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Sample records for endoscopic laser lithotripsy

  1. Endoscopically controlled laser lithotripsy of sialoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Peter; Hopf, Juergen U. G.; Linnarz, Marietta; Leege, Nils; Scherer, Hans H.; Tschepe, Johannes; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1992-08-01

    Among the diseases of the major salivary glands, sialolithiasis is a frequent clinical picture. Until now the condition has nearly always had to be treated surgically. In rare cases, discharge can be achieved by acid stimulation of secretion. If located distally in the excretory duct, concrements may be removed by enoral lancing. If it is close to glands, e.g., in the knee of Wharton's duct or in the ductal part of the submandibular gland, extirpation of the gland including the stone is unavoidable. Besides wound healing problems and the occurrence of salivary fistulas, the main risk of surgery is injury to the nerves around the major salivary glands, e.g., the n. facialis or one of its branches, the n. hypoglossus, or the n. lingualis with consecutive paresis. Based on the clinical results of lithotripsy by laser-induced shock waves (LIL) applied to renal stones and ureteroliths as well as bilary duct and pancreas stones, we investigated the suitability of endoscopically controlled laser therapy for sialolithiasis.

  2. Lithotripsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... have, their size, and where in your urinary system they are. Most of the time, lithotripsy removes all the stones. Alternative Names Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy; Shock wave lithotripsy; Laser lithotripsy; Percutaneous lithotripsy; Endoscopic lithotripsy; ESWL; Renal calculi- ...

  3. Kidney stones - lithotripsy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy - discharge; Shock wave lithotripsy - discharge; Laser lithotripsy - discharge; Percutaneous lithotripsy - discharge; Endoscopic lithotripsy - discharge; ESWL - discharge

  4. Lithotripsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laser lithotripsy; Percutaneous lithotripsy; Endoscopic lithotripsy; ESWL; Renal calculi-lithotripsy ... Lingeman JE. Surgical management of upper urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ...

  5. Percutaneous Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Management of Complicated Biliary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Kelly; Chamsuddin, Abbas; Spivey, James; Martin, Louis; Nieh, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Advances in endoscopic techniques have transformed the management of urolithiasis. We sought to evaluate the role of such urological interventions for the treatment of complex biliary calculi. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients (n=9) undergoing percutaneous holmium laser lithotripsy for complicated biliary calculi over a 4-year period (12/2003 to 12/2007). All previously failed standard techniques include ERCP with sphincterotomy (n=6), PTHC (n=7), or both of these. Access to the biliary system was obtained via an existing percutaneous transhepatic catheter or T-tube tracts. Endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy was performed via a flexible cystoscope or ureteroscope. Stone clearance was confirmed intra- and postoperatively. A percutaneous transhepatic drain was left indwelling for follow-up imaging. Results: Mean patient age was 65.6 years (range, 38 to 92). Total stone burden ranged from 1.7 cm to 5 cm. All 9 patients had stones located in the CBD, with 2 patients also having additional stones within the hepatic ducts. All 9 patients (100%) were visually stone-free after one endoscopic procedure. No major perioperative complications occurred. Mean length of stay was 2.4 days. At a mean radiological follow-up of 5.4 months (range, 0.5 to 21), no stone recurrence was noted. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic holmium laser lithotripsy is a minimally invasive alternative to open salvage surgery for complex biliary calculi refractory to standard approaches. This treatment is both safe and efficacious. Success depends on a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:19660213

  6. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Intrahepatic and Choledochal Biliary Stones

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri; Kleinmann, Nir; Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris; Winkler, Harry

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-{mu}m holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. Results: All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive 'balloon push' (n = 4) and 'rendezvous' (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Conclusion: Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

  7. A comparison of efficacies of holmium YAG laser, and pneumatic lithotripsy in the endoscopic treatment of ureteral stones

    PubMed Central

    Akdeniz, Ekrem; İrkılata, Lokman; Demirel, Hüseyin Cihan; Saylık, Acun; Bolat, Mustafa Suat; Şahinkaya, Necmettin; Zengin, Mehmet; Atilla, Mustafa Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to compare the effectiveness of holmium YAG laser and pneumatic lithotripsy in the treatment of ureteral stones. Material and methods: A total of 216 patients who had established indications of ureteroscopy between November 2011 and June 2012 were included in this study. Patients’ files were retrospectively reviewed by dividing cases as groups that underwent pneumatic (PL) or laser lithotripsy (LL) procedures. Age, sex, stone burden and localization, duration of follow-up, operative times were evaluated. Stone-free rates were evaluated by ureteroscopical examination, postoperative scout films and ultrasonography. Results: Group PL consisted of 109 and group LL of 107 patients. Median age was 43.93±15.94 years in Group PL and 46.15±14.54 years in Group LL. Male to female ratio, stone burden and localization were similar for both groups. Overall success rate was 89.9% in Group PL and 87.9% in Group LL, respectively (p<0.791). With the aid of additional procedures, success rate was 100% for both groups at the end of the first month. Groups were not different as for operative time, rate of insertion of an ureteral catheter and its removal time. Hospitalization period was apparently somewhat shorter in Group LL (p=0.00). Conclusion: Pneumatic lithotripsy can be as efficacious as laser lithotripsy and be used safely in the endoscopic management of ureteral stone. In comparison of both methods, we detected no differences as to operative time, success of operation and the time to removal of the catheter, however, hospitalization period was shorter in Group LL. PMID:26328167

  8. Laser lithotripsy with a Q-switched alexandrite laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebelacker, Walter

    1992-06-01

    The laser lithotripsy of ureter stones with the Alexan Triptor was introduced into urology in 1989. Pulsenergy, pulsewidth, wavelength, fiber performance, and endoscope performance are important parameters for effective stone disintegration.

  9. Comparison of different pulsed and Q-switched solid state laser systems for endoscopic laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy: performance and laser/stone interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiger, Erwin

    1990-06-01

    At present the laser induced shock wave lithotripsy (LISL) of urinary and biliary stones via fiber optic beam delivery is governed by two competing' laser systems: The flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser and the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The pulsed radiation of the dye system with pulse durations in the 1-2 .tsec region can be easily transmitted through extremely flexible fused silica fibers with core diameters of only 200 im whilst the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with pulselengths of 5-25 nsec needs fibers with more than 400 tm core diameter. The dye laser releases acoustic shock waves for fragmentation simply by stone contact, the Q-switched Nd:YAG produces these waves in the surrounding aqueous medium by laser induced optical breakdown (LIB) when refocused by optical means or through additional metal absorbers, i.e. opto - mechanical couplers. We report on the system performances and laser/stone interactions of two alternative solid-state laser systems with variable pulselengths in the range of 1.7 - 30 sec and 30 - 1000 nsec, respectively: The pulsed psec-Nd:YAG laser and the Q-switched alexandrite laser. Regarding the endoscopic laser lithotripsy of urinary and biliary stones in the ureter or common bile duct, respectively, the laser energy delivery system, i.e. the optical fiber; is the most stressed part. Therefore we used long-pulse solid-state laser systems like the pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a pulse-slicing unit and a pulselength-tunable Q-switched alexandrite laser and studied fragmentation of synthetic plaster samples as well as urinary and biliary stones. The radiation of both laser systems can be effectively transmitted via standard 200 im core diameter optical quartz fibers what is absolutely necessary when used in conjunction with small caliber rigid or flexible endoscopes. As a compact and reliable solid-state system the alexandrite laser lithotripter is much less expensive than an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter with the same fragmentation results

  10. Thulium Fiber Laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard Leious, Jr.

    The Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) has been studied as a potential alternative to the conventional Holmium:YAG laser (Ho:YAG) for the treatment of kidney stones. The TFL is more ideally suited for laser lithotripsy because of the higher absorption coefficient of the emitted wavelength in water, the superior Gaussian profile of the laser beam, and the ability to operate at arbitrary temporal pulse profiles. The higher absorption of the TFL by water helps translate into higher ablation of urinary stones using less energy. The Gaussian spatial beam profile allows the TFL to couple into fibers much smaller than those currently being used for Ho:YAG lithotripsy. Lastly, the ability of arbitrary pulse operation by the TFL allows energy to be delivered to the stone efficiently so as to avoid negative effects (such as burning or bouncing of the stone) while maximizing ablation. Along with these improvements, the unique properties of the TFL have led to more novel techniques that have currently not been used in the clinic, such as the ability to control the movement of stones based on the manner in which the laser energy is delivered. Lastly, the TFL has led to the development of novel fibers, such as the tapered fiber and removable tip fiber, to be used for lithotripsy which can lead to safer and less expensive treatment of urinary stones. Overall, the TFL has been demonstrated as a viable alternative to the conventional Ho:YAG laser and has the potential to advance methods and tools for treatment of kidney stones.

  11. Endoscopically-controlled electrohydraulic intracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (EISL) of salivary stones.

    PubMed

    Königsberger, R; Feyh, J; Goetz, A; Kastenbauer, E

    1993-02-01

    Twenty-nine patients with salivary stones were treated with the endoscopically-controlled electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripsy (EISL). This new minimally invasive treatment of sialolithiasis is performed under local anesthesia on an outpatient basis with little inconvenience to the patient. For endoscopy, a flexible fibroscope with an additional probe to generate shock waves is placed into the submandibular duct and advanced until the stone is identified. For shock wave-induced stone disintegration, the probe electrode must be placed 1 mm in front of the concrement. The shock waves are generated by a sparkover at the tip of the probe. By means of the endoscopically-controlled shock wave lithotripsy it was possible to achieve complete stone fragmentation in 20 out of 29 patients without serious side effects. In three patients, only partial stone fragmentation could be achieved due to the stone quality. Endoscopically-controlled electrohydraulic intracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy represents a novel minimally invasive therapy for endoscopically accessible salivary gland stones. The advantage in comparison to the endoscopically-controlled laser lithotripsy will be discussed. PMID:8445694

  12. Spectroscopy During Laser Induced Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, R.; Meyer, W.; Hering, P.

    1988-06-01

    In the course of laser induced shock wave lithotripsy (LISL) by means of a flashlamp pumped dye laser a plasma is formed on the stone's surface. Spectral analysis of the plasma flash leads to chemical stone analysis during the procedure. A time resolved integral analysis of scattered and laser induced fluorescence light makes stone detection possible and avoids tissue damage. We used a 200 μm fiber to transmit a 2 μs, 50 mJ pulse to the stone's surface and a second 200 μ fiber for analysis. This transmission system is small and flexible enough for controlled endoscopic use in the treatment of human ureter or common bile duct stones. Under these conditions the stone selective effect of lasertripsy leads only to minor tissue injury.

  13. Fragmentation methods in laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi X.; Whitehurst, Colin; King, Terence A.

    1991-07-01

    Following a series of opto-acoustic-mechanical and spectroscopic studies into the basic mechanisms of laser lithotripsy, a plasma-mediated opto-mechanical energy transfer model is presented. Laser energy, first absorbed by the calculi material at the surface and couples into the initiated plasma following ionization of vaporized material, is finally transformed into destructive mechanical energy via a shock wave induced by the impulsive expansion of the resulting plasma. This leads to the fragmentation of the calculi. The laser-plasma energy coupling gives a new definition for the fluence threshold to laser induced breakdown, which agrees with shock wave detection and analysis. A laser pulse shape with initial low intensity and sufficient fluence to vaporize a required amount of target material (lasting a few microsecond(s) ) and terminating in a short, intense pulse of about 1microsecond(s) or less, to couple most of the laser energy into the dense young plasma and so create high pressures, is required to produce optimum effect for laser lithotripsy. An opto-mechanical coupler has been designed which transfers the maximum laser energy into mechanically destructive energy, and successfully fragments various types of urinary and biliary calculi even including those calculi with poor surface absorptance, like pure white cystine. A solid state laser, Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers wavelength and 150 microsecond(s) pulse width), has also been tested as an alternative to the flashlamp-excited dye laser. The underwater shock wave induced by this laser has been measured and has successfully fragmented calculi with poor absorptance in the visible region.

  14. Comparison of a pulsed dye laser and electrohydraulic lithotripsy on porcine gallbladder and common bile duct in vitro.

    PubMed

    Birkett, D H; Lamont, J S; O'Keane, J C; Babayan, R K

    1992-01-01

    With the advent of minimal access biliary procedures there is a need for a safe intracorporal lithotripsy technique that can be used through small flexible endoscopes. Currently, the two techniques available are electrohydraulic lithotripsy and laser induced shock wave lithotripsy. In this study we compare the effect of a 504 nm coumarin pulsed dye laser and electrohydraulic lithotripsy on in vitro porcine gallbladder and common bile duct. Electrohydraulic lithotripsy at the lowest energy the generator would deliver caused perforation of both tissues in only a few pulses when a 1.9-F probe was placed in direct contact with the tissue. Energy from a 504 nm coumarin pulsed dye laser delivered through a 320-microns fiber placed in light contact with the tissue caused an energy-dependent perforation after 50 pulses in from none to 44% of tissues. It was also found that there was a higher incidence of perforation in more vascular than non-vascular tissue. When the EHL probe and the laser fiber were held 1-2 mm from the tissue surface, discharge of each resulted in no perforation. On histological examination of the tissues, the perforations were found to be very small with laser lithotripsy and considerably larger with the electrohydraulic lithotripsy. It was felt that laser lithotripsy in the clinical situation was likely to be much safer than electrohydraulic lithotripsy. PMID:1349415

  15. Holmium laser lithotripsy for ureteral calculi: an outpatient procedure.

    PubMed

    Yip, K H; Lee, C W; Tam, P C

    1998-06-01

    A retrospective review was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of ureteroscopic lithotripsy using the holmium laser with a semirigid endoscope in a newly established day surgery center. In 1996, 69 consecutive patients (40 male and 29 female) with a mean age of 46.7 (range 21-73) years and ASA status I or II underwent ureteroscopic lithotripsy for their ureteral calculi using the holmium laser (365-micron fiber; power setting 0.5-1.4 J/5 Hz) and 8.5F semirigid ureteroscope in a day surgery setting. Stone features, postoperative pain scores, readmissions, and complications were evaluated. Eighteen upper, 17 middle, and 34 lower ureteral stones were treated, with a mean size measuring 12.1 (5-45) mm. The mean operative time was 61 minutes including the anesthetic time (range 15-150 minutes), and the success rate was 91% (63/69). The complication rate was 10% (7/69) including four unscheduled readmissions (6%). Telephone follow-up on postoperative Day 1 and Day 3 revealed mean pain scores of 2 and 1, respectively (on a 0-10 scale) and an analgesic requirement of 1 tablet of Dologesic (containing 32.5 mg of dextropropoxyphene + 320 mg of paracetamol) four times a day on both days. Ureteroscopic lithotripsy using the holmium laser and a semirigid endoscope is highly successful and well tolerated and carries a low complication rate. It is indicated as an ambulatory and minimally invasive treatment modality in low-risk patients with ureteral stones. PMID:9658294

  16. Holmium laser lithotripsy of bladder calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Poon, Michael W.

    1998-07-01

    Although the overall incidence of bladder calculi has been decreasing, it is still a significant disease affecting adults and children. Prior treatment options have included open cystolitholapaxy, blind lithotripsy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and visual lithotripsy with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes. The holmium laser has been found to be extremely effective in the treatment of upper tract calculi. This technology has also been applied to the treatment of bladder calculi. We report our experience with the holmium laser in the treatment of bladder calculi. Twenty- five patients over a year and a half had their bladder calculi treated with the Holmium laser. This study was retrospective in nature. Patient demographics, stone burden, and intraoperative and post-operative complications were noted. The mean stone burden was 31 mm with a range of 10 to 60 mm. Preoperative diagnosis was made with either an ultrasound, plain film of the abdomen or intravenous pyelogram. Cystoscopy was then performed to confirm the presence and determine the size of the stone. The patients were then taken to the operating room and given a regional or general anesthetic. A rigid cystoscope was placed into the bladder and the bladder stone was then vaporized using the holmium laser. Remaining fragments were washed out. Adjunctive procedures were performed on 10 patients. These included transurethral resection of the prostate, transurethral incision of the prostate, optic internal urethrotomy, and incision of ureteroceles. No major complications occurred and all patients were rendered stone free. We conclude that the Holmium laser is an effective and safe modality for the treatment of bladder calculi. It was able to vaporize all bladder calculi and provides a single modality of treating other associated genitourinary pathology.

  17. Femtosecond laser lithotripsy: feasibility and ablation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Wang, Tianyi; Neev, Joseph; Glickman, Randolph D.; Chan, Kin Foong; Milner, Thomas E.

    2010-03-01

    Light emitted from a femtosecond laser is capable of plasma-induced ablation of various materials. We tested the feasibility of utilizing femtosecond-pulsed laser radiation (λ=800 nm, 140 fs, 0.9 mJ/pulse) for ablation of urinary calculi. Ablation craters were observed in human calculi of greater than 90% calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine (CYST), or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MAPH). Largest crater volumes were achieved on CYST stones, among the most difficult stones to fragment using Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) lithotripsy. Diameter of debris was characterized using optical microscopy and found to be less than 20 μm, substantially smaller than that produced by long-pulsed Ho:YAG ablation. Stone retropulsion, monitored by a high-speed camera system with a spatial resolution of 15 μm, was negligible for stones with mass as small as 0.06 g. Peak shock wave pressures were less than 2 bars, measured by a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) needle hydrophone. Ablation dynamics were visualized and characterized with pump-probe imaging and fast flash photography and correlated to shock wave pressures. Because femtosecond-pulsed laser ablates urinary calculi of soft and hard compositions, with micron-sized debris, negligible stone retropulsion, and small shock wave pressures, we conclude that the approach is a promising candidate technique for lithotripsy.

  18. Laser lithotripsy with the Ho:YAG laser: fragmentation process revealed by time-resolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, Franz R.; Beghuin, Didier; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Venzi, Giordano; Jichlinski, Patrice; Rink, Klaus; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Graber, Peter

    1998-07-01

    Improvements of endoscopic techniques have renewed the interest of urologists in laser lithotripsy in recent years. Laser energy can be easily transmitted through flexible fibers thereby enabling different surgical procedures such as cutting, coagulating and lithotripsy. The Ho:YAG laser offers multiple medical applications in Urology, among them stone fragmentation. However, the present knowledge of its fragmentation mechanism is incomplete. The objective was therefore to analyze the fragmentation process and to discuss the clinical implications related to the underlying fragmentation mechanism. The stone fragmentation process during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy was observed by time resolved flash video imaging. Possible acoustic transient occurrence was simultaneously monitored with a PVDF-needle hydrophone. Fragmentation was performed on artificial and cystine kidney stones in water. We observed that though the fragmentation process is accompanied with the formation of a cavitation bubble, cavitation has only a minimal effect on stone fragmentation. Fragment ejection is mainly due to direct laser stone heating leading to vaporization of organic stone constituents and interstitial water. The minimal effect of the cavitation bubble is confirmed by acoustic transients measurements, which reveal weak pressure transients. Stone fragmentation with the Holmium laser is the result of vaporization of interstitial (stone) water and organic stone constituents. It is not due to the acoustic effects of a cavitation bubble or plasma formation. The fragmentation process is strongly related with heat production thereby harboring the risk of undesired thermal damage. Therefore, a solid comprehension of the fragmentation process is needed when using the different clinically available laser types of lithotripsy.

  19. Laser lithotripsy using double pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfmann, Juergen; Doerschel, Klaus; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1990-07-01

    There are currntly several methods in the field of laser lithotripsy which operate not only at different wavelengths and pulse lengths but also with various types of optical front ends and various irrigation fluids'6. The methods can be divided into two main groups: First, those which utilize stone absorption and plasma formation on the stone surface to initiate stone fragmentation, such as dye lasers. Second, those which generate shock waves and caviatation in the surrounding fluid and which require additional means to produce aplasma (e.g. irrigation, focussing fiber end or metal surfaces). The pulsed Nd:YAG laser belongs to this group. The method presented here is the double pulse technique which is a combination of both methods. It uses two laser pulses with a short time delay transmitted by means of a fiber to destroy body concrements. The first pulse is the first harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser (532nm) which improves the coupling efficiency of the laser radiation with the stone. The second pulse is in the fundamental mode of the laser (1064 nm) delivering the high energy for the stone disruption.

  20. Spectroscopic feedback in laser lithotripsy and laser angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi X.; King, Terence A.; Shah, T.; Watson, Graham M.

    1992-08-01

    The feasibility of new forms of monitoring the fragmentation and ablation process through the plasma feedback signals in laser lithotripsy and laser angioplasty has been investigated. In laser lithotripsy it has been found that shock wave feedback monitoring is not as reliable as the plasma emission feedback monitoring. The plasma emission spectra indicate clearly plasma formation on calculi or calcified plaque, while an audible signal can be observed on targets such as dark tissue, catheter, and blood. This technique was successful in ex-vivo experiments in which calculi were inserted into pigs' ureter and then fragmented. Spectra were obtained in vivo indicating calcium abundance in calculi and the feasibility of real-time stone composition analysis. Ex-vivo gallstone fragmentation was also performed successfully under plasma spectra feedback monitoring. In laser angioplasty, in vitro experiments have shown a discriminative effect at laser pulse energies of 40 mJ or greater. Strong plasma spectra can only be observed from calcified plaque and not from normal artery tissue or fibrous plaque. The threshold for plasma formation on calcified plaque increases in blood compared to that in saline while the spectral structure becomes more specific. This study shows promising prospects for the technique in both laser lithotripsy and laser angioplasty.

  1. Laser lithotripsy of difficult bile duct stones under direct visual control.

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, H; Hoffmann, W; Zillinger, C; Classen, M

    1993-01-01

    Biliary laser lithotripsy was performed under direct visual control in 35 consecutive patients not amenable to routine endoscopy. The patients had 1-50 (median 1) bile duct stones with the greatest diameter of the largest stone being 9-42 mm (median 20 mm). Conventional endoscopic treatment had failed because of an inaccessible papilla (16 patients), biliary strictures (seven patients), and impaction or large size of calculi (12 patients). Twelve patients, depending on their anatomical condition, underwent peroral cholangioscopy by means of a mother-babyscope system. Percutaneous cholangioscopy was initially carried out in 23 patients, 7-20 days (median 10 days) after creation of a transhepatic fistula. Pulsed dye laser (32 patients) or alexandrite laser (three patients) lithotripsy was applied under an appropriate direct visual control in all cases. Complete stone disintegration succeeded in 33 of 35 patients. All resultant fragments passed the papilla within a mean number of 1.3 treatment sessions. Peroral cholangioscopic lithotripsy failed in two cases. One patient successfully underwent percutaneous laser treatment and the other patient was referred to surgery. Fever, temporary haemobilia, or a subcapsular liver haematoma were seen in a total of eight patients during establishment of the cutaneobiliary fistula. A 95 year old patient who had been admitted with septic cholangitis died because of cardiorespiratory failure 5 days after bile duct clearance. It is concluded that laser lithotripsy performed under a direct visual control is an effective and safe procedure for the non-surgical treatment of difficult bile duct stones. Ductal clearance can usually be achieved in a single treatment session when the papilla and the stones are accessible by the peroral route. Percutaneous cholangioscopic lithotripsy is more time consuming but highly effective even in patients with a difficult anatomy, bile duct strictures, or intrahepatic calculi. This approach should be

  2. Fragmentation process induced by microsecond laser pulses during lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rink, K.; Delacrétaz, G.; Salathé, R. P.

    1992-07-01

    A fiber optic stress sensing technique is applied to evaluate the fragmentation mechanism for pulsed dye-laser lithotripsy. We demonstrate for the first time that the fragmentation process with microsecond laser pulses originates from the shock wave induced by the cavitation bubble collapse. This shock occurs some hundreds of microseconds after the laser pulse. The shock induced by the plasma expansion, which occurs during laser irradiation, has a minor effect.

  3. Endoscopic Gastrointestinal Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buchi, Kenneth N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of flexible fibers for the delivery of laser energy led to the first endoscopic laser applications in humans in the early 1970s. Since that time, much has been learned about applications throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The risks appear to be minimal. The coagulative effect of laser energy is used to treat gastrointestinal hemorrhage and small, benign mucosal lesions. The ablative effect of the Nd:YAG laser on tissue is used for palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal disorders and incisional therapy for anatomic lesions such as strictures or cysts. New laser modalities that potentially can be tuned throughout large segments of the electromagnetic spectrum, new fiber-optic delivery systems with specialized tips and new methods of sensitizing tissue to laser energy all indicate that the endoscopic laser should continue to have many new and innovative applications. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:3911589

  4. [The endoscopic treatment of large calculi in the choledochus. The preliminary results with intracorporeal electrohydraulic shock-wave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, B

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported of endoscopic treatment of: 236 patients with common bile duct calculi treated by endoscopic sphincterotomy with or without hydrostatic balloon extraction and extraction of the calculi, mechanical lithotripsy and endoprosthesis; preliminary results in 12 patients treated by intracorporeal electrohydraulic lithotripsy. Complete removal of calculi from the common bile duct was achieved in 171 of 236 sphincterotomized patients (72 per cent). Complications were observed in 11 per cent of the patients. Mechanical cracking of common bile duct calculi was realized in 60 of 65 patients (92 per cent) with complications observed in 3 per cent. Thus, with the use of mechanical lithotripsy the success of endoscopic treatment rose to 98 per cent, without increase in the incidence of complications. Seven patients had endoprostheses placed because of failure to extract the calculi. Intracorporeal electrohydraulic lithotripsy was performed in 12 patients with common bile duct lithiasis (4 with single and 8 with numerous stones with diameter 20-40 mm. In one patient transient acute pancreatitis was observed. A rise in serum amylase content was recorded in 9 patients. The stones in the common bile duct were effectively broken to pieces and removed in 8 patients. Lithotripsy was unsuccessful in 4 patients, two of whom had solid calcium depositions. In the common bile duct of the other two MTBE gas applied. The patients were subjected to repeated lithotripsy with positive effect. It is pointed out in conclusion that crushing stones in the common bile duct allows real improvement of the results of endoscopic sphincterotomy in common bile duct calculosis. Endoscopic treatment of larger calculi became also feasible which until a few years ago were contraindication for endoscopic treatment. PMID:2102523

  5. Laser and acoustic lens for lithotripsy

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Makarewicz, Anthony J.; London, Richard A.; Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2002-01-01

    An acoustic focusing device whose acoustic waves are generated by laser radiation through an optical fiber. The acoustic energy is capable of efficient destruction of renal and biliary calculi and deliverable to the site of the calculi via an endoscopic procedure. The device includes a transducer tip attached to the distal end of an optical fiber through which laser energy is directed. The transducer tip encapsulates an exogenous absorbing dye. Under proper irradiation conditions (high absorbed energy density, short pulse duration) a stress wave is produced via thermoelastic expansion of the absorber for the destruction of the calculi. The transducer tip can be configured into an acoustic lens such that the transmitted acoustic wave is shaped or focused. Also, compressive stress waves can be reflected off a high density/low density interface to invert the compressive wave into a tensile stress wave, and tensile stresses may be more effective in some instances in disrupting material as most materials are weaker in tension than compression. Estimations indicate that stress amplitudes provided by this device can be magnified more than 100 times, greatly improving the efficiency of optical energy for targeted material destruction.

  6. Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy for the management of urolithiasis in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halland, Spring K.; House, John K.; George, Lisle

    2001-05-01

    Obstructive urolithiasis is a common problem in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs. The most common site of urinary tract obstruction in these species is the urethra. Surgical procedures developed to relieve obstructions, in our experience have been effective in approximately 75% of cases. Urethral stricture is a common complication if the mucosa of the urethra is disrupted. The objective of this project was to evaluate endoscopy guided laser lithotripsy as a therapeutic modality to relieve urethral obstructions in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs. The study population consisted of patients presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California Davis with obstructive urolithiasis. Lithotripsy was performed using a Holmium:YAG laser via a 200-micron low water quartz fiber passed through a flexible mini-endoscope. Two types of urinary calculi were managed with this technique, calcium carbonate and calcium hydroxyphosphate. Laser lithotripsy was effective at relieving obstructions caused by both types of calculi when conventional methods had failed. Laser lithotripsy performed via urethral endoscopy is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for management of obstructive urolithiasis in small ruminants and pot-bellied pigs and reduces the risk of post procedural urethral stricture.

  7. Influence of Saline on Temperature Profile of Laser Lithotripsy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Igor N.; Donalisio da Silva, Rodrigo; Gustafson, Diedra; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: We established an ex vivo model to evaluate the temperature profile of the ureter during laser lithotripsy, the influence of irrigation on temperature, and thermal spread during lithotripsy with the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: Two ex vivo models of Ovis aries urinary tract and human calcium oxalate calculi were used. The Open Ureteral Model was opened longitudinally to measure the thermal profile of the urothelium. On the Clinical Model, anterograde ureteroscopy was performed in an intact urinary system. Temperatures were measured on the external portion of the ureter and the urothelium during lithotripsy and intentional perforation. The lithotripsy group (n=20) was divided into irrigated (n=10) and nonirrigated (n=10), which were compared for thermal spread length and values during laser activation. The intentional perforation group (n=10) was evaluated under saline flow. The Ho:YAG laser with a 365 μm laser fiber and power at 10W was used (1J/Pulse at 10 Hz). Infrared Fluke Ti55 Thermal Imager was used for evaluation. Maximum temperature values were recorded and compared. Results: On the Clinical Model, the external ureteral wall obtained a temperature of 37.4°C±2.5° and 49.5°C±2.3° (P=0.003) and in the Open Ureteral Model, 49.7°C and 112.4°C with and without irrigation, respectively (P<0.05). The thermal spread along the external ureter wall was not statically significant with or without irrigation (P=0.065). During intentional perforation, differences in temperatures were found between groups (opened with and without irrigation): 81.8°±8.8° and 145.0°±15.0°, respectively (P<0.005). Conclusion: There is an increase in the external ureteral temperature during laser activation, but ureteral thermal values decreased when saline flow was applied. Ureter thermal spread showed no difference between irrigated and nonirrigated subgroups. This is the first laser lithotripsy thermography study

  8. Intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    A variety of devices are currently available for intracorporeal stone fragmentation. Recently a new wavelength of laser, the Holmium:YAG, has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications including ablation of soft tissue lesions as well as stone fragmentation. This laser has a wavelength of 2100 nm and operates in a pulsed mode. Energy is delivered through a 400 um quartz end-firing fiber. In this presentation we review our clinical experience with the Holmium:YAG laser for the treatment of renal and ureteral calculi. Over a 23 month period, 63 patients underwent 67 procedures. Seven procedures consisted of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy for large or staghorn renal calculi. Sixty procedures were performed for ureteral stones. Procedures for proximal ureteral stones (6) employed a retrograde approach using flexible ureteroscopes (8.5 or 9.8). Stones in the mid ureter (12) and distal ureter (42) were approached transurethrally using a 6.9 rigid ureteroscope. Complete stone fragmentation without the need for additional procedures was achieved in 82% of cases. Treatment failures included 1 stone migration into the renal pelvis during laser activation, 6 patients who had incomplete fragmentation and 3 patients in which laser malfunction precluded complete fragmentation. Stone analysis available in 23 patients revealed calcium oxalate monohydrate (15), calcium oxalate dihydrate (2), cystine (2), uric acid (3) and calcium phosphate (1). A single complication of ureteral perforation occurred when the laser was fired without direct visual guidance. Radiographic follow-up at an average of 16 weeks is available in 22 patients and has identified 2 patients with ureteral strictures that are not believed to be related to laser lithotripsy. In summary, we have found the Holmium:YAG laser to be a reliable and versatile device for intracorporeal lithotripsy. Its safety and efficacy make it a suitable alternative for performing intracorporeal lithotripsy of urinary

  9. Laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy of canine urocystoliths and nephroliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J. P.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Stair, Ernest L.; Schafer, Steven A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1997-05-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease affecting dogs which can sometimes be treated with dietary and medical protocols. In many cases, however, medical management cannot be employed because the dietary restrictions are contraindicated, effective medical dissolution protocols for the calculi (uroliths) do not exist, or obstruction by the calculi may result in deterioration of renal function during the time required for medical dissolution. At present, the management of medically untreatable calculi has been surgical removal which may result in temporary but dramatic decrease in renal function, irreversible loss of damaged nephrons, and significant risk, particularly for bilateral or recurrent nephroliths. An innovative technique for the removal of these uroliths would involve laser lithotripsy which transforms light energy into acoustical energy generating a shock wave sufficient to fragment stones (photoacoustic ablation). The laser is transmitted via quartz fibers which are small and flexible and can be used under direct vision through endoscopes resulting in effective fragmentation with little surrounding tissue damage. Lasers are becoming increasingly more utilized in veterinary medicine, in contrast to the limited availability of other non-invasive methods of treatment of nephroliths (i.e. extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy).

  10. Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The objective was to prove the advantage of endoscopic laser-urethroplasty over internal urethrotomy in acquired urethral strictures. Patients and Method: From January, 1996 to June, 2005, 35 patients with a mean age of 66 years were submitted to endoscopic laser-urethroplasty for strictures of either the bulbar (30) or membranous (5) urethra. The operations were carried out under general anesthesia. First of all, the strictures were incised at the 4, 8 and 12 o'clock position by means of a Sachse-urethrotom. Then the scar flap between the 4 and 8 o'clock position was vaporized using a Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1060 nm and a 600 pm bare fiber, the latter always being in contact with the tissue. The laser worked at 40W power in continuous mode. The total energy averaged 2574 J. An indwelling catheter was kept in place overnight and the patients were discharged the following day. Urinalysis, uroflowmetry and clinical examination were performed at two months after surgery and from then on every six months. Results: No serious complications were encountered. Considering a mean follow-up of 18 months, the average peak flow improved from 7.3 ml/s preoperatively to 18.7 mVs postoperatively. The treatment faded in 5 patients ( 14.3% ) who finally underwent open urethroplasty. Conclusions: Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty yields better short-term results than internal visual urethrotomy. Long-term follow-up has yet to confirm its superiority in the treatment of acquired urethral strictures.

  11. Sialoendoscopy with and without holmium:YAG laser-assisted lithotripsy in the management of obstructive sialadenitis of major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Sionis, S; Caria, R A; Trucas, M; Brennan, P A; Puxeddu, R

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sialadenitis is a major cause of dysfunction of the salivary glands, and increasingly sialoendoscopy is used in both diagnosis and treatment. At present the limit of the endoscopic approach is the size of the stone as only stones of less than 4mm can be removed. Endoscopic laser lithotripsy has the potential to treat many stones larger than this with minimal complications and preservation of a functional salivary gland. The holmium:YAG laser has been widely and safely used in urology, and its use has been recently proposed in salivary lithotripsy for the removal of bigger stones. We describe our experience with sialoendoscopy for stones in the parotid and submandibular glands and assess the feasibility and the efficacy of holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy. We have used the procedure 50 times for 43 patients with obstructive sialadenitis; 31 patients had sialolithiasis, 15 of whom (48%) had stones with diameters between 4 and 15mm (mean 7). Total extraction after fragmentation was possible in 14 of the 15 patients without complications. Intraductal holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy is effective and safe, and allows the treatment of large stones in Stensen's and Wharton's ducts. PMID:24280118

  12. Lithotripsy with the alexandrite laser: our initial 100 clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Pertusa, C; Albisu, A; Acha, M; Blasco, M; Llarena, R; Arregui, P

    1991-01-01

    The alexandrite laser system has proven to be an effective and safe method of treating ureteral stones. When the electromagnetic energy of a laser light pulse is selectively absorbed by the stone, a plasma forms at the surface. This plasma, which is composed of ions and electrons, continues to absorb laser energy, reaching very high pressure and generating a shock wave that fragments the stone. The degree of stone fragmentation is directly related to the composition and crystal lattice structure of the calculus. 112 calculi have been treated, and laser lithotripsy was successful in 87.5%. 6% of the stones were inadvertently flushed back into the kidney. No patient required an open ureterolithotomy. Guidance of the laser fiber onto the stone was performed by rigid ureteroscopy. There were no troublesome complications, and in a 3-month follow-up, no sequelae were reported. PMID:1687678

  13. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy in an in vitro ureter model.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Luke A; Wilson, Christopher R; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2014-12-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to the clinical gold standard holmium:YAG laser. The holmium laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. The TFL (λ=1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150 to 500 Hz, and a 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate/40% calcium phosphate) of uniform mass and diameter (4 to 5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 and 13.7 ml/ min for the TFL and holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from the tube's center and 1 mm above the mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded throughout each experiment for both lasers. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. The holmium laser time measured 167±41 s (n=12). TFL times measured 111±49, 39±11, and 23±4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz, respectively (n=12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24±1°C for holmium, and 33±3°C, 33±7°C, and 39±6°C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz, respectively. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and observation of reduced stone retropulsion and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional holmium laser for lithotripsy. PMID:25518001

  14. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy in an in vitro ureter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-12-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to the clinical gold standard holmium:YAG laser. The holmium laser (λ=2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. The TFL (λ=1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150 to 500 Hz, and a 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate/40% calcium phosphate) of uniform mass and diameter (4 to 5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 and 13.7 ml/min for the TFL and holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from the tube's center and 1 mm above the mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded throughout each experiment for both lasers. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. The holmium laser time measured 167±41 s (n=12). TFL times measured 111±49, 39±11, and 23±4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz, respectively (n=12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24±1°C for holmium, and 33±3°C, 33±7°C, and 39±6°C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz, respectively. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and observation of reduced stone retropulsion and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional holmium laser for lithotripsy.

  15. Laser lithotripsy: a review of 20 years of research and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dretler, S P

    1988-01-01

    Four new technologies have transformed the treatment of urinary calculi: electrohydraulic lithotripsy, ultrasonic lithotripsy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and laser lithotripsy. Initial attempts to ablate urinary calculi by continuous wave CO2, ruby, and Nd-YAG lasers failed because of excess thermal injury and inability to pass the laser energy via a flexible fiber. Basic laboratory studies then demonstrated that short pulsed laser energy absorbed by the calculus resulted in fragmentation. The parameters that produced optimal urinary calculus fragmentation were found using the flashlamp pumped tunable dye laser, with the following parameters: wavelength: 504 nm; pulse duration: 1 microsec; fiber: 250 micro silica-coated quartz; repetition: 5-20 Hz. Use of pulsed dye laser caused no tissue damage. The mechanism of fragmentation is light absorption, plasma development, and repetitive acoustic shock wave action with resultant fragmentation. The techniques for application of laser to calculi have been successful, and new, miniature instruments have been developed. Laser lithotripsy is a successful method for fragmenting ureteral calculi. The small caliber of the laser fiber makes this method useful for treating calculi in narrow, tortuous ureters; impacted calculi; distal calculi in ureters that cannot be dilated, via the percutaneous route for stones in calyces or impacted in the upper ureter. Investigations are continuing to optimize fragmentation of harder calculi and to use laser fragmentation within the kidney. Laser lithotripsy may also be used to fragment biliary calculi. PMID:2902498

  16. Visualizing mechanical stress and liquid flow during laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinten, Ilja; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf; van der Veen, Albert; Klaessens, John

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism of action of the holmium laser lithotripsy is attributed to explosive expanding and imploding vapor bubbles in association with high-speed water jets creating high mechanical stress and cracking the stone surface. A good understanding of this mechanism will contribute to the improvement and the safety of clinical treatments. A new method has been developed to visualize the dynamics of mechanical effects and fluid flow induced by Holmium laser pulses around the fiber tip and the stone surface. The fiber tip was positioned near the surface of a stone on a slab of polyacrylamide gel submerged in water. The effects were captured with high speed imaging at 2000-10000 f/s. The dynamics of the pressure wave after the pulse could be visualized by observing the optical deformation of a fine line pattern in the background of the water container using digital subtraction software. This imaging technique provides a good understanding of the mechanical effects contributing to the effectiveness and safety of lithotripsy and can be used to study the optimal fiber shape and position towards the stone surface.

  17. Laser lithotripsy of a urethral calculus via ischial urethrotomy in a steer.

    PubMed

    Streeter, R N; Washburn, K E; Higbee, R G; Bartels, K E

    2001-09-01

    A steer examined because of obstructive urolithiasis and urethral rupture underwent laser lithotripsy, using a chromium-thulium-holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser inserted through an ischial urethrotomy. Procedures were performed with caudal epidural anesthesia. Six months after surgery, the urethra was patent with no clinical evidence of urethral stricture or fistula. Ischial urethrotomy provided rapid access to the bladder for catheterization and to the obstructive urolith for lithotripsy. Laser lithotripsy was a rapid and effective means of urolith removal in this steer. PMID:11549094

  18. Laser lithotripsy for removal of uroliths in dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Larry G.; Lulich, Jody P.

    2006-02-01

    Introduction: This study evaluated the ability to fragment and remove naturally occurring uroliths in dogs using a holmium: YAG laser. Methods: Twenty four dogs with naturally occurring uroliths including 10 spayed females and 14 neutered males. The dogs were 8.7 +/- 2.8 years old and weighed 13.7 +/- 8.0 kg. All dogs had bladder stones and 5 male dogs also had urethral stones. In female dogs, cystoscopy was performed using a rigid cystoscope with sheath diameter of 14 to 19 french. Cystoscopy was performed in males dogs using a 7.5 french diameter pediatric ureteroscope. Uroliths were fragmented using a 20 watt Holmium: YAG laser and the fragments were removed by basket extraction and voiding urohydropropulsion. Results: Average laser parameters for urolith fragmentation were 0.7 Joules at 8 Hertz (range: 0.5 to 1.3 Joules at 5 to 13 Hertz). All urolith fragments were successfully removed in all 10 female dogs and 11 of 14 male dogs. In one male dog, the urethra was too small to allow passage of the ureteroscope. In one of the male dogs, the urethral stones were successfully removed by laser lithotripsy, but removal of the bladder stones was performed by cystotomy. There was one complication of urethral perforation during attempts to pass an access sheath transurethrally in a dog with extensive proliferative urethritis. Conclusions: Laser lithotripsy is a safe and effective method of removing bladder and urethral stones in dogs provided the dog is large enough to permit transurethral passage of a cystoscope or ureteroscope.

  19. Successful Removal of a Large Common Bile Duct Stone by Using Direct Peroral Cholangioscopy and Laser Lithotripsy in a Patient with Severe Kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song I; Lim, Byung Hun; Heo, Won Gak; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Tae Hyeon

    2016-07-01

    A 75-year-old woman with hypertension presented with acute suppurative cholangitis. Chest radiography revealed severe kyphosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large stone impacted in the common bile duct (CBD). The patient underwent emergent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and cholangiography revealed a large stone (7×3 cm) in the CBD that could not be captured using a large basket. We could not use the percutaneous approach for stone fragmentation by using a cholangioscope because of severe degenerative kyphosis. Finally, we performed holmium laser lithotripsy under peroral cholangioscopy by using an ultraslim endoscope, and the large stone in the CBD was successfully fragmented and removed without complications. PMID:27000425

  20. Successful Removal of a Large Common Bile Duct Stone by Using Direct Peroral Cholangioscopy and Laser Lithotripsy in a Patient with Severe Kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Song I; Lim, Byung Hun; Heo, Won Gak; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Tae Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman with hypertension presented with acute suppurative cholangitis. Chest radiography revealed severe kyphosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large stone impacted in the common bile duct (CBD). The patient underwent emergent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and cholangiography revealed a large stone (7×3 cm) in the CBD that could not be captured using a large basket. We could not use the percutaneous approach for stone fragmentation by using a cholangioscope because of severe degenerative kyphosis. Finally, we performed holmium laser lithotripsy under peroral cholangioscopy by using an ultraslim endoscope, and the large stone in the CBD was successfully fragmented and removed without complications. PMID:27000425

  1. Cavitation bubble dynamics during thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored for lithotripsy. TFL parameters differ from standard Holmium:YAG laser in several ways, including smaller fiber delivery, more strongly absorbed wavelength, low pulse energy/high pulse rate operation, and more uniform temporal pulse structure. High speed imaging of cavitation bubbles was performed at 105,000 fps and 10 μm spatial resolution to determine influence of these laser parameters on bubble formation. TFL was operated at 1908 nm with pulse energies of 5-75 mJ, and pulse durations of 200-1000 μs, delivered through 100-μm-core fiber. Cavitation bubble dynamics using Holmium laser at 2100 nm with pulse energies of 200-1000 mJ and pulse duration of 350 μs was studied, for comparison. A single, 500 μs TFL pulse produced a bubble stream extending 1090 +/- 110 μm from fiber tip, and maximum bubble diameters averaged 590 +/- 20 μm (n=4). These observations are consistent with previous studies which reported TFL ablation stallout at working distances < 1.0 mm. TFL bubble dimensions were five times smaller than for Holmium laser due to lower pulse energy, higher water absorption coefficient, and smaller fiber diameter used.

  2. Safety and efficacy of holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy in patients with bleeding diatheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Cook, Anthony J.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Auge, Brian K.; Preminger, Glenn M.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser lithotripsy in the treatment of upper urinary tract calculi in patients with known and uncorrected bleeding diatheses. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review from 2 tertiary stone centers was performed to identify patients with known bleeding diatheses who were treated with holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy for upper urinary tract calculi. Twenty-five patients with 29 upper urinary tract calculi were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. Bleeding diatheses identified were coumadin administration for various conditions (17), liver dysfunction (3), thrombocytopenia (4), and von Willebrand's disease (1). Mean international normalized ratio (INR), platelet count and bleeding time were 2.3, 50 x 109/L, and > 16 minutes, for patients receiving coumadin or with liver dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, or von Willebrand's disease, respectively. Results: Overall, the stone-free rate was 96% (27/28) and 29 of 30 procedures were completed successfully without significant complication. One patient who was treated concomitantly with electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) had a significant retroperitoneal hemorrhage that required blood transfusion. Conclusions: Treatment of upper tract urinary calculi in patients with uncorrected bleeding diatheses can be safely performed using contemporary small caliber ureteroscopes and holmium laser as the sole modality of lithotripsy. Ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy without preoperative correction of hemostatic parameters limits the risk of thromboembolic complications and costs associated with an extended hospital stay. Avoidance of the use of EHL is crucial in reducing bleeding complications in this cohort of patients.

  3. Experience with endoscopic holmium laser in the pediatric population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merguerian, Paul A.; Reddy, Pramod P.; Barrieras, Diego; Bagli, Darius J.; McLorie, Gordon A.; Khoury, Antoine E.

    1999-06-01

    Introduction: Due to the unavailability of suitable endoscopic instruments, pediatric patients have not benefited fully from the technological advances in the endoscopic management of the upper urinary tract. This limitation may be overcome with the Holmuim:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet(Ho:YAG) laser delivered via small instruments. To date, there is no published report on the use of this modality in children. Purpose: We evaluated the indications, efficacy, and complications of endourological Ho:YAG laser surgery in the treatment of pediatric urolithiasis, posterior urethral valves, ureterocele and ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Methods: The patient population included 10 children with renal, ureteral and bladder calculi, 2 children with posterior urethral valves, 2 children with obstructing ureteroceles, 2 children with ureteropelvic junction obstruction and 1 child with a urethral stricture. Access to the lesions was either antegrade via a percutaneous nephrostomy tract or retrograde via the urethra. A solid state Ho:YAG laser with maximum output of 30 watts (New Star lasers, Auburn, CA) was utilized as the energy source. Results: A total of 10 patients underwent laser lithotripsy. The means age of the patients was 9 yrs (5-13 yrs). The average surface area of the calculi as 425.2 mm2 (92-1645 mm2). 8 of the patients required one procedure to render them stone free, one patient had a staghorn calculus filling every calyx of a solitary kidney requiring multiple treatments and one other patient with a staghorn calculus required 2 treatments. There were no complications related to the laser lithotripsy. Two newborn underwent successful ablation of po sterious urethral valves. Two infants underwent incision of obstructing ureteroceles with decompression of the ureterocele on postoperative ultrasound. Two children underwent endypyelotomy for ureteropelvic junction obstruction. One was successful an done required an open procedure to correct the obstruction. One child

  4. Pulse-stretched Alexandrite laser for improved optical fiber reliability for laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, David; Koschmann, Eric C.

    1992-06-01

    Clinical data shows that short pulse duration lasers used in laser induced shock wave lithotripsy severely damage optical fibers on both the proximal and distal ends which is unsuitable for clinical use. An Alexandrite laser system has been developed that uses dynamic pulse stretching of the Q-switched laser pulse and improved optical fiber coupling to eliminate the fiber damage. The method of pulse stretching presented controls the laser output pulse energy from 50 to 150 millijoules and temporal shape from 0.5 to 1.5 microseconds. This yields effective fragmentation of calculi without damage to the optical fiber.

  5. Endoscopic laser therapy in gastroenterology.

    PubMed Central

    Pritikin, J; Weinman, D; Harmatz, A; Young, H

    1992-01-01

    Endoscopic laser therapy has become an important and widely used tool in gastroenterology. It has become important for outpatient palliative therapy for ablating obstructing gastrointestinal neoplasms. This method has often circumvented the need for major palliative surgical resections. Caution must be applied to laser therapy for potentially curable malignant neoplasms because, with vaporization of the target tissue, no tissue specimen is available to assure that local or invasive residual carcinoma is excluded. Therefore, in good surgical candidates, surgical resection of potentially curable cancers is always recommended. In the future, however, the combination of refined endoscopic ultrasonography and laser fluorescence techniques may lead to earlier detection, more precise localization, and even curative ablation of gastrointestinal malignancy. Images PMID:1413743

  6. Comparison of fluoride and sapphire optical fibers for Er: YAG laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel; Wang, Tianyi; Elmaanaoui, Badr; Gamez, David; Milner, Thomas E

    2010-06-01

    The long-pulse (200-350 micros) Holmium: YAG (Ho: YAG) laser (lambda = 2.12 microm) is used extensively in urology for laser lithotripsy. The long-pulse Erbium: YAG (Er: YAG) laser (lambda = 2.94 microm) fragments urinary calculi up to 5 times more efficiently than the Ho: YAG laser, however, no optical fibers are available to transmit efficiently 2.94 microm laser light for laser lithotripsy. We report results of a study evaluating a fluoride glass fiber to transmit Er: YAG laser light for laser lithotripsy and compare to a sapphire fiber that provides good transmission of Er: YAG light at low irradiance. The fluoride fiber provides superior light transmission efficiency over the sapphire fiber at an Er: YAG wavelength (2.94 microm). The sapphire fiber provides a more durable and robust delivery waveguide than the fluoride fiber when ablating urinary calculi in contact mode. Results of our study suggest that further development to improve performance of fluoride fibers for laser lithotripsy is warranted. PMID:20414904

  7. Treatment of ureteral calculus obstruction with laser lithotripsy in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Todd L; Sur, Roger L

    2012-03-01

    An adult female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) presented with acute anorexia secondary to progressive azotemia (blood urea nitrogen = 213 mg/dl, creatinine [Cr] = 9.5 mg/dl) and electrolyte abnormalities (K = 7.4 mEq/L). It was later diagnosed with postrenal obstruction secondary to bilaterally obstructing ureteral calculi seen on ultrasound. Treatment of the obstruction required two endoscopic procedures, cystoscopy for ureteral stent placement and ureteroscopy to perform intracorporeal lithotripsy on the obstructing calculi. Before the first procedure, the dolphin's azotemia was stabilized with aggressive fluid therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and treatment for acidosis. Diuresis subsequent to the fluid therapy enabled passage of the right obstructing urolith. For both endoscopic procedures, the dolphin was placed in left lateral recumbency due to the peritoneal dialysis catheter in the right retroperitoneal region. For the first procedure, a 12-French (Fr) flexible cystoscope was inserted retrograde into the bladder via the urethra, whereupon a calculus was seen obstructing the left ureteral orifice. A 4.8-Fr, 26-cm double-pigtail ureteral stent was placed up the left ureter to relieve the postrenal obstruction. Inadvertent proximal migration of the left ureteral stent occurred during the procedure. However, renal parameters (serum Cr = 5.8, K = 5.4) improved significantly by the next day. For the second procedure, 28 hr later, ureteroscopy was performed to treat the calculus and replace the existing stent with a longer stent. The left ureteral calculus was pulverized into tiny fragments by using a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser inserted through a 6.9-Fr semirigid ureteroscope. The migrated stent was visualized in the distal left ureter and replaced with a 90-cm single-pigtail ureteral stent that was sutured exterior to the urogenital slit and removed 3 days later. Renal function normalized over the next several days, and the dolphin recovered over

  8. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using small spherical distal fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    This study tests a 100-μm-core fiber with 300-μm-diameter ball tip during Thulium fiber laser (TFL) lithotripsy. The TFL was operated at 1908 nm wavelength with 35-mJ pulse energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and 300-Hz pulse rate. Calcium oxalate/phosphate stone samples were weighed, laser procedure times measured, and ablation rates calculated for ball tip fibers, with comparison to bare tip fibers. Photographs of ball tips were taken before and after each procedure to observe ball tip degradation and determine number of procedures completed before need to replace fiber. Saline irrigation rates and ureteroscope deflection were measured with and without TFL fiber present. There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) between stone ablation rates for single-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.4 mg/s) (n=10), multiple-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.5 mg/s) (n=44), and conventional single-use bare tip fibers (1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/s) (n=10). Ball tip durability varied widely, but fibers averaged > 4 stone procedures before decline in stone ablation rates due to mechanical damage at front surface of ball tip. The small fiber diameter did not impact ureteroscope deflection or saline flow rates. The miniature ball tip fiber may provide a cost-effective design for safe fiber insertion through the ureteroscope working channel and the ureter without risk of scope damage or tissue perforation, and without compromising stone ablation efficiency during TFL ablation of kidney stones.

  9. Differentiation of tissue and kidney stones for laser lithotripsy using different spectroscopic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Birgit; Cordes, Jens; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Holmium lasers are nowadays the gold standard for endoscopic laser lithotripsy. However, there is a risk of damaging or perforating the ureter or kidney tissue when the vision is poor. An automatic tissue/stone differentiation would improve the handling and safety of the procedure. To achieve this objective, an easy and robust real-time discrimination method has to be found which can be used to realize a feedback loop to control the laser system. Two possible approaches have been evaluated: White light reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy. In both cases, we use the treatment fiber for detection and evaluate the possibility to decide whether the fiber is placed in front of tissue or calculus by the signal that is delivered by the surface in front of it. White light reflectance spectroscopy uses the standard light source for endourologic surgeries: Radiation of a Xenon light source is coupled to the ureteroscope via a liquid light guide. The part of the white light that is reflected back into the fiber is spectroscopically analyzed. In a clinical proof of concept study reflection signals were measured in vivo in 8 patients. For differentiation of stone and tissue via autofluorescence, excitation as well as detection was done via the treatment fiber. A suitable excitation wavelength was chosen with in vitro measurements (UV / visible) on several human renal calculi and porcine tissues. For verification of the positive results with green excitation in a clinical proof of concept study, a measurement set-up was realized which allows the recording of fluorescence signals during an endourological intervention.

  10. EXTRACORPOREAL SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPSY AND ENDOSCOPIC URETERAL STENT PLACEMENT IN AN ASIAN SMALL-CLAWED OTTER (AONYX CINEREA) WITH NEPHROLITHIASIS.

    PubMed

    Wojick, Kimberlee B; Berent, Allyson C; Weisse, Chick W; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2015-06-01

    Urolithiasis is a significant disease concern in Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinerea), with over 60% of captive animals affected. Bilateral ureteral stent placement, using endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance, and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) were performed as salvage procedures in a 13-yr-old intact female Asian small-clawed otter following a 7-yr history of nephrolithiasis and progressive renal insufficiency. Following the procedure, radiographs revealed a slight shifting of urolith position, although a decrease in urolith mass was not observed. As a result of declining quality of life related to severe osteoarthritis, the otter was euthanized 5 wk after the procedure. While this treatment approach was unsuccessful in this case, the technique was clinically feasible, so ESWL and ureteral stent placement may remain a consideration for other individuals of this species presented earlier in the course of this disease. PMID:26056891

  11. Ureteropyeloscopy and homium: YAG laser lithotripsy for treatment of ureteral calculi (report of 356 cases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhong; Din, Qiang; Jiang, Hao-wen; Zen, Jing-cun; Yu, Jiang; Zhang, Yuanfang

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of holmium YAG laser lithotripsy for the treatment of ureteral calculi. Methods: A total of 356 patients underwent ureteropyeloscopic lithotripsy using holmium YAG laser with a semirigid uretesopyeloscope, 93 upper, 135 middle, and 128 lower ureteral stones were treated. Results: The overall successful fragmentation rate for all ureteral stones in a single session achieved 98% (349/356). The successful fragmentation rate stratified by stone location was 95% 88/93 in the upper ureter, 99% (134/135) in the mid ureter , and 99%(127/128) in the distal ureter. 12 cases with bilateral ureteral stones which caused acute renal failure and anuria were treated rapidly and effectively by the holmium YAG laser lithotripsy. No complications such as perforation and severe trauma were encountered during the operations. 2 weeks 17months (with an average of 6.8 month ) follow up postoperatively revealed that the overall stone-free rate was 98%(343/349) and no ureteral stenosis was found. Conclusions Holmium YAG laser lithotripsy is a highly effective, minimally invasive and safe therapy for ureteral calculi. It is indicated as a first choice of treatment for patients with ureteral calculi, especially for the ones with mid- lower levels of ureteral calculi.

  12. [Endoscopic management of biliary stones].

    PubMed

    Barinagarrementería, R

    1990-07-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy is one of the more effective therapeutic procedures for the management of some biliary tree abnormalities. In choledocolitiasis, a 90% succesfull rate has been obtained. Complications include bleeding, perforation, cholangitis, and pancreatitis. Mortality rates between 1.0 to 1.3% are informed. Contraindications are the same as for panendoscopy as well as the presence of stones greater than 2.5 cms. In giant stones, some other endoscopic approaches can be used, including mechanical lithotripsy, chemical treatment, electrohydraulic shockwaves, laser and biliary stent application. Endoscopic sphincterotomy is also indicated as an adjuvant therapy previous to extracorporeal lithotripsy. PMID:19256137

  13. Management of impacted proximal ureteral stone: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy versus ureteroscopy with holmium: YAG laser lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Prospective evaluation of the efficacy and safety of the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and ureteroscopy with Holmium: YAG laser lithotripsy (URSL) as a primary treatment for impacted stone in the proximal ureter. Patients and Methods: A total of 82 patients with a single impacted stone in the proximal ureter were included in the study. Patients were allocated into two groups according to patient preference for either procedure. The first group included 37 patients who were treated by SWL and the second group included 45 patients treated by URSL. The preoperative data and treatment outcomes of both procedures were compared and analyzed. Results: There was no difference as regards to patient and stone characters between the two groups. There was significantly higher mean session number and re-treatment rate in the SWL group in comparison to URSL group (1.5 ± 0.8 vs. 1.02 ± 0.15 session, and 43.2% vs. 2.2%, respectively). At one month, the stone-free rate of the URSL group was statistically significantly higher than that of the SWL group (80% vs. 67.6%, respectively). The stone-free rate at three months was still higher in the URSL group, but without statistically significant difference (80.2% vs. 78.4%, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications between the SWL and URSL (24.3% vs. 15.6%, respectively). Conclusion: Both procedures can be used effectively and safely as a primary treatment for impacted stone in the proximal ureter; however, the URSL has a significantly higher initial stone-free rate and lower re-treatment rate. PMID:23798864

  14. New tunable flashlamp-pumped solid state Ti:sapphire laser for laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi X.; Giannetas, V.; Charlton, Andrew; King, Terence A.

    1993-05-01

    Laser pulses from a flashlamp pumped, solid state Ti:sapphire laser (Vuman, free running untuned wavelength 792 nm, 2 microseconds pulse width and up to 240 mJ pulse energy) have been successfully and efficiently coupled into thin optical fibers. The coupling efficiency can be up to 67% for 300 micron and 43% for 200 micron core diameter optical fibers. With these two optical fibers in vitro laser lithotripsy has been performed successfully on various human calculi including gall bladder, kidney, ureter and salivary duct stones. The bright white flash of the induced plasma emission, strong shock waves, fiber recoil and stone propulsion and the splattering of the stone chips have been observed during the calculi fragmentation.

