremic pumas died; causes of death were septicemia (n=2), intraspecific aggression (n=2), and anemia/dehydration (n=1). Outcome after FeLV exposure in pumas was similar to that in domestic cats, with evidence of regressive, latent, and persistent infections. Management of the epizootic included vaccination, and as of April 2007, 52 free-ranging pumas had received one or more inoculations. Vaccinations were concentrated in OKS and in a band between OKS and the remainder of the puma population. There have been no new cases since July 2004; however, the potential for reintroduction of the virus remains. PMID:18689639

  12. Insights into the nuclear export of murine leukemia virus intron-containing RNA

    PubMed Central

    Pessel-Vivares, Lucie; Houzet, Laurent; Lainé, Sébastien; Mougel, Marylène

    2015-01-01

    The retroviral genome consists of an intron-containing transcript that has essential cytoplasmic functions in the infected cell. This viral transcript can escape splicing, circumvent the nuclear checkpoint mechanisms and be transported to the cytoplasm by hijacking the host machinery. Once in the cytoplasm, viral unspliced RNA acts as mRNA to be translated and as genomic RNA to be packaged into nascent viruses. The murine leukemia virus (MLV) is among the first retroviruses discovered and is classified as simple Retroviridae due to its minimal encoding capacity. The oncogenic and transduction abilities of MLV are extensively studied, whereas surprisingly the crucial step of its nuclear export has remained unsolved until 2014. Recent work has revealed the recruitment by MLV of the cellular NXF1/Tap-dependent pathway for export. Unconventionally, MLV uses of Tap to export both spliced and unspliced viral RNAs. Unlike other retroviruses, MLV does not harbor a unique RNA signal for export. Indeed, multiple sequences throughout the MLV genome appear to promote export of the unspliced MLV RNA. We review here the current understanding of the export mechanism and highlight the determinants that influence MLV export. As the molecular mechanism of MLV export is elucidated, we will gain insight into the contribution of the export pathway to the cytoplasmic fate of the viral RNA. PMID:26158194

  13. Identification of an NF-kappa B binding site in the bovine leukemia virus promoter.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P A; Nyborg, J K; Cockerell, G L

    1995-10-01

    Although the mechanism by which bovine leukemia virus (BLV) induces neoplastic transformation of the host B cells is unknown, it is likely that critical interactions between cellular DNA-binding proteins and the virus are involved. We have used DNase I protection (footprinting) assays to construct a map of protein-DNA interactions on the 5' long terminal repeat of BLV. In addition to the three cyclic AMP response elements previously reported, we have also found an NF-kappa B binding site between -118 and -70 nucleotides upstream of the RNA start site. This site binds several members of the kappa B family of proteins, including p49, p50, and p65, in both footprint and electrophoretic mobility shift assays and functions as an enhancer element when inserted upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. NF-kappa B may be a critical nuclear binding protein that regulates both viral replication and key cellular genes in BLV-infected B cells. PMID:7666505

  14. Epizootiology and management of feline leukemia virus in the Florida puma.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mark W; Brown, Meredith A; Shindle, David B; Terrell, Scott P; Hayes, Kathleen A; Ferree, Bambi C; McBride, R T; Blankenship, Emmett L; Jansen, Deborah; Citino, Scott B; Roelke, Melody E; Kiltie, Richard A; Troyer, Jennifer L; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-07-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) was not detected in Florida pumas (Puma concolor coryi) in almost 20 yr of surveillance; however, the finding of two FeLV antigen-positive pumas during the 2002-2003 capture season led to an investigation of FeLV in the population. Between January 1990 and April 2007, the proportion of pumas testing FeLV antibody positive increased, with antibody-positive pumas concentrated in the northern portion of puma range. Five of 131 (4%) pumas sampled between July 2000 and April 2007 were viremic, with all cases clustered in Okaloacoochee Slough (OKS). Clinical signs and clinical pathology at capture were absent or included lymphadenopathy, moderate-to-severe anemia, and lymphopenia. All viremic pumas died; causes of death were septicemia (n=2), intraspecific aggression (n=2), and anemia/dehydration (n=1). Outcome after FeLV exposure in pumas was similar to that in domestic cats, with evidence of regressive, latent, and persistent infections. Management of the epizootic included vaccination, and as of April 2007, 52 free-ranging pumas had received one or more inoculations. Vaccinations were concentrated in OKS and in a band between OKS and the remainder of the puma population. There have been no new cases since July 2004; however, the potential for reintroduction of the virus remains. PMID:18689639

  15. Assembly and composition of intracellular particles formed by Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M; Jelinek, L; Jones, R S; Stegeman-Olsen, J; Barklis, E

    1993-01-01

    Assembly of type C retroviruses such as Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) ordinarily occurs at the plasma membranes of infected cells and absolutely requires the particle core precursor protein, Pr65gag. Previously we have shown that Pr65gag is membrane associated and that at least a portion of intracellular Pr65gag protein appears to be routed to the plasma membrane by a vesicular transport pathway. Here we show that intracellular particle formation can occur in M-MuLV-infected cells. M-MuLV immature particles were observed by electron microscopy budding into and within rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and vacuolar compartments. Biochemical fractionation studies indicated that intracellular Pr65gag was present in nonionic detergent-resistant complexes of greater than 150S. Additionally, viral RNA and polymerase functions appeared to be associated with intracellular particles, as were Gag-beta-galactosidase fusion proteins which have the capacity to be incorporated into virions. Immature intracellular particles in postnuclear lysates could be proteolytically processed in vitro to mature forms, while extracellular immature M-MuLV particles remained immature as long as 10 h during incubations. The occurrence of M-MuLV-derived intracellular particles demonstrates that Pr65gag can associate with intracellular membranes and indicates that if a plasma membrane Pr65gag receptor exists, it also can be found in other membrane compartments. These results support the hypothesis that intracellular particles may serve as a virus reservoir during in vivo infections. Images PMID:8350394

  16. Quantitation of specific antibodies bound to feline leukemia virus in the plasma of pet cats.

    PubMed

    Snyder, H W; Singhal, M C; Yoshida, L H; Jones, F R

    1985-08-01

    A method is described for determining levels of circulating immune complexes (CIC) composed of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigens and corresponding antibodies in plasma of persistently-infected pet cats. The procedure is based on the ability of high-titered heterologous anti-FeLV serum to chase cat anti-FeLV IgG from dissociated CIC by successfully competing for binding of free antigen. The eluted cat antibody is then collected and quantitated. In a study of cats in the process of clearing persistent FeLV infections, measured levels of FeLV-specific CIC correlated well with fluctuating levels of free FeLV antigen and antibody. The Raji cell assay for CIC in those cats was of comparatively little value in following the clearance of the virus, presumably because that assay does not distinguish between CIC containing viral and those containing non-viral antigens. The method described can be adapted to studies of specific immune complexes associated with a variety of syndromes, provided that the antigen eliciting the immune response is known. PMID:2995795

  17. Structure, distribution, and expression of an ancient murine endogenous retroviruslike DNA family.

    PubMed Central

    Obata, M M; Khan, A S

    1988-01-01

    An endogenous retroviruslike DNA, B-26, was cloned from a BALB/c mouse embryo gene library by using a generalized murine leukemia virus DNA probe. Southern blot hybridization and nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that B-26 DNA might be a novel member of the GLN DNA family (A. Itin and E. Keshet, J. Virol. 59:301-307, 1986) which contains murine leukemia virus-related pol and env sequences. Northern analysis indicated that B-26-related RNAs of 8.4 and 3.0 kilobases were transcribed in thymus, spleen, brain, and liver tissues of 6-week-old BALB/c mice. Images PMID:3172346

  18. The Role of B Cells for in Vivo T Cell Responses to a Friend Virus-Induced Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Kirk R.; Klarnet, Jay P.; Gieni, Randall S.; Hayglass, Kent T.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1990-08-01

    B cells can function as antigen-presenting cells and accessory cells for T cell responses. This study evaluated the role of B cells in the induction of protective T cell immunity to a Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced leukemia (FBL). B cell-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced tumor-specific CD4^+ helper and CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell responses after priming with FBL or a recombinant vaccinia virus containing F-MuLV antigens. Moreover, these mice had diminished T cell responses to the vaccinia viral antigens. Tumor-primed T cells transferred into B cell-deficient mice effectively eradicated disseminated FBL. Thus, B cells appear necessary for efficient priming but not expression of tumor and viral T cell immunity.

  19. [Sarcoidosis and leukemia/T-cell lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 virus infection in adults (apropos of a case)].

