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Sample records for endoscopic surgical skill

  1. Kinematic Measures for Evaluating Surgical Skills in Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES).

    PubMed

    Roche, Christopher A; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Dargar, Saurabh; Matthes, Kai; De, Suvranu

    2014-01-01

    Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery is an emerging procedure that requires training and adoption to be successful. Currently no objective performance metrics exist for evaluating skills for NOTES. In this work, we have improved upon our previous study on objective performance metrics using kinematic measures by introducing two new measures, the flex and the roll and recruiting more subjects to increase the statistical power. The measures were evaluated in a transgastric NOTES appendectomy procedure performed with ex-vivo organs using the EASIE-RTM trainer box. Four motion tracking sensors attached to an endoscope were used to measure the scope position and orientation to compute the kinematic measures. Results from our study showed that completion time, economy of motion, jerk and roll of the scope are valid kinematic measures to differentiate between expert and novice NOTES surgeons. PMID:24732533

  2. Gynaecological Endoscopic Surgical Education and Assessment. A diploma programme in gynaecological endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Campo, Rudi; Wattiez, Arnaud; Tanos, Vasilis; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Grimbizis, Grigoris; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Brucker, Sara; Puga, Marco; Molinas, Roger; O'Donovan, Peter; Deprest, Jan; Van Belle, Yves; Lissens, Ann; Herrmann, Anja; Tahir, Mahmood; Benedetto, Chiara; Siebert, Igno; Rabischong, Benoit; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, training and education in endoscopic surgery has been critically reviewed. Clinicians, both surgeons as gynaecologist who perform endoscopic surgery without proper training of the specific psychomotor skills are at higher risk to increased patient morbidity and mortality. Although the apprentice-tutor model has long been a successful approach for training of surgeons, recently, clinicians have recognised that endoscopic surgery requires an important training phase outside the operating theatre. The Gynaecological Endoscopic Surgical Education and Assessment programme (GESEA), recognises the necessity of this structured approach and implements two separated stages in its learning strategy. In the first stage, a skill certificate on theoretical knowledge and specific practical psychomotor skills is acquired through a high stake exam; in the second stage, a clinical programme is completed to achieve surgical competence and receive the corresponding diploma. Three diplomas can be awarded: (a) the Bachelor in Endoscopy; (b) the Minimally Invasive Gynaecological Surgeon (MIGS); and (c) the Master level. The Master level is sub-divided into two separate diplomas: the Master in Laparoscopic Pelvic Surgery and the Master in Hysteroscopy. The complexity of modern surgery has increased the demands and challenges to surgical education and the quality control. This programme is based on the best available scientific evidence and it counteracts the problem of the traditional surgical apprentice tutor model. It is seen as a major step toward standardization of endoscopic surgical training in general. PMID:26946312

  3. Surgical cartographic navigation system for endoscopic bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Voruganti, Arun; Mayoral, Rafael; Jacobs, Stephan; Grunert, Ronny; Moeckel, Hendrik; Korb, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic bypass grafting with the da Vinci system is still challenging and needs high level of experience and skill of the surgeon. Therefore, it is necessary to support the surgeon with enhanced vision and augmented reality. The augmentation of the patient model into the view of the endoscope is a direct approach to enhance support. The results of a preclinical study are shown in this paper. The method applied is suitable for endoscopic bypass grafting and in general applicable to minimal invasive surgery. The system was designed as an open architecture to facilitate easy transfer of the methodology into other surgical domain applications. PMID:18002243

  4. Endoscopic repair of post-surgical gastrointestinal complications.

    PubMed

    Manta, Raffaele; Magno, Luca; Conigliaro, Rita; Caruso, Angelo; Bertani, Helga; Manno, Mauro; Zullo, Angelo; Frazzoni, Marzio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Galloro, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Complications following gastrointestinal surgery may require re-intervention, can lead to prolonged hospitalization, and significantly increase health costs. Some complications, such as anastomotic leakage, fistula, and stricture require a multidisciplinary approach. Therapeutic endoscopy may play a pivotal role in these conditions, allowing minimally invasive treatment. Different endoscopic approaches, including fibrin glue injection, endoclips, self-expanding stents, and endoscopic vacuum-assisted devices have been introduced for both anastomotic leakage and fistula treatment. Similarly endoscopic treatments, such as endoscopic dilation, incisional therapy, and self-expanding stents have been used for anastomotic strictures. All these techniques can be safely performed by skilled endoscopists, and may achieve a high technical success rate in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Here we will review the endoscopic management of post-surgical complications; these techniques should be considered as first-line approach in selected patients, allowing to avoid re-operation, reduce hospital stay, and decrease costs. PMID:23623147

  5. Massive surgical emphysema following transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Simkens, Geert AAM; Nienhuijs, Simon W; Luyer, Misha DP; de Hingh, Ignace HJT

    2014-01-01

    We describe an impressive and rare case of surgical emphysema after minimally invasive rectal surgery. This case reports on a patient who developed massive retroperitoneal, intraperitoneal and subcutaneous emphysema directly following a transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) procedure for a rectal intramucosal carcinoma. Free intra-abdominal air after gastro-intestinal surgery can be a sign of a bowel perforation or anastomotic leakage. This is a serious complication often requiring immediate surgery. In our patient an abdominal computed tomography-scan with rectal contrast showed no signs of a rectal perforation. Therefore this emphysema was caused by the insufflation of CO2 gas in the rectum during the TEM-procedure. Conservative treatment resulted in an uneventful recovery. With the increasing usage of TEM for rectal lesions we expect this complication to occur more often. After ruling out a full thickness rectal wall perforation in patients with surgical emphysema following TEM, conservative treatment is the treatment of choice. PMID:25161765

  6. Surgical Skills Beyond Scientific Management.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Nicholas

    2015-07-01

    During the Great War, the French surgeon Alexis Carrel, in collaboration with the English chemist Henry Dakin, devised an antiseptic treatment for infected wounds. This paper focuses on Carrel's attempt to standardise knowledge of infected wounds and their treatment, and looks closely at the vision of surgical skill he espoused and its difference from those associated with the doctrines of scientific management. Examining contemporary claims that the Carrel-Dakin method increased rather than diminished demands on surgical work, this paper further shows how debates about antiseptic wound treatment opened up a critical space for considering the nature of skill as a vital dynamic in surgical innovation and practice. PMID:26090737

  7. Surgical Skills Beyond Scientific Management

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    During the Great War, the French surgeon Alexis Carrel, in collaboration with the English chemist Henry Dakin, devised an antiseptic treatment for infected wounds. This paper focuses on Carrel’s attempt to standardise knowledge of infected wounds and their treatment, and looks closely at the vision of surgical skill he espoused and its difference from those associated with the doctrines of scientific management. Examining contemporary claims that the Carrel–Dakin method increased rather than diminished demands on surgical work, this paper further shows how debates about antiseptic wound treatment opened up a critical space for considering the nature of skill as a vital dynamic in surgical innovation and practice. PMID:26090737

  8. Credentialing of surgical skills centers.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ajit K

    2011-01-01

    Major imperatives regarding quality of patient care and patient safety are impacting surgical care and surgical education. Also, significant emphasis continues to be placed on education and training to achieve proficiency, expertise, and mastery in surgery. Simulation-based surgical education and training can be of immense help in acquiring and maintaining surgical skills in safe environments without exposing patients to risk. Opportunities for repetition of tasks can be provided to achieve pre-established standards, and knowledge and skills can be verified using valid and reliable assessment methods. Also, expertise and mastery can be attained through repeated practice, specific feedback, and establishment of progressively higher learning goals. Simulation-based education and training can help surgeons maintain their skills in infrequently performed procedures and regain proficiency in procedures they have not performed for a period of time. In addition, warm-ups and surgical rehearsals in simulated environments should enhance performance in real settings. Major efforts are being pursued to advance the field of simulation-based surgical education. New education and training models involving validation of knowledge and skills are being designed for practicing surgeons. A competency-based national surgery resident curriculum was recently launched and is undergoing further enhancements to address evolving education and training needs. Innovative simulation-based surgical education and training should be offered at state-of-the-art simulation centers, and credentialing and accreditation of these centers are key to achieving their full potential. PMID:21549986

  9. Recognition of surgical skills using hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Stefanie; Zentek, Tom; Sudra, Gunther; Gehrig, Tobias; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Gutt, Carsten; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a highly complex medical discipline and can be regarded as a major breakthrough in surgical technique. A minimally invasive intervention requires enhanced motor skills to deal with difficulties like the complex hand-eye coordination and restricted mobility. To alleviate these constraints we propose to enhance the surgeon's capabilities by providing a context-aware assistance using augmented reality techniques. To recognize and analyze the current situation for context-aware assistance, we need intraoperative sensor data and a model of the intervention. Characteristics of a situation are the performed activity, the used instruments, the surgical objects and the anatomical structures. Important information about the surgical activity can be acquired by recognizing the surgical gesture performed. Surgical gestures in minimally invasive surgery like cutting, knot-tying or suturing are here referred to as surgical skills. We use the motion data from the endoscopic instruments to classify and analyze the performed skill and even use it for skill evaluation in a training scenario. The system uses Hidden Markov Models (HMM) to model and recognize a specific surgical skill like knot-tying or suturing with an average recognition rate of 92%.

  10. Modeling surgical skill learning with cognitive simulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Shi-Hyun; Suh, Irene H; Chien, Jung-hung; Paik, Jaehyon; Ritter, Frank E; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2011-01-01

    We used a cognitive architecture (ACT-R) to explore the procedural learning of surgical tasks and then to understand the process of perceptual motor learning and skill decay in surgical skill performance. The ACT-R cognitive model simulates declarative memory processes during motor learning. In this ongoing study, four surgical tasks (bimanual carrying, peg transfer, needle passing, and suture tying) were performed using the da Vinci© surgical system. Preliminary results revealed that an ACT-R model produced similar learning effects. Cognitive simulation can be used to demonstrate and optimize the perceptual motor learning and skill decay in surgical skill training. PMID:21335834

  11. [Endoscopic and surgical procedures for enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Wallstabe, I; Tiedemann, A; Schiefke, I; Weimann, A

    2013-07-01

    Standardized management of oncology patients necessarily includes screening for nutritional risk. Weight loss of > 5 kg within 3 months and diminished food intake are warning signals even in overweight patients. In case oral nutrition is neither adequate nor feasible even by fortification or oral nutritional supplements, the implantation of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) or fine needle catheter jejunostomy (FNCJ) offers enteral access for long-term nutritional support. Although the indications derive from fulfilling caloric needs, endoscopic or operative measures are not considered to be an urgent or even emergency measure. The endoscopist or surgeon should be fully aware and informed of the indications and make a personal assessment of the situation. The implantation of a feeding tube requires informed consent of the patient or legal surrogates. The review summarizes recent indications, technical problems and complications. PMID:23719727

  12. Systematic review comparing endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical pancreatic pseudocyst drainage

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Dhir, Vinay; Jin, Zhen-Dong; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Seo, Dong Wan; Ho, Khek Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review comparing the outcomes of endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical pancreatic pseudocyst drainage. METHODS: Comparative studies published between January 1980 and May 2014 were identified on PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane controlled trials register and assessed for suitability of inclusion. The primary outcome was the treatment success rate. Secondary outcomes included were the recurrence rates, re-interventions, length of hospital stay, adverse events and mortalities. RESULTS: Ten comparative studies were identified and 3 were randomized controlled trials. Four studies reported on the outcomes of percutaneous and surgical drainage. Based on a large-scale national study, surgical drainage appeared to reduce mortality and adverse events rate as compared to the percutaneous approach. Three studies reported on the outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and surgical drainage. Clinical success and adverse events rates appeared to be comparable but the EUS approach reduced hospital stay, cost and improved quality of life. Three other studies compared EUS and esophagogastroduodenoscopy-guided drainage. Both approaches were feasible for pseudocyst drainage but the success rate of the EUS approach was better for non-bulging cyst and the approach conferred additional safety benefits. CONCLUSION: In patients with unfavorable anatomy, surgical cystojejunostomy or percutaneous drainage could be considered. Large randomized studies with current definitions of pseudocysts and longer-term follow-up are needed to assess the efficacy of the various modalities. PMID:27014427

  13. Learning Basic Surgical Skills through Simulator Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvennoinen, Minna; Helfenstein, Sacha; Ruoranen, Minna; Saariluoma, Pertti

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based surgical training simulators are instrumental in skill-based training and performance measurement. However, to date, the educational employment of these tools lacks empirically founded insights and effective practical guidelines. This study examined surgical residents during computer-based simulator training of basic laparoscopic…

  14. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Surgical Technologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment as surgical technologists. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and credentialing, the…

  15. The use of rotational optical encoders for dial sensing in the Virtual translumenal Endoscopic Surgical Trainer (VTEST.

    PubMed

    Dargar, Saurabh; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; De, Suvranu

    2013-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a minimally invasive procedure, known for its scar-less nature and short post operative recovery periods. A critical skill necessary for a NOTES procedure is the surgeon's ability to navigate and gain visualization of the target organ, which is done by moving the endoscope tip using the dials on the handle. We have developed an accurate and high resolution optical encoder based system to measure that dial manipulations, as part of a larger project to develop a VR-NOTES surgical simulator. PMID:23400138

  16. Beyond the middle ear: endoscopic surgical anatomy and approaches to inner ear and lateral skull base.

    PubMed

    Presutti, Livio; Nogueira, João Flávio; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Marchioni, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    Currently, the main application of endoscopic surgery relies on the middle ear cholesteatoma surgical treatment. However, in the natural evolution of the technique there are the steps toward of lateral skull base surgery and treatment of pathologic conditions of pertous bone. The endoscopic approaches to lateral skull base are (1) a transcanal exclusively endoscopic approach or (2) combined approaches (microscopic endoscope-assisted), including transotic, infralabyrinthine, and suprameatal translabyrinthine. PMID:23566905

  17. Surgical challenge: endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSF) result from an abnormal communication between the subarachnoid space and the extracranial space. Approximately 90% of CSF leak at the anterior skull base manifests as rhinorrhea and can become life-threatening condition. Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) has become a common otolaryngologist procedure. The aim of this article is to consider our experience and to evaluate the outcomes in patients who underwent a purely endoscopic repair of CSF leaks of the anterior skull base. Findings Retrospective chart review was performed of all patients surgically treated for CSF leaks presenting to the Section of Nasal and Sinus Disorders at the Service of ENT–Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela (CHUS), between 2004 and 2010. A total of 30 patients who underwent repair CSF leak by ESS. The success rate was 93.4% at the first attempt; only two patients (6.6%) required a second surgical procedure, and none of it was necessary to use a craniotomy for closure. Follow-up periods ranged from 4 months to 6 years. Conclusion Identifying the size, site, and etiology of the CSF leak remains the most important factor in the surgical success. It is generally accepted that the ESS have made procedures minimally invasive, and CSF leak is now one of its well-established indications with low morbidity and high success rate, with one restriction for fistulas of the posterior wall of the frontal sinus should be repaired in conjunction with open techniques. PMID:22925201

  18. Endoscopic duodenal perforation: surgical strategies in a regional centre

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Duodenal perforation is an uncommon complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) and a rare complication of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Most are minor perforations that settle with conservative management. A few perforations however result in life-threatening retroperitoneal necrosis and require surgical intervention. There is a relative paucity of references specifically describing the surgical interventions required for this eventuality. Methods Five cases of iatrogenic duodenal perforation were ascertained between 2002 and 2007 at Cairns Base Hospital. Clinical features were analyzed and compared, with reference to a review of ERCP at that institution for the years 2005/2006. Results One patient recovered with conservative management. Of the other four, one died after initial laparotomy. The other three survived, undergoing multiple procedures and long inpatient stays. Conclusions Iatrogenic duodenal perforation with retroperitoneal necrosis is an uncommon complication of endoscopy, but when it does occur it is potentially life-threatening. Early recognition may lead to a better outcome through earlier intervention, although a protracted course with multiple procedures should be anticipated. A number of surgical techniques may need to be employed according to the individual circumstances of the case. PMID:24461069

  19. Training for complex endoscopic procedures: how to incorporate endoscopic submucosal dissection skills in the West?

    PubMed

    Draganov, Peter V; Coman, Roxana M; Gotoda, Takuji

    2014-02-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been employed for removal of early neoplastic gastrointestinal lesions and has well-documented higher en bloc and curative resection rates compared with endoscopic mucosal resection. Based on these advantages, ESD has gained widespread use in Asia but unfortunately not in the West. The main obstacles remain the very flat learning curve and lack of training resources. In Asia, ESD skills are acquired in the time-honored mentor/apprentice model over a period of few years. This algorithm cannot be directly applied in the West due to substantial differences. Can we train Western endoscopists in ESD in a model that bridges the gap between the traditional approach that requires years to gain proficiency and the weekend crash course approach that does not do justice to our patients? We propose a training algorithm that would guide the ESD training of Western endoscopists in a way to reliably deliver high-quality end product. PMID:24308749

  20. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to Ventral Posterior Fossa Meningiomas: From Case Selection to Surgical Management.

    PubMed

    Beer-Furlan, André; Vellutini, Eduardo A S; Balsalobre, Leonardo; Stamm, Aldo C

    2015-07-01

    Clival, petroclival, and foramen magnum meningiomas are challenging lesions to manage independently of the selected surgical approach. The expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) provided a safe alternative on the armamentarium of skull base approaches. There is a paucity of literature regarding endoscopic management of meningiomas because of certain limiting factors, including rarity of the pathologic condition, technical challenges, expertise of the surgical team, and available resources. The surgical technique, possible complications, and postoperative care are described in detail. This article highlights the important aspects in choosing this surgical approach and managing ventral posterior fossa meningiomas through the EEA. PMID:26141360

  1. Endoscopic Endonasal Dacryocystorhinostomy: Best Surgical Management for DCR.

    PubMed

    Bharangar, Sandeep; Singh, Nirupama; Lal, Vikram

    2012-12-01

    EEDCR is a highly rewarding Endoscopic procedure for management of dacryocystitis when epiphora does not respond to medications or repeated syringing of nasolacrimal duct. It is a simple, less time consuming, safe but skilful, highly satisfying surgery both for the patients as well as the surgeons. There is very big advantage of EEDCR, it is close 100% successful procedure, even if there is recurrence of epiphora it is again correctable fully with no residual affects. EEDCR is far more superior to External DCR/Laser DCR and there are definite reasons for it. A total number of 578 cases have been operated by me from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2011, only very few reoccurrences were there and they were corrected easily so much so that it can be said that it is a close 100% successful procedure and best surgical management of DACRYOCYSTITIS up to date. The successful outcome was defined as symptomatic relief from epiphora and dacryocystitis and a patent nasolacrimal duct upon syringing at the end of procedure and on follow up of patient. PMID:24294581

  2. Robotic Surgical Skills: Acquisition, Maintenance, and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Karen M.; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Guy, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The degradation in robotic skills that occurs during periods of robotic surgical inactivity in newly trained surgeons was measured. The role of animate training in robotic skill was also assessed. Methods: Robotically naïve resident and attending surgeons underwent training with the da Vinci® robot on needle passage (DN), rocking ring transfer peg board (RPB), and running suture pod tasks (SP). Errors were established to convert actual time to adjusted time. Participants were deemed “proficient” once their adjusted times were within 80% of those set by experienced surgeons through repeated trials. Participants did not use the robot except for repeating the tasks once at 4, 8, and 12 weeks (tests). Participants then underwent animate training and completed a final test within 7 days. Results: Twenty-five attending and 29 resident surgeons enrolled; 3 withdrew. There were significant increases in time to complete each of the tasks, and in errors, by 4 weeks (Adjusted times: DN: 122.9 ± 2.2 to 204.2 ± 11.7, t=6.9, P<.001; RPB: 262.4 ± 2.5 to 364.7 ± 8.0, t=12.4, P<.001; SP: 91.4 ± 1.4 to 169.9 ± 6.8, t=11.3, P<.001). Times decreased following animate training, but not to levels observed after proficiency training for the RPB and SP modules. Conclusions: Robotic surgical skills degrade significantly within 4 weeks of inactivity in newly trained surgeons. Animate training may provide different skills than those acquired in the dry lab. PMID:23477169

  3. Surgical Skills and Lessons from Other Vocations

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, RM

    2006-01-01

    Formerly, a few lucky trainees, attached to talented masters* keen to teach, derived excellent, well-rounded training – but many others struggled alone. Now, formal courses allow experts to teach simple, safe methods, often using simulations. Courses are usually delivered as modules – each unit designed to provide an assessable competence. Simulations are, however, imperfect substitutes for living tissues. Such courses are aids, not substitutes, for operative experience – but this, for many irreversible reasons, is restricted. Successful operators in all specialties and all countries, have in common the combination of good judgement, commitment, intimate knowledge of anatomy and pathology, together with technical skills that are more easily recognised than described. We need to identify good trainers and relieve them of commitments that reduce their ability to pass on their skills. As a trainee, try to identify and copy their characteristics. This advice comes not from a gifted surgeon but from one fortunate to have worked with, and watched, surgical masters – and who is still privileged to teach. PMID:16551392

  4. Laying the foundation of surgical skills for trainees (residents).

    PubMed

    Perry, Richard E

    2009-03-01

    The role of the surgical skills laboratory is becoming increasingly important as surgical service needs evolve and educational processes seek to become more robust. The skills laboratory offers an opportunity to better prepare residents for their clinical rotations and to accelerate their clinical effectiveness. The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons has developed and introduced a new standardised basic surgical skills curriculum that can be delivered sustainably in centres throughout Australia and New Zealand. A technical skill set required by all surgical disciplines was compiled, and each skill was deconstructed into cognitive steps. Models were devised to simulate an application of each skill, and standardized demonstrations were created and recorded to ensure uniform teaching. Extensive resource material supports the course programme, with information for tutors, technicians, course directors and participants. Currently, clinical rotations offer inconsistent opportunities for trainees to practise their skills after the course. Recruitment and retention of tutors remains a key challenge. PMID:19317775

  5. Review of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography using several endoscopic methods in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimatani, Masaaki; Takaoka, Makoto; Tokuhara, Mitsuo; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2015-01-01

    The endoscopic approach for biliary diseases in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy (SAGA) had been generally deemed impractical. However, it was radically made feasible by the introduction of double balloon endoscopy (DBE) that was originally developed for diagnosis and treatments for small-bowel diseases. Followed by the subsequent development of single-balloon endoscopy (SBE) and spiral endoscopy (SE), interventions using several endoscopes for biliary disease in patients with SAGA widely gained an acceptance as a new modality. Many studies have been made on this new technique. Yet, some problems are to be solved. For instance, the mutual unavailability among devices due to different working lengths and channels, and unestablished standardization of procedural techniques can be raised. Additionally, in an attempt to standardize endoscopic procedures, it is important to evaluate biliary cannulating methods by case with existence of papilla or not. A full comprehension of the features of respective scope types is also required. However there are not many papers written as a review. In our manuscript, we would like to evaluate and make a review of the present status of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography applying DBE, SBE and SE for biliary diseases in patients with SAGA for establishment of these modalities as a new technology and further improvement of the scopes and devices. PMID:26078830

  6. Characteristic endoscopic ultrasound findings of ampullary lesions that predict the need for surgical excision or endoscopic ampullectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rejeski, Jared J.; Kundu, Sarba; Hauser, Matthew; Conway, Jason D.; Evans, John A.; Pawa, Rishi; Mishra, Girish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The management of ampullary lesions has evolved to include endoscopic ampullectomy (EA) as a curative approach to cancers of the ampulla of Vater. With this change comes a need to risk-stratify patients at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Patients with verified ampullary lesions (N = 50) were analyzed in a case-control design. We evaluated endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) data to define characteristics that yield a high sensitivity in selecting candidates for EA. Results: Using data from previously published studies yielded a sensitivity of 0.765 in appropriately identifying the 34 surgical cases. Expanding these characteristics increased the sensitivity of EUS to 0.971 in identifying surgical candidates. Additionally, of advanced disease cases, the expanded characteristics correctly identified these cases with a sensitivity of 1.0-improved over 0.708 using prior published data. Conclusion: EA should be strongly considered if ampullary lesions are found to fit the following characteristics after EUS evaluation: lesion size <2.5 cm, invasion ≤4 mm, pancreatic duct dilatation ≤3 mm, ≤T1 lesion, no lymph nodes present, and no ductal stent in place. Furthermore, EUS data can be used to identify all high-risk lesions. With these characteristics identified, clinicians are better able to risk-stratify patients using EUS as either appropriate for or too high-risk for endoscopic resection. PMID:27386476

  7. Surgical Technique: Endoscopic Endonasal Transphenoidal Resection of a Large Suprasellar Mixed Germ Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Vikram; Hanna, George; DeLos Reyes, Kennethy

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transphenoidal approach has proven to be a very versatile surgical approach for the resection of small midline skull base tumors. This is due to its minimally invasive nature, the potentially fewer neurological complications, and lower morbidity in comparison to traditional craniotomies. This surgical approach has been less commonly utilized for large midline tumors such as suprasellar germ cell tumors, due to numerous reasons including the surgeon’s comfort with the surgical approach, a higher chance of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, limited visualization due to arterial/venous bleeding, and limited working space. We present our surgical technique in the case of a large suprasellar and third ventricular mixed germ cell tumor that was resected via an endoscopic endonasal approach with favorable neurological outcome and no postoperative CSF leak. PMID:27014537

  8. Surgical Success in Chronic Pancreatitis: Sequential Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography and Surgical Longitudinal Pancreatojejunostomy (Puestow Procedure).

    PubMed

    Ford, Kathryn; Paul, Anu; Harrison, Phillip; Davenport, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis (CP) can be a cause of recurrent, severe, disabling abdominal pain in children. Surgery has been suggested as a useful therapy, although experience is limited and the results unpredictable. We reviewed our experience of a two-stage protocol-preliminary endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and duct stenting, and if symptoms resolved, definitive surgical decompression by longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy (LPJ) (Puestow operation). Patients and Methods This is a single-center, retrospective review of children with established CP who underwent an LPJ between February 2002 and September 2012. A questionnaire was completed (incorporating visual analog scale pain and lifestyle scores) to assess functional outcome. Data are expressed as median (range). Results In this study, eight (M:F ratio of 4:4) children underwent an LPJ and one female child had a more limited pancreatojejunostomy anastomosis following preliminary ERCP and stent placement where possible. Diagnoses included hereditary pancreatitis (n = 3), idiopathic or structural pancreatitis (n = 5), and duct stricture following radiotherapy (n = 1). Median duct diameter presurgery was 5 (4-11) mm. Endoscopic placement of a Zimmon pancreatic stent was possible in six with relief of symptoms in all. Median age at definitive surgery was 11 (range, 7-17) years with a median postoperative stay of 9 (range, 7-12) days and a follow-up of 6 (range, 0.5-12) years. All children reported markedly reduced episodes of pain postprocedure. One developed diabetes mellitus, while three had exocrine deficiency (fecal elastase < 200 µg/g) requiring enzyme supplementation. The child with limited LPJ had symptomatic recurrence and required restenting and further surgery to widen the anastomosis to become pain free. Conclusion ERCP and stenting provide a therapeutic trial to assess possible benefit of a definitive duct drainage procedure. LPJ-the modified Puestow

  9. Endoscopic versus surgical resection for early colorectal cancer—a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Eduardo Guimaraes Hourneaux; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Leite de Castro, Vinicius; Morais, Cintia; Baba, Elisa Ryoka; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the available data on the treatment of early colorectal cancer (CRC), either endoscopically or surgically. Methods Two independent reviewers searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL COCHRANE, LILACS and EBSCO for articles published up to August 2015. No language or dates filters were applied. Inclusion criteria were studies with published data about patients with early colonic or rectal cancer undergoing either endoscopic resection (i.e., mucosectomy or submucosal dissection) or surgical resection (i.e., open or laparoscopic). Extracted data items undergoing meta-analysis were en bloc resection rate, curative resection rate, and complications. A complementary analysis was performed on procedure time. The risk of bias among studies was evaluated with funnel-plot expressions, and sensitivity analyses were carried out whenever a high heterogeneity was found. The risk of bias within studies was assessed with the Newcastle score. Results A total of 12,819 articles were identified in the preliminary search. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, three cohort studies with a total of 768 patients undergoing endoscopic resection and 552 patients undergoing surgical resection were included. The en bloc resection rate risk difference was −11% [−13%, −8% confidence interval (CI)], demonstrating worse outcome results for the endoscopic resection group as compared to the surgical resection group [number need to harm (NNH) =10]. The curative resection rate risk difference was −9% [(−12%, 6% CI)] after a sensitivity analysis was performed, which also demonstrated worse outcomes in the intervention group (NNH =12). The complications rate exhibited a −7% risk difference [(−11%, −4% CI)], denoting a lesser number of complications in the endoscopic group [Number Need to Treat (NNT =15). A complementary analysis of procedure time with two of the selected studies demonstrated a mean difference of −118.32 min [(−127.77, −108.87 CI)], in

  10. Objective performance measures using motion sensors on an endoscopic tool for evaluating skills in natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES).