  15. Pulsed dye laser lithotripsy for treatment of urolithiasis in two geldings.

    PubMed

    Howard, R D; Pleasant, R S; May, K A

    1998-05-15

    Transendoscopic pulsed dye laser lithotripsy was effective in the treatment of calcium carbonate urothlithiasis in 2 adult geldings. Perineal urethrotomy provided convenient access for standing transendoscopic lithotripsy and evacuation of a large cystic calculus in one gelding. In the second horse, an obstructive urethral calculus was fragmented and removed by a transurethroscopic approach. Pulsed dye laser lithotriptor is effective in fragmentation of the most common form (calcium carbonate) of uroliths in horses and may be performed in standing horses with reduced surgical invasiveness and trauma to the urinary tract, compared with conventional approaches. The principle disadvantages include cost of the procedure, which is comparable to laparocystotomy, and the time delay required to make arrangements for use of the pulsed dye laser lithotriptor. PMID:9604033

  16. Effectiveness and Safety of Ureteroscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Upper Urinary Tract Calculi in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Takashi; Otsuki, Hideo; Uehara, Shinya; Shimizu, Toshihiro; Murao, Wataru; Fujio, Koji; Fujio, Kei; Wada, Koichiro; Araki, Motoo; Nasu, Yasutomo

    2016-06-01

    Upper urinary tract calculi are common; however, there is no recommended treatment selection for elderly patients. Ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy (URS lithotripsy) is minimally invasive, and it provides a high stone-free rate (SFR) treatment for upper urinary tract calculi. Here, we retrospectively evaluated the surgical outcomes of URS lithotripsy after dividing the 189 cases into 3 groups by patient age: the '<65 group' (<65 years old, n=108), the '65-74 group' (65-74 years old, n=42), and the ' 75 group' ( 75 years old, n=39). The patients' characteristics, stone status, and perioperative outcomes were assessed. The 65-74 group and the 75 group had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension compared to the<65 group. Compared to the<65 group, the 65-74 group had a significantly higher prevalence of hyperlipidemia, and the 75 group had significantly higher the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores. Despite these preoperative risk factors, SFR and postoperative pyelonephritis in the 65-74 group and the 75 group were similar to those of the<65 group. In conclusion, URS lithotripsy is the preferred treatment for upper urinary tract calculi, even for elderly patients who have multiple preoperative risk factors. PMID:27339204

  17. The pulsed dye laser versus the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Pensel, J; Engelhardt, R; Meyer, W; Hofstetter, A G

    1988-01-01

    To date, there are two fairly well-established alternatives for laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy in clinical practice. The Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is distinguished by the high-stone selectivity of its coupler systems. The necessity of a coupler system and its fairly small conversion rate of light energy into mechanical energy present serious drawbacks. Furthermore, the minimal outer diameter of the transmission system is 1.8 mm. The pulsed-dye laser can be used with a highly flexible and uncomplicated 200-micron fiber. However, the laser system itself is more complicated than the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and requires a great deal of maintenance. Biological evaluation of damage caused by direct irradiation shows that both laser systems produce minor damage of different degrees. YAG laser lithotripsy with the optomechanical coupler was assessed in 31 patients with ureteral calculi. The instability and limited effectiveness of the fiber application system necessitated auxiliary lithotripsy methods in 14 cases. Dye-laser lithotripsy is currently being tested in clinical application. Further development, such as systems for blind application or electronic feedback mechanisms to limit adverse tissue effects, have yet to be optimized. Nevertheless, laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy has the potential to become a standard procedure in the endourologic management of stone disease. PMID:2902500

  18. Retrograde flexible ureterorenoscopic holmium-YAG laser lithotripsy: the new gold standard.

    PubMed

    Gould, D L

    1998-03-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy of flexible retrograde ureterorenoscopic holmium-YAG intracorporeal laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal calculi, a total of 86 patients presenting to our hospital with renal calculi underwent flexible retrograde ureterorenoscopic holmium-YAG intracorporeal laser lithotripsy of their stones, and the data were collected prospectively. As extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is not available at our institution, all patients with renal calculi in this study were treated in a retrograde fashion using the Richard Wolf 6.0F semirigid ureteroscope, the 7.5F flexible ureterorenoscope, and the holmium-YAG laser by Coherent Inc. Except for inhospital consults or patients requiring admission secondary to infection, all cases were performed on an ambulatory basis. All renal calculi 3 cm or smaller were approached in a retrograde fashion. Where possible, the stones were initially debulked using the semirigid ureteroscope and the 550-microm fiber followed by the flexible ureterorenoscope in combination with the 360- or 200-microm laser fiber depending on stone position. Stones were fragmented until they were small enough to be removed by hydrocleansing. Using this technique, stone-free success rates for calculi 2.5 cm or smaller after a single treatment, regardless of stone composition or location, are superior to those of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. For calculi between 2.5 and 3 cm, the results also are noted to be superior. We conclude that for calculi larger than 3 cm or for partial staghorn calculi, the treatment of choice appears to be a percutaneous approach. PMID:9568772

  19. Laser-assisted percutaneous endoscopic neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Epstein, J M; Adler, R

    2000-01-01

    Endoscopic lysis of adhesive scar utilizing a steerable fiberoptic scope is currently being performed by a growing number of physicians. Various techniques and medications are presently being used to lyse epidural adhesions as a way of improving refractory lumbar radiculopathies. We present a case report discussing laser-assisted endoscopic lysis with radiographic images before and after laser-assisted neurolysis. We were able to demonstrate improvement in the filling of the nerve root with epidural contrast after the laser lysis of scar. This correlated with improvement in pain without neurologic deficit. The laser may represent a useful adjunct in the treatment of pain due to epidural fibrosis. PMID:16906206

  20. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber lasers for lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser is currently the most common laser lithotripter. However, recent experimental studies have demonstrated that the Thulium fiber laser is also capable of vaporizing urinary stones. The high-temperature water absorption coefficient for the Thulium wavelength (μa = 160 cm-1 at λ = 1908 nm) is significantly greater than for the Holmium wavelength (μa = 28 cm-1 at λ = 2120 nm). We hypothesize that this should translate into more efficient laser lithotripsy using the Thulium fiber laser. This study directly compares stone vaporization rates for Holmium and Thulium fiber lasers. Holmium laser radiation pulsed at 3 Hz with 70 mJ pulse energy and 220 μs pulse duration was delivered through a 100-μm-core silica fiber to human uric acid (UA) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones, ex vivo (n = 10 each). Thulium fiber laser radiation pulsed at 10 Hz with 70 mJ pulse energy and 1 ms pulse duration was also delivered through a 100-μm fiber for the same sets of 10 stones. For same number of pulses and total energy (126 J) delivered to each stone, mass loss averaged 2.4 +/- 0.6 mg (UA) and 0.7 +/- 0.2 mg (COM) for Holmium laser and 12.6 +/- 2.5 mg (UA) and 6.8 +/- 1.7 (COM) for Thulium fiber laser. UA and COM stone vaporization rates for Thulium fiber laser averaged 5-10 times higher than for Holmium laser at 70 mJ pulse energies. With further development, the Thulium fiber laser may represent an alternative to the conventional Holmium laser for more efficient laser lithotripsy.

  1. Laser scanning endoscope for diagnostic medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouimette, Donald R.; Nudelman, Sol; Spackman, Thomas; Zaccheo, Scott

    1990-07-01

    A new type of endoscope is being developed which utilizes an optical raster scanning system for imaging through an endoscope. The optical raster scanner utilizes a high speed, multifaceted, rotating polygon mirror system for horizontal deflection, and a slower speed galvanometer driven mirror as the vertical deflection system. When used in combination, the optical raster scanner traces out a raster similar to an electron beam raster used in television systems. This flying spot of light can then be detected by various types of photosensitive detectors to generate a video image of the surface or scene being illuminated by the scanning beam. The optical raster scanner has been coupled to an endoscope. The raster is projected down the endoscope, thereby illuminating the object to be imaged at the distal end of the endoscope. Elemental photodetectors are placed at the distal or proximal end of the endoscope to detect the reflected illumination from the flying spot of light. This time sequenced signal is captured by an image processor for display and processing. This technique offers the possibility for very small diameter endoscopes since illumination channel requirements are eliminated. Using various lasers, very specific spectral selectivity can be achieved to optimum contrast of specific lesions of interest. Using several laser lines, or a white light source, with detectors of specific spectral response, multiple spectrally selected images can be acquired simultaneously. The potential for co-linear therapy delivery while imaging is also possible.

  2. Evaluation of the shock-wave pattern for endoscopic electrohydraulic lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Engelmann, Y

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the electrical events and the resulting shock waves of the spark discharge for electrohydraulic lithotripsy at the tip of a 3.3F probe. Spark generation was achieved by variable combinations of voltage and capacity. The effective electrical output was determined by means of a high-voltage probe, a current coil, and a digital oscilloscope. Peak pressures, rise times, and pulse width of the pressure profiles were recorded using a polyvinylidene difluoride needle hydrophone in 0.9% NaCl solution at a distance of 10 mm. The peak pressure and the slope of the shock front depend solely on the voltage, while the pulse width was correlated with the capacity. Pulses of less than 1-microsecond duration can be obtained when low capacity is applied and the inductivity of the cables and plugs is kept at a low level. Using chalk as a stone model it was proven that short pulses of high peak pressure provided by a low capacity and a high voltage have a greater impact on fragmentation than the corresponding broader shock waves of lower peak pressure carrying the same energy. PMID:7725212

  3. Study of cavitation bubble dynamics during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high-speed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yu, Honggang; Devincentis, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    Although laser lithotripsy is now the preferred treatment option for urolithiasis, the mechanism of laser pulse induced calculus damage is still not fully understood. This is because the process of laser pulse induced calculus damage involves quite a few physical and chemical processes and their time-scales are very short (down to sub micro second level). For laser lithotripsy, the laser pulse induced impact by energy flow can be summarized as: Photon energy in the laser pulse --> photon absorption generated heat in the water liquid and vapor (super heat water or plasma effect) --> shock wave (Bow shock, acoustic wave) --> cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation, and center of bubble movement , super heat water at collapse, sonoluminscence) --> calculus damage and motion (calculus heat up, spallation/melt of stone, breaking of mechanical/chemical bond, debris ejection, and retropulsion of remaining calculus body). Cavitation bubble dynamics is the center piece of the physical processes that links the whole energy flow chain from laser pulse to calculus damage. In this study, cavitation bubble dynamics was investigated by a high-speed camera and a needle hydrophone. A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.1 mu;m, StoneLightTM 30, with pulse energy from 0.5J up to 3.0 J, and pulse width from 150 mu;s up to 800 μs, was used as laser pulse source. The fiber used in the investigation is SureFlexTM fiber, Model S-LLF365, a 365 um core diameter fiber. A high-speed camera with frame rate up to 1 million fps was used in this study. The results revealed the cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation and center of bubble movement) by laser pulse at different energy level and pulse width. More detailed investigation on bubble dynamics by different type of laser, the relationship between cavitation bubble dynamics and calculus damage (fragmentation/dusting) will be conducted as a future study.

  4. Treatment of Kidney Stone in a Kidney-Transplanted Patient with Mini-Percutaneous Laser Lithotripsy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Markić, Dean; Krpina, Kristian; Ahel, Juraj; Gršković, Antun; Španjol, Josip; Rubinić, Nino; Materljan, Mauro; Mikolašević, Ivana; Orlić, Lidija; Rački, Sanjin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a kidney-transplanted patient with urolithiasis treated with mini-percutaneous laser lithotripsy. The patient presented with renal dysfunction and graft hydronephrosis. Diagnostic procedures revealed ureterolithiasis as a cause of obstruction, and percutaneous nephrostomy was inserted as a temporary solution. Before surgery, the stone migrated to the renal pelvis. Mini-percutaneous laser lithotripsy was successfully performed, and during surgery, all stone fragments were removed. Six months after successful treatment, the patient has good functioning and stone-free graft. PMID:27066492

  5. Gallbladder stone inspection and identification for laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yacob; Kokaj, Jahja O.

    1999-03-01

    Using high speed imaging techniques, the gall bladder stone immersed in liquid is detected and identified. The detection of the shock waves induced by laser power is reached by using interferometry technique. Using gall bladder and tissue images obtained by ultra-fast photography and time resolved laser fluorescence the correlation of correlation is performed. The tissue image is used to perform the correlation filter. Hence lower correlation output is used for firing of the laser power.

  6. Endoscopic management of difficult common bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Trikudanathan, Guru; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy is widely accepted as the first treatment option in the management of bile duct stones. In this review we focus on the alternative endoscopic modalities for the management of difficult common bile duct stones. Most biliary stones can be removed with an extraction balloon, extraction basket or mechanical lithotripsy after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation with or without endoscopic sphincterotomy or mechanical lithotripsy has been shown to be effective for management of difficult to remove bile duct stones in selected patients. Ductal clearance can be safely achieved with peroral cholangioscopy guided laser or electrohydraulic lithotripsy in most cases where other endoscopic treatment modalities have failed. Biliary stenting may be an alternative treatment option for frail and elderly patients or those with serious co morbidities. PMID:23345939

  7. Microscopic analysis of laser-induced proximal fiber tip damage during holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-04-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to the standard holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. The TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium-doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller (e.g., 50- to 150-μm core) fibers than possible during holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether the more uniform TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared with the holmium laser multimodal beam. Light and confocal microscopy images were taken of the proximal surface of each fiber to inspect for possible laser-induced damage. A TFL beam at a wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, and 500-μs pulse duration, and 100,000 pulses were delivered at each pulse rate setting of 50, 100, 200, 300, and 400 Hz. For comparison, single use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical holmium laser lithotripsy procedures performed with standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output pulse energy and average power were stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed at settings up to 35 mJ, 400 Hz, and 14 W average power (n=5). In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation, indicated by small ablation craters on the scale of several micrometers in all fibers (n=20). In summary, the proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted up to 14 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially translate into lower costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  8. Ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy: an emerging definitive management strategy for symptomatic ureteral calculi in pregnancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Wollin, Timothy A.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: Symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy that does not respond to conservative measures has traditionally been managed with ureteral stent insertion or percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN). Holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser lithotripsy using state-of-the-art ureteroscopes represents an emerging strategy for definitive stone management in pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to review the results of holmium laser lithotripsy in a cohort of patients who presented with symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted at 2 tertiary stone centers from January 1996 to August 2001 to identify pregnant patients who were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for symptomatic urolithiasis or encrusted stents. Eight patients with a total of 10 symptomatic ureteral calculi and 2 encrusted ureteral stents were treated. Mean gestational age at presentation was 22 weeks. Mean stone size was 8.1 mm. Stones were located in the proximal ureter/ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) (3), mid ureter (1), and distal ureter (6). Results: Complete stone fragmentation and/or removal of encrusted ureteral stents were achieved in all patients using the holmium:YAG laser. The overall procedural success rate was 91%. The overall stone-free rate was 89%. No obstetrical or urological complications were encountered. Conclusions: Ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy can be performed safely in all stages of pregnancy providing definitive management of symptomatic ureteral calculi. The procedure can be done with minimal or no fluoroscopy and avoids the undesirable features of stents or nephrostomy tubes.

  9. Detachable fiber optic tips for use in thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchens, Thomas C.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-03-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) has recently been proposed as an alternative to the Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser for lithotripsy. The TFL's Gaussian spatial beam profile provides higher power transmission through smaller optical fibers with reduced proximal fiber tip damage, and improved saline irrigation and flexibility through the ureteroscope. However, distal fiber tip damage may still occur during stone fragmentation, resulting in disposal of the entire fiber after the procedure. A novel design for a short, detachable, distal fiber tip that can fit into an ureteroscope's working channel is proposed. A prototype, twist-lock, spring-loaded mechanism was constructed using micromachining methods, mating a 150-μm-core trunk fiber to 300-μm-core fiber tip. Optical transmission measuring 80% was observed using a 30-mJ pulse energy and 500-μs pulse duration. Ex vivo human calcium oxalate monohydrate urinary stones were vaporized at an average rate of 187 μg/s using 20-Hz modulated, 50% duty cycle 5 pulse packets. The highest stone ablation rates corresponded to the highest fiber tip degradation, thus providing motivation for use of detachable and disposable distal fiber tips during lithotripsy. The 1-mm outer-diameter prototype also functioned comparable to previously tested tapered fiber tips.

  10. Percutaneous yttrium aluminum garnet-laser lithotripsy of intrahepatic stones and casts after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Nis Hallundbaek; Svenningsen, Peter; Frevert, Susanne; Wettergren, André; Hillingsø, Jens

    2015-06-01

    Bile duct stones and casts (BDSs) contribute importantly to morbidity after liver transplantation (LT). The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical efficacy, safety, and long-term results of percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopic lithotripsy (PTCSL) in transplant recipients and to discuss underlying factors affecting the outcome. A retrospective chart review revealed 18 recipients with BDSs treated by PTCSL laser lithotripsy with a holmium-yttrium aluminum garnet laser probe at 365 to 550 µm. They were analyzed in a median follow-up time of 55 months. In all but 1 patient (17/18 or 94%), it was technically feasible to clear all BDSs with a mean of 1.3 sessions. PTCSL was unsuccessful in 1 patient because of multiple stones impacting the bile ducts bilaterally; 17% had early complications (Clavien II). All biliary casts were successfully cleared; 39% had total remission; 61% needed additional interventions in the form of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and dilation (17%), re-PTCSL (11%), self-expandable metallic stents (22%), or hepaticojejunostomy (6%); and 22% eventually underwent retransplantation. The overall liver graft survival rate was 78%. Two patients died during follow-up for reasons not related to their BDS. Nonanastomotic strictures (NASs) were significantly associated with treatment failure. We conclude that PTCSL in LT patients is safe and feasible. NASs significantly increased the risk of relapse. Repeated minimally invasive treatments, however, prevented graft failure in 78% of the cases. PMID:25821134

  11. Application systems for the intracorporal laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy using the Nd:YAG Q-switched laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Klaus H.; Eichenlaub, M.; Hessel, Stefan F. F.; Wondrazek, Fritz

    1990-06-01

    For the laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy the electromagnetic energy of a laser light pulse is converted intracorporally into the acoustic energy of a shock wave. The lithotriptor is based on a specially developed, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser whose high power light pulses (70 mJ, 25 ns) are coupled into a flexible quartz fiber of 600 pim core diameter. Using focussing elements energy densities higher than 6 1O J m2 can be achieved resulting in an optical breakdown in water followed by a shock wave. As a result of different absorption mechanisms the breakdown threshold can be decreased by placing a metallic target into the laser beam. The different shockwave formations of such optomechanical transducers have been measured. First clinical applications have been performed.

  12. Characterization of a 50-μm-core optical fiber for potential use in Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-03-01

    Our laboratory is currently studying the Thulium fiber laser (TFL) as a potential alternative laser lithotripter to the standard clinical Holmium:YAG laser. We have previously demonstrated efficient coupling of TFL energy into fibers as small as 100-μm-core-diameter without damage to the proximal end. Although smaller fibers have greater tendency to degrade at the distal tip during lithotripsy, fiber diameters (<= 200 μm) have been shown to increase saline irrigation rates through the working channel of a flexible ureteroscope, maximize ureteroscope deflection, and reduce stone retropulsion during laser lithotripsy. In this study, a 50-μm-core-diameter, 85-μm-outer-diameter fiber is characterized for TFL ablation of human calcium oxalate monohydrate urinary stones, ex vivo. The stone ablation rate was measured to be 70 +/- 22 μg/s for 35-mJ-pulse-energy, 500-μs-pulse-duration, and 50-Hz-pulse-rate. The ureteroscope working channel flow rate including the 50-μm fiber decreased by only 10% with no impairment of ureteroscope deflection. The fiber delivered up to 15.4 +/- 5.9 W under extreme bending (5-mm-radius) conditions. Stone retropulsion and fiber burn-back averaged 201 +/- 336 and 3000 +/- 2600 μm, respectively, after 2 minutes. With further development, Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using ultra-small, 50-μm-core fibers may introduce new integration and miniaturization possibilities and potentially provide an alternatiμe to conventional Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy using larger fibers.

  13. In vitro investigations of repulsion during laser lithotripsy using a pendulum set-up.

    PubMed

    Sroka, Ronald; Haseke, Nicolas; Pongratz, Thomas; Hecht, Volkmar; Tilki, Derya; Stief, Christian G; Bader, Markus Jürgen

    2012-05-01

    Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy is a commonly used technique to treat ureteral calculi.The type of energy source used is one of the main influences of retrograd calculi propulsion. Using a momentum pendulum under-water set-up the induced momentum and the initial velocity were investigated. Pulsed laser light from three different clinically available laser systems, including a Ho:YAG laser, a frequency-doubled double-pulse (second harmonic generation, SHG) Nd:YAG laser and a flash-lamp pumped dye (FLPD) laser, were transmitted via flexible fibres of different core diameter to the front of the pendulum sinker. Single pulses at variable pulse energy, according to the clinical laser parameter settings, were applied to the target sinker, thus causing a repulsion-induced deflection which was documented by video recording. The maximum deflection was determined. Solving the differential equation of a pendulum gives the initial velocity, the laser-induced momentum and the efficiency of momentum transfer. The induced deflection as well as the starting velocity of the two short-duration pulsed laser systems (SHG Nd:YAG, FLPD) were similar (s (max) = 2-3.6 cm and v (0) = 150-200 mm/s, respectively), whereas both values were lower using the Ho:YAG laser with a long pulse duration (s (max) = 0.9--1.6 cm and v (0) = 60-105 mm/s, respectively). The momentum I induced by the Ho:YAG laser was only 50% and its transfer efficacy η (Repuls) was reduced to less than 5% of the values of the two short-pulsed laser systems. This investigation clearly showed the variable parts and amounts of repulsion using different pulsed lasers in an objective and reproducible manner. The momentum transfer efficiency could be determined without any physical friction problems. Further investigations are needed to compare stone fragmentation techniques with respect to laser repulsion and its clinical impact. PMID:22011742

  14. Integrated Multipoint-Laser Endoscopic Airway Measurements by Transoral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Neitsch, Marie; Horn, Iris-Susanne; Hofer, Mathias; Dietz, Andreas; Fischer, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Optical and technical characteristics usually do not allow objective endoscopic distance measurements. So far no standardized method for endoscopic distance measurement is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of transoral airway measurements with a multipoint-laser endoscope. Methods. The semirigid endoscope includes a multipoint laser measurement system that projects 49 laser points (wavelength 639 nm, power < 5 mW) into the optical axis of the endoscopic view. Distances, areas, and depths can be measured in real-time. Transoral endoscopic airway measurements were performed on nine human cadavers, which were correlated with CT measurements. Results. The preliminary experiment showed an optimum distance between the endoscope tip and the object of 5 to 6 cm. There was a mean measurement error of 3.26% ± 2.53%. A Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.95 (p = 0.01) was calculated for the laryngeal measurements and of 0.93 (p < 0.01) for the tracheal measurements compared to the CT. Using the Bland-Altman-Plot, the 95% limits of agreement for the laryngeal measurements were satisfactory: −0.76 and 0.93. Conclusions. Integrated multipoint-laser endoscopic measurement is a promising technical supplement, with potential use in diagnostic endoscopy and transoral endoscopic surgery in daily practice. PMID:27022612

  15. Efficacy and safety of Ho:YAG Laser Lithotripsy for ureteroscopic removal of proximal and distal ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laser lithotripsy is an established endourological modality. Ho:YAG laser have broadened the indications for ureteroscopic stone managements to include larger stone sizes throughout the whole upper urinary tract. Aim of current work is to assess efficacy and safety of Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy during retrograde ureteroscopic management of ureteral calculi in different locations. Methods 88 patients were treated with ureteroscopic Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy in our institute. Study endpoint was the number of treatments until the patient was stone-free. Patients were classified according to the location of their stones as Group I (distal ureteric stones, 51 patients) and group II (proximal ureteral stones, 37). Group I patients have larger stones as Group II (10.70 mm vs. 8.24 mm, respectively, P = 0.020). Results Overall stone free rate for both groups was 95.8%. The mean number of procedures for proximal calculi was 1.1 ± 0.1 (1–3) and for distal calculi was 1.0 ± 0.0. The initial treatment was more successful in patients with distal ureteral calculi (100% vs. 82.40%, respectively, P = 0.008). No significant difference in the stone free rate was noticed after the second laser procedure for stones smaller versus larger than 10 mm (100% versus 94.1%, P = 0.13). Overall complication rate was 7.9% (Clavien II und IIIb). Overall and grade-adjusted complication rates were not dependant on the stone location. No laser induced complications were noticed. Conclusions The use of the Ho:YAG laser appears to be an adequate tool to disintegrate ureteral calculi independent of primary location. Combination of the semirigid and flexible ureteroscopes as well as the appropriate endourologic tools could likely improve the stone clearance rates for proximal calculi regardless of stone-size. PMID:25107528

  16. Large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy of renal calculi in a spina bifida patient: lessons we learn

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Samsudin, Azi; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter L; Soni, Bakul M; Selmi, Fahed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paraplegic patients are at greater risk of developing complications following ureteroscopic lithotripsy because of urine infection associated with neuropathic bladder, difficulties in access due to altered anatomy of urinary bladder and urethra, spinal curvature, spasticity, and contractures. We report the occurrence of large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopy and discuss lessons we learn from this case. Case report A 48-year-old male patient with spina bifida underwent ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy and ureteric stenting for left ureteric stone and staghorn calculus with hydronephrosis; laser lithotripsy was repeated after 3 months; both procedures were performed by a senior urologist and did not result in any complications. Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy was performed 5 months later by a urological trainee; it was difficult to negotiate the scope as vision became poor because of bleeding (as a result of the procedure). Postoperatively, hematuria persisted; temperature was 39°C. Cefuroxime was given intravenously followed by gentamicin for 5 days; hematuria subsided gradually; he was discharged home. Ten days later, this patient developed temperature, the urine culture grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ciprofloxacin was given orally. Computed tomography (CT) of the urinary tract, performed 4 weeks after ureteroscopy, revealed a 9×7 cm subcapsular collection on the left kidney compressing underlying parenchyma. Percutaneous drainage was not feasible because of severe curvature of spine. Isotope renogram revealed deterioration in left renal function from 30% to 17%. Follow-up CT revealed reduction in the size of subcapsular hematoma, no hydronephrosis, and several residual calculi. Conclusion Risk of subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic lithotripsy can be reduced by avoiding prolonged endoscopy and performing ureteroscopy under low pressure. When a paraplegic patient develops features of infection after ureteroscopy, renal

  17. An integrated fiber and stone basket device for use in Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-03-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative laser lithotripter to the Holmium:YAG laser. The TFL's superior near-single mode beam profile enables higher power transmission through smaller fibers with reduced proximal fiber tip damage. Recent studies have also reported that attaching hollow steel tubing to the distal fiber tip decreases fiber degradation and burn-back without compromising stone ablation rates. However, significant stone retropulsion was observed, which increased with pulse rate. In this study, the hollow steel tip fiber design was integrated with a stone basket to minimize stone retropulsion during ablation. A device was constructed consisting of a 100-μm-core, 140-μm-OD silica fiber outfitted with 5-mm-long stainless steel tubing at the distal tip, and integrated with a 1.3-Fr (0.433-mm-OD) disposable nitinol wire basket, to form an overall 1.9-Fr (0.633-mm- OD) integrated device. This compact design may provide several potential advantages including increased flexibility, higher saline irrigation rates through the ureteroscope working channel, and reduced fiber tip degradation compared to separate fiber and stone basket manipulation. TFL pulse energy of 31.5 mJ with 500 μs pulse duration and pulse rate of 500 Hz was delivered through the integrated fiber/basket device in contact with human uric acid stones, ex vivo. TFL stone ablation rates measured 1.5 +/- 0.2 mg/s, comparable to 1.7 +/- 0.3 mg/s (P > 0.05) using standard bare fiber tips separately with a stone basket. With further development, this device may be useful for minimizing stone retropulsion, thus enabling more efficient TFL lithotripsy at higher pulse rates.

  18. Endoscopic laser palliation for advanced malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Hawes, R; Matthewson, K; Swain, C P; Barr, H; Boulos, P B; Clark, C G

    1987-01-01

    Palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia aims to optimise swallowing for the maximum time possible with the minimum of general distress to these seriously ill patients. Thirty four patients considered unsuitable for surgery because of advanced malignancy, other major pathology or in whom previous surgery had been unsuccessful were treated endoscopically with the Nd YAG laser. Significant improvement was achieved in 29 (85%). On a scale of 0-4 (0 = normal swallowing; 4 = dysphagia for all fluids), mean improvement was 1.7, with 25 patients (74%) able to swallow most, or all solids after treatment. With increasing experience, the average number of treatment sessions required for each patient became less; initial time in hospital became comparable to that needed for intubation. Failures were caused by inappropriate patient selection (3), or laser related perforation (2). The mean survival in the whole group was 19 weeks (range 2-44). Eighteen patients needed further treatment for recurrent dysphagia, a mean of six weeks (range 2-15) after initial therapy. Ten of these responded, but eight eventually required insertion of a prosthetic tube. The duration of good palliation was very variable after initial laser therapy. Images Fig. 3 PMID:2443431

  19. The use of laser lithotripsy status post cholecystostomy tube placement without interval cholecystectomy for calculous cholecystitis in a patient unfit for general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Polite, Nathan M; Brown, Roy; Braveman, Joshua

    2013-12-01

    Acute cholecystitis in patients unfit for general anesthesia often initially requires cholecystectomy tube placement without cholecystectomy. The best way to definitively manage those patients with irreversible medical conditions, leaving them unable to undergo cholecystectomy, has yet to be defined. Laser lithotripsy is currently used in the management of stones of the genitourinary system. Extracorporeal shock wave cholelithotripsy has been extensively evaluated in Munich, Germany and since then, has been abandoned as an alternative treatment of cholelithiasis. This report discusses a novel approach using established cholecystocutaneous fistula tracts and laser lithotripsy to definitively treat this group of patients. PMID:24300938

  20. Flexible endoscope deflectability: changes using a variety of working instruments and laser fibers.

    PubMed

    Poon, M; Beaghler, M; Baldwin, D

    1997-08-01

    To measure the effects of different working instruments and holmium laser fibers on the deflectability in a variety of actively deflectable flexible endoscopes, a benchtop study was performed. The endoscopes studied were the Storz 7.5 flexible ureteroscope, the AUR-7 and AUR-9 flexible ureteroscopes (Circon-ACMI), a prototype Mitsubishi flexible ureteroscope (Mitsubishi Optics, Inc.), the ACN flexible cystoscope (Circon-ACMI), and the Storz flexible cystoscope. Working instruments included 1.6F (Wolf) and 1.9F (Microvasive) electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) probes, 1.9F two-prong graspers and Bagley baskets, 2.4F Segura and helical baskets (Microvasive), 3.0F Segura basket, and 200- and 365-micron holmium laser fibers (Xintec). In ureteroscopes, the effect of 1.6F and 1.9F EHL probes ranged from having no effect in the Xintec 6,000, to decreasing deflection by 30 degrees in the AUR-7. Working instruments that were 2.4F or greater reduced deflection from 33 degrees to 93 degrees. Better deflectability was noted with the 200-micron holmium laser fiber than with the 365-micron fiber. The diameter of the working instrument did not affect deflectability as severely in cystoscopes. No significant differences in deflection existed between the 365-micron and 200-micron fibers in the flexible nephroscopes tested. In general, working instruments less than 2.4F and the 200-micron laser fiber have little effect on deflectability compared with working instruments 2.4F or larger and the 365-micron fiber. Flexible cystoscopes, with their larger working channels and stronger deflection cables, are affected less by working instrument diameter than are flexible ureteroscopes. PMID:9376842

  1. Characterization of calculus migration during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high speed camera using suspended pendulum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian James; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Chia, Ray W. J.; Hasenberg, Tom

    2014-03-01

    Calculus migration is a common problem during ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy procedure to treat urolithiasis. A conventional experimental method to characterize calculus migration utilized a hosting container (e.g. a "V" grove or a test tube). These methods, however, demonstrated large variation and poor detectability, possibly attributing to friction between the calculus and the container on which the calculus was situated. In this study, calculus migration was investigated using a pendulum model suspended under water to eliminate the aforementioned friction. A high speed camera was used to study the movement of the calculus which covered zero order (displacement), 1st order (speed) and 2nd order (acceleration). A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.1 um, 365-um core fiber, and calculus phantom (Plaster of Paris, 10×10×10mm cube) were utilized to mimic laser lithotripsy procedure. The phantom was hung on a stainless steel bar and irradiated by the laser at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5J energy per pulse at 10Hz for 1 second (i.e., 5, 10, and 15W). Movement of the phantom was recorded by a high-speed camera with a frame rate of 10,000 FPS. Maximum displacement was 1.25+/-0.10, 3.01+/-0.52, and 4.37+/-0.58 mm for 0.5, 1, and 1.5J energy per pulse, respectively. Using the same laser power, the conventional method showed <0.5 mm total displacement. When reducing the phantom size to 5×5×5mm (1/8 in volume), the displacement was very inconsistent. The results suggested that using the pendulum model to eliminate the friction improved sensitivity and repeatability of the experiment. Detailed investigation on calculus movement and other causes of experimental variation will be conducted as a future study.

  2. Endoscopic Nd-YAG Laser Therapy for Gastric Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Sun Moon; Sun, Duk Jhae; Rim, Kyu Sung

    1986-01-01

    With the development of a special quartz fiberoptic transmission system, the application of laser energy through an endoscope became possible. Now, endoscopic laser therapy is widely used for gastrointestinal bleeding, and gastrointestinal neoplasm, and we have removed broad-based gastric polyps using an endoscopic Nd:YAG laser in 12 patients between January and December 1985. The size of the polyps ranged from 0.2 cm to 1.0 cm in diameter. The most frequent location for the polyp was in the antrum (7 cases) and followed by the fundus (5 cases). The application number of laser energy was from 6 to 58 and the small lesions of the 10 patients were completely ablated by the first endoscopic laser therapy. Follow-up endoscopy in all patients revealed no new polyp formation, but all patients had a residual ulcer at the end of the first week post polypectomy, and ulcers were healed by the fifth week of follow up. PMID:3154618

  3. Endoscopic laser scalpel for head and neck cancer surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Snehal; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Kirov, Stefan; Li, Yongbiao; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques, such as laparoscopic surgery and endoscopy, provide reliable disease control with reduced impact on the function of the diseased organ. Surgical lasers can ablate, cut and excise tissue while sealing small blood vessels minimizing bleeding and risk of lymphatic metastases from tumors. Lasers with wavelengths in the IR are readily absorbed by water causing minimal thermal damage to adjacent tissue, ideal for surgery near critical anatomical structures. MIS techniques have largely been unable to adopt the use of lasers partly due to the difficulty in bringing the laser into the endoscopic cavity. Hollow waveguide fibers have been adapted to bring surgical lasers to endoscopy. However, they deliver a beam that diverges rapidly and requires careful manipulation of the fiber tip relative to the target. Thus, the principal obstacle for surgical lasers in MIS procedures has been a lack of effective control instruments to manipulate the laser in the body cavity and accurately deliver it to the targeted tissue. To overcome this limitation, we have designed and built an endoscopic laser system that incorporates a miniature dual wedge beam steering device, a video camera, and the control system for remote and /or robotic operation. The dual wedge Risley device offers the smallest profile possible for endoscopic use. Clinical specifications and design considerations will be presented together with descriptions of the device and the development of its control system.

  4. Endoscopic laser treatment of subglottic and tracheal stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Alex J.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Reinisch, Lou

    1999-06-01

    The ideal laser produces discrete wounds in a reproducible manner. The CO2 laser with its 10.6 micron wavelength is highly absorbed by water, its energy concentrated at the point of impact and the longer wavelength creates less scatter in tissue. The development of binocular endoscopic delivery system for use with binocular microlaryngoscopes have aided in using CO2 laser to treat patients with subglottic and tracheal stenosis. Often, patients with these disease processes require multiple endoscopic or open reconstructive procedures and my ultimately become tracheotomy dependent. The canine model of subglottic stenosis that has been develop allows testing of new agents as adjuncts to laser treatment. Mitomycin-C is an antibiotic with antitumor activity used in chemotherapy and also in ophthalmologic surgery due to its known inhibition of fibroblast proliferation. Current studies indicate this drug to have significant potential for improving our current management of this disease process.

  5. A Miniaturized, 1.9F Integrated Optical Fiber and Stone Basket for Use in Thulium Fiber Laser Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher R; Hutchens, Thomas C; Hardy, Luke A; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2015-10-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative laser lithotripter to the standard holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The more uniform beam profile of the TFL enables higher power transmission through smaller fibers. In this study, a 100-μm core, 140-μm outer-diameter (OD) silica fiber with 5-mm length hollow steel tip was integrated with 1.3F (0.433-mm OD) nitinol wire basket to form a 1.9F (0.633-mm OD) device. TFL energy of 30 mJ, 500 μs pulse duration, and 500 Hz pulse rate was delivered to human uric acid stones, ex vivo. Stone ablation rates measured 1.5 ± 0.2 mg/s, comparable to 1.7 ± 0.3 mg/s using bare fiber tips separately with stone basket. With further development, this device may minimize stone retropulsion, allowing more efficient TFL lithotripsy at higher pulse rates. It may also provide increased flexibility, higher saline irrigation rates through the ureteroscope working channel, reduce fiber degradation compared with separate fiber and basket manipulation, and reduce laser-induced nitinol wire damage. PMID:26167738

  6. Endoscopic laser reshaping of rabbit tracheal cartilage: preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Walter; Lam, Anthony; Protsenko, Dmitry; Wong, Brian J.

    2005-04-01

    Background: Tracheal cartilage deformities due to trauma, prolonged endotracheal intubation or infection are difficult to correct. Current treatment options such as dilation, laser ablation, stent placement, and segmental resection are only temporary or carry significant risks. The objectives of this project were to design and test a laser activated endotracheal stent system that can actively modify the geometry of tracheal cartilage, leading to permanent retention of a new and desirable tracheal geometry. Methods: Ex vivo rabbit tracheal cartilage (simulating human neonate trachea) were irradiated with an Er: Glass laser, (λ= 1.54um, 0.5W-2.5W, 1 sec to 5 sec). Shape change and gross thermal injury were assessed visually to determine the best laser power parameters for reshaping. A rigid endoscopic telescope and hollow bronchoscope were used to record endoscopic images. The stent was constructed from nitinol wire, shaped into a zigzag configuration. An ex vivo testing apparatus was also constructed. Results: The best laser power parameter to produce shape change was 1 W for 6-7 seconds. At this setting, there was significant shape change with only minimal thermal injury to the tracheal mucosa, as assessed by visual inspection. The bronchoscopy system functioned adequately during testing in the ex vivo testing apparatus. Conclusion: We have successfully designed instrumentation and created the capability to endoscopically reshape tracheal cartilage in an ex vivo rabbit model. The results obtained in ex vivo tracheal cartilage indicated that reshaping using Er: Glass laser can be accomplished.

  7. Endoscopic CO(2) Laser Horizontal Partial Laryngectomy in Larynx Carcinosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Bianchini, Chiara; Iannini, Valeria; Faita, Antonio; Bianchini, Enzo; Stomeo, Francesco; Pelucchi, Stefano; Pastore, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background. Carcinosarcoma is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm, with both a malignant epithelial and mesenchymal component, that rarely affects the larynx. Aim. Aim of this paper is to describe the case of a patient affected by a larynx carcinosarcoma treated by endoscopic horizontal partial laryngectomy with CO(2) laser and particularly discuss the histogenetic hypothesis as well as the possible treatment modalities of this rare lesion. Methods. Case report and literature review. Discussion and Conclusion. Still little is known about the biology of carcinosarcoma and there is still no consensus in the literature on the treatment of these tumors. Endoscopic horizontal partial laryngectomy could represent another treatment option in selected cases. PMID:25126435

  8. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (~10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-μm-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J/cm2, respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern.

  9. Comparison of holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser lithotripsy: ablation thresholds, ablation rates, and retropulsion effects.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Richard L; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2011-07-01

    The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates (∼10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the thulium fiber laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate efficiently at high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion for the two different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5 to 35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10 to 400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30 to 550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and a pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through 200- and 270-μm-core optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 and 20.8 J∕cm(2), respectively. Stone retropulsion with the Ho:YAG laser linearly increased with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates less than 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies less than 175 mJ at 10 Hz and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies of 100 to 200 mJ and high pulse rates of 100 to 150 Hz may also provide an alternative to the Ho:YAG laser for higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not a primary concern. PMID:21806249

  10. Endoscopic goniotomy probe for holmium:YAG laser delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Ren, Qiushi

    1994-06-01

    Goniotomy is an effective treatment for primary infantile glaucoma. Because a cloudy cornea may prevent a clear view of the anterior chamber angle through the operating microscope, we investigated whether an endoscope can be combined with a cutting laser to perform laser goniotomy in a surgical model of primary infantile glaucoma. The anterior chambers of cadaver procine eyes were deepened with a viscoelastic material. A 300-micron-diameter silica fiber coupled to an Olympus 0.8-mm-diameter flexible fiber optic endoscope entered the anterior chambers through 4-mm corneal incisions. The anterior chamber angles were clearly observed on a videoscreen as the endoscopic fiber optic laser scalpel approached the pectinate ligaments. With the guidance of a He-Ne aiming beam, the anterior chamber angle pectinate ligaments were cut over a 160 degree arc with a pulsed Ho:YAG laser (2.1 micrometers wavelength, 50 mJ, 5 Hz repetition). The specimens were fixed in glutaraldehyde and processed for scanning electron microscopy, or fixed in formalin and processed for light microscopy. The treated area demonstrated incision of the pectinate ligaments with opening of the underlying trabecular meshwork. The edoscopic fiber optic laser scalpel is capable of cutting the pectinate ligaments in a surgical model of primary infantile glaucoma. Therefore, it may be a useful instrument for performing goniotomy when a cloudy cornea in primary infantile glaucoma prevents visualization of the anterior chamber angle with a goniotomy lens.

  11. Kidney stone ablation times and peak saline temperatures during Holmium:YAG and Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy, in vitro, in a ureteral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental Thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. The Holmium laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150-500 Hz, and 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate / 40% calcium phosphate), of uniform mass and diameter (4-5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 ml/min and 13.7 ml/min for the TFL and Holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from tube's center and 1 mm above mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded during experiments. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. Holmium laser time measured 167 +/- 41 s (n = 12). TFL times measured 111 +/- 49 s, 39 +/- 11 s, and 23 +/- 4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz (n = 12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24 +/- 1 °C for Holmium, and 33 +/- 3 °C, 33 +/- 7 °C, and 39 +/- 6 °C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and reduced stone retropulsion, and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional Holmium laser for lithotripsy.

  12. Endoscopic photodynamic therapy of tumors using gold vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Mironov, Andrei F.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Shental, V. V.; Vaganov, Yu. E.; Kondratjeva, T. T.; Trofimova, E. V.

    1996-01-01

    Compact sealed-off gold vapor laser (GVL) with 2 W average power and 628 nm wavelength was used for endoscopic photodynamic therapy in 20 patients with different tumors in respiratory system and upper gastrointestinal tract. Russian-made hematoporphyrin derivative (Hpd) `Photohem' was used as a photosensitizer. It was given intravenously at a dose of 2 - 2.5 mg/kg body weight 48 hours prior to tumor illumination with 628 nm light from GVL. Intermittent irradiation with GVL was done through flexible endoscope always under local anaesthesia at a power of 200 - 400 mW/sm2 and a dose of 150 - 400 J/sm2. 80% patients showed complete or partial response depending on stage of tumor. In cases of early gastric cancer all patients had complete remission with repeated negative biopsies. No major complication occurred.

  13. Flexible hollow polycarbonate fiber for endoscopic infrared laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Masayuki; Shi, Yi-Wei; Iwai, Katsumasa; Matsuura, Yuji; Zhu, Xiao-Song; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2007-07-01

    For endoscopic application, inexpensive, safe, and extremely flexible hollow infrared optical fibers have been fabricated based on the polycarbonate (PC) capillary with silver and cyclic olefin polymer (COP) as inner coatings. By optimizing the drawing condition of PC capillary from a commercially available polycarbonate tube and inner-coating process, transmission efficiency of hollow PC fibers is shown to be equal to those of glass capillary based ones. Both Er:YAG laser light and green pilot beam were delivered through the endoscope with low losses even when it was sharply bent with a bending radius as small as 1 centimeter. Preliminary experiments were also conducted on possibility of transmitting infrared thermal image by using bundled silver-coated PC hollow fibers.

  14. Moderate high power 1 to 20μs and kHz Ho:YAG thin disk laser pulses for laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, Günther

    2015-02-01

    An acousto-optically or self-oscillation pulsed thin disk Ho:YAG laser system at 2.1 μm with an average power in the 10 W range will be presented for laser lithotripsy. In the case of cw operation the thin disk Ho:YAG is either pumped with InP diode stacks or with a thulium fiber laser which leads to a laser output power of 20 W at an optical-to-optical efficiency of 30%. For the gain switched mode of operation a modulated Tm-fiber laser is used to produce self-oscillation pulses. A favored pulse lengths for uric acid stone ablation is known to be at a few μs pulse duration which can be delivered by the thin disk laser technology. In the state of the art laser lithotripter, stone material is typically ablated with 250 to 750 μs pulses at 5 to 10 Hz and with pulse energies up to a few Joule. The ablation mechanism is performed in this case by vaporization into stone dust and fragmentation. With the thin disk laser technology, 1 to 20 μs-laser pulses with a repetition rate of a few kHz and with pulse energies in the mJ-range are available. The ablation mechanism is in this case due to a local heating of the stone material with a decomposition of the crystalline structure into calcium carbonate powder which can be handled by the human body. As a joint process to this thermal effect, imploding water vapor bubbles between the fiber end and the stone material produce sporadic shock waves which help clear out the stone dust and biological material.

  15. Ureteroscopic Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Demetrius H.

    1997-01-01

    There is a wide array of endoscopic lithotriptors presently available. Each of these has its own advantages and disadvantages. No single lithotriptor is suitable for all applications and none can meet the goal of fragmenting all calculi while remaining harmless to tissue. PMID:18493444

  16. Endoscopic and interstitial Nd:YAG laser therapy to control duodenal and periampullary carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Hugh; Fowler, Aiden L.

    1996-12-01

    Duodenal and periampullary cancer present with jaundice, bleeding and obstruction. Many patients are unsuitable for radical surgery. Endoscopic palliation of jaundice can be achieved using endoscopic sphincterotomy or stent insertion. However, the problems of bleeding and obstruction can be difficult to manage. Ten patients were treated using superficial Nd:YAG laser ablation and lower power interstitial laser therapy. After initial outpatient endoscopic therapy, treatment was repeated at 4 monthly intervals to prevent recurrent symptoms. Bleeding was controlled in all patients and only one patient developed obstructive symptoms between treatment sessions. This responded to further endoscopic laser therapy. The median survival was 21 months. Laser treated patients were compared with a historical series of 22 patients treated with endoscopic sphincterotomy or stent insertion. The complication rate was less in patients treated with the laser.

  17. [Technological characteristics of endoscopic high frequency current and laser interventions].

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1993-01-01

    High frequency current and laser radiation perform two possibilities to generate therapeutic and surgical heat. The integration of these two technologies into endoscopy resulted in important ancillary techniques in the hands of a surgeon. Starting from the principal methods for coagulation and dissection of tissue the respective technological aspects at the interaction of high frequency currents and intensive laser radiation with different wavelengths on biological tissue are illustrated. Mono- and bipolar HF-techniques as well as the light-guide assisted laser method in the contact and non-contact mode are explained. The special problems in endoscopy arising from the reduction in visibility by haemorrhages and the development of smoke at the thermally induced coagulation may be overcome successfully by the simultaneous instillation of a nearly isolating liquid during the HF-treatment. The so-called electrohydrothermosation (EHT) method is presented and several probes and instruments for endoscopic hemostasis and microsurgery are explained. For an increase in safety at the endoscopic application of HF-current the use of the bipolar technique is recommended and several technological developments used in this mode are pointed out. It is shown that the absorption of radiation through the water-content of the tissue is mainly responsible for the reactions which may be produced with laser-light. Furthermore it is mentioned that the range of lasers which might be used has a large spectrum of medical applications which had been even increased especially by the new erbium and holmium solid state lasers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8147152

  18. Study of fiber-tip damage mechanism during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high-speed camera and the Schlieren method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Getzan, Grant; Xuan, Jason R.; Yu, Honggang

    2015-02-01

    Fiber-tip degradation, damage, or burn back is a common problem during the ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy procedure to treat urolithiasis. Fiber-tip burn back results in reduced transmission of laser energy, which greatly reduces the efficiency of stone comminution. In some cases, the fiber-tip degradation is so severe that the damaged fiber-tip will absorb most of the laser energy, which can cause the tip portion to be overheated and melt the cladding or jacket layers of the fiber. Though it is known that the higher the energy density (which is the ratio of the laser energy fluence over the cross section area of the fiber core), the faster the fiber-tip degradation, the damage mechanism of the fibertip is still unclear. In this study, fiber-tip degradation was investigated by visualization of shockwave, cavitation/bubble dynamics, and calculus debris ejection with a high-speed camera and the Schlieren method. A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.12 um, 273/365/550-um core fibers, and calculus phantoms (Plaster of Paris, 10x10x10 mm cube) were utilized to mimic the laser lithotripsy procedure. Laser energy induced shockwave, cavitation/bubble dynamics, and stone debris ejection were recorded by a high-speed camera with a frame rate of 10,000 to 930,000 fps. The results suggested that using a high-speed camera and the Schlieren method to visualize the shockwave provided valuable information about time-dependent acoustic energy propagation and its interaction with cavitation and calculus. Detailed investigation on acoustic energy beam shaping by fiber-tip modification and interaction between shockwave, cavitation/bubble dynamics, and calculus debris ejection will be conducted as a future study.

  19. High-speed photography during laser-based gall bladder stone lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaj, Jahja O.

    2001-04-01

    Shadowgraphy of gall bladder stone, which is held by a basket and immersed in a civete is performed. The exposure time is determined by the time of a N-Dye laser pulse used as a lightening source for photography. The shadowgram is projected in the objective of a camera which is connected to a microscope. The light coming from the laser, illuminates the civete collecting optical information of the stone and physical phenomena appearing above the stone. On top of the stone a tip of optical fiber is fixed, which is used for transmitting Ho:Yag laser power to the stone. Using a computer and time delay the laser pulses used for destruction and illumination are synchronized. Since the N-Dye laser pulse is pico-second range and the Ho:Yag laser pulse is in the range of micro-second, many image frames are obtained within the time of one pulse applied during the destruction. It is known that in the process of stone destruction several phenomena like plume, plasma, shock wave and bubble formation take place. However, the physical mechanism of the stone destruction is not yet completely understood. From the obtained results the above phenomena are studied which gives new information and clue for understanding some of the mentioned phenomena. The laser power which is guided by an optical fiber into the gall bladder or kidney of the human body can damage the living tissue and cause some serious health problems. For this reason the fiber needs to be oriented properly during the action of the laser power.

  20. Proteus mirabilis viability after lithotripsy of struvite calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabakharan, Sabitha; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Spore, Scott S.; Sabanegh, Edmund; Glickman, Randolph D.; McLean, Robert J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Urinary calculi composed of struvite harbor urease-producing bacteria within the stone. The photothermal mechanism of holmium:YAG lithotripsy is uniquely different than other lithotripsy devices. We postulated that bacterial viability of struvite calculi would be less for calculi fragmented with holmium:YAG irradiation compared to other lithotripsy devices. Human calculi of known struvite composition (greater than 90% magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate) were incubated with Proteus mirabilis. Calculi were fragmented with no lithotripsy (controls), or shock wave, intracorporeal ultrasonic, electrohydraulic, pneumatic, holmium:YAG or pulsed dye laser lithotripsy. After lithotripsy, stone fragments were sonicated and specimens were serially plated for 48 hours at 38 C. Bacterial counts and the rate of bacterial sterilization were compared. Median bacterial counts (colony forming units per ml) were 8 X 106 in controls and 3 X 106 in shock wave, 3 X 107 in ultrasonic, 4 X 105 in electrohydraulic, 8 X 106 in pneumatic, 5 X 104 in holmium:YAG and 1 X 106 in pulsed dye laser lithotripsy, p less than 0.001. The rate of bacterial sterilization was 50% for holmium:YAG lithotripsy treated stones versus 0% for each of the other cohorts, p less than 0.01. P. mirabilis viability is less after holmium:YAG irradiation compared to other lithotripsy devices.

  1. [Significance of the CO2-laser angle, oral cavity endoscopes].

    PubMed

    Gáspár, L; Bakos, R; Kásler, M

    1991-10-01

    The CO2-laser ray guided at 90 degrees to the surface creates a crater of typical "v" shape. If the guide angle of the ray deviates therefrom and the smaller the angle of incidence than 90 degrees, destruction becomes the more astymmetric, the crater takes an ever more flattened eliptical shape. The lack of tissue becomes even more superficial, thus removal of a circumscribed pathological area requires the sacrifice of more ambient healthy tissue. Consterning the possible angle of incidence of the laser ray instrumental measurements were carried out. It has been ascertained that in the pharinx third of the mouth cavity behind the plain corresponding to the premolars, as a rule, only guide angles below 50 degrees, in the middle third of the mouth cavity corresponding to the area between the front teeth and the molars guide angles between 50-70 degrees, and in the front third mostly a ray guiding below 90 degrees are possible. In the middle and rear third of the mouth cavity the ideal rey-guiding at 90 degrees can be obtained but with reflection, certain areas even cannot be treated directly, are visible but in mirrors. By transforming the hand piece of the laser apparatus endoscopes with fixed mirror and rotating mirror have been constructed. By means of the endoscope with fixed mirror already all parts of the mouth cavity have been rendered accessible while the rotating mirror model became suitable even to admit the laser ray to the surfaces at the ideal angle of incidence of 90(2). PMID:1765203

  2. Integrated and miniaturized endoscopic devices for use during high power infrared fiber laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher Ryan

    The Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) is currently being studied as a potential alternative to the conventional, solid-state Holmium:YAG laser (Ho:YAG) for the treatment of kidney stones. The TFL is an ideal candidate to replace the Ho:YAG for laser lithotripsy due to a higher absorption coefficient in water of the emitted wavelength, an ability to operate at high pulse rates, and a near single mode, Gaussian spatial beam profile. The higher absorption of the TFL wavelength by water translates to a decrease in ablation threshold by a factor of four. High pulse rate operation allows higher ablation rates than the Ho:YAG, thus decreasing operation time necessary to ablate the urinary stone. The Gaussian spatial beam profile allows the TFL to couple higher laser power into smaller optical fibers than those currently being used for Ho:YAG lithotripsy. This decrease in fiber diameter translates into a potential decrease in the size of ureteroscope working channel, higher saline irrigation rates for improved visibility and safety, and may also extend to a decrease in overall ureteroscope diameter. Furthermore, the improved spatial beam profile reduces the risk of damage to the input end of the fiber. Therefore, the trunk fiber, minus the distal fiber tip, may be preserved and re-used, resulting in significant cost savings. This thesis details rapid TFL lithotripsy at high pulse rates up to 500 Hz, both with and without the aid of a stone retrieval basket, in order to demonstrate the TFL's superior ablation rates over the Ho:YAG. Collateral damage testing of the TFL effect on the ureter wall and Nitinol stone baskets were conducted to ensure patient safety for future clinical use. Proximal fiber end damage testing was conducted to demonstrate fiber preservation, critical for permanent fiber integration. Optical fibers were fitted with fabricated hollow steel tips and integrated with stone retrieval baskets for testing. Ball tipped optical fibers were tested to maintain ablation

  3. Water content contribution in calculus phantom ablation during Q-switched Tm:YAG laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Wang, Hui; Chia, Ray W. J.; Hasenberg, Tom; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-12-01

    Q-switched (QS) Tm:YAG laser ablation mechanisms on urinary calculi are still unclear to researchers. Here, dependence of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance was investigated. White gypsum cement was used as a calculus phantom model. The calculus phantoms were ablated by a total 3-J laser pulse exposure (20 mJ, 100 Hz, 1.5 s) and contact mode with N=15 sample size. Ablation volume was obtained on average 0.079, 0.122, and 0.391 mm3 in dry calculus in air, wet calculus in air, and wet calculus in-water groups, respectively. There were three proposed ablation mechanisms that could explain the effect of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance, including shock wave due to laser pulse injection and bubble collapse, spallation, and microexplosion. Increased absorption coefficient of wet calculus can cause stronger spallation process compared with that caused by dry calculus; as a result, higher calculus ablation was observed in both wet calculus in air and wet calculus in water. The test result also indicates that the shock waves generated by short laser pulse under the in-water condition have great impact on the ablation volume by Tm:YAG QS laser.

  4. Water content contribution in calculus phantom ablation during Q-switched Tm:YAG laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian J; Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Xuan, Jason Rongwei; Wang, Hui; Chia, Ray W J; Hasenberg, Tom; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-12-01

    Q-switched (QS) Tm:YAG laser ablation mechanisms on urinary calculi are still unclear to researchers. Here, dependence of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance was investigated. White gypsum cement was used as a calculus phantom model. The calculus phantoms were ablated by a total 3-J laser pulse exposure (20 mJ, 100 Hz, 1.5 s) and contact mode with N=15 sample size. Ablation volume was obtained on average 0.079, 0.122, and 0.391  mm3 in dry calculus in air, wet calculus in air, and wet calculus in-water groups, respectively. There were three proposed ablation mechanisms that could explain the effect of water content in calculus phantom on calculus ablation performance, including shock wave due to laser pulse injection and bubble collapse, spallation, and microexplosion. Increased absorption coefficient of wet calculus can cause stronger spallation process compared with that caused by dry calculus; as a result, higher calculus ablation was observed in both wet calculus in air and wet calculus in water. The test result also indicates that the shock waves generated by short laser pulse under the in-water condition have great impact on the ablation volume by Tm:YAG QS laser. PMID:26662067

  5. First experience with blind lithotripsy of ureteral calculi by ruby laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupkova, Ludmila S.; Reznikov, Leonid L.; Sokolovsky, Alexander A.; Mursin, A. G.; Soms, Leonid N.; Berenberg, Vladimir A.; Polikarpov, Sergey S.; Parkhomchuk, N. A.; Voskresensky, M. A.

    1994-05-01

    For the last two years we have applied continuous dual-wavelength Nd:YAG 20 - 60 W power laser to various urologic operations. Transmission of laser irradiation via a flexible quartz fiber permitted operating at any depth of the wound. High-intensity irradiation of 1.06 mkm wavelength was effective in making thin incisions into a variety of tissues, including skin, subcutaneous fat, aponeurosis, muscles, urinary bladder wall, prostate gland, renal pelvis, renal capsule and parenchyma, and urethra. The incisions were especially effective if the contact method was used. Operational access was accomplished in 3 - 5 minutes. At the same time, hemostasis occurred in small diameter vessels. More reliable hemostasis could be achieved by means of 1.32 mkm wavelength. With the present laser device, we carried out 57 different urologic operations in our clinic. Examples of such operations include prostatectomy, pyelolithotomy, ureterolithotomy, nephrectomy, resection of renal cysts, condylomata acuminata of the urogenital organs, and papilloma of the urethra and bladder. The results suggest that a combination of these two wavelengths may prove most effective. Advantages of this approach include a decreased blood loss and decreased surgical time, asepsis, good short- and long-term results, and no complications.

  6. Endoscopic Combination Therapy Of Nd:YAG Laser In Conjunction With Conventional Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Sohtaro; Aoki, Jun; Shiina, Yasubimi; Miwa, Takeshi; Daikuzono, Norio; Joffe, Stephen N.

    1988-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibilities of the clinical application of the contact method with various endoprobes, either alone or combination with other conventional treat ment such as endoscopic polypectomy, local injection therapy, intubation of prosthesis, radiation therapy and general chemotherapy. According to the type of lesions and the severity of the complicated diseases, endoscopic techniques were chosen and combined. It was generally recognized that all of the endoscopic treatments were not curative therapies but applied as local therapeutics. Therefore, during the management of high risk patients with GI cancer within the mucosa, contact endoscopic Nd:YAG laser therapy should be preferred to general surgery.

  7. Photoactive dye enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-02-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia with high laser power. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue ablation with low laser power. The experiment was implemented on chicken breast due to minimal optical absorption Amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532-nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm2. Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-VIS spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with input parameter. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2+/-0.2 μm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33 % reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. In-depth comprehension on photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation can help accomplish efficient and safe laser treatment for BPH with low power application.

  8. Combined Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography and Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Utzinger, Urs

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are promising modalities for tissue characterization in human patients and animal models. OCT detects coherently backscattered light, whereas LIF detects fluorescence emission of endogenous biochemicals, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), collagen, and fluorescent proteins, or exogenous substances such as cyanine dyes. Given the complementary mechanisms of contrast for OCT and LIF, the combination of the two modalities could potentially provide more sensitive and specific detection of disease than either modality alone. Sample probes for both OCT and LIF can be implemented using small diameter optical fibers, suggesting a particular synergy for endoscopic applications. In this chapter, the mechanisms of contrast and diagnostic capability for both OCT and LIF are briefly examined. Evidence of complementary capability is described. Example published combined OCT-LIF systems are reviewed, one successful commercial instrument is discussed, and example applications are provided.

  9. Endoscopic Nd:YAG laser treatment of rectosigmoid cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, L A; Grigg, D; Boulos, P B; Bown, S G

    1990-01-01

    Forty nine patients with rectosigmoid carcinoma considered unsuitable for surgery underwent endoscopic Nd:YAG laser treatment for palliation of symptoms and tumour eradication, if feasible. Altogether 25 (51%) of the lesions had distal margins less than 7 cm from the anus and 36 (73%) extended above the peritoneal reflection. In seven patients with tumours less than 3 cm in diameter, symptomatic improvement was achieved in all (mean follow up 16 months) and complete tumour eradication in three. In the remaining 42 patients with larger tumours (34 greater than 2/3 circumferential, mean length 5.5 cm), symptomatic improvement was achieved with repeated treatments (average 3.4) in 31 (74%) over a mean follow up of 19 weeks. Of the parameters assessed, only circumferential tumour extent proved significant in predicting functional outcome after treatment. All treatment failures (eight initial, three late) occurred in patients with extensive tumours, and only seven of these patients were considered fit for colostomy. Bowel perforation occurred in two patients (5%) but there was no treatment-related mortality. Mean stay in hospital for all laser treatments was nine days (30% were outpatient attendances). These results suggest that laser therapy may be the palliative treatment of choice in patients with rectal carcinoma unsuitable for surgery. PMID:1695161

  10. Proof-of-concept of a laser mounted endoscope for touch-less navigated procedures

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Florian; Gueler, Oezguer; Perwoeg, Martina; Bardosi, Zoltan; Puschban, Elisabeth J; Riechelmann, Herbert; Freysinger, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives During navigated procedures a tracked pointing device is used to define target structures in the patient to visualize its position in a registered radiologic data set. When working with endoscopes in minimal invasive procedures, the target region is often difficult to reach and changing instruments is disturbing in a challenging, crucial moment of the procedure. We developed a device for touch less navigation during navigated endoscopic procedures. Materials and Methods A laser beam is delivered to the tip of a tracked endoscope angled to its axis. Thereby the position of the laser spot in the video-endoscopic images changes according to the distance between the tip of the endoscope and the target structure. A mathematical function is defined by a calibration process and is used to calculate the distance between the tip of the endoscope and the target. The tracked tip of the endoscope and the calculated distance is used to visualize the laser spot in the registered radiologic data set. Results In comparison to the tracked instrument, the touch less target definition with the laser spot yielded in an over and above error of 0.12 mm. The overall application error in this experimental setup with a plastic head was 0.61 ± 0.97 mm (95% CI −1.3 to +2.5 mm). Conclusion Integrating a laser in an endoscope and then calculating the distance to a target structure by image processing of the video endoscopic images is accurate. This technology eliminates the need for tracked probes intraoperatively and therefore allows navigation to be integrated seamlessly in clinical routine. However, it is an additional chain link in the sequence of computer-assisted surgery thus influencing the application error. Lasers Surg. Med. 45:377–382, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23737122

  11. Modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi: A single-surgeon experience of 382 cases

    PubMed Central

    YAN, ZEJUN; XIE, GUOHAI; YUAN, HESHENG; CHENG, YUE

    2015-01-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi, a retrospective chart review of a single surgeon's 3-year modular flexible ureteroscopy experience was performed. All of the patients were treated with modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy by a single surgeon. Stone-free status was defined as no fragments or a single fragment ≤4 mm in diameter at the 3-month follow-up. The procedure number, operative time, stone-free rates, repeat usage of the multilumen catheter, and perioperative complications were documented. The present study included 215 male patients and 167 female patients, with an average age of 48.5±13.7 years (range, 17–84 years). The mean stone size was 11.5±4.1 mm (range, 4–28 mm), and the mean total stone burden was 17.5±5.7 mm (range 15–46 mm). A total of 305 patients (79.8%) had a stone burden ≤20 mm, and 77 patients (20.2%) had a stone burden >20 mm. The mean number of primary procedures was 1.3±0.2 (range, 1–3). The stone-free rate following the first and the second procedure was 73.4 and 86.9%, respectively. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 3.1±1.2 days (range, 2–6 days). The highest clearance rates were observed for proximal ureteral stones (100%) and renal pelvic stones (88.7%), whereas the lowest clearance rates were observed for lower calyx stones (76.7%) and multiple calyx stones (77.8%). The higher the initial stone burden, the lower the postoperative stone-free rate (≤20 vs. >20 mm; 89.8 vs. 75.3%). The overall complication rate was 8.1%. The results of the present study suggest that modular flexible ureteroscopy with holmium laser lithotripsy may be considered the primary method for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi in select patients, due to its acceptable efficacy, low morbidity, and relatively low maintenance costs. PMID:26622508

  12. Endoscopic laser therapy of erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of patients in oncological hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Oleg N.; Kuvshinov, Yu. P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kartasheva, E. O.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The results of laser therapy present in 374 patients with erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of respiratory organs and of gastro-intestinal tract after oncological operations. Two types of laser namely endoscopic laser on the basis of He-Ne and Cu laser were used as sources of radiation. It was shown high therapeutic effectiveness of laser therapy. This method may be recommended for the above-mentioned category of the patients.