    PubMed

    Panelatti, G; Plumelle, Y; Arfi, S; Pascaline, N; Caplanne, D; Jean-Baptiste, G

    1992-01-01

    The HTLV-1 virus causes a disturbance of the immune system, the evaluation of which is often difficult. We report a case of sarcoidosis in a 49 year old woman of Martinique as evidenced by bilateral hilar adenopathy, hypercalcaemia, uveitis and granulomatous lesions on histological examination. Serological was positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Three years later she developed an adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The relationships between the HTLV-1 retroviral infection and different pathologies observed are discussed. PMID:1287773

  20. [Efficacy of siRNA on feline leukemia virus replication in vitro].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Melanie; Weber, Karin; Rauch, Gisep; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Hosie, Margaret J; Meli, Marina L; Hartmann, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) can lead to severe clinical signs in cats. Until now, there is no effective therapy for FeLV-infected cats. RNA interference-based antiviral therapy is a new concept. Specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) are designed complementary to the mRNA of a target region, and thus inhibit replication. Several studies have proven efficacy of siRNAs in inhibiting virus replication. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory potential of siRNAs against FeLV replication in vitro. siRNAs against the FeLV env gene and the host cell surface receptor (feTHTR1) which is used by FeLV-A for entry as well as siRNA that were not complementary to the FeLV or cat genome, were tested. Crandell feline kidney cells (CrFK cells) were transfected with FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. On day 13, infected cells were transfected with siRNAs. As control, cells were mock-transfected or treated with azidothymidine (AZT) (5 μg/ml). Culture supernatants were analyzed for FeLV RNA using quantitative real-time RT-PCR and for FeLV p27 by ELISA every 24 hours for five days. All siRNAs significantly reduced viral RNA and p27 production, starting after 48 hours. The fact that non-complementary siRNAs also inhibited virus replication may lead to the conclusion that unspecific mechanisms rather than specific binding lead to inhibition. PMID:26054227

  1. Absence of Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in buffaloes from Amazon and southeast region in Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Cairo H S; Resende, Cláudia F; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Barbosa, José D; Fonseca, Antônio A; Leite, Rômulo C; Reis, Jenner K P

    2016-07-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis is an infectious disease caused by Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and is well described in bovines. The majority of infected animals are asymptomatic, one to five percent develop lymphoma and from 30 to 50% present a persistent lymphocytosis. The virus occurs naturally in cattle and experimentally in buffaloes, capybaras and rabbits. The occurrence of lymphoma in buffaloes has been attributed to BLV infection by some authors in India and Venezuela, but not confirmed by other studies and little information on natural BLV infection in buffaloes is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of BLV in a sub-sample of buffalo from Amazon and southeast regions in Brazil. Three hundred and fifteen serum samples were negative using commercial AGID and ELISA (ELISA-gp51) which detect anti-BLV glycoprotein gp51 antibodies. The same samples were also evaluated for antibodies to whole virus through a commercial ELISA (ELISA-BLV) in which 77 (24.44%) were found seropositive and two (0.63%) inconclusive. On the other hand, all animals were negative by PCR to BLV targeted to the env and tax genes. These results suggest that ELISA-BLV produces false positive results in buffalo serum (p<0.001). In addition, one buffalo lymphoma sample was negative in both PCR assays used in this study. BLV was not detected in buffaloes from the Amazon basin and the southeast region of Brazil. Serological tests, like ELISA-BLV, usually used for cattle may produce false-positive results for BLV in buffaloes and direct detection tests such as PCR should be chosen in these surveys. The occurrence of lymphoma in buffalo was not associated with BLV infection in the one case analyzed in this work and the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease should be clarified. PMID:27317318

  2. [Adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia associated with HTLV-I virus in Martinique: apropos of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Plumelle, Y; Sanhadji, K; Barin, F; Gazzolo, L; Constant-Desportes, M; Pascaline, N; Diebold, J; De-Thé, G

    1986-01-01

    Two HTLV-I associated adult T cell leukemia cases were observed in patient from Martinique (French West Indies). These case are similar to the clinical entity, described by Takatsuki in 1977 in Japan and by Catovsky in Caribbean patients, characterized by a lymphadenopathy, skin lesions and visceral involvement, hypercalcemia, an aggressive course, and poor prognosis. The malignant cells with T4 phenotype and often suppressive function, were pleomorphic, mature, with prominent nuclear irregularities. Systematic research of HTLV-I virus or antibodies in patients with this clinical picture, to measure the influence of this virus in T cell lymphoproliferative diseases in France and in French West Indies is required. PMID:3016639

  3. Delayed-onset enzootic bovine leukosis possibly caused by superinfection with bovine leukemia virus mutated in the pol gene.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tadaaki; Inoue, Emi; Mori, Hiroshi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2015-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL), to which animals are most susceptible at 4-8 years of age. In this study, we examined tumor cells associated with EBL in an 18-year-old cow to reveal that the cells carried at least two different copies of the virus, one of which was predicted to encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) lacking ribonuclease H activity and no integrase. Such a deficient enzyme may exhibit a dominant negative effect on the wild-type RT and cause insufficient viral replication, resulting in delayed tumor development in this cow. PMID:26025155

  4. AP-1-directed human T cell leukemia virus type 1 viral gene expression during monocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christian; Jain, Pooja; Nonnemacher, Michael; Flaig, Katherine E; Irish, Bryan; Ahuja, Jaya; Alexaki, Aikaterini; Alefantis, Timothy; Wigdahl, Brian

    2006-09-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has previously been shown to infect antigen-presenting cells and their precursors in vivo. However, the role these important cell populations play in the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis or adult T cell leukemia remains unresolved. To better understand how HTLV-1 infection of these important cell populations may potentially impact disease progression, the regulation of HTLV-1 viral gene expression in established monocytic cell lines was examined. U-937 promonocytic cells transiently transfected with a HTLV-1 long-terminal repeat (LTR) luciferase construct were treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to induce cellular differentiation. PMA-induced cellular differentiation resulted in activation of basal and Tax-mediated transactivation of the HTLV-1 LTR. In addition, electrophoretic mobility shift analyses demonstrated that PMA-induced cellular differentiation induced DNA-binding activity of cellular transcription factors to Tax-responsive element 1 (TRE-1) repeat II. Supershift analyses revealed that factors belonging to the activator protein 1 (AP-1) family of basic region/leucine zipper proteins (Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB, and JunD) were induced to bind to TRE-1 repeat II during cellular differentiation. Inhibition of AP-1 DNA-binding activity by overexpression of a dominant-negative c-Fos mutant (A-Fos) in transient expression analyses resulted in severely decreased levels of HTLV-1 LTR activation in PMA-induced U-937 cells. These results have suggested that following infection of peripheral blood monocytes, HTLV-1 viral gene expression may become up-regulated by AP-1 during differentiation into macrophages or dendritic cells. PMID:16829632

  5. Lethal cutaneous disease in transgenic mice conditionally expressing type I human T cell leukemia virus Tax.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hakju; Ogle, Louise; Benitez, Bobby; Bohuslav, Jan; Montano, Mauricio; Felsher, Dean W; Greene, Warner C

    2005-10-21

    Type I human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) is etiologically linked with adult T cell leukemia, an aggressive and usually fatal expansion of activated CD4+ T lymphocytes that frequently traffic to skin. T cell transformation induced by HTLV-I involves the action of the 40-kDa viral Tax transactivator protein. Tax both stimulates the HTLV-I long terminal repeat and deregulates the expression of select cellular genes by altering the activity of specific host transcription factors, including cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor, NF-kappaB/Rel, and serum response factor. To study initiating events involved in HTLV-I Tax-induced T cell transformation, we generated "Tet-off" transgenic mice conditionally expressing in a lymphocyte-restricted manner (EmuSR alpha promoter-enhancer) either wild-type Tax or mutant forms of Tax that selectively compromise the NF-kappaB (M22) or CREB/activating transcription factor (M47) activation pathways. Wild-type Tax and M47 Tax-expressing mice, but not M22-Tax expressing mice, developed progressive alopecia, hyperkeratosis, and skin lesions containing profuse activated CD4 T cell infiltrates with evidence of deregulated inflammatory cytokine production. In addition, these animals displayed systemic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. These findings suggest that Tax-mediated activation of NF-kappaB plays a key role in the development of this aggressive skin disease that shares several features in common with the skin disease occurring during the preleukemic stage in HTLV-I-infected patients. Of note, this skin disease completely resolved when Tax transgene expression was suppressed by administration of doxycycline, emphasizing the key role played by this viral oncoprotein in the observed pathology. PMID:16105841

  6. A paradigm for virus-host coevolution: Sequential counter-adaptations between endogenous and exogenous retroviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of the host germline transmitted vertically from generation to generation. It is hypothesized that during evolution some ERVs were used by the host to drive extinction of exogenous horizontally-transmitted retroviruses. Se...