    PubMed

    Chin, Lauren I; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Dargar, Saurabh; Matthes, Kai; De, Suvranu

    2013-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery is an emerging procedure. High fidelity virtual reality-based simulators allow development of new surgical procedures and tools and train medical personnel without risk to human patients. As part of a project funded by the National Institutes of Health, we are developing a Virtual Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery Trainer (VTEST TM) for this purpose. In this work, objective performance measures derived from motion tracking sensors attached to an endoscope was tested for the transgastric NOTES appendectomy procedure performed with ex-vivo pig organs using the EASIE-R(TM) trainer box. Results from our study shows that both completion time and economy of motion parameters were able to differentiate between expert and novice NOTES surgeons with p value of 0.039 and 0.02 respectively. Jerk computed on sensor 2 data also showed significant results (p = 0.02). We plan to incorporate these objective performance measures in VTEST(TM). PMID:23400134

  11. Endoscopic Endonasal Access to the Jugular Foramen: Defining the Surgical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dennis L.Y.; McCoul, Edward D.; Anand, Vijay K.; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The endoscopic endonasal approach to the parapharyngeal space (PPS) and jugular foramen is not well defined. We sought to systematically define the important landmarks and limitations of this new surgical technique using an endoscopic transmaxillary transpterygoid corridor. Methods Endoscopic dissection was performed in both sides of two latex-injected cadaver heads. Left-sided dissections were facilitated by the addition of a sublabial maxillary antrostomy. The pterygopalatine fossa, infratemporal fossa, and PPS were sequentially dissected and the endoscopic perspective was examined. Measurements were obtained from the surgical orifices to the upper cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) and internal jugular vein (IJV). Results Successful access to the PPS and jugular foramen was achieved in each dissection. The lateral pterygoid plate, mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve, middle meningeal artery, levator veli palatini muscle, Eustachian tube, and stylopharyngeal fascia were identified as landmarks for the upper cervical ICA and the IJV. The mean distance from the nasal sill was markedly greater than from an ipsilateral sublabial antrostomy. Conclusion The endoscopic endonasal approach can provide adequate access to the PPS, carotid sheath, and jugular foramen. Multiple landmarks are useful to guide the dissection within these deep spaces and may facilitate the clinical application of this approach. PMID:24083127

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage as an alternative to percutaneous drainage and surgical bypass.

    PubMed

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2015-01-16

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography had been a treatment modality of choice for both benign and malignant biliary tract obstruction for more than half century, with a very high clinical success rate and low complications. But in certain circumstances, such as advanced and locally advanced pancreatobiliary malignancies (pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, ampullary tumor) and tight benign strictures, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) fails. Up to this point, the only alternative interventions for these conditions were percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventions was introduced for a couple decades with the better visualization and achievement of the pancreatobiliary tract. And it's still in the process of ongoing development. The inventions of new techniques and accessories lead to more feasibility of high-ended procedures. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage was a novel treatment modality for the patient who failed ERCP with the less invasive technique comparing to surgical bypass. The technical and clinical success was high with acceptable complications. Regarded the ability to drain the biliary tract internally without an exploratory laparotomy, this treatment modality became a very interesting procedures for many endosonographers, worldwide, in a short period. We have reviewed the literature and suggest that endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage is also an option, and one with a high probability of success, for biliary drainage in the patients who failed conventional endoscopic drainage. PMID:25610532

  13. Endoscopic Debridement for Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis: An Innovative Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Maker, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one the most common pathologies seen by foot and ankle surgeons. When nonoperative therapy fails, surgical intervention is warranted. Various surgical procedures are available for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The most common surgical management typically consists of open versus endoscopic plantar fascia release. The documented comorbidities associated with the release of the plantar fascia include lateral column overload and metatarsalgia. We present a new technique for this painful condition that is minimally invasive, allows visualization of the plantar fascia, and maintains the integrity of this fascia. Our hypothesis was that the use of endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia would provide a minimally invasive technique with acceptable patient outcomes. PMID:26952313

  14. Vision-based endoscope tracking for 3D ultrasound image-guided surgical navigation.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Wang, J; Ando, T; Kubota, A; Yamashita, H; Sakuma, I; Chiba, T; Kobayashi, E

    2015-03-01

    This work introduces a self-contained framework for endoscopic camera tracking by combining 3D ultrasonography with endoscopy. The approach can be readily incorporated into surgical workflows without installing external tracking devices. By fusing the ultrasound-constructed scene geometry with endoscopic vision, this integrated approach addresses issues related to initialization, scale ambiguity, and interest point inadequacy that may be faced by conventional vision-based approaches when applied to fetoscopic procedures. Vision-based pose estimations were demonstrated by phantom and ex vivo monkey placenta imaging. The potential contribution of this method may extend beyond fetoscopic procedures to include general augmented reality applications in minimally invasive procedures. PMID:25263644

  15. Endoscopic goniotomy: a potential surgical procedure for primary infantile glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Alward, Wallace L. M.; Folberg, Robert

    1993-06-01

    Goniotomy is an effective treatment for primary infantile glaucoma. Unlike trabeculotomy, goniotomy facilitates the visualization of the trabecular meshwork and does not disturb the conjunctiva. Because a cloudy cornea may prevent a clear view of the anterior chamber angle through the operating microscope, we investigated whether an endoscope would improve visualization during goniotomy in pig cadaver eyes. We deepened the anterior chamber of each pig eye with viscoelastic material. A modified 23-gauge needle attached to an Olympus 0.8 mm diameter flexible fiberoptic endoscope entered the anterior chamber through a 3 mm limbal incision. The angle was clearly seen on a videoscreen as the needle approached and incised the trabecular pillars for 120 degree(s); the iris immediately fell back. Following the procedure, the eyes were fixed in formalin and sectioned for light microscopy, or fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde for scanning electron microscopy. Trabecular pillars were present from the iris root to Schwalbe's line in the untreated region of the anterior chamber angle. The treated area demonstrated incision of the trabecular pillars with opening of the underlying trabecular meshwork.

  16. Displaying 3D radiation dose on endoscopic video for therapeutic assessment and surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jimmy; Hope, Andrew J.; Cho, B. C. John; Sharpe, Michael B.; Dickie, Colleen I.; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Jaffray, David A.; Weersink, Robert A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a method to register and display 3D parametric data, in particular radiation dose, on two-dimensional endoscopic images. This registration of radiation dose to endoscopic or optical imaging may be valuable in assessment of normal tissue response to radiation, and visualization of radiated tissues in patients receiving post-radiation surgery. Electromagnetic sensors embedded in a flexible endoscope were used to track the position and orientation of the endoscope allowing registration of 2D endoscopic images to CT volumetric images and radiation doses planned with respect to these images. A surface was rendered from the CT image based on the air/tissue threshold, creating a virtual endoscopic view analogous to the real endoscopic view. Radiation dose at the surface or at known depth below the surface was assigned to each segment of the virtual surface. Dose could be displayed as either a colorwash on this surface or surface isodose lines. By assigning transparency levels to each surface segment based on dose or isoline location, the virtual dose display was overlaid onto the real endoscope image. Spatial accuracy of the dose display was tested using a cylindrical phantom with a treatment plan created for the phantom that matched dose levels with grid lines on the phantom surface. The accuracy of the dose display in these phantoms was 0.8-0.99 mm. To demonstrate clinical feasibility of this approach, the dose display was also tested on clinical data of a patient with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy, with estimated display accuracy of ˜2-3 mm. The utility of the dose display for registration of radiation dose information to the surgical field was further demonstrated in a mock sarcoma case using a leg phantom. With direct overlay of radiation dose on endoscopic imaging, tissue toxicities and tumor response in endoluminal organs can be directly correlated with the actual tissue dose, offering a more nuanced assessment of normal tissue

  17. Design of a surgical robot with dynamic vision field control for Single Port Endoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yo; Sekiguchi, Yuta; Tomono, Yu; Watanabe, Hiroki; Toyoda, Kazutaka; Konishi, Kozo; Tomikawa, Morimasa; Ieiri, Satoshi; Tanoue, Kazuo; Hashizume, Makoto; Fujie, Masaktsu G

    2010-01-01

    Recently, a robotic system was developed to assist Single Port Endoscopic Surgery (SPS). However, the existing system required a manual change of vision field, hindering the surgical task and increasing the degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the manipulator. We proposed a surgical robot for SPS with dynamic vision field control, the endoscope view being manipulated by a master controller. The prototype robot consisted of a positioning and sheath manipulator (6 DOF) for vision field control, and dual tool tissue manipulators (gripping: 5DOF, cautery: 3DOF). Feasibility of the robot was demonstrated in vitro. The "cut and vision field control" (using tool manipulators) is suitable for precise cutting tasks in risky areas while a "cut by vision field control" (using a vision field control manipulator) is effective for rapid macro cutting of tissues. A resection task was accomplished using a combination of both methods. PMID:21096985

  18. Imaging in the Evaluation of Endoscopic or Surgical Treatment for Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Diego; Mardighian, Andrea; D'Amora, Marilina; Roberto, Luca; Lassandro, Francesco; Rossi, Claudia; Gatta, Gianluca; Scaglione, Mariano; Giuseppe, Guglielmi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic (pneumatic dilation) versus surgical (Heller myotomy) treatment in patients affected by esophageal achalasia using barium X-ray examination of the digestive tract performed before and after the treatment. Materials and Methods. 19 patients (10 males and 9 females) were enrolled in this study; each patient underwent a barium X-ray examination to evaluate the esophageal diameter and the height of the barium column before and after endoscopic or surgical treatment. Results. The mean variation of oesophageal diameter before and after treatment is -2.1 mm for surgery and 1.74 mm for pneumatic dilation (OR 0.167, CI 95% 0.02-1.419, and P: 0.10). The variations of all variables, with the exception of the oesophageal diameter variation, are strongly related to the treatment performed. Conclusions. The barium X-ray study of the digestive tract, performed before and after different treatment approaches, demonstrates that the surgical treatment has to be considered as the treatment of choice of achalasia, reserving endoscopic treatment to patients with high operative risk and refusing surgery. PMID:26819603

  19. Imaging in the Evaluation of Endoscopic or Surgical Treatment for Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Palladino, Diego; Mardighian, Andrea; D'Amora, Marilina; Roberto, Luca; Lassandro, Francesco; Rossi, Claudia; Gatta, Gianluca; Scaglione, Mariano; Giuseppe, Guglielmi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic (pneumatic dilation) versus surgical (Heller myotomy) treatment in patients affected by esophageal achalasia using barium X-ray examination of the digestive tract performed before and after the treatment. Materials and Methods. 19 patients (10 males and 9 females) were enrolled in this study; each patient underwent a barium X-ray examination to evaluate the esophageal diameter and the height of the barium column before and after endoscopic or surgical treatment. Results. The mean variation of oesophageal diameter before and after treatment is −2.1 mm for surgery and 1.74 mm for pneumatic dilation (OR 0.167, CI 95% 0.02–1.419, and P: 0.10). The variations of all variables, with the exception of the oesophageal diameter variation, are strongly related to the treatment performed. Conclusions. The barium X-ray study of the digestive tract, performed before and after different treatment approaches, demonstrates that the surgical treatment has to be considered as the treatment of choice of achalasia, reserving endoscopic treatment to patients with high operative risk and refusing surgery. PMID:26819603

  20. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the pharyngeal region using anchored hemoclip with surgical thread: A novel method

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Hitomi; Tabuchi, Maiko; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of the pharyngeal region has not been well accepted, although ESD of the gastrointestinal tract is a standard procedure for treating early cancers. However, early detection and treatment of pharyngeal cancers is highly beneficial because surgical resection can be highly invasive and cause serious cosmetic deformities, swallowing disorders, dysgeusia, and speech defects. On the other hand, application of an anchored clip with surgical thread during ESD of the gastrointestinal tract has been reported to be beneficial. This pilot case series reveals the usefulness and clinical feasibility of applying a clip with thread in ESD of the pharyngeal region. PMID:27540568

  1. Teaching cognitive skills improves learning in surgical skills courses: a blinded, prospective, randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Kohls-Gatzoulis, Julie A.; Regehr, Glenn; Hutchison, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the teaching of cognitive skills within a technical skills course, we carried out a blinded, randomized prospective study. Methods Twenty-one junior residents (postgraduate years 1– 3) from a single program at a surgical-skills training centre were randomized to 2 surgical skills courses teaching total knee arthroplasty. One course taught only technical skill and had more repetitions of the task (5 or 6). The other focused more on developing cognitive skills and had fewer task repetitions (3 or 4). All were tested with the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS) both before and after the course, as well as a pre- and postcourse error-detection exam and a postcourse exam with multiple-choice questions (MCQs) to test their cognitive skills. Results Both groups' technical skills as assessed by OSATS were equivalent, both pre- and postcourse. Taking their courses improved the technical skills of both groups (OSATS, p < 0.01) over their pre-course scores. Both groups demonstrated equivalent levels of knowledge on the MCQ exam, but the cognitive group scored better on the error-detection test (p = 0.02). Conclusions Cognitive skills training enhances the ability to correctly execute a surgical skill. Furthermore, specific training and practice are required to develop procedural knowledge into appropriate cognitive skills. Surgeons need to be trained to judge the correctness of their actions. PMID:15362330

  2. Surgical mistake causing an high recto-vaginal fistula. A case report with combined surgical and endoscopic approach: therapeutic considerations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectovaginal fistulas (RVFs) have multiple causes, size and location on which the surgical treatment depends. Description The Authors consider different approaches to RVFs and describe a clinical case of recurrent high RVF. Conclusions Most RVFs can be successfully repaired, although many interventions may be necessary. A colostomy with delayed repair may improve RVFs outcome. Moreover, several authors indicate Mucosal Advancement Flap and Babcock-Bacon technique as the treatments of choice respectively for low and high RVFs (complex and recurrent) and emphasize the placement of endoscopic prothesis in cases of difficult healing of the anastomosis. PMID:24266908

  3. Informatics Approach to Improving Surgical Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Surgery as a profession requires significant training to improve both clinical decision making and psychomotor proficiency. In the medical knowledge domain, tools have been developed, validated, and accepted for evaluation of surgeons' competencies. However, assessment of the psychomotor skills still relies on the Halstedian model of…

  4. Therapeutic Armamentarium for Stricturing Crohn's Disease: Medical Versus Endoscopic Versus Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Fleshner, Phillip; Shen, Bo

    2015-09-01

    One-third of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) present as stricturing phenotype characterized by progressive luminal narrowing and obstructive symptoms. The diagnosis and management of these patients have been intriguing and challenging. Immunomodulators and biologics have been successfully used in treating inflammatory and fistulizing CD. There are issues of efficacy and safety of biological agents in treating strictures in CD. Rapid mucosal healing from potent biological agents may predispose patients to the development of new strictures or worsening of existing strictures. On the other hand, strictures constitute one-fifth of the reasons for surgery in patients with CD. Disease recurrence is common at or proximal to the anastomotic site with the majority of these patients developing new endoscopic lesions within 1 year of surgery. The progressive nature of the disease with repetitive cycle of inflammation and stricture formation results in repeated surgery, with a risk of small bowel syndrome. There is considerable quest for bowel conserving endoscopic and surgical strategies. Endoscopic balloon dilation and stricturoplasty have emerged as valid alternatives to resection. Endoscopic balloon dilation has been shown to be feasible, safe, and effective for the short primary or anastomotic strictures. However, repeated dilations are often needed, and long-term outcomes of endoscopic balloon dilation remain to be investigated. The introduction of stricturoplasty has added another dimension to bowel saving strategy. Although postoperative recurrence rate after stricturoplasty is comparable with surgical resection, there are concerns for increased risk of malignancy in preserved bowel. Laparoscopic surgery has widely been performed with similar outcomes to open approach with fewer complications, quicker recovery, better cosmesis, and lower cost. All of these issues should be considered by physicians involved in the management of patients with stricturing CD. PMID

  5. Spectrum of Use and Effectiveness of Endoscopic and Surgical Therapies for Chronic Pancreatitis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Lisa M.; Whitcomb, David C.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Kennard, Elizabeth; Slivka, Adam A.; Brand, Randal E.; Anderson, Michelle; Banks, Peter A.; Lewis, Michele D.; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; DiSario, James; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; O’Connell, Michael; Gelrud, Andres; Etemad, Babak; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Gardner, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aims to describe the frequency of use and reported effectiveness of endoscopic and surgical therapies in patients with CP treated at US referral centers. METHODS Five hundred fifteen patients were enrolled prospectively in the North American Pancreatitis II Study 2, where patients and treating physicians reported previous therapeutic interventions and their perceived effectiveness. We evaluated the frequency and effectiveness of endoscopic (biliary or pancreatic sphincterotomy, biliary or pancreatic stent placement) and surgical (pancreatic cyst removal, pancreatic drainage procedure, pancreatic resection, surgical sphincterotomy) therapies. RESULTS Biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy (42%) were the most commonly attempted endoscopic procedure (biliary stent, 14%; pancreatic stent, 36%; P<0.001). Endoscopic procedures were equally effective (biliary sphincterotomy, 40.0%; biliary stent, 40.8%; pancreatic stent, 47.0%; P=0.34). On multivariable analysis, the presence of abdominal pain (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% 95% confidence interval, 1.15–2.88) predicted endoscopy, whereas exocrine insufficiency (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval 0.42–0.94) deterred endoscopy. Surgical therapies were attempted equally (cyst removal, 7%; drainage procedure, 10%; resection procedure, 12%) except for surgical sphincteroplasty (4%; P<0.001). Surgical sphincteroplasty was the least effective therapy (46%; P<0.001) versus cyst removal (76% drainage [71%] and resection [73%]). CONCLUSIONS Although surgical therapies were performed less frequently than endoscopic therapies, they were more often reported to be effective. PMID:24717802

  6. Cross-platform digital assessment forms for evaluating surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A variety of structured assessment tools for use in surgical training have been reported, but extant assessment tools often employ paper-based rating forms. Digital assessment forms for evaluating surgical skills could potentially offer advantages over paper-based forms, especially in complex assessment situations. In this paper, we report on the development of cross-platform digital assessment forms for use with multiple raters in order to facilitate the automatic processing of surgical skills assessments that include structured ratings. The FileMaker 13 platform was used to create a database containing the digital assessment forms, because this software has cross-platform functionality on both desktop computers and handheld devices. The database is hosted online, and the rating forms can therefore also be accessed through most modern web browsers. Cross-platform digital assessment forms were developed for the rating of surgical skills. The database platform used in this study was reasonably priced, intuitive for the user, and flexible. The forms have been provided online as free downloads that may serve as the basis for further development or as inspiration for future efforts. In conclusion, digital assessment forms can be used for the structured rating of surgical skills and have the potential to be especially useful in complex assessment situations with multiple raters, repeated assessments in various times and locations, and situations requiring substantial subsequent data processing or complex score calculations. PMID:25959653

  7. Results of endoscopic and surgical fistula treatment in oesophagointestinal anastomosis after gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ciostek, Piotr; Petryka, Robert; Słowik, Jakub; Jarosz, Mirosław

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal fistulas occur in 4–8% of cases of upper gastrointestinal tract surgery. Until now, surgery has been the standard of treating fistulas in oesophagointestinal anastomosis. The use of stents and haemoclips still causes much controversy, but more and more publications present good results with this type of treatment. Aim To present results of endoscopic and surgical treatment of fistulas in oesophagointestinal anastomosis after gastrectomy. Material and methods A fistula in the oesophagointestinal anastomosis was observed in 23 (4.8%) patients within an 18-year period. The indications for endoscopic treatment were small fistulas (< 50 ml/day), and large (> 50 ml/day) fistulas in subjects with no symptoms of peritonitis or abscess were treated with implantation a of covered stent. Surgical treatment was performed with a large fistula leading to peritonitis and complicated gangrene of margins and/or the presence of abscess. Results Four subjects were treated endoscopically with the use of haemoclips, resulting in 50% technical and clinical success. We implanted stents in 12 patients. Technical success was achieved in all the patients, yet permanent closure of the fistula was reported for 8 (66%) subjects. The percentage of patients operated on for fistula was 33%. We recorded 4 deaths in this group. Conclusions The use of haemoclips in treatment of small fistulas, and self-expandable, covered stents in treatment of medium and large fistulas, is an effective method that shortens the hospitalisation period and accelerates introduction of oral nutrition while reducing the number of fatal complications. PMID:26865886

  8. The Arthroscopic Surgical Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET)

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Ryan J.; Amsdell, Simon; Arendt, Elizabeth A; Bisson, Leslie J; Braman, Jonathan P; Butler, Aaron; Cosgarea, Andrew J; Harner, Christopher D; Garrett, William E; Olson, Tyson; Warme, Winston J.; Nicandri, Gregg T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgeries employing arthroscopic techniques are among the most commonly performed in orthopaedic clinical practice however, valid and reliable methods of assessing the arthroscopic skill of orthopaedic surgeons are lacking. Hypothesis The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET) will demonstrate content validity, concurrent criterion-oriented validity, and reliability, when used to assess the technical ability of surgeons performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy on cadaveric specimens. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3 Methods Content validity was determined by a group of seven experts using a Delphi process. Intra-articular performance of a right and left diagnostic knee arthroscopy was recorded for twenty-eight residents and two sports medicine fellowship trained attending surgeons. Subject performance was assessed by two blinded raters using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity, inter-rater reliability, and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Results Content validity: The content development group identified 8 arthroscopic skill domains to evaluate using the ASSET. Concurrent criterion-oriented validity: Significant differences in total ASSET score (p<0.05) between novice, intermediate, and advanced experience groups were identified. Inter-rater reliability: The ASSET scores assigned by each rater were strongly correlated (r=0.91, p <0.01) and the intra-class correlation coefficient between raters for the total ASSET score was 0.90. Test-retest reliability: there was a significant correlation between ASSET scores for both procedures attempted by each individual (r = 0.79, p<0.01). Conclusion The ASSET appears to be a useful, valid, and reliable method for assessing surgeon performance of diagnostic knee arthroscopy in cadaveric specimens. Studies are ongoing to determine its generalizability to other procedures as well as to the live OR and other simulated environments. PMID:23548808

  9. Baseline urologic surgical skills among medical students: Differentiating trainees

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishaal; Lantz, Andrea G.; Alzharani, Tarek; Foell, Kirsten; Lee, Jason Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Urology training programs seek to identify ideal candidates with the potential to become competent urologic surgeons. It is unclear whether innate technical ability has a role in this selection process. We aimed to determine whether there are any innate differences in baseline urologic technical skills among medical students. Methods: Second-year medical students from the University of Toronto were recruited for this study and stratified into surgical and non-surgical cohorts based on their reported career aspirations. After a pre-test questionnaire, subjects were tested on several urologic surgical skills: laparoscopy, cystoscopy and robotic surgery. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared test, student t-tests and Spearman’s correlation where appropriate. Results: A total of 29 students participated in the study and no significant baseline differences were found between cohorts with respect to demographics and prior surgical experience. For laparoscopic skills, the surgical cohort outperformed the non-surgical cohort on several exercises: Lap Beans Missed (4.9 vs. 9.3, p < 0.01), Lap Bean Rating (3.8 vs. 3.1, p = 0.01), Lap Rings Error (0.2 vs. 1.22, p < 0.01), Lap Rings Rating (3.9 vs. 2.9, p < 0.01) and LapSim Grasping Score (64.3 vs. 46.4, p = 0.01). For cystoscopic skills, there were no significant differences between cohorts on any of the performance metrics. The surgical cohort also outperformed the non-surgical cohort on all measured robotic surgery performance metrics: Task Time (50.6 vs. 76.3, p < 0.01), Task Errors (0.2 vs. 3.1, p < 0.01), and Task Score (89.5 vs. 72.6, p < 0.01). Discussion: Objective innate technical ability in urological skills, particularly laparoscopy and robotics, may differ between early trainees interested in a surgical career compared to those interested in a non-surgical career. Further studies are required to illicit what impact such differences have on future performance and competence. PMID

  10. Endoscopic versus surgical treatment of ampullary adenomas: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Ernesto Quaresma; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux; Chaves, Dalton Marques; Kondo, André; Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Baracat, Felipe Iankelevich

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to address the outcomes of endoscopic resection compared with surgery in the treatment of ampullary adenomas. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. For this purpose, the Medline, Embase, Cochrane, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS), Scopus and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were scanned. Studies included patients with ampullary adenomas and data considering endoscopic treatment compared with surgery. The entire analysis was based on a fixed-effects model. Five retrospective cohort studies were selected (466 patients). All five studies (466 patients) had complete primary resection data available and showed a difference that favored surgical treatment (risk difference [RD] = -0.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.44 to -0.04). Primary success data were identified in all five studies as well. Analysis showed that the surgical approach outperformed endoscopic treatment for this outcome (RD = -0.37, 95% CI = -0.50 to -0.24). Recurrence data were found in all studies (466 patients), with a benefit indicated for surgical treatment (RD = 0.10, 95% CI = -0.01 to 0.19). Three studies (252 patients) presented complication data, but analysis showed no difference between the approaches for this parameter (RD = -0.15, 95% CI = -0.53 to 0.23). Considering complete primary resection, primary success and recurrence outcomes, the surgical approach achieves significantly better results. Regarding complication data, this systematic review concludes that rates are not significantly different. PMID:26872081

  11. Endoscopic versus surgical treatment of ampullary adenomas: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Ernesto Quaresma; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux de; Chaves, Dalton Marques; Kondo, André; Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Baracat, Felipe Iankelevich

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to address the outcomes of endoscopic resection compared with surgery in the treatment of ampullary adenomas. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. For this purpose, the Medline, Embase, Cochrane, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS), Scopus and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were scanned. Studies included patients with ampullary adenomas and data considering endoscopic treatment compared with surgery. The entire analysis was based on a fixed-effects model. Five retrospective cohort studies were selected (466 patients). All five studies (466 patients) had complete primary resection data available and showed a difference that favored surgical treatment (risk difference [RD] = -0.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.44 to -0.04). Primary success data were identified in all five studies as well. Analysis showed that the surgical approach outperformed endoscopic treatment for this outcome (RD = -0.37, 95% CI = -0.50 to -0.24). Recurrence data were found in all studies (466 patients), with a benefit indicated for surgical treatment (RD = 0.10, 95% CI = -0.01 to 0.19). Three studies (252 patients) presented complication data, but analysis showed no difference between the approaches for this parameter (RD = -0.15, 95% CI = -0.53 to 0.23). Considering complete primary resection, primary success and recurrence outcomes, the surgical approach achieves significantly better results. Regarding complication data, this systematic review concludes that rates are not significantly different. PMID:26872081

  12. GPs with enhanced surgical skills: a questionable solution for remote surgical services

    PubMed Central

    Vinden, Christopher; Ott, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Canadian College of Family Physicians recently decided to recognize family physicians with enhanced surgical skills (ESS) and has proposed a 1-year curriculum of surgical training. The purpose of this initiative is to bring or enhance surgical services to remote and underserviced areas. We feel that this proposed curriculum is overly ambitious and unrealistic and that it is unlikely to produce surgeons, or a system, capable of delivering high-quality surgical services. The convergence of a new training curriculum for general surgeons, coupled with the current oversupply of surgeons, provide an alternate pathway to meet the needs of these communities. A long-term solution will also require alternate funding models, a sophisticated and coordinated national locum service and a national review of the population and infrastructure requirements necessary for both sustainable resident surgical services and surgical outreach services. PMID:26574827

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreaticobiliary intervention in patients with surgically altered anatomy and inaccessible papillae: A review of current literature

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aaron; Kistler, Charles Andrew; Wrobel, Piotr; Yang, Juliana F.; Siddiqui, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    The management of pancreaticobiliary disease in patients with surgically altered anatomy is a growing problem for gastroenterologists today. Over the years, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the treatment of pancreaticobiliary disease. Patient anatomy has become increasingly complex due to advances in surgical resection of pancreaticobiliary disease and EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice when endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed cannulation or when the papilla is inaccessible such as in gastric obstruction or duodenal obstruction. The current article gives a comprehensive review of the current literature for EUS-guided intervention of the pancreaticobiliary tract in patients with altered surgical anatomy. PMID:27386471

  14. Evaluation of robotic minimally invasive surgical skills using motion studies.

    PubMed

    Jun, Seung-Kook; Sathia Narayanan, Madusudanan; Singhal, Pankaj; Garimella, Sudha; Krovi, Venkat

    2013-09-01

    Robotic Minimally Invasive Surgery, and the engendered computer-integration, offers unique opportunities for quantitative computer-based surgical-performance evaluation. In this work, we examine extension of traditional manipulative skill assessment, having deep roots in performance evaluation in manufacturing industries, for applicability to robotic surgical skill evaluation. This method relies on: defining task-level segmentation of modular sub-tasks/micro-motions called 'Therbligs' that can be combined to perform a given task; and analyzing intra- and inter-user performance variance by studying surgeons' performance over each 'Therbligs'. Any of the performance metrics of macro-motions-from motion-economy, tool motion measurements to handed-symmetry-can now be extended over the micro-motion temporal segments. Evaluation studies were based on video recordings of surgical tasks in two settings: first, we examined performance of two representative manipulation exercises (peg board and pick-and-place) on a da Vinci surgical SKILLS simulator. This affords a relatively-controlled and standardized test-scenarios for surgeons with varied experience-levels. Second, task-sequences from real surgical videos were analyzed with a list of predefined 'Therbligs' in order to investigate its overall usefulness. PMID:27000920

  15. Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Foraminotomy: An Advanced Surgical Technique and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun-Kyong; Kim, Ho; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Haeng-Nam

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although several authors have reported the use of endoscopic techniques to treat lumbar foraminal stenosis, the practical application of these techniques has been limited to soft disc herniation. OBJECTIVE: To describe the details of the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar foraminotomy (ELF) technique for bony foraminal stenosis and to demonstrate the clinical outcomes. METHODS: Two years of prospective data were collected from 33 consecutive patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis who underwent ELF. The surgical outcomes were assessed using the visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and modified MacNab criteria. The procedure begins at the safer extraforaminal zone rather than the riskier intraforaminal zone. Then, a full-scale foraminal decompression can be performed using a burr and punches under endoscopic control. RESULTS: The mean age of the 18 female and 15 male patients was 64.2 years. The mean visual analog scale score for leg pain improved from 8.36 at baseline to 3.36 at 6 weeks, 2.03 at 1 year, and 1.97 at 2 years post-surgery (P < .001). The mean Oswestry Disability Index improved from 65.8 at baseline to 31.6 at 6 weeks, 19.7 at 1 year, and 19.3 at 2 years post-surgery (P < .001). Based on the modified MacNab criteria, excellent or good results were obtained in 81.8% of the patients, and symptomatic improvements were obtained in 93.9%. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous ELF under local anesthesia could be an efficacious surgical procedure for the treatment of foraminal stenosis. This procedure may offer safe and reproducible results, especially for elderly or medically compromised patients. ABBREVIATIONS: ELF,endoscopic lumbar foraminotomy ODI, Oswestry Disability Index VAS, visual analog scale PMID:24691470

  16. The Relationship of Endoscopic Proficiency to Educational Expense for Virtual Reality Simulator Training Amongst Surgical Trainees.