  13. Use of the flexible fiber CO2 laser in pediatric transcanal endoscopic middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Landegger, Lukas D; Cohen, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    We describe 4 pediatric patients (age 6-11 years) who underwent transcanal endoscopic ear surgery (TEES) with the assistance of a flexible fiber CO2 laser over a period of 6 months. Three of these individuals suffered from densely adherent cholesteatoma, where the laser permitted one-handed dissection while preserving endoscopic visualization by limiting bleeding. In the fourth patient, TEES ossiculoplasty was performed for a congenital stapes bar, with subsequent hearing improvement. Advantages and disadvantages of the flexible fiber CO2 laser in the setting of TEES are discussed. Use of the flexible fiber CO2 laser was found to expand the TEES toolkit. PMID:27240515

  14. Laryngocele resection by combined external and endoscopic laser approach.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Sandra L; Carothers, Daniel G; Hoffman, Henry T

    2003-04-01

    Options in the management of laryngoceles include observation, endoscopic resection, and resection via an external approach. We introduce a combined endoscopic and external approach that we have employed on several occasions to ensure complete removal of the laryngocele and the saccule from which it originated. A case is presented to help define the technique. PMID:12731632

  15. A comparative study to analyze the efficacy and safety of flexible ureteroscopy combined with holmium laser lithotripsy for residual calculi after percutaneous nephrolithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gang; Wen, Jiaming; Li, Zhongyi; Zhang, Zhewei; Gong, Xiuqing; Chen, Jimin; Du, Chuanjun

    2015-01-01

    A certain proportion of patients with initial Percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) management require ancillary procedures to increase the stone-free rate. In this study, we aim to analyze the efficacy and safety of flexible ureteroscopy combined with holmium laser lithotripsy (F-UL) for treatment of residual calculi after PCNL by comparison with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). Total of 96 patients with residual renal calculi (4 mm to 20 mm) after PCNL was enrolled from May 2010 to March 2013. They were randomly divided into two groups: US Group: patients were treated with F-UL; SWL Group: patients were treated with SWL. Follow-up was made one month and three months after treatment. The mean residual stone size after PCNL was 12.4 ± 4.3 mm in US group compared with 11.9 ± 4.5 in SWL group. The stone-free rate was 84.7% one month after surgical procedure in US group, this rate increased to 91.3% in the third months, while the stone-free rate in SWL group is 64.6% one month after treatment and 72.9% in the third month. For residual stone in lower calyx, the stone-free rate three month after treatment was 90.4% in US group compared to 65.2% in SWL group (P < 0.05). The overall complication rate was low in both groups, no severe complication was found. Both F-UL and SWL are safe and effective methods for residual calculi after PCNL, without severe complications. F-UL provided significantly higher stone-free rate compared with SWL, especially for low-pole calculi. PMID:26064375

  16. Laser-induced shock wave lithotripsy. Influence of laser pulse energy and irrigation solutions on stone disintegration.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, R; Hartung, R; Schmidt-Kloiber, H; Reichel, E

    1990-01-01

    With a high intensity Q-switched Nd-YAG laser shock waves can be generated in a liquid close to the calculus. Up to 80 mJ single pulse energy with 8 nsec pulse duration can be transmitted through flexible quartz fibers. Energy conversion and enhancement can be accomplished at the fiber tip with optical focussing of the light at the quartz tip, with irrigation solutions and with high pulse energies. Iron-III-dextran solutions (1 mg Fe3+/1) and magnesium chloride (50 mmol/l) increased the pressure in the laser induced breakdown up to ten times (8,000-10,000 bar). Smaller stone particles and higher efficacy in stone fragmentation could be achieved. PMID:1969188

  17. Bacteria Inactivation During Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Sol Quintero, María; Mora, Ulises; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mues, Enrique; Castaño, Eduardo; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M.

    2006-09-01

    The influence of extracorporeal and intracorporeal lithotripsy on the viability of bacteria contained inside artificial kidney stones was investigated in vitro. Two different bacteria were exposed to the action of one extracorporeal shock wave generator and four intracorporeal lithotripters.

  18. Endoscopic laser therapy in malignant tracheobronchial obstruction using sequential Nd YAG laser and photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moghissi, K.; Dixon, K.; Hudson, E.; Stringer, M.; Brown, S.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because the survival after treatment of advanced inoperable endo-tracheobronchial carcinoma is so poor, a pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the combined cumulative effect on survival of neodymium yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd YAG) laser followed by photodynamic treatment used endoscopically. METHODS: Seventeen patients who presented between January 1992 and March 1996 with inoperable tracheobronchial lesions causing more than 50% endoluminal obstruction were selected to enter the pilot study. Initially they had bronchoscopic Nd YAG laser treatment to debulk the tumour, and this was followed six weeks later by photodynamic therapy to treat the residual tumour. RESULTS: All patients had symptomatic relief and at least a partial response, and seven had a complete response for 3-6 months. Eight of the 17 (47%) survived for at least two years and 11 (65%) survived for a year or more. The median survival of the 10 patients who had died by the time of writing was 18.5 months (range 5-39), 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.9 to 29.5. CONCLUSIONS: Combined Nd YAG laser and endoscopic photodynamic therapy may be an effective palliative treatment for patients with inoperable endotracheobronchial cancer. 


 PMID:9093347

  19. Application Of Endoscopic Lasers For Operations In Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelkin, O. K.; Saphronov, A. M.; Shapovalov, A. M.; Zaharov, P. I.

    1988-06-01

    We have described our experience in the application of high energy argon and Nd:YAG lasers for endoscopic surgical manipulations. Laser was used for the removal of polyps with a wide base, villi tumours in colon, for the elimination of scar strictures in colon anastomosis, for the formation of primary-delayed colon anastomosis and for the removal of timoral stenosis in esophagus and in colon. Laser therapy has certain advantages over other endoscopic manipulations: long-term and immediate results are better. One can use this therapy in combination with others (radial therapy, surgical treatment). We have worked out a classification of polyps and stenosing tumours in the digestive system to determine indications for laser endoscopy and to choose the best parameters of laser irradiation.

  20. A laser-scanning endoscope based on polysilicon micromachined mirrors with enhanced attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Markus; Albrecht, Hansjoerg; Schurr, Marc O.; Papageorgas, Panagiotis G.; Hofmann, Ulrich; Maroulis, Dimitris; Depeursinge, Christian D.; Iakkovidis, Dimitris; Theofanous, Nikiforos; Menciassi, Arianna

    2003-10-01

    A miniaturized laser scanning endoscope is presented which makes use of three lasers to illuminate a sample with a red, a green and a blue wavelength simultaneously. Scattered light from the sample is descanned and chromatically separated into the three channels for detection and postprocessing to compose a color image. The scanning subsystem consists of two micro-electro-mechanical mirrors suitable for mass production. The endoscope head can be assembled fast and at low cost. A resolution of the order of 16 lines per mm is achieved for a working distance common in endoscopy. Considerations of the system design include the operation of the mico mirrors, the filtering of reflected light by using polarization effects and a strategy to cope with color metamery. An expert system based on a neural network was found able to analyze endoscopic images to identify suspicious lesions.

  1. Endoscopic laser treatment for rectosigmoid villous adenoma: factors effecting the results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetaud, Jean Marc; Maunoury, Vincent; Cochelard, Dominique; Boniface, Brigitte

    1994-12-01

    This present work reports the long term results after endoscopic laser treatment in 474 patients with benign rectosigmoid villous adenomas revealed by biopsy. Two types of wavelength were used: The 1.06 micrometers infrared light from the Nd:YAG laser and the green light from the argon laser or the Nd:YAG frequency doubled laser. In some patients, both wavelengths were used. Treatment was completed in 415 patients. Total tumor destruction was obtained in 92.8% of them, a carcinoma was detected in 6.5% on biopsy specimens obtained during laser treatment, and benign villous tissue persisted in 0.7%. During the average 30 mo. follow up period of the patients with total tumor destruction, 18% had a tumor recurrence. Treatment was well tolerated with a 1.8% complication rate (one perforation, one hemorrhage, and 7 stenosis requiring dilatation). Because treatment is long and difficult and cancer rate is high, endoscopic laser should be limited in patients with a circumferential villous adenoma to nonsurgical candidates. The risk of complication after surgery (some being fatal) has to be balanced against the risk of undetected carcinoma in the other patients and the indication for endoscopic laser treatment should be discussed case by case.

  2. Salivary Stone Pneumatic Lithotripsy in a Live Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Walvekar, Rohan R; Hoffman, Henry T; Kolenda, Jack; Hernandez, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic fragmentation and removal of artificial calculi in a live porcine model employing intracorporeal pneumatic lithotripsy. In this experimental study, 7 submandibular ducts were accessed and artificial calculi placed. A salivary pneumatic lithotripter probe was inserted through an interventional sialendoscope to fragment the calculi. A salivary duct catheter was then used to flush stone fragments, followed by endoscopy to assess complete fragmentation and ductal trauma. Ultimately, 7 artificial stones (3-10 mm, 4F/5F) were successfully fragmented without causing significant endoluminal trauma. Number of pulses for adequate stone fragmentation averaged 20 (range, 5-31). In all cases, stone fragments were successfully flushed out with the salivary duct catheter. Postprocedure endoscopy confirmed ductal integrity in all 7 ducts. While more studies are needed, this preliminary animal model demonstrates efficacy of endoscopic pneumatic lithotripsy for the management of sialolithiasis. PMID:27048662

  3. Endoscopic removal of a proximal urethral stent using a holmium laser: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Francisco; Thomas, Anil A.; Miocinovic, Ranko; Angermeier, Kenneth W.

    2012-01-01

    Urethral stents were initially developed for the management of urethral strictures and obstructive voiding disorders in select patients. Urethral stent complications are common and may require stent explantation, which is often quite challenging. We present our experience with endoscopic removal of an encrusted UroLume proximal urethral stent in a 72-year-old male using a holmium laser. The literature on various management options and outcomes for urethral stent removal is reviewed. Endoscopic removal of proximal urethral stents is feasible and safe and should be considered as the primary treatment option in patients requiring stent extraction. PMID:23248530

  4. Modelling of a laser-pumped light source for endoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie J.; Elson, Daniel S.; Hanna, George B.; Neil, Mark A. A.

    2008-09-01

    A white light source, based on illumination of a yellow phosphor with a fibre-coupled blue-violet diode laser, has been designed and built for use in endoscopic surgery. This narrow light probe can be integrated into a standard laparoscope or inserted into the patient separately via a needle. We present a Monte Carlo model of light scattering and phosphorescence within the phosphor/silicone matrix at the probe tip, and measurements of the colour, intensity, and uniformity of the illumination. Images obtained under illumination with this light source are also presented, demonstrating the improvement in illumination quality over existing endoscopic light sources. This new approach to endoscopic lighting has the advantages of compact design, improved ergonomics, and more uniform illumination in comparison with current technologies.

  5. Correction method of bending loss in the hollow optical fiber for endoscopic submucosal dissection using carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakari, Daisuke; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection using carbon dioxide laser is a promising treatment of early digestive cancer because it can avoid the risk of perforation. Although a hollow optical fiber transmitting mid-infrared light has been used, it was observed that the irradiation effect was influenced by bending a gastrointestinal gastrointestinal endoscope due to the change in transmittance by the bending loss. Therefore, we quantitatively evaluated the change in the irradiation effect by bending the hollow optical fiber in the gastrointestinal endoscope and proposed a correction method to stabilize the irradiation effect. First, the relationship between the irradiated laser energy density and the incision depth for porcine stomach was measured by bending the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope. Next, the relationship between the bending angle of the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope and the temperature rise of the hollow optical fiber in the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope was measured during the laser irradiation. As a result, the laser energy density and the incision depth decreased as the bending angle increased, and linear correlation between the laser energy density and the incision depth was observed. It was found that the bending angle can be estimated by the ratio of the setting laser power to time derivative of the temporal profile of the temperature of the hollow optical fiber. In conclusion, it is suggested that the correction of the laser energy density and stabilization of the incision capability is possible by measuring the temporal profile of the temperature of the hollow optical fiber.

  6. Suture of the mucosa after the endoscopic LASER mucomyotomy of Zenker's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Minovi, Carolina Morales; Minovi, Amir; Dost, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of choice of Zenker's diverticulum is the rigid endoscopic mucomyotomy. At our ENT department, we usually perform an endoscopic mucosal suture after the myotomy. We diagnosed 49 patients and treated 39 patients between 2003 and 2013 due to a Zenker's diverticulum. We used the classification of Brombart to determine the size of the diverticulum. Surgery was performed as an endoscopic LASER mucomyotomy with mucosal sutures or as an open approach with diverticulectomy and myotomy. Patients were phoned to ask for their complaints postoperatively. The symptoms were classified using a visual scale from 0 (no complaint) until 10 (same or more complaints than before the surgery). The distribution of the diverticulum's size was: 6 patients Brombart I, 11 patients Brombart II, 14 patients Brombart III and 18 patients Brombart IV. 10 patients did not undergo surgery. With 33 patients, we performed an endoscopic operation and 6 patients underwent an open approach. The scale of postoperative complaints was the following: 20 patients (0/10), 12 patients (1/10 or 2/10), 3 patients (3/10), 1 patient (6/10) and 1 patient (10/10). None of the patients suffered from severe complications such as mediastinitis. In 85% of the cases, an endoscopic approach could be performed. Postoperatively, 94% of the patients did not have any or just mild complaints. The risk of severe complications or recurrence of the diverticulum is low. The mucosal suture might reduce the risk of infections. PMID:25164870

  7. Treatment of nose, pharynx, larynx, and trachea disorders with Nd:YAG laser through fiber endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mengkui; Zhong, Denan; Yang, Shulan

    1993-03-01

    This article is about 203 examples and 14 types of pathological illnesses in the nose, pharynx, and trachea. All these are effectively treated under fiber endoscope with YAG laser, except one example of adenocarcinoma in the nose and pharynx which has relapsed after three times of treatment with rays. The other 202 examples needed only one time of treatment with the rays. The results of the experiment in one to three years is satisfactory.

  8. Endoscopic laser surgery for subglottic and tracheal stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouye, Tetsuzo; Tanabe, Tetsuya; Nakanoboh, Manabu; Ohmae, Yukio; Ogura, Masami

    1995-05-01

    Seventeen patients with subglottic or tracheal stenosis were treated with laser surgery. Six patients had airway compromise caused by malignant tumors. Sixteen patients required emergency endolaryngeal laser surgery, and satisfactory results were achieved in 12 obtaining an adequate lumen for ventilation. Five patients with airway tumors underwent laser surgery to increase the airway lumen, however, only one patient showed excellent results, with a sufficient airway lumen not being obtained in the other. Airway obstructions due to tumors can be treated satisfactorily by laser surgery, although long term postoperative follow up confirmed recurrence of tumor in most cases.

  9. Fibre-end micro-lens system for endoscopic erbium-laser surgery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heifer, D.; Frenz, M.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.

    1994-04-01

    A sapphire micro-lens system in combination with a zirconium-fluoride (ZrF4) fibre has been designed and constructed as a surgical tool for focusing Er:YAG-laser radiation. It both refocuses the laser radiation transmitted through a 350 µm core fibre to a spot diameter of 570 µm at a working distance of 7.6 mm, and protects the distal fibre end from damage. An accurate and uncomplicated visualization of the focus position of the erbium-laser beam is realized by coupling a HeNe aiming laser into the cladding of the fibre. In vitro cutting experiments reveal the high cutting precision with minimal thermal damage of the surrounding tissue and the high damage resistance of the system. It may render the use of the erbium laser possible in a wide range of endoscopic applications.

  10. Towards endoscopic ultrafast laser microsurgery of vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Christopher L; Everett, W Neil; Yildirim, Murat; Kobler, James; Zeitels, Steven M; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2012-03-01

    Vocal fold scarring is a predominant cause of voice disorders yet lacks a reliable treatment method. The injection of soft biomaterials to improve mechanical compliance of the vocal folds has emerged as a promising treatment. Here, we study the use of precise femtosecond laser microsurgery to ablate subsurface voids, with a goal of eventually creating a plane in dense subepithelial scar tissue into which biomaterials can be injected for their improved localization. Specifically, we demonstrate the ablation of small subepithelial voids in porcine vocal fold tissue up to 120 [micro sign]m below the surface such that larger voids in the active area of vocal fold mucosa (~3×10 mm(2)) can eventually be ablated in about 3 min. We use sub-μJ, 776-nm pulses from a compact femtosecond fiber laser system operating at a 500-kHz repetition rate. The use of relatively high repetition rates, with a small number of overlapping pulses, is critical to achieving ablation in a very short time while still avoiding significant heat deposition. Additionally, we use the same laser for nonlinear optical imaging to provide visual feedback of tissue structure and to confirm successful ablation. The ablation parameters, including pulse duration, pulse energy, spot size, and scanning speed, are comparable to the specifications in our recently developed miniaturized femtosecond laser surgery probes, illustrating the feasibility of developing an ultrafast laser surgical instrument. PMID:22502583

  11. Flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) with holmium laser versus extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for treatment of renal stone <2 cm: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Ren, Kewei; Pan, Haiyan; Zhu, Lijie; Wu, Sheng; You, Xiaoming; Shao, Hongbao; Dai, Feng; Peng, Tao; Qin, Feng; Wang, Jian; Huang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study was to systematically review the efficacy and safety of flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) with holmium laser versus extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for the treatment of renal stone <2 cm. A systematic literature review was performed in April 2015 using the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Chinese Biomedical Literature (CNKI and Wanfang) databases to identify relevant studies. All clinical trials were retrieved and their included references investigated. Two reviewers independently assessed the quality of all included studies, and the eligible studies were included and analyzed using the RevMan 5.3 software. Six prospective randomized comparison trials and eight retrospective comparison trials were included, involving a total of 2348 patients. For renal stone 1-2 cm, F-URS technique provided a significantly higher stone-free rate (SFR) [weighted mean difference (WMD) = 2.35, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.65-3.34, P < 0.00001], lower auxiliary procedure rate (APR) [odds ratio (OR) 0.33, 95 % CI 0.22-0.50, P < 0.00001] and lower retreatment rate (RR) (OR 0.07, 95 % CI 0.01-0.37, P = 0.002). Similar results were found in the lower pole stone for 1-2 cm subgroup. For renal stone <1 cm, F-URS technique also showed a significantly higher SFR than ESWL (WMD = 2.13, 95 % CI 1.13-4.00, P = 0.02). F-URS is associated with higher SFR, lower APR and RR than ESWL. F-URS is a safe and effective procedure. It can successfully treat patients with stones for 1-2 cm, especially for lower pole stone, without increasing complications, operative time and hospital stay. F-URS can be used as an alternative treatment to ESWL in selected cases with larger renal stones. However, further randomized trials are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26530230

  12. An endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry of a gastroduodenal mucosa at bleeding ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapkin, U. G.; Kapralov, C. V.; Gogolev, A. A.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2006-08-01

    One of the important problems of a bleeding gastroduodenal ulcer surgery is a prognosis of the recurrent hemorrhage and appraisal of endoscopic hemostasis quality. Endoscopic Laser Doppler Flowmetry of a mucous coat of stomach and a duodenum was made on 34 patients for the purpose of investigation of features of microcirculation. Analogous researches are made on 30 patients with a peptic ulcer and on 28 practically healthy people. Analysis of LDF-grams has shown certain differences in regional microcirculations in stomach and duodenal at normal and at a pathology. Increase of regional perfusion in periulcerose zone with its pathology disbalance can serve as a criterion for activities of an alteration processes in gastroduodenal ulcer defining the risk of possible hemorrhage.

  13. Effect of alpha1-blockers on stentless ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianguo; Liang, Yuxiang; Chen, Weihong; Xu, Shuxiong; Wang, Yuanlin; Hu, Jianxing; He, Hui-chan; Zhong, Wei-de; Sun, Zhaolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the clinical efficiency of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists on stentless ureteroscopic lithotripsy treating uncomplicated lower ureteral stones. Materials and Methods From January 2007 to January 2013, 84 patients who have uncomplicated lower ureteral stones treated by ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium laser were analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups, group A (44 patients received indwelled double-J stents) and group B (40 patients were treated by alpha1-adrenergic antagonists without stents). All cases of group B were treated with alpha1 blocker for 1 week. Results The mean operative time of group A was significantly longer than group B. The incidences of hematuria, flank/abdominal pain, frequency/urgency after surgery were statistically different between both groups. The stone-free rate of each group was 100%. Conclusions The effect of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists is more significant than indwelling stent after ureteroscopic lithotripsy in treating uncomplicated lower ureteral stones. PMID:27136474

  14. Endoscopic laser-assisted reshaping of collapsed tracheal cartilage: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Perrault, D F; Pankratov, M M; Shapshay, S M

    1996-03-01

    Repair of anterior tracheal wall collapse is a common and troublesome problem encountered by the head and neck surgeon. The standard treatment calls for an open procedure with or without stenting, depending on the extent of the damage. To avoid the morbidity of the open procedure, a new concept of endoscopic cartilage reshaping was investigated in a laboratory animal study. It involved the application of 1.44-micron pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser at relatively low power to restructure without devitalizing cartilage. An in vivo study was done in six dogs to determine appropriate laser dosimetry in a model of tracheal wall collapse created by a tracheotomy. The deformed cartilage was treated endoscopically with a noncontact 1.44-micron Nd:YAG laser, at 2 to 4 W of power with a repetition rate of 20 Hz, in three animals. As a control, three animals had endoscopic cartilage incisions followed by stent placement. Six weeks postoperatively, both groups had an adequate airway lined by healthy mucosa. In the animals with stenting, however, there was stenosis formation due to scarring at both ends of the stent, with significant inflammatory response in the local area. This study shows that it is possible to use low-power laser energy to reshape cartilage without destroying its viability, and to restore the tracheal wall to a normal contour without ablation or vaporization. The reshaped cartilage will tend to retain its shape with functional elastic force, as seen in in vitro studies. These preliminary results are encouraging, and it seems reasonable to consider using the technique in selected clinical cases as an alternative to conventional open surgery. PMID:8615580

  15. Endoscopic laser-induced steam generator: a new method of treatment for early gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takuya; Arai, Tsunenori; Tajiri, Hisao; Nogami, Yashiroh; Hino, Kunihiko; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1996-05-01

    The minimum invasive endoscopic treatment for early gastric cancer has been popular in Japan. The endoscopic mucosal resection and laser coagulation by Nd:YAG laser irradiation has been the popular treatment method in this field. However, the submucosal cancer has not been successfully treated by these methods. To treat the submucosal cancer endoscopically, we developed a new coagulation therapy using hot steam generated by Nd:YAG laser. The steam of which temperature was over 10 deg. in Celsius was generated by the laser power of 30 W with 5 ml/min. of saline. The steam was emitted to canine gastric wall under laparotomy or endoscopy for 50 s respectively. Follow up endoscopy was performed on 3, 7, 14, 28 days after the treatment. Histological examination was studied on 7, 28 days, and just after the emission. In the acute observation, the submucosal layer was totally coagulated. On the 7th day, ulceration with white coat was seen. The mucosal defect, submucosal coagulation, and marked edema without muscle degeneration were found by the histological study. On the 14th day, the ulcer advanced in the scar stage. On the 28th day, it completely healed into white scar with mucosal regeneration and mucosal muscle thickening. We could obtain reproducible coagulation up to deep submucosal layer with large area in a short operation time. Moreover there were no degeneration of proper muscle. This treatment effectiveness could be easily controlled by the steam temperature and emission duration. We think that this method can be applied to early gastric cancer including the submucosal cancer, in particular poor risk case for operation. Further study should be done to apply this method to clinical therapy.

  16. Endoscopic laser range scanner for minimally invasive, image guided kidney surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friets, Eric; Bieszczad, Jerry; Kynor, David; Norris, James; Davis, Brynmor; Allen, Lindsay; Chambers, Robert; Wolf, Jacob; Glisson, Courtenay; Herrell, S. Duke; Galloway, Robert L.

    2013-03-01

    Image guided surgery (IGS) has led to significant advances in surgical procedures and outcomes. Endoscopic IGS is hindered, however, by the lack of suitable intraoperative scanning technology for registration with preoperative tomographic image data. This paper describes implementation of an endoscopic laser range scanner (eLRS) system for accurate, intraoperative mapping of the kidney surface, registration of the measured kidney surface with preoperative tomographic images, and interactive image-based surgical guidance for subsurface lesion targeting. The eLRS comprises a standard stereo endoscope coupled to a steerable laser, which scans a laser fan beam across the kidney surface, and a high-speed color camera, which records the laser-illuminated pixel locations on the kidney. Through calibrated triangulation, a dense set of 3-D surface coordinates are determined. At maximum resolution, the eLRS acquires over 300,000 surface points in less than 15 seconds. Lower resolution scans of 27,500 points are acquired in one second. Measurement accuracy of the eLRS, determined through scanning of reference planar and spherical phantoms, is estimated to be 0.38 +/- 0.27 mm at a range of 2 to 6 cm. Registration of the scanned kidney surface with preoperative image data is achieved using a modified iterative closest point algorithm. Surgical guidance is provided through graphical overlay of the boundaries of subsurface lesions, vasculature, ducts, and other renal structures labeled in the CT or MR images, onto the eLRS camera image. Depth to these subsurface targets is also displayed. Proof of clinical feasibility has been established in an explanted perfused porcine kidney experiment.

  17. Ex vivo pyelotomy, nephroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy of a staghorn stone in a donor kidney prior to renal transplant

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Dariusz; Bolanowska, Barbara; Jankowski, Paweł; Dorobisz, Tadeusz; Dorobisz, Karolina; Chabowski, Mariusz; Janczak, Dawid

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents the diagnostic and treatment procedures of stone removal from the kidney of a 67-year-old donor, the transplantation of the kidney to a 65-year-old recipient, and the postoperative course until the end of hospitalization. Computed tomography performed before collecting the organ showed a staghorn stone in the renal pelvis and lower calyces in the right donor kidney. The stones were removed ex-vivo using a rigid ureteroscope and a holmium laser prior to transplantation. Then the organ was transplanted to the left iliac fossa of a 65-year-old man with end-stage renal failure. The authors think there is a possibility of increasing the kidney pool, by using organs containing large calculi. In such cases stones should be removed before the operation and the patient should be monitored regularly, especially in the first months after the transplant. PMID:26240630

  18. Preliminary evaluation of a pulsed 2.15-micron laser system for fiberoptic endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Treat, M R; Trokel, S L; Reynolds, R D; DeFilippi, V J; Andrew, J; Liu, J Y; Cohen, M G

    1988-01-01

    There is a need for lasers that are compatible with fiberoptic endoscopes and that provide greater cutting precision than currently can be produced by the widely used Nd:YAG (1.06 micron) laser. Recently available lasers that operate in the 2-micron region fill this need. This laser light energy can be transmitted by low OH- silica fibers and has much less tissue penetration than radiation at 1.06 micron. We have been evaluating a prototype solid state laser system that produces pulses of 2.15 microns light that is delivered by a silica based fiberoptic delivery system with negligible transmission losses. This system is based on a thulium-holmium-chromium doped YAG (Tm-Ho-Cr: YAG) rod that lases at 2.15 micron. The laser does not require cryogenic cooling, toxic gases, or custom utilities and should be practical in a clinical environment. In vivo animal testing of this laser confirms that it provides greater ablating precision than does the Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 micron. PMID:2839746

  19. Kidney Stone Treatment with Lithotripsy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Kidney Stone Treatment with Lithotripsy Broward Health Medical Center Fort Lauderdale, FL November 11, 2011 I'm ... got at least three stones in his left kidney. He's been having pain and blood in his ...

  20. Safety and feasibility of day case ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy (URSL) in patients with a solitary kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anngona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of nephrolithiasis in patients with a solitary kidney poses a treatment challenge. The study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of ureteroscopy and laser stone fragmentation (URSL) for renal stones in these patients treated in our university teaching hospital. Material and methods Between July 2012 and December 2014, seventeen cases of URSL for stones in a solitary kidney were reviewed. Patient demographics, stone dimensions, perioperative and post-operative outcomes were recorded in a prospectively maintained database. Serum creatinine levels pre-procedure and at follow-up were also compared. Results Seventeen cases of URSL were conducted with a mean age of 52.9 ±19.9 years. 8 of the 17 (47%) patients had stones in multiple locations and 13 (76%) were in the lower pole. The mean ± SD stone size and BMI were 13.0 ±8.9 mm and 31.6 ±5.8 kg/m2, respectively. The stone free rate (SFR) was 82.5%. Fourteen (82.5%) patients were discharged the same day and 16 cases (94%) were discharged within 24 hours. For patients with deranged pre-operative serum creatinine, the mean serum creatinine level improved from 131.2 ±68.3 µmol/L pre-URSL to 106.5 ±36.7 µmol/L at follow-up. There was one Clavien grade II complication with a patient requiring additional antibiotics for post-operative urinary tract infection. There were no other major or minor complications. Conclusions Day case ureteroscopy for stone disease in a solitary kidney is safe and feasible with a low complication rate and an overall improvement in renal function. PMID:27123333

  1. Endoscopic common-path OCT based on sweeping laser source and curled optical patch cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Suk; Jung, Eun Joo; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok; Kang, Jin U.

    2008-02-01

    Several technical problems have to be overcome before Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can be accepted among the established endoscopic imaging modalities. Most of conventional Michelson-based OCT systems need to have two separated paths of the sample and reference arms, which limits the flexibility of endoscopic probe. Recently, common-path interferometer based OCT have been demonstrated to circumvent the mismatch problems of length, polarization, and dispersion between the reference and sample arms, but the interferometric scanning methods have been realized with time-domain PZT or spectral-domain CCD. In this work, we demonstrate a novel Fourier-domain common-path OCT based on sweeping laser source, which shows superiority in the speed and robustness. Using a holey optical fiber with low bending loss, a novel curled optical patch cord, like a curl cord of telephone, is also adapted for the convenient access to the biological target at the flexible distance. The freedom to use an arbitrary length and wiring of the probe can provide more flexibility for use in endoscopic OCT.

  2. Outpatient management of esophageal cancer with endoscopic Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Lightdale, C J; Zimbalist, E; Winawer, S J

    1987-01-01

    In 50 inoperable patients with advanced malignant obstruction of the esophagus, endoscopic Nd:YAG laser treatment was used for palliation of dysphagia. In 30 of these patients, treatment was carried out entirely in an outpatient setting, providing more time at home and saving costs of hospitalization. Most patients had received prior radiation and chemotherapy. All were unable to swallow solid food; 16 had difficulty with liquids. Palliation was achieved in 69% allowing patients to eat a nearly normal diet. Therapy was least successful in cancers involving the cervical esophagus, in cancers more than 8 cm in length, and in cancers that were primarily infiltrating or extraluminal. Epidermoid carcinomas and adenocarcinomas were effectively treated, except for adenocarcinomas of the gastric cardia, which tended to be infiltrating. There were two serious but nonfatal complications, one perforation and one episode of bleeding, directly attributable to Nd:YAG laser therapy. An esophageal dilation prior to endoscopic Nd:YAG laser treatment facilitated outpatient management. PMID:2432776

  3. Automatic Tracking Algorithm in Coaxial Near-Infrared Laser Ablation Endoscope for Fetus Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yan; Yamanaka, Noriaki; Masamune, Ken

    2014-07-01

    This article reports a stable vessel object tracking method for the treatment of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome based on our previous 2 DOF endoscope. During the treatment of laser coagulation, it is necessary to focus on the exact position of the target object, however it moves by the mother's respiratory motion and still remains a challenge to obtain and track the position precisely. In this article, an algorithm which uses features from accelerated segment test (FAST) to extract the features and optical flow as the object tracking method, is proposed to deal with above problem. Further, we experimentally simulate the movement due to the mother's respiration, and the results of position errors and similarity verify the effectiveness of the proposed tracking algorithm for laser ablation endoscopy in-vitro and under water considering two influential factors. At average, the errors are about 10 pixels and the similarity over 0.92 are obtained in the experiments.

  4. Low cost and compact nonlinear (SHG/TPE) laser scanning endoscope for bio-medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiayun; Lim, Ken Choong; Li, Hao; Seck, Hon Luen; Yu, Xia; Kok, Shaw Wei; Zhang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence (TPE) and second harmonic generation (SHG) can been used to extract biological information from tissues at the molecular level, which is blind to traditional microscopes. Through these two image contrast mechanisms, a nonlinear laser scanning endoscope (NLSE) is able to image tissue cells and the extra cellular matrix (ECM) through a special fiber and miniaturized scanner without the requirement of poisonous chemical staining. Therefore, NLSE reserves high potential for in-vivo pathological study and disease diagnosis. However, the high cost and bulky size of a NLSE system has become one of the major issues preventing this technology from practical clinical operation. In this paper, we report a fiber laser based multi-modality NLSE system with compact size and low cost, ideal for in-vivo applications in clinical environments. The demonstration of the developed NLSE nonlinear imaging capability on different bio-structures in liver, retina and skin are also presented.

  5. Endoscopic management of post-traumatic prostatic and supraprostatic strictures using Neodymium-YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Ghulam; Dogra, Prem Nath

    2002-12-01

    We assessed the feasibility, efficacy and long-term results of endoscopic management using Neodymium-YAG (Nd-YAG) laser as a day care procedure in patients with post-traumatic supraprostatic and prostatic strictures. Three patients with post-traumatic prostatic and supraprostatic obliterative strictures underwent Nd-YAG laser core through urethrotomy as a day care procedure. Patient age ranged between 12 and 14 years. Mean duration of injury was 16 months. The length of stricture was assessed by bi-directional endoscopy prior to the procedure in all cases. Core through procedure was carried out using Nd-YAG laser under the guidance of a cystoscope placed antegradely. Patients were discharged on the same day with urethral catheter. Foley catheters were removed at 6 weeks. Nd-YAG laser core through procedure was carried out successfully in all cases with negligible blood loss in a mean time of 48 min. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Patients were discharged on the same day. Follow-up cystogram was conducted at 6 weeks and urethroscopy at months. At a mean follow-up of 23 months, patients were asymptomatic and voiding well. Nd-YAG laser core through urethrotomy is a safe and effective procedure. It is a less invasive alternative to more complex urethroplasty procedures for patients with post-traumatic prostatic and supraprostatic strictures. It can be carried out as a day care procedure in carefully selected patients and has no complications. PMID:12492959

  6. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural

  7. Endoscopic laser surgery of patients with pretumoral diseases and tumors of the organs of respiration and gastro-intestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubny, Boris K.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Efimov, Oleg N.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The result of treatment of 566 patients with precancerous diseases, cancer and benign tumors of respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract are presented. The `Raduga-1' as a source of laser radiation has been used. The wavelength of radiation 1060 nm. The maximum of basic radiation at the end of lightguide is 50 W. It is shown that the method of endoscopic laser destruction is a highly effective one and may be recommended for radical treatment.

  8. [Adjustable electrohydraulic lithotripsy for minimally invasive ureteroscopic stone treatment].

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Engelking, R

    1992-03-01

    We report on 82 ureteroscopies and electrohydraulic lithotripsies performed with small semirigid ureteroscopes with a minimum outer diameter of 6.5 F and probes of 2.4 F and 3.3 F. Prototypes of new lithotripters were employed, which incorporate infinitely variable energy within a range of 265-1382 mJ per pulse. Increased energy was provided by a rise in voltage, thus modifying the peak pressure and the initial slope of the shock wave. One third of the stones were situated in the upper ureter, 15% in the middle and 46% in the lower ureter. In 54% of these cases previous ESWL (Dornier MFL 5000) had been performed without success. Over 85% of the manipulations were performed under local anesthesia and i.v. sedation. Stone contact was achieved in 99%. Lithotripsy was fully successful in over 90%. The average energy per pulse was 450 mJ. In 7% partial disintegration was achieved and the residual stone was flushed back into the renal pelvis followed by further effective ESWL treatment. One stone had to be removed by open surgery. There were no major complications, such as perforations, due to the electrohydraulic lithotripsy itself. One perforation was caused when the endoscope was advanced into the ureter. No strictures were seen at the 6-month follow-up examination. An indwelling stent was placed in 48% of cases, as the stone burden or an inflamed stone bed suggested this was necessary. We conclude that electrohydraulic lithotripsy with adjustable energy resulting in various peak pressures of the shock wave is a safe and effective method of endoureteral stone treatment. PMID:1561730

  9. Laser induced fluorescence as a diagnostic tool integrated into a scanning fiber endoscope for mouse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher M.; Maggio-Price, Lillian; Seibel, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) technology has shown promise as a minimally invasive optical imaging tool. To date, it is capable of capturing full-color 500-line images, at 15 Hz frame rate in vivo, as a 1.6 mm diameter endoscope. The SFE uses a singlemode optical fiber actuated at mechanical resonance to scan a light spot over tissue while backscattered or fluorescent light at each pixel is detected in time series using several multimode optical fibers. We are extending the capability of the SFE from a RGB reflectance imaging device to a diagnostic tool by imaging laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in tissue, allowing for correlation of endogenous fluorescence to tissue state. Design of the SFE for diagnostic imaging is guided by a comparison of single point spectra acquired from an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) model to tissue histology evaluated by a pathologist. LIF spectra were acquired by illuminating tissue with a 405 nm light source and detecting intrinsic fluorescence with a multimode optical fiber. The IBD model used in this study was mdr1a-/- mice, where IBD was modulated by infection with Helicobacter bilis. IBD lesions in the mouse model ranged from mild to marked hyperplasia and dysplasia, from the distal colon to the cecum. A principle components analysis (PCA) was conducted on single point spectra of control and IBD tissue. PCA allowed for differentiation between healthy and dysplastic tissue, indicating that emission wavelengths from 620 - 650 nm were best able to differentiate diseased tissue and inflammation from normal healthy tissue.

  10. Endoscopic urethrotomy versus urethrotomy plus Nd-YAG laser in the treatment of urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Vicente, J; Salvador, J; Caffaratti, J

    1990-01-01

    Between February 1987 and May 1988, 30 patients who presented with single, iatrogenic, annular strictures of the bulbar urethra were included in this prospective study. They were randomly divided into two groups; group 1: 15 patients who underwent direct-vision endoscopic urethrotomy (cold-knife incision at 12 o'clock) and group 2: 15 patients who underwent internal urethrotomy plus Nd-YAG laser. The results obtained were analyzed and compared at 1 and 2 years by clinical evaluation, uroflowmetry and retrograde-voiding urethrography. Group 1 obtained 80% good results at 1 year, falling to 60% at 2 years follow-up. Group 2 presented good results in 73.3% both at 1 and 2 years of follow-up. PMID:2261927

  11. Endoscopic laser Doppler flowmetry in the experiment and in the bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcer clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapralov, S. V.; Shapkin, Y. G.; Lychagov, V. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    One of the most complex problems of emergency surgery is the choice of surgical tactics to deal with bleeding peptic ulcer. Endoscopic hemostasis is prescribed to patients with continuing bleedings and prerelapse syndrome. But till nowdays the objective verification of the prerelapse condition had not been worked out. What is more there are no objective criteria to judge the effectiveness of the carried endohemostasis. The aim of the study was to work out a new objective diagnostic method of pre-recurrence syndrome that can be able to make prognosis for possible gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding recurrence more precise. Laser Doppler flowmetry was the method of studies the regional perfusion. The device used in this work was made at the Optics and Biophysics Department of Saratov State University.

  12. A prospective comparison of laser therapy and intubation in endoscopic palliation for malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Loizou, L A; Grigg, D; Atkinson, M; Robertson, C; Bown, S G

    1991-05-01

    There is little objective long-term follow-up comparing laser therapy with intubation for palliation of malignant dysphagia. In a prospective, nonrandomized two-center trial 43 patients treated with the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser were compared with 30 patients treated by endoscopic intubation; the two groups were comparable for mean age and tumor position, length, and histology. Dysphagia was graded from 0 to 4 (0, normal swallowing; 4, dysphagia for liquids). Pretreatment mean dysphagia grades were similar: laser-treated group, 2.9 (SD, 0.6); intubated group, 3.2 (SD, 0.55). For thoracic esophageal tumors, the percentage of patients achieving an improvement in dysphagia grade by greater than or equal to 1 grade initially and over the long term was similar (laser, 95% and 77%; intubation, 100% and 86%). For tumors crossing the cardia, intubation was significantly better (laser, 59% and 50%; intubation, 100% and 92%, respectively; P less than 0.001). In patients palliated over a long period, however, the mean dysphagia grade over the remainder of their mean dysphagia grade over the remainder of their lives (mean survival: laser, 6.1 months; intubation, 5.1 months) was better in the laser group (1.6 vs. 2.0; P less than 0.01); 33% of laser-treated and 11% of intubated patients could eat most or all solids (P less than 0.05). For long-term palliation, laser-treated patients required on average more procedures (4.6 vs. 1.4; P less than 0.05) and days in the hospital (14 vs. 9; P less than 0.05). The perforation rate was lower in the laser-treated group (2% vs. 13%; P less than 0.02); no treatment-related deaths occurred in either group. For individual patients, the best results are likely to be achieved when the two techniques are used in a complementary fashion in specialist centers. PMID:1707386

  13. Efficacy and safety of endoscopic Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation of flat colorectal adenomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Pasquale; Mancini, Andrea; dal Fante, Marco; Cunsolo, Rocco

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation for the treatment of flat colorectal adenomas. From January 1982 to December 1994, 222 lesions were treated in 216 patients. Initial eradication was obtained in 96% of lesions with a diameter less than 1 cm, in 89% of lesions with a diameter between 1 and 4 cm, and in 64% of lesions with a diameter greater than 4 cm. According to the histology, a complete disappearance was obtained in 94% of tubular, in 89% of tubulovillous, and in 80% of villous adenomas. Adenomas with severe dysplasia or foci of invasive carcinoma were eradicated in 76% and in 75% of cases, respectively. During a median follow- up of 24 months (3 - 129 months), recurrences developed in 46 of the 186 initially cured lesions (25%). All recurrent lesions were submitted to Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation, obtaining eradication in 37/46 (80%) of the cases. Malignant degeneration occurred in 6% of lesions. Complications related to laser treatments were observed in 5% of patients.

  14. Endoscopic cystoventriculostomy and ventriculo-cysternostomy using a 2.0 micron fiber guided cw laser in children with hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans C.; Kruschat, Thomas; Knobloch, Torsten; Rostasy, Kevin M.; Teichmann, Heinrich O.; Buchfelder, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Preterm infants have a high incidence of post hemorrhagic or post infectious hydrocephalus often associated with ventricular or arachnoic cysts which carry a high risk of entrapment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In these cases fenestration and opening of windows within the separating membranes are neurosurgical options. In occlusive hydrocephalus caused by aquaeductal stenosis 3rd ventriculostomy is the primary choice of the operative procedures. Although Nd:YAG and diode lasers have already been used in neuroendoscopic procedures, neurosurgeons avoid the use of high energy lasers in proximity to vital structures because of potential side effects. We have used a recently developed diode pumped solid state (DPSS) laser emitting light at a wavelength of 2.0 micron (Revolix TM LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany), which can be delivered through silica fibres towards endoscopic targets. From July 2002 until May 2005 22 endoscopic procedures in 20 consecutive patients (age 3 months to 12 years old) were performed. Most children suffered from complex post hemorrhagic and post infectious hydrocephalus, in whom ventriculoperitoneal shunt devices failed to restore a CSF equilibrium due to entrapment of CSF pathways by the cysts. We used two different endoscopes, a 6 mm Neuroendoscope (Braun Aesculap, Melsungen, Germany) and a 4 mm miniature Neuroscope (Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). The endoscopes were connected to a standard camera and TV monitor, the laser energy was introduced through a 365 micron core diameter bare ended silica fibre (PercuFib, LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany) through the endoscope's working channel. The continuous wave laser was operated at power levels from 5 to 15 Watt in continuous and chopped mode. The frequency of the laser in chopped mode was varied between 5 and 20 Hz. All patients tolerated the procedure well. No immediate or long term side effects were noted. In 3 patients with cystic compression of the 4th ventricle, insertion of

  15. Application of endoscopic Ho:YAG laser incision technique treating urethral strictures and urethral atresias in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Futao, Sun; Wentong, Zhang; Yan, Zhuang; Qingyu, Dong; Aiwu, Li

    2006-06-01

    Endoscopic holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser incision is a new method applied in pediatric urology recent years. To evaluate its therapeutic efficacy on treating the pediatric patients with urethral strictures and urethral atresias, a retrospective study was performed from June 2001 to July 2005 in a total of 28 pediatric patients who underwent endoscopic internal urethrotomy using Ho:YAG laser in our center. In these patients, 25 had urethral strictures and 3 urethral atresias. Follow-up was done ranging from 2 months to 4 years to assess the treatment. Of the 28 patients, 25 (89.3%) have achieved satisfied result without complications following initial incisions. Two patients with urethral atresias and another with long lesion of stricture (> 2 cm) have postoperative stenosis (10.7%). Among the three reoccurred patients, two were successfully reoperated by Ho:YAG laser and open end-to-end anastomosis, respectively. One patient failed to follow-up. With the advantages of safety, efficacy and minimal invasion, endoscopic Ho:YAG laser incision technique could be used as a primary treatment in urethral stricture patients and is worthy to be popularized further in pediatric surgery. PMID:16736220

  16. Endoscopic cystoventriculostomy and ventriculocysternostomy using a recently developed 2.0-micron fiber-guided high-power diode-pumped solid state laser in children with hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans C.; Kruschat, Thomas; Knobloch, Torsten; Rostasy, Kevin; Buchfelder, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Preterm infants have a high incidence of post hemorrhagic or post infectious hydrocephalus often associated with ventricular or arachnoic cysts which carry a high risk of entrapment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In these cases fenestration and opening of windows within the separating membranes are neurosurgical options. Although Nd:YAG- and diode-lasers have already been used in neuroendoscopic procedures, neurosurgeons avoid the use of high energy lasers in proximity to vital structures because of potential side effects. We have used a recently developed diode pumped solid state (DPSS) laser emitting light at a wavelength of 2.0 μm (Revolix TM LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany), which can be delivered through silica fibres towards endoscopic targets. From July 2002 until June 2004 fourteen endoscopic procedures in 12 consecutive patients (age 3 months to 12 years old) were performed. Most children suffered from complex post hemorrhagic and post infectious hydrocephalus, in whom ventriculoperitoneal shunt devices failed to restore a CSF equilibrium due to entrapment of CSF pathways by the cysts. We used two different endoscopes, a 6 mm Neuroendoscope (Braun Aesculap, Melsungen, Germany; a 4 mm miniature Neuroscope (Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). The endoscopes were connected to a standard camera and TV monitor, the laser energy was introduced through a 365 μm core diameter bare ended silica fibre (PercuFib, LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany) through the endoscope"s working channel. The continuous wave laser was operated at power levels from 5 to 15 Watt in continuous and chopped mode. The frequency of the laser in chopped mode was varied between 5 and 20 Hz. All patients tolerated the procedure well. No immediate or long term side effects were noted. In 3 patients with cystic compression of the 4th ventricle, insertion of a shunt device could be avoided. The authors conclude that the use of the new RevolixTM laser enables safe and effective procedures

  17. Compact, transmissive two-dimensional spatial disperser design with application in simultaneous endoscopic imaging and laser microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Metz, Philipp; Adam, Jost; Gerken, Martina; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-01-20

    Minimally invasive surgery procedures benefit from a reduced size of endoscopic devices. A prospective path to implement miniaturized endoscopy is single optical-fiber-based spectrally encoded imaging. While simultaneous spectrally encoded inertial-scan-free imaging and laser microsurgery have been successfully demonstrated in a large table setup, a highly miniaturized optical design would promote the development of multipurpose endoscope heads. This paper presents a highly scalable, entirely transmissive axial design for a spectral 2D spatial disperser. The proposed design employs a grating prism and a virtual imaged phased array (VIPA). Based on semi-analytical device modeling, we performed a systematic parameter analysis to assess the spectral disperser's manufacturability and to obtain an optimum application-specific design. We found that, in particular, a low grating period combined with a high optical input bandwidth and low VIPA tilt showed favorable results in terms of a high spatial resolution, a small device diameter, and a large field of view. Our calculations reveal that a reasonable imaging performance can be achieved with system diameters of below 5 mm, which renders the proposed 2D spatial disperser design highly suitable for use in future endoscope heads that combine mechanical-scan-free imaging and laser microsurgery. PMID:24514122

  18. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones. Possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed Central

    Vergunst, H; Terpstra, O T; Brakel, K; Laméris, J S; van Blankenstein, M; Schröder, F H

    1989-01-01

    Recently extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been introduced as a nonoperative treatment for gallstone disease. Except for lung damage, no significant adverse effects of ESWL of gallbladder stones have been observed in animals. In clinical use ESWL of gallbladder stones is now confined to 15% to 30% of symptomatic patients. To achieve complete stone clearance, ESWL of gallbladder stones must be supplemented by an adjuvant therapy. ESWL of bile duct stones is highly effective and can be considered in patients in whom primary endoscopic or surgical stone removal fails. Second generation lithotriptors allow anesthesia-free (outpatient) treatments, but the clinical experience with most of these ESWL devices is still limited. The likelihood of gallbladder stone recurrence is a major disadvantage of ESWL treatment, which raises the issue of cost-effectiveness. ESWL for cholelithiasis is a promising treatment modality with good short-term and unknown long-term results. PMID:2684058

  19. Endoscopic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Auer, L M; Holzer, P; Ascher, P W; Heppner, F

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an ultrasound-guided, laser-assisted, and TV-controlled endoscopic technique which has been used so far in 133 patients for a variety of intracranial lesions. Following CT or MRI image reconstruction, and a decision on the placement of a 1 cm or a 2 cm burrhole, a 1 cm 5.0 mHz or 7.5 mHz intraoperative ultrasound probe is used to direct the endoscope from the burrhole to the target area. A 22.5 cm long rigid endoscope tube with an outer diameter of 6 mm with an inbuilt suction irrigation system, Neodymium Yag laser with 600 micron Quartz glass-fibre and an inlet for various microinstruments is then introduced. The attachment of a TV camera to the ocular lens allows the operator to control further surgical steps in the target area via the TV screen and thus warrants sterility in the operating field. The technique has been used for evacuation of 77 spontaneous intracerebral haematomas (lobar, putaminal, thalamic), 8 traumatic intracerebral haematomas, 13 ventricular haematomas, 8 cerebellar haematomas and 1 brainstem haematoma. Total or subtotal evacuation was achieved in 33% of intracerebral haematomas, removal of more than 50% of the clot in 55%. Twenty-four brain tumours (12 ventricular, 12 cystic cerebral or cerebellar tumours) were operated on for biopsy, evacuation of cyst, resection or removal of the cyst wall and/or laser irradiation of solid tumour or the inner cyst wall of cystic tumours. The complication rate probably related to surgery was 1.6%, morbidity 1.6%, mortality 0%. This high-tec endoscopic technique with its minimal surgical trauma and short operation time can be recommended as a low-risk alternative to conventional neurosurgical techniques. PMID:3278501

  20. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

  1. Voice quality after endoscopic laser surgery and radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: objective measurements emphasizing the Voice Handicap Index

    PubMed Central

    Caminero Cueva, Maria Jesús; Señaris González, Blanca; Llorente Pendás, José Luis; Gorriz Gil, Carmen; López Llames, Aurora; Alonso Pantiga, Ramón; Suárez Nieto, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the functional outcome and self-evaluation of the voice of patients with T1 glottic carcinoma treated with endoscopic laser surgery and radiotherapy. We performed an objective voice evaluation, as well as a physical, emotional and functional well being assessment of 19 patients treated with laser surgery and 18 patients treated with radiotherapy. Voice quality is affected both by surgery and radiotherapy. Voice parameters only show differences in the maximum phonation time between both treatments. Results in the Voice Handicap Index show that radiotherapy has less effect on patient voice quality perception. There is a reduced impact on the patient’s perception of voice quality after radiotherapy, despite there being no significant differences in vocal quality between radiotherapy and laser cordectomy. PMID:17999074

  2. Navigated laser-assisted endoscopic fenestration of a suprasellar arachnoid cyst in a 2-year-old child with bobble-head doll syndrome. Case report.

    PubMed

    Van Beijnum, Janneke; Hanlo, Patrick W; Han, K Sen; Ludo Van der Pol, W; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M; Van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno

    2006-05-01

    The authors present the case of a 2-year-old boy with bobble-head doll syndrome (BHDS) associated with a large suprasellar arachnoid cyst and enlarged ventricles, who was successfully treated with neuronavigated laser-assisted endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy. The clinical history, surgical treatment, and clinical follow up of the patient are described. A navigated laser-assisted endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy of the suprasellar arachnoid cyst led to cessation of the head bobbing, and notable reduction of the cyst and ventricles was visible on the postoperative magnetic resonance images. Caused by a suprasellar arachnoid cyst, BHDS can be successfully treated with navigated laser-assisted endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy. The advantages of this procedure are minimal invasiveness and facilitated guidance of the neuronavigation system to the target area when normal anatomical landmarks are not visible. PMID:16848093

  3. Endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Leonard K; SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  4. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K.; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  5. [Use of a laser beam (YAG) with a flexible fiber for endoscopic treatment of some broncho-tracheal lesions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Toty, L; Personne, C L; Hertzog, P; Colchen, A; Lotteau, J; Romanelli, J; Guillet, R; Miro, L; Audebaud, G; Vourc'h, G

    1979-01-01

    For several years we employed an endoscope permitting electro-coagulation in the treatment of some broncho-tracheal lesions and were able to observe the limits and accidents involved in this method. When compared with clinical results (work of Freche in ORL, laser CO2) and after experimental research, the use of a flexible laser beam (YAG) seems to bring about a noteworthy increase in therapeutic possibilities. This flexible fiber beam could easily be used by some medico-surgical teams who already possess appropriate of easily adaptable endoscopic equipment. Clinical studies are in progress. PMID:575806

  6. Use of endoscopic distal attachment cap to enhance image stabilization in probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy in colorectal lesions*

    PubMed Central

    Ussui, Vivian; Xu, Can; Crook, Julia E.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Hardee, Joy; Staggs, Estela G.; Shahid, Muhammad W.; Wallace, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Colorectal cancer can be prevented through the use of colonoscopy with polypectomy. Most colon polyps are benign or low grade adenomas. However, currently all lesions need histopathologic analysis, which increases diagnostic costs and delays the final diagnosis. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is a new technology that enables real-time endomicroscopy. However, there are challenges to maintaining a stable image with currently available systems. We conducted a small study to obtain a preliminary assessment of whether the use of an endoscopic distal attachment cap may enhance image quality of CLE in comparison with images obtained with free-hand acquisition. Patients and methods: Forty outpatients underwent colonoscopy for evaluation of colon polyps in a single academic medical center. Patients were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 study arms on the basis of whether an endoscopic distal attachment cap was used (n = 21, Cap Used) or not used (n = 19, No Cap) in the procedure. The quality of confocal images and probe stabilization was summarized. Results: A total of 81 polyps were identified. The proportion of polyps with images of high quality was 74 % (28/38) in the Cap Used group and 79 % (30/38) in the No Cap arm. Image stability was also similar with and without a cap. Diagnostic accuracy was estimated to be slightly higher in the Cap Used group for probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE; 78 % vs 70 %). This was also true for white-light and narrow-band imaging. Conclusions: This preliminary study did not yield any evidence to support that the use of an endoscopic distal attachment cap improves the quality of images obtained during CLE. PMID:26528511

  7. Endoscopic management of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Veeral M; Kahaleh, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common gastrointestinal illness, which affects the quality of life with substantial morbidity and mortality. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. However, at the time of this publication, guidelines to establish care of these patients are lacking. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the various treatment options available, including medical, surgical and endoscopic options. In addition, technological advances such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogrophy, endoscopic shock wave lithotripsy and endoscopic ultrasound can now be offered with reasonable success for pancreatic decompression, stricture dilatation with stent placement, stone fragmentation, pseudocyst drainage, and other endoscopic interventions such as celiac plexus block for pain relief. We emphasize the endoscopic options in this review, and attempt to extract the most up to date information from the current literature. The treatment of CP and its complications are discussed extensively. Complications such as biliary strictures. pancreatic pseudocysts, and chronic pain are common issues that arise as long-term complications of CP. These often require endoscopic or surgical management and possibly a combination of approaches, however choosing amongst the various therapeutic and palliative modalities while weighing the risks and benefits, makes the management of CP challenging. Treatment goals should be not just to control symptoms but also to prevent disease progression. Our aim in this paper is to advocate and emphasize an evidence based approach for the management of CP and associated long term complications. PMID:23330050

  8. Combined laparoscopic pyelolithotomy and endoscopic pyelolithotripsy for staghorn calculi: long-term follow-up results from a case series

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Antonio Luigi; Palleschi, Giovanni; Silvestri, Luigi; Leto, Antonino; Ripoli, Andrea; Fuschi, Andrea; Al Salhi, Yazan; Autieri, Domenico; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Carbone, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Staghorn renal stones are a challenging field in urology. Due to their high recurrence rates, particularly those associated with an infective process, a complete removal is the ultimate goal in their management. We report our experience with a combined approach of laparoscopic pyelolithotomy and endoscopic pyelolithotripsy, the stone clearance rate, and long-term, follow-up outcomes. Methods: From June 2012 to October 2014, nine adult patients with large staghorn renal calculi (mean size, 7.2 cm; range, 6.2–9.0 cm) underwent a combined laparoscopic and endoscopic approach. The technique comprised laparoscopic pyelolithotomy and holmium-YAG laser stone fragmentation with the use of a flexible cystoscope introduced through a 12 mm trocar. Results: The average operative time was 140 min (range, 90–190 min). The mean estimated hemoglobin loss was 0.6 mmol/l (range 0.5–0.7 mmol/l). None of the patients required an open- surgery conversion. The mean hospital stay was 4 days (range, 2–6 days). A computed tomography urogram control at 6 months of follow up did not show any stone recurrence. Conclusions: Laparoscopic pyelolithotomy combined with endoscopic pyelolithotripsy could be a therapeutic option in cases where mini-invasive procedures, that is, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, ureteroscopic lithotripsy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) have failed. This technique has a high stone-clearance rate (75–100%) comparable with open surgery and PCNL. However, it could be technically demanding and should be performed by skilled laparoscopy surgeons. PMID:26834835

  9. Sialendoscopy with holmium:YAG laser treatment for multiple large sialolithiases of the Wharton duct: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Ting; Lee, Kuo-Sheng; Hung, Shih-Han; Su, Chin-Hui

    2014-12-01

    Sialolithiasis is defined as calcified stone(s) in the salivary duct or glands. Submandibular gland sialolithiasis is the most common (80 to 90%), followed by parotid gland sialolithiasis (5 to 15%). The typical clinical presentation is salivary gland swelling after eating. As the swelling persists, symptoms owing to local inflammation, such as pain and trismus, emerge. In severe cases, cellulitis and even abscess formation occur and subsequently lead to salivary gland atrophy or fistula formation if the sialolithiasis remains untreated. The most common treatment is complete excision of the affected gland together with the stone(s). In some cases, intraoral sialolithotomy is performed when the stone is solitary and easily palpable through the oral cavity. Sialendoscopy is increasingly performed because of its minimal invasiveness. The major limitation of endoscopic laser lithotripsy of the salivary glands is the size of the stone. Often, for a stone larger than 4 mm, multiple fragmentations of the stone into small pieces is necessary before the pieces can be removed by wire basket or grasping forceps. Recently, the holmium:YAG laser has been reported as quite effective in removing larger salivary gland stones. However, sialoendoscopic laser lithotripsy is a very time-consuming procedure and in most cases, when there are multiple large stones in a single gland, entire gland excision is recommended. This report describes a male patient diagnosed with multiple large stones in his left submandibular gland who was successfully treated under sialendoscopy with holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy. PMID:25216563

  10. Comparison of the clinical efficacy and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy in the treatment of obstructive upper ureteral calculi with concurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Tao; Li, Wei-Guo; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Sun, Wen-Lan; Zhao, Wei; Ruan, Yuan; Zhong, Chen; Wood, Kristofer; Wei, Hai-Bin; Xia, Shu-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Wen

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (RPLU) and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy (UHLL) as two minimally invasive procedures in managing obstructive upper ureteral calculi with concurrent urinary tract infections (UTI). The retrospective study included 189 patients who underwent unilateral obstructive upper ureteral stones with concurrent UTI from January 2007 to November 2014 at our institution. Patients received RPLU (81 cases) or UHLL (108 cases). All patients received preoperative anti-infection treatment (indwelling ureteral stent and/or preoperative antibiotics). Collected data, including sex, age, stone size, success rate, operation duration, post-operation hospitalization time, and post-operation complications, were compared. All patients were followed up for more than 6 months after surgeries, and no ureterostenosis occurred. The study included 189 patients, 41 (21.7 %) females and 148 (78.3 %) males with a medium age of 52 years (range 22-81 years). All surgeries were successfully performed without conversion to open surgery. Stone size in the RPLU group was larger than that of the UHLL group (16.1 ± 1.4 vs. 10.4 ± 1.6 mm, P = 0.012). Operative duration (P = 0.009) and hospitalization time (P < 0.001) in the UHLL group were significantly shorter than those in the RPLU group, whereas stone clearance rate was significantly higher in the RPLU group (100 vs. 88.9 %, P = 0.002). Of note, postoperative fever was more common in patients treated with UHLL (15 cases) versus RPLU (4 cases) (13.9 vs. 4.9 %, P = 0.043). Moreover, in the UHLL group, three patients without a preoperative indwelling ureteral stent were complicated with sepsis, which was not seen in RPLU group. In our study, the safety and stone clearance rate of RPLU are better than those of UHLL in the treatment of unilateral upper ureteric calculi with concurrent UTI

  11. Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair®: A novel, full-endoscopic surgical technique for the treatment of symptomatic cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J.; Cianciabella, Augusto; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a novel full-endoscopic, anterior cervical, trans-discal, motion preserving, laser assisted, nonfusion, outpatient surgical procedure to safely treat symptomatic cervical disc diseases including herniation, spondylosis, stenosis, and annular tears. Here we describe a new endoscopic approach to cervical disc disease that allows direct visualization of the posterior longitudinal ligament, posterior vertebral endplates, annulus, neuroforamina, and herniated disc fragments. All patients treated with Deuk Laser Disc Repair were also candidates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods: A total of 142 consecutive adult patients with symptomatic cervical disc disease underwent Deuk Laser Disc Repair during a 4-year period. This novel procedure incorporates a full-endoscopic selective partial decompressive discectomy, foraminoplasty, and posterior annular debridement. Postoperative complications and average volume of herniated disc fragments removed are reported. Results: All patients were successfully treated with cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair. There were no postoperative complications. Average volume of herniated disc material removed was 0.09 ml. Conclusions: Potential benefits of Deuk Laser Disc Repair for symptomatic cervical disc disease include lower cost, smaller incision, nonfusion, preservation of segmental motion, outpatient, faster recovery, less postoperative analgesic use, fewer complications, no hardware failure, no pseudoarthrosis, no postoperative dysphagia, and no increased risk of adjacent segment disease as seen with fusion. PMID:23230523

  12. Variable-focus side-firing endoscopic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemberg, Vladimir G.; Black, Michael

    1996-05-01

    Conventional side-firing fiber technology exhibits performance limitations and utilizes expensive single-use only devices which often require multiple fibers for laser prostatectomy. Another limitation of existing side-firing fiber technology is its inability to focus the beam to create incisions for urologic applications such as laser TURP (transurethral resectional prostatectomy), tumor necrosis, lithotripsy, genital warts, and photodynamic therapy. Newly introduced variable-focus side-firing endoscopic device utilizes either one or two lenses and a mirror, onto a single cylinder of molded glass. The laser beam exits the optical fiber, passes through the lens, strikes the cylindrical mirror, and traverses the cylindrical surface. Depending on the design, the laser beam is reflected at the angles ranging from 30 degrees to 120 degrees out of the cylindrical lens. A second lens can be formed onto the side of the cylindrical surface at the beam's exit point. Another advantage of the innovative side-firing device is its capability to provide versatile matching to multiple laser wavelengths from 360 nm to 2.5 microns, and achieve power densities great enough to perform vaporization, incision and coagulation of tissue. Precise focusing of the laser beam results in reduced tissue necrosis of surrounding the treatment area as well as in decreased laser radiation back-scattering. Surgeons can very the focus by adjusting the distance from the tip to the target area. The variable focus side-firing device provides a focused beam at the range of 1.0 to 1.5 mm, for incision. Outside this range, it produces a defocused beam for coagulation.