  7. Rat sequences of the Kirsten and Harvey murine sarcoma virus genomes: nature, origin, and expression in rat tumor RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G R; Robbins, K C

    1976-01-01

    Two murine sarcoma viruses, the Kirsten and the Harvey, were isolated by passage of mouse type C leukemia viruses through rats. These sarcoma viruses have genomes containing portions of their parental type C mouse leukemia virus genomes, in stable association with specific rat cellular sequences that we find to be quite likely not those of a rat type C leukemia virus. To determine if these murine sarcoma viruses provide a model relevant to the events occurring in spontaneous tumors, we have hybridized DNA and RNA prepared from rat tumors and normal rat tissues to [3H]DNA prepared from the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. We have also hybridized these rat tissue nucleic acids to [3H]DNA prepared from a respresentative endogenous rat type C leukemia virus, the WFU (Wistar-Furth). Sarcoma-viral rat cellular sequences and endogenous rat leukemia viral sequences were detected in the DNA of both tumor and normal tissues, with no evidence of either gene amplification or additional sequences being present in tumor DNA. Sarcoma-viral rat cellular sequences and endogenous rat leukemia viral sequences were detected at elevated concentrations in the RNA of many rat tumors and in specific groups of normal tissues. PMID:176419

  8. Novel CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell epitopes in bovine leukemia virus with cattle.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lanlan; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Isogai, Emiko; Kohara, Junko; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-16

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) plays a key role in suppressing the progression of disease caused by BLV. T and B cell epitopes in BLV have been studied, but CD8(+) CTL epitopes remain poorly understood. We used a library of 115 synthetic peptides covering the entirety of the Env proteins (gp51 and gp30), the Gag proteins (p15, p24, and p12), and the Tax protein of BLV to identify 11 novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes (gp51N5, gp51N11, gp51N12, gp30N5, gp30N6, gp30N8, gp30N16, tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20) in four calves experimentally infected with BLV. The number of CD8(+) T cell epitopes that could be identified in each calf correlated with the BLV proviral load. Interestingly, among the 11 epitopes identified, only gp51N11 was capable of inducing CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in all four calves, but it is not a suitable vaccine target because it shows a high degree of polymorphism according to the Wu-Kabat variability index. By contrast, no CTL epitopes were identified from the Gag structural protein. In addition, several epitopes were obtained from gp30 and Tax, indicating that cellular immunity against BLV is strongly targeted to these proteins. CD8(+) CTL epitopes from gp30 and Tax were less polymorphic than epitopes from. Indeed, peptides tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20 include a leucine-rich activation domain that encompasses a transcriptional activation domain, and the gp30N16 peptide contains a proline-rich region that interacts with a protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 to regulate B cell activation. Moreover, at least one CD8(+) CTL epitope derived from gp30 was identified in each of the four calves. These results indicate that BLV gp30 may be the best candidate for the development of a BLV vaccine. PMID:26552001

  9. Assembly of Epstein-Barr Virus Capsid in Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Hung; Kuo, Chung-Wen; Chang, Li-Kwan; Hung, Chen-Chia; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) capsid contains a major capsid protein, VCA; two minor capsid proteins, BDLF1 and BORF1; and a small capsid protein, BFRF3. During the lytic cycle, these capsid proteins are synthesized and imported into the host nucleus for capsid assembly. This study finds that EBV capsid proteins colocalize with promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) in P3HR1 cells during the viral lytic cycle, appearing as nuclear speckles under a confocal laser scanning microscope. In a glutathione S-transferase pulldown study, we show that BORF1 interacts with PML-NBs in vitro. BORF1 also colocalizes with PML-NBs in EBV-negative Akata cells after transfection and is responsible for bringing VCA and the VCA-BFRF3 complex from the cytoplasm to PML-NBs in the nucleus. Furthermore, BDLF1 is dispersed throughout the cell when expressed alone but colocalizes with PML-NBs when BORF1 is also present in the cell. In addition, this study finds that knockdown of PML expression by short hairpin RNA does not influence the intracellular levels of capsid proteins but reduces the number of viral particles produced by P3HR1 cells. Together, these results demonstrate that BORF1 plays a critical role in bringing capsid proteins to PML-NBs, which may likely be the assembly sites of EBV capsids. The mechanisms elucidated in this study are critical to understanding the process of EBV capsid assembly. IMPORTANCE Capsid assembly is an important event during the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle, as this process is required for the production of virions. In this study, confocal microscopy revealed that the EBV capsid protein BORF1 interacts with promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) in the host nucleus and is responsible for transporting the other EBV capsid proteins, including VCA, BDLF1, and BFRF3, to these subnuclear locations prior to initiation of capsid assembly. This study also found that knockdown of PML expression by short hairpin RNA

  10. Construction and characterization of the recombinant Moloney murine leukemia viruses bearing the mouse Fv-4 env gene.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, M; Yoshikura, H

    1990-01-01

    A nucleotide sequence of the mouse Fv-4 env gene was completed. Structural comparison revealed a close relationship of Fv-4 to the ecotropic Cas-Br-E murine leukemia virus isolated from a wild mouse in southern California. Various portions of the env gene of Moloney murine leukemia virus were replaced by the corresponding Fv-4 env sequence to construct recombinant murine leukemia virus clones. Infectivity of these recombinants was checked by the S+L- cell focus induction assay and the XC cell syncytium formation assay. Recombinants bearing the following Fv-4 env sequence retained ecotropic infectivity; the AccI-BamHI and BamHI-BalI regions coding for the N- and C-terminal halves of Fv-4 gp70SU, respectively; and the BalI-NcoI region encoding the cleavage site between gp70SU and p15(E)TM of the Fv-4 env. However, when the Fv-4 sequence was substituted for the p15(E)TM-coding NcoI-EcoRV region or the AccI-EcoRV region covering almost the entire env gene, infectivity was undetectable in our assays. The recombinant clone containing the Fv-4 AccI-EcoRV region, i.e., almost the entire Fv-4 env sequence, was introduced with pSV2neo into NIH 3T3 cells, and a G418r cell line named NIH(Fv4)-2 was isolated. The NIH(Fv4)-2 cell released viral particles that contained reverse transcriptase, Fv-4 env molecules as well as the other viral proteins, and viral genomic RNA. However, proviral DNA synthesis was not detected upon inoculation of this virus in NIH 3T3 cells. The loss of infectivity of the recombinant virus bearing the Fv-4 AccI-EcoRV region appeared to be caused by failure in an early step of replication. Images PMID:2304138

  11. Immunovirotherapy with vesicular stomatitis virus and PD-L1 blockade enhances therapeutic outcome in murine acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiwei; Patnaik, Mrinal M; Ruiz, Autumn; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2016-03-17

    Patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have limited therapeutic options. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-interferon β (IFNβ)-sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is an oncolytic VSV encoding IFNβ and the NIS reporter. Syngeneic AML C1498 tumors responded to IV therapy with VSV-murine IFNβ (mIFNβ)-NIS in a dose-dependent manner. Imaging for NIS expression showed robust virus infection within the tumors. Virus infection did not increase programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) on tumor cells. Combining VSV-mIFNβ-NIS with anti-PD-L1 antibody (Ab) therapy enhanced antitumor activity compared with treatment with virus alone or Ab alone; this enhancement was not significant at higher VSV-mIFNβ-NIS doses. Systemic VSV therapy reduced systemic C1498-green fluorescent protein (GFP) tumor burden in the blood, bone marrow, spleen, and liver of mice with AML. Combination VSV-mIFNβ-NIS and anti-PD-L1 Ab therapy significantly enhanced the survival of these mice with no evidence of toxicity, compared with isotype control, anti-PD-L1, or virus alone. There was an increase in tumor-infiltrating CD4 and CD8 cells. Single-agent VSV-mIFNβ-NIS virotherapy induced both VSV-specific and GFP-specific CD8 T cells as determined by IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot, pentamer, and intracellular IFN-γ staining assays. Both of these responses were further enhanced by addition of anti-PD-L1 Ab. Depletion of CD8 or natural killer cells, but not CD4 cells, resulted in loss of antitumor activity in the VSV/anti-PD-L1 group. Clinical samples from chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myelomonocytic leukemia appear to be especially susceptible to VSV. Overall, our studies show that oncolytic virotherapy combined with immune checkpoint blockade is a promising approach to AML therapy. PMID:26712908

  12. Feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus infections in a cat with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shelton, G H; McKim, K D; Cooley, P L; Dice, P F; Russell, R G; Grant, C K

    1989-01-15

    Lymphoma was diagnosed in a 7-year-old domestic cat found to be infected with FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). The cat was affected by chronic disorders suggestive of immunosuppression, including gingivitis, periodontitis, keratitis, and abscesses. Despite treatment, peripheral keratitis of the left eye progressed, resulting in uveitis, chronic glaucoma, and eventual corneal rupture. Microscopic retinal and optic disk pathologic processes also were suspected. Abnormal jaw movements that were believed to be indicative of neurologic disease were observed. Approximately 17 months later, the cat developed generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and bilateral renomegaly. Lymphoblastic lymphoma and glomerulonephritis were diagnosed histologically. Manganese- and magnesium-dependent reverse transcriptase activity were detected in supernatants from lymph node and spleen mononuclear cell cultures, suggesting T-lymphocyte infection with FeLV and FIV. PMID:2537274

  13. Exposure to Bovine Leukemia Virus Is Associated with Breast Cancer: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Buehring, Gertrude Case; Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Jin, Diana L.; Hudes, Mark; Block, Gladys