    PubMed

    Raque, Jessica; Goble, Adam; Jones, Veronica M; Waldman, Lindsey E; Sutton, Erica

    2015-07-01

    With the introduction of Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery, training methods in flexible endoscopy are being augmented with simulation-based curricula. The investment for virtual reality simulators warrants further research into its training advantage. Trainees were randomized into bedside or simulator training groups (BED vs SIM). SIM participated in a proficiency-based virtual reality curriculum. Trainees' endoscopic skills were rated using the Global Assessment of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Skills (GAGES) in the patient care setting. The number of cases to reach 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score and calculated costs of training were compared. Nineteen residents participated in the study. There was no difference in the average number of cases required to achieve 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score for esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 13 (SIM) versus11 (BED) (P = 0.63), or colonoscopy 21 (SIM) versus 4 (BED) (P = 0.34). The average per case cost of training for esophagogastroduodenoscopy was $35.98 (SIM) versus $39.71 (BED) (P = 0.50), not including the depreciation costs associated with the simulator ($715.00 per resident over six years). Use of a simulator appeared to increase the cost of training without accelerating the learning curve or decreasing faculty time spent in instruction. The importance of simulation in endoscopy training will be predicated on more cost-effective simulators. PMID:26140898

  17. Double esophageal perforation by ingested foreign body: Endoscopic and surgical approach. A case report.

    PubMed Central

    Ugenti, I.; Digennaro, R.; Martines, G.; Caputi Iambrenghi, O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal perforation in adults is most frequently caused by ingested foreign bodies. They can migrate through the esophageal wall, damaging the nearby organs such as the aorta or the trachea, with fatal outcome. After the diagnosis, the viable treatments for extracting the foreign body and repairing the perforation are several. The appropriate treatment, may be endoscopic, surgical or combined, depending on the level of the perforation, on the co-morbidities of the patient and on the available resources. Presentation of case This paper describes a case of a 68 years old patient with a double EP caused by a meat-bone that perforated the thoracic esophageal wall, approaching the aorta on the left side and the azygos vein on the right side. Discussion Because of the double transfixion and the position near the aorta and the azygos, it was not possible to remove safely the bone during the endoscopy. The management required a combined endoscopic and surgical approach. This way it was possible to detect easily the location of the perforation, to remove safely the foreign body, to repair the perforation both from the outside and from the inside, and to place the nasogastric tube under direct vision. Conclusion Even when the type of esophageal perforation requires surgical treatment, the simultaneous use of endoscopy proved to be an advantage in order to extract the foreign body safely, to perform a double repair of the perforation and to place the nasogastric tube under direct vision. PMID:26551553

  18. A Review of New Surgical and Endoscopic Therapies for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the United States today is binary, with the majority of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease being treated with antisecre-tory medications and a minority of patients, typically those with volume regurgitation, undergoing Nissen fundoplication. However, there has been increasing dissatisfaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy among a significant number of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease owing to cost, side effects, and refractory symptoms, and there has been a general reluctance to undergo surgical fundoplication due to its attendant side-effect profile. As a result, a therapy gap exists for many patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Alternative techniques are available for these gap patients, including 2 endoscopic fundoplication techniques, an endoscopic radiofrequency energy delivery technique, and 2 minimally invasive surgical procedures. These alternative techniques have been extensively evaluated; however, there are limitations to published studies, including arbitrary definitions of success, variable efficacy measurements, deficient reporting tools, inconsistent study designs, inconsistent lengths of follow-up postintervention, and lack of comparison data across techniques. Although all of the techniques appear to be safe, the endoscopic techniques lack demonstrable reflux control and show variable symptom improvement and variable decreases in proton pump inhibitor use. The surgical techniques are more robust, with evidence for adequate reflux control, symptom improvement, and decreased proton pump inhibitor use; however, these techniques are more difficult to perform and are more intrusive. Additionally, these alternative techniques have only been studied in patients with relatively normal anatomy. The field of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment is in need of consistent definitions of efficacy, standardized study design and outcome measurements, and improved reporting

  19. A Review of New Surgical and Endoscopic Therapies for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the United States today is binary, with the majority of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease being treated with antisecre-tory medications and a minority of patients, typically those with volume regurgitation, undergoing Nissen fundoplication. However, there has been increasing dissatisfaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy among a significant number of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease owing to cost, side effects, and refractory symptoms, and there has been a general reluctance to undergo surgical fundoplication due to its attendant side-effect profile. As a result, a therapy gap exists for many patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Alternative techniques are available for these gap patients, including 2 endoscopic fundoplication techniques, an endoscopic radiofrequency energy delivery technique, and 2 minimally invasive surgical procedures. These alternative techniques have been extensively evaluated; however, there are limitations to published studies, including arbitrary definitions of success, variable efficacy measurements, deficient reporting tools, inconsistent study designs, inconsistent lengths of follow-up postintervention, and lack of comparison data across techniques. Although all of the techniques appear to be safe, the endoscopic techniques lack demonstrable reflux control and show variable symptom improvement and variable decreases in proton pump inhibitor use. The surgical techniques are more robust, with evidence for adequate reflux control, symptom improvement, and decreased proton pump inhibitor use; however, these techniques are more difficult to perform and are more intrusive. Additionally, these alternative techniques have only been studied in patients with relatively normal anatomy. The field of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment is in need of consistent definitions of efficacy, standardized study design and outcome measurements, and improved reporting

  20. Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: The Role of Medical, Surgical, and Endoscopic Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Violeta B.; Lim, Joseph K.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a rapidly growing cause of chronic liver disease in the United States and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, including progression to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD comprises a spectrum of liver conditions, ranging from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation (steatohepatitis) and progressive fibrosis. Weight loss represents a first line therapeutic modality for the management of NAFLD. Herein, we review the evidence base for medical, surgical, and endoscopic approaches to weight loss and their potential impact on the natural history of NAFLD. PMID:26623270

  1. Digital Environment for Movement Control in Surgical Skill Training.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Juan A; Gómez, Juan J; Peguero, Pedro D; Ruisoto, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Intelligent environments are increasingly becoming useful scenarios for handling computers. Technological devices are practical tools for learning and acquiring clinical skills as part of the medical training process. Within the framework of the advanced user interface, we present a technological application using Leap Motion, to enhance interaction with the user in the process of a laparoscopic surgical intervention and integrate the navigation through augmented reality images using manual gestures. Thus, we intend to achieve a more natural interaction with the objects that participate in a surgical intervention, which are augmented and related to the user's hand movements. PMID:27091754

  2. A Novel Endoscopic Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging System for Intraoperative Surgical Navigation.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianming; Liu, Xia; Qu, Yawei; Liu, Haixiao; Bao, Chengpeng; Leng, Chengcai; Hu, Zhenhua; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging is an emerging optical technique for imaging the distribution of radiopharmaceuticals in vivo. However, because of the light scattering effect, it cannot obtain optical information from deep internal organs. To overcome this challenge, we established a novel endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system that used a clinically approved laparoscope and an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera. We assessed the performance of the system through a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results demonstrated superior superficial imaging resolution (0.1 mm), a large field of view (500 mm2 with 10 mm imaging distance), and superb imaging sensitivity (imaging 1 μCi) of our system. It captured the weak Cerenkov signal from internal organs successfully and was applied to intraoperative surgical navigation of tumor resection. It offered objective information of the tumor location and tumor residual during the surgical operation. This technique holds great potential for clinical translation. PMID:26431810

  3. Kinect based real-time position calibration for nasal endoscopic surgical navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jingfan; Yang, Jian; Chu, Yakui; Ma, Shaodong; Wang, Yongtian

    2016-03-01

    Unanticipated, reactive motion of the patient during skull based tumor resective surgery is the source of the consequence that the nasal endoscopic tracking system is compelled to be recalibrated. To accommodate the calibration process with patient's movement, this paper developed a Kinect based Real-time positional calibration method for nasal endoscopic surgical navigation system. In this method, a Kinect scanner was employed as the acquisition part of the point cloud volumetric reconstruction of the patient's head during surgery. Then, a convex hull based registration algorithm aligned the real-time image of the patient head with a model built upon the CT scans performed in the preoperative preparation to dynamically calibrate the tracking system if a movement was detected. Experimental results confirmed the robustness of the proposed method, presenting a total tracking error within 1 mm under the circumstance of relatively violent motions. These results point out the tracking accuracy can be retained stably and the potential to expedite the calibration of the tracking system against strong interfering conditions, demonstrating high suitability for a wide range of surgical applications.

  4. Halstedian technique revisited. Innovations in teaching surgical skills.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, R W; Lang, N P; Whiteside, M F

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the laboratory models used to teach fundamental surgical skills in our general surgery residency. The laboratory modules allow supervision and self-instruction, practice, and videotape monitoring of the following techniques: skin incision, suturing, knot tying, hemostasis, vascular anastomosis, and intestinal anastomosis. Pigs' feet simulate human skin for exercises in skin incision, lesion excision, suturing, and basic plastic surgical techniques. Latex tubing and penrose drains allow experience in suturing, knot tying, and hemostasis. Polytetrafluoroethylene vascular prostheses permit quantification of the precision of needle passage and suturing by measurement of leakage of water through a vascular anastomosis. Reconstituted, lyophilized, irradiated bovine arteries and ileum provide models of biologic tissue for creating handsewn vascular anastomoses and sutured or stapled gastrointestinal anastomoses. A headlamp videocamera allows unobstructive recording of the resident's technical performance and provides subsequent visual feedback for self-improvement when compared to reference instructional videotapes. We feel that these innovations may enhance surgical dexterity of residents without the need for animal sacrifice. Our goal is to foreshorten the learning curve for basic surgical skills and improve performance in the clinical operating room. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2742408

  5. Affordable, web-based surgical skill training and evaluation tool.

    PubMed

    Islam, Gazi; Kahol, Kanav; Li, Baoxin; Smith, Marshall; Patel, Vimla L

    2016-02-01

    Advances in the medical field have increased the need to incorporate modern techniques into surgical resident training and surgical skills learning. To facilitate this integration, one approach that has gained credibility is the incorporation of simulator based training to supplement traditional training programs. However, existing implementations of these training methods still require the constant presence of a competent surgeon to assess the surgical dexterity of the trainee, which limits the evaluation methods and relies on subjective evaluation. This research proposes an efficient, effective, and economic video-based skill assessment technique for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). It analyzes a surgeon's hand and surgical tool movements and detects features like smoothness, efficiency, and preciseness. The system is capable of providing both real time on-screen feedback and a performance score at the end of the surgery. Finally, we present a web-based tool where surgeons can securely upload MIS training videos and receive evaluation scores and an analysis of trainees' performance trends over time. PMID:26556643

  6. Mastering Surgical Skills Through Simulation-Based Learning: Practice Makes One Perfect

    PubMed Central

    Khunger, Niti; Kathuria, Sushruta

    2016-01-01

    Simulation-based learning in surgery is a learning model where an environment similar to real life surgical situation is created for the trainee to learn various surgical skills. It can be used to train a new operator as well to assess his skills. This methodology helps in repetitive practice of surgical skills on nonliving things so that the operator can be near-perfect when operating on a live patient. Various models are available for learning different dermatosurgery skills. PMID:27081246

  7. Mastering Surgical Skills Through Simulation-Based Learning: Practice Makes One Perfect.

    PubMed

    Khunger, Niti; Kathuria, Sushruta

    2016-01-01

    Simulation-based learning in surgery is a learning model where an environment similar to real life surgical situation is created for the trainee to learn various surgical skills. It can be used to train a new operator as well to assess his skills. This methodology helps in repetitive practice of surgical skills on nonliving things so that the operator can be near-perfect when operating on a live patient. Various models are available for learning different dermatosurgery skills. PMID:27081246

  8. Why Canada needs networks to provide rural surgical care, including family doctors with essential surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, Garth; Miles, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Time is long overdue for action to improve rural surgical services in Canada. In this issue of CJS, a proposed curriculum for the provision of enhanced surgical skills (ESS) to rural family physicians offers an opportunity to fortify a seamless network of high-quality surgical care for rural Canada. It is supported and enhanced by the best available evidence and measured advice from specialists and generalists alike. Publication of this curriculum proposal provides for essential dialogue with general surgeons. We discuss why we must play an active role in the development, teaching and evaluation of ESS, or we will have minimal influence and limited grounds on which to criticize its outcome or celebrate the opportunity of success it promises. PMID:26574826

  9. Endoscopes and robots for tight surgical spaces: use of precurved elastic elements to enhance curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remirez, Andria A.; Webster, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Many applications in medicine require flexible surgical manipulators and endoscopes capable of reaching tight curvatures. The maximum curvature these devices can achieve is often restricted either by a strain limit, or by a maximum actuation force that the device's components can tolerate without risking mechanical failure. In this paper we propose the use of precurvature to "bias" the workspace of the device in one direction. Combined with axial shaft rotation, biasing increases the size of the device's workspace, enabling it to reach tighter curvatures than a comparable device without biasing can achieve, while still being able to fully straighten. To illustrate this effect, we describe several example prototype devices which use flexible nitinol strips that can be pushed and pulled to generate bending. We provide a statics model that relates the manipulator curvature to actuation force, and validate it experimentally.

  10. Toward real-time endoscopically-guided robotic navigation based on a 3D virtual surgical field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Hu, Danying; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-03-01

    The challenge is to accurately guide the surgical tool within the three-dimensional (3D) surgical field for roboticallyassisted operations such as tumor margin removal from a debulked brain tumor cavity. The proposed technique is 3D image-guided surgical navigation based on matching intraoperative video frames to a 3D virtual model of the surgical field. A small laser-scanning endoscopic camera was attached to a mock minimally-invasive surgical tool that was manipulated toward a region of interest (residual tumor) within a phantom of a debulked brain tumor. Video frames from the endoscope provided features that were matched to the 3D virtual model, which were reconstructed earlier by raster scanning over the surgical field. Camera pose (position and orientation) is recovered by implementing a constrained bundle adjustment algorithm. Navigational error during the approach to fluorescence target (residual tumor) is determined by comparing the calculated camera pose to the measured camera pose using a micro-positioning stage. From these preliminary results, computation efficiency of the algorithm in MATLAB code is near real-time (2.5 sec for each estimation of pose), which can be improved by implementation in C++. Error analysis produced 3-mm distance error and 2.5 degree of orientation error on average. The sources of these errors come from 1) inaccuracy of the 3D virtual model, generated on a calibrated RAVEN robotic platform with stereo tracking; 2) inaccuracy of endoscope intrinsic parameters, such as focal length; and 3) any endoscopic image distortion from scanning irregularities. This work demonstrates feasibility of micro-camera 3D guidance of a robotic surgical tool.

  11. Extended score interval in the assessment of basic surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Stefan; Sevonius, Dan; Beckman, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Basic Surgical Skills course uses an assessment score interval of 0–3. An extended score interval, 1–6, was proposed by the Swedish steering committee of the course. The aim of this study was to analyze the trainee scores in the current 0–3 scored version compared to a proposed 1–6 scored version. Methods Sixteen participants, seven females and nine males, were evaluated in the current and proposed assessment forms by instructors, observers, and learners themselves during the first and second day. In each assessment form, 17 tasks were assessed. The inter-rater reliability between the current and the proposed score sheets were evaluated with intraclass correlation (ICC) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results The distribution of scores for ‘knot tying’ at the last time point and ‘bowel anastomosis side to side’ given by the instructors in the current assessment form showed that the highest score was given in 31 and 62%, respectively. No ceiling effects were found in the proposed assessment form. The overall ICC between the current and proposed score sheets after assessment by the instructors increased from 0.38 (95% CI 0.77–0.78) on Day 1 to 0.83 (95% CI 0.51–0.94) on Day 2. Discussion A clear ceiling effect of scores was demonstrated in the current assessment form, questioning its validity. The proposed score sheet provides more accurate scores and seems to be a better feedback instrument for learning technical surgical skills in the Basic Surgical Skills course. PMID:25636607

  12. ‘Minimum-incision’ endoscopically assisted transvesical prostatectomy: Surgical technique and early outcomes

    PubMed Central

    El-Karamany, Tarek M.; Al-Adl, Ahmed M.; Abdel-Baky, Shabieb A.; Abdel-Azeem, Abdallah F.; Zaazaa, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the surgical technique and report the early outcomes of a ‘minimum-incision’ endoscopically assisted transvesical prostatectomy (MEATP) for managing benign prostatic obstruction secondary to a large (>80 g) prostate. Patients and methods In a prospective feasibility trial, 60 men with large benign prostates underwent MEATP. The baseline and postoperative evaluation included the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), a measurement of maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), and the postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume. The adenoma was enucleated digitally through a 3-cm suprapubic skin incision, and haemostasis was completed with endoscopic coagulation of the prostatic fossa. Perioperative complications were recorded and stratified according to the modified Clavien–Dindo score. Results The mean (SD, range) prostate weight estimated by ultrasonography was 102.9 (15.4, 80–160) g, the operative duration was 52 (8, 40–65) min, the haemoglobin loss was 2.1 (1, 0.4–5) g/dL, the catheterisation time was 5.2 (1.3, 4–9) days, and the hospital stay was 6.2 (1.4, 5–10) days. There were 21 complications recorded in 16 (27%) patients, and most (86%) were of grades 1 and 2. The most frequent complications were bleeding requiring a blood transfusion (8%), and prolonged drainage (5%). There was a significant improvement at 3 months after surgery in the IPSS (8.6 vs. 21.6, P < 0.001), Qmax (19.5 vs. 7.7, P < 0.001), and PVR (15.8 vs. 83.9 mL, P < 0.001). Conclusion MEATP is feasible, safe and effective. Comparative studies and long-term data are required to determine its role in the surgical treatment of large-volume BPH. PMID:26019954

  13. Endoscopic versus surgical approach in the treatment of Zenker’s diverticulum: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Débora V.; Kondo, André; Bernardo, Wanderley M.; Sakai, Paulo; Moura, Renata Nobre; Silva, Gustavo Luis Rodela; Ide, Edson; Tomishige, Toshiro; de Moura, Eduardo G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Zenker’s diverticulum is a rare disease in the general population. Its treatment can be carried out by either an endoscopic or surgical approach. The objective of this study was to systematically identify all reports that compare both treatment modalities and to assess the outcomes in terms of length of procedure, length of hospitalization, time until diet introduction, complication rates, and recurrence rates. Methods: A search of Medline and Embase selected all studies that compared different methods of surgical and endoscopic treatment for Zenker’s diverticulum published in the English, Portuguese, and Spanish languages between 1975 and 2014. The meta-analysis was developed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. Data were extracted and analyzed for five different outcomes. Results: Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria, describing outcomes of endoscopic versus surgical treatment for 596 patients with Zenker’s diverticulum. A meta-analysis of the studies suggested a statistically significant reduction in operating time and length of hospitalization, favoring endoscopic treatment (standardized mean difference (SMD) – 78.06, 95 %CI – 90.63, – 65.48 and SMD – 3.72, 95 %CI – 4.49, – 2.95, respectively), just as with the reduction in the fasting period (SMD – 4.30, 95 %CI – 5.18, – 3.42) and risk of complications (SMD – 0.09, 95 %CI 0.03, 0.43) for patients who had undergone the endoscopic approach in comparison with the surgical group. Also, a statistically significant reduction in the risk of symptom recurrence was seen when the treatment of Zenker’s diverticulum was carried out by a surgical approach compared with endoscopic treatment (SMD 0.08, 95 %CI 0.03, 0.13). Conclusion: Compared with a surgical approach, endoscopic treatment appeared to result in a shorter length of procedure and

  14. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Euan R B; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in order to compensate for the reduction in 'hands-on' experience. Simulation training provides the opportunity to develop surgical skills in a controlled environment whilst minimising risks to patient safety, operating theatre usage and financial expenditure. Many options for simulation exist within orthopaedics from cadaveric or prosthetic models, to arthroscopic simulators, to advanced virtual reality and three-dimensional software tools. There are limitations to this form of training, but it has significant potential for trainees to achieve competence in procedures prior to real-life practice. The evidence for its direct transferability to operating theatre performance is limited but there are clear benefits such as increasing trainee confidence and familiarity with equipment. With progressively improving methods of simulation available, it is likely to become more important in the ongoing and future training and assessment of orthopaedic surgeons. PMID:25523023

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary intervention in patients with surgically altered anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Siripun, Aroon; Sripongpun, Pimsiri; Ovartlarnporn, Bancha

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) in patients with surgically altered anatomies. METHODS: We performed a search of the MEDLINE database for studies published between 2001 to July 2014 reporting on EUS-BD in patients with surgically altered anatomy using the terms “EUS drainage” and “altered anatomy”. All relevant articles were accessed in full text. A manual search of the reference lists of relevant retrieved articles was also performed. Only full-text English papers were included. Data regarding age, gender, diagnosis, method of EUS-BD and intervention, type of altered anatomy, technical success, clinical success, and complications were extracted and collected. Anatomic alterations were categorized as: group 1, Billroth I; group 2, Billroth II; group 4, Roux-en-Y with gastric bypass; and group 3, all other types. RESULTS: Twenty three articles identified in the literature search, three reports were from the same group with different numbers of cases. In total, 101 cases of EUS-BD in patients with altered anatomy were identified. Twenty-seven cases had no information and were excluded. Seventy four cases were included for analysis. Data of EUS-BD in patients categorized as group 1, 2 and 4 were limited with 2, 3 and 6 cases with EUS-BD done respectively. Thirty four cases with EUS-BD were reported in group 3. The pooled technical success, clinical success, and complication rates of all reports with available data were 89.18%, 91.07% and 17.5%, respectively. The results are similar to the reported outcomes of EUS-BD in general, however, with limited data of EUS-BD in patients with altered anatomy rendered it difficult to draw a firm conclusion. CONCLUSION: EUS-BD may be an option for patients with altered anatomy after a failed endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiography in centers with expertise in EUS-BD procedures in a research setting. PMID:25789101

  16. Can a one-day practical lesson in surgical skills encourage medical students to consider a surgical career?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Florian; Rommel, Niklas; Koerdt, Steffen; Fichter, Andreas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kesting, Marco R

    2016-05-01

    Interest in a surgical career is declining among medical students, and many more need to commit themselves to becoming surgeons to cope with this. We have therefore developed a one-day practical lesson in surgical skills to find out whether a short course such as this can make students more enthusiastic about surgery, and about subsequently pursuing a career in one of its subspecialties. Fifty-four randomly-selected medical students did a one-day practical course in the skills required for maxillofacial surgical specialties. The 4 subdivisions involved - traumatology, resection of a tumour (cancer surgery), plastic surgery (microsurgery), and cleft lip and palate surgery. All students took written tests and completed an evaluation form about their interest in a surgical career before and after training. There was a significant increase in test scores in almost all categories at the end of the course, and significantly more students were prepared to consider a surgical career or a career in maxillofacial surgery after the training. This study shows that a one-day training course in surgical skills can significantly improve medical students' surgical knowledge, and might encourage them to enter a surgical career. We recommend the integration of a short training course such as this into the medical school curriculum. Only time and further evaluation will tell whether this increased exposure to surgical techniques can be transformed into additional surgeons. PMID:26549483

  17. Tether-free endoscopic biopsy with self-assembled micro-surgical tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultepe, Evin; Shin, Eun Ji; Selaru, Florin; Kalloo, Anthony; Gracias, David

    2013-03-01

    Feynman's futuristic vision of ``swallowing the surgeon'' or a truly non-invasive surgery relies on the invention and utilization of tetherless, stimuli-responsive and miniaturized surgical tools. We propose a step in this direction by the use of sub-millimeter scale, untethered, self-assembled endoscopic tools by designing and deploying microgrippers (μ-grippers) for effective mucosal sampling from large surface-area organs and for tissue retrieval from hard to reach places in the body. Due to their small size, tether-free actuation, parallel fabrication and deployment, μ-grippers can be dispersed in large numbers (hundreds or thousands) to collect tissue samples and allow statistical sampling of large mucosal areas. Monte Carlo simulations showed that using large number of biopsy tools increases the sampling coverage for screening procedures and hence the chance of detecting the malignant lesions. To establish the feasibility of using μ-grippers for sampling large organs we used with ex-vivo colon and in-vivo esophagus models. Our results showed that it is possible to retrieve high quality tissue samples which are suitable for either conventional cytologic or genetic analyses by using μ-grippers. This work was funded in part by the NSF grant NSF CBET-1066898 and the NIH Director's New Innovator Award Program through grant DP2-OD004346-01; in part by FAMRI grant 072119 YCSA and by a K08 Award (DK09015) from the NIH.

  18. Palliation With Endoscopic Metal Stents May Be Preferable to Surgical Intervention for Patients With Obstructive Pancreatic Head Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kofokotsios, Alexandros; Papazisis, Konstantinos; Andronikidis, Ioannis; Ntinas, Achilleas; Kardassis, Dimitrios; Vrochides, Dionisios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopically placed metal stents in comparison with operative procedures, in patients with obstructive pancreatic head cancer. Endoscopic stenting techniques and materials for gastrointestinal malignancies are constantly improving. Despite this evolution, many still consider operative procedures to be the gold standard for palliation in patients with unresectable obstructive pancreatic head cancer. This is a retrospective study of 52 patients who were diagnosed with obstructive (biliary, duodenal, or both) adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head. Twenty-nine patients (endoscopy group) underwent endoscopic stenting. Eleven patients (bypass group) underwent biliodigestive bypass. Twelve patients (Whipple group) underwent Whipple operation with curative intent; however, histopathology revealed R1 resection (palliative Whipple). T4 disease was identified in 13 (44.8%), 7 (63.6%), and 3 (25%) patients in the endoscopy, bypass, and Whipple groups, respectively. Metastatic disease was present only in the endoscopy group (n = 12; 41.3%). There was no intervention-related mortality. Median survival was 280 days [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 103, 456 days], 157 days (95% CI, 0, 411 days), and 647 days (95% CI, 300, 993 days) for the endoscopy, bypass, and Whipple groups, respectively (P = 0.111). In patients with obstructive pancreatic head cancer, endoscopic stenting may offer equally good palliation compared with surgical double bypass. The numerically (not statistically) better survival after palliative Whipple might be explained by the smaller tumor burden in this subgroup of patients and not by the superior efficacy of this operation. PMID:26414833

  19. Percutaneous endoscopic versus surgical gastrostomy in patients with benign and malignant diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, José Gonçalves Pereira; Ide, Edson; Kondo, Andre; de Moura, Diogo Turiani Hourneaux; de Moura, Eduardo Turiani Hourneaux; Sakai, Paulo; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    To compare the complications and mortality related to gastrostomy procedures performed using surgical and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy techniques, this review covered seven studies. Five of these were retrospective and two were randomized prospective studies. In total, 406 patients were involved, 232 of whom had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and 174 of whom had undergone surgical gastrostomy. The analysis was performed using Review Manager. Risk differences were computed using a fixed-effects model and forest and funnel plots. Data on risk differences and 95% confidence intervals were obtained using the Mantel-Haenszel test. There was no difference in major complications in retrospective (95% CI (-0.11 to 0.10)) or randomized (95% CI (-0.07 to 0.05)) studies. Regarding minor complications, no difference was found in retrospective studies (95% CI (-00.17 to 0.09)), whereas a difference was observed in randomized studies (95% CI (-0.25 to -0.02)). Separate analyses of retrospective and randomized studies revealed no differences between the methods in relation to mortality and major complications. Moreover, low levels of minor complications were observed among endoscopic procedures in randomized studies, with no difference observed compared with retrospective studies. PMID:27074179

  20. Comparison of Surgical Conditions During Propofol or Isoflurane Anesthesia for Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marzban, Shideh; Haddadi, Soudabeh; Mahmoudi Nia, Hossein; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Nemati, Shadman; Naderi Nabi, Bahram

    2013-01-01

    Background The Anesthesia planning is an important and determining factor in the amount of intraoperative hemorrhage, which can affect the rate of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Objectives In this study we used two different anesthesia techniques in functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and compared the amount of hemorrhage in the two groups. Patients and Methods In a single–blind clinical trial, 44 patients with ASA class I and II candidate for FESS in Amir-Al-Momenin hospital in Rasht were entered the study and divided into two equal groups randomly. In both groups anesthesia was induced with propofol, remifentanil and cis. atracurium and then, infusion of propofol – remifentanil in the first group and isoflurane plus Remifentanil infusion in the second group was used for maintenance of anesthesia. Systolic blood pressure was maintained about 90 mmHg. Then on the basis of maximum allowable blood loss (MABL) formula, we calculated the percentage of hemorrhage. Finally the patients' hemorrhage was categorized into three groups (< 10%, 10-20%, > 20%). The surgeon's satisfaction from surgical field was calculated according to the Visual Analogue Scale. Then the data was statistically analyzed with T- test. Results There were meaningful differences between average of hemorrhage (propofol group = 155cc, and Isoflurane group = 291.3cc; P = 0.003), and surgeon’s satisfaction (propofol group = 1.9 and Isoflurane group = 2.95; P = 0.007). Conclusions The amount of hemorrhage in propofol group was less than Isoflurane group and the field condition was better in propofol group than the Isoflurane group. PMID:24282774

  1. Is Three-Dimensional Videography the Cutting Edge of Surgical Skill Acquisition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Victoria A.; Brandt, Michael G.; Moore, Corey C.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The process of learning new surgical technical skills is vital to the career of a surgeon. The acquisition of these new skills is influenced greatly by visual-spatial ability (VSA) and may be difficult for some learners to rapidly assimilate. In many cases, the role of VSA on the acquisition of a novel technical skill has been explored; however,…

  2. [Objective surgery -- advanced robotic devices and simulators used for surgical skill assessment].