  13. Our experience with transcanalicular laser-assisted endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (TCLADCR) in patients of chronic dacryocystitis with deviated nasal septum.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchi; Nagpal, Smriti; Kumar, Sushil; Kamal, Saurabh; Dangda, Sonal; Bodh, Sonam Angmo

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to study the operative difficulties and success rate of transcanalicular laser-assisted endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy in patients of chronic dacryocystitis with deviated nasal septum (DNS). A prospective interventional clinical study of 36 consecutive patients suffering from chronic dacryocystitis with nasolacrimal duct obstruction with DNS undergoing primary TCLADCR from March to June 2011 was carried out. Diode laser was used to create a 16-mm(2) ostium which was enlarged to 64 mm(2) using Blakesley's forceps. Success was defined as anatomical patency and absence of symptoms at 12 months of follow-up. Out of the 36 patients, 25 were females with ages 20-72 years, and 19 were left sided. There were 12 high, 12 mid and 12 basal DNS towards the side of surgery, mild to moderate in severity. Intraoperatively there was difficulty in visualising the aiming beam in the nose, tedious manipulation of endoscope and excessive bleeding in 3 patients. Increased bleeding and failures were significantly higher in high DNS (Fisher exact test-2 tailed: 0.0045). The procedure was successful in 94.4 % cases with average ostium size of 21.94 mm(2) at 12 months and no statistically significant difference in success rates between mild and moderate DNS (Fisher exact test-2 tailed: 1.000). Also there was no difference in the complication rate between mild and moderate DNS (Fisher exact test-2 tailed: 0.0841). TCLADCR is an effective procedure in patients with mild to moderate mid and basal DNS and obviates the need for multiple procedures and a cutaneous scar. PMID:25702037

  14. Perspective on Lithotripsy Adverse Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Thomas; Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar

    2008-09-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is an effective and without any doubt the least invasive procedure to treat upper urinary tract calculi. Acute complications are rarely reported and do not require specific treatment in most cases. However, one should be aware that energy levels sufficient for stone breakage are capable of damaging tissue as well, and significant hematoma—not only in the kidney but as well in surrounding organs—has been observed. Furthermore, only little is known about the long-term effects of SWL. Some authors have reported an increased incidence of hypertension and possibly also diabetes mellitus. Such chronic diseases—if indeed related to prior SWL—may be a late result of acute SWL-related trauma but the discussion on the underlying pathogenesis is controversial. Many factors have to be considered, such as the natural history of recurrent stone formers, technical principles of SWL, and differences in treatment protocols. Promising studies are currently underway to optimize stone breakage while limiting potential collateral damage. With this progress, SWL remains a safe treatment option for most urinary calculi.

  15. [Case of renal subcapsular hematoma caused by flexible transurethral lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryuta; Inada, Kouji; Azuma, Kouji; Yamashita, Yokihiko; Oka, Akihiro

    2013-09-01

    A 39-year-old man with macroscopic hematuria was admitted to our hospital. A stone, 5 mm in diameter was detected in the right ureteropelvic junction after abdominal computed tomography and plain abdominal radiography. We performed flexible transurethral lithotripsy (f-TUL) and crushed the stone and extracted almost all stone fragments without any complications. However, almost immediately after the operation, the patient began to complain about pain in the right back. In the results of abdominal plain computed tomography right renal subcapsular hematoma was detected. Because active bleeding was not observed in the results of enhanced computed tomography, only conservative treatment was performed. The patient was discharged from the hospital on day 11 of hospitalization. One month after the operation, plain computed tomography was performed and diminished subcapsular hematoma was detected. Renal subcapsular hematoma is assumed to be a unique complication of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. This is the first report of a case of renal subcapsular hematoma caused by f-TUL. The onset of renal subcapsular hematoma following f-TUL could have been caused either because the laser fiber thrust into the renal lithiasis unintentionally or because the internal pressure of the renal pelvis increased substantially during the operation. PMID:24113753

  16. A review of Thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.

    2011-02-01

    The clinical solid-state Holmium:YAG laser lithotripter (λ=2120 nm) is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but its efficient operation is limited to low pulse rates during lithotripsy. The diode-pumped experimental Thulium Fiber Laser (λ=1908 nm) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate at high pulse rates. This review compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion effects for Ho:YAG and TFL. Laser lithotripsy complications also include optical fiber bending failure resulting in endoscope damage and low irrigation rates leading to poor visibility. Both problems are related to fiber diameter and limited by Ho:YAG laser multimode spatial beam profile. This study exploits TFL spatial beam profile for higher power transmission through smaller fibers. A short taper is also studied for expanding TFL beam at the distal tip of a small-core fiber. Stone mass loss, stone crater depths, fiber transmission losses, fiber burn-back, irrigation rates, and deflection through a flexible ureteroscope were measured for tapered fiber and compared with conventional fibers. The stone ablation threshold for TFL was four times lower than for Ho:YAG. Stone retropulsion with Ho:YAG increased linearly with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates < 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. TFL beam profile provides higher laser power through smaller fibers than Ho:YAG laser, potentially reducing fiber failure and endoscope damage and allowing greater irrigation rates for improved visibility and safety. Use of a short tapered distal fiber tip also allows expansion of the laser beam, resulting in decreased fiber tip damage compared to conventional fibers, without compromising fiber bending, stone ablation efficiency, or irrigation rates.

  17. Functional results of endoscopic laser surgery in advanced head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadick, Haneen; Baker-Schreyer, Antonio; Bergler, Wolfgang; Maurer, Joachim; Hoermann, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Functional results following lasersurgery of minor laryngeal carcinomas were very encouraging. The indication for lasersurgical intervention was then extended to larger carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx. The purpose of this study was to assess vocal function and swallowing ability after endoscopic lasersurgery and to compare the results with conventional surgical procedures. From January 1994 to December 1996, 72 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx were examined prospectively. The patients underwent endoscopic lasersurgery instead of laryngopharyngectomy. The voice quality was evaluated pre- and postoperatively by subjective assessment, registration of voice parameters and sonegraphic classification. The swallowing ability was judged according to individual scores. The necessity of tracheostomy and nasogastric tube were registered and the duration of hospitalization was documented. The results showed that laryngeal phonation and swallowing ability were significantly better 12 months after lasersurgery compared to the preoperative findings whereas the recurrence rate was similar or even better after conventional pharyngolaryngectomy. Lasersurgery as an alternative surgical procedure to laryngectomy enables patients to retain a sufficient voice function and swallowing ability.

  18. Endoscopic endonasal cranial base surgery simulation using an artificial cranial base model created by selective laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kenichi; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Muto, Jun; de Souza, Daniel G; Gun, Ramazan; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Mastery of the expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) requires anatomical knowledge and surgical skills; the learning curve for this technique is steep. To a great degree, these skills can be gained by cadaveric dissections; however, ethical, religious, and legal considerations may interfere with this paradigm in different regions of the world. We assessed an artificial cranial base model for the surgical simulation of EEA and compared its usefulness with that of cadaveric specimens. The model is made of both polyamide nylon and glass beads using a selective laser sintering (SLS) technique to reflect CT-DICOM data of the patient's head. It features several artificial cranial base structures such as the dura mater, venous sinuses, cavernous sinuses, internal carotid arteries, and cranial nerves. Under endoscopic view, the model was dissected through the nostrils using a high-speed drill and other endonasal surgical instruments. Anatomical structures around and inside the sphenoid sinus were accurately reconstructed in the model, and several important surgical landmarks, including the medial and lateral optico-carotid recesses and vidian canals, were observed. The bone was removed with a high-speed drill until it was eggshell thin and the dura mater was preserved, a technique very similar to that applied in patients during endonasal cranial base approaches. The model allowed simulation of almost all sagittal and coronal plane EEA modules. SLS modeling is a useful tool for acquiring the anatomical knowledge and surgical expertise for performing EEA while avoiding the ethical, religious, and infection-related problems inherent with use of cadaveric specimens. PMID:25323096

  19. [Rigid ureteroscopy and the pulsed laser. Apropos of 325 treated calculi].

    PubMed

    Gautier, J R; Leandri, P; Rossignol, G; Quintens, H; Caissel, J

    1990-01-01

    A pulsed dye laser (Candela) was used in our lithiasis treatment center during the period 02/88-09/89 to remove 325 calculi in 278 patients, requiring 285 endoscopic instrumentations. The pulsed laser allowed to obtain fragmentation of 318 calculi, 238 of which were reduced to thin sand and 80 to coarser fragments. The latter were either cleared using a Dormia probe or further disintegrated by electrohydrolytic shock wave treatment or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). No complication imputable to laser stone fragmentation was noted. Failure of stone clearance was chiefly due to the nature and shape of the stone (black, smooth monohydrated calcium oxalate calculi). The thinness of the laser fiber has made it possible to use small caliber ureteroscopes, thereby increasing the reliability of ureteroscopy. Coupled with ESWL (EDAP LT01), this technique has caused the rate of open surgical removal of ureter confined calculi to fall from 11% to 1%. PMID:2212706

  20. Uncovering the Secret of Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, P.

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is an engineering innovation that has revolutionized the treatment of kidney stone disease since the early 1980s [1] - [3]. Today, SWL is the first-line therapy for millions of patients worldwide with renal and upper urinary stones [3, 4].

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is used to see organs in and near the digestive ... Ultrasound is a way to see the inside of the body using high-frequency sound waves. Endoscopic ...

  2. Cleaning of endodontic root canal by ultrasonics and Nd:YAG laser beam with fiber optic delivery: scanning electron microscopy, endoscopic and microradiographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berna, Norberto; Melis, Marco; Benvenuti, Alessandro; Tosto, Sebastiano; Pierdominici, Fabrizio

    1997-05-01

    12 teeth have been extracted and treated 'in vitro' by ultrasonics and Nd:YAG pulsed laser with fiber optic delivery to compare the cleaning efficiency of the root canal. The optic fiber was equipped with a water-air coaxial cooling system. The ultrasonic device was equipped with a 3 percent NaCl solution douche system. The samples have been prepared according to the technical specifications of the suppliers of laser and ultrasonics and observed by an endodontic endoscope. Cross sections of the samples have been utilized for microradiographic investigations and scanning electron microscopy observations. Local melting has been observed after laser irradiation.Also, vitrification preferentially occurred in the apical zones. The occurrence of vitrification was found strongly dependent on the translation velocity of the laser beam inside the root canal. The laser beam has shown a cleaning efficiency greater than that obtained by ultrasonic procedure.

  3. Percutaneous endoscopic management of intrahepatic stones in patients with altered biliary anatomy: A case series.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Suryaprakash; Bathini, Rajesh; Sharma, Atul; Maydeo, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Incidence of primary intrahepatic stones (IHS) in India is very less as compared to the Far East. However patients with altered biliary anatomy are prone for IHS formation secondary to anastomotic stricture formation. Indian data on percutaneous endoscopic management of IHS is scare. Five patients with IHS were managed percutaneously. All patients had undergone Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy and were not suitable for direct endoscopic intervention. All patients underwent percutaneous biliary drainage followed by cholangioscopy-guided laser lithotripsy. Crushed stones were pushed across the anastomotic site using basket/balloon and ductal clearance was achieved. Good stone pulverization could be achieved in five patients (100 %). Complete ductal clearance could be achieved in all patients (100 %). Cholangioscopy-guided treatment of IHS can be valuable alternative to surgery in select group of patients especially those having dilated biliary tree with absence of intrahepatic strictures. However long-term follow up studies are required to see for recurrence of stone formation. PMID:27041379

  4. Nd:YAG laser treatment for benign lesions of vocal cord through fiber endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pin, Wei-Zheng

    1993-03-01

    This paper describes 120 cases with benign lesions of the vocal cord, such as the polyp and the nodule, treated by laser irradiation and application of Nd:YAG laser and optical fiber carried out through fiber laryngoscope under surface anaesthesia. One-hundred-eleven of the cases were cured, 9 improved, and 0 failed. This method is superior to other methods and has the following features: accuracy, rapidity, non-bleeding, painlessness, easy operation, rare complication, and good effect.

  5. Endoscopic removal of PMMA in hip revision surgery with a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazy, John; Kollmer, Charles; Uppal, Gurvinder S.; Lane, Gregory J.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1991-05-01

    Purpose: to compare CO2 laser to mechanical means of PMMA removal in total hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients requiring hip revision surgery were studied and compared to historical controls. Cement was removed from the femoral canal utilizing a 30 centimeter laparoscope. A CO2 laser waveguide was passed through the laparoscope into the femoral canal and a TV camera was placed over the eye piece to permit visualization of the depths of the femoral canal on a video monitor. The leg was placed in a horizontal position which avoided the pooling of blood or saline in the depths of the femur. Under direct vision the distal plug could be vaporized with a 40 centimeter CO2 laser waveguide. Power settings of 20 to 25 watts and a superpulsed mode were used. A 2 mm suction tube was welded to the outside of the laparoscope permitting aspiration of the products of vaporization. Results: Of 45 hip revisions there were no shaft perforation, fractures or undue loss of bone stock. There was no statistically different stay in hospital time, blood loss or operative time between the CO2 revision group compared to the non-laser revision group, in which cement was removed by mechanical methods. Conclusions: Mechanical methods used in removing bone cement using high speed burrs, reamers, gouges, and osteotomies is technically difficult and fraught with complications including shaft fracture, perforations, and unnecessary loss of bone stock. The authors' experience using the CO2 laser in hip revision surgery has permitted the removal of bone cement. Use of a modified laparoscope has allowed for precise, complete removal of bone cement deep within the femoral shaft without complication or additional operative time. The authors now advocate the use of a CO2 laser with modified laparoscope in hip revision surgery in which bone cement is to be removed from within the femoral shaft.

  6. Optimizing Shock Wave Lithotripsy: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Paul D; Lange, Jessica N; Assimos, Dean G

    2013-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy is a commonly used procedure for eradicating upper urinary tract stones in patients who require treatment. A number of methods have been proposed to improve the results of this procedure, including proper patient selection, modifications in technique, adjunctive therapy to facilitate elimination of fragments, and changes in lithotripter design. This article assesses the utility of these measures through an analysis of contemporary literature. PMID:24082843

  7. Endoscopic mucosal incision by diode laser for early cancer treatment in the alimentary tract: effect of submucosal indocyanine green solution injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takuya; Arai, Tsunenori; Nakamura, Naoko; Tajiri, Hisao; Miura, Soichiro; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1999-06-01

    Mucosal incision technique by diode laser ablation was studied to ensure the operation of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), which is gold standard method for early gastric cancer with little/no risk of lymphnode metastasis. Our method was designed to facilitate grasping a large lesion by hitching the snaring wire on the incised mucosal groove around the lesion. We employed local submucosal injection of indocyanine green (ICG) solution. ICG solution was used to prevent direct laser light penetration to the muscularis propriae owing to strong absorption of 805nm light (absorption coefficent at 805 nm is about 200cm-1). We used diode laser radiation with an output of 25W by contact (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 kg/cm2) and non-contact irradiation methods. In the preliminary experiment with resected porcine stomach, muscularis propriae was intact by the 60s non-contact irradiation or the 8s contact irradiation with contact pressure of 1kg/cm2. In the endoscopic experiment we used 3 dogs. Using conical contact probe, we successfully demonstrated 3cm diameter circular incision with sharp groove in 10 minutes. We could place the snaring wire on the incised groove. Histology of the endoscopically incised canine stomach revealed that the submucosal layer welled up to 6mm in thickness and the bottom of the incision groove reached 1.9mm at deepest below the mucosal muscle. The thickness of the coagulation layer around the incised groove was up to 1.8mm. No damage was seen a the muscularis propriae. We demonstrate easy as well as sure snaring by using our laser incision technique. We think our technique may be available to enhance the efficacy of EMR for early gastric cancer including the lesion over 2cm in diameter.

  8. Retrospective measures on applying endoscopic YAG laser to treat alimentary canal diseases from 1983 to 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Zhong; Wu, Ning-Xiao; Gao, Su-ping; Rong, Zeng-Qin

    1996-05-01

    It was in 1983 when we started to apply YAG laser to do experiments on animal and fresh internal organs off the body to confirm its effectiveness. Then we started to use it in clinical practice. Up to October 1995, in the twelve years, we treated 1075 cases, 2574 person times. Seven-hundred-seventy-nine cases of various esophagostenosis. Four-hundred-fifty-six of them were malignant stenosis, 295 anastomostenosis, 15 stenosis after radiotherapeutics, 7 corrosive anastomostenosis, 6 inflammatory anastomostenosis, plus we cured 5 cardia losses of relax, and 241 polyps in the alimentary canal. Among the 2154 polyps cured, 6 were that of esophagus, 6 that of cardia, 25 that of stomach, 10 that of duodenum, 194 that of large intestine. In addition, we treated 15 alimentary canal bleeding and 35 malignant colon and tectum cancers. Our experience in laser operating on the coelom has become richer and richer. The methods we used are being widened. The range of our laser application is being enlarged. We have gained our own experience in preventing complications and keeping the endoscopy from being damaged. The cure rate of the non-malignant had raised up to 98.7%. Cure rate of the malignant had raised up to 91%. The alimentary canal polyps can be cured perfectly. It is hard to tell whether YAG laser or high frequency electroresection has the advantage over the other. Besides, this paper is going to put forward several questions to discuss.

  9. Miniaturized optical fiber endoscope without inertial scan for simultaneous imaging and laser microsurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Jost; Metz, Philipp; Gerken, Martina; Jalali, Bahram

    2013-09-01

    The current autostereoscopic projection system is accomplished by array projectors. It is easy to realize optically but has a drawback with size. Another type is to place the shutter on the screen. It saves the volume but reduces the efficiency depending on how many views are produced. The shutter in the lens aperture has the same efficiency problem, too. To overcome these problems, a full HD autostereoscopic projector based on the lens aperture switching type is proposed. It has RGB laser sources and can produce 16-views or even higher stereoscopic images. This system removes the shutter in the lens aperture by the opti-mechanism itself. The specific light on the lens aperture coming from the point on the DMD is reflected to different angles. The proper angle of light is generated in the object side by the relay and folding system. The UHP lamps or the LED rays are difficult to constrain in a relative small cone angle. For this reason, the laser is applied to the design. The very small etendue of the laser is good for this architecture. The rays are combined by dichroic filter from RGB laser sources then forming and expanding to the mirror. The mirror is synchronized with DMD by the DSP control system. The images of different views are generated by DMD and specific position of the mirror. By the double lenticular screen, the lens aperture is imaged to the observer's viewing zone and the 3D scene is created.

  10. [The role of the laser in urology].

    PubMed

    Anidjar, M; Cussenot, O; Ravery, V; Teillac, P; Le Duc, A; Boccon-Gibod, L

    1995-04-01

    There is currently a renewed interest in laser in the field of urology, essentially for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy, as a result of recent developments in the field of fibres. Laser is light coherent in time and space emitted continuously or in pulses. Only its thermal and photochemical properties are used in urology. Endoscopic coagulation of superficial bladder tumours by Nd YAG laser does not seem to be better than classical endoscopic resection, at the present time, as although it is less haemorrhagic, it does not decrease the recurrence rate. Photochemotherapy of bladder carcinoma in situ still constitutes a complex treatment protocol reserved for specialized centres. Lastly, upper urinary tract tumours can be treated by Nd YAG laser coagulation, in rare indications which are the same as those of ureteroscopic or percutaneous resection. The recent development of lateral firing laser fibres and contact tip fibres has led to a renewed interest in laser in benign prostatic hypertrophy. Two different techniques have been proposed: Nd YAG laser coagulation under direct visual or ultrasound control (TULIP), which gives delayed objective results (two or three months) and contact tissue vaporization (Nd YAG, diode), whose effects are more immediate. In both cases, intraoperative bleeding is minimal and the length of hospital stay is decreased, but the duration of urine drainage remains to be defined. Endoscopic pulsed laser urinary lithotripsy (dye, Ho YAG), although effective and atraumatic, is not justified at the present time because of its high cost compared to mechanical percussion lithotripters. Lastly, laser treatment for urethral stricture has not been found to be superior to classical scalpel urethrotomy and laser tissue welding is still in the experimental stages. In conclusion, laser technology, especially fibers, has currently reached an important phase of development with applications for urological disease, essentially in the treatment

  11. Comparison of urinary calculus fragmentation during Ho:YAG and Er:YAG lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Ho; Teichman, Joel H.; Welch, A. J.

    2005-04-01

    We compared urinary calculus fragmentation with long pulsed Ho:YAG (λ= 2.12 μm) versus Er:YAG (λ = 2.94 μm) lasers. We measured the ablation width, depth, volume and efficiency as a function of pulse energy from calculus threshold energy to clinical energy typically used for Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy. Ablation effects were evaluated for three types of urinary calculi (calcium oxalate monohydrate, cystine, and uric acid), for single and multiple pulses applied at various optical energy levels. By means of comparing laser-induced crater topography and ablation volume for each stone type, the feasibility of Er:YAG laser lithotripsy was appraised. The Er:YAG laser pulse energy generated deeper and narrower crater shapes with relatively smooth contours whereas the Ho:YAG laser produced shallower and wider craters with irregular shapes. In terms of multiple pulses ablation, the Er:YAG produced larger ablation volume than Ho:YAG. The deeper crater induced by the Er:YAG was attributed to the higher absorption coefficient of stones at the 2.94 μm wavelength, and widening of crater by Ho:YAG was perhaps caused by lateral expansion of ablated material. Comparing the ablation efficiency, Er:YAG was superior to Ho:YAG for both single and five-pulses.

  12. Treatment for intranasal synechiae by CO2 laser under endoscopic visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yunhai; Yin, Shankai

    2005-07-01

    Endonasal low intensity laser therapy (ELILT) began in China in 1998. Now in China it is widely applied to treat hyperlipidemia and brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, poststroke depression, intractable headache, ache in head or face, cerebral thrombosis, acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease, migraine, brain lesion and mild cognitive impairment. There are four pathways mediating EILILT, Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells. Two unhealth acupoints of Yangming channal inside nose might mediate the one as is low intensity laser acupuncture. Unbalance autonomic nervous systems might be modulated. Blood cells might mediate the one as is intravascular low intensity laser therapy. These three pathways are integrated in ELILT so that serum amyloid β protein, malformation rate of erythrocyte, CCK-8, the level of viscosity at lower shear rates and hematocrit, or serum lipid might decrease, and melanin production/SOD activity or β endorphin might increase after ELILT treatment. These results indicate ELILT might work, but it need to be verified by randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  13. Computed tomographic evaluation of gallstone calcification for biliary lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Caslowitz, P L; Fishman, E K; Kafonek, D R; Lillemoe, K D; Mitchell, S; Widlus, D M; Saba, G P

    1991-04-01

    As the Food and Drug Administration trials for biliary lithotripsy in the United States near completion, future criteria for patient eligibility remain to be defined. Gallstone calcification greater than 3-mm partial rim on plain film (KUB) or oral cholecystogram (OCG) has excluded patients thus far, since early results of gallstone clearance (lithotripsy plus chemodissolution) were suboptimal with calcified stones. To evaluate the usefulness of these criteria for gallstone fragmentation, computed tomographic (CT) scans were performed on 20 patients immediately prior to lithotripsy to evaluate gallstone density and 24 hours after lithotripsy to observe the CT appearance of fragmentation. The adequacy of fragmentation was determined by pre- and post-lithotripsy sonography. This report constitutes the results of these investigations. PMID:10149158

  14. Complications of non-endoscopic percutaneous laser disc decompression and nucleotomy with the neodymium: YAG laser 1064 nm.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, J

    2004-10-01

    In this review, we discuss how nonendoscopic percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and nucleotomy, using the YAG laser 1064, now has reinforced itself as a minimally invasive procedure in discogenic, vertebral pain syndromes, created by bulging, protrusions, and contained and uncontained extrusions in all areas of the spine. The rate of complication is an important criterion of the application of this new method. 3377 patients were treated with this method in the period of November 11, 1989 to April 30, 2002. While 356 patients' cervical spine was operated on, a further 38 patients had their thoracic spine operated on. Six weeks later, a prospective, consecutive control followed with an uninterrupted recording. Subsequently, all complications that occurred in this time frame were recorded. A comparison was carried out between the complication rate as covered by the literature of other intradiscal percutaneous methods and open disc surgery. Using the Nd-YAG laser 1064 nm, PLDD is generally evaluated with a complication rate of 0.5%. In the cervical spine area, the complication rate was 1.0%. No significant complications followed the thoracic intervention. In comparison to figures suggested by the relevant literature regarding possible complications with other procedures, this particular procedure is relative risk-free. In conjunction with the satisfying results regarding pain and paralysis removal, the extraordinarily low complication density of Nd-YAG PLDD culminates in the recommendation that the procedure should be applied to patients who are between unsuccessful conservative therapy and other operative methods. PMID:15671715

  15. Retrospective analysis of a combined endoscopic and transcutaneous technique for the management of parotid salivary gland stones.

    PubMed

    Numminen, Jura; Sillanpää, Saara; Virtanen, Jussi; Sipilä, Markku; Rautiainen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Sialendoscopy is used in the diagnosis and treatment of various symptoms relating to the salivary gland, e.g. chronic swelling or obstruction and inflammation of the salivary duct. Small intraductal stones can be removed with various instruments during sialendoscopy, whereas larger ones can be fragmented with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy or laser. However, 5-10% of the patients with parotid stones cannot be treated with these methods. In patients with large impacted stones or stones in a hilus area, a combined endoscopic and transcutaneous technique can be employed. The stone is approached endoscopically, a skin flap is raised over or a small incision is made through the illuminated area, and the stone is removed by an external route with minimal morbidity. This retrospective study analysed the cases of 8 patients treated using the combined technique, 6 of whom became symptom free. Superficial parotidectomy was performed in 1 patient. No complications were observed, and ductal stents were not used. The average diameter of the stones was 7.6 mm (range 7.0-10.2). The combined technique is recommended for the removal of large and impacted intraductal stones in the parotid gland. No major complications have been reported. PMID:25500629

  16. Endoscopic palliation of colorectal benign and malignant tumors: YAG laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberto, Lorenzo; Ranzato, Riccardo; Marino, Saverio; Angriman, Imerio; Vella, Vincenzo; Donadi, Michele; D'Amico, D. F.

    1997-12-01

    From November 1, 1992 to January 31, 1997, we treated 189 pts: 113 males and 76 females, of mean age 67 yrs. 148 pts were affected with colo-rectal cancer and 41 pts with extensive carpet benign tumors. Tumor location was: rectum in 115 pts, recto-sigmoid joint in 31 pts, colo-rectal anastomosis in 25 pts, sigmoid colon in 15 pts, descending colon in 2 pts and cecum in 1 pt. 26 pts were treated with diathermo-therapy, 15 pts with dilatation, 12 pts with radiotherapy, 5 pts with chemotherapy, 1 pt with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Yag-laser palliation gave good results in 90% (170 - 189) with an average survival of 24 weeks; there were complications due to the treatment in due pts (1%) without hospital mortality.

  17. Patient and personnel exposure during extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Glaze, S; LeBlanc, A D; Bushong, S C; Griffith, D P

    1987-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has provided a nonsurgical approach to treatment of renal stones. The Dornier lithotripter uses dual image intensified x-ray systems to center the stone before treatment. Three imaging modes are offered: a fluoroscopic mode and two video spot filming modes. The average entrance exposure to the stone side of the typical patient at our facility is 2.6 X 10(-3) C kg-1 (10 R) [range: 0.5-7.7 X 10(-3) C kg-1 (2-30 R)] which is comparable and often much less than that reported for percutaneous lithotripsy. Recommendations are made for minimizing patient exposure. Scattered radiation levels in the lithotripter room are presented. We have determined that Pb protective apparel is not required during this procedure provided x-ray operation is temporarily halted should personnel be required to lean directly over the tub to attend to the patient. If the walls of the ESWL room are greater than 1.83 m (6 feet) from the tub, shielding in addition to conventional construction is not required. PMID:3679826

  18. [TRANSURETHRAL CONTACT URETERAL LITHOTRIPSY IN A GASEOUS (CO2) MEDIUM].

    PubMed

    Glybochko, P V; Aljaev, Ju G; Rapoport, L M; Carichenko, D G; Arzumanjan, E G

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes for the first time the method of contact ureteral lithotripsy in gaseous (CO2) medium. It presents the results of a comparative study of urolithiasis patients treated with this treatment modality (study group, n=30) and with traditional contact ureteral lithotripsy in liquid medium (control group, n=30). The incidence of retrograde migration of calculus in the kidney in the study group was 0%, while it was 16.6% in the control group. Acute or exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis was diagnosed in only 3 (10%) patients in the control group. The suggested method of contact ureteral lithotripsy is safe and provides several advantages over traditional contact ureteral lithotripsy in a fluid medium, such as: physiologic validity, absence of calculus hypermobility (increased mobility), improved visualization during surgery and high cost effectiveness. PMID:26237808

  19. [Using safocid for antibiotic prophylaxis in minimally-invasive endoscopic operations and manipulations].

    PubMed

    Proskurin, A A; Asfandiiarov, F R; Kalashnikov, E S; Miroshnikov, V M

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy of safocid (1 g of seknidasol, 1 g of azitromycin, 150 mg of fluconasol) was studied in antibiotic prophylaxis before conduction of urological endoscopic operations: diagnostic cystoscopy, renal stenting, ureteroscopy with contact lithotripsy. A total of 128 patients of the urological department received a single safocid dose 90 min before surgical intervention. Safocid efficacy in prevention of infectious complications reached 96.2%. PMID:21427992

  20. Outcome of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A single-center prospective study in 45 patients

    PubMed Central

    Lönnebro, Ragnar; Stigliano, Serena; Haas, Stephan L; Swahn, Fredrik; Enochsson, Lars; Noel, Rozh; Segersvärd, Ralf; Chiaro, Marco Del; Verbeke, Caroline S; Arnelo, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of pre-malignant and malignant lesions in the bile duct and the pancreas is sometimes cumbersome. This applies in particular to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN) and bile duct strictures in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Aims To evaluate in a prospective cohort study the sensitivity and specificity of probe-based confocal laser microscopy (pCLE) during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Methods We performed pCLE together with mother-baby endoscopy (SpyGlass) during 50 ERCP sessions in 45 patients. The Miami and Paris criteria were applied. Clinical diagnosis via imaging was compared to pCLE and the final pathological diagnosis from surgically-resected, biopsy, or cytology specimens. Patients were followed up for at least 1 year. Results We were able to perform pCLE in all patients. Prior to endoscopy, the diagnosis was benign in 23 patients and undetermined (suspicious) in 16 patients, while six patients had an unequivocal diagnosis of malignancy. Sensitivity was 91% and specificity 52%. The positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) was 82% and 100%, respectively. Apart from mild post-ERCP pancreatitis in two patients, no complications occurred. Conclusions Our study showed that pCLE is a safe, expert endoscopic method with high technical feasibility, high sensitivity and high NPV. It provided diagnostic information that can be helpful for decisions on patient management, especially in the case of IPMN and unclear pancreatic lesions, in individuals whom are at increased risk for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26668748

  1. Endoscopic therapy in chronic pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Seicean, Andrada; Vultur, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy in chronic pancreatitis (CP) aims to provide pain relief and to treat local complications, by using the decompression of the pancreatic duct and the drainage of pseudocysts and biliary strictures, respectively. This is the reason for using it as first-line therapy for painful uncomplicated CP. The clinical response has to be evaluated at 6-8 weeks, when surgery may be chosen. This article reviews the main possibilities of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) therapies. Endotherapy for pancreatic ductal stones uses ultrasound wave lithotripsy and sometimes additional stone extractions. The treatment of pancreatic duct strictures consists of a single large stenting for 1 year. If the stricture persists, simultaneous multiple stents are applied. In case of unsuccessful ERCP, the EUS-guided drainage of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) or a rendezvous technique can solve the ductal strictures. EUS-guided celiac plexus block has limited efficiency in CP. The drainage of symptomatic or complicated pancreatic pseudocysts can be performed transpapillarily or transgastrically/transduodenally, preferably by EUS guidance. When the biliary stricture is symptomatic or progressive, multiple plastic stents are indicated. In conclusion, as in many fields of symptomatic treatment, endoscopy remains the first choice, either by using ERCP or EUS-guided procedures, after consideration of a multidisciplinary team with endoscopists, surgeons, and radiologists. However, what is crucial is establishing the right timing for surgery. PMID:25565876

  2. Axial-Stereo 3-D Optical Metrology for Inner Profile of Pipes Using a Scanning Laser Endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Johnston, Richard S.; Melville, C. David; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-07-01

    As the rapid progress in the development of optoelectronic components and computational power, 3-D optical metrology becomes more and more popular in manufacturing and quality control due to its flexibility and high speed. However, most of the optical metrology methods are limited to external surfaces. This article proposed a new approach to measure tiny internal 3-D surfaces with a scanning fiber endoscope and axial-stereo vision algorithm. A dense, accurate point cloud of internally machined threads was generated to compare with its corresponding X-ray 3-D data as ground truth, and the quantification was analyzed by Iterative Closest Points algorithm.

  3. Axial-Stereo 3-D Optical Metrology for Inner Profile of Pipes Using a Scanning Laser Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Johnston, Richard S.; Melville, C. David; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    As the rapid progress in the development of optoelectronic components and computational power, 3D optical metrology becomes more and more popular in manufacturing and quality control due to its flexibility and high speed. However, most of the optical metrology methods are limited to external surfaces. This paper proposed a new approach to measure tiny internal 3D surfaces with a scanning fiber endoscope and axial-stereo vision algorithm. A dense, accurate point cloud of internally machined threads was generated to compare with its corresponding X-ray 3D data as ground truth, and the quantification was analyzed by Iterative Closest Points algorithm. PMID:26640425

  4. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for Management of Residual Stones after Ureterolithotripsy versus Mini-Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhichao; Zhao, Xiaokun; Zhang, Lei; Zhong, Zhaohui; Xu, Ran; Zhang, Lianping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in managing residual stones after ureterolithotripsy and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was carried out of 71 patients with proximal urinary tract stones (greater than 10 mm) who underwent ureterolithotripsy or mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy at a single institution from 2009 to 2011. The 71 patients were divided into two groups: group I (n = 37) comprised patients who underwent ureterolithotripsy, and group II (n = 34) comprised patients who underwent mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Clinical characteristics, stone-free rates, stone demographics, and complications were evaluated. Results The overall stone-free rate was 90.1%. The stone-free rates in groups I and II were 97.3% and 82.4%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in the stone-free rates between groups I and II (P = 0.035). Neither serious intraoperative nor postoperative complications were observed. No significant difference in complications was observed between the two groups (P = 0.472). Conclusions The results of our study suggest that extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is an effective and safe auxiliary procedure for managing residual stones after primary endoscopic surgery. This procedure is associated with a satisfactory stone-free rate and a low complication rate, particularly for residual stones after ureteroscopic procedures. PMID:23785516

  5. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The nasal endoscope is a small, lighted metal telescope placed into the nostril. The endoscope allows the ... sinus surgery involves the use of a small telescope (nasal endoscope) that is inserted through the nostril ...

  6. Massive Pulmonary Calculi Embolism: A Novel Complication of Pneumatic Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pneumatic lithotripsy is a minimally invasive technique mainly for the treatment of urinary staghorn stones. Previous literatures have reported some therapeutic complications during or after this procedure, but calculi embolism has not been mentioned before. We report here a fatal case of calculi-induced pulmonary embolism in an adult woman who underwent pneumatic lithotripsy. An autopsy did not reveal any evidence of pulmonary embolism. However, light microscopy revealed noticeable presence of calculi in pulmonary arterioles and capillaries, as evidenced by environmental scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The primary determinants of calculi embolism include intrarenal pressure, and volume and viscosity of the calculi fragments formation. Vascular intravasation of smashed calculi might increase pulmonary vascular resistance and hypoxemia and decrease cardiac output. This case report intends to provide information for clinicians to consider the probability of intraoperative calculi embolism during lithotripsies when patients develop typical symptoms of acute pulmonary embolism. PMID:26222867

  7. Observation of cavitation during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    A system was built to detect cavitation in pig kidney during shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) with a Dornier HM3 lithotripter. Active detection, using echo on B-mode ultrasound, and passive cavitation detection (PCD), using coincident signals on confocal, orthogonal receivers, were equally sensitive and were used to interrogate the renal collecting system (urine) and the kidney parenchyma (tissue). Cavitation was detected in urine immediately upon SW administration in urine or urine plus X-ray contrast agent, but in tissue, cavitation required hundreds of SWs to initiate. Localization of cavitation was confirmed by fluoroscopy, sonography, and by thermally marking the kidney using the PCD receivers as high intensity focused ultrasound sources. Cavitation collapse times in tissue and native urine were about the same but less than in urine after injection of X-ray contrast agent. Cavitation, especially in the urine space, was observed to evolve from a sparse field to a dense field with strong acoustic collapse emissions to a very dense field that no longer produced detectable collapse. The finding that cavitation occurs in kidney tissue is a critical step toward determining the mechanisms of tissue injury in SWL. [Work sup ported by NIH (DK43881, DK55674, FIRCA), ONRIFO, CRDF and NSBRI SMS00203.

  8. Management of lower pole renal calculi: shock wave lithotripsy versus percutaneous nephrolithotomy versus flexible ureteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Preminger, Glenn M

    2006-04-01

    Current ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy devices and stone retrieval technology allow for the treatment of calculi located throughout the intra-renal collecting system. Difficulty accessing lower pole calculi, especially when the holmium laser fiber is utilized, is often encountered. Herein we review our experience where lower pole renal calculi were ureteroscopically managed by holmium laser fragmentation, either in situ, or by first displacing the stone into a less dependent position with the aid of a nitinol stone retrieval device. Lower pole stones less than 20 mm can be primarily treated by ureteroscopic means in patients: that are obese; have a bleeding diathesis; with stones resistant to shockwave lithotripsy (SWL); with complicated intra-renal anatomy; or as a salvage procedure after failed SWL. Lower pole calculi are fragmented with a 200 microm holmium laser fiber via a 7.5 F flexible ureteroscope. For those patients where the laser fiber reduced ureteroscopic deflection, precluding re-entry into the lower pole calyx, a 1.9 F nitinol basket is used to displace the lower pole calculus into a more favorable position, thus allowing for easier fragmentation. A nitinol device passed into the lower pole, through the ureteroscope, for stone displacement cause only a minimal loss of deflection and no significant impact on irrigation. Eighty-five percent of patients were stone free by IVP or CT scan performed at 3 months. Ureteroscopic management of lower pole calculi is a reasonable alternative to SWL or percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) in patients with low volume stone disease. If the stone cannot be fragmented in situ, nitinol basket or grasper retrieval, through a fully deflected ureteroscope, allows for repositioning of the stone into a less dependant position, thus facilitating stone fragmentation. PMID:16463145

  9. [beta 2-Adrenomimetics before and after extracorporeal lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Pytel', Iu A; Rapoport, D M; Rudenko, V I; Chaban, A V

    1998-01-01

    Successful disintegration of the calculus in nephrolithiasis patients is impossible without normalization of the upper urinary tracts urodynamics in dyskinesia. We employ combined treatment with high-selective beta-2-adrenomimetic hexoprenalin (hinipral) to improve migration of the concrement fragments and therefore to prevent ureteral occlusion, acute pyelonephritis and renal colic. Hexoprenalin (hinipral) is taken 6 tablets a day or intravenously in drops (5 ml per 100 ml of saline) 3-5 days before and for 10-12 days after extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy. Adjuvant use of hexoprenalin in combined treatment of nephrolithiasis complicated by ureteropelvic dysfunction allows effective conduction of lithotripsy. PMID:9820034

  10. Lithotripsy of gallstones by means of a quality-switched giant-pulse neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. Basic in vitro studies using a highly flexible fiber system.

    PubMed

    Hochberger, J; Gruber, E; Wirtz, P; Dürr, U; Kolb, A; Zanger, U; Hahn, E G; Ell, C

    1991-11-01

    The quality-switched neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser represents a new instrument for athermal fragmentation of gallstones by transformation of optical energy into mechanical energy in the form of shock waves via local plasma formation. A highly flexible 300-micron fiber transmission system was used in basic investigations to determine the influence of varying pulse repetition rates (5-30 Hz) and pulse energies (15 and 20 mJ) on shock wave intensity and stone fragmentation in vitro for 105 biliary calculi of known size and chemical composition. After performance of 1200 shock wave pressure measurements using polyvinylidenefluoride hydrophones, stone fragmentation was analyzed by determination of fragment removal rates (volume of fragments removed per fragmentation time), ablation rates (mean volume removed per laser pulse), and median fragment sizes for each laser setting. With the quality-switched neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser system, all concrements could be reliably disintegrated into small fragments (median diameter, 0.7-1.7 mm). Compared with pure cholesterol stones, a significantly higher fragment removal rate was achieved in cholesterol stones containing 30% calcium phosphate (P = 0.039), in cholesterol stones containing 20% pigment (P = 0.015), and in pure pigment stones (P = 0.007). Fragment removal rates, local shock wave pressures, and median grain sizes were significantly higher at a pulse energy of 20 mJ than with 15 mJ. Shock wave pressures showed a distinct dependence on pulse repetition rates at 20 mJ, yet not at 15 mJ. Because there is no evident hazard of thermal damage to tissue using the quality-switched neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, it appears to be a promising device for nonsurgical biliary stone therapy. PMID:1682203

  11. Mirizzi Syndrome with Endoscopic Ultrasound Image

    PubMed Central

    Rayapudi, K.; Gholami, P.; Olyaee, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 66-year-old Caucasian man with type 1 Mirizzi syndrome diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound. He presented with acute onset of jaundice, malaise, dark urine over 3–4 days, and was found to have obstructive jaundice on lab testing. CT scan of the abdomen showed intrahepatic biliary ductal dilation, a 1.5 cm common bile duct (CBD) above the pancreas, and possible stones in the CBD, but no masses. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) by a community gastroenterologist failed to cannulate the CBD. At the University Center, type 1 Mirizzi syndrome was noted on endoscopic ultrasound with narrowing of the CBD with extrinsic compression from cystic duct stone. During repeat ERCP, the CBD could be cannulated over the pancreatic duct wire. A mid CBD narrowing, distal CBD stones, proximal CBD and extrahepatic duct dilation were noted, and biliary sphincterotomy was performed. A small stone in the distal CBD was removed with an extraction balloon. The cystic duct stone was moved with the biliary balloon into the CBD, mechanical basket lithotripsy was performed and stone fragments were delivered out with an extraction balloon. The patient was seen 7 weeks later in the clinic. Skin and scleral icterus had cleared up and he is scheduled for an elective cholecystectomy. Mirizzi syndrome refers to biliary obstruction resulting from impacted stone in the cystic duct or neck of the gallbladder and commonly presents with obstructive jaundice. Type 1 does not have cholecystocholedochal fistulas, but they present in types 2, 3 and 4. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy. Endoscopic treatment is effective and can also be used as a temporizing measure or definitive treatment in poor surgical risk candidates. PMID:23741207

  12. Endoscopic photodynamic therapy (PDT) for oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, Keyvan

    2006-06-01

    Endoscopic photodynamic therapy (PDT) is undertaken only when tumour is visible endoscopically with malignancy biopsy confirmed. Patients will be either Group A: inoperable cases with locally advanced cancer when the aim is palliation of dysphagia, or Group E: patients with early stage I-II disease who are unsuitable for surgery or decline operation, when the intent is curative. Following assessment for suitability for PDT and counselling, Photofrin 2mg/(kgbw) is administered 24-72h before endoscopic illumination using a Diode 630nm laser. Illumination may be either interstitial or intraluminal at a dose of 100-200J/cm. PMID:25049097

  13. Delivery of Erbium:YAG laser radiation through side-firing germanium oxide optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Anthony K.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2006-02-01

    The Erbium:YAG laser is currently being tested experimentally for endoscopic applications in urology, including more efficient laser lithotripsy and more precise incision of urethral strictures than the Holmium:YAG laser. While side-firing silica fibers are available for use with the Ho:YAG laser in urology, no such fibers exist for use with the Er:YAG laser. These applications may benefit from the availability of a side-firing, mid-infrared optical fiber capable of delivering the laser radiation at a 90-degree angle to the tissue. The objective of this study is to describe the simple construction and characterization of a side-firing germanium oxide fiber for potential use in endoscopic laser surgery. Side-firing fibers were constructed from 450-micron-core germanium oxide fibers of 1.45-m-length by polishing the distal tip at a 45-degree angle and placing a 1-cm-long protective quartz cap over the fiber tip. Er:YAG laser radiation with a wavelength of 2.94 microns, pulse duration of 300 microseconds, pulse repetition rate of 3 Hz, and pulse energies of from 5 to 550 mJ was coupled into the fibers. The fiber transmission rate and damage threshold measured 48 +/- 4 % and 149 +/- 37 mJ, respectively (n = 6 fibers). By comparison, fiber transmission through normal germanium oxide trunk fibers measured 66 +/- 3 %, with no observed damage (n = 5 fibers). Sufficient pulse energies were transmitted through the side-firing fibers for contact tissue ablation. Although these initial tests are promising, further studies will need to be conducted, focusing on assembly of more flexible, smaller diameter fibers, fiber bending transmission tests, long-term fiber reliability tests, and improvement of the fiber output spatial beam profile.

  14. Endoscopic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Sung, Kung-Bin; Collier, Tom; Clark, Anne; Arifler, Dizem; Lacy, Alicia; Descour, Michael; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    In vivo endoscopic optical microscopy provides a tool to assess tissue architecture and morphology with contrast and resolution similar to that provided by standard histopathology – without need for physical tissue removal. In this article, we focus on optical imaging technologies that have the potential to dramatically improve the detection, prevention, and therapy of epithelial cancers. Epithelial pre-cancers and cancers are associated with a variety of morphologic, architectural, and molecular changes, which currently can be assessed only through invasive, painful biopsy. Optical imaging is ideally suited to detecting cancer-related alterations because it can detect biochemical and morphologic alterations with sub-cellular resolution throughout the entire epithelial thickness. Optical techniques can be implemented non-invasively, in real time, and at low cost to survey the tissue surface at risk. Our manuscript focuses primarily on modalities that currently are the most developed: reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). However, recent advances in fluorescence-based endoscopic microscopy also are reviewed briefly. We discuss the basic principles of these emerging technologies and their current and potential applications in early cancer detection. We also present research activities focused on development of exogenous contrast agents that can enhance the morphological features important for cancer detection and that have the potential to allow vital molecular imaging of cancer-related biomarkers. In conclusion, we discuss future improvements to the technology needed to develop robust clinical devices. PMID:14646041

  15. Endoscopic Removal of a Nitinol Mesh Stent from the Ureteropelvic Junction after 15 Years

    PubMed Central

    Smrkolj, Tomaž; Šalinović, Domagoj

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with a large stone encrusted on a nitinol mesh stent in the ureteropelvic junction. The stent was inserted in the year 2000 after failure of two pyeloplasty procedures performed due to symptomatic ureteropelvic junction stenosis. By combining minimally invasive urinary stone therapies—extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, semirigid ureterorenoscopy with laser lithotripsy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy—it was possible to completely remove the encrusted stone and nitinol mesh stent that was implanted for 15 years, rendering the patient symptom and obstruction free. PMID:26697258

  16. Holmium:YAG surgical lasers.

    PubMed

    1995-03-01

    "Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG)" is the shorthand name for a family of solid-state lasers that use the doping element holmium in a laser crystal (e.g., YAG [yttrium-aluminum-garnet]) and that emit energy at approximately 2.1 microns. This wavelength is relatively new to medicine and has been used in laser surgery for only about the last six years. Like the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser when it was first used clinically, the Ho:YAG laser is poised for rapid and wide-spread use. Ho:YAG lasers, like CO2 lasers, offer precise cutting with minimal damage to adjacent tissue; however, unlike CO2 lasers, they also offer fiberoptic delivery (which is ideal for endoscopic use) and the ability to treat tissue in a liquid-filled environment (e.g., saline, blood). The initial specialty for which the Ho:YAG laser was used was arthroscopic surgery, especially diskectomy. Today, it is effectively used in many surgical specialties, including general surgery, urology, laparoscopy, neurosurgery, lithotripsy, angioplasty, orthopedic surgery (which includes procedures such as meniscectomy, bone sculpting [may also be performed in plastic surgery], and some experimental surgery, such as cartilage shrinking to tighten loose joints), and dentistry. Because of its broad range of potential applications, it has been called the "Swiss Army Knife" of lasers. High-powered Ho:YAG lasers, which enable surgeons to work more quickly and cut more smoothly, have been made available only within the last three years (units offering > 20 W) to 18 months (units offering > 60 W). Because of this rapid increase, high-powered units are still relatively expensive, and it is not yet clear whether maximum power outputs will continue to increase or whether the cost of higher-power units will begin to come down. Although low-power and high-power Ho:YAG lasers can be used for the same procedures, their different ranges of possible clinical techniques make them better suited to different applications: low-power units are

  17. Damage mechanisms in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza

    Shock wave lithotripsy is a 'non-invasive' therapy for treating kidney stones. Focused shock waves fragment stones to a size that can be passed naturally. There is, however, considerable tissue injury, and the mechanisms of stone fragmentation and tissue injury are not well understood. This work investigates potential tissue damage mechanisms, with an aim towards enhancing stone fragmentation and minimizing tissue damage. Lysis of red blood cells (RBC's) due to in vitro exposure to shock waves was investigated. Fluid flow-fields induced by a non-uniform shock wave, as well as radial expansion/implosion of a bubble was hypothesized to cause cell lysis. Both the above flow-fields constitute an unsteady extensional flow, exerting inertial as well as viscous forces on the RBC membrane. The resultant membrane tension and the membrane areal strain due to the above flow-fields were estimated. Both were found to exert a significantly higher inertial force (50--100 mN/m) than the critical membrane tension (10 mN/m). Bubble-induced flow-field was estimated to last for a longer duration (˜1 microsec) compared to the shock-induced flow (˜1 ns) and hence, was predicted to be lytically more effective, in typical in vitro experimental conditions. However, in vivo conditions severely constrain bubble growth, and cell lysis due to shock-induced shear could be dominant. Hemolysis due to shock-induced shear, in absence of cavitation, was experimentally investigated. The lithotripter-generated shock wave was refocused by a parabolic reflector. This refocused wave-field had a tighter focus (smaller beam-width and a higher amplitude) than the lithotripter wave-field. Cavitation was eliminated by applying overpressure to the fluid. Acoustic emissions due to bubble activity were monitored by a novel passive cavitation detector (HP-PCD). Aluminum foils were also used to differentiate cavitational from non-cavitational mode of damage. RBC's were exposed to the reflected wave-field from

  18. Endoscopic simple prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Fiutowski, Marek; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Słojewski, Marcin; Szydełko, Tomasz; Szymański, Michał; Demkow, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many options exist for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), laser surgery, and open adenomectomy. Recently, endoscopic techniques have been used in the treatment of BPH. Material and methods We reviewed clinical studies in PubMed describing minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for the treatment of BPH. Results Laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) and robotic–assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) were introduced in the early 2000s. These operative techniques have been standardized and reproducible, with some individual modifications. Studies analyzing the outcomes of LA and RASP have reported significant improvements in urinary flow and decreases in patient International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). These minimally invasive approaches have resulted in a lower rate of complications, shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, faster recoveries, and an earlier return to work. Conclusions Minimally invasive techniques such as LA and RASP for the treatment BPH are safe, efficacious, and allow faster recovery. These procedures have a short learning curve and offer new options for the surgeon treating BPH. PMID:25667758

  19. [Endoscopic management of urethral stricture].

    PubMed

    Rossi Neto, R; Tschirdewahn, S; Tschirderwahn, S; Rose, A; vom Dorp, F; Rübben, H

    2010-06-01

    Great progress has been seen in the treatment of urethral strictures since the first endoscopic urethrotomy was performed in 1893 by Felix Martin Oberländer in Dresden, Germany. With the introduction of endoscopic laser therapy and the variety of urethral reconstruction methods other ways to treat this important urologic entity became available. Despite this progress, urethrotomy still represents the preferred treatment concept for primary, short and bulbar urethral strictures. In this study we performed a 2-year retrospective analysis of 20 patients undergoing primary endoscopic urethrotomy by single bulbar or penile narrowing. A high incidence of recurrence was seen in 70% of the patients. Nevertheless, direct vision urethrotomy represented a safe and effective transitory method to treat these patients. Moreover, 80% of the patients preferred, in cases of recurrence, a repeated urethrotomy as the treatment of choice. Although the long-term results evidence high relapse rates after the first and second procedures, there have been no sufficient data in the literature which support the use of other methods. Furthermore, primary endoscopic management of urethral strictures remains a simple, safe, and cost-effective procedure that should be indicated before more invasive approaches are taken to provide relief to these patients from this limiting problem. PMID:20544332

  20. Experience of curing serious obstruction of advanced-stage upper digestive tract tumor using laser under endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Man-Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Qiang; Zhang, Feng-Qiu; Kong, De-Jia; Tang, Li-Bin

    1998-11-01

    The patients who suffer from upper digestive tract tumor, such as cancer of esophagus, cancer of cardia, all have serious obstruction and fail to get nutrition and can not bear the strike of the radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In order to reduce the obstruction symptom and suffering of the patients and to prolong their life time, since 1989, our hospital used the laser to cure the upper digestive tract tumor 11 cases with serious obstruction and got remarkable curative effect.

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Needle-Based Probe Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (nCLE) of Intrapancreatic Ectopic Spleen.

    PubMed

    Bastidas, Amanda B; Holloman, David; Lankarani, Ali; Nieto, Jose M

    2016-04-01

    Accessory spleens and splenosis represent the congenital and acquired type of ectopic splenic tissue. Generally, they are asymptomatic entities posing as solid hypervascular masses at the splenic hilum or in other organs, such as the pancreas. Intrapancreatic ectopic spleen mimics pancreatic neoplasms on imaging studies, and due to the lack of radiological diagnostic criteria, patients undergo unnecessary distal pancreatectomy. We present the first case of intrapancreatic ectopic spleen in which the concomitant use of needle-based probe confocal laser endomicroscopy and fine-needle aspiration supported the final diagnosis. PMID:27144203

  2. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Needle-Based Probe Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (nCLE) of Intrapancreatic Ectopic Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Bastidas, Amanda B.; Holloman, David; Lankarani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Accessory spleens and splenosis represent the congenital and acquired type of ectopic splenic tissue. Generally, they are asymptomatic entities posing as solid hypervascular masses at the splenic hilum or in other organs, such as the pancreas. Intrapancreatic ectopic spleen mimics pancreatic neoplasms on imaging studies, and due to the lack of radiological diagnostic criteria, patients undergo unnecessary distal pancreatectomy. We present the first case of intrapancreatic ectopic spleen in which the concomitant use of needle-based probe confocal laser endomicroscopy and fine-needle aspiration supported the final diagnosis. PMID:27144203

  3. Nonvisualized gallbladder on oral cholecystography: implications for lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wong, K; Ekberg, O; Laufer, I; Malet, P F; Arger, P

    1990-01-01

    Currently, most protocols evaluating the efficacy of gallstone lithotripsy require a visualized gallbladder on oral cholecystography (OCG). The primary purpose of the OCG is to establish that the cystic duct is patent. When the gallbladder is visualized on OCG, it can also be used to number and size gallstones accurately. Patients with non-visualization of the gallbladder on OCG are excluded from consideration for lithotripsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the ultrasonographic findings (i.e., number and sizes of stones in 32 patients with nonvisualization on the OCG). In 11 patients (34%) ultrasound (US) did not detect any stone, and it is presumed that the gallbladder failed to visualize for other reasons. Six patients (19%) had one or two stones and 15 (47%) patients had more than three stones. This suggests that 20% of patients with nonvisualization of the gallbladder on OCG would otherwise be eligible for lithotripsy provided that patency of the cystic duct can be demonstrated by other means, such as computed tomographic (CT) examination with oral biliary contrast or cholescintigraphy. PMID:2180774

  4. Minimally invasive percutaneous cystostomy with ureteroscopic pneumatic lithotripsy for calculus in bladder diverticula

    PubMed Central

    GU, SI-PING; YOU, ZHI-YUAN; HUANG, YUNTENG; LU, YI-JIN; HE, CAOHUI; CAI, XIAO-DONG; ZHOU, XIAO-MING

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of minimally invasive percutaneous cystostomy with ureteroscopic pneumatic lithotripsy for treating calculus in bladder diverticula. Percutaneous cystostomy with ureteroscopic pneumatic lithotripsy was performed on six elderly male patients with calculi in bladder diverticula, who could not be treated with transurethral ureteroscopic lithotripsy. The stones were successfully removed from all patients, with no complications such as bladder perforation, rupture, urethritis or cystitis. The surgery time was 15–60 min, with an average time of 32 min. Postoperative ultrasound or X-ray examination showed no stone residues and the bladder stoma healed well. No recurrent stones were detected in the follow-up of 3–24 months (average, 16 months). Minimally invasive percutaneous cystostomy with ureteroscopic pneumatic lithotripsy is a safe, efficient and easy treatment for calculus in bladder diverticula. This method provides a new clinical approach for lithotripsy and we suggest that it is worthy of wider use. PMID:23837044

  5. Percutaneous papillary large balloon dilation during percutaneous cholangioscopic lithotripsy for the treatment of large bile-duct stones: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Han, Jee Young; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng

    2015-03-01

    When access to a major duodenal papilla or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has failed, percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopic lithotripsy (PTCS-L) may be useful for removing common bile duct (CBD) stones. However, the feasibility and usefulness of percutaneous transhepatic papillary large-balloon dilation (PPLBD) during PTCS-L for the removal of large CBD stones has not been established. We aimed to determine the safety and efficacy of PPLBD for the treatment of large CBD stones. Eleven patients with large CBD stones in whom the access to the major papilla or bile duct had failed were enrolled prospectively. Papillary dilation was performed using a large (12-20 mm) dilation balloon catheter via the percutaneous transhepatic route. Post-procedure adverse events and efficacy of the stone retrieval were measured. The initial success rate of PPLBD was 100%. No patient required a basket to remove a stone after PPLBD. Electrohydraulic lithotripsy was required in 2 (18.2%) patients. The median time to complete stone removal after PPLBD was 17.8 min and no adverse events occurred after PPLBD. Asymptomatic hyperamylasemia was not encountered in any patients. This study indicates that PPLBD is safe and effective for removal of large CBD stones. PMID:25729250

  6. Technological fundamentals of endoscopic haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1992-01-01

    In order to perform endoscopic haemostasis there exist several different mechanical, biochemical and thermal methods, which may be applied together with rigid or fully flexible endoscopes in different situations. The technological fundamentals of convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer, the irradiation with coherent electromagnetic waves like microwaves and laser radiation and the resistive heating by RF-current are described. A review of the state of the art of haemostatic coagulation by laser radiation (photocoagulation) and radio-frequency currents (surgical diathermy, high-frequency coagulation) is given. The wavelength-dependent interactions of coherent light waves are compared especially for the three mainly different laser types, i.e., carbon-dioxide-, neodymium-YAG- and argon-ion-laser. The well-known disadvantages of the conventional RF-coagulation are overcome by the so-called electrohydrothermosation (EHT), i.e. the liquid-assisted application of resistive heating of biological tissues to perform haemostasis. Different technological solutions for bipolar RF-coagulation probes including ball-tips and forceps are shown and the first experimental results are discussed in comparison. PMID:1595405

  7. FRAGMENTATION OF URINARY CALCULI IN VITRO BY BURST WAVE LITHOTRIPSY

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Hsi, Ryan S.; Harper, Jonathan D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sorensen, Mathew D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have developed a new method of lithotripsy that uses short, broadly focused bursts of ultrasound rather than shock waves to fragment stones. This study investigated the characteristics of stone comminution by burst wave lithotripsy in vitro. Materials and Methods Artificial and natural stones (mean 8.2±3.0 mm, range 5–15 mm) were treated with ultrasound bursts using a focused transducer in a water bath. Stones were exposed to bursts with focal pressure amplitude ≤6.5 MPa at 200 Hz burst repetition rate until completely fragmented. Ultrasound frequencies of 170 kHz, 285 kHz, and 800 kHz were applied using 3 different transducers. The time to achieve fragmentation for each stone type was recorded, and fragment size distribution was measured by sieving. Results Stones exposed to ultrasound bursts were fragmented at focal pressure amplitudes ≥2.8 MPa at 170 kHz. Fractures appeared along the stone surface, resulting in fragments separating at the surface nearest to the transducer until the stone was disintegrated. All natural and artificial stones were fragmented at the highest focal pressure of 6.5 MPa with treatment durations between a mean of 36 seconds for uric acid to 14.7 minutes for cystine stones. At a frequency of 170 kHz, the largest artificial stone fragments were <4 mm. Exposures at 285 kHz produced only fragments <2 mm, and 800 kHz produced only fragments <1 mm. Conclusions Stone comminution with burst wave lithotripsy is feasible as a potential noninvasive treatment method for nephrolithiasis. Adjusting the fundamental ultrasound frequency allows control of stone fragment size. PMID:25111910

  8. Clinical factors associated with postoperative hydronephrosis after ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Woo; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Yim, Sang Un; Cho, Yang Hyun; Shin, Bo Sung; Chung, Ho Seok; Yu, Ho Song; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Jung, Seung Il; Kang, Taek Won; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to determine the predictors of ipsilateral hydronephrosis after ureteroscopic lithotripsy for ureteral calculi. Materials and Methods From January 2010 to December 2014, a total of 204 patients with ureteral calculi who underwent ureteroscopic lithotripsy were reviewed. Patients with lack of clinical data, presence of ureteral rupture, and who underwent simultaneous percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) were excluded. Postoperative hydronephrosis was determined via computed tomographic scan or renal ultrasonography, at 6 months after ureteroscopic lithotripsy. Multivariable analysis was performed to determine clinical factors associated with ipsilateral hydronephrosis. Results A total of 137 patients were enrolled in this study. The mean age of the patients was 58.8±14.2 years and the mean stone size was 10.0±4.6 mm. The stone-free rate was 85.4%. Overall, 44 of the 137 patients (32.1%) had postoperative hydronephrosis. Significant differences between the hydronephrosis and nonhydronephrosis groups were noted in terms of stone location, preoperative hydronephrosis, impacted stone, operation time, and ureteral stent duration (all, p<0.05). On multivariable analysis, increasing preoperative diameter of the hydronephrotic kidney (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12–1.31; p=0.001) and impacted stone (adjusted OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.15–7.61; p=0.031) independently predicted the occurrence of postoperative hydronpehrosis. Conclusions Large preoperative diameter of the hydronephrotic kidney and presence of impacted stones were associated with hydronephrosis after ureteroscopic stone removal. Therefore, patients with these predictive factors undergo more intensive imaging follow-up in order to prevent renal deterioration due to postoperative hydronephrosis. PMID:27617316

  9. [Color processing of ultrasonographic images in extracorporeal lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Lardennois, B; Ziade, A; Walter, K

    1991-02-01

    A number of technical difficulties are encountered in the ultrasonographic detection of renal stones which unfortunately limit its performance. The margin of error of firing in extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) must be reduced to a minimum. The role of the ultrasonographic monitoring during lithotripsy is also essential: continuous control of the focussing of the short-wave beamand assessment if the quality of fragmentation. The authors propose to improve ultrasonographic imaging in ESWL by means of intraoperative colour processing of the stone. Each shot must be directed to its target with an economy of vision avoiding excessive fatigue. The principle of the technique consists of digitalization of the ultrasound video images using a Macintosh Mac 2 computer. The Graphis Paint II program is interfaced directly with the Quick Capture card and recovers the images on its work surface in real time. The program is then able to attribute to each of these 256 shades of grey any one of the 16.6 million colours of the Macintosh universe with specific intensity and saturation. During fragmentation, using the principle of a palette, the stone changes colour from green to red indicating complete fragmentation. A Color Space card converts the digital image obtained into a video analogue source which is visualized on the monitor. It can be superimposed and/or juxtaposed with the source image by means of a multi-standard mixing table. Colour processing of ultrasonographic images in extracoporeal shockwave lithotripsy allows better visualization of the stones and better follow-up of fragmentation and allows the shockwave treatment to be stopped earlier. It increases the stone-free performance at 6 months. This configuration will eventually be able to integrate into the ultrasound apparatus itself. PMID:1364639

  10. Tracking kidney stones with sound during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracht, Jonathan M.

    The prevalence of kidney stones has increased significantly over the past decades. One of the primary treatments for kidney stones is shock wave lithotripsy which focuses acoustic shock waves onto the stone in order to fragment it into pieces that are small enough to pass naturally. This typically requires a few thousand shock waves delivered at a rate of about 2 Hz. Although lithotripsy is the only non-invasive treatment option for kidney stories, both acute and chronic complications have been identified which could be reduced if fewer shock waves were used. One factor that could be used to reduce the number of shock waves is accounting for the motion of the stone which causes a portion of the delivered shock waves to miss the stone, yielding no therapeutic benefit. Therefore identifying when the stone is not in focus would allow tissue to be spared without affecting fragmentation. The goal of this thesis is to investigate acoustic methods to track the stone in real-time during lithotripsy in order to minimize poorly-targeted shock waves. A relatively small number of low frequency ultrasound transducers were used in pulse-echo mode and a novel optimization routine based on time-of-flight triangulation is used to determine stone location. It was shown that the accuracy of the localization may be estimated without knowing the true stone location. This method performed well in preliminary experiments but the inclusion of tissue-like aberrating layers reduced the accuracy of the localization. Therefore a hybrid imaging technique employing DORT (Decomposition of the Time Reversal Operator) and the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) algorithm was developed. This method was able to localize kidney stories to within a few millimeters even in the presence of an aberrating layer. This would be sufficient accuracy for targeting lithotripter shock waves. The conclusion of this work is that tracking kidney stones with low frequency ultrasound should be effective clinically.