    2015-01-01

    Background Age, reproductive history, hormones, genetics, and lifestyle are known risk factors for breast cancer, but the agents that initiate cellular changes from normal to malignant are not understood. We previously detected bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a common oncogenic virus of cattle, in the breast epithelium of humans. The objective of this study was to determine whether the presence of BLV DNA in human mammary epithelium is associated with breast cancer. Methods This was a case-control study of archival formalin fixed paraffin embedded breast tissues from 239 donors, received 2002–2008 from the Cooperative Human Tissue Network. Case definition as breast cancer versus normal (women with no history of breast cancer) was established through medical records and examination of tissues by an anatomical pathologist. Breast exposure to BLV was determined by in situ-PCR detection of a biomarker, BLV DNA, localized within mammary epithelium. Results The frequency of BLV DNA in mammary epithelium from women with breast cancer (59%) was significantly higher than in normal controls (29%) (multiply- adjusted odds ratio = 3.07, confidence interval = 1.66–5.69, p = .0004, attributable risk = 37%). In women with premalignant breast changes the frequency of BLV DNA was intermediate (38%) between that of women with breast cancer and normal controls (p for trend < .001). Conclusions Among the specimens in this study, the presence of amplified BLV DNA was significantly associated with breast cancer. The odds ratio magnitude was comparable to those of well-established breast cancer risk factors related to reproductive history, hormones, and lifestyle and was exceeded only by risk factors related to genetics (familial breast cancer), high dose ionizing radiation, and age. These findings have the potential for primary and secondary prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26332838

  14. Crystal Structure of the Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus RNase H Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lim,D.; Gregorio, G.; Bingman, C.; Martinez-Hackert, E.; Hendrickson, W.; Goff, S.

    2006-01-01

    A crystallographic study of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) RNase H domain was performed to provide information about its structure and mechanism of action. These efforts resulted in the crystallization of a mutant Mo-MLV RNase H lacking the putative helix C ({Delta}C). The 1.6-{angstrom} resolution structure resembles the known structures of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Escherichia coli RNase H. The structure revealed the coordination of a magnesium ion within the catalytic core comprised of the highly conserved acidic residues D524, E562, and D583. Surface charge mapping of the Mo-MLV structure revealed a high density of basic charges on one side of the enzyme. Using a model of the Mo-MLV structure superimposed upon a structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase bound to an RNA/DNA hybrid substrate, Mo-MLV RNase H secondary structures and individual amino acids were examined for their potential roles in binding substrate. Identified regions included Mo-MLV RNase H {beta}1-{beta}2, {alpha}A, and {alpha}B and residues from {alpha}B to {alpha}D and its following loop. Most of the identified substrate-binding residues corresponded with residues directly binding nucleotides in an RNase H from Bacillus halodurans as observed in a cocrystal structure with RNA/DNA. Finally, superimposition of RNases H of Mo-MLV, E. coli, and HIV-1 revealed that a loop of the HIV-1 connection domain resides within the same region of the Mo-MLV and E. coli C-helix. The HIV-1 connection domain may serve to recognize and bind the RNA/DNA substrate major groove.

  15. Comprehensive mapping of receptor-functioning domains in feline leukemia virus subgroup C receptor FLVCR1.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer K; Fung, Claire; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2006-02-01

    Infection of cells by the highly anemogenic feline leukemia virus subgroup C (FeLV-C) is mediated by the heme exporter FLVCR1, a cell surface protein containing 12 potential transmembrane segments with six presumptive extracellular loops (ECLs). To identify FLVCR1 residues critical for mediating FeLV-C infection, we first independently isolated a human cDNA encoding the FLVCR2 protein that shares 52% identity to human FLVCR1, and we show that FLVCR2 does not function as a receptor for FeLV-C. Then, by generating specific hybrids between FLVCR1 and FLVCR2 and testing susceptibility of mouse cells expressing these hybrids to beta-galactosidase encoding FeLV-C, we identify FLVCR1 ECLs 1 and 6 as critical for mediating FeLV-C infection. Mouse cells expressing a hybrid protein containing FLVCR2 backbone with the ECL6 sequence from FLVCR1 were highly susceptible to FeLV-C infection. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that a single mutation of Asn463 in FLVCR2 ECL6 to an acidic Asp residue (a residue present in the corresponding position 487 in FLVCR1 ECL6) is sufficient to render FLVCR2 functional as an FeLV-C receptor. However, an Asp487Asn mutation in FLVCR1 ECL6 or substitution of the entire FLVCR1 ECL6 sequence for FLVCR2 ECL6 sequence does not disrupt receptor function. Subsequent substitutions show that residues within FLVCR1 ECL1 also contribute to mediating FeLV-C infection. Furthermore, our results suggest that FLVCR1 regions that mediate FeLV-C surface unit binding are distinct from ECL1 and ECL6. Our results are consistent with previous conclusions that infection of cells by gammaretroviruses involves interaction of virus with multiple receptor regions. PMID:16439531

  16. Comprehensive Mapping of Receptor-Functioning Domains in Feline Leukemia Virus Subgroup C Receptor FLVCR1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jennifer K.; Fung, Claire; Tailor, Chetankumar S.

    2006-01-01

    Infection of cells by the highly anemogenic feline leukemia virus subgroup C (FeLV-C) is mediated by the heme exporter FLVCR1, a cell surface protein containing 12 potential transmembrane segments with six presumptive extracellular loops (ECLs). To identify FLVCR1 residues critical for mediating FeLV-C infection, we first independently isolated a human cDNA encoding the FLVCR2 protein that shares 52% identity to human FLVCR1, and we show that FLVCR2 does not function as a receptor for FeLV-C. Then, by generating specific hybrids between FLVCR1 and FLVCR2 and testing susceptibility of mouse cells expressing these hybrids to β-galactosidase encoding FeLV-C, we identify FLVCR1 ECLs 1 and 6 as critical for mediating FeLV-C infection. Mouse cells expressing a hybrid protein containing FLVCR2 backbone with the ECL6 sequence from FLVCR1 were highly susceptible to FeLV-C infection. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that a single mutation of Asn463 in FLVCR2 ECL6 to an acidic Asp residue (a residue present in the corresponding position 487 in FLVCR1 ECL6) is sufficient to render FLVCR2 functional as an FeLV-C receptor. However, an Asp487Asn mutation in FLVCR1 ECL6 or substitution of the entire FLVCR1 ECL6 sequence for FLVCR2 ECL6 sequence does not disrupt receptor function. Subsequent substitutions show that residues within FLVCR1 ECL1 also contribute to mediating FeLV-C infection. Furthermore, our results suggest that FLVCR1 regions that mediate FeLV-C surface unit binding are distinct from ECL1 and ECL6. Our results are consistent with previous conclusions that infection of cells by gammaretroviruses involves interaction of virus with multiple receptor regions. PMID:16439531

  17. Genetic evidence for a product of the Fv-1 locus that transfers resistance to mouse leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, R W; Schluter, B; Myer, F E; Otten, J A; Yang, W K; Brown, A

    1976-01-01

    Extracts of mouse cells have been shown to transfer to N- or B-trophic host range types of mouse leukemia viruses. The genetic specificity of the inhibition was tested in two ways: (i) by correlating the Fv-1 genotype of a number of mouse strains with the restriction-transferring activity of extracts of the respective embryo cell cultures, and (ii) by correlating the Fv-1 genotype of BLC3F2 (C57BL/6 female [Fv-1bb] by C3H male [Fv-1nn] parental strains) mouse embryos, which segregate the Fv-1 alleles in a 12:1 ratio, with the inhibitor activity of extracts of the cells from each embryo. Five independent matings, totaling 45 individual embryos, were tested. Each embryo was cultured, and the Fv-1 genotype was determined independently by titration of N- and B-tropic viruses; the extracts of replicate secondary cultures were tested for their effect on infection of permissive cells by N- and B-tropic viruses. The specific-restriction-transferring activity of the embryos was found to segregate with the appropriate Fv-1 genotype. These res-lts confirm the suggestion that the inhibitor of the leukemia virus host range types in the cellular extracts is a product of the Fv-1 locus. PMID:186636

  18. Serological and molecular detection of bovine leukemia virus in cattle in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Khudhair, Yahia Ismail; Hasso, Saleem Amin; Yaseen, Nahi Y; Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is highly endemic in many countries, including Iraq, and it impacts the beef and dairy industries. The current study sought to determine the percentage of BLV infection and persistent lymphocytosis (PL) in cattle in central Iraq. Hematological, serological, and molecular observations in cross breeds and local breeds of Iraqi cattle naturally infected with BLV were conducted in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 400 cattle (340 cross breed and 60 local breed) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On the basis of the absolute number of lymphocytes, five of the 31 positive PCR cases had PL. Among these leukemic cattle, one case exhibited overt neutrophilia. Serum samples were used to detect BLV antibodies, which were observed in 28 (7%) samples. PCR detected BLV provirus in 31 samples (7.75%). All 28 of the seropositive samples and the 3 seronegative samples were positive using PCR. Associations were observed between bovine leukosis and cattle breed, age and sex. Age-specific analysis showed that the BLV percentage increased with age in both breeds. Female cattle (29 animals; 7.34%) exhibited significantly higher infectivity than male cattle (two animals; 4.34%). In conclusion, comprehensive screening for all affected animals is needed in Iraq; programs that segregate cattle can be an effective and important method to control and/or eliminate the BLV. PMID:27273225