    PubMed

    Suhánszki, Norbert; Haidegger, Tamás

    2014-12-01

    Robotic assistance became a leading trend in minimally invasive surgery, which is based on the global success of laparoscopic surgery. Manual laparoscopy requires advanced skills and capabilities, which is acquired through tedious learning procedure, while da Vinci type surgical systems offer intuitive control and advanced ergonomics. Nevertheless, in either case, the key issue is to be able to assess objectively the surgeons' skills and capabilities. Robotic devices offer radically new way to collect data during surgical procedures, opening the space for new ways of skill parameterization. This may be revolutionary in MIS training, given the new and objective surgical curriculum and examination methods. The article reviews currently developed skill assessment techniques for robotic surgery and simulators, thoroughly inspecting their validation procedure and utility. In the coming years, these methods will become the mainstream of Western surgical education. PMID:25500641

  3. Establishing a surgical skills laboratory and dissection curriculum for neurosurgical residency training.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K C; Kshettry, Varun R; Recinos, Pablo F; Kamian, Kambiz; Schlenk, Richard P; Benzel, Edward C

    2015-11-01

    Surgical education has been forced to evolve from the principles of its initial inception, in part due to external pressures brought about through changes in modern health care. Despite these pressures that can limit the surgical training experience, training programs are being held to higher standards of education to demonstrate and document trainee competency through core competencies and milestones. One of the methods used to augment the surgical training experience and to demonstrate trainee proficiency in technical skills is through a surgical skills laboratory. The authors have established a surgical skills laboratory by acquiring equipment and funding from nondepartmental resources, through institutional and private educational grants, along with product donations from industry. A separate educational curriculum for junior- and senior-level residents was devised and incorporated into the neurosurgical residency curriculum. The initial dissection curriculum focused on cranial approaches, with spine and peripheral nerve approaches added in subsequent years. The dissections were scheduled to maximize the use of cadaveric specimens, experimenting with techniques to best preserve the tissue for repeated uses. A survey of residents who participated in at least 1 year of the curriculum indicated that participation in the surgical skills laboratory translated into improved understanding of anatomical relationships and the development of technical skills that can be applied in the operating room. In addition to supplementing the technical training of surgical residents, a surgical skills laboratory with a dissection curriculum may be able to help provide uniformity of education across different neurosurgical training programs, as well as provide a tool to assess the progression of skills in surgical trainees. PMID:26052729

  4. Surgical Outcomes Using a Medial-to-Lateral Endonasal Endoscopic Approach to Pituitary Adenomas Invading the Cavernous Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, Graeme F.; Patel, Kunal S.; Shin, Benjamin; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Tsouris, A. John; McCoul, Edward D.; Anand, Vijay K.; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT To detail the extent of resection and complications with endonasal endoscopic surgery for pituitary tumors invading the cavernous sinus (CS) using a moderately aggressive approach to maximize extent of resection through the medial cavernous sinus wall while minimizing the risk of cranial neuropathy and blood loss. Tumor in the medical cavernous sinus was aggressively pursued while tumor in the lateral cavernous sinus was debulked in preparation for radiosurgery. METHODS A prospective surgical database of consecutive endonasal pituitary surgeries with verified CS invasion on intraoperative visual inspection was reviewed. The extent of resection as a whole and within the CS was assessed by an independent neuroradiologist using pre- and post-operative Knosp-Steiner (KS) categorization and volumetrics of the respective magnetic resonance images. The extent of resection and clinical outcomes were compared for medial (KS1-2) and lateral (KS3-4) lesions. RESULTS Thirty-six consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas involving the CS who had surgery via an endonasal endoscopic approach were identified. The extent of resection was 84.6% for KS 1–2 and 66.6% for KS 3–4 (p=.04). Gross-total resection was 53.8% for KS 1–2 and 8.7% for KS 3–4 (p=.0006). Of six patients (16.8%) with pre-operative cranial neuropathies, all showed subjective improvement after surgery. Surgical complications included 2 transient post-operative cranial neuropathies (5.6%), 1 postoperative CSF leak (2.8%), 1 reoperation for mucocele (2.8%) and 1 infection (2.8%). CONCLUSIONS The endoscopic endonasal “medial-to-lateral” approach permits safe debulking of tumors in the medial and lateral CS. Although GTR rates are moderate, particularly in the lateral CS, the risk of permanent cranial neuropathy is extremely low with a high chance of improvement of pre-existing deficits. This approach can also facilitate targeting for post-operative radiosurgery. PMID:24527820

  5. Novel Endoscopic and Surgical Techniques for Treatment of Morbid Obesity: A Glimpse into the Future.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    The burden of obesity and weight-related comorbid disease is significant. Existing laparoscopic techniques show excellent efficacy and safety. New endoscopic and laparoscopic procedures offer different approaches, as primary and revisional techniques, to treat obesity and associated metabolic disease. PMID:27473806

  6. A proposal for the curriculum and evaluation for training rural family physicians in enhanced surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Nadine; Iglesias, Stuart; Friesen, Randall; Berjat, Vanessa; Humber, Nancy; Falk, Ryan; Prins, Mark; Haines, Victoria Vogt; Geller, Brian; Janke, Fred; Woollard, Robert; Batchelor, Bret; Van Bussel, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rural western Canada relies heavily on family physicians with enhanced surgical skills (ESS) for surgical services. The recent decision by the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) to recognize ESS as a “community of practice” section offers a potential home akin to family practice anesthesia and emergency medicine. To our knowledge, however, a skill set for ESS in Canada has never been described formally. In this paper the Curriculum Committee of the National ESS Working Group proposes a generic curriculum for the training and evaluation of the ESS skill set. PMID:26574835

  7. Comparison of quality of the surgical field after controlled hypotension using esmolol and magnesium sulfate during endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Gupta, Ashok; Arora, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Most vital aspect of Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (ESS) is an optimal visibility in the surgical field. This invariably requires controlled hypotension to facilitate surgical dissection and to decrease operative time. We used esmolol and magnesium sulfate to achieve controlled hypotension and assessed the quality of the surgical field in ESS. Material and Methods: A total of 30 patients undergoing ESS, were enrolled in three parallel groups of 10 patients each in a prospective randomized double-blind study. “Magnesium Sulfate group” received magnesium sulfate 40 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.) as a bolus over 10 min before induction of anesthesia, followed by 15-30 mg/kg/h through infusion. “Esmolol group” received 0.5 mg/kg i.v. bolus over 10 min after induction followed by 150-300 μg/kg/min infusion and “control group” received normal saline in same volume schedule. The primary aim was to assess the quality of surgical field, using Fromme scale. Category Scale values of all the three groups were compared using Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Hemodynamic data was compared using ANOVA test. Results: Quality of the surgical field was better in both magnesium sulfate and esmolol groups as compared to the control group. Durations of anesthesia and surgery were significantly lower in esmolol group as compared to the control group. Blood loss was comparable in all the three groups. Conclusion: Quality of the surgical field was better in esmolol and magnesium sulfate groups as compared to control group. Duration of surgery was significantly less in esmolol group as compared to other two groups. PMID:27625479

  8. Exploratory Evaluation of Surgical Skills Mentorship Program Design and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagliardi, Anna R.; Wright, Frances C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: There are few opportunities for mentorship of practicing surgeons and no evidence to guide the design of such programs. This study explored outcomes and barriers associated with the design of surgical mentorship programs. Methods: Interviews were held with organizers, mentors, and proteges of 2 programs. Data from 23 participant…

  9. Surgical outcomes of the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for large and giant pituitary adenomas: institutional experience with special attention to approach-related complications.

    PubMed

    Constantino, Edson Rocha; Leal, Rafael; Ferreira, Christian Cândido; Acioly, Marcus André; Landeiro, José Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Objective In this study, we investigate our institutional experience of patients who underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for treatment of large and giant pituitary adenomas emphasizing the surgical results and approach-related complications. Method The authors reviewed 28 consecutive patients who underwent surgery between March, 2010 and March, 2014. Results The mean preoperative tumor diameter was 4.6 cm. Gross-total resection was achieved in 14.3%, near-total in 10.7%, subtotal in 39.3%, and partial in 35.7%. Nine patients experienced improvement in visual acuity, while one patient worsened. The most common complications were transient diabetes insipidus (53%), new pituitary deficit (35.7%), endonasal adhesions (21.4%), and cerebrospinal fluid leak (17.8%). Surgical mortality was 7.1%. Conclusions Endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery is a valuable treatment option for large or giant pituitary adenomas, which results in high rates of surgical decompression of cerebrovascular structures. PMID:27191235

  10. Surgical treatment of chronic achilles tendinopathy: long-term results of the endoscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Surgery has long been established as a valid alternative for chronic Achilles tendinopathies that have failed conservative treatment. Endoscopic procedures have shown satisfactory preliminary results for managing such injuries. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes of endoscopic surgery in patients with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. We evaluated 27 endoscopic procedures in 24 patients (mean age 45.5 ± 8.9 years; 12 males and 12 females) with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and at least 5 (mean 7.7, range 5 to 14) years of follow-up. All ambulatory procedures consisted of paratenon debridement and longitudinal tenotomies. The clinical evaluation included 2 specific functional rating systems (the Achilles Tendon Scoring System and the Victorian Institute Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire) and a pain visual analog scale. Patient satisfaction with the procedure was assessed using a patient global assessment response to therapy Likert scale score. All patients had an improved clinical outcome at the final follow-up visit. Both scoring systems showed significant improvement in all clinical outcomes at the last follow-up visit. The Victorian Institute Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire score had improved from 37.0 ± 4.9 points preoperatively to 97.5 ± 12.1 points postoperatively (p = .0006). The Achilles Tendon Scoring System score had improved from 32.6 ± 13.1 points preoperatively to 97.2 ± 12.3 points postoperatively (p = .000006). The pain visual analog scale score averaged 0.2 ± 1.1, and the patient global assessment response to therapy score was 0.25 ± 0.71. The percentage of patients with an excellent patient global assessment response to therapy score was 85.1%. Two postoperative problems were reported (7.4%): a delayed keloid lesion and a seroma with chronic fistula. The infection rate and systemic complication rate were 0%. In conclusion, endoscopic surgery provided a high rate of excellent

  11. Transanal endoscopic proctectomy and nerve injury risk: bottom to top surgical anatomy, key points.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, M M; Colombo, P E; Alsaid, B; Prudhomme, M; Rouanet, P

    2014-09-01

    The transanal approach for rectal resection is a promising approach, because it increases the circumferential radial margin, especially for difficult cases. Meanwhile, functional sequelae are frequent after rectal cancer surgery and are often due to neurological lesions. There is little literature describing surgical anatomy from bottom to top. We combined our surgical experience with our fetal and adult anatomical research to provide a bottom-up surgical description focusing on neurological anatomy (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/DCR/A148). PMID:25101614

  12. [Surgical Outcome of Acute and Subacute Subdural Hematoma with Endoscopic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Miki, Koichi; Yoshioka, Tsutomu; Hirata, Yoko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Takagi, Tomohiro; Tsugu, Hitoshi; Inoue, Tooru

    2016-06-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) and subacute subdural hematoma(SASDH)evacuations are commonly performed through a large craniotomy or with external decompression surgery to avoid secondary brain injury. In the field of head trauma, minimally invasive surgeries performed with neuroendoscopy were recently reported. We report 12 patients with ASDH( n=9) and SASDH (n=3)w ho underwent endoscopic hematoma evacuation via a small craniotomy between November 2013 and May 2015. All patients were over 65 years of age(mean age, 78.8 years[range, 65-91 years]) and had subdural hematomas without extensive contusion. The mean preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale(GCS)score was 8.75 (range, 4-13). In three patients, we observed the bleeding point and substantially coagulated it. Decompression in all patients was adequate after surgery. Patients with a preoperative GCS score of 4-6 showed poor outcomes, whereas those with a score >9 showed relatively good outcomes. We performed the operations safely in patients who were on antithrombotic therapy or had a systemic bleeding tendency pre-injury. Endoscopic hematoma evacuation via a small craniotomy is a safe and minimally invasive procedure in patients older than 65 years with comorbidities. PMID:27270143

  13. Comparison of surgical conditions following premedication with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery: A randomized, double-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat Pai, Rohini V; Badiger, Santhoshi; Sachidananda, Roopa; Basappaji, Santhosh Mysore Chandramouli; Shanbhag, Raghunath; Rao, Raghavendra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) provides a challenge and an opportunity to the anesthesiologists to prove their mettle and give the surgeons a surgical field which can make their delicate surgery safer,more precise and faster. The aim of the study was to evaluate the surgical field and the rate of blood loss in patients premedicated with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery. Material and Methods: ASA I or II patients who were scheduled to undergo ESS were randomly allocated to group D (n = 30) or group C (n = 30). The patients' vital parameters, propofol infusion rate, and rate of blood loss were observed and calculated. The surgeon, who was blinded, rated the visibility of the surgical field from grade 0-5. Results: In the clonidine group, the rate of blood loss, the surgical time, propofol infusion rate was found to be statistically lower as compared to the diazepam group. Also a higher number of patients in the clonidine group had a better surgical score (better surgical field) than the diazepam group and vice versa. Conclusions: Premedication with clonidine as compared to diazepam, provides a better surgical field with less blood loss in patients undergoing ESS. PMID:27275059

  14. Single surgical step for endoscopic surgery and orbital reconstruction of a silent sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cardesín, Alda; Escamilla, Yolanda; Romera, Manuel; Molina, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Silent sinus syndrome (SSS) is an uncommon disease characterised by enophthalmos, caused by ipsilateral maxillary sinus atelectasis. The diagnosis is clinical with radiological confirmation. The treatment has two objectives: to regulate the aeration of the maxillary sinus through achieving normal nasal cavity drainage and to restore the orbital architecture. A case of SSS treated in our hospital in a single surgical intervention is reported. PMID:22421390

  15. [Endoscopic cholecystectomy. Experience of the surgical team at the Saint-Charles hospital].

    PubMed

    Abousleiman, C; Husseini, H; Cherfane, M; Baaklini, J; Rouhana, G; Saad, H

    1993-01-01

    The laparoscopic cholecystectomy has been a major event in the progress of surgical techniques during the last few years and becomes more and more present every day in the surgeon's life. We present our experience with our 26 first patients. The results are similar to those already published in the literature. No procedure was converted to laparotomy. No major complications were noted. The team work is stressed upon and advised to our Lebanese colleagues. PMID:8057331

  16. Medium term endoscopic assessment of the surgical outcome following laryngeal saccule resection in brachycephalic dogs.

    PubMed

    Cantatore, M; Gobbetti, M; Romussi, S; Brambilla, G; Giudice, C; Grieco, V; Stefanello, D

    2012-05-19

    Laryngeal saccule eversion has been widely reported as an important component of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS). The authors hypothesised that saccules affected by acute histological changes in patients showing marked improvement following palate and nares surgery might spontaneously return to normal; moreover, spontaneous resolution of the eversion in patients with fibrotic saccules and/or without clinical improvement following BAOS surgery might be impossible and, on the contrary, the persistence of turbulent airflow and associated ongoing inflammation might lead to aberrant tissue proliferation after resection. In order to demonstrate our hypotheses, the authors decided to perform a unilateral sacculectomy and to postpone and assess the need for the execution of the contralateral saccule resection according to the findings of a second-look laryngoscopy. Ten dogs were enrolled. None of the saccules left in situ underwent spontaneous resolution of the eversion. In one dog, after sacculectomy, proliferation of a soft tissue lesion endoscopically similar to a newly formed saccule occurred. The results of the present study suggest that spontaneous resolution of saccule eversion is uncommon, even after the correction of the primary abnormalities (palate, nares). Resection of the saccules can relieve ventral rima glottidis obstruction; however, secondary intention healing might occasionally result in the recurrence of the obstruction. PMID:22472536

  17. Surgical treatment of venous ulcers: role of subfascial endoscopic perforator vein ligation.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Manju; Gloviczki, Peter

    2003-06-01

    Existing data in the literature lack answers to several questions about the optimal treatment of patients with advanced CVI, especially venous ulcers. There is no level I evidence to support the superiority of surgical over medical treatment and the extent of surgical intervention. Specifically, knowledge about the efficacy and applicability of SEPS is incomplete, and prospective, randomized studies are needed. In the light of present-day knowledge, all patients should undergo a trial of medical management before resorting to surgery. Patients who benefit from surgical treatment and the addition of SEPS, if indicated, are patients with ulcers resulting from PVI of the superficial and perforating veins, with or without DVI. Based on available data, these patients can be assured an 80% to 90% chance of long-term freedom from ulcer recurrence. Despite subjective symptomatic and objective clinical score improvement, the role of surgery and SEPS is controversial in patients with PT because only 50% of patients can be predicted to have long-term freedom from ulcer recurrence. Patients with ulcer recurrence after SEPS should undergo duplex scanning to exclude recurrent or persistent perforators. If these are found to be incompetent, repeat SEPS is warranted. If there is no perforator incompetence, patients should be considered for deep venous reconstruction. PMID:12822732

  18. Laparo-endoscopic single site surgery in pediatrics: Feasibility and surgical outcomes from a preliminary prospective Canadian experience

    PubMed Central

    Khambati, Aziz; Wehbi, Elias; Farhat, Walid A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) is becoming an alternative to standard laparoscopic surgery. Proposed advantages include enhanced cosmesis and faster recovery. We assessed the early post-operative surgical outcomes of LESS surgery utilizing different instruments in the pediatric urological population in Canada. Methods: We prospectively captured data on all patients undergoing LESS at our institution between February 2011 and August 2012. This included patient age, operative time, length of stay, complications and short-term surgical outcomes. Different instruments/devices were used to perform the procedures. Access was achieved through a transumbilical incision. Results: A total of 16 LESS procedures were performed, including seven pyeloplasties, four unilateral and one bilateral varicocelectomies, two simple nephrectomies, one renal cyst decortication and one pyelolithotomy. There was no statistical difference in the operative times, hospital length of stay and cost (pyeloplasty only) in patients undergoing pyeloplasty and varicocelectomy using the LESS technique when compared to an age matched cohort of patients managed with the traditional laparoscopic approach. One pyeloplasty in the LESS group required conversion to open due to a small intra-renal pelvis. There were no immediate or short term post-operative complications; however, one patient experienced a decrease in renal function status post LESS pyeloplasty. Since all procedures were performed by a vastly experienced surgeon at a tertiary center, the generalizability of the results cannot be assessed. Conclusions: There are only a few series that have assessed the role of LESS in pediatric urological surgery. Although our experience is limited by a heterogeneous group of patients with a short follow-up period, the present cohort demonstrates the safety and feasibility of LESS. Further evaluation with randomized studies is required to better assess the role of LESS in pediatric

  19. Optimization of a vector quantization codebook for objective evaluation of surgical skill.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Timothy M; Rosen, Jacob; Chang, Lily; Sinanan, Mika N; Hannaford, Blake

    2004-01-01

    Surgical robotic systems and virtual reality simulators have introduced an unprecedented precision of measurement for both tool-tissue and tool-surgeon interaction; thus holding promise for more objective analyses of surgical skill. Integrative or averaged metrics such as path length, time-to-task, success/failure percentages, etc., have often been employed towards this end but these fail to address the processes associated with a surgical task as a dynamic phenomena. Stochastic tools such as Markov modeling using a 'white-box' approach have proven amenable to this type of analysis. While such an approach reveals the internal structure of the of the surgical task as a process, it requires a task decomposition based on expert knowledge, which may result in a relatively large/complex model. In this work, a 'black box' approach is developed with generalized cross-procedural applications., the model is characterized by a compact topology, abstract state definitions, and optimized codebook size. Data sets of isolated tasks were extracted from the Blue DRAGON database consisting of 30 surgical subjects stratified into six training levels. Vector quantization (VQ) was employed on the entire database, thus synthesizing a lexicon of discrete, task-independent surgical tool/tissue interactions. VQ has successfully established a dictionary of 63 surgical code words and displayed non-temporal skill discrimination. VQ allows for a more cross-procedural analysis without relying on a thorough study of the procedure, links the results of the black-box approach to observable phenomena, and reduces the computational cost of the analysis by discretizing a complex, continuous data space. PMID:15544266

  20. Mental distress and effort to engage an image-guided navigation system in the surgical training of endoscopic sinus surgery: a prospective, randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, M N; Ledderose, G J; Becker, S; Leunig, A; Arpe, S; Luz, M; Stelter, K

    2015-04-01

    The use of image-guided navigation systems in the training of FESS is discussed controversy. Many experienced sinus surgeons report a better spatial orientation and an improved situational awareness intraoperatively. But many fear that the navigation system could be a disadvantage in the surgical training because of a higher mental demand and a possible loss of surgical skills. This clinical field study investigates mental and physical demands during transnasal surgery with and without the aid of a navigation system at an early stage in FESS training. Thirty-two endonasal sinus surgeries done by eight different trainee surgeons were included. After randomization, one side of each patient was operated by use of a navigation system, the other side without. During the whole surgery, the surgeons were connected to a biofeedback device measuring the heart rate, the heart rate variability, the respiratory frequency and the masticator EMG. Stress situations could be identified by an increase of the heart rate frequency and a decrease of the heart rate variability. The mental workload during a FESS procedure is high compared to the baseline before and after surgery. The mental workload level when using the navigation did not significantly differ from the side without using the navigation. Residents with more than 30 FESS procedures already done, showed a slightly decreased mental workload when using the navigation. An additional workload shift toward the navigation system could not be observed in any surgeon. Remarkable other stressors could be identified during this study: the behavior of the supervisor or the use of the 45° endoscope, other colleagues or students entering the theatre, poor vision due to bleeding and the preoperative waiting when measuring the baseline. The mental load of young surgeons in FESS surgery is tremendous. The application of a navigation system did not cause a higher mental workload or distress. The device showed a positive effort to engage

  1. [Evaluation of surgical skills of French ophthalmology, orthopedic and gastrointestinal surgery residents: Current status and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Tranchart, H; Aurégan, J C; Gaillard, M; Giocanti-Aurégan, A

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the need for nationwide assessment of surgical skills during residency, and to define ideal methods for assessment in three surgical disciplines: ophthalmology, orthopedics and gastrointestinal surgery. Three online questionnaires were sent by e-mail to 784 residents, fellows and hospital practitioners, and 119 university hospital physican-professors. Questionnaires focused on current assessment methods at the regional level, the roles of the surveyed population in these evaluations, potential obstacles to their development and the most relevant methods for practical evaluations. Nine hundred and three questionnaires were sent; 355 participants replied (response rate: 39%). The establishment of systematic assessment seemed necessary to over 90% of the survey population, and this opinion was equitably distributed among all three specialties. Over 60% of respondents felt that current assessment procedures were not satisfactory. In all three specialties, the ideal evaluation method proposed was a real patient procedure. This "in vivo" evaluation was considered applicable in 80% of cases, potential barriers to its development being the resident's anxiety, medical-legal reasons and the lack of objective criteria. The ideal timing of these assessments was bi-annual. Implementation of surgical skills assessment during residency seems necessary. The survey population appears dissatisfied with current arrangements. A step-by-step evaluation combining surgical simulations, animal training and live patient procedures may be appropriate. PMID:26343276

  2. Endoscopic pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; de Divitiis, Oreste; Solari, Domenico; Esposito, Felice; Colao, Annamaria

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary surgery is a continuous evolving speciality of the neurosurgeons' armamentarium, which requires precise anatomical knowledge, technical skills and integrated appreciation of the pituitary pathophysiology. What we consider "pure" endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery is a procedure performed through the nose and the sphenoid bone, with the endoscope alone throughout the whole approach to visualize the surgical target area and without the use of any transsphenoidal retractor. It offers some advantages due to the endoscope itself: a superior close-up view of the relevant anatomy and an enlarged working angle are provided with an increased panoramic vision inside the surgical area. Concerning results in terms of mass removal, relief of clinical symptoms, cure of the underlying disease and complication rate, they are, at least, similar to those reported in the major microsurgical series, but patient compliance is by far better. Furthermore transsphenoidal endoscopy brings advantages to the patient (less nasal traumatism, no nasal packing, less post-op pain and usually quick recovery), to the surgeon (wider and closer view of the surgical target area, increase of the scientific activity as from the peer-reviewed literature on the topic in the last 10 years, smoothing of interdisciplinary cooperation), to the institution (shorter post-op hospital stay, increase of the case load). Besides, further progress and technological advance are expected from the close cooperation between different technologies and industries. Continuing works in such field of "minimalism" will offer further possibilities to provide the surgeon with even more effectiveness and safety, and, on the other hand, the patient with improvement of results. PMID:18286374

  3. Development of an orthopaedic surgical skills curriculum for post-graduate year one resident learners - the University of Iowa experience.