  11. [Extracorporeal lithotripsy in the treatment of renal colic].

    PubMed

    Derevianko, I M; Naumenko, A A

    1996-01-01

    Renal colic arises in acute ureteral obstruction and indicates a sharp rise in intrapelvic pressure (up to 150 mm Hg). The diagnosis of renal colic is made basing on direct and indirect measurements of intrapelvic pressure. Ultrasound in renal colic detects dilatation of the calices and pelvis on the colic side, ureterolith can be also revealed by ultrasound. The authors used extracorporeal lithotripsy for fragmentation of the stone and colic relief in 68 patients. The colic stopped in all the cases. This method is extremely valuable in cases when spasmolytic and analgetic drugs, other conservative modalities fail. PMID:8928326

  12. Renal milk of calcium: contraindication to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, A; Vorreuther, R; Krug, B; Moul, J W; Engelmann, U H

    1996-01-01

    Renal milk-of-calcium (MOC) cysts are rare findings, with only approximately 60 cases reported in the literature. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of the typical "half-moon" configuration on horizontal beam radiography; classical ultrasound finding is a gravity-dependent, echogenic shadowy material in a renal cyst. The importance of the MOC syndrome lies in its recognition and differentiation from a renal stone in order to avoid unwarranted surgery or extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). We have encountered five patients with renal MOC and present the typical clinical and radiological features in order to facilitate differential diagnosis. PMID:9118405

  13. Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Swallowing Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy) Do you have problems swallowing? ... Some names you might hear are: Endoscopy Endoscopic Evaluation of swallowing FEES (Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) ...

  14. [Endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures].

    PubMed

    Oosterlinck, W; Lumen, N

    2006-08-01

    The present article reviews the literature regarding the endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures. Only few prospective randomised clinical trials with sufficient power have been performed and most of the literature provides evidence of only level 3 and 4. Since length, location, extent and calibre of the urethral stricture have an important impact on prognosis, diagnosis and the role of ultrasonography are discussed. Pathophysiology of wound healing is discussed in relation to urethrotomy, as it explains the outcomes of the procedure. Operative techniques using cold knife and laser, use of endoprostheses, indications, complications, results and postoperative management are described. The possible role of urethral catheters, hydraulic dilatations and corticosteroid applications are discussed. PMID:16970069

  15. Endoscopic palliation of tracheobronchial malignancies.

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, M R; Smith, S G

    1991-01-01

    The prognosis for tracheobronchial tumours remains poor. Most patients can be offered only palliation. When the main symptom is breathlessness or refractory haemoptysis from a large airway tumour endoscopic treatment may be very effective. Over the last decade most attention has focused on the neodymium YAG laser. This often produces dramatic effects but has some important limitations. In the last few years better techniques for stenting and intrabronchial radiotherapy (brachytherapy) have also been developed. This article discusses the range of techniques now available and aims to help clinicians decide which patients may benefit from referral to centres providing these techniques. Images PMID:1712516

  16. Transurethral laser urethrotomy in man: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Bülow, H; Bülow, U; Frohmüller, H G

    1979-03-01

    After in vitro and in vivo endoscopic laser investigation on normal and experimentally strictured urethras in dogs transurethral laser urethrotomy was done on men. A neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet laser with a flexible laser light guide was used. The endoscope developed for this purpose is described in detail. The first laser operations were without complications. PMID:430619

  17. Micromotor endoscope catheter for in vivo, ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, P. R.; Chen, Y.; Aguirre, A. D.; Schneider, K.; Hsiung, P.; Fujimoto, J. G.; Madden, K.; Schmitt, J.; Goodnow, J.; Petersen, C.

    2004-10-01

    A distally actuated, rotational-scanning micromotor endoscope catheter probe is demonstrated for ultrahigh-resolution in vivo endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The probe permits focus adjustment for visualization of tissue morphology at varying depths with improved transverse resolution compared with standard OCT imaging probes. The distal actuation avoids nonuniform scanning motion artifacts that are present with other probe designs and can permit a wider range of imaging speeds. Ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic imaging is demonstrated in a rabbit with <4-µm axial resolution by use of a femtosecond Crforsterite laser light source. The micromotor endoscope catheter probe promises to improve OCT imaging performance in future endoscopic imaging applications.

  18. Holographic high-resolution endoscopic image recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1991-03-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help

  19. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  20. Modification of the edge wave in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2012-10-01

    To reduce the bubble cavitation and the consequent vascular injury of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), a new method was devised to modify the diffraction wave generated at the aperture of a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter. Subsequently, the duration of the tensile wave was shortened significantly (3.2±0.54 μs vs. 5.83±0.56 μs). However, the amplitude and duration of the compressive wave of LSW between these two groups as well as the -6 dB beam width and the amplitude of the tensile wave are almost unchanged. The suppression on bubble cavitation was confirmed using the passive cavitation technique. At the lithotripter focus, while 30 shocks can cause rupture of blood vessel phantom using the HM-3 lithotripter at 20 kV; no rupture could be found after 300 shocks with the edge extender. On the other hand, after 200 shocks the HM-3 lithotripter at 20 kV can achieve a stone fragmentation of 50.4±2.0% on plaster-of-Paris stone phantom, which is comparable to that of using the edge extender (46.8±4.1%, p=0.005). Altogether, the modification on the diffraction wave at the lithotripter aperture can significantly reduce the bubble cavitation activities. As a result, potential for vessel rupture in shock wave lithotripsy is expected.

  1. Development of 3D holographic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Meriç; Önal Tayyar, Duygu

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the development of a 3D holographic endoscope with an interferometer built around a commercial rigid endoscope. We consider recording the holograms with coherent and incoherent light separately without compromising the white light imaging capacity of the endoscope. In coherent light based recording, reference wave required for the hologram is obtained in two different ways. First, as in the classical holography, splitting the laser beam before the object illumination, and secondly creating the reference beam from the object beam itself. This second method does not require path-length matching between the object wave and the reference wave, and it allows the usage of short coherence length light sources. For incoherent light based holographic recordings various interferometric configurations are considered. Experimental results on both illumination conditions are presented.

  2. Endoscopic video manifolds for targeted optical biopsy.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Selen; Mateus, Diana; Meining, Alexander; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Navab, Nassir

    2012-03-01

    Gastro-intestinal (GI) endoscopy is a widely used clinical procedure for screening and surveillance of digestive tract diseases ranging from Barrett's Oesophagus to oesophageal cancer. Current surveillance protocol consists of periodic endoscopic examinations performed in 3-4 month intervals including expert's visual assessment and biopsies taken from suspicious tissue regions. Recent development of a new imaging technology, called probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE), enabled the acquisition of in vivo optical biopsies without removing any tissue sample. Besides its several advantages, i.e., noninvasiveness, real-time and in vivo feedback, optical biopsies involve a new challenge for the endoscopic expert. Due to their noninvasive nature, optical biopsies do not leave any scar on the tissue and therefore recognition of the previous optical biopsy sites in surveillance endoscopy becomes very challenging. In this work, we introduce a clustering and classification framework to facilitate retargeting previous optical biopsy sites in surveillance upper GI-endoscopies. A new representation of endoscopic videos based on manifold learning, "endoscopic video manifolds" (EVMs), is proposed. The low dimensional EVM representation is adapted to facilitate two different clustering tasks; i.e., clustering of informative frames and patient specific endoscopic segments, only by changing the similarity measure. Each step of the proposed framework is validated on three in vivo patient datasets containing 1834, 3445, and 1546 frames, corresponding to endoscopic videos of 73.36, 137.80, and 61.84 s, respectively. Improvements achieved by the introduced EVM representation are demonstrated by quantitative analysis in comparison to the original image representation and principal component analysis. Final experiments evaluating the complete framework demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method as a promising step for assisting the endoscopic expert in retargeting the

  3. Ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Herz, Paul R.; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Desai, Saleem; Pedrosa, Macos; Koski, Amanda; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2005-01-01

    Early detection of gastrointestinal cancer is essential for the patient treatment and medical care. Endoscopically guided biopsy is currently the gold standard for the diagnosis of early esophageal cancer, but can suffer from high false negative rates due to sampling errors. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology which can generate high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissue in situ and in real time, without the removal of tissue specimen. Although endoscopic OCT has been used successfully to identify certain pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract, the resolution of current endoscopic OCT systems has been limited to 10 - 15 m for clinical procedures. In this study, in vivo imaging of the gastrointestinal tract is demonstrated at a three-fold higher resolution (< 5 m), using a portable, broadband, Cr4+:Forsterite laser as the optical light source. Images acquired from the esophagus, gastro-esophageal junction and colon on animal model display tissue microstructures and architectural details at high resolution, and the features observed in the OCT images are well-matched with histology. The clinical feasibility study is conducted through delivering OCT imaging catheter using standard endoscope. OCT images of normal esophagus, Barrett's esophagus, and esophageal cancers are demonstrated with distinct features. The ability of high resolution endoscopic OCT to image tissue morphology at an unprecedented resolution in vivo would facilitate the development of OCT as a potential imaging modality for early detection of neoplastic changes.

  4. Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Brent A

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery has undergone rapid advancement in the past decade moving from pituitary surgery to suprasellar lesions and now to a myriad of lesions extending from the cribriform plate to C2 and laterally out to the infratemporal fossa and petrous apex. Evolution of several technological advances as well as advances in understanding of endoscopic anatomy and the development of surgical techniques both in resection and reconstruction have fostered this capability. Management of benign disease via endoscopic methods is largely accepted now but more data is needed before the controversy on the role of endoscopic management of malignant disease is decided. Continued advances in surgical technique, navigation systems, endoscopic imaging technology, and robotics assure continued brisk evolution in this expanding field. PMID:19434274

  5. Endoscopic Devices for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Kartik; Dinani, Amreen M; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-06-01

    The obesity epidemic, recognized by the World Health Organization in 1997, refers to the rising incidence of obesity worldwide. Lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy are often ineffective long-term solutions; bariatric surgery remains the gold standard for long-term obesity weight loss. Despite the reported benefits, it has been estimated that only 1% of obese patients will undergo surgery. Endoscopic treatment for obesity represents a potential cost-effective, accessible, minimally invasive procedure that can function as a bridge or alternative intervention to bariatric surgery. We review the current endoscopic bariatric devices including space occupying devices, endoscopic gastroplasty, aspiration technology, post-bariatric surgery endoscopic revision, and obesity-related NOTES procedures. Given the diverse devices already FDA approved and in development, we discuss the future directions of endoscopic therapies for obesity. PMID:27115879

  6. New tip design and shock wave pattern of electrohydraulic probes for endoureteral lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R

    1993-02-01

    A new tip design of a 3.3F electrohydraulic probe for endoureteral lithotripsy was evaluated in comparison to a regular probe. The peak pressure, as well as the slope of the shock front, depend solely on the voltage. Increasing the capacity leads merely to broader pulses. A laser-like short high-pressure pulse has a greater impact on stone disintegration than a corresponding broader low-pressure pulse of the same energy. Using the regular probe, only positive pressures were obtained. Pressure distribution around the regular tip was approximately spherical, whereas the modified probe tip "beamed" the shock wave to a great extent. In addition, a negative-pressure half-cycle was added to the initial positive peak pressure, which resulted in a higher maximal pressure amplitude. The directed shock wave had a greater depth of penetration into a model stone. Thus, the ability of the new probe to destroy harder stones especially should be greater. The trauma to the ureter was reduced when touching the wall tangentially. No difference in the effect of the two probes was seen when placing the probe directly on the mucosa. PMID:8481720

  7. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Necrotizing Pancreatitis Following Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Scambia, J; Gandillon, C; Aversano, F; Batista, R

    2016-09-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a common procedure in the treatment of renal calculi. There have been major complications reported with ESWL such as acute pancreatitis, bower perforation, venous thrombosis, and biliary obstruction. There are few reports in the literature of necrotizing pancreatitis secondary to ESWL. We have a case report of a 29-year-old female that developed an abdominal compartment syndrome with an acute necrotizing pancreatitis hours after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. PMID:27462545

  8. Pneumatic v electrokinetic lithotripsy in treatment of ureteral stones.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Klotz, T; Heidenreich, A; Nayal, W; Engelmann, U

    1998-06-01

    Recently, a new device (Combilith) for electrokinetic lithotripsy (EKL) has become available which is very similar to the well-known device for pneumatic (ballistic) lithotripsy (Swiss Lithoclast). The Lithoclast uses air pressure to push a projectile within the handpiece against the end of a metal probe, which is thereby accelerated and thrown like a jackhammer against the stone. In principle, the same stroking movement of a small metal probe is provided by EKL; the difference is that instead of a projectile, a magnetic core within the handpiece is accelerated by the electromagnetic principle. This paper compares the clinical efficacy and the features of the two devices. Testing the devices on a stone model, taking into account stone propulsion, the systems turned out to equally effective regarding stone disintegration. However, stone displacement was more pronounced with the Lithoclast applied on easily breaking stones. In a second experiment, an optoelectronic movement-measuring apparatus (Zimmer camera) was employed to measure the range and velocity of the movement of the probe tip without any contact. The linear acceleration velocity ranged from 5 to a maximum of 12.5 m/sec with both systems, but the maximum height of the stroke was 2.5 mm with the Lithoclast and 1 mm with EKL. After the initial break-up of soft stones, further impact of the probe tip against the stone resulted merely in propulsion; thus, the greater probe stroke height is the cause of the stone displacement. In a clinical trial, 22 ureteral stones were treated with the Lithoclast and 35 with the EKL. The two devices were equally effective in terms of stone disintegration and safety margin. Fixation using a Dormia basket was necessary in 12 cases (8 Lithoclast, 4 EKL). Although a difference in probe stroke height was noted when comparing pneumatic and electrokinetic lithotripsy, there were no clinically significant differences in the efficacy of stone fragmentation or stone-free rates. At the

  9. Current applications of endoscopic suturing

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Modayil, Rani; Friedel, David

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic suturing had previously been considered an experimental procedure only performed in a few centers and often by surgeons. Now, however, endoscopic suturing has evolved sufficiently to be easily implemented during procedures and is more commonly used by gastroenterologists. We have employed the Apollo OverStitch suturing device in a variety of ways including closure of perforations, closure of full thickness defects in the gastrointestinal wall created during endoscopic full thickness resection, closure of mucosotomies during peroral endoscopic myotomy, stent fixation, fistula closure, post endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic mucosal resection and Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery defect closures, post-bariatric surgery gastrojejunal anastomosis revision and primary sleeve gastroplasty. PMID:26191342

  10. Endoscopic management of chronic radiation proctitis

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy occurs in 5%-20% of patients following pelvic radiotherapy. Although many cases resolve spontaneously, some lead to chronic symptoms including diarrhea, tenesmus, urgency and persistent rectal bleeding with iron deficiency anemia requiring blood transfusions. Treatments for chronic radiation proctitis remain unsatisfactory and the basis of evidence for various therapies is generally insufficient. There are very few controlled or prospective trials, and comparisons between therapies are limited because of different evaluation methods. Medical treatments, including formalin, topical sucralfate, 5-amino salicylic acid enemas, and short chain fatty acids have been used with limited success. Surgical management is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy using modalities such as the heater probe, neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser, potassium titanyl phosphate laser and bipolar electrocoagulation has been reported to be of some benefit, but with frequent complications. Argon plasma coagulation is touted to be the preferred endoscopic therapy due to its efficacy and safety profile. Newer methods of endoscopic ablation such as radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy have been recently described which may afford broader areas of treatment per application, with lower rate of complications. This review will focus on endoscopic ablation therapies, including such newer modalities, for chronic radiation proctitis. PMID:22147960

  11. Lasers in the management of calcified urinary tract stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nseyo, Unyime O.; Tunuguntla, Hari S. G. R.; Crone, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Indwelling double J ureteral stents are used for internal urinary diversion for ureteral obstruction and post-surgical drainage of the upper urinary tract. Stent calcification is a serious complication especially in those with forgotten stents. In a retrospective review of 16 patients (10 male and 6 female) we found holmium laser to be highly effective in the management of calcified stents. Encrustations/calcifications were noted on the distal end of the sent in 6 patiens (37.5%), middle and distal portions in 2 patients (12.5%), along the entire length of the stent in 3 patients (18.75%), lower portion of the stent in 4 patients (25%) and at the upper and lower ends of the stent in one patient (6.25%). Cystolitholapaxy, retrograde ureteroscopy (URS) with holmium: YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser intracorporeal lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrostolithotomy (PNL) and antegrade URS with holmium: YAG laser intracorporeal lithotripsy were effectively performed without intraoperative complications. Lithotripsy became necessary before stent removal in 11 patients (68.75%). Holmium laser lithotripsy was useful in managing 7 patients (43.75%), and shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) in 6 patients (37.5%). In two patients (12.5%) both holmium and SWL were used before the stent can be removed.

  12. Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepinder; Watson, Rabindra R

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and its associated cardio-metabolic comorbidities have emerged as a global pandemic. The efficacy of various hypo-caloric diets and prescription drugs has been poor with respect to sustained weight loss. Recent advancements in endoscopic technology and techniques have opened a new field of minimally invasive endoscopic treatment options for combatting obesity both as a first line and adjunctive therapy. Presently, two endoscopic space-occupying devices in the form of intragastric balloons have received FDA approval for 6-month implantation in patients within a BMI range of 30-40 kg/m(2). Furthermore, full-thickness suturing has led to the development of primary endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass revision as viable endoscopic alternatives to surgical approaches. These techniques have the potential to reduce adverse events, cost, and recovery times. Looking forward, a variety of promising and novel medical devices and endoscopic platforms that target obesity and diabetes are in various phases of development and investigation. The present review aims to discuss the current and forthcoming endoscopic bariatric therapies with emphasis on relevant procedural technique and review of available evidence. PMID:27098813

  13. Is endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation really a risk factor for post-ERCP pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Toshio; Kagawa, Koichi; Hisatomi, Kantaro; Kubota, Kensuke; Nakajima, Atsushi; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-14

    Endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation (EPBD) is useful for decreasing early complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP), including bleeding, biliary infection, and perforation, but it is generally avoided in Western countries because of a relatively high reported incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). However, as the efficacy of endoscopic papillary large-balloon dilatation (EPLBD) becomes widely recognized, EPBD is attracting attention. Here we investigate whether EPBD is truly a risk factor for PEP, and seek safer and more effective EPBD procedures by reviewing past studies. We reviewed thirteen randomised control trials comparing EPBD and endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) and ten studies comparing direct EPLBD and EST. Three randomized controlled trials of EPBD showed significantly higher incidence of PEP than EST, but no study of EPLBD did. Careful analysis of these studies suggested that longer and higher-pressure inflation of balloons might decrease PEP incidence. The paradoxical result that EPBD with small-calibre balloons increases PEP incidence while EPLBD does not may be due to insufficient papillary dilatation in the former. Insufficient dilatation could cause the high incidence of PEP through the use of mechanical lithotripsy and stress on the papilla at the time of stone removal. Sufficient dilation of the papilla may be useful in preventing PEP. PMID:27468185

  14. Is endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation really a risk factor for post-ERCP pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Toshio; Kagawa, Koichi; Hisatomi, Kantaro; Kubota, Kensuke; Nakajima, Atsushi; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation (EPBD) is useful for decreasing early complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP), including bleeding, biliary infection, and perforation, but it is generally avoided in Western countries because of a relatively high reported incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). However, as the efficacy of endoscopic papillary large-balloon dilatation (EPLBD) becomes widely recognized, EPBD is attracting attention. Here we investigate whether EPBD is truly a risk factor for PEP, and seek safer and more effective EPBD procedures by reviewing past studies. We reviewed thirteen randomised control trials comparing EPBD and endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) and ten studies comparing direct EPLBD and EST. Three randomized controlled trials of EPBD showed significantly higher incidence of PEP than EST, but no study of EPLBD did. Careful analysis of these studies suggested that longer and higher-pressure inflation of balloons might decrease PEP incidence. The paradoxical result that EPBD with small-calibre balloons increases PEP incidence while EPLBD does not may be due to insufficient papillary dilatation in the former. Insufficient dilatation could cause the high incidence of PEP through the use of mechanical lithotripsy and stress on the papilla at the time of stone removal. Sufficient dilation of the papilla may be useful in preventing PEP. PMID:27468185

  15. [Endoscopic ureterolithotomy in large concrements of the upper third of the ureter].

    PubMed

    Martov, A G; Teodorovich, O V; Galliamov, É A; Lutsevich, O É; Zabrodina, N B; Gordienko, A Iu; Parkhonin, D I

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic ureterolithotomy was made in 38 patients who had concrements in the upper third of the ureter more than 1 cm in size. Operations were retroperitoneoscopic and laparoscopic in 20 and 18 cases, respectively. Five patients had recurrent stones, 7 patients had prior extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy, 2 patients failed contact ureterolithotripsy. In the rest cases endoscopic ureterolithotomy was a first-line treatment. A complete elimination of the stone was achieved in all the cases. Mean time of the operation in a retroperitoneoscopic approach was 149 min, in laparoscopic - 125 min. Mean blood loss was the same. Conversion was performed in one case in the group of retroperitoneal approach. Postoperative stay in hospital in retroperitoneo- and laparoscopic ureterolithotomy was 3 - 16 days. Laparoscopic ureterolithotomy produced a complication in one case - an insignificant injury of the colon. Urinous infiltration and pneumonia developed after retroperitoneoscopic ureterolithotomy in one and one case, respectively. Thus, endoscopic ureterolithotomy in large stones of the upper third of the ureter via retroperitoneal and transperitoneal approach is a safe, low-invasive and effective operation which provides complete stones elimination. Endoscopic ureterolithotomy should be done in uneffective first-line treatment. It is a leading method in the treatment of large and long-standing stones of the upper third of the ureter. PMID:22279788

  16. Endoscopic treatment of gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Thomas R; Rustagi, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Gastroparesis has traditionally been a largely medically managed disease with refractory symptoms typically falling under the umbrella of the surgical domain. Surgical options include, but are not limited to, gastrostomy, jejunostomy, pyloromyotomy, or pyloroplasty, and the Food and Drug Administration approved gastric electrical stimulation implantation. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis most commonly involves intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection; however, there exists a variety of endoscopic approaches on the horizon that have the potential to radically shift standard of care. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis seeks to treat delayed gastric emptying with a less invasive approach compared to the surgical approach. This review will serve to highlight such innovative and potentially transformative, endoscopic interventions available to gastroenterologists in the management of gastroparesis. PMID:26078560

  17. Understanding EUS (Endoscopic Ultrasonography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification (MOC) Course Calendar GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Endoscopic Learning Library IT&T Hands-On Training Training and ... ASGE Endorsed Activities Ambassador Program Trainee Resources Traveling Learning ... MANAGEMENT GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Featured Courses ...

  18. Endoscopic Techniques in Tympanoplasty.

    PubMed

    Anzola, Jesus Franco; Nogueira, João Flávio

    2016-10-01

    The endoscope has transformed the way we observe, understand, and treat chronic ear disease. Improved view, exclusive transcanal techniques, assessment of ventilation routes and mastoid tissue preservation have led to decreased morbidity and functional enhancement of minimally invasive reconstruction of the middle ear. The philosophical identity of endoscopic ear surgery is evolving; new research, long-term results, and widespread acknowledgement of its postulates will undoubtedly define its role in otology. PMID:27565390

  19. Standardized endoscopic reporting.

    PubMed

    Aabakken, Lars; Barkun, Alan N; Cotton, Peter B; Fedorov, Evgeny; Fujino, Masayuki A; Ivanova, Ekaterina; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Kuznetzov, Konstantin; de Lange, Thomas; Matsuda, Koji; Moine, Olivier; Rembacken, Björn; Rey, Jean-Francois; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Rösch, Thomas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Yao, Kenshi; Waye, Jerome D

    2014-02-01

    The need for standardized language is increasingly obvious, also within gastrointestinal endoscopy. A systematic approach to the description of endoscopic findings is vital for the development of a universal language, but systematic also means structured, and structure is inherently a challenge when presented as an alternative to the normal spoken word. The efforts leading to the "Minimal Standard Terminology" (MST) of gastrointestinal endoscopy offer a standardized model for description of endoscopic findings. With a combination of lesion descriptors and descriptor attributes, this system gives guidance to appropriate descriptions of lesions and also has a normative effect on endoscopists in training. The endoscopic report includes a number of items not related to findings per se, but to other aspects of the procedure, formal, technical, and medical. While the MST sought to formulate minimal lists for some of these aspects (e.g. indications), they are not all well suited for the inherent structure of the MST, and many are missing. Thus, the present paper offers a recommended standardization also of the administrative, technical, and other "peri-endoscopic" elements of the endoscopic report; important also are the numerous quality assurance initiatives presently emerging. Finally, the image documentation of endoscopic findings is becoming more obvious-and accessible. Thus, recommendations for normal procedures as well as for focal and diffuse pathology are presented. The recommendations are "minimal," meaning that expansions and subcategories will likely be needed in most centers. Still, with a stronger common grounds, communication within endoscopy will still benefit. PMID:24329727

  20. Endoscopic video manifolds.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Selen; Mateus, Diana; Lallemand, Joe; Meining, Alexander; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Navab, Nassir

    2010-01-01

    Postprocedural analysis of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic videos is a difficult task because the videos often suffer from a large number of poor-quality frames due to the motion or out-of-focus blur, specular highlights and artefacts caused by turbid fluid inside the GI tract. Clinically, each frame of the video is examined individually by the endoscopic expert due to the lack of a suitable visualisation technique. In this work, we introduce a low dimensional representation of endoscopic videos based on a manifold learning approach. The introduced endoscopic video manifolds (EVMs) enable the clustering of poor-quality frames and grouping of different segments of the GI endoscopic video in an unsupervised manner to facilitate subsequent visual assessment. In this paper, we present two novel inter-frame similarity measures for manifold learning to create structured manifolds from complex endoscopic videos. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed method yields high precision and recall values for uninformative frame detection (90.91% and 82.90%) and results in well-structured manifolds for scene clustering. PMID:20879345

  1. Interaction of Laser Induced Micro-shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leela, Ch.; Bagchi, Suman; Tewari, Surya P.; Kiran, P. Prem

    Laser induced Shock Waves (LISWs) characterized by several optical methods provide Equation of State (EOS) for a variety of materials used in high-energy density physics experiments at Mbar pressures [1, 2]. Other applications include laser spark ignition for fuel-air mixtures, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation engines, laser shock peening [3], surface cleaning [4] and biological applications (SW lithotripsy) [5] to name a few.

  2. Laser in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Boord, Mona

    2006-08-01

    The laser is a tool that will augment the surgical techniques available to the veterinarian. When using the laser compared with traditional surgery there are multiple procedures that can be performed with much greater ease, and some procedures that previously could not be performed. Specialty and academic practices have used lasers for photodynamic therapy, lithotripsy of urinary calculi, and percutaneous disk ablation. This article will focus on the lasers use in dermatology. It is essential that the surgeon learn the basics of laser physics, how the laser interacts with tissue and the safety issues one needs to consider during its use. On deciding to use the laser the surgical techniques chosen should always be based on considering the advantages and disadvantages the laser has to offer. The use of biomedical lasers is a "cutting edge" technique now available to our veterinary field. PMID:16933481

  3. Dual-channel spectrally encoded endoscopic probe

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Guy; Genish, Hadar; Rosenbluh, Michael; Yelin, Dvir

    2012-01-01

    High quality imaging through sub-millimeter endoscopic probes provides clinicians with valuable diagnostics capabilities in hard to reach locations within the body. Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) has been shown promising for such task; however, challenging probe fabrication and high speckle noise had prevented its testing in in vivo studies. Here we demonstrate a novel miniature SEE probe which incorporates some of the recent progress in spectrally encoded technology into a compact and robust endoscopic system. A high-quality miniature diffraction grating was fabricated using automated femtosecond laser cutting from a large bulk grating. Using one spectrally encoded channel for imaging and a separate channel for incoherent illumination, the new system has large depth of field, negligible back reflections and well controlled speckle noise which depends on the core diameter of the illumination fiber. Moreover, by using a larger imaging channel, higher groove density grating, shorter wavelength and broader spectrum, the new endoscopic system now allow significant improvements in almost all imaging parameter compared to previous systems, through an ultra-miniature endoscopic probe. PMID:22876349

  4. Enhanced endoscopic detection of early colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, Gowra; Trowers, Eugene A.

    1999-06-01

    Enhanced endoscopic detection of small flat adenomas is becoming increasingly important as they have a reported 14 percent incidence of dysplasia when compared with 5% incidence in polypod adenomas of the same size. These lesions even when invasive do not show up against the translucent surrounding mucosa making endoscopic detection difficult. Dye spraying with indigo carmine makes their morphology clear, with well-circumscribed borders. Dye spraying and magnifying endoscopes can be used to observe pit patterns on the surface of the bowel. Combining dye spraying and high-resolution video endoscopy demonstrates well the colorectal epithelial surface. Scanning immersion video endoscopy visualizes the epithelial surface of the colorectal mucosa by high-resolution endoscopy after filling the lumen with water. Endoscopic ultrasound can be used to see if the lesion is intramucosal or not and assess the depth of invasion if malignancy is presented. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy has the potential to detect colonic dysplasia in vivo. Combining such technologies with conventional colonoscopy can help in the surveillance of large areas of colonic mucosa for the presence of dysplasia. Guided biopsy can replace random biopsy based on information provided at the time of colonoscopic examination.

  5. Comparison of different methods for endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding canine esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Silpa, M L; Tapia, J I; Beilin, D B; Machicado, G A

    1983-06-01

    Despite advances in the therapy of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, morbidity and mortality remain high. Continued severe variceal hemorrhage remains a major clinical problem in poor risk patients who cannot tolerate emergency surgery for hemostasis. Several endoscopic hemostatic methods might be effective for variceal hemostasis, but they have not been systematically evaluated. Using a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices, several hemostatic modalities were tested and compared to determine which were most effective in stopping variceal bleeding. Methods tested were endoscopic sclerotherapy, organ laser, neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, monopolar electro-coagulation, bipolar electrocoagulation, ferromagnetic tamponade, and endoscopic heater probe. Both neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy provided reliable hemostasis in acutely bleeding canine varices. Large heater probe controlled bleeding 50% of the time, and all the other methods stopped bleeding in less than half the trials. Rebleeding after balloon inflation proximal to the coagulated bleeding site did not occur with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or endoscopic sclerotherapy-treated varices but did occur with the other methods. The principal differences between neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy were the ease of application of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the higher frequency of esophageal ulcers or erosions with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the lack of variceal obliteration with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. PMID:6341157

  6. Transient cavitation produced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioanta, Iulian

    1998-12-01

    Two decades ago, a new medical procedure was introduced, allowing the fragmentation of kidney stones from outside the human body (noninvasively) using a shock wave device termed lithotripter ('stone crusher'). Considered as one of the most important medical inventions of this century, lithotripsy is currently used in more than 80% of urolithiasis cases. Experimental studies have shown that transient or inertial cavitation is generated by this procedure near the stones and in renal tissue. To find a correlation between the number of shocks delivered and the treatment efficiency, the acoustic emission (AE) generated by the oscillation of cavitation bubbles, and its relation with stone fragmentation and tissue damage during shock wave lithotripsy were studied. In vitro experiments were carried out to identify the correlation between the AE signals and the expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles, which were captured by high-speed photography (20,000 frames per second). This correlation has been verified on four different electrohydraulic lithotripters, under multiple experimental conditions. The effects of tissue attenuation on AE and stone fragmentation were also studied. The in vitro results have further allowed the interpretation of AE signals from in vivo experiments with pigs. Although similar in general trend, in vivo AE signals are found to be shorter in expansion and longer in the total ringing times (including the rebound phenomenon) than for in vitro AE signals, indicating a tissue constraining effect on bubble oscillation. Based on this observation a new mechanism for renal vascular and tubular injury is proposed. In addition, changes in AE signals have been observed as the total number of shocks increases, and this dose dependence feature has allowed the determination of a threshold value for extended tissue injury at 20 kV. This result has been confirmed by histological analysis and by results of a theoretical model study of bubble oscillation in a

  7. Combined endoscopic surgery in the prone-split leg position for successful single-session removal of an encrusted ureteral stent: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although encrusted stents may lead to some unwanted complications including urinary tract obstruction, urinary sepsis, and potential loss of kidney function, there is currently no consensus on the most efficient method for managing stents that are intentionally left in situ. This is the first report describing the management of an encrusted stent using combined endoscopic surgery in the prone split-leg position in a single session. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian man presented with left flank pain and macrohematuria. The patient had undergone left ureteral stenting three years previously for the treatment of left ureteral stones and hydronephrosis; however, he was lost to follow-up before the treatment for the ureter stones was completed. Therefore, the ureteral stent and stones were not removed. An abdominal radiograph and a noncontrast computed tomography scan showed encrustation along the retained stent with stone burdens in the kidney and ureter. The ureteral stent could not be removed by cystoscopy after shock wave lithotripsy of the left ureteral stones. Therefore, endoscopic lithotripsy combined with flexible ureteroscopy and miniature nephroscopy was performed with the patient in the prone split-leg position. All the stones and the encrusted ureteral stent were successfully removed in a single session. Conclusions In this case, percutaneous nephrolithomy in addition to flexible ureteroscopy was preferred because severe encrustation of the proximal stent and ureteral stones complicated the therapeutic strategy. Combined endoscopic techniques in the prone split-leg position can achieve successful and safe management of encrusted stents. PMID:24742133

  8. Two-wavelength method for endoscopic shape measurement by spatial phase-shifting speckle-interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kandulla, Jochen; Kemper, Björn; Knoche, Sabine; von Bally, Gert

    2004-10-10

    A two-wavelength method for endoscopic topography reconstruction is introduced that can be applied to out-of-plane sensitive electronic-speckle-pattern interferometry systems based on rigid endoscope imaging systems. The surface measurement is performed by detection of the phase-difference distribution affected by a change in the applied laser wavelength. Furthermore, the off-axis endoscopic illumination geometry is taken into account by an approximation. Experimental results of the characterization of the endoscopic surface reconstruction technique and the measurement accuracy obtained are described and discussed. Finally, the applicability of the method is demonstrated with results from the topographic reconstruction of a free-form surface. PMID:15508598

  9. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  10. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  11. Impact of shock wave pattern and cavitation bubble size on tissue damage during ureteroscopic electrohydraulic lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Corleis, R; Klotz, T; Bernards, P; Engelmann, U

    1995-03-01

    It is known that electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) during ureteroscopy may cause ureteral damage. To evaluate this trauma potential, find its mechanism and make it possible to avoid it, our research employed photographic evaluation, tissue studies, shock wave measurements and disintegration tests. The setup included a 3.3 F probe attached to an experimental generator with adjustable voltages and capacities providing energies from 25 mJ. to 1300 mJ. per pulse. In general, we distinguish between two traumatic mechanisms: (1) After placing the probe directly on the mucosa the rapid initial plasma penetrates the tissue resulting in a small, nonthermal, punched-like defect, whose depth depends on the energy applied. This trauma has minor clinical implications and is avoided by maintaining a minimum safety distance of 1 mm.; (2) According to physics, each plasma is followed by a cavitation bubble. The maximum size of this bubble depends on the energy applied and ranges from 3 mm. (25 mJ) to > 15 mm. (1300 mJ). In proportion to the bubble size, the ureteral wall may be distended or disrupted, even when the probe is not in direct contact with the mucosa. Therefore, the goal should be to obtain a low energy pressure pulse with high disintegration efficacy. Our evaluation of the pressure waves revealed that the selection of a high voltage and a low capacity leads to short and steep "laser-like" pulses. These pulses have a significant higher impact on stone disintegration than the broader pulses of the same energy provided by currently available generators. PMID:7861549

  12. Management of Large Proximal Ureteral Stones: A Comparative Clinical Trial Between Transureteral Lithotripsy (TUL) and Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    PubMed Central

    Rabani, Seyed Mohammadreza; Moosavizadeh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Background A review of the related medical journals indicates that there is no definite evidence-based option for managing large proximal ureteral stones, although many procedures such as transureteral lithotripsy (TUL), shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), percutaneous nephrolithotripsy, laparoscopic ureterolithotomy, and open ureterolithotomy are currently used to treat this urological problem. Objectives In this study, we tried to determine the most appropriate treatment plan for proximal ureteral stones larger than 12 mm by comparing the two most commonly used procedures. Patients and Methods Between February 2005 and April 2011, 62 patients including 40 males and 22 females (mean age 39.5 years, range 19 to 64) with proximal ureteral stones larger than 12 mm (12–26 mm) with a mean size of 17.64 mm were prospectively divided into two groups consisting of 32 patients who underwent TUL (group A) and 30 who underwent SWL (group B). In unsuccessful cases, repeat SWL or TUL was planned. Patients who could not tolerate the lithotomy position, younger than 18 years, had undergone coagulopathy, had concurrent renal and ureteral stones, were pregnant, or had sepsis were excluded from this study. Results Stone access was successful in 28 patients and the treatment was efficient in 18 patients (56.25%) in group A. For the patients with successful stone access but unsuccessful TUL, a DJ was inserted and a second ureteroscopic intervention was performed. The second intervention was successful in 7 patients (21.87). SWL was successful in 14 patients (46.66%) in the first attempt and in 7 additional patients in the second intervention (23.33%). Conclusions In this study, we showed different success rates for SWL and TUL because of the larger size of the stones. We achieved a success rate of 56.25% in the first attempt in the TUL group, and the overall success rate (after the second TUL) was 78.12%. In comparison, the SWL group had a success rate of 46.66% in the first attempt, and

  13. Effect of Shock Wave Lithotripsy on Renal Hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, Rajash K.; Willis, Lynn R.; Evan, Andrew P.; Connors, Bret A.

    2008-09-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) can injure tissue and decrease blood flow in the SWL-treated kidney, both tissue and functional effects being largely localized to the region targeted with shock waves (SWs). A novel method of limiting SWL-induced tissue injury is to employ the "protection" protocol, where the kidney is pretreated with low-energy SWs prior to the application of a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs. Resistive index measurements of renal vascular resistance/impedance to blood flow during SWL treatment protocols revealed that a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs did not alter RI during SW application. However, there was an interaction between low- and high-energy SWL treatment phases of the "protection" protocol such that an increase in RI (vasoconstriction) was observed during the later half of SW application, a time when tissue damage is occurring during the standard high-energy SWL protocol. We suggest that renal vasoconstriction may be responsible for reducing the degree of tissue damage that normally results from a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs.

  14. Secondary shock wave emissions from cavitation in lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    We investigate the role of secondary shock waves (SSWs) generated by cavitation in lithotripsy. Acoustic pressure was measured with a fiber optic probe hydrophone and cavitation using a dual passive cavitation detector (PCD) consisting of two confocal transducers. An artificial stone (~7 mm diameter and ~9 mm length) was placed at the focus of an electrohydraulic lithotripter. The fiber was inserted through a hole drilled through the stone so that the tip was at the proximal surface. SSWs were identified by matching the time of arrival to that of the inertial collapse signature acquired by the PCD. Measurements of SSWs were obtained for 50% of SWs fired at 20 kV and 1 Hz. The peak positive pressure for the SSW was p+=33.7+/-14.8 MPa, which was comparable to the pressure induced by the incident SW (p+=42.6+/-6 MPa). The peak pressure in water was p+=23.2+/-4.4 MPa. The PCD also recorded acoustic emissions from forced collapse of pre-existing bubbles caused by the incident SW. We propose that both the reflection from the semi-rigid stone boundary and SSW from the forced collapse contribute to the observed increase in the peak pressure of the incident SW in presence of a stone. [Work supported by NIH.

  15. Dynamics of concerted bubble cluster collapse in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-10-01

    Cavitation bubble cluster collapse at the surface of artificial kidney stones during shock wave lithotripsy was investigated in vitro by means of multiframe high-speed photography, passive cavitation detection (PCD), and pressure waveform measurements using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH). It was observed that after the passage of the lithotripter shock pulse the stone was covered by numerous individual bubbles. During their growth phase the bubbles coalesced into bubble clusters, with the biggest cluster at the proximal face of the stone. High-speed camera images suggested that cluster collapse started at the periphery and ended with a violent collapse in a small region in the center of the surface of the stone. Shadowgraphy resolved numerous secondary shock waves emitted during this focused collapse. Shock wave emission during cluster collapse was confirmed by PCD. Measurement with the FOPH showed that these shock waves were typically of short duration (0.2 μs). The majority of the shock waves emanating from cluster collapse were low amplitude but some shock waves registered amplitudes on the order of the incident shock pulse (tens of MPa). [Work supported by NIH DK43881, DK55674.

  16. Drugs for Pain Management in Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Christian; Zaman, Faruquz; Kachrilas, Stefanos; Kumar, Priyadarshi; Buchholz, Noor; Masood, Junaid

    2011-01-01

    Objective. With this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the main aspects and currently used drugs for analgesia in shockwave lithotripsy. Evidence Acquisition. We reviewed current literature, concentrating on newer articles and high-quality reviews in international journals. Results. No standardized protocols for pain control in SWL exist, although it is crucial for treatment outcome. General and spinal anaesthesia show excellent pain control but are only recommended for selected cases. The newer opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are able to deliver good analgesia. Interest in inhalation anaesthesia with nitrous oxide, local anaesthesia with deep infiltration of the tissue, and dermal anaesthesia with EMLA or DMSO has recently rekindled, showing good results in terms of pain control and a favourable side effect profile. Tamsulosin and paracetamol are further well-known drugs being currently investigated. Conclusion. Apart from classically used drugs like opioids and NSARs, medicaments like nitrous oxide, paracetamol, DMSA, or refined administration techniques for infiltration anaesthesia show a good effectiveness in pain control for SWL. PMID:22135735

  17. High-efficiency shock-wave generator for extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Broyer, P; Cathignol, D; Theillère, Y; Mestas, J L

    1996-09-01

    In extracorporeal lithotripsy, the electro-acoustic efficiency of electrohydraulic generators is limited by the inductance of the electrical discharge circuit. A new shock-wave generator is described that uses a coaxial discharge line enabling electro-acoustic efficiency to be greatly increased. The line is built using a para-electric ceramic with a relative dielectric constant of 1700, manufactured for use in high-voltage impulse mode. A coaxial spark gap, with minimal inductance, has been developed to obtain the triggered breakdown of the discharge line. Shock waves are created with a coaxial electrode plugged directly into the spark gap and immersed in an electrolyte of degassed saline. Electrode gap and electrolyte resistivity are adjusted to match the resistivity of the electrolyte volume between the underwater electrodes to the characteristic impedance of the line. The discharge line generates in the medium a rectangular current pulse with an amplitude of about 6000 A and a rise time of 50 ns. Compared with conventional generators, measurements of the expansive peak pressure pulse show an increase of 105% at 10 kV, 86.5% at 12 kV and 34.5% at 14 kV charging voltage. Electro-acoustic efficiency is found to be 11% instead of 5.5% for a conventional discharge circuit. PMID:8945854

  18. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan B.; Zhong, Pei

    2013-01-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury. PMID:23927195

  19. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a study of renal stone differences.

    PubMed

    Powers, C J; Tinterow, M M; Burpee, J F

    1989-01-01

    The extracorporeal shock wave lithotriptor (ESWL or lithotriptor) is a new, revolutionary, noninvasive method of treating renal calculi. It offers a safer, cheaper and more effective method of treatment compared to the traditional open surgery. Its history dates back only to 1980--and to 1985 at HCA Wesley Medical Center in Wichita, where research is just beginning. Initial research focused on ESWL versus traditional open surgery, but more recent research is investigating elements within the ESWL treatment. This article presents an investigation of renal stone size in relation to number of ESWL treatments needed per stone, number of shock waves per treatment, length of hospital stay post-lithotripsy, and hospital costs per length of stay during HCA Wesley's first year of operation. The subjects in this study consisted of approximately every third patient who received an ESWL treatment and were grouped according to stone sizes of less than 2 cm and those greater than 2 cm. A questionnaire was used, and after data were collected from the patient's charts and billing, a t-test for independent samples was used for analysis. PMID:2709649

  20. Pediatric extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: Predicting successful outcomes.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Sean; Shukla, Aseem R

    2010-10-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is currently a first-line procedure of most upper urinary tract stones <2 cm of size because of established success rates, its minimal invasiveness and long-term safety with minimal complications. Given that alternative surgical and endourological options exist for the management of stone disease and that ESWL failure often results in the need for repeat ESWL or secondary procedures, it is highly desirable to identify variables predicting successful outcomes of ESWL in the pediatric population. Despite numerous reports and growing experience, few prospective studies and guidelines for pediatric ESWL have been completed. Variation in the methods by which study parameters are measured and reported can make it difficult to compare individual studies or make definitive recommendations. There is ongoing work and a need for continuing improvement of imaging protocols in children with renal colic, with a current focus on minimizing exposure to ionizing radiation, perhaps utilizing advancements in ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. This report provides a review of the current literature evaluating the patient attributes and stone factors that may be predictive of successful ESWL outcomes along with reviewing the role of pre-operative imaging and considerations for patient safety. PMID:21369388

  1. Shock wave lithotripsy: advances in technology and technique

    PubMed Central

    Lingeman, James E.; McAteer, James A.; Gnessin, Ehud; Evan, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is the only noninvasive method for stone removal. Once considered as a primary option for the treatment of virtually all stones, SWL is now recognized to have important limitations that restrict its use. In particular, the effectiveness of SWL is severely limited by stone burden, and treatment with shock waves carries the risk of acute injury with the potential for long-term adverse effects. Research aiming to characterize the renal response to shock waves and to determine the mechanisms of shock wave action in stone breakage and renal injury has begun to suggest new treatment strategies to improve success rates and safety. Urologists can achieve better outcomes by treating at slower shock wave rate using a step-wise protocol. The aim is to achieve stone comminution using as few shock waves and at as low a power level as possible. Important challenges remain, including the need to improve acoustic coupling, enhance stone targeting, better determine when stone breakage is complete, and minimize the occurrence of residual stone fragments. New technologies have begun to address many of these issues, and hold considerable promise for the future. PMID:19956196

  2. The problem of coupling in dry-head lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Neucks, Joshua S.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.

    2007-04-01

    Recent in vitro studies have shown that air pockets can get trapped at the coupling interface of the treatment head in dry-head lithotripsy, and this can pose a significant barrier to transmission of shock wave energy to the focal zone. Breakage of model stones is very sensitive to the presence of air pockets at the coupling interface. The quality of routine coupling is highly variable, and it seems quite feasible that the way in which the coupling gel is applied may have a significant effect on the quality of coupling. Therefore, attempts to find the best coupling regime may be valuable to perform, and preliminary results of in vitro tests are presented in this report. Experiments were conducted using gel or castor oil as coupling agents. The test tank was coupled through a transparent Mylar membrane to the water-filled cushion of the treatment head, so that pockets of air trapped between the two coupling surfaces could be observed and photographed. It is shown that the quality of coupling can be improved by applying an excessive amount of gel to just the water cushion of the lithotripter, while applying gel to both the water cushion and the Mylar membrane typically gives poor coupling. Repeat decoupling and re-coupling substantially degraded the quality of coupling, reducing shock wave energy density at the target by ˜80%. It was also observed that using castor oil as a coupling medium does not guarantee air-free coupling.

  3. A mechanistic analysis of stone fracture in lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Maxwell, Adam D; MacConaghy, Brian; Bailey, Michael R

    2007-02-01

    In vitro experiments and an elastic wave model were used to analyze how stress is induced in kidney stones by lithotripsy and to test the roles of individual mechanisms-spallation, squeezing, and cavitation. Cylindrical U30 cement stones were treated in an HM-3-style lithotripter. Baffles were used to block specific waves responsible for spallation or squeezing. Stones with and without surface cracks added to simulate cavitation damage were tested in glycerol (a cavitation suppressive medium). Each case was simulated using the elasticity equations for an isotropic medium. The calculated location of maximum stress compared well with the experimental observations of where stones fractured in two pieces. Higher calculated maximum tensile stress correlated with fewer shock waves required for fracture. The highest calculated tensile stresses resulted from shear waves initiated at the proximal corners and strengthened along the side surfaces of the stone by the liquid-borne lithotripter shock wave. Peak tensile stress was in the distal end of the stone where fracture occurred. Reflection of the longitudinal wave from the distal face of the stone--spallation-produced lower stresses. Surface cracks accelerated fragmentation when created near the location where the maximum stress was predicted. PMID:17348540

  4. Tandem shock wave cavitation enhancement for extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Loske, Achim M; Prieto, Fernando E; Fernandez, Francisco; van Cauwelaert, Javier

    2002-11-21

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been successful for more than twenty years in treating patients with kidney stones. Hundreds of underwater shock waves are generated outside the patient's body and focused on the kidney stone. Stones fracture mainly due to spalling, cavitation and layer separation. Cavitation bubbles are produced in the vicinity of the stone by the tensile phase of each shock wave. Bubbles expand, stabilize and finally collapse violently, creating stone-damaging secondary shock waves and microjets. Bubble collapse can be intensified by sending a second shock wave a few hundred microseconds after the first. A novel method of generating two piezoelectrically generated shock waves with an adjustable time delay between 50 and 950 micros is described and tested. The objective is to enhance cavitation-induced damage to kidney stones during ESWL in order to reduce treatment time. In vitro kidney stone model fragmentation efficiency and pressure measurements were compared with those for a standard ESWL system. Results indicate that fragmentation efficiency was significantly enhanced at a shock wave delay of about 400 and 250 micros using rectangular and spherical stone phantoms, respectively. The system presented here could be installed in clinical devices at relatively low cost, without the need for a second shock wave generator. PMID:12476975

  5. Role of steroidal anti-inflammatory agent prior to intracorporeal lithotripsy under local anesthesia for ureterovesical junction calculus: A prospective randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Bijit; Singh, Kaku Akoijam; Sinam, Rajendra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the following study is to assess the effect of steroidal anti-inflammatory agent on the outcome of ureterorenoscopic lithotripsy (URSL) for ureterovesical junction (UVJ) calculus. Settings and Design: This was a prospective randomized controlled study conducted at the Department of Urology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and twenty-six patients requiring ureteroscopic lithotripsy for UVJ calculus were randomly assigned into two groups. The study group received tablet deflazacort 30 mg once a day for 10 days prior to the procedure, whereas the control group did not receive such treatment. Parameters with respect to the outcome of the procedure were recorded for all patients in both groups. Statistical Analysis Used: Fisher's exact and independent t-test was used to compare the outcome between the groups where P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: There was significant statistical difference (P - 0.016) on the endoscopic appearance of the region of ureteric orifice in patients receiving steroidal anti-inflammatory agent compared with control. Severe procedure related pain and mean operative time was less in the study group compared to control (P - 0.020 and 0.031, respectively). Re-treatment rates in the study group were lower than the control group (4.76% vs. 17.46%) and found to be statistically significant (P - 0.044). It is found that computed tomography (CT) appearance (r - 0.399) and stone size (r - 0.410) strongly correlate with the endoscopic findings of the region of UVJ (P - 0.001). Conclusions: Inflamed and or obliterated ureteric orifice is the major constraints for stone clearance at ureterovesical junction. The present study showed the administration of tablet deflazacort (a steroidal anti-inflammatory agent) significantly improves the outcome of URSL under local anesthesia. We strongly recommend its use prior to URSL for UVJ calculus, especially

  6. Transvaginal endoscopic appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eung Jin; Jeong, Gui Ae; Jung, Jun Chul; Cho, Gyu Seok; Lim, Chul Wan; Kim, Hyung Chul; Song, Ok Pyung

    2010-12-01

    Since Kalloo and colleagues first reported the feasibility and safety of a peroral transgastric approach in the porcine model in 2004, various groups have reported more complex natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedures, such as the cholecystectomy, splenectomy and liver biopsy, in the porcine model. Natural orifice access to the abdominal cavity, such as transgastric, transvesical, transcolonic, and transvaginal, has been described. Although a novel, minimally invasive approach to the abdominal cavity is a peroral endoscopic transgastric approach, there are still some challenging issues, such as the risk of infection and leakage, and the method of gastric closure. Hybrid-NOTES is an ideal first step in humans. Human hybrid transvaginal access has been used for years by many surgeons for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Here, we report a transvaginal flexible endoscopic appendectomy, with a 5-mm umbilical port using ultrasonic scissors in a 74-year-old woman with acute appendicitis. PMID:21221245

  7. Technicalities of endoscopic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N; Ignacio, J G

    1995-11-01

    Despite the wealth of biopsy forceps currently available, it is obvious that there are sufficient drawbacks and shortcomings to reconsider the overall design of the endoscopic biopsy depth, the short lifespan of reusable forceps, damage to the working channel, excessive time consumption, cleaning and disinfection difficulties, etc. Improvements should be possible that approach the same degree of sophistication as is currently available in endoscopic equipment. Fully-automated, repetitive, quickly targeted biopsy sampling should be possible, but it will require the utmost technical ingenuity and expertise to achieve. PMID:8903983

  8. Endoscopic Sedation: Medicolegal Considerations.

    PubMed

    Kralios, Andreas A; Feld, Kayla A; Feld, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Goals of endoscopic sedation are to provide patients with a successful procedure, and ensure that they remain safe and are relieved from anxiety and discomfort; agents should provide efficient, appropriate sedation and allow patients to recover rapidly. Sedation is usually safe and effective; however, complications may ensue. This paper outlines some medicolegal aspects of endoscopic sedation, including informed consent, possible withdrawal of consent during the procedure, standard of care for monitoring sedation, use of anesthesia personnel to deliver sedation, and new agents and devices. PMID:27372770

  9. Endoscopic Facial Nerve Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Soloperto, Davide; Rubini, Alessia; Nogueira, João Flávio; Badr-El-Dine, Mohamed; Presutti, Livio

    2016-10-01

    Tympanic facial nerve segment surgery has been traditionally performed using microscopic approaches, but currently, exclusive endoscopic approaches have been performed for traumatic, neoplastic, or inflammatory diseases, specially located at the geniculate ganglion, greater petrosal nerve, and second tract of the facial nerve, until the second genu. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve can be reached and visualized using an exclusive transcanal endoscopic approach, even in poorly accessible regions such as the second genu and geniculate ganglion, avoiding mastoidectomy, bony demolition, and meningeal or cerebral lobe tractions, with low complication rates using a minimally invasive surgical route. PMID:27468633

  10. Novel focused OCT-LIF endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Wall, R. Andrew; Bonnema, Garret T.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2011-01-01

    Combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) endoscopy has shown higher sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing normal tissue from adenoma when compared to either modality alone. Endoscope optical design is complicated by the large wavelength difference between the two systems. A new high-resolution endoscope 2 mm in diameter is presented that can create focused beams from the ultraviolet to near-infrared. A reflective design ball lens operates achromatically over a large wavelength range, and employs TIR at two faces and reflection at a third internal mirrored face. The 1:1 imaging system obtains theoretically diffraction-limited spots for both the OCT (1300 nm) and LIF (325 nm) channels. PMID:21412448

  11. Outcomes Following Endoscopic Stapes Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jacob B; Rivas, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    There are limited studies describing the surgical and hearing outcomes following endoscopic stapes surgeries, despite the burgeoning interest and excitement in endoscopic ear surgery. Current studies have demonstrated that endoscopic stapes surgery is safe and has similar audiologic outcomes when compared with microscopic stapes procedures. However, preliminary studies show decreased postoperative pain in endoscopic cases compared with microscopic controls. In regards to possible endoscopic advantages, these few studies demonstrate mixed results when comparing the need to remove the bony medial external auditory canal wall to improve visualization and access to the oval window niche. PMID:27565387

  12. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  13. [Long-term results of endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures].