  19. Determinants of the Bovine Leukemia Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Involved in Infectivity, Replication and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    de Brogniez, Alix; Mast, Jan; Willems, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of viral envelope proteins with host cell membranes has been extensively investigated in a number of systems. However, the biological relevance of these interactions in vivo has been hampered by the absence of adequate animal models. Reverse genetics using the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) genome highlighted important functional domains of the envelope protein involved in the viral life cycle. For example, immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM) of the envelope transmembrane protein (TM) are essential determinants of infection. Although cell fusion directed by the aminoterminal end of TM is postulated to be essential, some proviruses expressing fusion-deficient envelope proteins unexpectedly replicate at wild-type levels. Surprisingly also, a conserved N-linked glycosylation site of the extracellular envelope protein (SU) inhibits cell-to-cell transmission suggesting that infectious potential has been limited during evolution. In this review, we summarize the knowledge pertaining to the BLV envelope protein in the context of viral infection, replication and pathogenesis. PMID:27023592

  20. Association of feline leukemia virus with lymphosarcoma and other disorders in the cat.

    PubMed

    Cotter, S M; Hardy, W D; Essex, M

    1975-03-01

    Two hundred fifty Boston cats with disorders such as lymphosarcoma, myeloproliferative disease, anemia, glomerulonephritis, pregnancy abnormalities, feline infectious peritonitis, toxoplasmosis, and various bacterial infections were examined for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) by immunofluorescence. Antibody titers against feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen (FOCMA) were tested in 133 of these cats. The tests for FeLV and FOCMA antibody were also conducted among healthy cats not known to have been exposed to FeLV, as well as among healthy cats from households where FeLV was known to be present. Most of the cats with lymphosarcoma and the other aforementioned disorders were infected with FeLV and low FOCMA antibody titers. Healthy cats known to have been exposed to FeLV were often viremic, but those that remained healthy were able to develop high FOCMA antibody titers. Healthy cats without known prior exposure to FeLV were unlikely to be viremic but often had detectable FOCMA antibody titers, indicating that some exposure occurs under natural conditions in the Boston area. The association of FeLV with infections other than lymphosarcoma was assumed to be caused by the immunosuppresive effect of FeLV, thus allowing development of disease. PMID:163223

  1. A detailed molecular analysis of complete bovine leukemia virus genomes isolated from B-cell lymphosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Moratorio, Gonzalo; Fischer, Sabrina; Bianchi, Sergio; Tomé, Lorena; Rama, Gonzalo; Obal, Gonzalo; Carrión, Federico; Pritsch, Otto; Cristina, Juan

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the majority of cancers result from multiple cellular events leading to malignancy after a prolonged period of clinical latency, and that the immune system plays a critical role in the control of cancer progression. Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is an oncogenic member of the Retroviridae family. Complete genomic sequences of BLV strains isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from cattle have been previously reported. However, a detailed characterization of the complete genome of BLV strains directly isolated from bovine tumors is much needed in order to contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of leukemogenesis induced by BLV in cattle. In this study, we performed a molecular characterization of BLV complete genomes from bovine B-cell lymphosarcoma isolates. A nucleotide substitution was found in the glucocorticoid response element (GRE) site of the 5' long terminal repeat (5'LTR) of the BLV isolates. All amino acid substitutions in Tax previously found to be related to stimulate high transcriptional activity of 5'LTR were not found in these studies. Amino acid substitutions were found in the nucleocapsid, gp51 and G4 proteins. Premature stop-codons in R3 were observed. Few mutations or amino acid substitutions may be needed to allow BLV provirus to achieve silencing. Substitutions that favor suppression of viral expression in malignant B cells might be a strategy to circumvent effective immune attack. PMID:23506507

  2. Bimodal high-affinity association of Brd4 with murine leukemia virus integrase and mononucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Larue, Ross C; Plumb, Matthew R; Crowe, Brandon L; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Sharma, Amit; DiFiore, Julia; Malani, Nirav; Aiyer, Sriram S; Roth, Monica J; Bushman, Frederic D; Foster, Mark P; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2014-04-01

    The importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integration into host chromatin is highlighted by the development of MLV-based vectors for human gene-therapy. We have recently identified BET proteins (Brd2, 3 and 4) as the main cellular binding partners of MLV integrase (IN) and demonstrated their significance for effective MLV integration at transcription start sites. Here we show that recombinant Brd4, a representative of the three BET proteins, establishes complementary high-affinity interactions with MLV IN and mononucleosomes (MNs). Brd4(1-720) but not its N- or C-terminal fragments effectively stimulate MLV IN strand transfer activities in vitro. Mass spectrometry- and NMR-based approaches have enabled us to map key interacting interfaces between the C-terminal domain of BRD4 and the C-terminal tail of MLV IN. Additionally, the N-terminal fragment of Brd4 binds to both DNA and acetylated histone peptides, allowing it to bind tightly to MNs. Comparative analyses of the distributions of various histone marks along chromatin revealed significant positive correlations between H3- and H4-acetylated histones, BET protein-binding sites and MLV-integration sites. Our findings reveal a bimodal mechanism for BET protein-mediated MLV integration into select chromatin locations. PMID:24520112

  3. Broadening the use of antiretroviral therapy: the case for feline leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Greggs, Willie M; Clouser, Christine L; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2011-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs have saved and extended the lives of millions of individuals infected with HIV. The major classes of anti-HIV drugs include reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, and entry/fusion inhibitors. While antiretroviral drug regimens are not commonly used to treat other types of retroviral infections, there are instances where there is a perceived need for re-evaluation of the benefits of antiretroviral therapy. One case in point is that of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), an infection of companion felines. While vaccines exist to prevent FeLV infection and spread, they have not eliminated FeLV infection. For FeLV-infected felines and their human companions, antiretroviral therapy would be desirable and of practical importance if good options were available. Here, we discuss FeLV biology and current treatment options, and propose that there is a need for antiretroviral treatment options for FeLV infection. The comparative use and analysis of antiretroviral therapy can provide new insights into the mechanism of antiretroviral drug action. PMID:21479142

  4. Mutational analysis of human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 Tax.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, T M; Minella, A C; Fang, Z Y; Pettiford, S M; Green, P L

    1997-01-01

    A mutational analysis of human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 (HTLV-2) Tax (Tax-2) was performed to identify regions within Tax-2 important for activation of promoters through the CREB/ATF or NF-kappaB/Rel signaling pathway. Tax-2 mutations within the putative zinc-binding region as well as mutations at the carboxy terminus disrupted CREB/ATF transactivation. A single mutation within the central proline-rich region of Tax-2 disrupted the transactivation of the NF-kappaB/Rel pathway. Surprisingly, this mutation, which is thought to be in a separate activation domain, was suppressed by mutations within or around the putative zinc-binding region, suggesting an interaction between these two regions. These analyses indicate that the functional regions or domains important for transactivation through the CREB/ATF or NF-kappaB/Rel signaling pathway are similar, but not identical, in Tax-1 and Tax-2. Identification of these distinct Tax-2 mutants should facilitate comparative biological studies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 and ultimately lead to the determination of the functional importance of Tax trans-acting capacities in T-lymphocyte transformation by HTLV. PMID:9343258

  5. No benefit of therapeutic vaccination in clinically healthy cats persistently infected with feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Helfer-Hungerbuehler, A Katrin; Spiri, Andrea M; Riond, Barbara; Grest, Paula; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2015-03-24

    Therapeutic vaccinations have a potential application in infections where no curative treatment is available. In contrast to HIV, efficacious vaccines for a cat retrovirus, feline leukemia virus (FeLV), are commercially available. However, the infection is still prevalent, and no effective treatment of the infection is known. By vaccinating persistently FeLV-infected cats and presenting FeLV antigens to the immune system of the host, e.g., in the form of recombinant and/or adjuvanted antigens, we intended to shift the balance toward an advantage of the host so that persistent infection could be overcome by the infected cat. Two commercially available FeLV vaccines efficacious in protecting naïve cats from FeLV infection were tested in six experimentally and persistently FeLV-infected cats: first, a canarypox-vectored vaccine, and second, an adjuvanted, recombinant envelope vaccine was repeatedly administered with the aim to stimulate the immune system. No beneficial effects on p27 antigen and plasma viral RNA loads, anti-FeLV antibodies, or life expectancy of the cats were detected. The cats were unable to overcome or decrease viremia. Some cats developed antibodies to FeLV antigens although not protective. Thus, we cannot recommend vaccinating persistently FeLV-infected cats as a means of improving their FeLV status, quality of life or life expectancy. We suggest testing of all cats for FeLV infection prior to FeLV vaccination. PMID:25698488