    PubMed

    Karam, Matthew D; Westerlind, Brian; Anderson, Donald D; Marsh, J Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgery requires a high degree of technical skill. Current orthopaedic surgical education is based largely on an apprenticeship model. In addition to mounting evidence of the value of simulation, recent mandated requirements will undoubtedly lead to increased emphasis on surgical skills and simulation training. The University of Iowa's Department of Orthopaedic Surgery has created and implemented a month long surgical skills training program for PGY-1 residents. The goal of the program was to improve the basic surgical skills of six PGY-1 orthopaedic surgery residents and prepare them for future operative experiences. A modular curriculum was created by members of the orthopaedic faculty which encompassed basic skills felt to be important to the general orthopaedic surgeon. For each module multiple assessment techniques were utilized to provide constructive critique, identify errors and enhance the performance intensity of trainees. Based on feedback and debriefing surveys, the resident trainees were unanimously satisfied with the content of the surgical skills month, and felt it should remain a permanent part of our educational program. This manuscript will describe the development of the curriculum, the execution of the actual skills sessions and analysis of feedback from the residents and share valuable lessons learned and insights for future skills programs. PMID:24027480

  4. Interactive 3D-PDF Presentations for the Simulation and Quantification of Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mavar-Haramija, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Méndez, Juan A Juanes; Puigdelívoll-Sánchez, Anna; de Notaris, Matteo

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of the skull base was reconstructed from the pre- and post-dissection head CT images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The CT images were segmented using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data, and the resulting 3D geometrical models of anatomical structures were used for dual purpose: to simulate the extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approaches and to perform the quantitative analysis of the procedures. The analysis consisted of bone removal quantification and the calculation of quantitative parameters (surgical freedom and exposure area) of each procedure. The results are presented in three PDF documents containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D-PDF files include reconstructions of the nasal structures (nasal septum, vomer, middle turbinates), the bony structures of the anterior skull base and maxillofacial region and partial reconstructions of the optic nerve, the hypoglossal and vidian canals and the internal carotid arteries. Alongside the anatomical model, axial, sagittal and coronal CT images are shown. Interactive 3D presentations were created to explain the surgery and the associated quantification methods step-by-step. The resulting 3D-PDF files allow the user to interact with the model through easily available software, free of charge and in an intuitive manner. The files are available for offline use on a personal computer and no previous specialized knowledge in informatics is required. The documents can be downloaded at http://hdl.handle.net/2445/55224 . PMID:26306875

  5. A Review of Endoscopic Simulation: Current Evidence on Simulators and Curricula.

    PubMed

    King, Neil; Kunac, Anastasia; Merchant, Aziz M

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower endoscopy is an important tool that is being utilized more frequently by general surgeons. Training in therapeutic endoscopic techniques has become a mandatory requirement for general surgery residency programs in the United States. The Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery has been developed to train and assess competency in these advanced techniques. Simulation has been shown to increase the skill and learning curve of trainees in other surgical disciplines. Several types of endoscopy simulators are commercially available; mechanical trainers, animal based, and virtual reality or computer-based simulators all have their benefits and limitations. However they have all been shown to improve trainee's endoscopic skills. Endoscopic simulators will play a critical role as part of a comprehensive curriculum designed to train the next generation of surgeons. We reviewed recent literature related to the various types of endoscopic simulators and their use in an educational curriculum, and discuss the relevant findings. PMID:26699281

  6. Toward an objective assessment of technical skills: a national survey of surgical program directors in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alkhayal, Abdullah; Aldhukair, Shahla; Alselaim, Nahar; Aldekhayel, Salah; Alhabdan, Sultan; Altaweel, Waleed; Magzoub, Mohi Elden; Zamakhshary, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Background After almost a decade of implementing competency-based programs in postgraduate training programs, the assessment of technical skills remains more subjective than objective. National data on the assessment of technical skills during surgical training are lacking. We conducted this study to document the assessment tools for technical skills currently used in different surgical specialties, their relationship with remediation, the recommended tools from the program directors’ perspective, and program directors’ attitudes toward the available objective tools to assess technical skills. Methods This study was a cross-sectional survey of surgical program directors (PDs). The survey was initially developed using a focus group and was then sent to 116 PDs. The survey contains demographic information about the program, the objective assessment tools used, and the reason for not using assessment tools. The last section discusses the recommended tools to be used from the PDs’ perspective and the PDs’ attitude and motivation to apply these tools in each program. The associations between the responses to the assessment questions and remediation were statistically evaluated. Results Seventy-one (61%) participants responded. Of the respondents, 59% mentioned using only nonstandardized, subjective, direct observation for technical skills assessment. Sixty percent use only summative evaluation, whereas 15% perform only formative evaluations of their residents, and the remaining 22% conduct both summative and formative evaluations of their residents’ technical skills. Operative portfolios are kept by 53% of programs. The percentage of programs with mechanisms for remediation is 29% (19 of 65). Conclusion The survey showed that surgical training programs use different tools to assess surgical skills competency. Having a clear remediation mechanism was highly associated with reporting remediation, which reflects the capability to detect struggling residents

  7. Human-robot skills transfer interfaces for a flexible surgical robot.

    PubMed

    Calinon, Sylvain; Bruno, Danilo; Malekzadeh, Milad S; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2014-09-01

    In minimally invasive surgery, tools go through narrow openings and manipulate soft organs to perform surgical tasks. There are limitations in current robot-assisted surgical systems due to the rigidity of robot tools. The aim of the STIFF-FLOP European project is to develop a soft robotic arm to perform surgical tasks. The flexibility of the robot allows the surgeon to move within organs to reach remote areas inside the body and perform challenging procedures in laparoscopy. This article addresses the problem of designing learning interfaces enabling the transfer of skills from human demonstration. Robot programming by demonstration encompasses a wide range of learning strategies, from simple mimicking of the demonstrator's actions to the higher level imitation of the underlying intent extracted from the demonstrations. By focusing on this last form, we study the problem of extracting an objective function explaining the demonstrations from an over-specified set of candidate reward functions, and using this information for self-refinement of the skill. In contrast to inverse reinforcement learning strategies that attempt to explain the observations with reward functions defined for the entire task (or a set of pre-defined reward profiles active for different parts of the task), the proposed approach is based on context-dependent reward-weighted learning, where the robot can learn the relevance of candidate objective functions with respect to the current phase of the task or encountered situation. The robot then exploits this information for skills refinement in the policy parameters space. The proposed approach is tested in simulation with a cutting task performed by the STIFF-FLOP flexible robot, using kinesthetic demonstrations from a Barrett WAM manipulator. PMID:24491285

  8. Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair®: A novel, full-endoscopic surgical technique for the treatment of symptomatic cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J.; Cianciabella, Augusto; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a novel full-endoscopic, anterior cervical, trans-discal, motion preserving, laser assisted, nonfusion, outpatient surgical procedure to safely treat symptomatic cervical disc diseases including herniation, spondylosis, stenosis, and annular tears. Here we describe a new endoscopic approach to cervical disc disease that allows direct visualization of the posterior longitudinal ligament, posterior vertebral endplates, annulus, neuroforamina, and herniated disc fragments. All patients treated with Deuk Laser Disc Repair were also candidates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods: A total of 142 consecutive adult patients with symptomatic cervical disc disease underwent Deuk Laser Disc Repair during a 4-year period. This novel procedure incorporates a full-endoscopic selective partial decompressive discectomy, foraminoplasty, and posterior annular debridement. Postoperative complications and average volume of herniated disc fragments removed are reported. Results: All patients were successfully treated with cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair. There were no postoperative complications. Average volume of herniated disc material removed was 0.09 ml. Conclusions: Potential benefits of Deuk Laser Disc Repair for symptomatic cervical disc disease include lower cost, smaller incision, nonfusion, preservation of segmental motion, outpatient, faster recovery, less postoperative analgesic use, fewer complications, no hardware failure, no pseudoarthrosis, no postoperative dysphagia, and no increased risk of adjacent segment disease as seen with fusion. PMID:23230523

  9. Can a Teaching Assistant Experience in a Surgical Anatomy Course Influence the Learning Curve for Nontechnical Skill Development for Surgical Residents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidenreich, Mark J.; Musonza, Tashinga; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    The foundation upon which surgical residents are trained to work comprises more than just critical cognitive, clinical, and technical skill. In an environment where the synchronous application of expertise is vital to patient outcomes, the expectation for optimal functioning within a multidisciplinary team is extremely high. Studies have shown…

  10. Can a teaching assistant experience in a surgical anatomy course influence the learning curve for nontechnical skill development for surgical residents?

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Mark J; Musonza, Tashinga; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    The foundation upon which surgical residents are trained to work comprises more than just critical cognitive, clinical, and technical skill. In an environment where the synchronous application of expertise is vital to patient outcomes, the expectation for optimal functioning within a multidisciplinary team is extremely high. Studies have shown that for most residents, one of the most difficult milestones in the path to achieving professional expertise in a surgical career is overcoming the learning curve. This view point commentary provides a reflection from the two senior medical students who have participated in the Student-as-Teacher program developed by the Department of Anatomy at Mayo Clinic, designed to prepare students for their teaching assistant (TA) role in anatomy courses. Both students participated as TAs in a six week surgical anatomy course for surgical first assistant students offered by the School of Health Sciences at Mayo Clinic. Development of teaching skills, nontechnical leadership, communication, and assessment skills, are discussed in relation to their benefits in preparing senior medical students for surgical residency. PMID:26126886

  11. Objective Evaluation of Motor Skills for Orthopedic Residents Using a Motion Tracking Drill System: Outcomes of an ABOS Approved Surgical Skills Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Pourkand, Ashkan; Salas, Christina; Regalado, Jasmin; Bhakta, Krishan; Tufaro, Rachel; Mercer, Deana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Orthopedics is a motor skills-demanding surgical specialty requiring surgical skills training outside of the operating room. Unfortunately, limited quantitative techniques exist to determine the effectiveness of these surgical skills training programs. Using a variety of drill, surgeon, and specimen mounted sensors, we evaluated orthopedic surgery residents during a surgical skills training course approved by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons (ABOS). This evaluation consisted of quantitative measures of various kinematic and kinetic parameters with the goal of relating these to clinically-significant outcomes. Methods Seven experienced surgeons and 22 surgical residents participated in this study, each performing 5 surgical drilling trials, pre- and post-training. Utilizing arm and tool kinematics, applied force, tool and bone vibration, and drill RPM were measured using a combination of force, acceleration, and optical tracking sensors. Post hoc screw pullout testing and resident survey data were also evaluated. Overall, 25 measured parameters were expressed as scalars and their covariance calculated. Results Non-trivial direct correlations whose magnitude exceeded 0.5 were: maximum penetration distance with applied force, drill toggle with drill roll angle, and drill RPM with force. Surgeons applying a high drill RPM also yielded a large force which in turn gave an increase in tendency for over-penetration. As a whole, the differences between experienced and novice surgeons measured in these trials were not statistically significant. However, when looking at specific performance criterion individually (maintaining steady force, minimizing over-penetration, minimizing both the major and minor axis diameters, minimizing toggle and drill vibration), experienced surgeons tended to outperform their novice counterparts. Conclusions Objective assessment of surgical skills using sensor based technologies may help elucidate differences between

  12. Simulator-based assessment of haptic surgical skill: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Singapogu, Ravikiran B; Long, Lindsay O; Smith, Dane E; Burg, Timothy C; Pagano, Christopher C; Prabhu, Varun V; Burg, Karen J L

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if the forces applied by users of a haptic simulator could be used to distinguish expert surgeons from novices. Seven surgeons with significant operating room expertise and 9 novices with no surgical experience participated in this study. The experimental task comprised exploring 4 virtual materials with the haptic device and learning the precise forces required to compress the materials to various depths. The virtual materials differed in their stiffness and force-displacement profiles. The results revealed that for nonlinear virtual materials, surgeons applied significantly greater magnitudes of force than novices. Furthermore, for the softer nonlinear and linear materials, surgeons were significantly more accurate in reproducing forces than novices. The results of this study suggest that the magnitudes of force measured using haptic simulators may be used to objectively differentiate experts' haptic skill from that of novices. This knowledge can inform the design of virtual reality surgical simulators and lead to the future incorporation of haptic skills training in medical school curricula. PMID:25053621

  13. 'The Days of Brilliancy are Past': Skill, Styles and the Changing Rules of Surgical Performance, ca. 1820-1920.

    PubMed

    Schlich, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines how, over the course of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the appreciation of skill in surgery shifted in characteristic ways. Skill is a problematic category in surgery. Its evaluation is embedded into wider cultural expectations and evaluations, which changed over time. The paper examines the discussions about surgical skill in a variety of contexts: the highly competitive environment of celebrity practitioners in the amphitheatres of early nineteenth-century Britain; the science-oriented, technocratic German-language university hospitals later in the century; and the elitist surgeons of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century United States with their concerns about distancing themselves from commercialism and cheap showmanship. For analysing the interaction of surgical practices with their various contexts the paper makes use of the concept of 'performance' and examines how the rules of surgical performance varied according to the prevailing technical, social, and moral conditions. Over the course of the century, surgical performance looked more and more recognisably modern, increasingly following the ideals of replicability, universality and standardisation. The changing ideals of surgical skill are a crucial element of the complex history of the emergence of modern surgery, but also an illuminating example of the history of skill in modern medicine. PMID:26090735

  14. The Surgical Treatment of Single Level Multi-Focal Subarticular and Paracentral and/or Far-Lateral Lumbar Disc Herniations: The Single Incision Full Endoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David L.; Han, Xiao; Yacob, Alem

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgery for same level multi-focal extruded lumbar disc herniations is technically challenging and the optimal method controversial. The subarticular disc herniation may pose the most challenging subtype requiring partial or complete facetectomy with or without fusion. The far-lateral disc herniation, often treated using a Wiltse approach, can also be difficult to access especially in the obese patient. When both the subarticular and far-lateral subtypes are simultaneously present at the same level with or without a paracentral disc herniation, a total facetectomy and interbody fusion (TLIF) or a total disc replacement (TDR) may be necessary. Endoscopic surgical techniques may reduce the need for these more invasive methods. Methods Fifteen patients (6 male and 9 female) who had same level multi-focal (subarticular as well as far-lateral and/or paracentral) extruded disc herniations underwent single incision unilateral endoscopic disc excision by the same surgeon at a single institution. Patients were prospectively followed for an average of 15.3 months (range 14-18 months) and outcomes were evaluated radiographically and clinically (Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results The mean operative time was 52 minutes with minimal blood loss in all cases. Fourteen of the 15 patients were discharged to home on the day of their surgery. The mean ODI and leg VAS scores improved from 22.9 ± 3.2 to 12.9 ± 2.7 (p < 0.005), and from 8.6 ± 1.6 to 2.1 + 0.4 (p < 0.005), respectively. Conclusions After an average of 15.3 months of follow-up, the clinical and radiographic results of full endoscopic surgical treatment of single level multi-focal (subarticular as well as far-lateral and/or paracentral) disc herniations are excellent. This study is a case series with mid-term follow-up (Level IV). Clinical Relevance Foraminal and extra-foraminal full endoscopic decompression appears to offer a safe minimally invasive solution to a complex

  15. Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Brent A

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery has undergone rapid advancement in the past decade moving from pituitary surgery to suprasellar lesions and now to a myriad of lesions extending from the cribriform plate to C2 and laterally out to the infratemporal fossa and petrous apex. Evolution of several technological advances as well as advances in understanding of endoscopic anatomy and the development of surgical techniques both in resection and reconstruction have fostered this capability. Management of benign disease via endoscopic methods is largely accepted now but more data is needed before the controversy on the role of endoscopic management of malignant disease is decided. Continued advances in surgical technique, navigation systems, endoscopic imaging technology, and robotics assure continued brisk evolution in this expanding field. PMID:19434274

  16. Endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Leonard K; SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  17. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K.; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  18. Endoscopic non-technical skills team training: The next step in quality assurance of endoscopy training

    PubMed Central

    Matharoo, Manmeet; Haycock, Adam; Sevdalis, Nick; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether novel, non-technical skills training for Bowel Cancer Screening (BCS) endoscopy teams enhanced patient safety knowledge and attitudes. METHODS: A novel endoscopy team training intervention for BCS teams was developed and evaluated as a pre-post intervention study. Four multi-disciplinary BCS teams constituting BCS endoscopist(s), specialist screening practitioners, endoscopy nurses and administrative staff (A) from English BCS training centres participated. No patients were involved in this study. Expert multidisciplinary faculty delivered a single day’s training utilising real clinical examples. Pre and post-course evaluation comprised participants’ patient safety awareness, attitudes, and knowledge. Global course evaluations were also collected. RESULTS: Twenty-three participants attended and their patient safety knowledge improved significantly from 43%-55% (P ≤ 0.001) following the training intervention. 12/41 (29%) of the safety attitudes items significantly improved in the areas of perceived patient safety knowledge and awareness. The remaining safety attitude items: perceived influence on patient safety, attitudes towards error management, error management actions and personal views following an error were unchanged following training. Both qualitative and quantitative global course evaluations were positive: 21/23 (91%) participants strongly agreed/agreed that they were satisfied with the course. Qualitative evaluation included mandating such training for endoscopy teams outside BCS and incorporating team training within wider endoscopy training. Limitations of the study include no measure of increased patient safety in clinical practice following training. CONCLUSION: A novel comprehensive training package addressing patient safety, non-technical skills and adverse event analysis was successful in improving multi-disciplinary teams’ knowledge and safety attitudes. PMID:25516665

  19. A comparison of clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic surgery for adnexal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Ok; Yoon, Jung Won; Chung, Dawn; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic (TML) surgery for treatment of adnexal tumors. Methods Medical records were reviewed for patients undergoing surgery for benign adnexal tumors between January 2008 and April 2012 at our institution. All procedures were performed by the same surgeon. Clinical and surgical outcomes for patients undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port were compared with those patients undergoing TML surgery. Results A review of 129 patient cases undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port and 100 patient cases undergoing TML surgery revealed no significant differences in the baseline characteristics of the two groups. The median operative time was shorter in the LESS group using Glove port at 44 minutes (range, 19-126 minutes) than the TML group at 49 minutes (range, 20-196 minutes) (P=0.0007). There were no significant differences between in the duration of postoperative hospital stay, change in hemoglobin levels, pain score or the rate of complications between the LESS and TML groups. Conclusion LESS surgery showed comparable clinical and surgical outcomes to TML surgery, and required less operative time. Future prospective trials are warranted to further define the benefits of LESS surgery for adnexal tumor treatment. PMID:25264529

  20. Endoscopic treatment of gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Thomas R; Rustagi, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Gastroparesis has traditionally been a largely medically managed disease with refractory symptoms typically falling under the umbrella of the surgical domain. Surgical options include, but are not limited to, gastrostomy, jejunostomy, pyloromyotomy, or pyloroplasty, and the Food and Drug Administration approved gastric electrical stimulation implantation. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis most commonly involves intrapyloric botulinum toxin injection; however, there exists a variety of endoscopic approaches on the horizon that have the potential to radically shift standard of care. Endoscopic management of gastroparesis seeks to treat delayed gastric emptying with a less invasive approach compared to the surgical approach. This review will serve to highlight such innovative and potentially transformative, endoscopic interventions available to gastroenterologists in the management of gastroparesis. PMID:26078560

  1. Endoscopic bile duct and/or pancreatic duct cannulation technique for patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yoshinobu; Ishida, Yusuke; Kuraoka, Kei; Ushijima, Tomoyuki; Tsuruta, Osamu

    2014-04-01

    There are two major hurdles to carrying out endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy (Billroth II gastrectomy [B-II], Roux-en-Y anastomosis [R-Y] etc.), post-pancreatoduodenectomy or post-choledochojejunostomy. These are: (i) the endoscopic approach to the afferent loop, blind end, and the site of bilio-pancreatic anastomosis; and (ii) bile duct and/or pancreatic duct cannulation. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE) became available in recent years and is now being actively used to overcome the first hurdle and, at least, the success rate has improved. However, room for improvement still remains in regards to the second hurdle (i.e. the success rate of cannulation of the bile duct and/or pancreatic duct), and there has been a desire for the development of dedicated devices (ERCP catheters, hoods etc.) and for improvement in the functionality of the enteroscopes etc. In the present review, we explain the basic procedure for bile duct and/or pancreatic duct cannulation with conventional endoscopes and BAE, and modifications of the basic procedure. PMID:24750161

  2. A Human Factors Analysis of Technical and Team Skills Among Surgical Trainees During Procedural Simulations in a Simulated Operating Theatre

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Krishna; Munz, Yaron; Adams, Sally; Pandey, Vikas; Darzi, Ara

    2005-01-01

    Background: High-risk organizations such as aviation rely on simulations for the training and assessment of technical and team performance. The aim of this study was to develop a simulated environment for surgical trainees using similar principles. Methods: A total of 27 surgical trainees carried out a simulated procedure in a Simulated Operating Theatre with a standardized OR team. Observation of OR events was carried out by an unobtrusive data collection system: clinical data recorder. Assessment of performance consisted of blinded rating of technical skills, a checklist of technical events, an assessment of communication, and a global rating of team skills by a human factors expert and trained surgical research fellows. The participants underwent a debriefing session, and the face validity of the simulated environment was evaluated. Results: While technical skills rating discriminated between surgeons according to experience (P = 0.002), there were no differences in terms of the checklist and team skills (P = 0.70). While all trainees were observed to gown/glove and handle sharps correctly, low scores were observed for some key features of communication with other team members. Low scores were obtained by the entire cohort for vigilance. Interobserver reliability was 0.90 and 0.89 for technical and team skills ratings. Conclusions: The simulated operating theatre could serve as an environment for the development of surgical competence among surgical trainees. Objective, structured, and multimodal assessment of performance during simulated procedures could serve as a basis for focused feedback during training of technical and team skills. PMID:16244534

  3. Endoscopic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Auer, L M; Holzer, P; Ascher, P W; Heppner, F

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an ultrasound-guided, laser-assisted, and TV-controlled endoscopic technique which has been used so far in 133 patients for a variety of intracranial lesions. Following CT or MRI image reconstruction, and a decision on the placement of a 1 cm or a 2 cm burrhole, a 1 cm 5.0 mHz or 7.5 mHz intraoperative ultrasound probe is used to direct the endoscope from the burrhole to the target area. A 22.5 cm long rigid endoscope tube with an outer diameter of 6 mm with an inbuilt suction irrigation system, Neodymium Yag laser with 600 micron Quartz glass-fibre and an inlet for various microinstruments is then introduced. The attachment of a TV camera to the ocular lens allows the operator to control further surgical steps in the target area via the TV screen and thus warrants sterility in the operating field. The technique has been used for evacuation of 77 spontaneous intracerebral haematomas (lobar, putaminal, thalamic), 8 traumatic intracerebral haematomas, 13 ventricular haematomas, 8 cerebellar haematomas and 1 brainstem haematoma. Total or subtotal evacuation was achieved in 33% of intracerebral haematomas, removal of more than 50% of the clot in 55%. Twenty-four brain tumours (12 ventricular, 12 cystic cerebral or cerebellar tumours) were operated on for biopsy, evacuation of cyst, resection or removal of the cyst wall and/or laser irradiation of solid tumour or the inner cyst wall of cystic tumours. The complication rate probably related to surgery was 1.6%, morbidity 1.6%, mortality 0%. This high-tec endoscopic technique with its minimal surgical trauma and short operation time can be recommended as a low-risk alternative to conventional neurosurgical techniques. PMID:3278501

  4. Investigating the Influence of Hand Dominance on Postural Sway During Traditional and Simulated Laparoscopic Surgical Skills Practice.

    PubMed

    White, Anthony; Huang, Chun-Kai; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how hand dominance could influence postural sway during laparoscopic skills practice. Ten inexperienced medical trainees performed a peg transfer task using the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) training box and the virtual reality (VR) trainer. Surface electromyographic recordings of upper and lower limb muscles were taken, while the postural sway was measured by a pressure mapping system. Skills performance using the non-dominant hand required more muscle effort and increased more postural sway. Compared with the FLS training box, training with VR decreased the use of muscle effort and could reduce the influence of hand dominance on the overall postural sway during laparoscopic surgical skills practice. PMID:27046621

  5. Outcomes Following Endoscopic Stapes Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jacob B; Rivas, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    There are limited studies describing the surgical and hearing outcomes following endoscopic stapes surgeries, despite the burgeoning interest and excitement in endoscopic ear surgery. Current studies have demonstrated that endoscopic stapes surgery is safe and has similar audiologic outcomes when compared with microscopic stapes procedures. However, preliminary studies show decreased postoperative pain in endoscopic cases compared with microscopic controls. In regards to possible endoscopic advantages, these few studies demonstrate mixed results when comparing the need to remove the bony medial external auditory canal wall to improve visualization and access to the oval window niche. PMID:27565387

  6. Prospective, Randomized Ex Vivo Trial to Assess the Ideal Stapling Site for Endoscopic Fundoplication with Medigus Ultrasonic Surgical Endostapler.

    PubMed

    Gweon, Tae-Geun; Matthes, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Endoscopic fundoplication is an emerging technique for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of this study is to determine the ideal position of the staples in relation to gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Methods. Ten endoscopic fundoplication procedures were performed in each group using fresh ex vivo porcine stomachs: Group A: 2 staples each at 3 cm above the GEJ and 180° apart; Group B: 2 staples at 3 cm and 90° apart; Group C: 2 staples at 4 cm and 180° apart; Group D: 3 staples at 3 cm with 90° between each staple (180° total). After the procedure, the stomach was gradually filled with water. Gastric yield pressure (GYP) was determined by detection of reflux of the water in esophagus or by rupture of staples. Results. Mean increase of GYPs (±SD) after the procedure was as follows: Group A: 16.9 ± 8.7; Group B: 8.1 ± 7.9; Group C: 12.2 ± 9.4; Group D: 22.7 ± 13.3. GYP in Group A and Group D was higher than Group B (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, resp.). Conclusions. We recommend the placement of 3 staples at 3 cm distance from the GEJ, which resulted in the highest increase of GYP. PMID:27547219

  7. Prospective, Randomized Ex Vivo Trial to Assess the Ideal Stapling Site for Endoscopic Fundoplication with Medigus Ultrasonic Surgical Endostapler

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Endoscopic fundoplication is an emerging technique for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of this study is to determine the ideal position of the staples in relation to gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Methods. Ten endoscopic fundoplication procedures were performed in each group using fresh ex vivo porcine stomachs: Group A: 2 staples each at 3 cm above the GEJ and 180° apart; Group B: 2 staples at 3 cm and 90° apart; Group C: 2 staples at 4 cm and 180° apart; Group D: 3 staples at 3 cm with 90° between each staple (180° total). After the procedure, the stomach was gradually filled with water. Gastric yield pressure (GYP) was determined by detection of reflux of the water in esophagus or by rupture of staples. Results. Mean increase of GYPs (±SD) after the procedure was as follows: Group A: 16.9 ± 8.7; Group B: 8.1 ± 7.9; Group C: 12.2 ± 9.4; Group D: 22.7 ± 13.3. GYP in Group A and Group D was higher than Group B (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, resp.). Conclusions. We recommend the placement of 3 staples at 3 cm distance from the GEJ, which resulted in the highest increase of GYP. PMID:27547219

  8. Assessment of minimally invasive surgical skills of pre-medical students: What can we learn from future learners?

    PubMed Central

    Borahay, Mostafa A.; Jackson, Mary; Tapısız, Ömer L.; Lyons, Elizabeth; Patel, Pooja R.; Nassar, Ramsey; Kılıç, Gökhan Sami

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knowledge of baseline laparoscopic and robotic surgical skills of future learners is essential to develop teaching strategies that best fit them. The objectives of this study are to determine baseline laparoscopic and robotic skills of high school and college students and compare them to those of current obstetrics and gynecology residents. Material and Methods A cross-sectional (Class II-2) pilot study. Laparoscopic and robotic surgical skills of college and high (secondary) school students were evaluated using simulators and compared to those of obstetrics and gynecology residents. In addition, questionnaire data were collected regarding video game playing and computer use. Results A total of 17 students, both high school (n=9) and college (n=8), in addition to 11 residents, completed the study. Overall, students performed comparably to the residents in simple exercises (p>.05). However, students took significantly longer time to complete complex exercises (p=.001). Finally, students played video games significantly more than residents (p<.001). Conclusion Future learners may have a different background skill set. This difference may be related to improved hand-eye coordination, possibly due to playing video games. The results of this pilot study should spur more research into surgical teaching strategies. PMID:24976769

  9. A comparison of effects of oral premedication with clonidine and metoprolol on intraoperative hemodynamics and surgical conditions during functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Puthenveettil, Nitu; Rajan, Sunil; Kumar, Lakshmi; Nair, Suresh Gangadharan

    2013-01-01

    Context: Establishing a near perfect surgical field during functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is essential and even a minor bleeding can severely compromise an already restricted view. So, if controlled hypotension can be provided without compromising the safety of patient by a relatively effortless method, surgical field can be improved greatly. Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic changes and surgical conditions during FESS following oral premedication with clonidine and metoprolol. Settings and Design: A total of 40 patients undergoing FESS were included in this prospective, randomized controlled study. Subjects and Methods: Patients were divided into two equal groups. Group A patients were premedicated with oral clonidine 300 mcg and Group B with oral metoprolol 50 mg, 2 h before surgery. All patients received fentanyl 2 mcg/kg and induced with propofol 2 mg/kg. Intubation was done following vecuronium 1 mg/kg. Anesthesia was maintained with 66% N2O, 33% O2 and 1% isoflurane. The heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured before induction and thereafter every 15 min up to 2 h. The surgeons were asked to estimate the quality of the operative field using a pre-defined category scale with scores 1-5. Statistical Analysis: Difference within the groups was analyzed using analysis of variance and post-hoc test was used to test the difference between individual groups. Chi-square test was used to find out the association between categorical variables. Results: Comparison of category scale revealed a lower score in Group A up to 60 min. Group B patients showed a statistically lower HR from pre-induction up to 90 min while systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP) and mean arterial pressure did not show a significant difference. Conclusions: Oral premedication with 300 mcg of clonidine produced a better operative field than oral metoprolol 50 mg during FESS. PMID:25885986

  10. Percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy using working channel endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy has evolved as an efficient, minimally invasive spine surgery for cervical disc herniation or radiculopathy. The development of the working channel endoscope makes definitive decompression surgery through a percutaneous approach feasible. There are two methods of approach to target the pathology: anterior and posterior approach. The approach can be determined according to the zone of pathology or the surgeon's preference. The most significant benefits of this endoscopic surgical technique are minimal access tissue trauma and early recovery from the intervention. However, this technique is still evolving and have a steep learning curve. Extensive development of surgical technique and working channel endoscopes will enable us to treat cervical disc herniation more practically. The objective of this review is to describe the cutting-edge techniques of endoscopic surgery in the cervical spine and to discuss the pros and cons of these minimally invasive surgical techniques. PMID:27086505

  11. Effect of puncture resistant surgical gloves, finger guards, and glove liners on cutaneous sensibility and surgical psychomotor skills.