    PubMed

    Martov, A G; Ergakov, D V; Saliukov, R V; Fakhredinov, G A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was assessment of efficacy of internal urethrotomies made in Research Institute of Urology and city urological hospital N 47. A total of 802 endoscopic operations were performed in 644 male patients aged from 16 to 89 years (mean age 58.6 years) with urethral stricture in 1994-2004. Internal optic urethrotomy was made in 733 cases with a cold knife, in 52--with electric knife and in 17 cases--with laser. Endoscopic urethral resection was conducted in 47 cases. The strictures (0.5-8 cm long, mean 1.4 cm) located most frequently in the bulbous urethra (n=426, 66.1%). Short-term results (12 months) of endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures showed that efficacy of the primary internal urethrotomy conducted according to the authors' technique reached 80.4%. Endoscopic reoperations (from 1 to 6) were performed in 98 (19.6%) patients. A complete rehabilitation (follow-up 9 years maximum) including stenting was achieved in 95.1% patients. In 32 (4.9%) patients endoscopic and rehabilitation measures failed to bring about satisfactory clinical outcomes. These patients were treated with open urethroplasty. Thus, internal optic urethrotomy is an effective therapeutic method. After primary urethrotomy recurrences of the strictures to be reoperated reach 19.6%. These can be successfully managed by endoscopic reoperations and rehabilitation measures. PMID:18254221

  14. [Early Diagnosis And Endoscopic Minimally Invasive Treatment of Gastrointestinal Tumor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-ping; Wu, Jun-chao

    2015-11-01

    Gastrointestinal tumor could be aggressive and life threaten if it was not be diagnosed and treated at early stage. Digestive endoscopy plays a very important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal tumor, and shows rapid evolution with novel technologies in the past years, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, magnifying endoscopy, electronic staining endoscopy, endoscopic confocal laser microscopy. Nowaday it becomes feasible to learn more about the endoscopic manifestation in early stage GI tumor. Besides, several new endoscopic surgical techniques, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), endoscopicsubmucosal tunnel dissection (ESTD), submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection (STER), has been applied in clinical treatment of early stage GI tumor with curative effect. However, there are some new problems emerged, such as how to determine the depth of the lesion, how to avoid or reduce the incidence of postoperative complications, and how to standardize the pathological classification and the treatment of positive margin, which need multidisciplinary solution with the efforts from endoscopist, clinician and pathologist. With the deep insight on, molecular pathogenesis of GI tumor, new technologies combinding endoscopy, imaging and pathological measures, will promote more GI tumor early diagnosed and effectively treated, thus improve the survival and prognosis of GI tumor patients. PMID:26867326

  15. Advances in endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Gaddam, Srinivas; Sharma, Prateek

    2010-12-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is defined as abnormal specialized columnar metaplasia with intestinalization in place of the normal squamous esophageal epithelium. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a known risk factor for BE; nonetheless BE is also detected in asymptomatic individuals. Other risk factors for BE include smoking, male gender, age over 50 and obesity. Patients diagnosed with BE (without dysplasia) are recommended to undergo endoscopic surveillance every 3-5 years. Advances in imaging techniques (such as narrow band imaging, autofluorescence imaging and confocal laser endomicroscopy) have the potential to improve the detection of dysplasia and early cancer, thus making surveillance a more cost-effective endeavor. Patients with high grade dysplasia (HGD) and early cancer have a high rate of progression to invasive adenocarcinoma and traditionally these patients were treated with esophagectomy. The rapid advancement of endoscopic therapeutic techniques along with a low risk of complications have made endoscopic therapy an acceptable alternative to an esophagectomy in patients with HGD and early cancer. Several endoscopic treatment techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection, multipolar electrocoagulation, photodynamic therapy, argon plasma coagulation, cryotherapy, and radiofrequency ablation have been studied for endoscopic treatment. PMID:21091894

  16. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. PMID:24628672

  17. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  18. Endoscopic treatment of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Swidnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Wróblewski, Eugeniusz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increasing incidence of obesity and overweight among children and adolescents will be reflected by the imminent increase in the number of obese patients who require more definitive methods of treatment. There is great interest in new, safe, simple, nonsurgical procedures for weight loss. OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of new endoscopic methods for the treatment of obesity. METHODS: An English-language literature search on endoscopic interventions, endoscopically placed devices and patient safety was performed in the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases. RESULTS: The literature search yielded the following weight loss methods: space-occupying devices (widely used), gastric capacity reduction, modifying gastric motor function and malabsorptive procedures. A commercially available intragastric balloon was the most commonly used device for weight loss. In specific subgroups of patients, it improved quality of life, decreased comorbidities and served as a bridge to surgery. More evidence regarding the potential benefits and safety of other commercially available intragastric balloons is needed to clarify whether they are superior to the most commonly used one. Moreover, early experiences with transoral gastroplasty, the duodenaljejunal bypass sleeve and an adjustable, totally implantable intragastric prosthesis, indicate that they may be viable options for obesity treatment. Other agents, such as botulinum toxin and a device known as the ‘butterfly’, are currently at the experimental stage. CONCLUSION: New endoscopic methods for weight loss may be valuable in the treatment of obesity; however, more clinical experience and technical improvements are necessary before implementing their widespread use. PMID:22059171

  19. Automated endoscope reprocessors.

    PubMed

    Desilets, David; Kaul, Vivek; Tierney, William M; Banerjee, Subhas; Diehl, David L; Farraye, Francis A; Kethu, Sripathi R; Kwon, Richard S; Mamula, Petar; Pedrosa, Marcos C; Rodriguez, Sarah A; Wong Kee Song, Louis-Michel

    2010-10-01

    The ASGE Technology Committee provides reviews of existing, new, or emerging endoscopic technologies that have an impact on the practice of GI endoscopy. Evidence-based methodology is used, with a MEDLINE literature search to identify pertinent clinical studies on the topic and a MAUDE (U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health) database search to identify the reported complications of a given technology. Both are supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed and by scrutinizing pertinent references cited by the identified studies. Controlled clinical trials are emphasized, but in many cases data from randomized, controlled trials are lacking. In such cases, large case series, preliminary clinical studies, and expert opinions are used. Technical data are gathered from traditional and Web-based publications, proprietary publications, and informal communications with pertinent vendors. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are drafted by 1 or 2 members of the ASGE Technology Committee, reviewed and edited by the committee as a whole, and approved by the Governing Board of the ASGE. When financial guidance is indicated, the most recent coding data and list prices at the time of publication are provided. For this review, the MEDLINE database was searched through February 2010 for articles related to automated endoscope reprocessors, using the words endoscope reprocessing, endoscope cleaning, automated endoscope reprocessors, and high-level disinfection. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are scientific reviews provided solely for educational and informational purposes. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are not rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment or payment for such treatment. PMID:20883843

  20. Advances in the Endoscopic Assessment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Cooperation between Endoscopic and Pathologic Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jae Hee

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic assessment has a crucial role in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is particularly useful for the assessment of IBD disease extension, severity, and neoplasia surveillance. Recent advances in endoscopic imaging techniques have been revolutionized over the past decades, progressing from conventional white light endoscopy to novel endoscopic techniques using molecular probes or electronic filter technologies. These new technologies allow for visualization of the mucosa in detail and monitor for inflammation/dysplasia at the cellular or sub-cellular level. These techniques may enable us to alter the IBD surveillance paradigm from four quadrant random biopsy to targeted biopsy and diagnosis. High definition endoscopy and dye-based chromoendoscopy can improve the detection rate of dysplasia and evaluate inflammatory changes with better visualization. Dye-less chromoendoscopy, including narrow band imaging, iScan, and autofluorescence imaging can also enhance surveillance in comparison to white light endoscopy with optical or electronic filter technologies. Moreover, confocal laser endomicroscopy or endocytoscopy have can achieve real-time histology evaluation in vivo and have greater accuracy in comparison with histology. These new technologies could be combined with standard endoscopy or further histologic confirmation in patients with IBD. This review offers an evidence-based overview of new endoscopic techniques in patients with IBD. PMID:26018512

  1. Acute pulmonary embolism during an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Painter, Nate P; Kumar, Priya A; Arora, Harendra

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old female patient presented for an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for the removal of a biliary stent and lithotripsy. During the procedure, an acute drop in the end-tidal CO 2 , followed by cardiovascular collapse prompted the initiation of the advanced cardiac life support protocol. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated direct evidence of pulmonary embolism. The patient was promptly treated with thrombolytic therapy and subsequently discharged home on oral warfarin therapy, with no noted sequelae. Although, there have been case reports of air embolism during an ERCP presenting with cardiovascular collapse, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of acute pulmonary embolus during this procedure. While the availability of TEE in the operating suites is quite common, quick access and interpretation capabilities in remote locations may not be as common. With the expansion of anesthesia services outside of the operating rooms, it may be prudent to develop rapid response systems that incorporate resources such as TEE and trained personnel to deal with such emergent situations. PMID:24732617

  2. Endoscopic assessment of primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Boudewijn; Weersma, Rinse K

    2016-03-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a rare chronic liver disease of unknown etiology for which the only known curative treatment is liver transplantation. The disease is defined by progressive inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts, causing biliary strictures and cholestasis. Common complications of the disease are the presence of biliary lithiasis requiring stone extraction, and development of dominant bile duct strictures requiring balloon dilatation and stent placement through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The increased development of cholangiocarcinoma is a dreaded complication in PSC, as it is often detected in an advanced stage and is associated with a poor prognosis. Several endoscopic techniques, including endoscopic ultrasound, confocal laser endomicroscopy and peroral cholangioscopy are applied in the management of PSC and detection of cholangiocarcinoma. Tissue sampling through different types of biopsies and biliary brush combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization are used to differentiate benign dominant strictures from biliary neoplasia. Nonetheless early detection of cholangiocarcinoma in PSC remains a clinical challenge requiring a specialized diagnostic workup. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy in management of PSC, providing an overview of current literature. PMID:26446685

  3. [Endoscopic Therapy for Esophageal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatment for esophageal neoplasms includes endoscopic resection, argon plasma coagulation(APC), photodynamic therapy( PDT) and stent placement. Endoscopic resection is widely used as an effective, less invasive treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma in Japan. APC is considered to be safe and effective treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma which cannot be resected endoscopically because of severe comorbidities, as well as for local recurrence after endoscopic resection or chemoradiotherapy. PDT is thought to be an effective option as salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy. Stent placement mainly using self-expanding metallic stents have been used as a minimally invasive and effective modality for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction. Endoscopic treatment is expected to have more important role in the treatment of esophageal neoplasms in the future. PMID:27440040

  4. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy.

    PubMed

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score. PMID:27298743

  5. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score. PMID:27298743

  6. Endoscopic and Microscopic Microvascular Decompression.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Matthew; Lee, John Y K

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of the endoscope into the neurosurgeon's armamentarium has revolutionized ventral and anterior skull-base surgery and, more recently, has been used in the surgical treatment of cerebellopontine angle (CPA) pathology. The utilization of the endoscope in microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia and other associated cranial nerve hyperactivity syndromes allows for unparalleled panoramic views and illumination of the neurovascular structures within the CPA and identification of vessel-nerve contact traditionally unseen using the microscope. In this article, the technical advantages and challenges of using the endoscope for MVD, operative technique, and patient outcomes of endoscopic MVD are discussed. PMID:27324997

  7. Fluorescence endoscopic video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayan, G. V.; Kang, Uk

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes a fluorescence endoscopic video system intended for the diagnosis of diseases of the internal organs. The system operates on the basis of two-channel recording of the video fluxes from a fluorescence channel and a reflected-light channel by means of a high-sensitivity monochrome television camera and a color camera, respectively. Examples are given of the application of the device in gastroenterology.

  8. [Endoscopic interventions in pulmonology].

    PubMed

    Gompelmann, D; Herth, F J F

    2016-08-01

    Bronchoscopy plays a significant role in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Hemoptysis, or central airway obstruction, is a common indication for interventional bronchoscopy. In addition, the treatment of early lung cancer is the domain of bronchoscopy in inoperable patients. In recent years, endoscopic techniques have also been established as new therapeutic options in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and uncontrolled bronchial asthma. PMID:27351790

  9. Peroral endoscopic myotomy.

    PubMed

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-05-16

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  10. Peroral endoscopic myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  11. New Endoscopic Hemostasis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Leung Ki, En-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic treatment for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding has evolved over decades. Injection with diluted epinephrine is considered as a less than adequate treatment, and the current standard therapy should include second modality if epinephrine injection is used initially. Definitive hemostasis rate following mono-therapy with either thermo-coagulation or hemo-clipping compares favorably with dual therapies. The use of adsorptive powder (Hemo-spray) is a promising treatment although it needs comparative studies between hemospray and other modalities. Stronger hemo-clips with better torque control and wider span are now available. Over-the-scope clips capture a large amount of tissue and may prove useful in refractory bleeding. Experimental treatments include an endoscopic stitch device to over-sew the bleeding lesion and targeted therapy to the sub-serosal bleeding artery as guided by echo-endoscopy. Angiographic embolization of bleeding artery should be considered in chronic ulcers that fail endoscopic treatment especially in elderly patients with a major bleed manifested in hypotension. PMID:22977807

  12. New endoscopic hemostasis methods.

    PubMed

    Leung Ki, En-Ling; Lau, James Y W

    2012-09-01

    Endoscopic treatment for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding has evolved over decades. Injection with diluted epinephrine is considered as a less than adequate treatment, and the current standard therapy should include second modality if epinephrine injection is used initially. Definitive hemostasis rate following mono-therapy with either thermo-coagulation or hemo-clipping compares favorably with dual therapies. The use of adsorptive powder (Hemo-spray) is a promising treatment although it needs comparative studies between hemospray and other modalities. Stronger hemo-clips with better torque control and wider span are now available. Over-the-scope clips capture a large amount of tissue and may prove useful in refractory bleeding. Experimental treatments include an endoscopic stitch device to over-sew the bleeding lesion and targeted therapy to the sub-serosal bleeding artery as guided by echo-endoscopy. Angiographic embolization of bleeding artery should be considered in chronic ulcers that fail endoscopic treatment especially in elderly patients with a major bleed manifested in hypotension. PMID:22977807

  13. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  14. Ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic optical coherence tomography for gastrointestinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Herz, Paul R.; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Schneider, Karl; Fujimoto, James G.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Desai, Saleem; Pedrosa, Marcos; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Koski, Amanda

    2005-04-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology which can generate high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissue in situ and in real time, without the removal of tissue specimen. Although endoscopic OCT has been used successfully to identify certain pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract, the resolution of current endoscopic OCT systems has been limited to 10-15 um for clinical procedures. In this study, in vivo imaging of the gastrointestinal tract is demonstrated at a three-fold higher axial resolution (<5 um), using a portable, broadband, Cr4+:Forsterite laser as the optical light source. Images acquired from the esophagus and colon on animal model display tissue microstructures and architectural details at ultrahigh resolution, and the features observed in the OCT images are well-matched with histology. The clinical feasibility study is conducted through delivering OCT imaging catheter using the standard endoscope. OCT images of normal esophagus and Barrett's esophagus are demonstrated with distinct features.

  15. Endoscopic palliation for inoperable malignant dysphagia: long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Maunoury, V; Brunetaud, J M; Cochelard, D; Boniface, B; Cortot, A; Paris, J C

    1992-01-01

    This prospective non-randomised trial of 128 selected patients with unresectable oesophageal or gastrooesophageal junction cancers aims to evaluate the initial relief of malignant obstruction by means of bipolar electrocoagulation for both circumferential and submucosal strictures of Nd:YAG laser for the other patients. A limited dilatation was performed initially if a small calibre endoscope was unable to pass through the stricture. Prompt and significant relief of dysphagia without complications was achieved in 83% of patients. Improved patients were retreated monthly during the follow up period. Radiotherapy was recommended when possible. Symptomatic relief of obstruction lasted 4.2 months on average and 76% of patients remained palliated until death. Monthly retreatment using the most appropriate endoscopic procedure for the tumour configuration and radiotherapy after endoscopic relief of obstruction seems to give the best palliation for patients with unresectable cancers of the oesophagus or gastrooesophageal junction. PMID:1283144

  16. Combined radiological-endoscopic management of difficult bile duct stones: 18-year single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Cannavale, Alessandro; Bezzi, Mario; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Fanello, Gianfranco; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Donatelli, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Clinical evidence regarding radiological–endoscopic management of intrahepatic bile duct stones is currently lacking. Our aim is to report our 18-year experience in combined radiological–endoscopic management of intrahepatic difficult bile duct stones. Methods: From June 1994 to June 2012, 299 symptomatic patients with difficult bile duct stones were admitted to our institution. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC)/biliary drainage/s was performed, dilating the PTC track to 10 or 16 French within 3–7 days. Afterward we carried out percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) with electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) and/or interventional radiology techniques. Follow up was made with clinical/laboratory tests and ultrasound (US). We retrospectively analyzed our radiological–endoscopic approach and reported our technical and clinical outcomes. Results: Complete stone clearance was achieved in 298 patients after a maximum of 4 consecutive sessions. Most patients (64.6%) were treated with PTCS/EHL alone, while the remaining with radiological techniques alone (26%) or a combination of both techniques (13.3%). Recurrence of stones occurred in 45 cases (15%, Tsunoda class III and class IV) within 2 years and were successfully retreated. Major adverse events were: 5 (1.6%) cases of massive bleeding that required embolisation, 2 (0.66%) perforations of the common bile duct and 31 cases (10.3%) of acute cholangitis managed with medical therapy or intervention. Conclusion: After 18 years of experience we demonstrated that our combined radiological–endoscopic approach to ‘difficult bile duct stones‘ may result in both immediate and long-term clearance of stones with a low rate of adverse events. PMID:26557890

  17. Percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy using working channel endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy has evolved as an efficient, minimally invasive spine surgery for cervical disc herniation or radiculopathy. The development of the working channel endoscope makes definitive decompression surgery through a percutaneous approach feasible. There are two methods of approach to target the pathology: anterior and posterior approach. The approach can be determined according to the zone of pathology or the surgeon's preference. The most significant benefits of this endoscopic surgical technique are minimal access tissue trauma and early recovery from the intervention. However, this technique is still evolving and have a steep learning curve. Extensive development of surgical technique and working channel endoscopes will enable us to treat cervical disc herniation more practically. The objective of this review is to describe the cutting-edge techniques of endoscopic surgery in the cervical spine and to discuss the pros and cons of these minimally invasive surgical techniques. PMID:27086505

  18. Endoscopic surveillance strategy after endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Tsutomu; Tsujii, Masahiko; Kato, Motohiko; Hayashi, Yoshito; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Iijima, Hideki; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of early gastric cancer (EGC) is important to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic modalities and treatment devices, such as image-enhanced endoscopy and high-frequency generators, may make endoscopic treatment, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection, a therapeutic option for gastric intraepithelial neoplasia. Consequently, short-term outcomes of endoscopic resection (ER) for EGC have improved. Therefore, surveillance with endoscopy after ER for EGC is becoming more important, but how to perform endoscopic surveillance after ER has not been established, even though the follow-up strategy for more advanced gastric cancer has been outlined. Therefore, a surveillance strategy for patients with EGC after ER is needed. PMID:24891981

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound guided antitumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, M S

    2003-08-01

    This paper will review the possibilities of EUS guided anti-tumor therapy. Ablative energy may be delivered to a tumor under EUS guidance to destruct tumor cells by ultrasound itself, radiofrequency or radiation. Pilot results of endoscopic high intensity focused ultrasound in a human trial have been reported. The feasibility of performing EUS guided radiofrequency ablation has been reported in a swine model. An EUS bases radiation target simulation method has been developed for anal cancer therapy. Targeted delivery of an anti-cancer agent into a tumor under EUS guidance is possible as reported in an early clinical trial of local immunotherapy (Cytoimplant) or modified viruses delivered by EUS guided fine needle injection in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Image guided injection of alcohol is another approach used for local tumor ablation. Application of other ablation therapies such as laser, microwave and cryo is also conceptually feasible. We will have to wait and see where these initial and ongoing attempts for applying EUS against cancer take us. PMID:12929056

  20. MINOP: development of a miniaturized endoscopic operation system for neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guber, Andreas E.; Wieneke, Paul

    1996-04-01

    Within the framework of R&D activities in the field of microsystems technology, the Institute for Microstructure Technology of Karlsruhe Research Center among others has started to improve the functionality of existing medicotechnical instruments by increased integration of microtechnical components. On the basis of microsystems fabrication techniques, completely novel medical endoscope systems have become feasible. In cooperation with clinical, technical and industrial partners, a novel endoscopic operation system based on microsystems technology is being developed by the Institute for Microstructure Technology and the Aesculap AG company, Tuttlingen within the framework of the MINOP joint project. This new system shall be applied above all in the field of neurosurgery. This newly conceived endosystem is characterized by a multitude of novelties. It can perform a number of both sensor and actor functions. Due to its extremely small outer diameter, it can be applied through minute openings. As a result of the integrated microfluidic control system, the flexible endoscope can be moved to the actual site of operation on a previously specified path. This will allow future bi- and triportal neuro-endoscopic interventions for critical operations in the brain area. The different lumina of the flexible endoscope fulfill various functions. Via the optical fibers, laser radiation may be led to the distal end of the endoscope. Using microtechnical fabrication methods, special plastic microlenses have been produced. The working channel can be applied for rinsing and removal. Furthermore, the cleaning of the optics or the taking of tissue samples are possible. If required, another laser fiber can be driven forward through the working channel for selective therapy. For the first time, high-performance microinstruments have been developed on the basis of novel materials. These instruments can be applied either through the working channel or through an additional trocar.

  1. A full-color scanning fiber endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, Eric J.; Johnston, Richard S.; Melville, C. David

    2006-02-01

    Minimally invasive medical procedures will benefit from flexible endoscopes that are extremely thin yet produce high quality images. Current devices use fiber bundles or silicon image sensors placed in the distal tip where each pixel in the image is derived from an element in the distal tip, such that improving resolution requires increasing distal tip diameter. The University of Washington has developed the scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) to provide full color, high resolution images from a flexible endoscope with a small distal tip diameter. The SFE uses a single mode fiber vibrating in resonance to scan a focused laser spot over the tissue and a detector to record the time-multiplexed backscatter signal. The SFE contains a 400 micron diameter piezoelectric tube through which a length of singlemode optical fiber is placed. The tube drives the fiber tip at its resonant frequency (currently 5 KHz) in an expanding pattern of 250 spirals (500 pixel diameter image) at a frame rate of 15 Hertz. Imaging parameters are determined by the lens system placed in the 1.06 mm diameter distal tip. Prototype systems with 70 degree field-of-view and 10 micron resolution have been developed. Color images are created with red, green, and blue laser sources coupled into the single scanning fiber. Backscattered light is collected with twelve 250 micron multimode fibers placed around the periphery of the microscanner resulting in a total distal tip diameter of 1.6 mm. Frame sequential color, fluorescence, and continuous color imaging modes have been demonstrated in the non-confocal geometry.

  2. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  3. Rinsability of orthophthalaldehyde from endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Miner, Norman; Harris, Valerie; Lukomski, Natalie; Ebron, Towanda

    2012-01-01

    Orthophthalaldehyde high level disinfectants are contraindicated for use with urological instruments such as cystoscopes due to anaphylaxis-like allergic reactions during surveillance of bladder cancer patients. Allergic reactions and mucosal injuries have also been reported following colonoscopy, laryngoscopy, and transesophageal echocardiography with devices disinfected using orthophthalaldehyde. Possibly these endoscopes were not adequately rinsed after disinfection by orthophthalaldehyde. We examined this possibility by means of a zone-of-inhibition test, and also a test to extract residues of orthophthalaldehyde with acetonitrile, from sections of endoscope insertion tube materials, to measure the presence of alkaline glutaraldehyde, or glutaraldehyde plus 20% w/w isopropanol, or ortho-phthalaldehyde that remained on the endoscope materials after exposure to these disinfectants followed by a series of rinses in water, or by aeration overnight. Zones of any size indicated the disinfectant had not been rinsed away from the endoscope material. There were no zones of inhibition surrounding endoscope materials soaked in glutaraldehyde or glutaraldehyde plus isopropanol after three serial water rinses according to manufacturers' rinsing directions. The endoscope material soaked in orthophthalaldehyde produced zones of inhibition even after fifteen serial rinses with water. Orthophthalaldehyde was extracted from the rinsed endoscope material by acetonitrile. These data, and other information, indicate that the high level disinfectant orthophthalaldehyde, also known as 1,2-benzene dialdehyde, cannot be rinsed away from flexible endoscope material with any practical number of rinses with water, or by drying overnight. PMID:22665966

  4. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  5. Disposable sheath that facilitates endoscopic Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Short, Michael; Tai, Isabella T.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    In vivo endoscopic Raman spectroscopy of human tissue using a fiber optic probe has been previously demonstrated. However, there remain several technical challenges, such as a robust control over the laser radiation dose and measurement repeatability during endoscopy. A decrease in the signal to noise was also observed due to aging of Raman probe after repeated cycles of harsh reprocessing procedures. To address these issues, we designed and tested a disposable, biocompatible, and sterile sheath for use with a fiber optic endoscopic Raman probe. The sheath effectively controls contamination of Raman probes between procedures, greatly reduces turnaround time, and slows down the aging of the Raman probes. A small optical window fitted at the sheath cap maintained the measurement distance between Raman probe end and tissue surface. To ensure that the sheath caused a minimal amount of fluorescence and Raman interference, the optical properties of materials for the sheath, optical window, and bonding agent were studied. The easy-to-use sheath can be manufactured at a moderate cost. The sheath strictly enforced a maximum permissible exposure standard of the tissue by the laser and reduced the spectral variability by 1.5 to 8.5 times within the spectral measurement range.

  6. [Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure].

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, J; Lankisch, T

    2013-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage in the upper and lower intestinal tract is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Within the last 10 years endoscopic treatment options have been accepted as sufficient treatment option of these surgical complications. Endoscopic vacuum assisted closure (E-VAC) is a new innovative endoscopic therapeutic option in this field. E-VAC transfers the positive effects of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) on infected cutaneous wounds to infected cavities that can only be reached endoscopically. A sponge connected to a drainage tube is endoscopically placed in the leakage and a continuous vacuum is applied. Sponge and vacuum allow removal of infected fluids and promote granulation of the leakage. This results in clean wound grounds and finally allows wound closure. Meanwhile the method was also successfully used in the treatment of necrotic pancreatitis. PMID:23430199

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  8. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Bauder, Markus; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Management of subepithelial tumors (SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection of SET arising from deeper layers of the gastrointestinal wall requires advanced endoscopic methods and harbours the risk of perforation. Innovative techniques such as submucosal tunneling and full thickness resection have expanded the frontiers of endoscopic therapy in the past years. This review will give an overview about endoscopic resection techniques of SET with a focus on novel methods. PMID:25512768

  9. Endoscopic treatment of oesophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Krige, J E; Bornman, P C

    2000-12-01

    Major variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. Therapy for bleeding may be difficult and requires expertise and appropriate facilities. Endoscopic therapy using either injection sclerotherapy or band ligation after adequate resuscitation and diagnostic endoscopy is the preferred first-line treatment. Bleeding not controlled by initial endoscopic therapy requires balloon tamponade followed by repeat variceal ligation or sclerotherapy. Patients who continue to bleed after endoscopic therapy are best treated with percutaneous radiological transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent (TIPSS) insertion. After variceal eradication, patients require lifelong surveillance endoscopy and re-obliteration of varices by endoscopic therapy if they recur. Beta-blockers to prevent recurrent bleeding are reserved for selected patients. Patients with severe liver decompensation have a poor prognosis and should be evaluated for liver transplantation. Prophylactic endoscopic therapy in patients who have never bled from varices is contraindicated as it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:11424860

  10. Endoscopic Therapy in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Damien Meng Yew

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a debilitating disease that can result in chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and other related complications. The main aims of treatment are to control symptoms, prevent disease progression, and correct any complications. A multidisciplinary approach involving medical, endoscopic, and surgical therapy is important. Endoscopic therapy plays a specific role in carefully selected patients as primary interventional therapy when medical measures fail or in patients who are not suitable for surgery. Endoscopic therapy is also used as a bridge to surgery or as a means to assess the potential response to pancreatic surgery. This review addresses the role of endoscopic therapy in relief of obstruction of the pancreatic duct (PD) and bile du ct, closure of PD leaks, and drainage of pseudocysts in CP. The role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block for pain in chronic pancreatitis is also discussed. PMID:22205838

  11. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Alfieri, Alessandra; Colao, Annamaria; Ferone, Diego; Lombardi, Gaetano; de Divitiis, Enrico

    1999-01-01

    The outcome of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery in 10 patients with pituitary adenomas was compared with that of traditional transnasal transsphenoidal approach (TTA) in 20 subjects. Among the 10 individuals subjected to “pure endoscopy,” 2 had a microadenoma, 1 an intrasellar macroadenoma, 4 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 2 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 1 a residual tumor; 5 had acromegaly and 5 had a nonfunctioning adenoma (NFA). Among the patients subjected to TTA, 4 had a microadenoma, 2 had an intrasellar macroadenoma, 6 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 4 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 4 had a residual tumor; 9 patients had acromegaly, 1 hyperprolactinemia, 1 Cushing's disease, and 9 a NFA. At the macroscopic evaluation, tumor removal was total (100%) after endoscopy in 9 patients and after TTA in 14 patients. Six months after surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the total tumor removal in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%). Circulating growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) significantly decreased 6 months after surgery in all 14 acromegalic patients: normalization of plasma IGF-I levels was obtained in 4 of 5 patients after the endoscopic procedure and in 4 of 9 patients after TTA. Before surgery, pituitary hormone deficiency was present in 14 out of 30 patients: pituitary function improved in 4 patients, remaining unchanged in the other 10 patients. Visual field defects were present before surgery in 4 patients, and improved in all. Early surgical results in the group of 10 patients who underwent endoscopic pituitary tumor removal were at least equivalent to those of standard TTA, with excellent postoperative course. Postsurgical hospital stay was significantly shorter (3.1 ± 0.4 vs. 6.2 ± 0.3 days, p < 0.001) after endoscopy as compared to TTA. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171126

  12. Endoscopic pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; de Divitiis, Oreste; Solari, Domenico; Esposito, Felice; Colao, Annamaria

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary surgery is a continuous evolving speciality of the neurosurgeons' armamentarium, which requires precise anatomical knowledge, technical skills and integrated appreciation of the pituitary pathophysiology. What we consider "pure" endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery is a procedure performed through the nose and the sphenoid bone, with the endoscope alone throughout the whole approach to visualize the surgical target area and without the use of any transsphenoidal retractor. It offers some advantages due to the endoscope itself: a superior close-up view of the relevant anatomy and an enlarged working angle are provided with an increased panoramic vision inside the surgical area. Concerning results in terms of mass removal, relief of clinical symptoms, cure of the underlying disease and complication rate, they are, at least, similar to those reported in the major microsurgical series, but patient compliance is by far better. Furthermore transsphenoidal endoscopy brings advantages to the patient (less nasal traumatism, no nasal packing, less post-op pain and usually quick recovery), to the surgeon (wider and closer view of the surgical target area, increase of the scientific activity as from the peer-reviewed literature on the topic in the last 10 years, smoothing of interdisciplinary cooperation), to the institution (shorter post-op hospital stay, increase of the case load). Besides, further progress and technological advance are expected from the close cooperation between different technologies and industries. Continuing works in such field of "minimalism" will offer further possibilities to provide the surgeon with even more effectiveness and safety, and, on the other hand, the patient with improvement of results. PMID:18286374

  13. Endoscopic extraperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Hourlay, P; Vangertruyden, G; Verduyckt, F; Trimpeneers, F; Hendrickx, J

    1995-05-01

    From June 24, 1993, until November 9, 1993, eight sympathectomies were performed by extraperitoneal endoscopy for treatment of Sudeck atrophy. Seventy-five percent of the patients were satisfied with the result of the intervention. A follow-up after 4 months shows that four patients are free of pain. Two are satisfied, but some pain remains. In two cases, the intensity of the pain remains unchanged but the character of the pain has changed. This new technique is safe and offers the well-known advantages of minimal invasive surgery. Moreover, this endoscopic approach opens perspectives for the exploration of the entire retroperitoneum. PMID:7545831

  14. Endoscopic mucosal resection.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Joo Ha; Konda, Vani; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Enestvedt, Brintha K; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L; Komanduri, Sri; Maple, John T; Murad, Faris M; Pannala, Rahul; Thosani, Nirav C; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-08-01

    EMR has become an established therapeutic option for premalignant and early-stage GI malignancies, particularly in the esophagus and colon. EMR can also aid in the diagnosis and therapy of subepithelial lesions localized to the muscularis mucosa or submucosa. Several dedicated EMR devices are available to facilitate these procedures. Adverse event rates, particularly bleeding and perforation, are higher after EMR relative to other basic endoscopic interventions but lower than adverse event rates for ESD. Endoscopists performing EMR should be knowledgeable and skilled in managing potential adverse events resulting from EMR. PMID:26077453

  15. Therapeutic Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology has evolved dramatically over the past 20 years, from being a supplementary diagnostic aid available only in large medical centers to being a core diagnostic and therapeutic tool that is widely available. Although formal recommendations and practice guidelines have not been developed, there are considerable data supporting the use of EUS for its technical accuracy in diagnosing pancreaticobiliary and gastrointestinal pathology. Endosonography is now routine practice not only for pathologic diagnosis and tumor staging but also for drainage of cystic lesions and celiac plexus neurolysis. In this article, we cover the use of EUS in biliary and pancreatic intervention, ablative therapy, enterostomy, and vascular intervention. PMID:27118942

  16. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal. PMID:27284515

  17. Physical mechanisms of importance to laser thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapyak, Edward J.; Godwin, Robert P.

    1998-07-01

    Bubble dynamics plays a key role in many medical procedures including Laser Thrombolysis (L-T), acoustic and laser lithotripsy, interocular laser surgery, photoacoustic drug delivery, and perhaps ultrasonic imaging. We are investigating the effect that interfaces of different materials, especially biological and biomedical materials, have on the dynamics of nearby bubbles. Collapsing bubbles often become nonspherical, resulting in spectacular directed motion with potentially both beneficial and undesirable consequences. This directed motion may explain L-T mass removal and some types of laser-induced tissue damage.

  18. Physical mechanisms of importance to laser thrombolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1998-12-31

    Bubble dynamics plays a key role in many medical procedures including Laser Thrombolysis (L-T), acoustic and laser lithotripsy, interocular laser surgery, photoacoustic drug delivery, and perhaps ultrasonic imaging. The authors are investigating the effect that interfaces of different materials, especially biological and biomedical materials, have on the dynamics of nearby bubbles. Collapsing bubbles often become nonspherical, resulting in spectacular directed motion with potentially both beneficial and undesirable consequences. This directed motion may explain L-T mass removal and some types of laser-induced tissue damage.

  19. Acceleration of lithotripsy using cavitation bubbles induced by second-harmonic superimposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuga, Masamizu; Yasuda, Jun; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy potentially produces residual stone fragments too large to pass through ureters and significant injury to the normal tissue surrounding the stone. Previous works have shown that the collapse of cavitation bubbles induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound can produce small stone fragments via cavitation erosion. However, the erosion rate is hypothesized to be reduced by ultrasound attenuation by excessively generated bubble clouds. If so, it is important to generate the bubbles only on the stone surface. The effects of peak-negative-enhanced (PNE) and peak-positive-enhanced (PPE) waves obtained by second-harmonic superimposition were investigated to control cavitation bubbles. With the PNE waves, the bubbles were generated only on the stone surface and the maximum erosion rate was 232 ± 32 mg/min. All the fragments were smaller than 2 mm, which makes them pass through ureters naturally. The proposed method shows the potential to significantly improve the speed of lithotripsy.

  20. 3D dynamic simulation of crack propagation in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijerathne, M. L. L.; Hori, Muneo; Sakaguchi, Hide; Oguni, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Some experimental observations of Shock Wave Lithotripsy(SWL), which include 3D dynamic crack propagation, are simulated with the aim of reproducing fragmentation of kidney stones with SWL. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the fragmentation of kidney stones by focusing an ultrasonic pressure pulse onto the stones. 3D models with fine discretization are used to accurately capture the high amplitude shear shock waves. For solving the resulting large scale dynamic crack propagation problem, PDS-FEM is used; it provides numerically efficient failure treatments. With a distributed memory parallel code of PDS-FEM, experimentally observed 3D photoelastic images of transient stress waves and crack patterns in cylindrical samples are successfully reproduced. The numerical crack patterns are in good agreement with the experimental ones, quantitatively. The results shows that the high amplitude shear waves induced in solid, by the lithotriptor generated shock wave, play a dominant role in stone fragmentation.

  1. Light dosimetry technique for endoscopic PDT using microlens optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.

    1999-06-01

    A simple procedure is presented for determining the irradiance of light striking tissues during light delivery using a microlens optical fiber via an endoscope. The particular example is photodynamic therapy (PDT) of laryngeal cancer. A microlens optical fiber is an optical fiber with a small lens assembly at its terminus which magnifies the image of the end of the fiber yielding a uniform irradiance in a plane distant from the fiber. Prior to the therapy, the relation between fiber-target distance, h [cm], and the diameter of the uniform beam, d(h) [cm], was established and the area of the beam was calculated: A(h) equals (pi) d(h)2/4. The laser power P [W] required to achieve a desired irradiance E [W/cm2] was P(h) equals EA(h), and this relation was prepared as a simple graph for routine use in the clinic. During the therapy, the doctor advances the optical fiber through the working channel of the endoscope to touch the target tissue site while observing through the optical channel, and marks the fiber on the outside of the endoscope. The doctor then retracts the fiber until an aiming beam transmitted through the fiber fully illuminates the desired target area, and again marks the fiber on the outside of the endoscope. The difference in the two marks on the fiber outside the endoscope yields h, the height of the fiber above the target tissue. The laser operator then uses the P(h) equals EA(h) graph to select the proper laser power to achieve the desired E. Although trivially simple, this dosimetry procedure was critical to the proper implementation of PDT for laryngeal cancer.

  2. Herpes zoster reactivation after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Krishnamoorthy; Pillai, Biju S.; Bansal, Devesh

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a reactivated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection of the sensory nerve ganglion, peripheral nerve, and its branches. Mechanical trauma to the nervous system can reactivate VZV. It is well known that extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) can produce mechanical damage to the tissue. We report a rare case of herpes zoster reactivation after SWL for treatment of 1.2 cm size renal stone in a 63-year-old male patient. PMID:27555686

  3. Herpes zoster reactivation after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Krishnamoorthy; Pillai, Biju S; Bansal, Devesh

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a reactivated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection of the sensory nerve ganglion, peripheral nerve, and its branches. Mechanical trauma to the nervous system can reactivate VZV. It is well known that extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) can produce mechanical damage to the tissue. We report a rare case of herpes zoster reactivation after SWL for treatment of 1.2 cm size renal stone in a 63-year-old male patient. PMID:27555686

  4. Renovascular acute renal failure precipitated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for pancreatic stones

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Nicolas; Goffette, Pierre; Deprez, Pierre; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic stones is considered a safe and efficient method to facilitate fragmentation and stone removal. We describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with a solitary functioning kidney who presented an acute-onset anuria and renovascular renal failure the day after ESWL. We speculate that vascular calcifications in the area targeted by shock waves played a critical role in renal artery obstruction in the present case. PMID:26251710

  5. Endoscopic extraction of adjustable gastric bands after intragastric migration as a complication of bariatric surgery: technique and advice

    PubMed Central

    Collado-Pacheco, David; Rábago-Torre, Luis Ramon; Arias-Rivera, Maria; Ortega-Carbonel, Alejandro; Olivares-Valles, Ana; Alonso-Prada, Alicia; Vázquez-Echarri, Jaime; Herrera-Merino, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery has been the method most widely used to manage the extraction of gastric bands with inclusion as a late complication of bariatric surgery; however, surgical extraction entails morbidity and limits future surgical procedures. The development of endoscopic techniques has provided an important means of improving the treatment of this complication, enabling minimally invasive and safe procedures that have a high success rate. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of patients who had laparoscopic gastric banding complicated by intragastric migration and were treated endoscopically. A technique already described for managing this complication was employed. An MTW Endoskopie Dormia basket for mechanical lithotripsy or a standard 0.0035-in guidewire was placed around the band, and an MTW Endoskopie emergency lithotripter was used to section it, after which the band was extracted with a standard polypectomy snare. Also analyzed were the initial symptoms of patients with this complication, the mean time from surgery to development of the event, the success rate of endoscopic treatment, and complications, Results: A total of 127 patients had undergone gastric banding surgery in our Bariatric Surgery Center; of these, 12 patients (9.4 %) developed a complication such as intragastric migration of the band. Weight gain and pain were the main symptoms in 11 patients (92 %), and the mean time to the development of symptoms was 51.3 months. A single endoscopic treatment was successful in 7 of 9 patients (78 %). Only 1 complication, involving ventilation during anesthesia, occurred; no other adverse events were recorded. Conclusions: The endoscopic extraction of bands with inclusion is feasible and can be performed easily and successfully. The procedure is available in all hospitals and has a low incidence of related complications, so that unnecessary surgical procedures can be avoided. PMID:27556077

  6. The Acute and Long-Term Adverse Effects of Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has proven to be a highly effective treatment for the removal of kidney stones. Shock waves (SW’s) can be used to break most stone types, and because lithotripsy is the only non-invasive treatment for urinary stones SWL is particularly attractive. On the downside SWL can cause vascular trauma to the kidney and surrounding organs. This acute SW damage can be severe, can lead to scarring with a permanent loss of functional renal volume, and has been linked to potentially serious long-term adverse effects. A recent retrospective study linking lithotripsy to the development of diabetes mellitus has further focused attention on the possibility that SWL may lead to life-altering chronic effects 1. Thus, it appears that what was once considered to be an entirely safe means to eliminate renal stones can elicit potentially severe unintended consequences. The purpose of this review is to put these findings in perspective. The goal is to explain the factors that influence the severity of SWL injury, update current understanding of the long-term consequences of SW damage, describe the physical mechanisms thought to cause SWL injury, and introduce treatment protocols to improve stone breakage and reduce tissue damage. PMID:18359401

  7. Long-term evaluation of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in the treatment of salivary stones.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, S; Zengel, P; Alvir, I; Andratschke, M; Berghaus, A; Lang, S

    2008-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is a rather new therapeutical method in the treatment of sialolithiasis. The objective was to evaluate retrospectively the results of the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy therapy performed with a Minilith SL 1 lithotripter on 167 out-patients with symptomatic stones (average size 5.94 mm) of the salivary glands over an observation period of seven years. A successful treatment with total stone disintegration was achieved in 51 (31 per cent) patients. In 92 (55 per cent) patients treatment was partially successful, with disappearance of the symptoms but a sonographically still identifiable stone. Treatment failure occurred in 24 (14 per cent) patients who then underwent surgery. The mean follow-up period was 35.6 months (minimum three, maximum 83), after which 83.2 per cent of the initially successfully treated patients were still free of symptoms.Therefore, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, as a non-invasive treatment alternative with few side effects, is an efficient technique for the therapy of sialolithiasis in selected patients. PMID:17466089

  8. Endoscopic Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Titus D.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective: Endoscopic neck surgery for the thyroid and parathyroid is being tested as an alternative to open thyroidectomy. The aim of this study was to determine the safety and feasibility of endoscopic transaxillary total thyroidectomy (ETTT). Methods and Results: Twenty-two consecutive patients from January 2006 to September 2008 underwent ETTT. No conversions to open were necessary. Mean age was 49.3±12.9 years, 20 were female, and 2 were male. Mean operating time was 238 minutes±72.7. Mean blood loss was 40mL±28.3mL. Mean weight of the gland was 137.05g±129.21g. The recurrent laryngeal nerve was identified with no permanent injury. Six patients developed hoarseness of the voice for a mean of 15.1±8.01 days. No patient developed tetany or hypocalcemia requiring treatment. Six patients experienced transient numbness in the anterior chest wall lasting 2 weeks in 5 patients and 2 months in one. All patients were discharged within 24 hours of admission. Conclusion: ETTT requires additional operative time compared with the open approach, but is cosmetically favorable. Visualization of the nerve and parathyroid is much better. Although the learning curve is steep, with experience the operative time will decrease. ETTT is different but safe and feasible. PMID:20202393

  9. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis PMID:22816012

  10. Guideline Implementation: Processing Flexible Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for processing flexible endoscopes" provides guidance to perioperative, endoscopy, and sterile processing personnel for processing all types of reusable flexible endoscopes and accessories in all procedural settings. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel safely and effectively process flexible endoscopes to prevent infection transmission. The key points address verification of manual cleaning, mechanical cleaning and processing, storage in a drying cabinet, determination of maximum storage time before reprocessing is needed, and considerations for implementing a microbiologic surveillance program. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:27568535

  11. Endoscopic surgery - exploring the modalities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel Jin Keat; Tan, Kok-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of endoscopic surgery continues to expand in clinical situations with the recent natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery technique enabling abdominal organ resection to be performed without necessitating any skin incision. In recent years, the development of numerous devices and platforms have allowed for such procedures to be carried out in a safer and more efficient manner, and in some ways to better simulate triangulation and surgical tasks (e.g., suturing and dissection). Furthermore, new novel techniques such as submucosal tunneling, endoscopic full-thickness resection and hybrid endo-laparoscopic approaches have further widened its use in more advanced diseases. Nevertheless, many of these new innovations are still at their pre-clinical stage. This review focuses on the various innovations in endoscopic surgery, with emphasis on devices and techniques that are currently in human use. PMID:26649156

  12. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is done in a procedure called a biopsy: the physician eases a long, thin tube called ... the tissue using instruments passed through the endoscope. Biopsy of the small intestine is the only way ...

  13. Foveated endoscopic lens

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We present a foveated miniature endoscopic lens implemented by amplifying the optical distortion of the lens. The resulting system provides a high-resolution region in the central field of view and low resolution in the outer fields, such that a standard imaging fiber bundle can provide both the high resolution needed to determine tissue health and the wide field of view needed to determine the location within the inspected organ. Our proof of concept device achieves 7∼8  μm resolution in the fovea and an overall field of view of 4.6 mm. Example images and videos show the foveated lens’ capabilities. PMID:22463022

  14. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Pande, Sonjjay; Namdev, Hemant; Agarwal, Moneet

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is considered as a treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus. It is indicated in hydrocephalus secondary to congenital aqueductal stenosis, posterior third ventricle tumor, cerebellar infarct, Dandy-Walker malformation, vein of Galen aneurism, syringomyelia with or without Chiari malformation type I, intraventricular hematoma, post infective, normal pressure hydrocephalus, myelomeningocele, multiloculated hydrocephalus, encephalocele, posterior fossa tumor and craniosynostosis. It is also indicated in block shunt or slit ventricle syndrome. Proper Pre-operative imaging for detailed assessment of the posterior communicating arteries distance from mid line, presence or absence of Liliequist membrane or other membranes, located in the prepontine cistern is useful. Measurement of lumbar elastance and resistance can predict patency of cranial subarachnoid space and complex hydrocephalus, which decides an ultimate outcome. Water jet dissection is an effective technique of ETV in thick floor. Ultrasonic contact probe can be useful in selected patients. Intra-operative ventriculo-stomography could help in confirming the adequacy of endoscopic procedure, thereby facilitating the need for shunt. Intraoperative observations of the patent aqueduct and prepontine cistern scarring are predictors of the risk of ETV failure. Such patients may be considered for shunt surgery. Magnetic resonance ventriculography and cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging are effective in assessing subarachnoid space and stoma patency after ETV. Proper case selection, post-operative care including monitoring of ICP and need for external ventricular drain, repeated lumbar puncture and CSF drainage, Ommaya reservoir in selected patients could help to increase success rate and reduce complications. Most of the complications develop in an early post-operative, but fatal complications can develop late which indicate an importance of long term follow

  15. Alternative endoscopic management in the treatment of urethral strictures.

    PubMed

    Niesel, T; Moore, R G; Alfert, H J; Kavoussi, L R

    1995-02-01

    Advances in endoscopic instrumentation and techniques have expanded our armamentarium for safe and effective treatment of urethral strictures. Endoscopic incision or dilation should remain the preferred treatment for uncomplicated primary strictures. Balloon dilation can be useful in the treatment of dense strictures. Incision using laser energy has yet to provide better results than procedures employing a cold knife. As such, it would be difficult to justify the added expense of laser urethrotomy. Endoscopic placement of free skin grafts into the bed of the urethra after transurethral resection or deep incision of the stricture is a novel approach that has shown a great deal of promise. Endourethroplasty is a reasonable alternative to open urethroplasty when treating long strictures, as more than 90% of the reported patients have had a successful outcome with no recurrence. However, larger experience with this procedure is necessary to verify its efficacy and for greater acceptance. The placement of indwelling stents is another new promising treatment option. Overall short-term success rates range from 75% to 100%, but the follow-up period is short, and little is known about the long-term risks of an indwelling foreign body in the urethra. Endoscopic incision via "cut-to-the-light" or "core-through" procedures is an excellent alternative in patients with obliterative strictures. Data from several centers reveal that the majority of patients gain relief of obstruction while maintaining continence and erectile potency. However, at least 25% of these patients will need further endoscopic management to maintain urethral patency. PMID:7780428

  16. Endoscopic Distal Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-04-01

    Chronic distal tibiofibular syndesmosis disruption can be managed by endoscopic arthrodesis of the syndesmosis. This is performed through the proximal anterolateral and posterolateral portals. The scar tissue and bone block are resected to facilitate the subsequent reduction of the syndesmosis. The reduction of the syndesmosis can be guided either arthroscopically or endoscopically. The tibial and fibular surfaces of the tibiofibular overlap can be microfractured to facilitate subsequent fusion. PMID:27462544

  17. Endoscopic Management of Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busafi, Said A.; Ghali, Peter; Wong, Philip; Deschenes, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Cirrhosis is the leading cause of portal hypertension worldwide, with the development of bleeding gastroesophageal varices being one of the most life-threatening consequences. Endoscopy plays an indispensible role in the diagnosis, staging, and prophylactic or active management of varices. With the expected future refinements in endoscopic technology, capsule endoscopy may one day replace traditional gastroscopy as a diagnostic modality, whereas endoscopic ultrasound may more precisely guide interventional therapy for gastric varices. PMID:22830037

  18. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  19. Ensuring the Safety of Your Endoscopic Procedure

    MedlinePlus

    ... an endoscope are as follows: Mechanical cleaning The operating channels and external portions of the endoscope are ... that there are no leaks in its internal operating channels. This not only ensures peak performance of ...

  20. Definitive ureteroscopy and intracorporeal lithotripsy in treatment of ureteral calculi during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Teleb, Mohamed; Ragab, Ahmed; Dawod, Tamer; Elgalaly, Hazem; Elsayed, Ehab; Sakr, Ahmed; Abdelhameed, Ahmed; Maarouf, Arif; Khalil, Salem

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the outcome of using semi-rigid ureteroscopy with or without intracorporeal pneumatic lithotripsy vs. temporary ureteric JJ stenting in the management of obstructing ureteric calculi in pregnant women. Patients and methods This prospective comparative study comprised 43 pregnant women with obstructing ureteric calculi. The diagnosis was based on the acute flank pain as the main symptom, microscopic haematuria, and unilateral hydronephrosis on abdominal ultrasonography (US). The patients were randomly divided into two groups; those in group 1 (22 patients) were treated by temporary ureteric JJ stenting until after delivery, and those in group 2 (21) were treated definitively by ureteroscopic stone extraction with intracorporeal pneumatic lithotripsy. Postoperative complications and the degree of patient satisfaction were reported. Results An obstructing ureteric stone was identified by US in 68% and 76% of groups 1 and 2, respectively. In group 1, nine patients had mid-ureteric stones and 13 had stones in the lower ureter. In group 2, seven patients had mid-ureteric stones, whilst the stones were in the distal ureter in 14. No perioperative foetal complications were detected in any group and all patients completed the full term of pregnancy. In group 1, four patients had a postoperative urinary tract infection (UTI), and the JJ stent was exchanged in seven. Two patients in group 2 had a postoperative UTI. Conclusions Definitive ureteroscopy, even with intracorporeal pneumatic lithotripsy, is an effective and safe treatment for pregnant women with obstructing ureteric calculi. It has a better outcome and is more satisfactory for the patients than a temporary JJ stent. PMID:26019966

  1. Emergency ureteroscopic lithotripsy in acute renal colic caused by ureteral calculi: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazo, Mohammed A; Ghalayini, Ibrahim Fathi; Al-Azab, Rami S; Bani Hani, Osamah; Bani-Hani, Ibrahim; Abuharfil, Mohammad; Haddad, Yazan

    2011-12-01

    This work was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of emergency ureteroscopic lithotripsy in patients with ureteral stones. From May 2003 to December 2010, 244 patients (184 men and 60 women, mean age 45.6 ± 12.7 years (range 22-73 years) were treated with emergency ureteroscopic lithotripsy for ureteral calculi. All patients were divided into three groups according to the stone location in the ureter. Intracorporeal lithotripsy when necessary was performed with the Swiss lithoclast. The overall stone-free status was defined as the complete absence of stone fragments at 4 weeks, postoperatively. A double J stent was inserted in selected patients if there was significant ureteral wall trauma, edema at the stone impaction site, suspected or proved ureteral perforation, and if the stone migrated to the kidney. The overall success rate was 90.6%. The success rates were different according to the stone site. The success rate of groups A, B and C was 69.4, 94.8 and 96.6%, respectively. The overall rate of ureteral stent insertion at the end of the procedure was 177/244 (72.5%). The rate of stent insertion was 41/49 (83.7%), 32/46 (69.6%) and 104/149 (69.8%) in groups A, B and C, respectively. The overall complication, failure, and stricture rate was 32/244 (13.1%), 23/244 (9.4%) and 0.8%, respectively. With the recent advances in ureteroscopic technology, intracorporeal probes and stone extraction devices, emergency ureteroscopy is found to be a safe and effective procedure with immediate relief from ureteral colic and ureteral stone fragmentation. PMID:21499919

  2. Laser therapy for severe radiation-induced rectal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlquist, D.A.; Gostout, C.J.; Viggiano, T.R.; Pemberton, J.H.

    1986-12-01

    Four patients with chronic hematochezia and transfusion-dependent anemia from postradiation rectal vascular lesions were successfully managed by endoscopic laser coagulation. In all four patients, symptomatic, hematologic, and endoscopic improvement was evident. Laser therapy for severe radiation-induced rectal bleeding seems to be safe and efficacious and should be considered before surgical intervention.

  3. Proximal fiber tip damage during Holmium:YAG and thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being studied as an alternative to Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy. TFL beam originates within an 18-μm-core thulium doped silica fiber, and its near single mode, Gaussian beam profile enables transmission of higher laser power through smaller fibers than possible during Holmium laser lithotripsy. This study examines whether TFL beam profile also reduces proximal fiber tip damage compared to Holmium laser multimodal beam. TFL beam at wavelength of 1908 nm was coupled into 105-μm-core silica fibers, with 35-mJ energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 50-500 Hz. For each pulse rate, 500,000 pulses were delivered. Magnified images of proximal fiber surfaces were taken before and after each trial. For comparison, 20 single-use, 270-μm-core fibers were collected after clinical Holmium laser lithotripsy procedures using standard settings (600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz). Total laser energy, number of laser pulses, and laser irradiation time were recorded, and fibers were rated for damage. For TFL studies, output power was stable, and no proximal fiber damage was observed after delivery of 500,000 pulses at settings up to 35 mJ, 500 Hz, and 17.5 W average power. In contrast, confocal microscopy images of fiber tips after Holmium lithotripsy showed proximal fiber tip degradation in all 20 fibers. The proximal fiber tip of a 105-μm-core fiber transmitted 17.5 W of TFL power without degradation, compared to degradation of 270-μm-core fibers after transmission of 3.6 W of Holmium laser power. The smaller and more uniform TFL beam profile may improve fiber lifetime, and potentially reduce costs for the surgical disposables as well.

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Endoscope Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is effective and safe for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of gastrointestinal disease. However, issues regarding endoscope-transmitted infections are emerging. Many countries have established and continuously revise guidelines for endoscope reprocessing in order to prevent infections. While there are common processes used in endoscope reprocessing, differences exist among these guidelines. It is important that the reprocessing of gastrointestinal endoscopes be carried out in accordance with the recommendations for each step of the process. PMID:26473117

  5. Endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Maple, John T; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Hwang, Joo Ha; Komanduri, Sri; Manfredi, Michael; Konda, Vani; Murad, Faris M; Siddiqui, Uzma D; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-01-01

    ESD is an established effective treatment modality for premalignant and early-stage malignant lesions of the stomach, esophagus, and colorectum. Compared with EMR, ESD is generally associated with higher rates of en bloc, R0, and curative resections and a lower rate of local recurrence. Oncologic outcomes with ESD compare favorably with competing surgical interventions, and ESD also serves as an excellent T-staging tool to identify noncurative resections that will require further treatment. ESD is technically demanding and has a higher rate of adverse events than most endoscopic procedures including EMR. As such,sufficient training is critical to ensure safe conduct and high-quality resections. A standardized training model for Western endoscopists has not been clearly established,but will be self-directed and include courses, animal model training, and optimally an observership at an expert center.Numerous dedicated ESD devices are now available in the United States from different manufacturers. Although the use of ESD in the United States is increasing, issues related to technical difficulty, limited training opportunities and mentors, risk of adverse events, long procedure duration,and suboptimal reimbursement may limit ESD adoption in the United States to a modest number of academic referral centers for the foreseeable future. PMID:25796422

  6. Endoscopic Transaxillary Near Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ejeh, Ijeoma Acholonu; Speights, Fredne; Rashid, Qammar N.; Ideis, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Background: Since first reported in 1996, endoscopic minimally invasive surgery of the cervical region has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of benign thyroid and parathyroid disease. The endoscopic transaxillary technique uses a remote lateral approach to the thyroid gland. Because of the perceived difficulty in accessing the contralateral anatomy of the thyroid gland, this technique has typically been reserved for patients with unilateral disease. Objectives: The present study examines the safety and feasibility of the transaxillary technique in dissecting and assessment of both thyroid lobes in performing near total thyroidectomy. Methods: Prior to this study we successfully performed endoscopic transaxillary thyroid lobectomy in 32 patients between August 2003 and August 2005. Technical feasibility in performing total thyroidectomy using this approach was accomplished first utilizing a porcine model followed by three human cadaver models prior to proceeding to human surgery. After IRB approval three female patients with histories of enlarging multinodular goiter were selected to undergo endoscopic near total thyroidectomy. Results: The average operative time for all models was 142 minutes (range 57–327 min). The three patients in this study had clinically enlarging multinodular goiters with an average size of 4 cm. The contralateral recurrent laryngeal nerve and parathyroid glands were identified in all cases. There was no post-operative bleeding, hoarseness or subcutaneous emphysema. Conclusion: Endoscopic transaxillary near total thyroidectomy is feasible and can be performed safely in human patients with bilateral thyroid disease. PMID:16882421

  7. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula.

    PubMed

    Pham, Khanh N; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  8. Motion magnification for endoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Baxter, John S. H.; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic and laparoscopic surgeries are used for many minimally invasive procedures but limit the visual and haptic feedback available to the surgeon. This can make vessel sparing procedures particularly challenging to perform. Previous approaches have focused on hardware intensive intraoperative imaging or augmented reality systems that are difficult to integrate into the operating room. This paper presents a simple approach in which motion is visually enhanced in the endoscopic video to reveal pulsating arteries. This is accomplished by amplifying subtle, periodic changes in intensity coinciding with the patient's pulse. This method is then applied to two procedures to illustrate its potential. The first, endoscopic third ventriculostomy, is a neurosurgical procedure where the floor of the third ventricle must be fenestrated without injury to the basilar artery. The second, nerve-sparing robotic prostatectomy, involves removing the prostate while limiting damage to the neurovascular bundles. In both procedures, motion magnification can enhance subtle pulsation in these structures to aid in identifying and avoiding them.

  9. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  10. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  11. Hemostasis in Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pant, Harshita

    2016-06-01

    Intraoperative bleeding during endoscopic sinus surgery poses an additional dimension to an already technically challenging surgical approach because of the narrow sinonasal surgical field, single working hand, and the use of endoscopic instruments. Poor visualization is one of the most important factors that increase the risk of intraoperative complications such as inadvertent injury to major vessels and nerves, and incomplete surgery. This article provide a logical approach to improving the surgical field, minimizing risk of inadvertent vascular injury, and managing intraoperative bleeding. PMID:27267017

  12. Endoscopic Ganglionectomy of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Resection of the ganglion of the elbow is indicated if the size or location of the cyst impairs function or causes significant pain. Arthroscopic decompression or endoscopic resection of the cyst is the minimally invasive surgical option. It has the potential advantage of better cosmetic results and less soft-tissue dissection. Endoscopic resection is indicated if the cyst is not communicating with the joint or the communication is not identifiable arthroscopically or if there is a long and narrow communication placing the cyst away from the elbow joint. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is essential for surgical planning. PMID:26870641

  13. Endoscopic Ganglionectomy of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Resection of the ganglion of the elbow is indicated if the size or location of the cyst impairs function or causes significant pain. Arthroscopic decompression or endoscopic resection of the cyst is the minimally invasive surgical option. It has the potential advantage of better cosmetic results and less soft-tissue dissection. Endoscopic resection is indicated if the cyst is not communicating with the joint or the communication is not identifiable arthroscopically or if there is a long and narrow communication placing the cyst away from the elbow joint. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is essential for surgical planning. PMID:26870641

  14. Scrotal hematoma resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for a renal calculus: a sign of retroperitoneal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Darren J.; Dodds, Lachlan J.

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of a patient presenting with scrotal hematoma associated with retroperitoneal hemorrhage after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). We propose a mechanism for the formation of scrotal hematoma and its importance as a sign of retroperitoneal hemorrhage. PMID:24578909

  15. The effect of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on the prosthesis interface in cementless arthroplasty. Evaluation in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Stranne, S K; Callaghan, J J; Fyda, T M; Fulghum, C S; Glisson, R R; Weinerth, J L; Seaber, A V

    1992-06-01

    The effect of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy on interfacial strength between prosthesis and bone in cementless arthroplasty was examined using a rabbit model. Paired femora, each implanted with fiber mesh porous coated titanium implants, were harvested from rabbits 15 weeks after implantation. In group I, one femur from each pair was exposed to lithotripsy treatment consisting of 2,000 shocks at 20 kV. In group II, one femur from each pair was exposed to 2,000 shocks at 26 kV. Contralateral femora from each pair served as controls in both groups. Mechanical pushout tests were conducted on the implants using a 1321 Instron testing machine at a constant rate of 1 mm/minute. Shock waves generated at 20 kV were found to have no significant decrease on either the prosthesis/bone interfacial strength or energy to failure of cementless implants. Shock waves generated at 26 kV produced a mean 17.45% decrease in the prosthesis/bone interfacial strength, which approached statistical significance (P = .062), and a 7.84% mean decrease in the energy to failure (P = .268). However, in four of the seven group II specimens, cortical fractures occurred. These findings suggest that lithotripsy will not aid in the removal of uncemented porous coated devices and lithotripsy inadvertently focused at an uncemented device will not disrupt significantly the prosthesis-bone interface. PMID:1613525

  16. Pancreatic Pseudocysts: Advances in Endoscopic Management.

    PubMed

    Ge, Phillip S; Weizmann, Mikhayla; Watson, Rabindra R

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic drainage is the first-line therapy in the management of pancreatic pseudocysts. Before endoscopic drainage, clinicians should exclude the presence of pancreatic cystic neoplasms and avoid drainage of immature peripancreatic fluid collections or pseudoaneurysms. The indication for endoscopic drainage is not dependent on absolute cyst size alone, but on the presence of attributable signs or symptoms. Endoscopic management should be performed as part of a multidisciplinary approach in close cooperation with surgeons and interventional radiologists. Drainage may be performed either via a transpapillary approach or a transmural approach; additionally, endoscopic necrosectomy may be performed for patients with walled-off necrosis. PMID:26895678

  17. Endoscope Reprocessing: Update on Controversial Issues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Several issues concerning endoscope reprocessing remain unresolved based on currently available data. Thus, further studies are required to confirm standard practices including safe endoscope shelf life, proper frequency of replacement of some accessories including water bottles and connecting tubes, and microbiological surveillance testing of endoscopes after reprocessing. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of newer technology that allows automated cleaning and disinfection is one such controversial issue. In addition, there are no guidelines on whether delayed reprocessing and extended soaking may harm endoscope integrity or increase the bioburden on the external or internal device surfaces. In this review, we discuss the unresolved and controversial issues regarding endoscope reprocessing. PMID:26473115

  18. Adverse effects of shock waves and strategies for improved treatment in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Connors, Bret A.; Williams, James C.; Willis, Lynn R.