  6. Serological and molecular detection of bovine leukemia virus in cattle in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Khudhair, Yahia Ismail; Hasso, Saleem Amin; Yaseen, Nahi Y; Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is highly endemic in many countries, including Iraq, and it impacts the beef and dairy industries. The current study sought to determine the percentage of BLV infection and persistent lymphocytosis (PL) in cattle in central Iraq. Hematological, serological, and molecular observations in cross breeds and local breeds of Iraqi cattle naturally infected with BLV were conducted in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 400 cattle (340 cross breed and 60 local breed) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). On the basis of the absolute number of lymphocytes, five of the 31 positive PCR cases had PL. Among these leukemic cattle, one case exhibited overt neutrophilia. Serum samples were used to detect BLV antibodies, which were observed in 28 (7%) samples. PCR detected BLV provirus in 31 samples (7.75%). All 28 of the seropositive samples and the 3 seronegative samples were positive using PCR. Associations were observed between bovine leukosis and cattle breed, age and sex. Age-specific analysis showed that the BLV percentage increased with age in both breeds. Female cattle (29 animals; 7.34%) exhibited significantly higher infectivity than male cattle (two animals; 4.34%). In conclusion, comprehensive screening for all affected animals is needed in Iraq; programs that segregate cattle can be an effective and important method to control and/or eliminate the BLV. PMID:27273225

  7. Fraction of bovine leukemia virus-infected dairy cattle developing enzootic bovine leukosis.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Sota; Hayama, Yoko; Yamamoto, Takehisa

    2016-02-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL) is a transmissible disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus that is prevalent in cattle herds in many countries. Only a small fraction of infected animals develops clinical symptoms, such as malignant lymphosarcoma, after a long incubation period. In the present study, we aimed to determine the fraction of EBL-infected dairy cattle that develop lymphosarcoma and the length of the incubation period before clinical symptoms emerge. These parameters were determined by a mathematical modeling approach based on the maximum-likelihood estimation method, using the results of a nationwide serological survey of prevalence in cattle and passive surveillance records. The best-fit distribution to estimate the disease incubation period was determined to be the Weibull distribution, with a median and average incubation period of 7.0 years. The fraction of infected animals developing clinical disease was estimated to be 1.4% with a 95% confidence interval of 1.2-1.6%. The parameters estimated here contribute to an examination of efficient control strategies making quantitative evaluation available. PMID:26754928

  8. Functional dissection of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein gp70.

    PubMed

    Bae, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-03-01

    The envelope protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) is a complex glycoprotein that mediates receptor binding and entry via fusion with cell membranes. By using a series of substitution mutations and truncations in the Mo-MLV external envelope surface protein gp70, we have identified regions important for these processes. Firstly, truncations of gp70 revealed that the minimal continuous receptor-binding region is amino acids 9 to 230, in broad agreement with other studies. Secondly, within this region there are two key basic amino acids, Arg-83 and Arg-95, that are essential for receptor binding and may interact with a negatively charged residue(s) or with the pi electrons of the aromatic ring on a hydrophobic residue(s) in the basic amino acid transporter protein that is the Mo-MLV ecotropic receptor. Finally, we showed that outside the minimal receptor-binding region at amino acids 2 to 8, there is a region that is essential for postbinding fusion events. PMID:9032341

  9. Solution Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Protein: Differences from HIV-1 Gag▿

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Clark, Patrick K.; Campbell, Stephen J.; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Immature retrovirus particles are assembled from the multidomain Gag protein. In these particles, the Gag proteins are arranged radially as elongated rods. We have previously characterized the properties of HIV-1 Gag in solution. In the absence of nucleic acid, HIV-1 Gag displays moderately weak interprotein interactions, existing in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Neutron scattering and hydrodynamic studies suggest that the protein is compact, and biochemical studies indicate that the two ends can approach close in three-dimensional space, implying the need for a significant conformational change during assembly. We now describe the properties of the Gag protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), a gammaretrovirus. We found that this protein is very different from HIV-1 Gag: it has much weaker protein-protein interaction and is predominantly monomeric in solution. This has allowed us to study the protein by small-angle X-ray scattering and to build a low-resolution molecular envelope for the protein. We found that MLV Gag is extended in solution, with an axial ratio of ∼7, comparable to its dimensions in immature particles. Mutational analysis suggests that runs of prolines in its matrix and p12 domains and the highly charged stretch at the C terminus of its capsid domain all contribute to this extended conformation. These differences between MLV Gag and HIV-1 Gag and their implications for retroviral assembly are discussed. PMID:21917964

  10. Development and clinical evaluation of a rapid diagnostic kit for feline leukemia virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Shik; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Kim, Hak-Yong; Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Jeong, Wooseog; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Lee, Jae-In

    2014-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) causes a range of neoplastic and degenerative diseases in cats. To obtain a more sensitive and convenient diagnosis of the disease, we prepared monoclonal antibodies specific for the FeLV p27 to develop a rapid diagnostic test with enhanced sensitivity and specificity. Among these antibodies, we identified two clones (hybridomas 8F8B5 and 8G7D1) that specifically bound to FeLV and were very suitable for a diagnostic kit. The affinity constants for 8F8B5 and 8G7D1 were 0.35 × 109 and 0.86 × 109, respectively. To investigate the diagnostic abilities of the rapid kit using these antibodies, we performed several clinical studies. Assessment of analytical sensitivity revealed that the detection threshold of the rapid diagnostic test was 2 ng/mL for recombinant p27 and 12.5 × 104 IU/mL for FeLV. When evaluating 252 cat sera samples, the kit was found to have a kappa value of 0.88 compared to polymerase chain reaction (PCR), indicating a significant correlation between data from the rapid diagnostic test and PCR. Sensitivity and specificity of the kit were 95.2% (20/21) and 98.5% (257/261), respectively. Our results demonstrated that the rapid diagnostic test would be a suitable diagnostic tool for the rapid detection of FeLV infection in cats. PMID:24136209

  11. Imbalance of tumor necrosis factor receptors during progression in bovine leukemia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Konnai, Satoru . E-mail: konnai@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp; Usui, Tatsufumi; Ikeda, Manabu; Kohara, Junko; Hirata, Toh-ichi; Okada, Kosuke; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; Onuma, Misao

    2005-09-01

    Previously, we found an up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-{alpha} and an imbalance of TNF receptors in sheep experimentally infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV). In order to investigate the different TNF-{alpha}-induced responses, in this study we examined the TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferative response and the expression levels of two distinct TNF receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from BLV-uninfected cattle and BLV-infected cattle that were aleukemic (AL) or had persistent lymphocytosis (PL). The proliferative response of PBMC isolated from those cattle with PL in the presence of recombinant bovine TNF-{alpha} (rTNF-{alpha}) was significantly higher than those from AL cattle and uninfected cattle and the cells from PL cattle expressed significantly higher mRNA levels of TNF receptor type II (TNF-RII) than those from AL and BLV-uninfected cattle. No difference was found in TNF-RI mRNA levels. Most cells expressing TNF-RII in PL cattle were CD5{sup +} or sIgM{sup +} cells and these cells showed resistance to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Additionally, there were significant positive correlations between the changes in provirus load and TNF-RII mRNA levels, and TNF-{alpha}-induced proliferation and TNF-RII mRNA levels. These data suggest that imbalance in the expression of TNF receptors could at least in part contribute to the progression of lymphocytosis in BLV infection.

  12. Determinants of the Bovine Leukemia Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Involved in Infectivity, Replication and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Brogniez, Alix; Mast, Jan; Willems, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of viral envelope proteins with host cell membranes has been extensively investigated in a number of systems. However, the biological relevance of these interactions in vivo has been hampered by the absence of adequate animal models. Reverse genetics using the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) genome highlighted important functional domains of the envelope protein involved in the viral life cycle. For example, immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM) of the envelope transmembrane protein (TM) are essential determinants of infection. Although cell fusion directed by the aminoterminal end of TM is postulated to be essential, some proviruses expressing fusion-deficient envelope proteins unexpectedly replicate at wild-type levels. Surprisingly also, a conserved N-linked glycosylation site of the extracellular envelope protein (SU) inhibits cell-to-cell transmission suggesting that infectious potential has been limited during evolution. In this review, we summarize the knowledge pertaining to the BLV envelope protein in the context of viral infection, replication and pathogenesis. PMID:27023592

  13. Fv-1 restriction and its effects on murine leukemia virus integration in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pryciak, P M; Varmus, H E