    PubMed

    Woods, J A; Leslie, L F; Drake, D B; Edlich, R F

    1996-01-01

    New puncture and cut resistant hand protection systems have been developed to enhance the barrier to cuts and needle puncture injuries during surgical procedures. It is important, however, that these new hand protection systems do not reduce tactile sensitivity or dexterity during surgery. Consequently, it was the purpose of this report to compare the cutaneous sensibility and dexterity of physicians' hands covered by these new puncture and cut resistant hand protection systems to that of the standard surgical latex glove. The hide (Medak) portion of the Life Liner and the polyethylene (Spectra) portion of the FingGuard, which offered the greatest resistance to needle puncture, were associated with the greatest reduction in cutaneous sensibility, as determined by moving and static two-point discrimination, aesthesiometer pressure sensation, and discrimination of suture size and configuration. In addition, the physicians believed that the puncture and cut resistant Life Liner glove liner markedly interfered with their handling of surgical instruments. The ultimate benefit of these puncture and cut resistant hand protection systems must be determined in well-controlled clinical trials. PMID:8734074

  12. Saturated salt solution method: a useful cadaver embalming for surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shogo; Homma, Hiroshi; Naito, Munekazu; Oda, Jun; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Kawamoto, Atsuo; Kawata, Shinichi; Sato, Norio; Fukuhara, Tomomi; Taguchi, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Kazuki; Azuhata, Takeo; Ito, Masayuki; Kawai, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tomoya; Nishizawa, Yuji; Araki, Jun; Matsuno, Naoto; Shirai, Takayuki; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Fukui, Hidekimi; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    This article evaluates the suitability of cadavers embalmed by the saturated salt solution (SSS) method for surgical skills training (SST). SST courses using cadavers have been performed to advance a surgeon's techniques without any risk to patients. One important factor for improving SST is the suitability of specimens, which depends on the embalming method. In addition, the infectious risk and cost involved in using cadavers are problems that need to be solved. Six cadavers were embalmed by 3 methods: formalin solution, Thiel solution (TS), and SSS methods. Bacterial and fungal culture tests and measurement of ranges of motion were conducted for each cadaver. Fourteen surgeons evaluated the 3 embalming methods and 9 SST instructors (7 trauma surgeons and 2 orthopedists) operated the cadavers by 21 procedures. In addition, ultrasonography, central venous catheterization, and incision with cauterization followed by autosuture stapling were performed in some cadavers. The SSS method had a sufficient antibiotic effect and produced cadavers with flexible joints and a high tissue quality suitable for SST. The surgeons evaluated the cadavers embalmed by the SSS method to be highly equal to those embalmed by the TS method. Ultrasound images were clear in the cadavers embalmed by both the methods. Central venous catheterization could be performed in a cadaver embalmed by the SSS method and then be affirmed by x-ray. Lungs and intestines could be incised with cauterization and autosuture stapling in the cadavers embalmed by TS and SSS methods. Cadavers embalmed by the SSS method are sufficiently useful for SST. This method is simple, carries a low infectious risk, and is relatively of low cost, enabling a wider use of cadavers for SST. PMID:25501070

  13. Saturated Salt Solution Method: A Useful Cadaver Embalming for Surgical Skills Training

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shogo; Homma, Hiroshi; Naito, Munekazu; Oda, Jun; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Kawamoto, Atsuo; Kawata, Shinichi; Sato, Norio; Fukuhara, Tomomi; Taguchi, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Kazuki; Azuhata, Takeo; Ito, Masayuki; Kawai, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tomoya; Nishizawa, Yuji; Araki, Jun; Matsuno, Naoto; Shirai, Takayuki; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Fukui, Hidekimi; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article evaluates the suitability of cadavers embalmed by the saturated salt solution (SSS) method for surgical skills training (SST). SST courses using cadavers have been performed to advance a surgeon's techniques without any risk to patients. One important factor for improving SST is the suitability of specimens, which depends on the embalming method. In addition, the infectious risk and cost involved in using cadavers are problems that need to be solved. Six cadavers were embalmed by 3 methods: formalin solution, Thiel solution (TS), and SSS methods. Bacterial and fungal culture tests and measurement of ranges of motion were conducted for each cadaver. Fourteen surgeons evaluated the 3 embalming methods and 9 SST instructors (7 trauma surgeons and 2 orthopedists) operated the cadavers by 21 procedures. In addition, ultrasonography, central venous catheterization, and incision with cauterization followed by autosuture stapling were performed in some cadavers. The SSS method had a sufficient antibiotic effect and produced cadavers with flexible joints and a high tissue quality suitable for SST. The surgeons evaluated the cadavers embalmed by the SSS method to be highly equal to those embalmed by the TS method. Ultrasound images were clear in the cadavers embalmed by both the methods. Central venous catheterization could be performed in a cadaver embalmed by the SSS method and then be affirmed by x-ray. Lungs and intestines could be incised with cauterization and autosuture stapling in the cadavers embalmed by TS and SSS methods. Cadavers embalmed by the SSS method are sufficiently useful for SST. This method is simple, carries a low infectious risk, and is relatively of low cost, enabling a wider use of cadavers for SST. PMID:25501070

  14. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  15. Retention of robot-assisted surgical skills in urological surgeons acquired using Mimic dV-Trainer

    PubMed Central

    Teishima, Jun; Hattori, Minoru; Inoue, Shogo; Ikeda, Kenichiro; Hieda, Keisuke; Ohara, Shinya; Egi, Hiroyuki; Ohdan, Hideki; Matsubara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We assess the retention of robot-assisted surgical skills among urologic surgeons. Methods: The robot-assisted surgery skills of 20 urologic surgeons were assessed using a Mimic dV-Trainer program (Mimic Technologies, Inc., Seattle, WA) consisting of 6 tasks. These 20 surgeons had no previous experience either using the Mimic dV-Trainer or acting as the main surgeon in robot-assisted surgery. The surgeons completed the program 4 times in a row; after 1 year, they completed it again for a fifth time. Performance scores were recorded using the Mimic dV-Trainer’s built-in algorithm. Results: For all 6 tasks, there were significant improvements to the scores in the fourth trials compared with those in the first trials. The scores in the fifth trials did not significantly decline compared with those in the fourth trials. There was no significant difference between the fifth trial scores of surgeons with laparoscopic surgery skills/experience and those without. Conclusion: Our results indicate that fundamental robot-assisted surgical skills can be retained in the long-term after they are acquired. PMID:25132896

  16. Chicken wing training model for endoscopic microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Jusue-Torres, Ignacio; Sivakanthan, Sananthan; Pinheiro-Neto, Carlos Diogenes; Gardner, Paul A; Snyderman, Carl H; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C

    2013-10-01

    Objectives To present and validate a chicken wing model for endoscopic endonasal microsurgical skill development. Setting A surgical environment was constructed using a Styrofoam box and measurements from radiological studies. Endoscopic visualization and instrumentation were utilized in a manner to mimic operative setting. Design Five participants were instructed to complete four sequential tasks: (1) opening the skin, (2) exposing the main artery in its neurovascular sheath, (3) opening the neurovascular sheath, and (4) separating the nerve from the artery. Time to completion of each task was recorded. Participants Three junior attendings, one senior resident, and one medical student were recruited internally. Main Outcome Measures Time to perform the surgical tasks measured in seconds. Results The average time of the first training session was 48.8 minutes; by the 10th training session, the average time was 22.4 minutes. The range of improvement was 25.7 minutes to 72.4 minutes. All five participants exhibited statistically significant decrease in time after 10 trials. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that an improvement of 50% was achieved by an average of five attempts at the 95% confidence interval. Conclusions The ex vivo chicken wing model is an inexpensive and relatively realistic model to train endoscopic dissection using microsurgical techniques. PMID:24436926

  17. Avoiding Complications in Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay Singh; Ratre, Shailendra; Kher, Yatin

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic neurosurgical techniques hold the potential for reducing morbidity. But they are also associated with limitations such as the initial learning curve, proximal blind spot, visual obscurity, difficulty in controlling bleeding, disorientation, and loss of stereoscopic image. Although some of the surgical techniques in neuroendoscopy and microsurgery are similar, endoscopy requires additional skills. A thorough understanding of endoscopic techniques and their limitations is required to get maximal benefit. Knowledge of possible complications and techniques to avoid such complications can improve results in endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). The surgeon must be able to manage complications and have a second strategy such as a cerebrospinal fluid shunt if ETV fails. It is better to abandon the procedure if there is disorientation or a higher risk of complications such as bleeding or a thick and opaque floor without any clear visualization of anatomy. Attending live workshops, practice on models and simulators, simpler case selection in the initial learning curve, and hands-on cadaveric workshops can reduce complications. Proper case selection, good surgical technique, and better postoperative care are essential for a good outcome in ETV. Although it is difficult to make a preoperative diagnosis of complex hydrocephalus (combination of communicating and obstructive), improving methods to detect the exact type of hydrocephalus before surgery could increase the success rate of ETV and avoid an unnecessary ETV procedure in such cases. PMID:26140421

  18. Analysis of Surgical Pathology Data in the HIRA Database: Emphasis on Current Status and Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Sun-ju; Kim, Woo Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Korea, medical institutions make claims for insurance reimbursement to the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA). Thus, HIRA databases reflect the general medical services that are provided in Korea. We conducted two pathology-related studies using a HIRA national patient sample (NPS) data (selection probability, 0.03). First, we evaluated the current status of general pathologic examination in Korea. Second, we evaluated pathologic issues associated with endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Methods: The sample data used in this study was HIRA-NPS-2013-0094. Results: In the NPS dataset, 163,372 pathologic examinations were performed in 103,528 patients during the year 2013. Considering sampling weight (33.3), it is estimated that 5,440,288 (163,372 × 33.3) pathologic examinations were performed. Internal medicine and general surgery were the most common departments requesting pathologic examinations. The region performing pathologic examinations were different according to type of medical institution. In total, 490 patients underwent ESD, and 43.4% (213/490) underwent ESD due to gastric carcinoma. The results of the ESD led to a change in disease code for 10.5% (29/277) of non-gastric carcinoma patients. In addition, 21 patients (4.3%) underwent surgery following the ESD. The average period between ESD and surgery was 44 days. Conclusions: HIRA sample data provide the nation-wide landscape of specific procedure. However, in order to reduce the statistical error, further studies using entire HIRA data are needed. PMID:27040517

  19. Evaluation of surgical training in the era of simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shaharan, Shazrinizam; Neary, Paul

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess where we currently stand in relation to simulator-based training within modern surgical training curricula. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed database using keywords “simulation”, “skills assessment” and “surgery”. The studies retrieved were examined according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Time period reviewed was 2000 to 2013. The methodology of skills assessment was examined. RESULTS: Five hundred and fifteen articles focussed upon simulator based skills assessment. Fifty-two articles were identified that dealt with technical skills assessment in general surgery. Five articles assessed open skills, 37 assessed laparoscopic skills, 4 articles assessed both open and laparoscopic skills and 6 assessed endoscopic skills. Only 12 articles were found to be integrating simulators in the surgical training curricula. Observational assessment tools, in the form of Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) dominated the literature. CONCLUSION: Observational tools such as OSATS remain the top assessment instrument in surgical training especially in open technical skills. Unlike the aviation industry, simulation based assessment has only now begun to cross the threshold of incorporation into mainstream skills training. Over the next decade we expect the promise of simulator-based training to finally take flight and begin an exciting voyage of discovery for surgical trainees. PMID:25228946

  20. Endoscopic and Microscopic Microvascular Decompression.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Matthew; Lee, John Y K

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of the endoscope into the neurosurgeon's armamentarium has revolutionized ventral and anterior skull-base surgery and, more recently, has been used in the surgical treatment of cerebellopontine angle (CPA) pathology. The utilization of the endoscope in microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia and other associated cranial nerve hyperactivity syndromes allows for unparalleled panoramic views and illumination of the neurovascular structures within the CPA and identification of vessel-nerve contact traditionally unseen using the microscope. In this article, the technical advantages and challenges of using the endoscope for MVD, operative technique, and patient outcomes of endoscopic MVD are discussed. PMID:27324997

  1. Unusual Complications Related to Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography and Its Endoscopic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Song, Sang Hee; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-induced complications, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity. Commonly 5% to 10% of patients experience procedure related complications such as post-ERCP pancreatitis, biliary hemorrhage, and cholangitis, in descending order. However, complications such as perforation, pneumothorax, air embolism, splenic injury, and basket impaction are rare but are associated with high mortality if occurred. Such unexpected unusual complications might extend the length of hospitalization, require urgent surgical intervention, and put the patient in miserable condition leading to permanent disability or mortality. Although these ERCP-induced complications can be minimized by a skilled operator using advanced techniques and devices, the occurrence of unusual complications are hard to expect and induce very difficult management condition. In this review, we will focus on the uncommon complications related to ERCP. This review is also aimed at suggesting optimal endoscopic treatment strategies for several complications based on our institutional experiences. PMID:23767036

  2. Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepinder; Watson, Rabindra R

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and its associated cardio-metabolic comorbidities have emerged as a global pandemic. The efficacy of various hypo-caloric diets and prescription drugs has been poor with respect to sustained weight loss. Recent advancements in endoscopic technology and techniques have opened a new field of minimally invasive endoscopic treatment options for combatting obesity both as a first line and adjunctive therapy. Presently, two endoscopic space-occupying devices in the form of intragastric balloons have received FDA approval for 6-month implantation in patients within a BMI range of 30-40 kg/m(2). Furthermore, full-thickness suturing has led to the development of primary endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass revision as viable endoscopic alternatives to surgical approaches. These techniques have the potential to reduce adverse events, cost, and recovery times. Looking forward, a variety of promising and novel medical devices and endoscopic platforms that target obesity and diabetes are in various phases of development and investigation. The present review aims to discuss the current and forthcoming endoscopic bariatric therapies with emphasis on relevant procedural technique and review of available evidence. PMID:27098813

  3. The Learning and Development of Low-Skilled Workers Training to Become Surgical Technologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Judith Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore how low-skilled workers who participated in a health care training program learned to acquire the technical, cognitive, and developmental competencies they needed to gain skilled employment in higher-level positions in the field and thus advance their careers. The data methods used were: (1) in-depth…

  4. Using virtual reality technology and hand tracking technology to create software for training surgical skills in 3D game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirova, A. A.; Ganiev, B. A.; Mullin, R. I.

    2015-11-01

    The lack of visible and approachable ways of training surgical skills is one of the main problems in medical education. Existing simulation training devices are not designed to teach students, and are not available due to the high cost of the equipment. Using modern technologies such as virtual reality and hands movements fixation technology we want to create innovative method of learning the technics of conducting operations in 3D game format, which can make education process interesting and effective. Creating of 3D format virtual simulator will allow to solve several conceptual problems at once: opportunity of practical skills improvement unlimited by the time without the risk for patient, high realism of environment in operational and anatomic body structures, using of game mechanics for information perception relief and memorization of methods acceleration, accessibility of this program.

  5. Gynecologic endoscopy skills training and assessment: review.

    PubMed

    Bharathan, Rasiah; Setchell, Thomas; Miskry, Tariq; Darzi, Ara; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Training in and assessment of endoscopic skills is currently undergoing a period of evolution. Several recognized factors driving this evolution include working pattern, training opportunities, cost, and patient safety. In addition, the need to continuously monitor competence is punctuated by the rapid technologic changes and rising consumer expectation. These challenges present an opportunity to positively enhance the learning and performance of surgical practice. PMID:23933352

  6. Lamb’s head: The model for novice education in endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Skitarelić, Neven; Mladina, Ranko

    2015-01-01

    Structured training in endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery (EESS) and skull base surgery is essential considering serious potential complications. We have developed a detailed concept on training these surgical skills on the lamb’s head. This simple and extremely cheap model offers the possibility of training even more demanding and advanced procedures in human endonasal endoscopic surgery such as: frontal sinus surgery, orbital decompression, cerebrospinal fluid-leak repair followed also by the naso-septal flap, etc. Unfortunately, the sphenoid sinus surgery cannot be practiced since quadrupeds do not have this sinus. Still, despite this anatomical limitation, it seems that the lamb’s head can be very useful even for the surgeons already practicing EESS, but in a limited edition because of a lack of the experience and dexterity. Only after gaining the essential surgical skills of this demanding field it makes sense to go for the expensive trainings on the human cadaveric model. PMID:26413487

  7. Lamb's head: The model for novice education in endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Skitarelić, Neven; Mladina, Ranko

    2015-09-26

    Structured training in endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery (EESS) and skull base surgery is essential considering serious potential complications. We have developed a detailed concept on training these surgical skills on the lamb's head. This simple and extremely cheap model offers the possibility of training even more demanding and advanced procedures in human endonasal endoscopic surgery such as: frontal sinus surgery, orbital decompression, cerebrospinal fluid-leak repair followed also by the naso-septal flap, etc. Unfortunately, the sphenoid sinus surgery cannot be practiced since quadrupeds do not have this sinus. Still, despite this anatomical limitation, it seems that the lamb's head can be very useful even for the surgeons already practicing EESS, but in a limited edition because of a lack of the experience and dexterity. Only after gaining the essential surgical skills of this demanding field it makes sense to go for the expensive trainings on the human cadaveric model. PMID:26413487

  8. ‘The Days of Brilliancy are Past’: Skill, Styles and the Changing Rules of Surgical Performance, ca. 1820–1920

    PubMed Central

    Schlich, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how, over the course of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the appreciation of skill in surgery shifted in characteristic ways. Skill is a problematic category in surgery. Its evaluation is embedded into wider cultural expectations and evaluations, which changed over time. The paper examines the discussions about surgical skill in a variety of contexts: the highly competitive environment of celebrity practitioners in the amphitheatres of early nineteenth-century Britain; the science-oriented, technocratic German-language university hospitals later in the century; and the elitist surgeons of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century United States with their concerns about distancing themselves from commercialism and cheap showmanship. For analysing the interaction of surgical practices with their various contexts the paper makes use of the concept of ‘performance’ and examines how the rules of surgical performance varied according to the prevailing technical, social, and moral conditions. Over the course of the century, surgical performance looked more and more recognisably modern, increasingly following the ideals of replicability, universality and standardisation. The changing ideals of surgical skill are a crucial element of the complex history of the emergence of modern surgery, but also an illuminating example of the history of skill in modern medicine. PMID:26090735

  9. Simulation in Surgical Education

    PubMed Central

    de Montbrun, Sandra L.; MacRae, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The pedagogical approach to surgical training has changed significantly over the past few decades. No longer are surgical skills solely acquired through a traditional apprenticeship model of training. The acquisition of many technical and nontechnical skills is moving from the operating room to the surgical skills laboratory through the use of simulation. Many platforms exist for the learning and assessment of surgical skills. In this article, the authors provide a broad overview of some of the currently available surgical simulation modalities including bench-top models, laparoscopic simulators, simulation for new surgical technologies, and simulation for nontechnical surgical skills. PMID:23997671

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is used to see organs in and near the digestive ... Ultrasound is a way to see the inside of the body using high-frequency sound waves. Endoscopic ...

  11. Hemostasis in Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pant, Harshita

    2016-06-01

    Intraoperative bleeding during endoscopic sinus surgery poses an additional dimension to an already technically challenging surgical approach because of the narrow sinonasal surgical field, single working hand, and the use of endoscopic instruments. Poor visualization is one of the most important factors that increase the risk of intraoperative complications such as inadvertent injury to major vessels and nerves, and incomplete surgery. This article provide a logical approach to improving the surgical field, minimizing risk of inadvertent vascular injury, and managing intraoperative bleeding. PMID:27267017

  12. Endoscopic Facial Nerve Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Soloperto, Davide; Rubini, Alessia; Nogueira, João Flávio; Badr-El-Dine, Mohamed; Presutti, Livio

    2016-10-01

    Tympanic facial nerve segment surgery has been traditionally performed using microscopic approaches, but currently, exclusive endoscopic approaches have been performed for traumatic, neoplastic, or inflammatory diseases, specially located at the geniculate ganglion, greater petrosal nerve, and second tract of the facial nerve, until the second genu. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve can be reached and visualized using an exclusive transcanal endoscopic approach, even in poorly accessible regions such as the second genu and geniculate ganglion, avoiding mastoidectomy, bony demolition, and meningeal or cerebral lobe tractions, with low complication rates using a minimally invasive surgical route. PMID:27468633

  13. Developments in undergraduate teaching of small-animal soft-tissue surgical skills at the University of Sydney.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Deepa; McGreevy, Paul D; Zuber, Richard M; Klupiec, Corinna; Baguley, John; Barrs, Vanessa R

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses recent developments in soft-tissue surgery teaching at the University of Sydney, Faculty of Veterinary Science. An integrated teaching program was developed for Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc) students with the aim of providing them with optimal learning opportunities to meet "Day One" small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies. Didactic lectures and tutorials were introduced earlier into the curriculum to prepare students for live-animal surgery practical. In addition to existing clinics, additional spay/neuter clinics were established in collaboration with animal welfare organizations to increase student exposure to live-animal surgery. A silicon-based, life-like canine ovariohysterectomy model was developed with the assistance of a model-making and special effects company. The model features elastic ovarian pedicles and suspensory ligaments, which can be stretched and broken like those of an actual dog. To monitor the volume and type of student surgical experience, an E-portfolio resource was established. This resource allows for the tracking of numbers of live, student-performed desexing surgeries and incorporates competency-based assessments and reflective tasks to be completed by students. Student feedback on the integrated surgical soft-tissue teaching program was assessed. Respondents were assessed in the fourth year of the degree and will have further opportunities to develop Day One small-animal soft-tissue surgical competencies in the fifth year. Ninety-four percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they were motivated to participate in all aspects of the program, while 78% agreed or strongly agreed that they received an adequate opportunity to develop their skills and confidence in ovariohysterectomy or castration procedures through the fourth-year curriculum. PMID:22430078

  14. Reflections in a time of transition: orthopaedic faculty and resident understanding of accreditation schemes and opinions on surgical skills feedback

    PubMed Central

    Gundle, Kenneth R.; Mickelson, Dayne T.; Hanel, Doug P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Orthopaedic surgery is one of the first seven specialties that began collecting Milestone data as part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System (NAS) rollout. This transition from process-based advancement to outcome-based education is an opportunity to assess resident and faculty understanding of changing paradigms, and opinions about technical skill evaluation. Methods In a large academic orthopaedic surgery residency program, residents and faculty were anonymously surveyed. A total of 31/32 (97%) residents and 29/53 (55%) faculty responded to Likert scale assessments and provided open-ended responses. An internal end-of-rotation audit was conducted to assess timeliness of evaluations. A mixed-method analysis was utilized, with nonparametric statistical testing and a constant-comparative qualitative method. Results There was greater familiarity with the six core competencies than with Milestones or the NAS (p<0.05). A majority of faculty and residents felt that end-of-rotation evaluations were not adequate for surgical skills feedback. Fifty-eight per cent of residents reported that end-of-rotation evaluations were rarely or never filled out in a timely fashion. An internal audit demonstrated that more than 30% of evaluations were completed over a month after rotation end. Qualitative analysis included themes of resident desire for more face-to-face feedback on technical skills after operative cases, and several barriers to more frequent feedback. Discussion The NAS and outcome-based education have arrived. Residents and faculty need to be educated on this changing paradigm. This transition period is also a window of opportunity to address methods of evaluation and feedback. In our orthopaedic residency, trainees were significantly less satisfied than faculty with the amount of technical and surgical skills feedback being provided to trainees. The quantitative and qualitative analyses converge on one

  15. [Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure].

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, J; Lankisch, T

    2013-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage in the upper and lower intestinal tract is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Within the last 10 years endoscopic treatment options have been accepted as sufficient treatment option of these surgical complications. Endoscopic vacuum assisted closure (E-VAC) is a new innovative endoscopic therapeutic option in this field. E-VAC transfers the positive effects of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) on infected cutaneous wounds to infected cavities that can only be reached endoscopically. A sponge connected to a drainage tube is endoscopically placed in the leakage and a continuous vacuum is applied. Sponge and vacuum allow removal of infected fluids and promote granulation of the leakage. This results in clean wound grounds and finally allows wound closure. Meanwhile the method was also successfully used in the treatment of necrotic pancreatitis. PMID:23430199

  16. Endoscopic Therapy in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Damien Meng Yew

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a debilitating disease that can result in chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and other related complications. The main aims of treatment are to control symptoms, prevent disease progression, and correct any complications. A multidisciplinary approach involving medical, endoscopic, and surgical therapy is important. Endoscopic therapy plays a specific role in carefully selected patients as primary interventional therapy when medical measures fail or in patients who are not suitable for surgery. Endoscopic therapy is also used as a bridge to surgery or as a means to assess the potential response to pancreatic surgery. This review addresses the role of endoscopic therapy in relief of obstruction of the pancreatic duct (PD) and bile du ct, closure of PD leaks, and drainage of pseudocysts in CP. The role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block for pain in chronic pancreatitis is also discussed. PMID:22205838

  17. Microneurosurgical Skills Training.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Ratre, Shailendra; Kher, Yatin; Iqbal, Mohmed

    2016-03-01

    Microneurosurgical operations differ from other surgery. Longer operative time, narrow and deep-seated operative corridors, hand-eye coordination, fine manipulation, and physiologic tremor present special problems. Proper understanding of visual feedback, control of physiologic tremor, better instrument design, and development of surgical skills with better precision is important for optimal surgical results. Using the pen-type precision grip with well-supported arm, wrist, hand, and fingers avoids fatigue and improves precision. Proper instrument design, patient positioning, hemostasis techniques, tilting operative table, good operative microscope, an adjustable chair, careful use of suction tube, bipolar forceps, and brain retraction play important roles in microneurosurgery. Sufficient clinical case volume or opportunity during routine operative hours may not be available in the beginning for young neurosurgeons; microsurgical training using various models can enable them to gain experience. Training models using deep-seated and narrow operative corridors, drilling, knot-tying technique, and anastomosis using fine sutures under high magnification can be practiced for skill improvement. Training laboratory and simulation modules can be useful for resident training and skill acquisition. Indigenously made inexpensive models and comparatively less expensive microscopes can be used in resource-constrained situations. The maintenance of microsurgical ability should be preserved by staying active in operative practice. The knowledge of ergonomics, proper training, observing hand movements of skillful surgeons, and the use of operative videos can improve skill. Endoscopic assistance, computer-assisted robot hand technique, and microtechnology can provide access to the smallest areas of the body. PMID:25915501

  18. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treating Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Young Hoon; Minami, Hitomi; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is the application of esophageal myotomy to the concept of natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) by utilizing a submucosal tunneling method. Since the first case of POEM was performed for treating achalasia in Japan in 2008, this procedure is being more widely used by many skillful endosopists all over the world. Currently, POEM is a spotlighted, emerging treatment option for achalasia, and the indications for POEM are expanding to include long-standing, sigmoid shaped esophagus in achalasia, even previously failed endoscopic treatment or surgical myotomy, and other spastic esophageal motility disorders. Accumulating data about POEM demonstrate excellent short-term outcomes with minimal risk of major adverse events, and some existing long-term data show the efficacy of POEM to be long lasting. In this review article, we review the technical details and clinical outcomes of POEM, and discuss some considerations of POEM in special situations. PMID:26717928

  19. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treating Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    Youn, Young Hoon; Minami, Hitomi; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-31

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is the application of esophageal myotomy to the concept of natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) by utilizing a submucosal tunneling method. Since the first case of POEM was performed for treating achalasia in Japan in 2008, this procedure is being more widely used by many skillful endosopists all over the world. Currently, POEM is a spotlighted, emerging treatment option for achalasia, and the indications for POEM are expanding to include long-standing, sigmoid shaped esophagus in achalasia, even previously failed endoscopic treatment or surgical myotomy, and other spastic esophageal motility disorders. Accumulating data about POEM demonstrate excellent short-term outcomes with minimal risk of major adverse events, and some existing long-term data show the efficacy of POEM to be long lasting. In this review article, we review the technical details and clinical outcomes of POEM, and discuss some considerations of POEM in special situations. PMID:26717928

  20. Peroral endoscopic myotomy: an evolving treatment for achalasia.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Robert; Ikeda, Haruo; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) was first performed in Japan in 2008 for uncomplicated achalasia. With excellent results, it was adopted by highly skilled endoscopists around the world and the indications for POEM were expanded to include advanced sigmoid achalasia, failed surgical myotomy, patients with previous endoscopic treatments and even other spastic oesophageal motility disorders. With increased uptake and performance of POEM, variations in technique and improved management of adverse events have been developed. Now, 6 years since the first case and with >3,000 procedures performed worldwide, long-term data has shown the efficacy of POEM to be long-lasting. A growing body of literature also exists pertaining to the learning curve, application of novel technologies, extended indications and physiologic changes with POEM. Ultimately, this once experimental procedure is evolving towards becoming the preferred treatment for achalasia and other spastic oesophageal motility disorders. PMID:26035678

  1. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. PMID:24628672

  2. Long-Term Outcomes after Endoscopic Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of gastric subepithelial tumors (SETs) has several advantages over biopsy techniques, such as superior diagnostic yield and definite diagnosis. Removal of gastric SETs and histopathologic confirmation should be considered whenever gastric SETs are highly suspected to have malignant potential such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) or neuroendocrine tumor. According to our clinical experience, we suggest that endoscopic resection of gastric SETs is feasible for GISTs less than 3.0 cm without positive endoscopic ultrasonography findings or for hypoechoic SETs less than 3.0 cm. However, serious complications such as macroperforation may occur during endoscopic resection, and this procedure is highly dependent on endoscopists’ skills. We recently reported the long-term clinical outcomes of endoscopic resection of gastric GIST, which showed a relatively low recurrence rate (2.2%) during long-term follow-up (46.0±28.5 months) despite the low R0 resection rate (25.0%). We suggest that endoscopic surveillance might be possible without additional surgical resection in completely resected GISTs without residual tumor confirmed to be lower risk, even if they show an R1 resection margin. PMID:27196737