    2005-04-01

    Lithotripter SWs rupture blood vessels in the kidney. This acute trauma, accompanied by a fall in renal function, can lead to significant long-term effects such as profound scarring of the kidney cortex and renal papillaea permanent loss of functional renal mass. SWL has been linked to new-onset hypertension in some patients, and recent studies suggest that multiple lithotripsies can actually alter a patient's stone disease leading to formation of stones (brushite) that are harder to break. Cavitation and shear appear to play a role in stone breakage and tissue damage. Progress in understanding these mechanisms, and the renal response to SWs, has led to practical strategies to improve treatment. Slowing the SW-rate, or initiating treatment at low kV/power both improve stone breakage and reduce the number of potentially tissue-damaging SWs needed to achieve comminution. The observation that SWs cause transient vasoconstriction in the kidney has led to studies in pigs showing that a pre-conditioning dose of low-energy SWs significantly reduces trauma from subsequent high-energy SWs. Thus, SWs can induce adverse effects in the kidney, but what we have learned about the mechanisms of SW action suggests strategies that could make lithotripsy safer and more effective. [Work supported by NIH-DK43881, DK55674.

  19. Reduction of tissue injury in shock-wave lithotripsy by using an acoustic diode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Songlin; Dreyer, Thomas; Liebler, Marko; Riedlinger, Rainer; Preminger, Glenn M; Zhong, Pei

    2004-05-01

    An acoustic diode (AD) was constructed of two acoustic transparent membranes with good initial contact to allow the transmission of the positive pressure of lithotripter shock wave at an almost unaltered level, yet attenuate significantly its negative pressure, was fabricated. It was evaluated systematically on a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter to assess its application potential to reduce vascular injury without compromising stone fragmentation efficiency during shock-wave lithotripsy. By inserting the AD, the maximum compressive pressure, maximum tensile pressure and tensile duration of the lithotripter shock wave were formed to drop from 49.7 to 47.8 MPa, -7.5 to -7.0 MPa and 6.0 to 5.1 micros, respectively. Damage of a 0.2-mm inner diameter vessel phantom (cellulose hollow fiber) was reduced from rupture after 31 +/- 11 shocks to no rupture after 100 shocks. Maximum bubble size in free-field, maximum dilation of the vessel phantom wall and bubble collapse time became smaller with the use of the AD. However, stone fragmentation showed similar results without a statistically significant difference between the case with and without the AD. All these evidences suggest that the use of an acoustic diode may be a feasible approach to reduce tissue injury without compromising stone comminution in shock-wave lithotripsy. PMID:15183234

  20. Development of a new diagnostic sensor for extra-corporeal shock-wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, F.; Coleman, A. J.; Leighton, T. G.; White, P. R.; Hurrell, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy is the leading technique used in urology for the non-invasive treatment of kidney and ureteric stones. The stone is comminuted by thousands of ultrasound shocks, into fragments small enough to be naturally passed. Since the technique was introduced in the 1980 different generations of lithotripters have been developed. Nevertheless the alignment systems (x-ray, ultrasound) still have some limitations (indeed, the tighter focusing of newer lithotripter reduces the tolerance for misalignment) and there is no capability for on-line monitoring of the degree of fragmentation of the stone. There is 50% incidence of re-treatments, possibly due to these deficiencies. The objective of this research is to design a new passive acoustic sensor, exploiting the secondary acoustic emission generated during the treatment, which could be used as a diagnostic device for lithotripsy. With a passive cylindrical cavitation detector, developed by the National Physical Laboratory, it was possible to detect these emissions in a laboratory lithotripter, and it was shown that they contain information on the degree of stone fragmentation and stone location. This information could be used to perform the desired monitoring and to improve the stone targeting. In collaboration with Precision Acoustic Ltd, some clinical prototypes were developed and tested to verify the relevance of these preliminary results. Clinical results are presented.

  1. Simulation of shock-induced bubble collapse with application to vascular injury in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran

    Shockwave lithotripsy is a noninvasive medical procedure wherein shockwaves are repeatedly focused at the location of kidney stones in order to pulverize them. Stone comminution is thought to be the product of two mechanisms: the propagation of stress waves within the stone and cavitation erosion. However, the latter mechanism has also been implicated in vascular injury. In the present work, shock-induced bubble collapse is studied in order to understand the role that it might play in inducing vascular injury. A high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing numerical scheme is developed to simulate the three-dimensional collapse of the bubble in both the free-field and inside a vessel phantom. The primary contributions of the numerical study are the characterization of the shock-bubble and shock-bubble-vessel interactions across a large parameter space that includes clinical shockwave lithotripsy pressure amplitudes, problem geometry and tissue viscoelasticity, and the subsequent correlation of these interactions to vascular injury. Specifically, measurements of the vessel wall pressures and displacements, as well as the finite strains in the fluid surrounding the bubble, are utilized with available experiments in tissue to evaluate damage potential. Estimates are made of the smallest injurious bubbles in the microvasculature during both the collapse and jetting phases of the bubble's life cycle. The present results suggest that bubbles larger than one micrometer in diameter could rupture blood vessels under clinical SWL conditions.

  2. Observations of the collapses and rebounds of millimeter-sized lithotripsy bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Bubbles excited by lithotripter shock waves undergo a prolonged growth followed by an inertial collapse and rebounds. In addition to the relevance for clinical lithotripsy treatments, such bubbles can be used to study the mechanics of inertial collapses. In particular, both phase change and diffusion among vapor and noncondensable gas molecules inside the bubble are known to alter the collapse dynamics of individual bubbles. Accordingly, the role of heat and mass transport during inertial collapses is explored by experimentally observing the collapses and rebounds of lithotripsy bubbles for water temperatures ranging from 20 to 60 °C and dissolved gas concentrations from 10 to 85% of saturation. Bubble responses were characterized through high-speed photography and acoustic measurements that identified the timing of individual bubble collapses. Maximum bubble diameters before and after collapse were estimated and the corresponding ratio of volumes was used to estimate the fraction of energy retained by the bubble through collapse. The rebounds demonstrated statistically significant dependencies on both dissolved gas concentration and temperature. In many observations, liquid jets indicating asymmetric bubble collapses were visible. Bubble rebounds were sensitive to these asymmetries primarily for water conditions corresponding to the most dissipative collapses. PMID:22088027

  3. Endoscopic thyroidectomy: the transoral approach

    PubMed Central

    Hellinger, Achim; Kaminski, Cornelia; Benhidjeb, Tahar

    2016-01-01

    Transoral endoscopic thyroid surgery seems to be the logical consequence in the evolution of thyroid surgery. Animal and cadaver studies have shown that different endoscopic techniques can be performed in a safe and successful way. Presently, the minimally invasive aspect and cosmetic advantage seem to be the most important factor for the patients. However, even if these procedures are feasible in patients, the transoral access must still be considered as experimental. In this study then we aim at comparing the available literature on transoral thyroid surgery with our own experience in this field. The access itself needs to be further refined, and even more suitable and better adapted instruments need to be developed so that optimal and safe results that meet all requirements on endocrine surgery can be achieved and all requirements for endocrine surgery are met. The transoral thyroidectomy should only be performed in highly specialized centres for endocrine and endoscopic surgery. As an alternative, a combination with endoscopic non-transoral techniques—so called hybrid techniques—might be useful for our patients. PMID:27294042

  4. Transnasal Endoscopic Eustachian Tube Surgery.

    PubMed

    Dean, Marc; Lian, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to give a contemporary review of transnasal endoscopic surgery for Eustachian tube disorders. The authors' perspective of the relevant anatomy, pathophysiology, and evaluation of Eustachian tube disorders as related to surgical intervention also is provided. PMID:27468637

  5. Endoscopic thyroidectomy: the transoral approach.

    PubMed

    Witzel, Kai; Hellinger, Achim; Kaminski, Cornelia; Benhidjeb, Tahar

    2016-06-01

    Transoral endoscopic thyroid surgery seems to be the logical consequence in the evolution of thyroid surgery. Animal and cadaver studies have shown that different endoscopic techniques can be performed in a safe and successful way. Presently, the minimally invasive aspect and cosmetic advantage seem to be the most important factor for the patients. However, even if these procedures are feasible in patients, the transoral access must still be considered as experimental. In this study then we aim at comparing the available literature on transoral thyroid surgery with our own experience in this field. The access itself needs to be further refined, and even more suitable and better adapted instruments need to be developed so that optimal and safe results that meet all requirements on endocrine surgery can be achieved and all requirements for endocrine surgery are met. The transoral thyroidectomy should only be performed in highly specialized centres for endocrine and endoscopic surgery. As an alternative, a combination with endoscopic non-transoral techniques-so called hybrid techniques-might be useful for our patients. PMID:27294042

  6. Endoscopic treatment of orbital tumors

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Francesco; Anile, Carmelo; Rigante, Mario; Paludetti, Gaetano; Pompucci, Angelo; Mangiola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Different orbital and transcranial approaches are performed in order to manage orbital tumors, depending on the location and size of the lesion within the orbit. These approaches provide a satisfactory view of the superior and lateral aspects of the orbit and the optic canal but involve risks associated with their invasiveness because they require significant displacement of orbital structures. In addition, external approaches to intraconal lesions may also require deinsertion of extraocular muscles, with subsequent impact on extraocular mobility. Recently, minimally invasive techniques have been proposed as valid alternative to external approaches for selected orbital lesions. Among them, transnasal endoscopic approaches, “pure” or combined with external approaches, have been reported, especially for intraconal lesions located inferiorly and medially to the optic nerve. The avoidance of muscle detachment and the shortness of the surgical intraorbital trajectory makes endoscopic approach less invasive, thus minimizing tissue damage. Endoscopic surgery decreases the recovery time and improves the cosmetic outcome not requiring skin incisions. The purpose of this study is to review and discuss the current surgical techniques for orbital tumors removal, focusing on endoscopic approaches to the orbit and outlining the key anatomic principles to follow for safe tumor resection. PMID:25789299

  7. Wide FOV wedge prism endoscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keri; Kim, Daeyoung; Matsumiya, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2005-01-01

    We.. have developed a novel robotic endoscope system. It can be used to observe a wide field of view without moving or bending the whole endoscope system. .. It consists of a rigid endoscope and two wedge prisms at the distal tip. Rotating each wedge prism respectively, we can change the direction of view. Accordingly it becomes possible to observe a wide field of view even in a small space, and suited to clinical uses because it does not damage body tissues or internal organs. .. Wedge prisms are designed to avoid vignetting which is caused by the refraction or the reflection at prisms. The endoscope has 10mm in diameter, and the drive unit is simply separable for the sterilization. In addition, since it has a simple and small drive unit, it does not obstruct surgeon or other surgery robots. The maximum movement of local field of view is 19degrees, and global field of view is 93degrees. In the evaluation experiment, we conformed that both of the image quality and the performance are acceptable. PMID:17281566

  8. Stereo Imaging Miniature Endoscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam; Manohara, Harish; White, Victor; Shcheglov, Kirill V.; Shahinian, Hrayr

    2011-01-01

    Stereo imaging requires two different perspectives of the same object and, traditionally, a pair of side-by-side cameras would be used but are not feasible for something as tiny as a less than 4-mm-diameter endoscope that could be used for minimally invasive surgeries or geoexploration through tiny fissures or bores. The proposed solution here is to employ a single lens, and a pair of conjugated, multiple-bandpass filters (CMBFs) to separate stereo images. When a CMBF is placed in front of each of the stereo channels, only one wavelength of the visible spectrum that falls within the passbands of the CMBF is transmitted through at a time when illuminated. Because the passbands are conjugated, only one of the two channels will see a particular wavelength. These time-multiplexed images are then mixed and reconstructed to display as stereo images. The basic principle of stereo imaging involves an object that is illuminated at specific wavelengths, and a range of illumination wavelengths is time multiplexed. The light reflected from the object selectively passes through one of the two CMBFs integrated with two pupils separated by a baseline distance, and is focused onto the imaging plane through an objective lens. The passband range of CMBFs and the illumination wavelengths are synchronized such that each of the CMBFs allows transmission of only the alternate illumination wavelength bands. And the transmission bandwidths of CMBFs are complementary to each other, so that when one transmits, the other one blocks. This can be clearly understood if the wavelength bands are divided broadly into red, green, and blue, then the illumination wavelengths contain two bands in red (R1, R2), two bands in green (G1, G2), and two bands in blue (B1, B2). Therefore, when the objective is illuminated by R1, the reflected light enters through only the left-CMBF as the R1 band corresponds to the transmission window of the left CMBF at the left pupil. This is blocked by the right CMBF. The

  9. Endoscopic diagnostic of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cubranić, Aleksandar; Dintinjana, Renata Dobrila; Vanis, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous inflammatory pancreatic disease, one characterized by irreversible morphological changes, often associates with pain and sometimes with the loss of endocrine and exocrine function. As a histological confirmation of chronic pancreatitis is often unavailable, the diagnosis is traditionally based on imaging methods such as computerized tomography (CT) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and recently magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) as a noninvasive alternative to ERCP. Developments in the classification system of CP include the Marseille classification of 1963 which offered histopathologic criteria for CP, the Cambridge classification of 1984 which introduced imaging features of computed tomography (CT), transabdominal ultrasound (TUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for classification of CP as well as Rosemont classification system of 2007 which presented the endoscopic ultrasonography diagnosis of CP. Endoscopic ultra-sonography (EUS) was first introduced as a diagnostic method for evaluation of pancreatic disease in 1986. It has experienced significant improvements since then and allowed for an alternative approach in diagnosing patients with pancreatic diseases. In patients with suspected pancreatic masses EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the best method for obtaining tissue diagnosis and differentiating CP from pancreatic carcinoma. The recent studies indicate that EUS is the method of choice when compared with other imaging methods such as ERCP because it frequently provides more accurate diagnostics. The aim of this review is to discuss the findings in endoscopic diagnostics up to the present moment and to indicate advantages, limitations and possible complications along with the current recommendations in CP diagnostics. PMID:25842773

  10. Chronic radiation proctopathy: A practical review of endoscopic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Luciano; Rohr, Rachel; Nakao, Frank; Libera, Ermelindo; Ferrari, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP) is a troublesome complication of pelvic radiotherapy. The most common presentation is rectal bleeding. CRP symptoms interfere with daily activities and decrease quality of life. Rectal bleeding management in patients with CRP represents a conundrum for practitioners. Medical therapy is ineffective in general and surgical approach has a high morbid-mortality. Endoscopy has a role in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of this disease. Currently available endoscopic modalities are formalin, potassium titanyl phosphate laser, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, argon laser, bipolar electrocoagulation (BiCAP), heater probe, band ligation, cryotherapy, radiofrequency ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). Among these options, APC is the most promising. PMID:26981189

  11. Chronic radiation proctopathy: A practical review of endoscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Luciano; Rohr, Rachel; Nakao, Frank; Libera, Ermelindo; Ferrari, Angelo

    2016-02-27

    Chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP) is a troublesome complication of pelvic radiotherapy. The most common presentation is rectal bleeding. CRP symptoms interfere with daily activities and decrease quality of life. Rectal bleeding management in patients with CRP represents a conundrum for practitioners. Medical therapy is ineffective in general and surgical approach has a high morbid-mortality. Endoscopy has a role in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of this disease. Currently available endoscopic modalities are formalin, potassium titanyl phosphate laser, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, argon laser, bipolar electrocoagulation (BiCAP), heater probe, band ligation, cryotherapy, radiofrequency ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). Among these options, APC is the most promising. PMID:26981189

  12. A new endoscopic hand drill for management of tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Batzella, Sandro; Lucantoni, Gabriele; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Iacono, Raffaele Dello; Battistoni, Paolo; Caterino, Umberto; Santini, Mario; Galluccio, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Tracheal resection and primary anastomosis is the treatment of choice for the management of benign tracheal stenoses. Rigid endoscopy with laser-assisted mechanical dilatation is an alternative to surgery and helps to improve symptoms and quality of life in patients unfit for surgery. Here, we describe the treatment of a simple web-like stenosis, using a new endoscopic hand drill that was assembled by sharpening the blunt tip of a standard endoscopic cotton applicator. The bronchoscopy was positioned proximally to the stenotic lesion and radial holes were made at 12, 3 and 9 o'clock. The tip of instrument touched the target area of the stenotic scar. The proximal end was handily rotated and the force, applied on the instrument's tip, and the hole was drilled. Next, endoscopic scissors was placed in the drill holes and the stenotic scar was cut. Mechanical dilatation with rigid bronchoscopes of increasing diameters completed the procedure. This procedure was successfully applied in 5 patients with simple benign tracheal stenosis and unfit for surgery. No intraoperative and/or postoperative complications occurred. No recurrence of stenosis was detected after a mean follow-up of 26 ± 2 months. PMID:27006182

  13. Ultrahigh resolution optical biopsy with endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, Paul R.; Chen, Yu; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Fujimoto, James G.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Schmitt, Joseph; Koski, Amanda; Goodnow, John; Petersen, Chris

    2004-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology that can generate high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissue in situ and in real time. Although endoscopic OCT has been used successfully to identify certain pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract, the resolution of current endoscopic OCT systems has been limited to 10-15 µm for in vivo studies. In this study, in vivo imaging of the rabbit gastrointestinal tract is demonstrated at a three-fold higher resolution (< 5 µm), using a broadband Cr4+:Forsterite laser as the optical light source. Images acquired from the esophagus, trachea, and colon reveal high resolution details of tissue architecture. Definitive correlation of architectural features in OCT images and histological sections is shown. The ability of ultrahigh resolution endoscopic OCT to image tissue morphology at an unprecedented resolution in vivo advances the development of OCT as a potential imaging tool for the early detection of neoplastic changes in biological tissue.

  14. Endoscopic prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Do Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) is not an uncommon adverse event but may be an avoidable complication. Although pancreatitis of severe grade is reported in 0.1%-0.5% of ERCP patients, a serious clinical course may be lethal. For prevention of severe PEP, patient risk stratification, appropriate selection of patients using noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods such as magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), and avoidance of unnecessary invasive procedures, are important measures to be taken before any procedure. Pharmacological prevention is also commonly attempted but is usually ineffective. No ideal agent has not yet been found and the available data conflict. Currently, rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used to prevent PEP in high-risk patients, but additional studies using larger numbers of subjects are necessary to confirm any prophylactic effect. In this review, we focus on endoscopic procedures seeking to prevent or decrease the severity of PEP. Among various cannulation methods, wire-guided cannulation, precut fistulotomy, and transpancreatic septostomy are reviewed. Prophylactic pancreatic stent placement, which is the best-known prophylactic method, is reviewed with reference to the ideal stent type, adequate duration of stent placement, and stent-related complications. Finally, we comment on other treatment alternatives, and make the point that further advances in EUS-guided techniques may afford useful PEP prophylaxis. PMID:25469026

  15. Strategies to optimize shock wave lithotripsy outcome: Patient selection and treatment parameters

    PubMed Central

    Semins, Michelle Jo; Matlaga, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was introduced in 1980, modernizing the treatment of upper urinary tract stones, and quickly became the most commonly utilized technique to treat kidney stones. Over the past 5-10 years, however, use of SWL has been declining because it is not as reliably effective as more modern technology. SWL success rates vary considerably and there is abundant literature predicting outcome based on patient- and stone-specific parameters. Herein we discuss the ways to optimize SWL outcomes by reviewing proper patient selection utilizing stone characteristics and patient features. Stone size, number, location, density, composition, and patient body habitus and renal anatomy are all discussed. We also review the technical parameters during SWL that can be controlled to improve results further, including type of anesthesia, coupling, shock wave rate, focal zones, pressures, and active monitoring. Following these basic principles and selection criteria will help maximize success rate. PMID:25949936

  16. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the treatment of distal ureteral stones larger than 10 mm in diameter].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Nobuyuki; Yoshinaga, Atsushi; Ohno, Rena; Chiba, Koji; Hayashi, Tetsuo; Kamata, Shigeyoshi; Watanabe, Toru; Yamada, Takumi

    2004-06-01

    Optimal treatment for distal ureteral stones remains controversial. During a period of 10 years, from December 1992 to December 2002, 103 distal ureteral stones larger than 10 mm in diameter were treated at our institution with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) using the Siemens Lithostar. Only 2 patients had a ureteral stent in place at the time of treatment. The overall stone-free rate was 98% with 1-12 session and 3-month stone-free rate was 95.1%. These data reveal that a high success rate was achieved in multisession ESWL. Therefore, ESWL is considered to be acceptable as first-line therapy for fragmentation of distal ureteral stones larger than 10 mm in diameter. PMID:15293734

  17. First temporal and spatial quantification of single-shot electrohydraulic lithotripsy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corleis, R; Vorreuther, R; Engelmann, U; Schaarschmidt, U; Morgenstern, B

    1996-01-01

    Single electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) discharges from a human ureter were analyzed with a mechanical high-speed motion analysis camera. We found a cavitation bubble, at 650 mJ, 4-11 mm in size, with a lifetime of 400-500 microseconds. Varying sizes and lifetimes were found using single-shot analysis, as well as in different shot-sequences. This supports similar observations by recent investigations of cavitation bubble size with high-shutter-speed videofilm, which have depicted events at shutter speeds of 4000/s, i.e., an approximate exposure time of 250 microseconds. Due to the occurrence of high-voltage interference from the EHL high-voltage generator, no other technical electronic event timing equipment has so far been available capable of mechanical high-speed film motion analysis, while at the same time avoiding high-voltage interference. PMID:8839484

  18. Fluorescence video endoscopic system for early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, A. Charles; Dunn, J. B.; Paspa, Paul M.; Doiron, Daniel R.; Balchum, Oscar J.

    1990-06-01

    A video system is being developed to allow the detection of cancerous lesions that are too small to be accurately identified visually or with x-ray. The system makes use of standard endoscopes and provides a video display of both the color image and a false color fluorescence image, with automated switching between the two views. Excitation of the fluorescence marker, Heinatoporphyrin Derivative (HpD) , or it ' 5 purified form , diheinatoporphyrin ether! ester (DHE) , is provided by a krypton ion laser operating in the violet. A brief discussion of fluorescence diagnostic theory and a description of the prototype system, its clinical use , and performance is reviewed.

  19. Combined Endoscopic and Percutaneous Retrieval of a Retained 4-Wire Ureteral Stone Basket

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Adam G.; Preminger, Glenn M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Complex endourologic procedures may require the use of a combined ureteroscopic and percutaneous approach. Endoscopic removal of a retained 4-wire ureteral stone basket is particularly complex, as broken tines can potentially injure the ureter if the basket is removed in a retrograde manner. The patient in this case presented with a ureteral stone basket embedded within the urothelium of the upper pole of the kidney. Holmium laser incision of the overlying urothelium allowed retrieval of the basket, although the tines were broken. Endoscopically guided percutaneous access to the kidney was obtained to allow for direct passage of the retained basket out of a nephrostomy sheath, thereby protecting the kidney.

  20. Clinical experience with shock-wave lithotripsy using the Siemens Modularis Vario lithotripter

    PubMed Central

    Hassouna, Mohamed E.; Oraby, Samir; Sameh, Wael; El-Abbady, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effectiveness of a lithotripter (Modularis Vario; Siemens, AG Healthcare, Munich, Germany) in the management of renal and ureteric stones. Patients and methods In all, 1146 adult patients with renal or ureteric stones were treated at one urological centre using the latest model of the Modularis Vario lithotripter. The effectiveness of lithotripsy and re-treatment rate were assessed. Data were obtained on stone location, stone size, shock wave usage, success rate, and complications. Results Between May 2007 and November 2009, 698 patients with renal stones and 448 with ureteric stones underwent extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The mean (SD) renal stone size was 12.8 (3.8) mm; a mean of 1.36 sessions was required, with a mean (SD) number of 3744 (1961) shocks delivered per renal stone. After 3 months, the success rate defined as the patient being stone-free or with residual fragments of <4 mm; for renal stones the rate was 91.1%, with a 6.9% complication rate in the form of steinstrasse and severe renal colic. The mean (SD) ureteric stone size was 10.4 (2.7) mm. A mean of 1.37 sessions was required, with a mean (SD) of 4551 (2467) shocks delivered for each ureteric stone. The success rate for ureteric stones was 89.5%, with a 5.6% complication rate. The overall efficiency quotient was 0.66. Conclusion The Siemens Modularis Vario lithotripter is a safe and effective machine for treating renal and ureteric stones. PMID:26579276

  1. Effects of hydrochlorothiazide on kidney stone therapy with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Tehranchi, Ali; Rezaei, Yousef; Mohammadi-Fallah, Mohammadreza; Mokhtari, Mohammadreza; Alizadeh, Mansour; Abedi, Farzad; Khalilzadeh, Masoud; Tehranchi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this investigation was to assess the efficacy of hydrochlorothiazide as a hypocalciuric diuretic on stone-free rate of renal pelvic calculi after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Materials and Methods: A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial was conducted and 52 patients with renal pelvic calculi (diameter ≤2 cm) were enrolled from February 2010 to September 2010. ESWL protocol was performed by 2,500 shocks per session. The patients were randomized into two groups: (1) 26 patients who were given 25 mg hydrochlorothiazide twice daily; and (2) 26 patients who received placebo. The stone-free rate was defined as residual calculus size ≤4 mm in controlled ultrasound on 2nd week, 1 month and 3 months after ESWL. Results: 19 (78%) of the first group and 9 (42.9%) of the second group were stone-free after one session of ESWL (P = 0.02). 88% of the group 1 and 47.8% of the group 2 were stone-free on 1 month after ESWL (P = 0.003); however, this effect of hydrochlorothiazide was not related to the patients' body mass index, age and gender. The accessory treatment procedures were applied in 24% of the group 1 compared with 19% of the group 2 during 3 months (P = 0.68). All patients in both groups were stone-free on 3 months following lithotripsy. Conclusions: Hydrochlorothiazide did not impact on the stone-free rate and using accessory procedure within 3 months; however, it decreased duration of stone-free status and number of ESWL sessions. PMID:25125892

  2. The economic burden of gallstone lithotripsy. Will cost determine its fate?

    PubMed

    Nealon, W H; Urrutia, F; Fleming, D; Thompson, J C

    1991-06-01

    Gallstone lithotripsy (LITHO) was performed on 52 patients who underwent 107 procedures. Two hundred sixty-seven gallstone patients were screened and 215 (81%) were excluded. Excessive stone burden and nonvisualization by oral cholecystogram (OCG) were the most common reasons for exclusion. The hospital course of 100 excluded patients who later underwent elective cholecystectomy was evaluated for length of hospital stay (2.3 days) and total cost of treatment ($3685.00). Successful fragmentation to less than 5 mm was achieved in 43 LITHO patients (83%). Five LITHO patients (10%) required conversion to operative management. Complications of LITHO included acute cholecystitis (1 of 52 patients) and biliary colic (17 of 52 patients, or 33%). Multiple procedures in one patient were common. Costs for LITHO were calculated in two ways: first the individual cost for each of the 52 candidates; second the cost for successful LITHO was calculated by excluding five patients who required operation as well as five patients (10%) who are predicted failures of LITHO. Including the preoperative evaluation, treatment, recovery room, and follow-up, the individual LITHO cost for 52 patients was $8275.00. If the same total expenditure is calculated after excluding patients who required operation and those predicted to fail, the cost per 'successful' LITHO procedure was $10,245. The cost of 1 year of bile acid therapy is $1949.00 or $2413.00 per 'successful' procedure. Follow-up costs were $1232.00 per patient or $1525.00 per 'successful' procedure. The added LITHO cost incurred by screening eventual noncandidates was $904.00 per successful procedure. The sum of these individual costs was $15,087.00 per success, as compared to $3685.00 for cholecystectomy. No allowance was made for cost of stone recurrence. Lithotripsy costs appear to be sufficiently high to render the procedure unlikely to emerge as the treatment of choice. PMID:2039296

  3. Comparison of ultrasonography and oral cholecystography in lithotripsy. II. Determining retreatment.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, B R; Jones, M T; Torres, W E; Nelson, R C; Peterson, J E

    1991-07-01

    Both ultrasonography (US) and oral cholecystography (OCG) are being used to evaluate patients after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for gallstones. Criteria for retreatment after the initial ESWL are usually related to the size of the residual fragments. This study examines the efficacy of ultrasound and OCG for determining both the size and number of stone fragments in the gallbladder in an in vitro model and in patients. Ultrasonography and OCG examinations using an in vitro ESWL phantom with ten groups of stones, and on 39 patients, were reviewed independently by three radiologists to determine both the size and number of stone fragments. For the in vitro study, the three readers estimated the correct number of fragments, or the next closest range, in 87% of observations by OCG and in 43% by US. The size of the largest fragment was measured within 1 mm of its actual size in 87% of observations by OCG and 20% by US. Correlation coefficients for the mean measurements of the three readers versus the actual fragment size and number were greater for OCG than for US. For the in vivo study, the three readers agreed in 47% of the OCG versus 32% of US examinations with respect to the number of fragments, and in 65% of OCG compared to 40% of US studies with respect to size of the largest fragment. Multiple statistical analyses demonstrate that these differences are statistically significant. A discrepancy among the readers concerning whether a patient was eligible for retreatment occurred in 15% of OCG as compared to 45% of US studies. Both the in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that there is more interobserver reproducibility for OCG than for US, and that OCG is more reliable in making the decision concerning patient eligibility for retreatment following lithotripsy. PMID:1885269

  4. Comparison of ultrasonography and oral cholecystography in biliary lithotripsy. I. Screening patients.

    PubMed

    Torres, W E; Baumgartner, B R; Jones, M T; Steinberg, H V; Peterson, J E

    1991-07-01

    Ultrasound and oral cholecystography (OCG) are both used to evaluate candidates for biliary lithotripsy. Some investigators have suggested abandoning the OCG, believing that sufficient screening information can be obtained from ultrasound. This study compares ultrasound and OCG in assessing the size and number of gallstones, both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro model, 35 gallstones, divided into 20 groups, were separately suspended in dilute contrast media in a phantom, and examined by ultrasound and simulated OCG by each of three gastrointestinal radiologists. In the in vivo study, the ultrasound and OCG examinations from 53 patients were independently reviewed by three radiologists. The number and size of the stones were recorded in both studies. In the in vitro study, the stone size was measured within 2 mm of the actual size by OCG in 23/35 stones (66%) and by ultrasound in 4/35 stones (11%). The correct number of stones was determined by OCG in 19/20 groups (95%), and by ultrasound in 14/20 (70%). In the in vivo study, all readers saw the same number of stones in 40/50 (80%) patients by OCG and 33/49 (67%) patients by ultrasound. Statistical analyses revealed correlation coefficients for OCG greater than those for ultrasound in each comparison. The size of the largest stone was within 2 mm by all readers in 26/51 (51%) of patients by OCG and 20/47 (43%) patients by ultrasound. Oral cholecystography is more reliable than ultrasound for the determination of size and number of stones in patients being screened for biliary lithotripsy. PMID:1885268

  5. Back to Basics: Flexible Endoscope Processing.

    PubMed

    Spruce, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    Flexible endoscopes are important tools in patient care, yet recent outbreaks of infections in patients who have undergone endoscopic procedures have increased awareness of how the complex design of these instruments makes them difficult to clean. This Back to Basics article focuses on flexible endoscope processing and provides sterile processing, endoscopy, and perioperative team members with strategies for successful processing of these instruments. PMID:27129751

  6. Endoscopic Ankle Lateral Ligament Graft Anatomic Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Michels, Frederick; Cordier, Guillaume; Guillo, Stéphane; Stockmans, Filip

    2016-09-01

    Chronic instability is a common complication of lateral ankle sprains. If nonoperative treatment fails, a surgical repair or reconstruction may be indicated. Today, endoscopic techniques to treat ankle instability are becoming more popular. This article describes an endoscopic technique, using a step-by-step approach, to reconstruct the ATFL and CFL with a gracilis graft. The endoscopic technique is reproducible and safe with regard to the surrounding anatomic structures. Short and midterm results confirm the benefits of this technique. PMID:27524711

  7. Outcomes of endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Dallapiazza, Robert F; Jane, John A

    2015-03-01

    Since the 1990s, endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas has increased in popularity. Outcomes of endoscopic surgery for clinically secretory adenomas are favorable, and results for nonfunctional tumors reveal high rates of complete resection, improvements in vision, and low rates of complications. This article discusses some of the recent studies reporting outcomes from endoscopic series for Cushing disease, acromegaly, prolactin-secreting tumors, and nonfunctioning macroadenomas. PMID:25732647

  8. Advanced virtual endoscopic pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, André; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Forster, Marie-Thérèse; Mroz, Lukas; Wegenkittl, Rainer; Bühler, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Endoscopy has recently been introduced to endonasal transsphenoidal pituitary surgery as a minimally invasive procedure for the removal of various kinds of pituitary tumors. To reduce morbidity and mortality with this new technique, the surgeon must be well-trained and well-prepared. Virtual endoscopy can be beneficial as a tool for training, preoperative planning, and intraoperative support. This paper introduces STEPS, a virtual endoscopy system designed to aid surgeons in getting acquainted with the endoscopic view of the anatomy, the handling of instruments, the transsphenoidal approach, and challenges associated with the procedure. STEPS also assists experienced surgeons in planning a real endoscopic intervention by getting familiar with the individual patient anatomy, identifying landmarks, planning the approach, and deciding upon the ideal target position of the actual surgical activity. The application provides interactive visualization, navigation, and perception aids and the possibility of simulating the procedure, including haptic feedback and simulation of surgical instruments. PMID:16144247

  9. Endoscopic subsurface imaging in tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B

    2001-02-12

    The objective of this work is to develop endoscopic subsurface optical imaging technology that will be able to image different tissue components located underneath the surface of the tissue at an imaging depth of up to 1 centimeter. This effort is based on the utilization of existing technology and components developed for medical endoscopes with the incorporation of the appropriate modifications to implement the spectral and polarization difference imaging technique. This subsurface imaging technique employs polarization and spectral light discrimination in combination with image processing to remove a large portion of the image information from the outer layers of the tissue which leads to enhancement of the contrast and image quality of subsurface tissue structures.

  10. Robotically Assisted Endoscopic Ovarian Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Wedergren, June S.; Carlson, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Ovarian transposition is the anatomical relocation of the ovaries from the pelvis to the abdomen. Transposition is beneficial in women who are to undergo pelvic radiation, because it allows maintenance of ovarian function and preservation of assisted reproductive capacity. Methods: The da Vinci surgical system (Intuitive Surgical™, Mountainview, CA, USA) was used to perform an endoscopic ovarian transposition. The ovaries were mobilized on their respective infundibulopelvic ligaments and sutured to the ipsilateral pericolic gutters. Results: A series of laboratory sessions using the da Vinci system was completed at our institution's training facility. Surgical experience included cadaveric pelvic dissection and abdominopelvic procedures on anesthetized porcine models. Additional didactic and laboratory training, including a certification examination, was obtained from Intuitive Surgical, Inc. The first clinical case of robotically assisted endoscopic ovarian transposition was performed. Conclusions: Robotically assisted endoscopy was successfully used for ovarian transposition. PMID:12723000

  11. Endoscopic treatment for early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Jae J

    2014-04-28

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer death. However the proportion of early gastric cancer (EGC) at diagnosis is increasing. Endoscopic treatment for EGC is actively performed worldwide in cases meeting specific criteria. Endoscopic mucosal resection can treat EGC with comparable results to surgery for selected cases. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) increases the en bloc and complete resection rates and reduces the local recurrence rate. ESD has been performed with expanded indication and is expected to be more widely used in the treatment of EGC through the technological advances in the near future. This review will describe the techniques, indications and outcomes of endoscopic treatment for EGC. PMID:24782609

  12. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  13. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-08-21

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  14. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Visrodia, Kavel H; Tabibian, James H; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic management of biliary obstruction has evolved tremendously since the introduction of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. For the last several decades, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become established as the mainstay for definitively diagnosing and relieving biliary obstruction. In addition, and more recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has gained increasing favor as an auxiliary diagnostic and therapeutic modality in facilitating decompression of the biliary tree. Here, we provide a review of the current and continually evolving role of gastrointestinal endoscopy, including both ERCP and EUS, in the management of biliary obstruction with a focus on benign biliary strictures. PMID:26322153

  15. Endoscopic Anatomy of the Protympanum.

    PubMed

    Jufas, Nicholas; Marchioni, Daniele; Tarabichi, Muaaz; Patel, Nirmal

    2016-10-01

    The protympanum, a final common pathway between the tympanic cavity and external environment, is gaining relevance due to the ease and completeness of visualization with angled endoscopes. Two primary conformations are described, quadrangular and triangular, and new anatomic structures such as the protiniculum, subtensor recess, and protympanic spine are defined. Surgical relevance of the protympanum is described with respect to ventilation, cholesteatoma, cerebrospinal fluid leak, otic neuralgia, and surgical access to the eustachian tube. PMID:27565384

  16. Barrett's esophagus: endoscopic treatments II

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Bruce D.; Lightdale, Charles J.; Abrams, Julian A.; Horwhat, John D.; Chuttani, Ram; Komanduri, Srinadh; Upton, Melissa P.; Appelman, Henry D.; Shields, Helen M.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Sontag, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    The following on endoscopic treatments of Barrett's esophagus includes commentaries on animal experiments on cryotherapy; indications for cryotherapy, choice of dosimetry, number of sessions, and role in Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma; recent technical developments of RFA technology and long-term effects; the comparative effects of diverse ablation procedures and the rate of recurrence following treatment; and the indications for treatment of dysplasia and the role of radiofrequency ablation. PMID:21950812

  17. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  18. Possibilities of interventional endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Makoto; Togawa, Osamu; Matsukawa, Miho; Shono, Takashi; Ochiai, Yasutoshi; Nakao, Masamitsu; Ishikawa, Keiko; Arai, Shin; Kita, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    Since endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was developed in the 1990s, EUS has become widely accepted as an imaging tool. EUS is categorized into radial and linear in design. Radial endoscopes provide cross-sectional imaging of the mediastinum, gastrointestinal tract, liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, and pancreas, which has highly accuracy in the T and N staging of esophageal, lung, gastric, rectal, and pancreatic cancer. Tumor staging is common indication of radial-EUS, and EUS-staging is predictive of surgical resectability. In contrast, linear array endoscope uses a side-viewing probe and has advantages in the ability to perform EUS-guides fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), which has been established for cytologic diagnosis. For example, EUS-FNA arrows accurate nodal staging of esophageal cancer before surgery, which provides more accurate assessment of nodes than radial-EUS imaging alone. EUS-FNA has been also commonly used for diagnose of pancreatic diseases because of the highly accuracy than US or computed tomography. EUS and EUS-FNA has been used not only for TNM staging and cytologic diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but also for evaluation of chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cystic lesions, and other pancreatic masses. More recently, EUS-FNA has developed into EUS-guided fine needle injection including EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis, celiac plexus block, and other “interventional EUS” procedures. In this review, we have summarized the new possibilities offered by “interventional EUS”. PMID:22816010

  19. Endoscopic resection of sinonasal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, Piero; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Bolzoni Villaret, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Malignant tumors of the sinonasal tract are rare, accounting for only 1% of all malignancies. Although they are associated with substantial histological heterogeneity, surgery plays a key role in their management. This review addresses the evolution of current treatments in view of the introduction of endoscopic resection techniques. The absence of facial incisions and osteotomies, decreased hospitalization time, better control of bleeding, improved visualization of tumor borders, and reduced morbidity and mortality rate are the major advantages of endoscopic techniques in comparison to traditional external approaches. The major criticisms focus on oncologic results in view of the short/intermediate follow-up of large series, which have commonly grouped together several histologies that may be associated with different prognoses. Since prospective studies contrasting the results of endoscopic and craniofacial resections are difficult to carry out given the rarity of the disease together with ethical issues, the creation of a large database would favor the analysis of several variables related to the patient, tumor, and treatment on survival performed on a large number of patients. PMID:21243539

  20. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  1. Possibilities of interventional endoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Makoto; Togawa, Osamu; Matsukawa, Miho; Shono, Takashi; Ochiai, Yasutoshi; Nakao, Masamitsu; Ishikawa, Keiko; Arai, Shin; Kita, Hiroto

    2012-07-16

    Since endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was developed in the 1990s, EUS has become widely accepted as an imaging tool. EUS is categorized into radial and linear in design. Radial endoscopes provide cross-sectional imaging of the mediastinum, gastrointestinal tract, liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, and pancreas, which has highly accuracy in the T and N staging of esophageal, lung, gastric, rectal, and pancreatic cancer. Tumor staging is common indication of radial-EUS, and EUS-staging is predictive of surgical resectability. In contrast, linear array endoscope uses a side-viewing probe and has advantages in the ability to perform EUS-guides fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), which has been established for cytologic diagnosis. For example, EUS-FNA arrows accurate nodal staging of esophageal cancer before surgery, which provides more accurate assessment of nodes than radial-EUS imaging alone. EUS-FNA has been also commonly used for diagnose of pancreatic diseases because of the highly accuracy than US or computed tomography. EUS and EUS-FNA has been used not only for TNM staging and cytologic diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but also for evaluation of chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cystic lesions, and other pancreatic masses. More recently, EUS-FNA has developed into EUS-guided fine needle injection including EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis, celiac plexus block, and other "interventional EUS" procedures. In this review, we have summarized the new possibilities offered by "interventional EUS". PMID:22816010

  2. Lasers in digestive endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetaud, Jean Marc; Maunoury, Vincent; Cochelard, Dominique

    1997-01-01

    Lasers were introduced in digestive endoscopy to stop active gastroduodenal hemorrhages. Their use spread progressively to the treatment of chronic hemorrhages from vascular malformations and sessile tumors. Laser face competition from other endoscopic techniques such as electrocoagulation, injection techniques, dilation, stents, and brachytherapy. Many series have reported the efficacy of lasers in digestive endoscopy used for their thermal or photochemical effects. However, they were gradually abandoned for the treatment of hemorrhages because of competition from nonlaser techniques. Lasers are still used for ablation of sessile tumors, but their true impact is difficult to evaluate. Modern methods of technology assessment did not allow gastroenterologists to clearly define the place of lasers among surgery, radio-chemotherapy, and other endoscopic techniques, and data on the daily use of lasers are not available. Therefore, the conclusion can only be subjective. The best current application of thermal lasers appears to be in the treatment of rectosigmoid villous adenomas in elderly patients. Small superficial rectal cancers may also become a good subject due to the impact of endoscopic ultrasonography. Early lesions with multifocal or diffuse disease such as early esophageal cancers could be the most promising subject of application for photodynamic therapy in the future.

  3. Safety and efficacy of using the stone cone and an entrapment and extraction device in ureteroscopic lithotripsy for ureteric stones

    PubMed Central

    Shabana, Waleed; Teleb, Mohamed; Dawod, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of using a stone cone and an entrapment and extraction device (N-Trap®, Cook Urological, Bloomington, IN, USA) to avoid stone retropulsion during ureteroscopic lithotripsy for ureteric stones. Patients and methods This retrospective comparative study included 436 patients treated with ureteroscopic lithotripsy for a single ureteric stone from February 2011 to January 2014. The diagnosis of a stone was confirmed by plain spiral computed tomography in all cases. Patients were divided according to the ureteric occlusion device applied to avoid stone retropulsion during pneumatic lithotripsy into three groups; group 1 (156) had no instruments used, group 2 (140) in whom the stone cone was applied, and group 3 (140) in whom the N-Trap was used. Patient demographics, stone criteria, operative duration and complications, and success rates (complete stone disintegration with no upward migration) were reported and analysed statistically. Results The stone was in the lower ureter in >55% of patients in all groups. The mean (SD) of maximum stone length was 9.8 (2.5), 10.4 (2.8) and 9.7 (2.9) in groups 1–3, respectively. The use of the stone cone or N-Trap did not significantly increase the operative duration (P = 0.13) or complication rates (P = 0.67). There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) favouring groups 2 and 3 for retropulsion and success rates, being 83.3% in group 1, 97.1% in group 2 and 95.7% in group 3. Conclusion The stone cone and N-Trap gave high success rates in preventing stone retropulsion during ureteric pneumatic lithotripsy. Both devices caused no increase in operative duration or complications when used cautiously. PMID:26413324

  4. Successful Multimodality Endoscopic Treatment of Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by an Impacted Gallstone (Bouveret's Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Rogart, Jason N.; Perkal, Melissa; Nagar, Anil

    2008-01-01

    Bouveret's syndrome is a rare condition of gastric outlet obstruction resulting from the migration of a gallstone through a choledochoduodenal fistula. Due to the large size of these stones and the difficult location in which they become impacted, endoscopic treatment is unsuccessful and most patients require surgery. We report the case of an elderly male who presented with nausea and hematemesis, and was found on CT scan and endoscopy to have an obstructing gallstone in his duodenal bulb. After several endoscopic sessions and the use of multiple instruments including a Holmium: YAG laser and electrohydraulic lithotripter, fragmentation and endoscopic removal of the stone were successful. We believe this to be the first case of Bouveret's syndrome successfully treated by endoscopy alone in the United States. We describe the difficulties encountered which necessitated varied and innovative therapeutic techniques. PMID:18493330

  5. High-resolution, lensless endoscope based on digital scanning through a multimode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Ioannis N; Farahi, Salma; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2013-02-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an ultra-thin rigid endoscope (450 μm diameter) based on a passive multimode optical fiber. We use digital phase conjugation to overcome the modal scrambling of the fiber to tightly focus and scan the laser light at its distal end. By exploiting the maximum number of modes available, sub-micron resolution, high quality fluorescence images of neuronal cells were acquired. The imaging system is evaluated in terms of fluorescence collection efficiency, resolution and field of view. The small diameter of the proposed endoscope, along with its high quality images offer an opportunity for minimally invasive medical endoscopic imaging and diagnosis based on cellular phenotype via direct tissue penetration. PMID:23411747

  6. Three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging based on multielement linear transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yi; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2011-09-01

    An implementation system of three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging is presented. The developed endoscopic photoacoustic detector integrates a multielement linear transducer array, a reflective device, a Plexiglass tube, and ultrasonic coupling medium. To match with the acoustic impendence of Plexiglass tube, a glycerin solution with 45% volume percentage was used as the ultrasonic coupling medium. This ultrasonic coupling medium can decrease photoacoustic pressure transmission loss during the progress of photoacoustic signal propagation. The capability of the system for three-dimensional imaging was verified with chicken breast tissue. Furthermore, pig normal rectal tissue and mouse breast tumor tissue in an ex vivo cavity model were imaged by the system. The reconstructed three-dimensional photoacoustic image presented the structural information of normal and lesion tissue. The experimental results demonstrate the multielement-based endoscopic photoacoustic imaging system with inside-out laser exciting mode has the ability of reconstructing three-dimensional images of biology tissue.

  7. Three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging based on multi-element linear transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yi; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    An implementation system of three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging is presented. The developed endoscopic photoacoustic detector integrates a multielement linear transducer array, a reflective device, a Plexiglass tube and ultrasonic coupling medium. To match with the acoustic impendence of Plexiglass tube, a glycerin solution with 45% volume percentage was used as the ultrasonic coupling medium. This ultrasonic coupling medium can decrease photoacoustic pressure transmission loss during the progress of photoacoustic signal propagation. The capability of the system for three-dimensional imaging was verified with chicken breast tissue. The experimental results demonstrate the multielement-based endoscopic photoacoustic imaging system with inside-out laser exciting mode has the ability of reconstructing three-dimensional images of biology tissue.

  8. Three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging based on multi-element linear transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yi; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    An implementation system of three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging is presented. The developed endoscopic photoacoustic detector integrates a multielement linear transducer array, a reflective device, a Plexiglass tube and ultrasonic coupling medium. To match with the acoustic impendence of Plexiglass tube, a glycerin solution with 45% volume percentage was used as the ultrasonic coupling medium. This ultrasonic coupling medium can decrease photoacoustic pressure transmission loss during the progress of photoacoustic signal propagation. The capability of the system for three-dimensional imaging was verified with chicken breast tissue. The experimental results demonstrate the multielement-based endoscopic photoacoustic imaging system with inside-out laser exciting mode has the ability of reconstructing three-dimensional images of biology tissue.

  9. Microbiological monitoring of endoscopes: 5-year review.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Elizabeth E; Kotsanas, Despina; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2008-07-01

    Periodic microbiological monitoring of endoscopes is a recommendation of the Gastroenterological Society of Australia (GENSA). The aim of monitoring has been to provide quality assurance of the cleaning and disinfection of endoscopes; however, there is controversy regarding its frequency. This lack of consensus stimulated a review of the experience within our health service. At Southern Health, routine microbiological sampling has involved 4-weekly monitoring of bronchoscopes, duodenoscopes and automated flexible endoscope reprocessors (AFER), and 3-monthly monitoring of all other gastrointestinal endoscopes. Records of testing were reviewed from 1 January 2002 until 31 December 2006. A literature review was conducted, cost analysis performed and positive cultures investigated. There were 2374 screening tests performed during the 5-year period, including 287 AFER, 631 bronchoscopes for mycobacteria and 1456 endoscope bacterial screens. There were no positive results of the AFER or bronchoscopes for mycobacteria. Of the 1456 endoscopic bacterial samples, six were positive; however, retesting resulted in no growth. The overall cost of tests performed and cost in time for nursing staff to collect the samples was estimated at $AUD 100,400. Periodic monitoring of endoscopes is both time-consuming and costly. Our review demonstrates that AFER (Soluscope) perform well in cleaning endoscopes. Based on our 5-year experience, assurance of quality for endoscopic use could be achieved through process control as opposed to product control. Maintenance of endoscopes and AFER should be in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and microbiological testing performed on commissioning, annually and following repair. Initial prompt manual leak testing and manual cleaning followed by mechanical leak testing, cleaning and disinfection should be the minimum standard in reprocessing of endoscopes. PMID:18086113

  10. Features of gallstone and kidney stone fragmentation by IR-pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishche, Sergei A.

    1995-05-01

    It is shown that infra-red ((lambda) equals 1064 nm) long pulse (approximately 100 microsecond(s) ) radiation of YAG:Nd laser, operating in free generation regime, effectively fragments gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones. The features of the mechanism of this process are investigated. Laser lithotripsy is nowadays a method widely used for fragmentation of gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones. Flashlamp pumped dye lasers of microsecond duration are most often used for such purposes. Nevertheless, there are some reports on lithotripsies with nanosecond duration laser pulses (for example, Q-switched YAG:Nd laser). The mechanism of the laser fragmentation of such stones was supposed to be the next. The laser powerful radiation, delivered through the optical fiber, is absorbed by the material of the stone. As a result of such highly localized energy absorption, dense plasma is formed, which expands. Such plasma and vapor, liquid confined, forms a cavitation bubble. This bubble grows, reaches its most dimension and then collapses on itself in some hundreds of micro seconds. Shock waves generated during the growth and the collapse of these bubbles are the origin of fragmentation of the stone. It is necessary to say that there are rather confined data on the hundreds microsecond laser pulse fragmentation especially what concerns the usage of infra-red (IR) YAG:Nd lasers with long laser pulses. Clearing this problem would result in better understanding of the fragmentation mechanism and it could favor development of simple and more reliable laser systems for lithotripsy. In this work we report about investigation of features of an effective fragmentation of gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones under exposure of IR ((lambda) equals 1064 nm) radiation of repetitive YAG:Nd laser working in free generation regime.

  11. [Possibilities and limits of endoscopic therapy in hemorrhage of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Fleig, W E

    1987-04-01

    Most of the hemostatic modalities currently used for endoscopic therapy of gastrointestinal bleeding are based on the principle of thermic coagulation of protein. Injection of vasoactive and sclerosing agents is also widely used, while the application of various other methods is rather limited. There are specific benefits and drawbacks inherent with each of the treatment modalities. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation in stopping upper gastrointestinal bleeding has been demonstrated in several controlled trials; however, effects on survival are controversial. None of the other methods used has been evaluated sufficiently by controlled clinical trials up to date. Depending on the availability at a local institution, each of the various methods may be used for an attempt of endoscopic hemostasis when Forrest type I and II (visible vessel) lesions are detected at emergency endoscopy. However, patients suffering from lesions, which are notable for their high risk of recurrent bleeding like ulcers with a spurting artery, with a visible vessel and lesions at the posterior wall of the duodenum, should be transferred to the surgeon for operative treatment in the absence of active bleeding immediately after successful endoscopic treatment. In the future, patients requiring surgery despite effective endoscopic hemostasis might be identified with high accuracy by checking the coagulated or injected ulcer base with an endoscopic Doppler device. PMID:3495714

  12. Endoscopic-assisted infraorbital nerve release

    PubMed Central

    Sosin, Michael; De La Cruz, Carla; Christy, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic-assisted techniques in plastic and craniofacial surgeries are limited. We present a patient with infraorbital nerve entrapment following traumatic facial injury that failed conservative management. Compression of the nerve was treated with an endoscopic-assisted nerve release of the surrounding soft tissue with a circumferential foraminal osteotomy.

  13. Endoscopic techniques in aesthetic plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    McCain, L A; Jones, G

    1995-01-01

    There has been an explosive interest in endoscopic techniques by plastic surgeons over the past two years. Procedures such as facial rejuvenation, breast augmentation and abdominoplasty are being performed with endoscopic assistance. Endoscopic operations require a complex setup with components such as video camera, light sources, cables and hard instruments. The Hopkins Rod Lens system consists of optical fibers for illumination, an objective lens, an image retrieval system, a series of rods and lenses, and an eyepiece for image collection. Good illumination of the body cavity is essential for endoscopic procedures. Placement of the video camera on the eyepiece of the endoscope gives a clear, brightly illuminated large image on the monitor. The video monitor provides the surgical team with the endoscopic image. It is important to become familiar with the equipment before actually doing cases. Several options exist for staff education. In the operating room the endoscopic cart needs to be positioned to allow a clear unrestricted view of the video monitor by the surgeon and the operating team. Fogging of the endoscope may be prevented during induction by using FREDD (a fog reduction/elimination device) or a warm bath. The camera needs to be white balanced. During the procedure, the nurse monitors the level of dissection and assesses for clogging of the suction. PMID:7568452

  14. Endoscopic approach for quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Qi, Songtao; Peng, Yuping; Fan, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cysts (QCACs), which are usually asymptomatic and may be accidental findings during radiological evaluation, are rare, comprising 5-10% of all intracranial arachnoid cysts (ACs). We report a series of eight patients with QCACs treated with neuroendoscopic intervention and try to discuss the different endoscopic approaches according to the different types of QCACs. Materials and methods Between October 2007 and January 2013, eight patients affected by QCACs were endoscopically treated. All the endoscopic procedures were completed uneventfully (infratentorial approaches in four cases and supratentorial approaches in four cases), which included ventriculocystostomy in seven cases (lateral ventriculocystostomy in one case, third ventricle cystostomy in five cases and both in one case), endoscopic third ventriculostomy in three cases and cystocisternostomy in one case. Results Five patients achieved complete cure after the endoscopic procedure alone; nevertheless, in none of the patients did the cyst totally collapse following the endoscopic procedure during follow-up. The number of episodes decreased significantly even after cessation of all medications and headache disappeared in one patient and the two patients who had unsteady gait together with visual complaints showed remarkable improvement. Conclusion QCAC is one kind of pineal region ACs and it is advisable to plan the operative approach before the endoscopic procedure according to the different types of pineal region ACs. Pineal region ACs and the associated hydrocephalus can be successfully treated with simple, minimally invasive endoscopic procedure. PMID:26744082

  15. Pulsed dye laser in the treatment of 325 calculi of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Gautier, J R; Leandri, P; Rossignol, G; Caissel, J; Quintens, H

    1990-01-01

    The pulsed dye laser (Candela) has been used from February 1988 to September 1989 in order to treat 325 stones in 278 patients. A total of 285 endoscopies has been performed. The pulsed laser has helped to achieve the fragmentation of 318 stones. Laser fragmentation has not induced any complication at all. The main failures can be attributed to the nature and shape of the stone. Thanks to the thin laser fiber, the use of small diameter ureteroscopes has increased the reliability of ureteroscopy. The use of this technique combined to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has reduced the rate of open surgery for ureteral stones down to less than 1%. PMID:1976095

  16. Endoscopic and non-endoscopic approaches for the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Joseph Paul; Wong, Andrew Thomas; Schwartz, David; Martinez, Manuel; Aytaman, Ayse; Schreiber, David

    2016-08-21

    Pelvic radiation is a commonly utilized treatment for malignancy of the genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal tract. Radiation proctitis and the resultant clinical picture varies from asymptomatic to potentially life threatening. Similarly, treatment options also vary greatly, from medical therapy to surgical intervention. Commonly utilized medical therapy includes sucralfate enemas, antibiotics, 5-aminosalicylic acid derivatives, probiotics, antioxidants, short-chain fatty acids, formalin instillation and fractionated hyperbaric oxygen. More invasive treatments include endoscopic-based, focally ablative interventions such as dilation, heater and bipolar cautery, neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet argon laser, radiofrequency ablation or argon plasma coagulation. Despite its relatively common frequency, there is a dearth of existing literature reporting head-to-head comparisons of the various treatment options via a randomized controlled approach. The purpose of our review was to present the reader a consolidation of the existing evidence-based literature with the goal of highlighting the comparative effectiveness and risks of the various treatment approaches. Finally, we outline a pragmatic approach to the treatment of radiation proctitis. In light of the lack of randomized data, our goal is to pursue as least invasive an approach as possible, with escalation of care tailored to the severity of the patient's symptoms. For those cases that are clinically asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic, observation or medical management can be considered. Once a patient fails such management or symptoms become more severe, invasive procedures such as endoscopically based focal ablation or surgical intervention can be considered. Although not all recommendations are supported by level I evidence, reported case series and single-institutional studies in the literature suggest that successful treatment with cessation of symptoms can be obtained in the majority of cases. PMID

  17. Endoscopic and non-endoscopic approaches for the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Joseph Paul; Wong, Andrew Thomas; Schwartz, David; Martinez, Manuel; Aytaman, Ayse; Schreiber, David

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic radiation is a commonly utilized treatment for malignancy of the genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal tract. Radiation proctitis and the resultant clinical picture varies from asymptomatic to potentially life threatening. Similarly, treatment options also vary greatly, from medical therapy to surgical intervention. Commonly utilized medical therapy includes sucralfate enemas, antibiotics, 5-aminosalicylic acid derivatives, probiotics, antioxidants, short-chain fatty acids, formalin instillation and fractionated hyperbaric oxygen. More invasive treatments include endoscopic-based, focally ablative interventions such as dilation, heater and bipolar cautery, neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet argon laser, radiofrequency ablation or argon plasma coagulation. Despite its relatively common frequency, there is a dearth of existing literature reporting head-to-head comparisons of the various treatment options via a randomized controlled approach. The purpose of our review was to present the reader a consolidation of the existing evidence-based literature with the goal of highlighting the comparative effectiveness and risks of the various treatment approaches. Finally, we outline a pragmatic approach to the treatment of radiation proctitis. In light of the lack of randomized data, our goal is to pursue as least invasive an approach as possible, with escalation of care tailored to the severity of the patient’s symptoms. For those cases that are clinically asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic, observation or medical management can be considered. Once a patient fails such management or symptoms become more severe, invasive procedures such as endoscopically based focal ablation or surgical intervention can be considered. Although not all recommendations are supported by level I evidence, reported case series and single-institutional studies in the literature suggest that successful treatment with cessation of symptoms can be obtained in the majority of cases

  18. Two-photon imaging using a flexible endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Schenkl, Selma; Le Harzic, Ronan; Sauer, Daniel; Ehlers, Alexander; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2008-02-01

    Two-photon autofluorescence imaging offers the analysis of cells and tissues without the need of taking biopsies, staining and complicated confocal detection systems. Therefore, it is of special interest for non- or minimal invasive clinical diagnostics. Until now, two-photon imaging was performed only on superficial surfaces like skin or of biopsies. To extend this technique to deeper tissues or inside the body the optical properties have to be reduced to endoscopical sizes. This can be achieved by tiny GRIN-optics, based on a radial gradient in the reflective index. A newly developed GRIN-lens assembly with increased numerical aperture is of special interest which is shown by the quality of tissue constituents and cell autofluorescence images. A fiber directs the laser light to the specimen in an assembly like an endoscope. This well-characterized photonic crystal fiber supports the high laser power of the femtosecond excitation impulses without the generation of non-linearities. A sensitive PMT detector detects the fluorescence. First fluorescence images using a fiber-GRIN lens combination were taken.