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms by which alleles at the mouse Fv-1 locus restrict replication of murine leukemia viruses. Inhibition of productive infection is closely paralleled by reduced accumulation of integrated proviral DNA as well as by reduced levels of linear viral DNA in a cytoplasmic fraction. Nevertheless, viral DNA is present at nearly normal levels in a nuclear fraction, and total amounts of viral DNA are only mildly affected in restrictive infections, suggesting a block in integration to account for reduced levels of proviral DNA. However, integrase (IN)-dependent trimming of 3' ends of viral DNA occurs normally in vivo during restrictive infections, demonstrating that not all IN-mediated events are prevented in vivo. Furthermore, viral integration complexes present in nuclear extracts of infected restrictive cells are fully competent to integrate their DNA into a heterologous target in vitro. Thus, the Fv-1-dependent activity that restricts integration in vivo may be lost in vitro; alternatively, Fv-1 restriction may prevent a step required for integration in vivo that is bypassed in vitro. Images PMID:1326652

  14. Solution Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Protein: Differences from HIV-1 Gag

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Clark, Patrick K.; Campbell, Stephen J.; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan

    2012-05-09

    Immature retrovirus particles are assembled from the multidomain Gag protein. In these particles, the Gag proteins are arranged radially as elongated rods. We have previously characterized the properties of HIV-1 Gag in solution. In the absence of nucleic acid, HIV-1 Gag displays moderately weak interprotein interactions, existing in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Neutron scattering and hydrodynamic studies suggest that the protein is compact, and biochemical studies indicate that the two ends can approach close in three-dimensional space, implying the need for a significant conformational change during assembly. We now describe the properties of the Gag protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), a gammaretrovirus. We found that this protein is very different from HIV-1 Gag: it has much weaker protein-protein interaction and is predominantly monomeric in solution. This has allowed us to study the protein by small-angle X-ray scattering and to build a low-resolution molecular envelope for the protein. We found that MLV Gag is extended in solution, with an axial ratio of {approx}7, comparable to its dimensions in immature particles. Mutational analysis suggests that runs of prolines in its matrix and p12 domains and the highly charged stretch at the C terminus of its capsid domain all contribute to this extended conformation. These differences between MLV Gag and HIV-1 Gag and their implications for retroviral assembly are discussed.

  15. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-06-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins.

  16. Effects of murine leukemia virus env gene proteins on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Takemoto, L. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    F5b Tumor cells were incubated with concentrated culture supernatants taken from cells resistant (F5m) or sensitive (F5b) to contact-dependent macrophage cytotoxicity. Macrophage cell line B6MP102 and murine peritoneal macrophages killed targets incubated with supernatants taken from sensitive cells but poorly killed cells incubated in supernatants isolated from resistant cells. Membranes from cells resistant to macrophage killing, F5m, were fused into F5b cells. The fused F5b cells were killed significantly less than F5b cells fused with F5b cell membranes or untreated F5b cells. The decreased killing of F5b cells corresponded to increased concentrations of gp70(a) molecules on F5b cells. Affinity purified gp70(a) was added to cytotoxicity assays but failed to inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. P15E molecules were detectable on both F5b and F5m cells. In addition, a synthetic peptide found to exhibit the inhibitory properties of p15E was added to cytotoxicity assays. P15E synthetic peptide also did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. Therefore, env gene proteins of murine leukemia virus do not appear responsible for inducing tumor cell resistance to activated macrophage contact-dependent cytotoxicity.

  17. Structure of glycosylated and unglycosylated gag polyproteins of Rauscher murine leukemia virus: carbohydrate attachment sites.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, A M; Lockhart, S M; Rabin, E M; Oroszlan, S

    1981-01-01

    The structural relationships among the gag polyproteins Pr65gag, Pr75gag, and gPr80gag of Rauscher murine leukemia virus were studied by endoglycosidase H digestion and formic acid cleavage. Fragments were identified by precipitation with specific antisera to constituent virion structural proteins followed by one-dimensional mapping. Endoglycosidase H reduced the size of gPr80gag to that of Pr75gag. By comparing fragments of gPr80gag and the apoprotein Pr75gag, the former was shown to contain two mannose-rich oligosaccharide units. By comparing fragments of Pr65gag and Pr75gag, the latter was shown to differ from Pr65gag at the amino terminus by the presence of a leader peptide approximately 7,000 daltons in size. The internal and carboxyl-terminal peptides of the two unglycosylated polyproteins were not detectably different. The location of the two N-linked carbohydrate chains in gPr80gag has been specified. One occurs in the carboxyl-terminal half of the polyprotein at asparagine177 of the p30 sequence and the other is found in a 23,000-dalton fragment located in the amino-terminal region of gPr80gag and containing the additional amino acid sequences not found in Pr65gag plus a substantial portion of p15. Images PMID:7241663

  18. Even transcriptionally competent proviruses are silent in bovine leukemia virus-induced sheep tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Van den Broeke, A; Cleuter, Y; Chen, G; Portetelle, D; Mammerickx, M; Zagury, D; Fouchard, M; Coulombel, L; Kettmann, R; Burny, A

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the role of proviral integration and expression in cellular transformation induced by bovine leukemia virus (BLV), three BLV-induced tumors harboring a single proviral copy were selected upon restriction and hybridization analysis. Tumors 344 and 395 were shown to contain a full-size proviral copy, whereas in tumor 1345 the provirus appeared to be heavily deleted. RNA gel blot hybridization with an antisense RNA probe showed no transcription of the viral sequences in the fresh tumors or in sheep tumor cells growing in vitro. The proviruses were cloned and transfected in mammalian cell lines. Transient-expression experiments revealed that the complete proviruses were still able to express the trans-activating protein (Tat) as well as structural proteins, demonstrating that the nonexpression of a provirus in a tumor cell does not necessarily imply a structural alteration of the viral information. In contrast, sequence analysis of the provirus with a large deletion and transient-expression assays proved that this truncated provirus, isolated from a tumor, was unable to code for viral proteins. These data indicate that expression of viral genes, including tat, is not required for the maintenance of the transformed state. Images PMID:2848258

  19. Horizontal transmission and phylogenetic analysis of bovine leukemia virus in two districts of Miyazaki, Japan.

    PubMed

    Mekata, Hirohisa; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Konnai, Satoru; Kirino, Yumi; Horii, Yoichiro; Norimine, Junzo

    2015-09-01

    Horizontal transmission is recognized as a major infection route for bovine leukemia virus (BLV), and cattle with high viral loads are considered to be a major infectious source in a herd. However, a correlation between viral loads and the risk of infection has been insufficient to use as a foundation for BLV control strategies. In this report, we examined the epidemiology of BLV infection and the infectious source in a local area. In 2013-2014, BLV infection was investigated in 1,823 cattle from 117 farms in two adjacent districts, Miyazaki, Japan. Seropositive samples for BLV were detected with 88 cattle and in 14 farms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 94% of the isolates clustered into genotype I and the remaining isolate into genotype III. Among genotype I, genetically distinct strains were spread at each farm, and cattle infected with less than 3 copies/100 cells did not transmit BLV to other cattle for more than thirty months. This is the first report of concrete data of viral load in relation to viral horizontal transmission under the field condition. The data facilitate farmers and veterinarians understanding the status of BLV infected cattle. This research contributes to BLV infection control and the development of effective BLV eradication programs. PMID:25892699

  20. First Report of Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection in Yaks (Bos mutus) in China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian-Gang; Zheng, Wen-Bin; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Qin, Si-Yuan; Yin, Ming-Yang; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Hu, Gui-Xue

    2016-01-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is a chronic lymphosarcoma disease of cattle caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV). No information is available concerning the epidemiology of BLV infection in yaks (Bos mutus). One thousand five hundred and eighty-four serum samples from 610 black yaks and 974 white yaks from Gansu province, northwest China, were collected between April 2013 and March 2014 and tested for BLV antibodies using a commercially available ELISA kit. The overall BLV seroprevalence in yaks was 21.09% (334/1584), with 24.26% (148/610) black yaks and 19.10% (186/974) white yaks yielding positive results. Risk factor analysis indicated that with the exception of breed (OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.06–1.73, P < 0.05), the age, region, gender, farm, and the numbers of pregnancies were not considered as risk factors for the presence of BLV in yaks included in this study. This is the first report of BLV infection in yaks in China, which provides information for controlling BLV infection in yaks. PMID:27340671

  1. Detection of bovine leukemia virus in cattle by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Murtaugh, M P; Lin, G F; Haggard, D L; Weber, A F; Meiske, J C

    1991-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is widely distributed in U.S. cattle herds. It infects B lymphocytes and causes neoplastic disease in 5-10% of infected animals. Direct economic losses are incurred as a result of death, reduced milk production and condemnation at slaughter. Thus the identification of cattle infected with BLV is of significant concern to the U.S. cattle industry. For this reason, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was used to examine seropositive and seronegative cattle for the presence of BLV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Using an amplification protocol able to detect 1 viral genome in 100,000 cells, BLV was not detected in 7 seronegative cattle in an infected herd. BLV sequences were detected in 13 of 18 seropositive animals with various levels of infection as determined by in vitro lymphocyte culture and electron microscopy. An active infection was demonstrated in one animal, based on the presence of viral RNA. These findings indicate that PCR is a sensitive method for the detection of BLV in cattle and provides new information regarding the dynamics of the infection. PMID:1658030