  3. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  4. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  5. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for removal of superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms: A technical review

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Noriaki; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Kita, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now the most common endoscopic treatment in Japan for intramucosal gastrointestinal neoplasms (non-metastatic). ESD is an invasive endoscopic surgical procedure, requiring extensive knowledge, skill, and specialized equipment. ESD starts with evaluation of the lesion, as accurate assessment of the depth and margin of the lesion is essential. The devices and strategies used in ESD vary, depending on the nature of the lesion. Prior to the procedure, the operator must be knowledgeable about the treatment strategy(ies), the device(s) to use, the electrocautery machine settings, the substances to inject, and other aspects. In addition, the operator must be able to manage complications, should they arise, including immediate recognition of the complication(s) and its treatment. Finally, in case the ESD treatment is not successful, the operator should be prepared to apply alternative treatments. Thus, adequate knowledge and training are essential to successfully perform ESD. PMID:22523613

  6. Endoscopic Ankle Lateral Ligament Graft Anatomic Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Michels, Frederick; Cordier, Guillaume; Guillo, Stéphane; Stockmans, Filip

    2016-09-01

    Chronic instability is a common complication of lateral ankle sprains. If nonoperative treatment fails, a surgical repair or reconstruction may be indicated. Today, endoscopic techniques to treat ankle instability are becoming more popular. This article describes an endoscopic technique, using a step-by-step approach, to reconstruct the ATFL and CFL with a gracilis graft. The endoscopic technique is reproducible and safe with regard to the surrounding anatomic structures. Short and midterm results confirm the benefits of this technique. PMID:27524711

  7. [Surgical training with simulators in training centers].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, José Ignacio; Turienzo-Santos, Estrella; Vigal-Brey, Guillermo; Brea-Pastor, Agustín

    2006-06-01

    The development of new endoscopic procedures and minimally-invasive surgical interventions has led the methodology used to date to be questioned. Greater demand for safety by patients, the growth of the health budget and the reduced time available for training have led to the proliferation of centers with accredited personnel in which the knowledge and surgical skills necessary for the controlled incorporation of these techniques can be acquired. Simulators are available for the learning of both digestive endoscopy and laparoscopic techniques. These simulators are more or less dynamic, virtual, with viscera or mixed; even live animals can be used. Thus, the various techniques can be incorporated into clinical practice safely and effectively and at a reasonable cost. Simulators also allow evaluation and follow-up of the skills acquired. PMID:16768997

  8. Endoscopic management of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Veeral M; Kahaleh, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common gastrointestinal illness, which affects the quality of life with substantial morbidity and mortality. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. However, at the time of this publication, guidelines to establish care of these patients are lacking. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the various treatment options available, including medical, surgical and endoscopic options. In addition, technological advances such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogrophy, endoscopic shock wave lithotripsy and endoscopic ultrasound can now be offered with reasonable success for pancreatic decompression, stricture dilatation with stent placement, stone fragmentation, pseudocyst drainage, and other endoscopic interventions such as celiac plexus block for pain relief. We emphasize the endoscopic options in this review, and attempt to extract the most up to date information from the current literature. The treatment of CP and its complications are discussed extensively. Complications such as biliary strictures. pancreatic pseudocysts, and chronic pain are common issues that arise as long-term complications of CP. These often require endoscopic or surgical management and possibly a combination of approaches, however choosing amongst the various therapeutic and palliative modalities while weighing the risks and benefits, makes the management of CP challenging. Treatment goals should be not just to control symptoms but also to prevent disease progression. Our aim in this paper is to advocate and emphasize an evidence based approach for the management of CP and associated long term complications. PMID:23330050

  9. Endoscopic Ganglionectomy of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Resection of the ganglion of the elbow is indicated if the size or location of the cyst impairs function or causes significant pain. Arthroscopic decompression or endoscopic resection of the cyst is the minimally invasive surgical option. It has the potential advantage of better cosmetic results and less soft-tissue dissection. Endoscopic resection is indicated if the cyst is not communicating with the joint or the communication is not identifiable arthroscopically or if there is a long and narrow communication placing the cyst away from the elbow joint. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is essential for surgical planning. PMID:26870641

  10. Endoscopic Ganglionectomy of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Resection of the ganglion of the elbow is indicated if the size or location of the cyst impairs function or causes significant pain. Arthroscopic decompression or endoscopic resection of the cyst is the minimally invasive surgical option. It has the potential advantage of better cosmetic results and less soft-tissue dissection. Endoscopic resection is indicated if the cyst is not communicating with the joint or the communication is not identifiable arthroscopically or if there is a long and narrow communication placing the cyst away from the elbow joint. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is essential for surgical planning. PMID:26870641

  11. The potential and perspective of peroral endoscopic esophageal myotomy for achalasia.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, K H; Schulz, T; Varga, G; Babic, B; Breithaupt, W

    2015-07-01

    The therapeutic spectrum of this disorder consists of medical therapy, endoscopic balloon dilatation, endoscopic Botox injection, open or laparoscopic cardia myotomy, and most recently transesophageal endoscopic myotomy (POEM peroral endoscopic myotomy). The most important requirement is a well-experienced team in interventional flexible endoscopy. The endoscopist as well as the assisting staff should have experience in advanced therapeutic endoscopic techniques and hemostasis to handle all necessary endoscopic instruments such as injection needles, needle knife, triangle knife, coagulation graspers, and endoscopic clip handling and closures. In addition, advanced surgical and especially laparoscopic skills and experience as well as surgical knowledge about esophageal disease must be available in case of conversion and/or consultation. Prior to this procedure, the patient undergoes a detailed diagnostic work-up to confirm the diagnosis of achalasia. The procedures are performed in general anesthesia. The patient is brought in a supine position, and the abdomen is free for inspection and palpation during the procedure. The myotomy can be performed in different locations around the esophageal circumference. In Europe, several centers with large experience in esophageal disease, laparoscopy, and especially advanced interventional endoscopy have started to introduce this POEM-technique in their clinical practice. Initial success and low complication rates are quite promising and show a great future perspective for this technique. In the USA, POEM is a procedure with a substantial increase in numbers performed in the past years with a low complication rate. The largest series are performed in Asia with a great clinical success. The perspective of POEM may be the lesser access trauma. Its potential can be also realized in Redo cases, where experienced centers have initial experience with POEM after POEM and POEM after LHMD. PMID:25651951

  12. The role of simulation in the development of endovascular surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Craig Iain; Birdi, Nikhil; Mafeld, Sebastian; Stansby, Gerrard

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular trainees in the National Health Service still largely rely on the apprentice-apprenticeship model from the late 19th century. As the scope for endovascular therapy increases, due to the rapid innovation, evolution and refinement of technology, so too do patients' therapeutic options. This climate has also opened the door for more novel training adjuncts, to address the gaps that exist in our current endovascular training curriculum. The aim of this paper is to present a succinct overview of endovascular simulation, synthesizing the trials and research behind this rapidly evolving training as well as highlighting areas where further research is required. The authors searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for relevant manuscripts on all aspects of endovascular simulation training. A comprehensive Google search was also undertaken to look for any relevant information on endovascular training courses available and any unpublished work that had been presented at relevant scientific meetings. Papers were categorized into the four models: synthetic, animal, virtual reality and human cadaver, and separate searches for evidence of skill transfer were also undertaken. Authors of novel research projects were contacted for further details of unpublished work and permission granted to report such findings in this manuscript. PMID:26797930

  13. Application of endoscopic techniques in orbital blowout fractures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Li, Yinwei; Fan, Xianqun

    2013-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques, particularly endoscopic techniques, have revolutionized otolaryngeal surgery. Endoscopic techniques have been gradually applied in orbital surgery through the sinus inferomedial to the orbit and the orbital subperiosteal space. Endoscopic techniques help surgeons observe fractures and soft tissue of the posterior orbit to precisely place implants and protect vital structures through accurate, safe, and minimally invasive approaches. We reviewed the development of endoscopic techniques, the composition of endoscopic systems for orbital surgery, and the problems and developmental prospects of endoscopic techniques for simple orbital wall fracture repair. PMID:23794028

  14. The effect of positive and negative verbal feedback on surgical skills performance and motivation.

    PubMed

    Kannappan, Aarthy; Yip, Dana T; Lodhia, Nayna A; Morton, John; Lau, James N

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable effort and time invested in providing feedback to medical students and residents during their time in training. However, little effort has been made to measure the effects of positive and negative verbal feedback on skills performance and motivation to learn and practice. To probe these questions, first-year medical students (n = 25) were recruited to perform a peg transfer task on Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery box trainers. Time to completion and number of errors were recorded. The students were then randomized to receive either positive or negative verbal feedback from an expert in the field of laparoscopic surgery. After this delivery of feedback, the students repeated the peg transfer task. Differences in performance pre- and post-feedback and also between the groups who received positive feedback (PF) vs negative feedback (NF) were analyzed. A survey was then completed by all the participants. Baseline task times were similar between groups (PF 209.3 seconds; NF 203 seconds, p = 0.58). The PF group averaged 1.83 first-time errors while the NF group 1 (p = 0.84). Post-feedback task times were significantly decreased for both groups (PF 159.75 seconds, p = 0.05; NF 132.08 seconds, p = 0.002). While the NF group demonstrated a greater improvement in mean time than the PF group, this was not statistically significant. Both groups also made fewer errors (PF 0.33 errors, p = 0.04; NF 0.38 errors, p = 0.23). When surveyed about their responses to standardized feedback scenarios, the students stated that both positive and negative verbal feedback could be potent stimulants for improved performance and motivation. Further research is required to better understand the effects of feedback on learner motivation and the interpersonal dynamic between mentors and their trainees. PMID:23111049

  15. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  16. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-08-21

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  17. Endoscopic surgery - exploring the modalities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel Jin Keat; Tan, Kok-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of endoscopic surgery continues to expand in clinical situations with the recent natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery technique enabling abdominal organ resection to be performed without necessitating any skin incision. In recent years, the development of numerous devices and platforms have allowed for such procedures to be carried out in a safer and more efficient manner, and in some ways to better simulate triangulation and surgical tasks (e.g., suturing and dissection). Furthermore, new novel techniques such as submucosal tunneling, endoscopic full-thickness resection and hybrid endo-laparoscopic approaches have further widened its use in more advanced diseases. Nevertheless, many of these new innovations are still at their pre-clinical stage. This review focuses on the various innovations in endoscopic surgery, with emphasis on devices and techniques that are currently in human use. PMID:26649156

  18. Endoscopic Anatomy of the Protympanum.

    PubMed

    Jufas, Nicholas; Marchioni, Daniele; Tarabichi, Muaaz; Patel, Nirmal

    2016-10-01

    The protympanum, a final common pathway between the tympanic cavity and external environment, is gaining relevance due to the ease and completeness of visualization with angled endoscopes. Two primary conformations are described, quadrangular and triangular, and new anatomic structures such as the protiniculum, subtensor recess, and protympanic spine are defined. Surgical relevance of the protympanum is described with respect to ventilation, cholesteatoma, cerebrospinal fluid leak, otic neuralgia, and surgical access to the eustachian tube. PMID:27565384

  19. Transnasal Endoscopic Eustachian Tube Surgery.

    PubMed

    Dean, Marc; Lian, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to give a contemporary review of transnasal endoscopic surgery for Eustachian tube disorders. The authors' perspective of the relevant anatomy, pathophysiology, and evaluation of Eustachian tube disorders as related to surgical intervention also is provided. PMID:27468637

  20. Advanced endoscopic submucosal dissection with traction.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, Hiroyuki; Hosoe, Naoki; Kashiwagi, Kazuhiro; Ohmori, Tai; Yahagi, Naohisa; Kanai, Takanori; Ogata, Haruhiko

    2014-07-16

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been established as a standard treatment for early stage gastric cancer (EGC) in Japan and has spread worldwide. ESD has been used not only for EGC but also for early esophageal and colonic cancers. However, ESD is associated with several adverse events, such as bleeding and perforation, which requires more skill. Adequate tissue tension and clear visibility of the tissue to be dissected are important for effective and safe dissection. Many ESD methods using traction have been developed, such as clip-with-line method, percutaneous traction method, sinker-assisted method, magnetic anchor method, external forceps method, internal-traction method, double-channel-scope method, outerroute method, double-scope method, endoscopic-surgical-platform, and robot-assisted method. Each method has both advantages and disadvantages. Robotic endoscopy, enabling ESD with a traction method, will become more common due to advances in technology. In the near future, simple, noninvasive, and effective ESD using traction is expected to be developed and become established as a worldwide standard treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasias. PMID:25031787

  1. What is the Evidence for Endoscopic Thyroidectomy in the Management of Benign Thyroid Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Sebag, F.; Henry, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Background Endoscopic thyroidectomy (ET) is a demanding surgical technique in which dissection of the gland is entirely performed with an endoscope, in a closed area maintained by insufflation or mechanical retraction. ET by direct cervical approach (anterior or lateral) is minimally invasive, but ET using an extracervical access (chest wall, breast, or axillary) is not. No technique seems to be universally accepted yet. This review was designed to clarify the existing evidence for performing endoscopic thyroid resections in the management of benign thyroid nodules. Methods A database search was conducted in PubMed and Embase from which summaries and abstracts were screened for relevant data, matching our definition. Publications were further assessed and assigned their respective levels of evidence. Additional data derived from our own unit’s experience with endoscopic thyroidectomy were included. Results Thirty mainly retrospective cohort studies have been published in which morbidity, such as unilateral vocal cord palsy, is poorly evaluated. ET takes from 90 to 280 minutes for lobectomy by cervical access and total thyroidectomy by chest wall approach, respectively. Cosmetic outcome in extracervical approach is less troubled by size of the resected specimen compared with direct cervical approach. Extracervical approach avoids a neck scar but implies invasiveness in terms of dissection and postoperative discomfort. Long-term cosmetic outcome comparisons with conventional thyroidectomy have not been published. Conclusions Currently it is not possible to recommend the application of ET based on evidence. Reported complications stress the importance of advanced endoscopic skills. ET should only be offered to carefully selected patients and, therefore, a high volume of patients requiring thyroid surgery is needed. Superiority of endoscopic to conventional thyroidectomy has yet to be demonstrated. Possible advantages of endoscopic thyroid techniques and our

  2. Endoscopic laser therapy in gastroenterology.

    PubMed Central

    Pritikin, J; Weinman, D; Harmatz, A; Young, H

    1992-01-01

    Endoscopic laser therapy has become an important and widely used tool in gastroenterology. It has become important for outpatient palliative therapy for ablating obstructing gastrointestinal neoplasms. This method has often circumvented the need for major palliative surgical resections. Caution must be applied to laser therapy for potentially curable malignant neoplasms because, with vaporization of the target tissue, no tissue specimen is available to assure that local or invasive residual carcinoma is excluded. Therefore, in good surgical candidates, surgical resection of potentially curable cancers is always recommended. In the future, however, the combination of refined endoscopic ultrasonography and laser fluorescence techniques may lead to earlier detection, more precise localization, and even curative ablation of gastrointestinal malignancy. Images PMID:1413743

  3. Robotically Assisted Endoscopic Ovarian Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Wedergren, June S.; Carlson, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Ovarian transposition is the anatomical relocation of the ovaries from the pelvis to the abdomen. Transposition is beneficial in women who are to undergo pelvic radiation, because it allows maintenance of ovarian function and preservation of assisted reproductive capacity. Methods: The da Vinci surgical system (Intuitive Surgical™, Mountainview, CA, USA) was used to perform an endoscopic ovarian transposition. The ovaries were mobilized on their respective infundibulopelvic ligaments and sutured to the ipsilateral pericolic gutters. Results: A series of laboratory sessions using the da Vinci system was completed at our institution's training facility. Surgical experience included cadaveric pelvic dissection and abdominopelvic procedures on anesthetized porcine models. Additional didactic and laboratory training, including a certification examination, was obtained from Intuitive Surgical, Inc. The first clinical case of robotically assisted endoscopic ovarian transposition was performed. Conclusions: Robotically assisted endoscopy was successfully used for ovarian transposition. PMID:12723000

  4. Surgical outcomes of the endoscopic transsphenoidal route to pituitary tumours in paediatric patients >10 years of age: 5 years of experience at a single institute

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rucai; Xu, Guangming; Wiebe, Timothy M; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach (EETA) for the management of pituitary adenomas in paediatric patients >10 years of age. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed to identify 56 paediatric patients between 10 and 18 years of age who underwent an endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approach for the resection of a pituitary adenoma during the last 5 years. The age, sex, symptoms, tumour size, extent of tumour resection, clinical outcome and surgical complications of patients were reviewed. Results Total resection was achieved in 49 (87.5%) cases, subtotal resection was achieved in 7 (12.5%) cases and no patient had a partial or insufficient resection. Of the 35 patients who experienced preoperative deterioration of vision, 33 (94.2%) achieved visual remission with rates of 34.2% and 60% for normalisation and improvement, respectively. Endocrinological normalisation was achieved in 13 (31.7%) of 41 patients who had preoperative hyperhormonal levels; hormone levels decreased in 25 (61.0%) patients, and 3 (7.3%) patients had no change in hormone level. Two (3.5%) patients incurred postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage, which was resolved after lumbar drainage. Four (7.1%) patients developed hypopituitarism, which required hormone therapy. Post-surgery, five (8.9%) patients incurred transient diabetes insipidus (DI), of which one (1.7%) patient developed persistent DI and was administered Minirin. Meningitis occurred in one (1.7%) patient who was cured by the administration of a third-generation antibiotic. There were no cases of intracranial haematoma, reoperation or death. Conclusions EETA allows neurosurgeons to safely and effectively remove paediatric pituitary adenomas with low morbidity and mortality. PMID:26006173

  5. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal. PMID:27284515

  6. Peroral endoscopic myotomy.

    PubMed

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-05-16

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  7. Peroral endoscopic myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  8. Endoscopic mucosal resection.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Joo Ha; Konda, Vani; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Enestvedt, Brintha K; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L; Komanduri, Sri; Maple, John T; Murad, Faris M; Pannala, Rahul; Thosani, Nirav C; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-08-01

    EMR has become an established therapeutic option for premalignant and early-stage GI malignancies, particularly in the esophagus and colon. EMR can also aid in the diagnosis and therapy of subepithelial lesions localized to the muscularis mucosa or submucosa. Several dedicated EMR devices are available to facilitate these procedures. Adverse event rates, particularly bleeding and perforation, are higher after EMR relative to other basic endoscopic interventions but lower than adverse event rates for ESD. Endoscopists performing EMR should be knowledgeable and skilled in managing potential adverse events resulting from EMR. PMID:26077453

  9. [Advances on endoscopic treatment of intestinal fistulas].

    PubMed

    Wu, X W; Ren, J A; Li, J S

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal fistulas are severe complications after abdominal surgical procedures. The endoscopic therapy makes it possible to close fistulas without surgical interventions. When patients achieved stabilization and had no signs of systemic sepsis or inflammation, these therapies could be conducted, which included endoscopic vacuum therapy, fibrin glue sealing, stents, fistula plug, suture, and Over The Scope Clip (OTSC). Various techniques may be combined. Endoscopy vacuum therapy could be applied to control systemic inflammation and prevent continuing septic contamination by active drainage. Endoscopic stent is placed over fistulas and gastrointestinal continuity is recovered. The glue sealing is applied for enterocutaneous fistulas, and endoscopy suture has the best results seen in fistulas <1 cm in diameter. Insertion of the fistula plug is used to facilitate fistula healing. The OTSC is effective to treat leaks with large defects. Endoscopic treatment could avoid reoperation and could be regarded as the first-line treatment for specific patients. PMID:26932894

  10. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula.

    PubMed

    Pham, Khanh N; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  11. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  12. NOTES and endoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy for the GI endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Mizuno, Suguru; Yashima, Yoko; Togawa, Osamu; Kogure, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasahira, Naoki; Nakai, Yousuke; Hirano, Kenji; Tsujino, Takeshi; Tada, Minoru; Kawabe, Takao; Omata, Masao

    2009-01-01

    Endoscopists seek to conduct more aggressive surgical procedures that surpass the limitations of existing endoscopic procedures. Endoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) are typical examples of this new trend; both are performed through the gastrointestinal wall without a skin incision. Endoscopic necrosectomy is effective for managing organized pancreatic necrosis and abscesses. The necrotic tissues are removed endoscopically by directly entering the cavity of the organized pancreatic necrosis. NOTES is a possible advance over surgical intervention, as it is a less invasive, more cosmetic, and effective procedure. There are various approaches, including the esophagus, stomach, colon, and vagina; Various procedures are possible using NOTES, such as cholecystectomy, appendectomy, full-thickness stomach resection, splenectomy, gastrointestinal (GI) anastomosis, and peritoneoscopy. The requirements for NOTES include high proficiency in endoscopic techniques, including knowledge of various devices, anatomy, and surgical procedures. Since most GI endoscopists have no surgical background, to increase the usage of NOTES, GI endoscopists should form and lead teams that include various specialists. We believe that endoscopic necrosectomy and NOTES represent a major shift in the treatment paradigm because physicians can treat beyond the gastrointestinal wall and endoscopic procedures will replace surgical treatment. PMID:19347662

  13. [A short history of endoscopic neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Song, Zhi-Bin; Gao, Jian-Wei; Li, Xu-Guangl

    2013-11-01

    Since 1910, rigid cystoscopy was first applied in the lateral ventricular choroid plexus cauterization for the treatment of congenital hydrocephalus, thus, opening up a new window in the endoscopic neurosurgery, but poor surgical outcome and high mortality made the application of endoscopic neurosurgery in question. Latterly, because of the appearance of new microscope and optical fiber endoscope, neuroendoscopy has been applied adequately in neurosurgery, with the increase of its clinical indications. Along with it, the concept of neuroendoscopy in surgery has changed, as well as the expansion of clinical indications. At present, neuroendoscopy technology has become a significant branch of modern neurosurgery. PMID:24524639

  14. Overview of methods for flexible endoscopic training and description of a simple explant model.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M S; Marks, J M

    2011-05-01

    The question of how to train surgeons in flexible endoscopy has been debated over the years as these skills have become an essential part of residency and practice. As many as two-thirds of surgeons perform flexible endoscopy, and for many, endoscopy represents up to 50% of their practice. Training in flexible endoscopy has evolved over many decades from an apprenticeship-type model to a more formal training program. Surgical residencies vary widely in their approach, with some having dedicated endoscopy rotations and others using an integrated approach. Innate to a good training program are faculty dedicated to teaching, an established curriculum, and adequate exposure of residents to proper training tools, whether as patient-based learning or supplemented by simulators. Hands-on models for teaching surgical endoscopy include mechanical, animal, and computer-based platforms. Herein, we describe our experience with a low-cost approach using porcine stomach explants that offers a breadth of endoscopic training including scope navigation, band ligation, endoscopic mucosal resection, hemostasis management, esophageal stenting, foreign body extraction, and ERCP. Simulation-based learning must be validated from a construct and internal validity perspective to be considered useful. Correlation between simulator learning and improvement in clinically relevant skills must then be shown using a validated scale, such as the Global Assessment of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Skills. Competency in flexible endoscopy, which is currently measured by case volume, may be replaced by objective programs, such as Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery, that combine didactic teaching, cognitive assessment, and hands-on technical skills evaluation to determine a minimum level of proficiency. PMID:22776220

  15. Endoscopic treatment of orbital tumors

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Francesco; Anile, Carmelo; Rigante, Mario; Paludetti, Gaetano; Pompucci, Angelo; Mangiola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Different orbital and transcranial approaches are performed in order to manage orbital tumors, depending on the location and size of the lesion within the orbit. These approaches provide a satisfactory view of the superior and lateral aspects of the orbit and the optic canal but involve risks associated with their invasiveness because they require significant displacement of orbital structures. In addition, external approaches to intraconal lesions may also require deinsertion of extraocular muscles, with subsequent impact on extraocular mobility. Recently, minimally invasive techniques have been proposed as valid alternative to external approaches for selected orbital lesions. Among them, transnasal endoscopic approaches, “pure” or combined with external approaches, have been reported, especially for intraconal lesions located inferiorly and medially to the optic nerve. The avoidance of muscle detachment and the shortness of the surgical intraorbital trajectory makes endoscopic approach less invasive, thus minimizing tissue damage. Endoscopic surgery decreases the recovery time and improves the cosmetic outcome not requiring skin incisions. The purpose of this study is to review and discuss the current surgical techniques for orbital tumors removal, focusing on endoscopic approaches to the orbit and outlining the key anatomic principles to follow for safe tumor resection. PMID:25789299

  16. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The nasal endoscope is a small, lighted metal telescope placed into the nostril. The endoscope allows the ... sinus surgery involves the use of a small telescope (nasal endoscope) that is inserted through the nostril ...

  17. Advanced virtual endoscopic pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, André; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Forster, Marie-Thérèse; Mroz, Lukas; Wegenkittl, Rainer; Bühler, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Endoscopy has recently been introduced to endonasal transsphenoidal pituitary surgery as a minimally invasive procedure for the removal of various kinds of pituitary tumors. To reduce morbidity and mortality with this new technique, the surgeon must be well-trained and well-prepared. Virtual endoscopy can be beneficial as a tool for training, preoperative planning, and intraoperative support. This paper introduces STEPS, a virtual endoscopy system designed to aid surgeons in getting acquainted with the endoscopic view of the anatomy, the handling of instruments, the transsphenoidal approach, and challenges associated with the procedure. STEPS also assists experienced surgeons in planning a real endoscopic intervention by getting familiar with the individual patient anatomy, identifying landmarks, planning the approach, and deciding upon the ideal target position of the actual surgical activity. The application provides interactive visualization, navigation, and perception aids and the possibility of simulating the procedure, including haptic feedback and simulation of surgical instruments. PMID:16144247

  18. Endoscopic techniques in aesthetic plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    McCain, L A; Jones, G

    1995-01-01

    There has been an explosive interest in endoscopic techniques by plastic surgeons over the past two years. Procedures such as facial rejuvenation, breast augmentation and abdominoplasty are being performed with endoscopic assistance. Endoscopic operations require a complex setup with components such as video camera, light sources, cables and hard instruments. The Hopkins Rod Lens system consists of optical fibers for illumination, an objective lens, an image retrieval system, a series of rods and lenses, and an eyepiece for image collection. Good illumination of the body cavity is essential for endoscopic procedures. Placement of the video camera on the eyepiece of the endoscope gives a clear, brightly illuminated large image on the monitor. The video monitor provides the surgical team with the endoscopic image. It is important to become familiar with the equipment before actually doing cases. Several options exist for staff education. In the operating room the endoscopic cart needs to be positioned to allow a clear unrestricted view of the video monitor by the surgeon and the operating team. Fogging of the endoscope may be prevented during induction by using FREDD (a fog reduction/elimination device) or a warm bath. The camera needs to be white balanced. During the procedure, the nurse monitors the level of dissection and assesses for clogging of the suction. PMID:7568452

  19. Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Leanne M.; Middleton, Philippa F.; Anthony, Adrian; Hamdorf, Jeffrey; Cregan, Patrick; Scott, David; Maddern, Guy J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of surgical simulation compared with other methods of surgical training. Summary Background Data: Surgical simulation (with or without computers) is attractive because it avoids the use of patients for skills practice and provides relevant technical training for trainees before they operate on humans. Methods: Studies were identified through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and other databases until April 2005. Included studies must have been randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing any training technique using at least some elements of surgical simulation, which reported measures of surgical task performance. Results: Thirty RCTs with 760 participants were able to be included, although the quality of the RCTs was often poor. Computer simulation generally showed better results than no training at all (and than physical trainer/model training in one RCT), but was not convincingly superior to standard training (such as surgical drills) or video simulation (particularly when assessed by operative performance). Video simulation did not show consistently better results than groups with no training at all, and there were not enough data to determine if video simulation was better than standard training or the use of models. Model simulation may have been better than standard training, and cadaver training may have been better than model training. Conclusions: While there may be compelling reasons to reduce reliance on patients, cadavers, and animals for surgical training, none of the methods of simulated training has yet been shown to be better than other forms of surgical training. PMID:16495690

  20. Structure, process, and outcomes in skilled nursing facilities: understanding what happens to surgical patients when they cannot go home. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hakkarainen, Timo W.; Ayoung-Chee, Patricia; Alfonso, Rafael; Arbabi, Saman; Flum, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background The surgical population is aging, and greater numbers of surgical patients are being discharged to skilled nursing facilities. Post-acute care is a poorly understood but very important aspect of our healthcare system. Methods This systematic review examines the current body of literature surrounding the structural, process of care, and outcomes measurements for patients in skilled nursing facilities. English language articles published between 1998 and 2011 that purposed to examine nursing facility structure, process of care, and/or outcomes were included. Results & Conclusions Abstracts (2129) were screened and 102 articles were reviewed in full. Twenty-nine articles were included in the qualitative synthesis. The role of the care setting and care delivery in contributing to outcomes has not been well studied, and no strong conclusions can be made. This area of care currently represents a “black box” to practicing surgeons. An understanding of these factors maybe instrumental to determining future directions for research to maximize positive outcomes for these patients. PMID:25439223

  1. Recent advances in natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery†.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon-chi; Chiu, Philip Wai-yan

    2016-01-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has emerged as one of the most exciting areas in the field of minimally invasive surgery during the last decade. NOTES comprises a wide spectrum of procedures from various natural accesses such as transgastric or transvaginal routes, and different direct-target or distant-target organs. Since polypectomy was first performed in 1955, major advances in technology and refinement of endoscopic technique have allowed endoscopic surgeons to perform complex endoscopic interventions such as endoscopic submucosal dissection. Recognizing the safety and feasibility of submucosal tunnelling and mucosal closure, endoscopic resection beyond the level of mucosa has been increasingly reported. One of these procedures, peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia, has gained much popularity and excellent results have been published comparable with that of traditional Heller's cardiomyotomy. Submucosal tunnelling endoscopic resection has also been reported for tumours situated in the muscular layer of the gastrointestinal tract. To overcome the difficulty of intestinal closure after NOTES, researchers have collaborated with the industry in developing different endoscopic suturing devices such as the Eagle Claw (Olympus Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) and Overstitch™ (Apollo Endosurgery, Austin TX, USA). These devices allow precise and secure suture application with the ordinary flexible endoscope, achieving tissue approximation similar to open surgical suturing. To further expand the potential of NOTES, investigators had also developed multitasking platforms enabling the performance of surgical procedures of even higher complexity. Recently, a novel endoscopic robotic system 'Master and Slave Transluminal Endoscopic Robot' (MASTER) has been developed. Early results of endoscopic resection utilizing this system have been encouraging, allowing both experts and novices in endoscopy to perform difficult endoscopic resection with a

  2. [Blue nevus syndrome: endoscopic treatment by sclerosis and banding ligation].