  19. Endoscopic fetal urethrotomy for anterior urethral valves: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Sago, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Satoshi; Chiba, Toshio; Ueoka, Katsuhiko; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Nakagawa, Atsuko; Kitagawa, Michihiro

    2008-01-01

    Anterior urethral valves are a rare congenital anomaly associated with distal urethral obstruction, which can result in a poor prognosis. We report on the endoscopic creation of a fetal urethrotomy for obstructive uropathy resulting from anterior urethral valves. A 33-year-old woman was evaluated at 17 weeks gestation due to fetal megacystis. The diagnosis of anterior urethral valves was confirmed by the characteristic sonographic feature of a dilated membranous penile urethra. Oligohydramnios with normal-appearing kidneys and favorable urinary electrolytes led to fetal intervention. Ablation on the ventral site of the fetal penis for a cutaneous urethrotomy was performed using a YAG laser under a 1-mm fetoscope at 19 weeks gestation. Urine was drained from the incision and the dilated penis and the distended bladder shrunk with an increase in amniotic fluid. However, the fetus died unexpectedly on postoperative day 3, and chorioamnionitis was suspected as the etiology. While the outcome was unfavorable, our preliminary experience shows that fetal urethrotomy for obstructive uropathy can be achieved in utero using an endoscopic laser approach. Further experience will be required to evaluate the therapeutic value of this new procedure in the management of fetal anterior urethral valves. PMID:18648205

  20. Endoscopic management of esophagogastric varices in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Taura, Naota; Miuma, Satoshi; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Esophagogastric varices are the most common complication in patients with portal hypertension, and endoscopy plays an important role in their diagnosis and in the prevention of acute bleeding from these structures. Recently, new modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and narrow-band imaging have been introduced for the diagnosis of esophagogastric varices. In Japan, endoscopic therapy has become the first choice for the treatment of acutely bleeding esophageal or gastric varices. The two principal methods used to treat esophageal varices are endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) and endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Recently, combinations of EIS plus EVL and EVL plus argon plasma coagulation were reported to be more effective than EVL or EIS alone. Additionally, endoscopic cyanoacrylate injection is superior to EIS and EVL for the treatment of acutely bleeding gastric varices. PMID:25333017

  1. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  2. Endoscopic options for early stage esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pari M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been the preferred treatment for early stage esophageal cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic treatments have been shown to be effective and safe. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) allow endoscopists to remove small, superficial lesions, providing tumor specimen that can be examined for accurate pathologic tumor staging and assessment of adequacy of resection. Endoscopic ablation procedures, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radio frequency ablation (RFA), have also been shown to safely and effectively treat esophageal dysplasia and early stage neoplasia, with excellent long-term disease control. Both approaches are becoming more widely available around the world, and provide an alternative, safe, low risk strategy for treating early stage disease, making combined endoscopic therapy the recommended treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancers. PMID:25642334

  3. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-07-10

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  4. Endoscopic management of biliary hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Akkiz, Hikmet; Akinoglu, Alper; Çolakoglu, Salih; Demiryürek, Haluk; Yagmur, Özgür

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of endoscopic sphincterotomy in the management of biliary hydatid disease. Design A case study between January 1992 and December 1994. Setting A university-affiliated hospital in Adana, Turkey. Patients Five patients with biliary hydatid disease, in which the cyst had ruptured into the biliary tree. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 12 months. Intervention Endoscopic sphincterotomy. Main Outcome Measures Morbidity, mortality and recurrence of the disease. Results All patients underwent successful endoscopic sphincterotomy, including removal of daughter cysts. During the follow-up period, ultrasonography and laboratory investigations showed complete cure in all patients. There were no complications due to endoscopic sphincterotomy. Conclusion Endoscopic sphincterotomy is the treatment of choice for the management of hydatid cysts that have ruptured into the biliary tract causing obstructive jaundice. PMID:8697318

  5. Endoscopic papillary large balloon dilation for the removal of bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hong; Yang, Min Jae; Hwang, Jae Chul; Yoo, Byung Moo

    2013-12-14

    Endoscopic papillary large balloon dilation (EPLBD) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) has been widely used as the alternative to EST along with endoscopic mechanical lithotripsy (EML) for the removal of large or difficult bile duct stones. Furthermore, EPLBD without EST was recently introduced as its simplified alternative technique. Thus, we systematically searched PubMed, Medline, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE, and analyzed all gathered data of EPLBD with and without EST, respectively, by using a single standardized definition, reviewing relevant literatures, published between 2003 and June 2013, where it was performed with large-diameter balloons (12-20 mm). The outcomes, including the initial success rate, the rate of needs for EML, and the overall success rate, and adverse events were assessed in each and compared between both of two procedures: "EPLBD with EST" and "EPLBD without EST". A total of 2511 procedures from 30 published articles were included in EPLBD with EST, while a total of 413 procedures from 3 published articles were included in EPLBD without EST. In the results of outcomes, the overall success rate was 96.5% in EPLBD with EST and 97.2% in EPLBD without EST, showing no significant difference between both of them. The initial success rate (84.0% vs 76.2%, P < 0.001) and the success rate of EPLBD without EML (83.2% vs 76.7%, P = 0.001) was significantly higher, while the rate of use of EML was significantly lower (14.1% vs 21.6%, P < 0.001), in EPLBD with EST. The rate of overall adverse events, pancreatitis, bleeding, perforation, other adverse events, surgery for adverse events, and fatal adverse events were 8.3%, 2.4%, 3.6%, 0.6%, 1.7%, 0.2% and 0.2% in EPLBD with EST and 7.0%, 3.9%, 1.9%, 0.5%, 0.7%, 0% and 0% in EPLBD without EST, respectively, showing no significant difference between both of them. In conclusion, recent accumulated results of EPLBD with or even without EST suggest that it is a safe and effective procedure for the

  6. Outcomes in Endoscopic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kiringoda, Ruwan; Kozin, Elliott D; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    Endoscopic ear surgery (EES) provides several advantages compared with traditional binocular microscopy, including a wide-field view, improved resolution with high magnification, and visual access to hidden corridors of the middle ear. Although binocular microscopic-assisted surgical techniques remain the gold standard for most otologists, EES is slowly emerging as a viable alternative for performing otologic surgery at several centers in the United States and abroad. In this review, we evaluate the current body of literature regarding EES outcomes, summarize our EES outcomes at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and compare these results with data for microscopic-assisted otologic surgery. PMID:27565392

  7. Current Endoscopic Treatment of Dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Ossoff, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    Benign laryngeal disorders result in dysphonia because of effects on glottic closure and the vibratory characteristics of the true vocal fold. Treatment is initially directed at reversing medical conditions and patterns of abuse with surgery reserved for unresolving lesions resulting in troublesome dysphonia. Benign lesions that require surgery are excised as precisely as possible sparing overlying mucosa and the underlying vocal ligament. Vocal fold scarring is currently best treated by augmentation procedures, and atrophy may be compensated for by medialization thyroplasty or by adding bulk to the affected folds. Application of current knowledge of laryngeal histology and physiology is prerequisite to endoscopic surgical intervention. PMID:18493531

  8. Integrated biophotonics in endoscopic oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muguruma, Naoki; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Marcon, Norman E.

    2009-02-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has made great progress during last decade. Diagnostic accuracy can be enhanced by better training, improved dye-contrast techniques method, and the development of new image processing technologies. However, diagnosis using conventional endoscopy with white-light optical imaging is essentially limited by being based on morphological changes and/or visual attribution: hue, saturation and intensity, interpretation of which depends on the endoscopist's eye and brain. In microlesions in the gastrointestinal tract, we still rely ultimately on the histopathological diagnosis from biopsy specimens. Autofluorescence imaging system has been applied for lesions which have been difficult to morphologically recognize or are indistinct with conventional endoscope, and this approach has potential application for the diagnosis of dysplastic lesions and early cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, supplementing the information from white light endoscopy. This system has an advantage that it needs no administration of a photosensitive agent, making it suitable as a screening method for the early detection of neoplastic tissues. Narrow band imaging (NBI) is a novel endoscopic technique which can distinguish neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions without chromoendoscopy. Magnifying endoscopy in combination with NBI has an obvious advantage, namely analysis of the epithelial pit pattern and the vascular network. This new technique allows a detailed visualization in early neoplastic lesions of esophagus, stomach and colon. However, problems remain; how to combine these technologies in an optimum diagnostic strategy, how to apply them into the algorithm for therapeutic decision-making, and how to standardize several classifications surrounding them. 'Molecular imaging' is a concept representing the most novel imaging methods in medicine, although the definition of the word is still controversial. In the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the future of

  9. Thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones using a 50-μm-core silica optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory is currently studying the experimental thulium fiber laser (TFL) as a potential alternative laser lithotripter to the gold standard, clinical Holmium:YAG laser. We have previously demonstrated the efficient coupling of TFL energy into fibers as small as 100-μm-core-diameter without damage to the proximal end. Although smaller fibers have a greater tendency to degrade at the distal tip during lithotripsy, fiber diameters (≤200 μm) have been shown to increase the saline irrigation rates through the working channel of a flexible ureteroscope, to maximize the ureteroscope deflection, and to reduce the stone retropulsion during laser lithotripsy. In this study, a 50-μm-core-diameter, 85-μm-outer-diameter, low-OH silica fiber is characterized for TFL ablation of human calcium oxalate monohydrate urinary stones, ex vivo. The 50-μm-core fiber consumes approximately 30 times less cross-sectional area inside the single working channel of a ureteroscope than the standard 270-μm-core fiber currently used in the clinic. The ureteroscope working channel flow rate, including the 50-μm fiber, decreased by only 10% with no impairment of ureteroscope deflection. The fiber delivered up to 15.4±5.9 W under extreme bending (5-mm-radius) conditions. The stone ablation rate measured 70±22 μg/s for 35-mJ-pulse-energy, 500-μs-pulse-duration, and 50-Hz-pulse-rate. Stone retropulsion and fiber burnback averaged 201±336 and 3000±2600 μm, respectively, after 2 min. With further development, thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using ultra-small, 50-μm-core fibers may introduce new integration and miniaturization possibilities and potentially provide an alternative to conventional Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy using larger fibers.

  10. Therapeutic aspects of endoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Timothy A.

    1999-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a technology that had been used primarily as a passive imaging modality. Recent advances have enabled us to move beyond the use of EUS solely as a staging tool to an interventional device. Current studies suggest that interventional applications of EUS will allow for minimally invasive assessment and therapies in a cost-effective manner. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been demonstrated to be a technically feasible, relatively safe method of obtaining cytologic specimens. The clinical utility of EUS- FNA appears to be greatest in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer and in the nodal staging of gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. In addition, EUS-FNA has demonstrated utility in the sampling pleural and ascitic fluid not generally appreciated or assessable to standard interventions. Interventional applications of EUS include EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage, EUS-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the treatment of achalasia, and EUS- guided celiac plexus neurolysis in the treatment of pancreatic cancer pain. Finally, EUS-guided fine-needle installation is being evaluated, in conjunction with recent bimolecular treatment modalities, as a delivery system in the treatment of certain gastrointestinal tumors.

  11. Novel Endoscopic Management of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic procedures have been well-documented in the obesity field, but have not yet reached a sufficient level of evidence as stand-alone methods for treating obesity. It is unclear if they should take over. Although expanding, the array of bariatric surgical techniques does not fully meet the current needs, and there are not enough resources for increasing surgery. Surgery is avoided by a majority of patients, so that less aggressive procedures are necessary. For the time being, relevant endoscopic methods include intra-gastric balloons, gastric partitioning (Endo-plication), and the metabolic field (Endo-barrier). Surgical novelties and basic research are also important contributors owing to their potential combination with endoscopy. Conditions have been listed for implementation of bariatric endoscopy, because innovation is risky, expensive, and faces ethical challenges. A scientific background is being built (e.g., hormonal studies). Some techniques require additional study, while others are not ready but should be priorities. Steps and goals include the search for conceptual similarities and the respect of an ethical frame. Minimally invasive bariatric techniques are not ready for prime time, but they are already being successful as re-do procedures. A time-frame for step-strategies can be defined, and more investments from the industry are mandatory. PMID:26855921

  12. Endoscopic parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Prades, Jean-Michel; Asanau, Alexander; Timoshenko, Andrei P; Gavid, Marie; Martin, Christian

    2011-06-01

    During the past decade, endoscopic video-assisted parathyroidectomy (EP) for primary hyper parathyroidism (PHPT) has gained wider acceptance. The endoscopic gasless procedure described by P. Miccoli (1997-1998) offers an attractive technique. A routine preoperative localization study was performed with both ultrasonography and 99m TC-Sestamibi scintigraphy for each patient with sporadic PHPT. The criteria to select patients eligible for EP included absence of significant nodular goiter, a previous neck surgery, a need for concomitant thyroidectomy, a significant obesity, and multiple enlarged parathyroid glands. The surgical outcome and the use of preoperative localization together with the operative strategy were evaluated. From 2005 to 2009, 59 out of 75 patients (78%) were potentially candidates for this approach. An enlarged parathyroid gland was located by both types of imaging for 34 patients (57%) and by 99 m Tc-Sestamibi scintigraphy for 46 patients (77%). Conversion was required in 11 cases (18%). Nine patients had a negative preoperative imaging study and five underwent a successful EP. The operating time ranged from 35 to 120 min (median 45 min). Usually patients were discharged home at 48 h. There were no cases of permanent hypocalcemia or recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Postoperative review showed that all calcium and parathyroid hormone levels remained normal at 3 months except for 1 patient with a double adenoma. EP is a quick, safe, and effective procedure in a selected group of patients. Our results show that this technique can be easily introduced into a general head and neck practice. PMID:21046411

  13. Cavitation induced by CW lasers in absorbing liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Rodriguez-Aboytes, E.; Martínez-Canton, A. E.; Baldovino-Pantaleon, O.; Torres-Hurtado, S.; Robledo-Martinez, A.; Korneev, N.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2010-02-01

    Novel results are presented on thermocavitation in highly absorbing solutions using CW low power laser (λ=975 nm). Due to the large absorption coefficient (135 cm-1) at the laser wavelength, penetration length is only ~74μm inside the liquid and asymmetric bubbles are generated near the beam's entrance wall. We report the temporal dynamic of the cavitation bubble, which is much shorter than previously reported. We found that the amplitude of the shock wave decreases exponentially with the beam power. As shown in this work, thermocavitation is a phenomenon that has a great application potential in areas such as ultrasonic waves generation and controlled tissue ablation for use in lithotripsy.

  14. Extracervical approaches to endoscopic thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Papaspyrou, Giorgos; Ferlito, Alfio; Silver, Carl E; Werner, Jochen A; Genden, Eric; Sesterhenn, Andreas M

    2011-04-01

    There is increasing demand for surgical procedures which avoid visible scars while maintaining optimal functional and ideal cosmetic results, without compromising the safety or effectiveness of the procedure. Endoscopic techniques have been adapted to abdominal and pelvic surgery and increasingly employed over the past three decades. Although hampered by the absence of a natural cavity, endoscopic techniques have been adapted to surgery in the neck for the past 15 years, particularly for the thyroid gland. While earlier attempts at endoscopic thyroid surgery were performed through incisions in or near the midline of the neck, recent techniques have been developed to place the incisions and endoscopic ports extracervically, or at least away from the midline region of the neck, rendering the cosmetic result more acceptable. Most of these approaches are through the axilla, breast, chest wall or a combination of approaches. Visualization of the thyroid and rate of complications with these approaches are equal to those attained with older endoscopic approaches. Careful patient selection is important for endoscopic surgery. Complications unique to the endoscopic approach are mostly related to insufflation of cervical tissues with pressurized CO(2). PMID:20844894

  15. Endoscopic mediastinal staging of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Kay-Leong; Ho, Khek-Yu

    2011-04-01

    The advent of endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling procedures such as endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has lead to significant advances in the mediastinal diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. These endoscopic techniques can be performed in the outpatient setting under conscious sedation and local anesthesia, in contrast to the surgical standard, mediastinoscopy (MS), which requires operating theatre time and general anesthesia. Proponents of mediastinoscopy have always emphasized the advantages of mediastinoscopy, namely its sensitivity even with a low prevalence of mediastinal metastases and its low false negative rate. Newer endoscopic techniques such as EBUS-TBNA are showing sensitivities exceeding that of mediastinoscopy, even in the setting of an equally low prevalence of mediastinal metastases. However, endoscopic techniques have double the false negative rate of mediastinoscopy. As the tracheobronchial route and esophageal route provide almost complete access to mediastinal lymph nodes, these endoscopic techniques are complementary rather than competing. When used in combination, it is possible mediastinoscopy may be superseded. The challenge however, is how best to select the appropriate endoscopic procedures to accurately stage lung cancer in the most cost-effective manner. PMID:21130638

  16. Developments in flexible endoscopic surgery: a review

    PubMed Central

    Feussner, Hubertus; Becker, Valentin; Bauer, Margit; Kranzfelder, Michael; Schirren, Rebekka; Lüth, Tim; Meining, Alexander; Wilhelm, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Flexible endoscopy is increasingly developing into a therapeutic instead of a purely diagnostic discipline. Improved visualization makes early lesions easily detectable and allows us to decide ad hoc on the required treatment. Deep enteroscopy allows the exploration of even the small bowel – for long a “white spot” for gastrointestinal endoscopy – and to perform direct treatment. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is a considerable step forward in oncologically correct endoscopic treatment of (early) malignant lesions. Though still technically challenging, it is increasingly facilitated by new manipulation techniques and tools that are being steadily optimized. Closure of wall defects and hemostasis could be improved significantly. Even the anatomy beyond the gastrointestinal wall is being explored by the therapeutic use of endoluminal ultrasound. Endosonographic-guided surgery is not only a suitable fallback solution if conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography fails, but even makes necrosectomy procedures, abscess drainage, and neurolysis feasible for the endoscopist. Newly developed endoscopic approaches aim at formerly distinctive surgical domains like gastroesophageal reflux disease, appendicitis, and cholecystitis. Combined endoscopic/laparoscopic interventional techniques could become the harbingers of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, whereas pure natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery is currently still in its beginnings. PMID:25565878

  17. Endoscopic Gallbladder Drainage for Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, Jessica; Alvarez, Paloma; Sharaiha, Reem Z.; Gossain, Sonia; Kedia, Prashant; Sarkaria, Savreet; Sethi, Amrita; Turner, Brian G.; Millman, Jennifer; Lieberman, Michael; Nandakumar, Govind; Umrania, Hiren; Gaidhane, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for cholecystitis. However, gallbladder stenting (GBS) has shown promise in debilitated or high-risk patients. Endoscopic transpapillary GBS and endoscopic ultrasound-guided GBS (EUS-GBS) have been proposed as safe and effective modalities for gallbladder drainage. Methods Data from patients with cholecystitis were prospectively collected from August 2004 to May 2013 from two United States academic university hospitals and analyzed retrospectively. The following treatment algorithm was adopted. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and cystic duct stenting was initially attempted. If deemed feasible by the endoscopist, EUS-GBS was then pursued. Results During the study period, 139 patients underwent endoscopic gallbladder drainage. Among these, drainage was performed in 94 and 45 cases for benign and malignant indications, respectively. Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was defined as decompression of the gallbladder without incidence of cholecystitis, and was achieved with ERCP and cystic duct stenting in 117 of 128 cases (91%). Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was also achieved with EUS-guided gallbladder drainage using transmural stent placement in 11 of 11 cases (100%). Complications occurred in 11 cases (8%). Conclusions Endoscopic gallbladder drainage techniques are safe and efficacious methods for gallbladder decompression in non-surgical patients with comorbidities. PMID:26473125

  18. Current and Future of Laser Therapy in the Management of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Feyzahan; Waisbourd, Michael; Katz, L. Jay

    2016-01-01

    There has been tremendous progress in the past decades in the utilization of lasers for treating patients with glaucoma. This article reviews the use of lasers in different areas of glaucoma, including the shift from argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT) to selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT), laser trabeculoplasty as an initial treatment for glaucoma, new laser trabeculoplasty procedures under investigation, and other recent laser treatment modalities such as endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation and laser-assisted deep sclerectomy. PMID:27014388

  19. Abruptly changing patterns of diffusion and use of extracorporeal shock-wave renal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B S; Hillman, A L; Schwartz, J S

    1991-07-01

    Early diffusion and use of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was found by a 1986 survey of the first 84 operational renal lithotripters in the United States to be similar to that of other equipment-embodied technologies. Resurvey in 1988 of this cohort of units found that clinical indications for ESWL treatment--stone size and location--expanded greatly. Professional fees for ESWL services remained essentially constant, while technical component charges increased 21.0%. Volume of procedures declined by 19.8% among the most productive units, and by 34.4% among the least productive study units; the previously noted approximate fourfold difference remained unchanged between most and least productive units. ESWL patterns of diffusion were comparable to other equipment-embodied diagnostic technology (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] and computed tomography [CT]) during the first few years of clinical availability. ESWL growth slowed sooner than that of CT and MRI following their introduction into clinical practice, declining in the fourth to fifth year of use following rapid expansion in the first 2 years of availability. While clinical indications for both ESWL and imaging technologies expanded over time, CT and MRI experienced continued growth beyond that of ESWL at the same points of their respective life cycles. In the market areas of the 84 study units, the use of ESWL declined even with expanded indications for treatment, perhaps due to faster expansion of number of units than growth of clinical indications for treatment. PMID:2063841

  20. Effects of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy on referred hyperalgesia from renal/ureteral calculosis.

    PubMed

    Giamberardino, M A; de Bigontina, P; Martegiani, C; Vecchiet, L

    1994-01-01

    In patients suffering from colics due to calculosis of one upper urinary tract the evolution in time of referred parietal hyperalgesia after stone fragment elimination promoted by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was studied. Before ESWL, all patients presented clinical evidence (positivity to dermographism and Head's procedure, pinch palpation, digital pressure and Giordano's manoeuver) and instrumental signs (significant lowering of pain threshold to electrical tissue stimulation) of cutaneous, subcutaneous and muscular tissue hyperalgesia in the lumbar region of the affected side. After ESWL, hyperalgesia decreased in the three tissues, as shown by progressive change in the clinical tests and an increase in pain threshold to electrical stimulation in relation to the extent of stone fragment expulsion. In the stone-free condition, hyperalgesia had disappeared in the skin but remained to a mild and moderate extent in the subcutaneous tissue and muscle respectively. It is concluded that the persistence in time of referred hyperalgesia is only in part linked to the continuing presence and activity of the stone in the urinary tract. To a certain extent, the phenomenon seems to become independent of the primary focus, possibly as a result of plastic neuronal changes in the central nervous system which, triggered by afferent visceral inputs, are maintained even after their removal. PMID:8159443

  1. Kidney damage in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a numerical approach for different shock profiles.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Kerstin; Ortiz, Michael

    2009-08-01

    In shock-wave lithotripsy--a medical procedure to fragment kidney stones--the patient is subjected to hypersonic waves focused at the kidney stone. Although this procedure is widely applied, the physics behind this medical treatment, in particular the question of how the injuries to the surrounding kidney tissue arise, is still under investigation. To contribute to the solution of this problem, two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations of a human kidney under shock-wave loading are presented. For this purpose a constitutive model of the bio-mechanical system kidney is introduced, which is able to map large visco-elastic deformations and, in particular, material damage. The specific phenomena of cavitation induced oscillating bubbles is modeled here as an evolution of spherical pores within the soft kidney tissue. By means of large scale finite element simulations, we study the shock-wave propagation into the kidney tissue, adapt unknown material parameters and analyze the resulting stress states. The simulations predict localized damage in the human kidney in the same regions as observed in animal experiments. Furthermore, the numerical results suggest that in first instance the pressure amplitude of the shock wave impulse (and not so much its exact time-pressure profile) is responsible for damaging the kidney tissue. PMID:18807077

  2. Can a dual-energy computed tomography predict unsuitable stone components for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung Hoon; Oh, Tae Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the potential of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) to identify urinary stone components, particularly uric acid and calcium oxalate monohydrate, which are unsuitable for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Materials and Methods This clinical study included 246 patients who underwent removal of urinary stones and an analysis of stone components between November 2009 and August 2013. All patients received preoperative DECT using two energy values (80 kVp and 140 kVp). Hounsfield units (HU) were measured and matched to the stone component. Results Significant differences in HU values were observed between uric acid and nonuric acid stones at the 80 and 140 kVp energy values (p<0.001). All uric acid stones were red on color-coded DECT images, whereas 96.3% of the nonuric acid stones were blue. Patients with calcium oxalate stones were divided into two groups according to the amount of monohydrate (calcium oxalate monohydrate group: monohydrate≥90%, calcium oxalate dihydrate group: monohydrate<90%). Significant differences in HU values were detected between the two groups at both energy values (p<0.001). Conclusions DECT improved the characterization of urinary stone components and was a useful method for identifying uric acid and calcium oxalate monohydrate stones, which are unsuitable for ESWL. PMID:26366277

  3. Impact of ureteric stent on outcome of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: A propensity score analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gołąb, Adam; Słojewski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is one of the most frequently performed procedures in patients with urolithiasis. For ureter-localized stones, SWL is often preceded by a double J stent insertion. However, fear of serious complications, including sepsis associated with stents, is often expressed. The following study assessed the impact of stent insertions on the results of SWL in patients with ureteric stones. Material and methods The study group consisted of 411 ureteric stone patients who were treated with SWL from January 2010 to December 2014. In 60 cases, treatment was preceded by ureteric stent insertion. A propensity scoring system was used to pair non-stented patients with the stented group. Success rates were assessed and compared using the chi-squared test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the influence of particular variables on the stone-free rate. Results The overall success rate was 82.2%. After matching, the success rate of the stented group was not significantly different from the control group (85.0% vs. 83.3% respectively, p = 0.80). The mean number of sessions was higher in the stented group (1.88 per patient). Stones located in the lower part of the ureter have the greatest chance of being successfully treated. Conclusions The double J stent has no influence on the outcome of SWL treatment. In view of the greater likelihood of having additional sessions, this approach should be reserved for selected cases. PMID:27551556

  4. Reduction of tissue injury without compromising stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Auge, Brian; Preminger, Glenn M.; Zhong, Pei

    2002-05-01

    To ameliorate vascular injury without compromising stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy, we have recently developed an in situ pulse superposition technique to suppress large intraluminal bubble expansion [Zhong and Zhou, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 3283-3291 (2001)]. This strategy was implemented using a simple modification of a HM-3 lithotripter reflector. In this work, further optimization of the reflector geometry was carried out based on theoretical analysis and in vitro pressure waveform measurements using a fiber optical hydrophone. Using the upgraded reflector, no rupture of a cellulose hollow fiber (i.d.=0.2 mm) vessel phantom could be observed around the lithotripter beam focus even after 200 shocks at 24 kV. In comparison, less than 50 shocks were needed to cause a rupture of the vessel phantom using the original reflector at 20 kV. At corresponding output settings, stone comminution is comparable between the two reflector configurations, although the size of the fragments produced by the upgraded reflector is slightly larger. In addition, preliminary results from animal studies have demonstrated a significant reduction in tissue injury using the upgraded reflector, which confirms the validity of this approach in vivo. [Work supported by NIH.

  5. Shock-induced bubble collapse in a vessel: Implications for vascular injury in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2014-11-01

    In shockwave lithotripsy, shocks are repeatedly focused on kidney stones so to break them. The process leads to cavitation in tissue, which leads to hemorrhage. We hypothesize that shock-induced collapse (SIC) of preexisting bubbles is a potential mechanism for vascular injury. We study it numerically with an idealized problem consisting of the three-dimensional SIC of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column embedded in gelatin. The gelatin is a tissue simulant and can be treated as a fluid due to fast time scales and small spatial scales of collapse. We thus model the problem as a compressible multicomponent flow and simulate it with a shock- and interface-capturing numerical method. The method is high-order, conservative and non-oscillatory. Fifth-order WENO is used for spatial reconstruction and an HLLC Riemann solver upwinds the fluxes. A third-order TVD-RK scheme evolves the solution. We evaluate the potential for injury in SIC for a range of pressures, bubble and vessel sizes, and tissue properties. We assess the potential for injury by comparing the finite strains in tissue, obtained by particle tracking, to ultimate strains from experiments. We conclude that SIC may contribute to vascular rupture and discuss the smallest bubble sizes needed for injury. This research was supported by NIH Grant No. 2PO1DK043881 and utilized XSEDE, which is supported by NSF Grant No. OCI-1053575.

  6. Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) induces significant structural and functional changes in the kidney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, Andrew P.; Willis, Lynn R.; Lingeman, James E.

    2003-10-01

    The foundation for understanding SWL-injury has been well-controlled renal structural and functional studies in pigs, a model that closely mimics the human kidney. A clinical dose (2000 shocks at 24 kV) of SWL administered by the Dornier HM3 induces a predictable, unique vascular injury at F2 that is associated with transient renal vasoconstriction, seen as a reduction in renal plasma flow, in both treated and untreated kidneys. Unilateral renal denervation studies links the fall in blood flow in untreated kidneys to autonomic nerve activity in the treated kidney. SWL-induced trauma is associated with an acute inflammatory process, termed Lithotripsy Nephritis and tubular damage at the site of damage that leads to a focal region of scar. Lesion size increases with shock number and kV level. In addition, risk factors like kidney size and pre-existing renal disease (e.g., pyelonephritis), can exaggerate the predicted level of renal impairment. Our new protection data show that lesion size can be greatly reduced by a pretreatment session with low kV and shock number. The mechanisms of soft tissue injury probably involves shear stress followed by acoustic cavitation. Because of the perceived enhanced level of bioeffects from 3rd generation lithotripters, these observations are more relevant than ever.

  7. Impact of voltage and capacity on the electrical and acoustic output of intracorporeal electrohydraulic lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Engelking, R

    1992-01-01

    The electrical and acoustic output created by the spark discharge for electrohydraulic lithotripsy at the tip of a 3.3-F probe was evaluated. Spark generation was achieved by variable combinations of voltage and capacity. The effective electrical output was determined by means of a high-voltage probe, a current coil and a digital oscilloscope. Peak pressures, rise times and pulse width of the shock waves were recorded using a polyvinylidene difluoride needle hydrophone in 0.9% NaCl solution at a distance of 10 mm. The effective electrical output is lower than the calculated output, due to inductivities, capacities and resistances of the cables and plugs. The life of the probes is markedly shorter when a combination of high voltage and low capacity is used than with low voltage and high capacity corresponding to the same energy. The peak pressure and the slope of the shock front depend solely on the voltage, while the pulse width is correlated with the capacity. The pulse intensity integral of the shock wave is likely to be the best equivalent to the applied energy. PMID:1455568

  8. Detecting Fragmentation of Kidney Stones in Lithotripsy by Means of Shock Wave Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Trusov, Leonid A.; Owen, Neil R.; Bailey, Michael R.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Although extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (a procedure of kidney stone comminution using focused shock waves) has been used clinically for many years, a proper monitoring of the stone fragmentation is still undeveloped. A method considered here is based on recording shock wave scattering signals with a focused receiver placed far from the stone, outside the patient body. When a fracture occurs in the stone or the stone becomes smaller, the elastic waves in the stone will propagate differently (e.g. shear waves will not cross a fracture) which, in turn, will change the scattered acoustic wave in the surrounding medium. Theoretical studies of the scattering phenomenon are based on a linear elastic model to predict shock wave scattering by a stone, with and without crack present in it. The elastic waves in the stone and the nearby liquid were modeled using a finite difference time domain approach. The subsequent acoustic propagation of the scattered waves into the far-field was calculated using the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral. Experimental studies were conducted using a research electrohydraulic lithotripter that produced the same acoustic output as an unmodified Dornier HM3 clinical lithotripter. Artificial stones, made from Ultracal-30 gypsum and acrylic, were used as targets. The stones had cylindrical shape and were positioned co-axially with the lithotripter axis. The scattered wave was measured by focused broadband PVDF hydrophone. It was shown that the size of the stone noticeably changed the signature of the reflected wave.

  9. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography for Clinical Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Fujimoto, James G.; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a real-time optical imaging technique that is similar in principle to ultrasonography, but employs light instead of sound waves and allows depth-resolved images with near-microscopic resolution. Endoscopic OCT allows the evaluation of broad-field and subsurface areas and can be used ancillary to standard endoscopy, narrow band imaging, chromoendoscopy, magnification endoscopy, and confocal endomicroscopy. This review article will provide an overview of the clinical utility of endoscopic OCT in the gastrointestinal tract and of recent achievements using state-of-the-art endoscopic 3D-OCT imaging systems. PMID:26852678

  10. [A short history of endoscopic neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Song, Zhi-Bin; Gao, Jian-Wei; Li, Xu-Guangl

    2013-11-01

    Since 1910, rigid cystoscopy was first applied in the lateral ventricular choroid plexus cauterization for the treatment of congenital hydrocephalus, thus, opening up a new window in the endoscopic neurosurgery, but poor surgical outcome and high mortality made the application of endoscopic neurosurgery in question. Latterly, because of the appearance of new microscope and optical fiber endoscope, neuroendoscopy has been applied adequately in neurosurgery, with the increase of its clinical indications. Along with it, the concept of neuroendoscopy in surgery has changed, as well as the expansion of clinical indications. At present, neuroendoscopy technology has become a significant branch of modern neurosurgery. PMID:24524639

  11. Evolving techniques for gastrointestinal endoscopic hemostasis treatment.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Kevin A; Jensen, Dennis M

    2016-05-01

    With mortality due to gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remaining stable, the focus on endoscopic hemostasis has been on improving other outcomes such as rebleeding rate, need for transfusions, and need for angiographic embolization or surgery. Over the past few years, a number of devices have emerged to help endoscopically assess and treat bleeding GI lesions. These include the Doppler endoscopic probe, hemostatic powder, and over-the-scope clip. Also, new applications have been described for radiofrequency ablation. In this article, we will discuss these evolving tools and techniques that have been developed, including an analysis of their efficacy and limitations. PMID:26651414

  12. Continuous dual-wavelength, high-intensive Nd:YAG laser in operative urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznikov, Leonid L.; Pupkova, Ludmila S.; Miroshnicov, B. I.; Snezhko, D. A.; Nikitichev, A. A.; Pokrovskiy, Vasiliy P.; Gomberg, Vladimir G.

    1994-05-01

    A ruby laser with a 0.694 mkm wavelength was used as a source of a new model of laser lithotriptor. The optical irradiation parameters selected included 1 mks duration pulse, frequency from 1 to 5 Hz, energy at an output of up to 120 mJ, transmitted via light guide quartz fiber of 400 kmk. The tip of the light guide was directed to the calculus through a catheterized cystoscope. Light guide position control was done by the presence of a specific acoustic signal accompanying plasma formation. Plasma is not formed by laser action on the ureter wall. In doubtful cases we used roentgenological examination. After lithotripsy and direct processing by irradiation, histological investigations of the ureter wall showed only slight submucosal hemorrhage or revealed no changes. Implantation of the calculus and fiber particles into the ureter wall was not observed. Twenty-nine patients were subjected to lithotripsy of calculus (oxalates, urates, phosphates) in the low and mid-ureter. Usually from 1000 to 3000 impulses were used to destroy the calculus. Calculus fragments passed without assistance (13 patients) or were removed by extractors (7 patients). The recovery of passing of urine and removal of renal colic were observed during lithotripsy if obturation had occurred (8 patients). Ureteral perforation, blood loss, and acute pyelonephritis did not occur.

  13. Improving patient and user safety during endoscopic investigation of the pancreatic and biliary ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, John E.; Melville, C. David; Lee, Cameron M.; Saunders, Michael D.; Burkhardt, Matthew R.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Endoscopic investigation of the main pancreatic duct and biliary ducts is called endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and carries a risk of pancreatitis for the patient. During ERCP, a metal guidewire is inserted into the pancreatobiliary duct from a side-viewing large endoscope within the duodenum. To verify correct placement of the ERCP guidewire, an injection of radiopaque dye is required for fluoroscopic imaging, which exposes the patient and clinical team to x-ray radiation. A safer and more effective means to access the pancreatobiliary system can use direct optical imaging, although the endoscope diameter and stiffness will be significantly larger than a guidewire's. To quantify this invasiveness before human testing, a synthetic force-sensing pancreas was fabricated and attached to an ERCP training model. The invasiveness of a new, 1.7-mm diameter, steerable scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) was compared to the standard ERCP guidewire of 0.89-mm (0.035") diameter that is not steerable. Although twice as large and significantly stiffer than the ERCP guidewire, the SFE generated lower or significantly less average force during insertion at all 4 sensor locations (P<0.05) within the main pancreatic duct. Therefore, the addition of steering and forward visualization at the tip of the endoscope reduced the invasiveness of the in vitro ERCP procedure. Since fluoroscopy is not required, risks associated with dye injection and x-ray exposure can be eliminated when using direct optical visualization. Finally, the SFE provides wide-field high resolution imaging for image-guided interventions, laser-based fluorescence biomarker imaging, and spot spectral analysis for future optical biopsy.

  14. [Advances on endoscopic treatment of intestinal fistulas].

    PubMed

    Wu, X W; Ren, J A; Li, J S

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal fistulas are severe complications after abdominal surgical procedures. The endoscopic therapy makes it possible to close fistulas without surgical interventions. When patients achieved stabilization and had no signs of systemic sepsis or inflammation, these therapies could be conducted, which included endoscopic vacuum therapy, fibrin glue sealing, stents, fistula plug, suture, and Over The Scope Clip (OTSC). Various techniques may be combined. Endoscopy vacuum therapy could be applied to control systemic inflammation and prevent continuing septic contamination by active drainage. Endoscopic stent is placed over fistulas and gastrointestinal continuity is recovered. The glue sealing is applied for enterocutaneous fistulas, and endoscopy suture has the best results seen in fistulas <1 cm in diameter. Insertion of the fistula plug is used to facilitate fistula healing. The OTSC is effective to treat leaks with large defects. Endoscopic treatment could avoid reoperation and could be regarded as the first-line treatment for specific patients. PMID:26932894

  15. Local excision by transanal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    García-Flórez, Luis J; Otero-Díez, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic surgery (TES) consists of a series of anorectal surgical procedures using different devices that are introduced into the anal canal. TES has been developed significantly since it was first used in the 1980s. The key point for the success of these techniques is how accurately patients are selected. The main indication was the resection of endoscopically unresectable adenomas. In recent years, these techniques have become more widespread which has allowed them to be applied in conservative rectal procedures for both benign diseases and selected cases of rectal cancer. For more advanced rectal cancers it should be considered palliative or, in some controlled trials, experimental. The role of newer endoscopic techniques available has not yet been defined. TES may allow for new strategies in the treatment of rectal pathology, like transanal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery or total mesorectal excision. PMID:26309355

  16. Devices for the endoscopic treatment of hemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Uzma D; Barth, Bradley A; Banerjee, Subhas; Bhat, Yasser M; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Gottlieb, Klaus T; Konda, Vani; Maple, John T; Murad, Faris M; Pfau, Patrick; Pleskow, Douglas; Tokar, Jeffrey L; Wang, Amy; Rodriguez, Sarah A

    2014-01-01

    Multiple endoscopic methods are available to treat symptomatic internal hemorrhoids. Because of its low cost, ease of use, low rate of adverse events, and relative effectiveness, RBL is currently the most widely used technique. PMID:24239254

  17. Recent traction methods for endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Kunihiro; Yoshida, Naohiro; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Doyama, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is problematic with regard to en bloc and curable resection rates. Advancements in endoscopic techniques have enabled novel endoscopic approaches such as endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), which has overcome some EMR problems, and has become the standard treatment for gastrointestinal tumors. However, ESD is technically difficult. Procedure time is longer and complications such as intraoperative perforation and bleeding occur more frequently than in EMR. Recently various traction methods have been introduced to facilitate ESD procedures, such as clip with line, external forceps, clip and snare, internal traction, double scope, and magnetic anchor. Each method must be used appropriately according to the anatomical characteristics. In this review we discuss recently proposed traction methods for ESD based on the characteristics of various anatomical sites. PMID:27468186

  18. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  19. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  20. Advanced endoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Helmut; Nägel, Andreas; Buda, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Advanced endoscopic imaging is revolutionizing our way on how to diagnose and treat colorectal lesions. Within recent years a variety of modern endoscopic imaging techniques was introduced to improve adenoma detection rates. Those include high-definition imaging, dye-less chromoendoscopy techniques and novel, highly flexible endoscopes, some of them equipped with balloons or multiple lenses in order to improve adenoma detection rates. In this review we will focus on the newest developments in the field of colonoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection rates. Described techniques include high-definition imaging, optical chromoendoscopy techniques, virtual chromoendoscopy techniques, the Third Eye Retroscope and other retroviewing devices, the G-EYE endoscope and the Full Spectrum Endoscopy-system. PMID:25789092

  1. Endoscopic resection of superficial gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Giovannini; Lopes, Cesar Vivian

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic endoscopy plays a major role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasia. Its indications can be generalized into four broad categories; to remove or obliterate neoplastic lesion, to palliate malignant obstruction, or to treat bleeding. Only endoscopic resection allows complete histological staging of the cancer, which is critical as it allows stratification and refinement for further treatment. Although other endoscopic techniques, such as ablation therapy, may also cure early GI cancer, they can not provide a definitive pathological specimen. Early stage lesions reveal low frequency of lymph node metastasis which allows for less invasive treatments and thereby improving the quality of life when compared to surgery. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are now accepted worldwide as treatment modalities for early cancers of the GI tract. PMID:18698673

  2. Endoscopic treatment of difficult choledocholithiasis.

    PubMed

    Belvedere, B; Frattaroli, S; Carbone, A; Viceconte, G

    2012-05-01

    Common bile duct stones can be treated with normal endoscopic techniques. Where stones cannot be removed due to their size or number or due to stenosis of the common bile duct, a plastic stent can be inserted, enabling rapid drainage of bile. At the three-month check-up complete removal of the stones was found in 41 (85.4%) of the 48 patients with difficult choledocholithiasis. In the remaining 7 patients (14.6%), the stent in any case resulted in clinical improvement. A permanent stent was necessary in 4 patients, enabling safe drainage with no complications. The use of endoscopy for stent placement was effective in all our cases of difficult coledocholithiasis without any complications. PMID:22709458

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS provides access to many organs and lesions which are in proximity to the gastrointestinal tract and thus giving an opportunity to target them for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. This modality also provides a real time opportunity to target the required area while avoiding adjacent vascular and other structures. Therapeutic EUS has found role in management of pancreatic fluid collections, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of gallbladder, celiac plexus neurolysis/blockage, drainage of mediastinal and intra-abdominal abscesses and collections and in targeted cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Infact, therapeutic EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice for management of pancreatic pseudocysts and recent innovations like fully covered removable metallic stents have improved results in patients with organised necrosis. Similarly, EUS guided drainage of biliary tract and pancreatic duct helps drainage of these systems in patients with failed cannulation, inaccessible papilla as with duodenal/gastric obstruction or surgically altered anatomy. EUS guided gall bladder drainage is a useful emergent procedure in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not fit for surgery. EUS guided celiac plexus neurolysis and blockage is more effective and less morbid vis-à-vis the percutaneous technique. The field of interventional EUS is rapidly advancing and many more interventions are being continuously added. This review focuses on the current status of evidence vis-à-vis the established indications of therapeutic EUS. PMID:26078831

  4. Histologic comparison of needle, holmium:YAG, and erbium:YAG endoscopic goniotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Rivera, Brian K.; Hernandez, Eleut; Shetlar, Debra J.

    1995-05-01

    An endoscope allows visualization of the anterior chamber angle in porcine eyes despite the presence of cloudy corneas. The pectinate ligaments in the anterior chamber angle are a surgical model for primary infantile glaucoma. This study investigated the histologic results, one month after treating the anterior chamber angle with a goniotomy needle, the holmium:YAG laser, or the erbium:YAG laser coupled to a small endoscope. The anterior chambers were deepened with a viscoelastic material in one-month-old anesthetized pigs. An Olympus 0.8 mm diameter flexible endoscope was externally coupled to a 23 gauge needle or a 300 micron diameter fiber. The angle was treated for 120 degrees by one of the three methods, and the probe was removed. During the acute study, all three methods cut the pectinate ligaments. The histologic findings one month after healing demonstrated minimal surrounding tissue damage following goniotomy with a needle and the most surrounding tissue damage following treatment with the holmium:YAG laser.

  5. Survey of Endoscope Reprocessing in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Bae; Yang, Jae Nam; Koo, Ja Seol; Jang, Jae Young; Park, Sang Hoon; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims There is a growing emphasis on quality management in endoscope reprocessing. Previous surveys conducted in 2002 and 2004 were not practitioner-oriented. Therefore, this survey is significant for being the first to target actual participants in endoscope reprocessing in Korea. Methods This survey comprised 33 self-filled questions, and was personally delivered to nurses and nursing auxiliaries in the endoscopy departments of eight hospitals belonging to the society. The anonymous responses were collected after 1 week either by post or in person by committee members. Results The survey included 100 participants. In the questionnaire addressing compliance rates with the reprocessing guideline, the majority (98.9%) had a high compliance rate compared to 27% of respondents in 2002 and 50% in 2004. The lowest rate of compliance with a reprocessing procedure was reported for transporting the contaminated endoscope in a sealed container. Automated endoscope reprocessors were available in all hospitals. Regarding reprocessing time, more than half of the subjects replied that reprocessing took more than 15 minutes (63.2%). Conclusions The quality management of endoscope reprocessing has improved as since the previous survey. A national survey expanded to include primary clinics is required to determine the true current status of endoscope reprocessing. PMID:25674525

  6. Forehead Mass Removal by Endoscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soyeon; Jung, Sung Won; Koh, Sung Hoon; Lim, Hyoseob

    2016-03-01

    Patients with forehead mass have a cosmetic problem because the forehead is an important first impression. Conventional skin approach results in visible scar even though surgeons designed the incision along the relaxed skin tension line1. Since Onishi introduced the technique for endoscopic approach in 1995, endoscopic surgery has become rapidly popular in the field of plastic surgery. Endoscopic approach to the forehead mass by small incision on the scalp behind hair line is big advantageous for leaving less ugly scar on the forehead. All procedures need to be identified under the endoscopic visualization. When it was completed, the mass was pulled out. The authors also used the osteotome or rasp when it was the osteoma. The forehead and scalp were applied compressive dressing to prevent hematoma and swelling for 2 days. The cosmesis was excellent because they have no visible scar on the forehead. Endoscopic approaching technique is getting popular and commonly used during the cosmetic surgery because it has many advantages. This method also, however, has difficulties to remove large-sized mass and to perform caudal dissection, and for increased operative times. Furthermore, there are complication of incomplete removal, hematoma, and swelling. The proper candidate is the patient with smooth forehead, with a mobile and soft mass, with a propensity for keloid formation, or hypertrophic scarring. Endoscopic technique is not only advantageous but also disadvantageous. That is why surgeon's selection is more important. PMID:26967101

  7. Transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vishwanath M.; Muthukumar, Pari; Prathap, Apoorva; Leo, Jayanth; A., Rekha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Endoscopic thyroidectomy, initially an experimental procedure, is now being performed in increasing frequency. It aims to provide patients undergoing thyroidectomy with a ‘scar-free’ surgery. Transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy is one such novel procedure that is based on the principles of natural orifice translumenal surgery (NOTES) and allows for a truly scar-free surgery with minimal dissection. Presentation of case A 21-year-old female presented with a swelling over the left side of her neck. Ultrasound revealed a solitary nodule and FNAC showed features suggestive of a follicular adenoma. Discussion The patient underwent transoral endoscopic hemi-thyroidectomy. The procedure lasted for 2 h and is one of the few documented cases of transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy performed on live patients. Conclusion Transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy is proving to be a feasible technique with little or no complications as compared to other endoscopic thyroid surgeries. It provides surgeons with easy access to the thyroid gland and patients with aesthetically pleasing results. PMID:26048629

  8. Endoscopically assisted excision of digital enchondroma.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Jeffrey F; Kachar, Sergey M; Nagle, Daniel J

    2007-06-01

    We present 2 cases of endoscopically assisted curettage of enchondroma of the hand. After initial open curettage of the lesion, a 1.9-mm arthroscope was introduced through a small cortical window. Under arthroscopic guidance, residual pathologic material was freed from the cavity wall and evacuated with the aid of repeated saline lavage combined with suction. The saline was injected through an 18-gauge angiocatheter under direct endoscopic control. The endoscope was then used to observe the filling of the cavity with demineralized bone matrix (DBX; Synthes [USA], Paoli, PA). We believe that endoscopically assisted curettage presents several advantages over open curettage alone. First, direct visualization of the medullary canal permits accurate assessment of the extent of the enchondroma. Second, the endoscope permits accurate assessment of the adequacy of the curettage, thus avoiding the need to perform multiple, blind, and aggressive passes with a curette. Multiple passes can increase the risk of violation of the cortical shell and can prolong the procedure. Third, the ability to completely clear the medullary canal of all tumors should logically reduce the rate of recurrence. In conclusion, the addition of an endoscope is an inexpensive modification that promises to save time, decrease morbidity, and possibly improve long-term outcomes. PMID:17560488

  9. Autonomous locomotion of capsule endoscope in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungwook; Park, Kitae; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Tae Song; Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Autonomous locomotion in gastrointestinal (GI) tracts is achieved with a paddling-based capsule endoscope. For this, a miniaturized encoder module was developed utilizing a MEMS fabrication technology to monitor the position of paddles. The integrated encoder module yielded the high resolution of 0.0025 mm in the linear motion of the paddles. In addition, a PID control method was implemented on a DSP to control the stroke of the paddles accurately. As a result, the average accuracy and the standard deviation were measured to be 0.037 mm and 0.025 mm by a laser position sensor for the repetitive measurements. The locomotive performance was evaluated via ex-vivo tests according to various strokes in paddling. In an in-vivo experiment with a living pig, the locomotion speed was improved by 58% compared with the previous control method relying on a given timer value for reciprocation of the paddles. Finally, the integrated encoder module and the control system allow consistent paddling during locomotion even under loads in GI tract. It provides the autonomous locomotion without intervention in monitoring and controlling the capsule endoscope. PMID:22255866

  10. Simultaneous dual-band optical coherence tomography for endoscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianbing; Yu, Luoqin; Wei, Xiaoming; Wang, Xie; Chui, Po Ching; Chan, Kin Tak; Lam, Edmund Y.; Lee, Nikki P.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Dual-band optical coherence tomography (OCT) can greatly enhance the imaging contrast with potential applications in functional (spectroscopic) analysis. A new simultaneous dual-band Fourier domain mode-locked swept laser configuration for dual-band OCT is reported. It was based on a custom-designed dual-channel driver to synchronize two different wavelength bands at 1310 and 1550 nm, respectively. Two lasing wavelengths were swept simultaneously from 1260 to 1364.8 nm for the 1310-nm band and from 1500 to 1604 nm for the 1550-nm band at an A-scan rate of 45 kHz. Broadband wavelength-division multiplexing was utilized to couple two wavelength bands into a common catheter for circumferential scanning to form dual-band OCT. The proposed dual-band OCT scheme was applied to endoscopic OCT imaging of mouse esophageal wall ex vivo and human fingertip in vivo to justify the feasibility of the proposed imaging technique. The proposed dual-band OCT system is fast and easy to be implemented, which allows for in vivo high-speed biomedical imaging with potential applications in spectroscopic investigations for endoscopic imaging.

  11. Flexible waveguide enabled single-channel terahertz endoscopic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world. The current standard of care for colorectal cancer is the conventional colonoscopy, which relies exclusively on the Physician's experience. Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, noninvasive medical imaging modality for detecting cancers. The current study demonstrates the design and development of a prototype terahertz endoscopic system based on flexible metal-coated terahertz waveguides. A CO2 pumped Far-Infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz frequency was used for illuminating the tissue, while the reflected signals were detected using liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer. The continuous-wave terahertz imaging system utilizes a single waveguide channel to transmit the radiation and collect the back reflected intrinsic terahertz signal from the sample and is capable of operation in both transmission and reflection modalities. The two dimensional reflectance images obtained using a prototype terahertz endoscopic system showed intrinsic contrast between cancerous and normal regions of the colorectal tissue, thereby demonstrating the potential impact of terahertz imaging for in vivo cancer detection.

  12. Quantitative study on appearance of microvessels in spectral endoscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Yasushi; Arai, Fumihito; Morimoto, Yoshinori; Yuasa, Atsuko

    2015-03-01

    Increase in abnormal microvessels in the superficial mucosa is often relevant to diagnostic findings of neoplasia in digestive endoscopy; hence, observation of superficial vasculature is crucial for cancer diagnosis. To enhance the appearance of such vessels, several spectral endoscopic imaging techniques have been developed, such as narrow-band imaging and blue laser imaging. Both techniques exploit narrow-band blue light for the enhancement. The emergence of such spectral imaging techniques has increased the importance of understanding the relation of the light wavelength to the appearance of superficial vasculature, and thus a new method is desired for quantitative analysis of vessel visibility in relation to the actual structure in the tissue. Here, we developed microvessel-simulating phantoms that allowed quantitative evaluation of the appearance of 15-μm-thick vessels. We investigated the relation between the vascular contrast and light wavelength by the phantom measurements and also verified it in experiments with swine, where the endoscopically observed vascular contrast was investigated together with its real vascular depth and diameter obtained by microscopic observation of fluorescence-labeled vessels. Our study indicates that changing the spectral property even in the wavelength range of blue light may allow selective enhancement of the vascular depth for clinical use.

  13. Laser-induced contained-vaporization in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Dingus, R.S.

    1992-03-01

    When a transparent liquid or solid medium is present in front of an opaque target being irradiated by an intense laser beam, then the expansion of hot vapors generated (at the interface between the medium and the target) by the irradiant heating of the target is restrained by the medium. The tamping effect of the overlying liquid or solid can cause a much larger fraction of the deposited energy to go into kinetic energy, which leads to enhanced tissue disruption, compared to when a gas or vacuum is in front of the target. Condensable vapors and high thermal conductivity in the surrounding material facilitate rapid energy transport out of the vapor, which can cause a major reduction in the tamping enhancements. This contained-vaporization process is likely important in laser-medical applications such as, for example, laser angioplasty and laser lithotripsy. The work enhancement by the process is probably advantageous for lithotripsy in providing the necessary energy to break urinary stones; however, for angioplasty, the enhancement may provide little aid in removing plaque but may cause significant damage to arterial walls. If gas could be introduced into the artery proceeding irradiation of the plaque, then the enhancements could be avoided. In summary, careful management of the tamping conditions during tissue irradiations in the clinical applications of lasers should lead to significant improvements in the overall desired outcome.

  14. Application of endoscopic techniques in orbital blowout fractures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Li, Yinwei; Fan, Xianqun

    2013-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques, particularly endoscopic techniques, have revolutionized otolaryngeal surgery. Endoscopic techniques have been gradually applied in orbital surgery through the sinus inferomedial to the orbit and the orbital subperiosteal space. Endoscopic techniques help surgeons observe fractures and soft tissue of the posterior orbit to precisely place implants and protect vital structures through accurate, safe, and minimally invasive approaches. We reviewed the development of endoscopic techniques, the composition of endoscopic systems for orbital surgery, and the problems and developmental prospects of endoscopic techniques for simple orbital wall fracture repair. PMID:23794028

  15. Spiral-scanning, side-viewing optical coherence tomography endoscope for three-dimensional fully sampled in vivo imaging of the mouse colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2013-03-01

    We have previously developed side-viewing endoscopic OCT systems to detect colorectal cancer in the murine model, which longitudinally scans the mouse colon at 8-16 discrete angular positions. This small number of angles is chosen to keep imaging time and the amount of data to analyze reasonable, but this azimuthal undersampling of the tissue may result in missed or incorrectly characterized adenomas. A need exists for a spiral-scanning OCT endoscope capable of generating 3D, in vivo OCT data sets that satisfy the Nyquist criterion for adequate sampling of the tissue. Our new endoscopic system replaces the sample arm optics of a commercial OCT system with a spiral-scanning, gradient-index lens-based endoscope. The endoscope provides unit magnification at a working distance capable of producing a focal depth of 280 μm in tissue. The working distance accounts for a 41° rod prism that reflects the beam through the endoscopic window into the tissue while minimizing back reflection. A swept-source laser with a central wavelength of 1040 nm and spectral bandwidth of 80 nm provides an axial resolution of 12 μm in air and 9 μm in water. The endoscope has a theoretical diffraction-limited lateral resolution of 5.85 μm. We present fully sampled, 3D, in vivo images of the mouse colon.

  16. Training methods and models for colonoscopic insertion, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naohisa; Fernandopulle, Nilesh; Inada, Yutaka; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito

    2014-09-01

    Colonoscopic examination is considered an effective examination for the detection of colorectal cancers. Additionally, early colorectal cancers can be resected using endoscopic techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection. However, those examinations and treatments need special techniques. Various training methods are practiced to acquire such endoscopic techniques throughout the world. In clinical cases, magnetic positioning devices help endoscopic insertion by less experienced endoscopists. There is a physical model made by polyvinyl chloride and a virtual simulator for training of colonoscopic insertion. Various techniques including a method to apply pressure to the abdomen and consideration for patient's pain can be trained using these models. In view of extensive training of endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection, animal models are useful and actually used. Live animal models of minipig, which entails blood flow, are ideal and used frequently, but are cumbersome to prepare. On the other hand, ex vivo animal models using intestine of porcine and bovine are convenient for preparation and less expensive. Unique ex vivo animal models with blood flow have been developed recently and techniques for hemostasis can be practiced. With respect to a method of training for colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection, a stepwise system has been adopted throughout the world. Thus, first they observe the expert's technique, then practice training of animal models, and finally, they perform clinical rectal cases. The system is useful for a safe and definite procedure. In this review, we reveal various training methods for colonoscopic examinations and treatments. PMID:25102984

  17. Evaluation of shock wave lithotripsy injury in the pig using a narrow focal zone lithotriptor

    PubMed Central

    Connors, Bret A.; McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Blomgren, Philip M.; Handa, Rajash K.; Johnson, Cynthia D.; Gao, Sujuan; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; Lingeman, James E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess renal injury in a pig model after treatment with a clinical dose of shock waves using a narrow focal zone (≈ 3 mm) lithotriptor (Modulith SLX, Karl Storz Lithotripsy). MATERIALS AND METHODS The left kidney of anaesthetized female pigs were treated with 2000 or 4000 shock waves (SWs) at 120 SWs/min, or 2000 SWs at 60 SWs/min using the Storz SLX. Measures of renal function (glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow) were collected before and 1 h after shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and the kidneys were harvested for histological analysis and morphometric quantitation of haemorrhage in the renal parenchyma with lesion size expressed as a percentage of functional renal volume (FRV). A fibre-optic probe hydrophone was used to determine acoustic output and map the focal width of the lithotriptor. Data for the SLX were compared with data from a previously published study in which pigs of the same age (7–8 weeks) were treated (2000 SWs at 120 or 60 SWs/min) using an unmodified Dornier HM3 lithotriptor. RESULTS Treatment with the SLX produced a highly focused lesion running from cortex to medulla and often spanning the full thickness of the kidney. Unlike the diffuse interstitial haemorrhage observed with the HM3, the SLX lesion bore a blood-filled core of near-complete tissue disruption devoid of histologically recognizable kidney structure. Despite the intensity of tissue destruction at the core of the lesion, measures of lesion size based on macroscopic determination of haemorrhage in the parenchyma were not significantly different from kidneys treated using the HM3 (2000 SWs, 120 SWs/min: SLX, 1.86 ± 0.52% FRV; HM3, 3.93 ± 1.29% FRV). Doubling the SW dose of the SLX from 2000 to 4000 SWs did not significantly increase lesion size. In addition, slowing the firing rate of the SLX to 60 SWs/min did not reduce the size of the lesion (2.16 ± 0.96% FRV) compared with treatment at 120 SWs/min, as was the case with the HM3 (0.42 ± 0.23% FRV vs 3

  18. Preclinical assessment of the new 1440-nm-wavelength Nd:YAG laser for fragmenting ureteral calculi in an ex-vivo pig model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollin, Timothy A.; Moore, Ronald B.; Tulip, John; Mourad, Walid A.; McPhee, Malcolm S.

    1996-05-01

    The dual wavelength Nd:YAG (multi-YAG) laser has excellent stone ablating properties. To investigate the safety of this laser for fragmenting ureteral calculi, an ex vivo animal study was undertaken to study acute tissue interactions associated with multi-YAG laser lithotripsy. Human ureteral calculi were implanted in ureters harvested from swine (n equals 42). Direct vision ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy was performed while varying pulse energy (0.3 to 1.5 Joules) and pulse frequency (5 to 15 Hz). All ureters were then examined histologically, graded for tissue injury, and compared to controls. Photofragmentation was associated with mucosal denudation and/or focal mucosal necrosis (grade 0 and 1) in 37/42 cases. Four treatments caused necrosis involving up to two thirds of the ureteral wall (grade 2) and 1/42 had grade 3 changes (transmural necrosis). Ureteroscopic examination alone produced grade 0 to 1 injuries. Logistic regression analysis revealed that pulse energy (p equals 0.47), total energy used for fragmentation (p equals 0.82), and stone weight (p equals 0.64) were not significant predictors of higher grade tissue injury. Pulse frequency (p equals 0.14) began to approach significance. Of the five ureters with grade 2 or greater injury, four were associated with a pulse frequency of 15 Hz. Our findings show that multi-YAG laser lithotripsy is associated with acute tissue changes ranging from mucosal denudation to different levels of coagulative necrosis. Low grade injury is most common and would have minimal potential for strictures. Although higher grade tissue injury is possible, all grade 2 and 3 injuries were microscopically focal in nature. Therefore, multi-YAG laser lithotripsy can be performed with acceptable levels of acute tissue injury at pulse energies up to 1.5 Joules and at pulse frequencies less than 15 Hz.

  19. Comparison Between Percutaneous Transhepatic Rigid Cholangioscopic Lithotripsy and Conventional Percutaneous Transhepatic Cholangioscopic Surgery for Hepatolithiasis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Beiwang; Huang, Binyuan; Xie, Jiafen; Liu, Yanmin; Zhu, Canhua; Ye, Chen; Zhou, Zixuan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) is one option for treating hepatolithiasis without surgical resection. This approach can use conventional biliary drainage methods over a long period, but a shorter procedure needs to be evolved. Objective: To evaluate the short-term and the long-term therapeutic outcomes of percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopic lithotripsy (PTCSL) in comparison with conventional PTCS. Methods: In this retrospective study, 118 patients with hepatolithiasis were enrolled who underwent treatment in our hospital between March 2007 and July 2014. About 67 of them received PTCSL and the remaining 51 patients received conventional PTCS. Preoperative data, surgical operation-related records, the postoperative therapeutic effect, and the long-term hepatolithiasis recurrence rate were collected for comparison between the 2 groups. Results: The age, sex, and surgical history were similar between the 2 groups, but there was a significant difference in the Child-Pugh score, with more grade 3 patients in the PTCS group (P=0.002). However, the operation time, intraoperative blood infusion, and the blood loss were similar between the 2 groups. The final clearance ratio of calculus in the PTCSL group was significantly better than in the PTCS group after multivariate analysis (P=0.021; OR=0.201; 95% CI, 0.051-0.785). Calculus recurrence was 9% (PTCSL) and 22% (PTCS). The postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter in the PTCSL group (P=0.001; OR=1.337; 95% CI, 1.132-1.58). Conclusions: PTCSL was a satisfactory therapeutic option for hepatolithiasis treatment, with less operation time and a superior long-term therapeutic effect compared with conventional PTCS. PMID:26679679

  20. Efficacy of Alfuzosin After Shock Wave Lithotripsy for the Treatment of Ureteral Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Ju; Shin, Soon Cheol; Seo, Do Young; Min, Dong Suk; Cho, Jeong Man; Kang, Jung Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the efficacy of alfuzosin for the treatment of ureteral calculi less than 10 mm in diameter after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Materials and Methods A randomized, single-blind clinical trial was performed prospectively by one physician between June 2010 and August 2011. A total of 84 patients with ureteral calculi 5 to 10 mm in diameter were divided into two groups. Alfuzosin 10 mg (once daily) and loxoprofen sodium 68.1 mg (as needed) were prescribed to group 1 (n=41), and loxoprofen sodium 68.1 mg (as needed) only was prescribed to group 2 (n=44). The drug administration began immediately after ESWL and continued until stone expulsion was confirmed up to a maximum of 42 days after the procedure. Results Thirty-nine of 41 (95.1%) patients in group 1 and 40 of 43 (93.0%) patients in group 2 ultimately passed stones (p=0.96). The number of ESWL sessions was 1.34±0.65 and 1.41±0.85 in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p=0.33). The patients who required analgesics after ESWL were 8 (19.5%) in group 1 and 13 (30.2%) in group 2 (p=0.31). Visual analogue scale pain severity scores were 5.33±1.22 and 6.43±1.36 in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p=0.056). The time to stone expulsion in groups 1 and 2 was 9.5±4.8 days and 14.7±9.8 days, respectively (p=0.005). No significant adverse effects occurred. Conclusions The use of alfuzosin in combination with ESWL seems to facilitate stone passage and to reduce the time of stone expulsion but does not affect the stone-free rate. PMID:23550174