  2. Seroprevalence of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in dairy cattle in Isfahan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Morovati, Hassan; Shirvani, Edris; Noaman, Vahid; Lotfi, Mohsen; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Hatami, Alireza; Bahreyari, Masoume; Shahramyar, Zahra; Morovati, Mohammad H; Azimi, Mahmoud; Sakhaei, Davoud

    2012-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), the causative agent of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is an exogenous C-type oncovirus in the Retroviridae family. It causes significant economic losses associated with the costs of control and eradication programs due to carcass condemnation at slaughter and restrictions of export of cattle and semen to importing countries. The main objective of this research was to determine the seroprevalence of BLV infection in cattle herds in central region of Iran (Isfahan province) using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect serum antibodies against BLV. Samples of blood serum were collected from 403 female dairy cattle (Holstein-Friesian) from 21 livestock farms and 303 animals (81.9%) were BLV seropositive. A significant association was found between age as a potential risk factor and BVL seroprevalence with animals ≥ 4 years (86.6%) having a significantly (χ(2) = 35.6, p < 0.001) higher seroprevalence compared to those < 4 years (54.2%). We found no significant statistical association between seroprevalence and pregnancy, lactation status and farming systems as potential risk factors in this study (p > 0.1). It is concluded that BLV infection is a very common problem in the study area. Hence, control measures should be instituted to combat the disease and further studies are required to investigate the impact of this disease on dairy production in the country. PMID:22210288

  3. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L; Bowler, Matthew W; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J Robert; Goff, Stephen P; Song, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins. PMID:27329342

  4. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag–Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins. PMID:27329342

  5. Mutational Analysis of Bovine Leukemia Virus Rex: Identification of a Dominant-Negative Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-A; Hope, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    The Rex proteins of the delta-retroviruses act to facilitate the export of intron-containing viral RNAs. The Rex of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is poorly characterized. To gain a better understanding of BLV Rex, we generated a reporter assay to measure BLV Rex function and used it to screen a series of point and deletion mutations. Using this approach, we were able to identify the nuclear export signal of BLV Rex. Further, we identified a dominant-negative form of BLV Rex. Protein localization analysis revealed that wild-type BLV Rex had a punctate nuclear localization and was associated with nuclear pores. In contrast, the dominant-negative BLV Rex mutation had a diffuse nuclear localization and no nuclear pore association. Overexpression of the dominant-negative BLV Rex altered the localization of the wild-type protein. This dominant-negative derivative of BLV Rex could be a useful tool to test the concept of intracellular immunization against viral infection in a large animal model. PMID:15890956

  6. Ribozyme cleaves rex/tax mRNA and inhibits bovine leukemia virus expression.

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, G H; McElwain, T F; Birkebak, T A; Palmer, G H

    1993-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) encodes at least two regulatory proteins, Rex and Tax. Tax, the transactivating protein, stimulates the long terminal repeat to promote viral transcription and may be involved in tumorigenesis. Rex is involved in the transition from early expression of regulatory proteins to later expression of viral structural proteins. We have targeted ribozymes against the mRNA encoding Rex and Tax. The ribozymes consist of the hammer-head catalytic motif flanked by antisense sequences that hybridize with the complementary rex/tax mRNA. To evaluate cleavage in a cell-free system, we transcribed portions of rex/tax mRNA and incubated them with synthetic RNA ribozymes. A ribozyme was identified that cleaves > 80% of the target RNA. Synthetic DNA encoding this ribozyme was cloned into the expression vector pRc/RSV and transfected into BLV-infected bat lung cells. Intracellular cleavage of rex/tax mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcriptase PCR. In cells expressing the ribozyme, viral expression was markedly inhibited. Expression of the BLV core protein p24 was inhibited by 61%, and reverse transcriptase activity in supernatant was inhibited by 92%. Ribozyme inhibition of BLV expression suggests that cattle expressing these sequences may be able to control BLV replication. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7504287

  7. Horizontal transmission and phylogenetic analysis of bovine leukemia virus in two districts of Miyazaki, Japan

    PubMed Central

    MEKATA, Hirohisa; SEKIGUCHI, Satoshi; KONNAI, Satoru; KIRINO, Yumi; HORII, Yoichiro; NORIMINE, Junzo

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal transmission is recognized as a major infection route for bovine leukemia virus (BLV), and cattle with high viral loads are considered to be a major infectious source in a herd. However, a correlation between viral loads and the risk of infection has been insufficient to use as a foundation for BLV control strategies. In this report, we examined the epidemiology of BLV infection and the infectious source in a local area. In 2013–2014, BLV infection was investigated in 1,823 cattle from 117 farms in two adjacent districts, Miyazaki, Japan. Seropositive samples for BLV were detected with 88 cattle and in 14 farms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 94% of the isolates clustered into genotype I and the remaining isolate into genotype III. Among genotype I, genetically distinct strains were spread at each farm, and cattle infected with less than 3 copies/100 cells did not transmit BLV to other cattle for more than thirty months. This is the first report of concrete data of viral load in relation to viral horizontal transmission under the field condition. The data facilitate farmers and veterinarians understanding the status of BLV infected cattle. This research contributes to BLV infection control and the development of effective BLV eradication programs. PMID:25892699

  8. Survey of feline leukemia virus and feline coronaviruses in captive neotropical wild felids from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Ana M S; Brandão, Paulo E; de Moraes, Wanderlei; Cubas, Zalmir S; Santos, Leonilda C; Villarreal, Laura Y B; Robes, Rogério R; Coelho, Fabiana M; Resende, Mauricio; Santos, Renata C F; Oliveira, Rosangela C; Yamaguti, Mauricio; Marques, Lucas M; Neto, Renata L; Buzinhani, Melissa; Marques, Regina; Messick, Joanne B; Biondo, Alexander W; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2009-06-01

    A total of 57 captive neotropical felids (one Leopardus geoffroyi, 14 Leopardus pardalis, 17 Leopardus wiedii, 22 Leopardus tigrinus, and three Puma yagouaroundi) from the Itaipu Binacional Wildlife Research Center (Refúgio Bela Vista, Southern Brazil) were anesthetized for blood collection. Feces samples were available for 44 animals, including one L. geoffroyi, eight L. pardalis, 14 L. wiedii, 20 L. tigrinus, and one P. yagouaroundi. Total DNA and RNA were extracted from blood and feces, respectively, using commercial kits. Blood DNA samples were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviral DNA, whereas reverse transcriptase-PCR was run on fecal samples for detection of coronavirus RNA. None of the samples were positive for coronaviruses. A male L. pardalis and a female L. tigrinus were positive for FeLV proviral DNA, and identities of PCR products were confirmed by sequencing. This is the first evidence of FeLV proviral DNA in these species in Southern Brazil. PMID:19569487

  9. Sequence-specific binding of DNA by the Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase protein.

    PubMed Central

    Krogstad, P A; Champoux, J J

    1990-01-01

    Genetic studies have indicated that integration of retroviral DNA into the host genome depends on the presence of the inverted repeats at the free termini of the long terminal repeats on the unintegrated DNA and on the product of the 3' end of the pol gene (the integrase [IN] protein). While the precise function of the Moloney murine leukemia virus IN protein is uncertain, others have shown that it is a DNA-binding protein and functions in the processing of the inverted repeats prior to integration. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we cloned and expressed the IN protein in Escherichia coli. Crude extracts of total cellular protein were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose filters, denatured in guanidine, renatured, and incubated with oligonucleotide probes. Single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides corresponding to the termini of unintegrated linear viral DNA were specifically bound by the IN protein in this assay. These data suggest that the role of the Moloney IN protein in the early steps of integration involves sequence-specific recognition of the DNA sequences found at the ends of the long terminal repeats. Images PMID:2186176

  10. Mutagenesis analysis of the murine leukemia virus matrix protein: identification of regions important for membrane localization and intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Soneoka, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-07-01

    We have created two sets of substitution mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) matrix protein in order to identify domains involved in association with the plasma membrane and in incorporation of the viral envelope glycoproteins into virus particles. The first set of mutations was targeted at putative membrane-associating regions similar to those of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein, which include a polybasic region at the N terminus of the Mo-MuLV matrix protein and two regions predicted to form beta strands. The second set of mutations was created within hydrophobic residues to test for the production of virus particles lacking envelope proteins, with the speculation of an involvement of the membrane-spanning region of the envelope protein in incorporation into virus particles. We have found that mutation of the N-terminal polybasic region redirected virus assembly to the cytoplasm, and we show that tryptophan residues may also play a significant role in the intracellular transport of the matrix protein. In total, 21 mutants of the Mo-MuLV matrix protein were produced, but we did not observe any mutant virus particles lacking the envelope glycoproteins, suggesting that a direct interaction between the Mo-MuLV matrix protein and envelope proteins either may not exist or may occur through multiple redundant interactions. PMID:9188629