    PubMed

    Sala Felis, T; Urquijo Ponce, J J; López Viedma, B; Pertejo Pastor, V; Berenguer Lapuerta, J

    1999-03-01

    The blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome is a rare entity characterized by the presence of cavernous hemangiomas in the skin and gastrointestinal tract with frequent digestive hemorrhages. Different therapeutic modalities exist: medical treatment, surgical resection; and most recently, endoscopic therapy has been described. We present a patient with blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome treated with combined endoscopic therapy: sclerosis and band ligation. PMID:10228324

  3. Endoscopic retrieval of baggies in body stuffers

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahtab; Zamani, Nasim; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Body packing/stuffing is currently a huge medical problem. A conservative approach and waiting for spontaneous packet expulsion are usually recommended. However, in a patient with packets stuck in the stomach, surgical treatments are generally advocated if complications occur. Endoscopic evacuation of the packets is generally not favored because of its potential hazards, including manipulation and rupture of the packets and deterioration of the patients' condition. However, it may prevent more invasive treatment modalities including surgical intervention. We present case reports on four symptomatic body stuffers with potentially dangerous ingestions who underwent endoscopic evacuation of their packets and survived. PMID:27092325

  4. [Endoscopic modified technique of ureteral resection during nephroureterectomy].

    PubMed

    Aguirre Benites, F; Blanco Carballo, O; Pamplona Casamayor, M; Díaz González, R; Leiva Galvis, O

    2007-01-01

    We show a technical modification of the ureteral endoscopic resection with which we try to avoid comunication between urine and surgical bed in order to prevent tumor local spread of upper urotelial tumor. PMID:17902476

  5. A STERILIZATION STANDARD FOR ENDOSCOPES AND OTHER DIFFICULT TO CLEAN MEDICAL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An array of difficult to clean devices are used for diagnostic and surgical procedures involving various degrees of invasiveness. These range from prophylaxis angles used for cleaning and polishing teeth to flexible fiberoptic endoscopes for surgical procedures that penetrate the...

  6. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Alfieri, Alessandra; Colao, Annamaria; Ferone, Diego; Lombardi, Gaetano; de Divitiis, Enrico

    1999-01-01

    The outcome of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery in 10 patients with pituitary adenomas was compared with that of traditional transnasal transsphenoidal approach (TTA) in 20 subjects. Among the 10 individuals subjected to “pure endoscopy,” 2 had a microadenoma, 1 an intrasellar macroadenoma, 4 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 2 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 1 a residual tumor; 5 had acromegaly and 5 had a nonfunctioning adenoma (NFA). Among the patients subjected to TTA, 4 had a microadenoma, 2 had an intrasellar macroadenoma, 6 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 4 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 4 had a residual tumor; 9 patients had acromegaly, 1 hyperprolactinemia, 1 Cushing's disease, and 9 a NFA. At the macroscopic evaluation, tumor removal was total (100%) after endoscopy in 9 patients and after TTA in 14 patients. Six months after surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the total tumor removal in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%). Circulating growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) significantly decreased 6 months after surgery in all 14 acromegalic patients: normalization of plasma IGF-I levels was obtained in 4 of 5 patients after the endoscopic procedure and in 4 of 9 patients after TTA. Before surgery, pituitary hormone deficiency was present in 14 out of 30 patients: pituitary function improved in 4 patients, remaining unchanged in the other 10 patients. Visual field defects were present before surgery in 4 patients, and improved in all. Early surgical results in the group of 10 patients who underwent endoscopic pituitary tumor removal were at least equivalent to those of standard TTA, with excellent postoperative course. Postsurgical hospital stay was significantly shorter (3.1 ± 0.4 vs. 6.2 ± 0.3 days, p < 0.001) after endoscopy as compared to TTA. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171126

  7. Systematic Review of Endoscopic Middle Ear Surgery Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kozin, Elliott D.; Gulati, Shawn; Lehmann, Ashton; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Kaplan, Alyson; Landegger, Lukas D.; Cohen, Michael S.; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Middle ear surgery increasingly employs endoscopes as an adjunct to or replacement for the operative microscope. Superior visualization and transcanal access to disease normally managed with a transmastoid approach are touted as advantages with the endoscope. No study, however, has systemically reviewed the literature to evaluate outcomes of endoscopic ear surgery (EES). We provide a systematic review of endoscope applications in middle ear surgery with an emphasis on outcomes. Data Sources PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Methods A literature review was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis recommendations. Articles were categorized based on study design, indication, and use of an endoscope either as an adjunct to or as a replacement for a microscope. Quantitative and descriptive analyses were performed. Results Ninety-one articles published between 1967 and 2014 met inclusion and exclusion criteria. The main indication for the use of an endoscope was cholesteatoma or myringoplasty. Of the identified articles, 40 provided a discrete discussion of outcomes. In cholesteatoma surgery, the endoscope has been mainly employed as an adjunct to the microscope, and although outcomes assessments vary across studies, the endoscope identified residual cholesteatoma in up to 50% of cases. Conclusion Endoscopes have been predominately used as an observational adjunct to the microscope to improve visualization of the tympanic cavity. Recent reports utilize the endoscope exclusively during surgical dissection; however, data comparing patient outcomes following the use of an operative endoscope versus a microscope are lacking. Areas in need of additional research are highlighted. PMID:25418475

  8. Endoscopic simple prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Fiutowski, Marek; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Słojewski, Marcin; Szydełko, Tomasz; Szymański, Michał; Demkow, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many options exist for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), laser surgery, and open adenomectomy. Recently, endoscopic techniques have been used in the treatment of BPH. Material and methods We reviewed clinical studies in PubMed describing minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for the treatment of BPH. Results Laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) and robotic–assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) were introduced in the early 2000s. These operative techniques have been standardized and reproducible, with some individual modifications. Studies analyzing the outcomes of LA and RASP have reported significant improvements in urinary flow and decreases in patient International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). These minimally invasive approaches have resulted in a lower rate of complications, shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, faster recoveries, and an earlier return to work. Conclusions Minimally invasive techniques such as LA and RASP for the treatment BPH are safe, efficacious, and allow faster recovery. These procedures have a short learning curve and offer new options for the surgeon treating BPH. PMID:25667758

  9. Incorporating Endoscopic Ear Surgery into Your Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Elliott D; Kiringoda, Ruwan; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    Paralleling the introduction of endoscopes for sinus surgery more than two decades ago, otology is facing a similar paradigm shift in the use of endoscopes to perform ear surgery. The wide-angle and high-resolution image provided by endoscopes allows for improved visualization of the tympanic cavity using minimally invasive surgical portals. Incorporating endoscopic ear surgery into otologic practice is challenging. A graduated and step-wise introduction of EES to otologic surgery is recommended to ensure safe and successful implementation. PMID:27565389

  10. Recent Advanced Endoscopic Management of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Related Duodenal Perforations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon Mee

    2016-01-01

    The management strategy for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related duodenal perforation can be determined based on the site and extent of injury, the patient’s condition, and time to diagnosis. Most cases of perivaterian or bile duct perforation can be managed with a biliary stent or nasobiliary drainage. Duodenal wall perforations had been treated with immediate surgical repair. However, with the development of endoscopic devices and techniques, endoscopic closure has been reported to be a safe and effective treatment that uses through-the-scope clips, ligation band, fibrin glue, endoclips and endoloops, an over-the-scope clipping device, suturing devices, covering luminal stents, and open-pore film drainage. Endoscopic therapy could be instituted in selected patients in whom perforation was identified early or during the procedure. Early diagnosis, proper conservative management, and effective endoscopic closure are required for favorable outcomes of non-surgical management. If endoscopic treatment fails, or in the cases of clinical deterioration, prompt surgical management should be considered. PMID:27484814

  11. Extracervical approaches to endoscopic thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Papaspyrou, Giorgos; Ferlito, Alfio; Silver, Carl E; Werner, Jochen A; Genden, Eric; Sesterhenn, Andreas M

    2011-04-01

    There is increasing demand for surgical procedures which avoid visible scars while maintaining optimal functional and ideal cosmetic results, without compromising the safety or effectiveness of the procedure. Endoscopic techniques have been adapted to abdominal and pelvic surgery and increasingly employed over the past three decades. Although hampered by the absence of a natural cavity, endoscopic techniques have been adapted to surgery in the neck for the past 15 years, particularly for the thyroid gland. While earlier attempts at endoscopic thyroid surgery were performed through incisions in or near the midline of the neck, recent techniques have been developed to place the incisions and endoscopic ports extracervically, or at least away from the midline region of the neck, rendering the cosmetic result more acceptable. Most of these approaches are through the axilla, breast, chest wall or a combination of approaches. Visualization of the thyroid and rate of complications with these approaches are equal to those attained with older endoscopic approaches. Careful patient selection is important for endoscopic surgery. Complications unique to the endoscopic approach are mostly related to insufflation of cervical tissues with pressurized CO(2). PMID:20844894

  12. Endoscopic mediastinal staging of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Kay-Leong; Ho, Khek-Yu

    2011-04-01

    The advent of endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling procedures such as endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has lead to significant advances in the mediastinal diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. These endoscopic techniques can be performed in the outpatient setting under conscious sedation and local anesthesia, in contrast to the surgical standard, mediastinoscopy (MS), which requires operating theatre time and general anesthesia. Proponents of mediastinoscopy have always emphasized the advantages of mediastinoscopy, namely its sensitivity even with a low prevalence of mediastinal metastases and its low false negative rate. Newer endoscopic techniques such as EBUS-TBNA are showing sensitivities exceeding that of mediastinoscopy, even in the setting of an equally low prevalence of mediastinal metastases. However, endoscopic techniques have double the false negative rate of mediastinoscopy. As the tracheobronchial route and esophageal route provide almost complete access to mediastinal lymph nodes, these endoscopic techniques are complementary rather than competing. When used in combination, it is possible mediastinoscopy may be superseded. The challenge however, is how best to select the appropriate endoscopic procedures to accurately stage lung cancer in the most cost-effective manner. PMID:21130638

  13. Developments in flexible endoscopic surgery: a review

    PubMed Central

    Feussner, Hubertus; Becker, Valentin; Bauer, Margit; Kranzfelder, Michael; Schirren, Rebekka; Lüth, Tim; Meining, Alexander; Wilhelm, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Flexible endoscopy is increasingly developing into a therapeutic instead of a purely diagnostic discipline. Improved visualization makes early lesions easily detectable and allows us to decide ad hoc on the required treatment. Deep enteroscopy allows the exploration of even the small bowel – for long a “white spot” for gastrointestinal endoscopy – and to perform direct treatment. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is a considerable step forward in oncologically correct endoscopic treatment of (early) malignant lesions. Though still technically challenging, it is increasingly facilitated by new manipulation techniques and tools that are being steadily optimized. Closure of wall defects and hemostasis could be improved significantly. Even the anatomy beyond the gastrointestinal wall is being explored by the therapeutic use of endoluminal ultrasound. Endosonographic-guided surgery is not only a suitable fallback solution if conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography fails, but even makes necrosectomy procedures, abscess drainage, and neurolysis feasible for the endoscopist. Newly developed endoscopic approaches aim at formerly distinctive surgical domains like gastroesophageal reflux disease, appendicitis, and cholecystitis. Combined endoscopic/laparoscopic interventional techniques could become the harbingers of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, whereas pure natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery is currently still in its beginnings. PMID:25565878

  14. Endoscopic Gallbladder Drainage for Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, Jessica; Alvarez, Paloma; Sharaiha, Reem Z.; Gossain, Sonia; Kedia, Prashant; Sarkaria, Savreet; Sethi, Amrita; Turner, Brian G.; Millman, Jennifer; Lieberman, Michael; Nandakumar, Govind; Umrania, Hiren; Gaidhane, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for cholecystitis. However, gallbladder stenting (GBS) has shown promise in debilitated or high-risk patients. Endoscopic transpapillary GBS and endoscopic ultrasound-guided GBS (EUS-GBS) have been proposed as safe and effective modalities for gallbladder drainage. Methods Data from patients with cholecystitis were prospectively collected from August 2004 to May 2013 from two United States academic university hospitals and analyzed retrospectively. The following treatment algorithm was adopted. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy and cystic duct stenting was initially attempted. If deemed feasible by the endoscopist, EUS-GBS was then pursued. Results During the study period, 139 patients underwent endoscopic gallbladder drainage. Among these, drainage was performed in 94 and 45 cases for benign and malignant indications, respectively. Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was defined as decompression of the gallbladder without incidence of cholecystitis, and was achieved with ERCP and cystic duct stenting in 117 of 128 cases (91%). Successful endoscopic gallbladder drainage was also achieved with EUS-guided gallbladder drainage using transmural stent placement in 11 of 11 cases (100%). Complications occurred in 11 cases (8%). Conclusions Endoscopic gallbladder drainage techniques are safe and efficacious methods for gallbladder decompression in non-surgical patients with comorbidities. PMID:26473125

  15. Local excision by transanal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    García-Flórez, Luis J; Otero-Díez, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic surgery (TES) consists of a series of anorectal surgical procedures using different devices that are introduced into the anal canal. TES has been developed significantly since it was first used in the 1980s. The key point for the success of these techniques is how accurately patients are selected. The main indication was the resection of endoscopically unresectable adenomas. In recent years, these techniques have become more widespread which has allowed them to be applied in conservative rectal procedures for both benign diseases and selected cases of rectal cancer. For more advanced rectal cancers it should be considered palliative or, in some controlled trials, experimental. The role of newer endoscopic techniques available has not yet been defined. TES may allow for new strategies in the treatment of rectal pathology, like transanal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery or total mesorectal excision. PMID:26309355

  16. Endoscopic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Konstantin; Sung, Kung-Bin; Collier, Tom; Clark, Anne; Arifler, Dizem; Lacy, Alicia; Descour, Michael; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    In vivo endoscopic optical microscopy provides a tool to assess tissue architecture and morphology with contrast and resolution similar to that provided by standard histopathology – without need for physical tissue removal. In this article, we focus on optical imaging technologies that have the potential to dramatically improve the detection, prevention, and therapy of epithelial cancers. Epithelial pre-cancers and cancers are associated with a variety of morphologic, architectural, and molecular changes, which currently can be assessed only through invasive, painful biopsy. Optical imaging is ideally suited to detecting cancer-related alterations because it can detect biochemical and morphologic alterations with sub-cellular resolution throughout the entire epithelial thickness. Optical techniques can be implemented non-invasively, in real time, and at low cost to survey the tissue surface at risk. Our manuscript focuses primarily on modalities that currently are the most developed: reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). However, recent advances in fluorescence-based endoscopic microscopy also are reviewed briefly. We discuss the basic principles of these emerging technologies and their current and potential applications in early cancer detection. We also present research activities focused on development of exogenous contrast agents that can enhance the morphological features important for cancer detection and that have the potential to allow vital molecular imaging of cancer-related biomarkers. In conclusion, we discuss future improvements to the technology needed to develop robust clinical devices. PMID:14646041

  17. Acquisition of Eye-hand Coordination Skills for Videoendoscopic Surgery

    PubMed

    Tsai; Heinrichs

    1994-08-01

    Evaluation of eye-hand coordination skills in relation to experiential human factors may lead to improved instruction for videoendoscopic surgical skills acquisition. Twenty-nine subjects (medical students or residents in surgical specialties) volunteered to perform three exercises of increasing complexity in an "inanimate" trainer system that simulated the eye-hand coordination tasks inherent in a laboratory videoendoscopic surgical environment. Fourteen subjects participated in a biweekly practice program of 4 weeks duration using an inanimate trainer. Fifteen subjects had no practice on the laparoscopic trainer during the 4 weeks. Both groups were tested after demonstration on three exercises at the beginning and end of a 4 week period and all performed the procedures in solitude. Both groups of subjects increased performance levels (time and accuracy) over the four weeks, but improvement was significantly greater for the practicing subjects. After eight sessions, convergence of performance levels was observed, but plateauing of performance levels was not evident, even with the simple paradigms evaluated. To investigate what factors contribute to learning, subjects were assessed with respect to their surgical experiences, personality, and self-evaluated motor skills. Subjects with prior endoscopic surgical experience, interest in mechanical activities (as measured by the Strong Interest Inventory), or regular engagement in video game play tended to be more skillful initially, but demonstrated less improvement in performance levels after practice than subjects who had lower levels of experience, interest, or video game play. Manual dexterity (as measured by the Purdue Pegboard Manual Dexterity Test) was positively related to the degree of observed improvement. We conclude that "inanimate" videoendoscopic paradigms offer relatively inexpensive and useful training exercises for acquiring basic eye-hand coordination skills. Relevance for animate laboratory skills

  18. Ultrasound-assisted endoscopic partial plantar fascia release.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Ken; Shinga, Kotaro; Hattori, Soichi; Yamada, Shin; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Various surgical treatment procedures for plantar fasciitis, such as open surgery, percutaneous release, and endoscopic surgery, exist. Skin trouble, nerve disturbance, infection, and persistent pain associated with prolonged recovery time are complications of open surgery. Endoscopic partial plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of the anatomy at the surgical site. However, the primary medial portal and portal tract used for this technique have been shown to be in close proximity to the posterior tibial nerves and their branches, and there is always the risk of nerve damage by introducing the endoscope deep to the plantar fascia. By performing endoscopic partial plantar fascia release under ultrasound assistance, we could dynamically visualize the direction of the endoscope and instrument introduction, thus preventing nerve damage from inadvertent insertion deep to the fascia. Full-thickness release of the plantar fascia at the ideal position could also be confirmed under ultrasound imaging. We discuss the technique for this new procedure. PMID:24265989

  19. [ENDOSCOPIC LUNG VOLUME REDUCTION IN PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA].

    PubMed

    Duysinx, B; Heinen, V; Louis, R; Corhay, J-L

    2015-12-01

    Emphysema is characterized by an irreversible alveolar destruction, a progressive lung hyperinflation and a dysfunction of respiratory muscles. It induces a respiratory functional limitation and a decrease of quality of life. Endoscopic lung volume reduction represents a potential alternative to surgical treatments for advanced heterogeneous emphysema without concomitant surgical morbidity. The different bronchoscopic systems for lung volume reduction currently under evaluation are presented. PMID:26867305

  20. Endoscope-Assisted Transoral Fixation of Mandibular Condyle Fractures: Submandibular Versus Transoral Endoscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Na-Hyun; Lee, Yoon-Hwan; You, Hi-Jin; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Kim, Deok-Woo

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, endoscope-assisted transoral approach for condylar fracture treatment has attracted much attention. However, the surgical approach is technically challenging: the procedure requires specialized instruments and the surgeons experience a steep learning curve. During the transoral endoscopic (TE) approach several instruments are positioned through a narrow oral incision making endoscope maneuvering very difficult. For this reason, the authors changed the entry port of the endoscope from transoral to submandibular area through a small stab incision. The aim of this study is to assess the advantage of using the submandibular endoscopic intraoral approach (SEI).The SEI approach requires intraoral incision for fracture reduction and fixation, and 4 mm size submandibular stab incision for endoscope and traction wires. Fifteen patients with condyle neck and subcondyle fractures were operated under the submandibular approach and 15 patients with the same diagnosis were operated under the standard TE approach.The SEI approach allowed clear visualization of the posterior margin of the ramus and condyle, and the visual axis was parallel to the condyle ramus unit. The TE approach clearly shows the anterior margin of the condyle and the sigmoid notch. The surgical time of the SEI group was 128 minutes and the TE group was 120 minutes (P >0.05). All patients in the TE endoscope group were fixated with the trocar system, but only 2 lower neck fracture patients in the SEI group required a trocar. The other 13 subcondyle fractures were fixated with an angulated screw driver (P <0.05). There were no differences in complication and surgical outcomes.The submandibular endoscopic approach has an advantage of having more space with good visualization, and facilitated the use of an angulated screw driver. PMID:27380571

  1. Management of a large mucosal defect after duodenal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal endoscopic resection is the most difficult type of endoscopic treatment in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and is technically challenging because of anatomical specificities. In addition to these technical difficulties, this procedure is associated with a significantly higher rate of complication than endoscopic treatment in other parts of the GI tract. Postoperative delayed perforation and bleeding are hazardous complications, and emergency surgical intervention is sometimes required. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to establish a management protocol for preventing serious complications. For instance, the prophylactic closure of large mucosal defects after endoscopic resection may reduce the risk of hazardous complications. However, the size of mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is relatively large compared with the size after endoscopic mucosal resection, making it impossible to achieve complete closure using only conventional clips. The over-the-scope clip and polyglycolic acid sheets with fibrin gel make it possible to close large mucosal defects after duodenal ESD. In addition to the combination of laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection, endoscopic full-thickness resection holds therapeutic potential for difficult duodenal lesions and may overcome the disadvantages of endoscopic resection in the near future. This review aims to summarize the complications and closure techniques of large mucosal defects and to highlight some directions for management after duodenal endoscopic treatment. PMID:27547003

  2. A novel low-fidelity simulator for both mitral valve and tricuspid valve surgery: the surgical skills trainer for classic open and minimally invasive techniques†

    PubMed Central

    Verberkmoes, Niels J.; Verberkmoes-Broeders, Elizabeth M.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Simulators have been proven to equip trainee surgeons with better skills than the traditional, standard approach to skill development. The purpose of this study was to develop a low-fidelity, low-cost, reusable and portable simulation device, which could provide training in nearly the full range of mitral valve surgery techniques, in both the classic, open approach as well as the minimally invasive approach. METHODS This novel simulator is made up of commonly available components. The basic elements are a classic baby bottle, with the associated feeding teat and screw ring, in combination with a sheet of dental dam. The detailed process for making this simulator is outlined in this article. Maximum suture tensile strength on the different components was tested with a digital force gauge. Reusability and the rate of wear as a result of suturing were documented. Total cost was calculated in euros (€). RESULTS This study resulted in a simulation model very similar in size to the actual anatomical dimensions of the mitral valve. Various pathological conditions, according to Carpentier's Functional Classification, could be simulated. This led to the possibility of providing training in several mitral valve surgical techniques. As the model developed, it became clear that it could also be used to practice tricuspid valve surgery techniques. Maximum mean suture tensions on the silicone teat and dental dam were 42.11 and 11.15 N/m2, respectively. The feeding teat started wearing after approximately 45 suture placements. Total cost of the study model was €5.14. CONCLUSIONS This relatively simple, low-cost, low-fidelity model can provide simulation training in nearly the full range of mitral valve and tricuspid valve surgical techniques, in both the classic open approach and the minimally invasive approach—and do so almost anywhere. Especially when used by young cardiothoracic surgeons in training, this model may contribute to the development of technical

  3. MEDIASSIST: medical assistance for intraoperative skill transfer in minimally invasive surgery using augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudra, Gunther; Speidel, Stefanie; Fritz, Dominik; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Gutt, Carsten; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2007-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a highly complex medical discipline with various risks for surgeon and patient, but has also numerous advantages on patient-side. The surgeon has to adapt special operation-techniques and deal with difficulties like the complex hand-eye coordination, limited field of view and restricted mobility. To alleviate with these new problems, we propose to support the surgeon's spatial cognition by using augmented reality (AR) techniques to directly visualize virtual objects in the surgical site. In order to generate an intelligent support, it is necessary to have an intraoperative assistance system that recognizes the surgical skills during the intervention and provides context-aware assistance surgeon using AR techniques. With MEDIASSIST we bundle our research activities in the field of intraoperative intelligent support and visualization. Our experimental setup consists of a stereo endoscope, an optical tracking system and a head-mounted-display for 3D visualization. The framework will be used as platform for the development and evaluation of our research in the field of skill recognition and context-aware assistance generation. This includes methods for surgical skill analysis, skill classification, context interpretation as well as assistive visualization and interaction techniques. In this paper we present the objectives of MEDIASSIST and first results in the fields of skill analysis, visualization and multi-modal interaction. In detail we present a markerless instrument tracking for surgical skill analysis as well as visualization techniques and recognition of interaction gestures in an AR environment.

  4. [Endoscopic ultrasonography of the upper digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Mesihović, Rusmir; Vanis, Nenad; Tanović, Haris; Gornjaković, Srdan; Smajlović, Fahrudin; Borovac, Nada

    2003-01-01

    Endoscopic Ultrasonography, or EUS, has joined medical techniques of endoscopy with high frequency ultrasound technique, known as ultrasound. This removable achievement allows physician for microscopic tissue examination, not only in digestive system, but also in its surroundings by highly frequent technique. Endoscopic ultrasonography detects all kinds and nature of possible abnormalities, including and information, which are necessary for proper diagnosis and optimal treatment. In experience hands, EUS can detect abnormalities, which are undetectable during any other techniques of examination. EUS is applied from inside the body, near or even touching the examined surface, so the precise, highly frequent energy of showing the images can be used. The sonography, MRI, CT techniques must show the inner organs through outside surface of body, loosing the resolution during process. The superior resolution of EUS shows 5 layers of digestive tract, almost equally good as by microscope; none of other techniques allows showing of intestinal wall equally good as this one. By EUS liquid has been proved with 90% of precision in diagnosis of operative degrees of pancreas tumours. CT in this case has shows only 50% of precision. Highly skilled surgeons are aware of application of these diagnostics techniques in preoperative cases so the surgical removement of tumours is going to be more effective. The precision of EUS findings are of critical importance for the utilisation of maximum of new treatment having in mind that abnormalities could be diagnosed and characterised without operative intervention. To be able to focus on specific anatomic surfaces, there is need of great knowledge, skillfulness and praxis during the manipulation with EUS instrument. The years of experience are needed to be able to achieve high standard of expertise. The accuracy of results varies, depending on physicians diagnostic experience, sub-optimal results are not going to be a good guide during

  5. Performance Assessment of Suture Type, Water Temperature, and Surgeon Skill in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

    2010-05-01

    This study assessed performance of seven suture types in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha implanted with acoustic microtransmitters. Nonabsorbable (Ethilon) and absorbable (Monocryl) monofilament and nonabsorbable (Nurolon, silk) and absorbable (Vicryl, Vicryl Plus, Vicryl Rapide) braided sutures were used to close incisions in Chinook salmon. Monocryl exhibited greater suture retention than all other suture types 7 d after surgery. Both monofilament suture types were retained better than all braided suture types at 14 d. Incision openness and tag retention did not differ among suture types. Wound inflammation was similar for Ethilon, Monocryl, and Nurolon at 7 d. Wound ulceration was lower for Ethilon, Monocryl, and Nurolon than for all other suture types at 14 d post-surgery. Fish held in 12°C water had more desirable post-surgery healing characteristics (i.e., higher suture and tag retention and lower incision openness, wound inflammation, and ulceration) at 7 and 14 d after surgery than those held in 17°C water. The effect of surgeon was a significant predictor for all response variables at 7 d. This result emphasizes the importance of including surgeon as a variable in telemetry study analyses when multiple surgeons are used. Monocryl performed better with regard to post-surgery healing characteristics in the study fish. The overall results support the conclusion that Monocryl is the best suture material to close incisions created during surgical implantation of acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon.

  6. Performance Assessment of Suture Type, Water Temperature, and Surgeon Skill in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

    2010-08-01

    Size reductions of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision - one that may warrant only one suture for closure. However, it is not known if a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during passage of hydroelectric dams. The objectives of this study were to evaluate five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon subjected to simulated turbine passage. Fish were implanted with an acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air); incisions (6 mm) were closed with either one or two sutures. Following exposure, no transmitters were expelled. In addition, suture and incision tearing and mortal injury did not differ between treatment and control fish. Viscera expulsion was higher in treatment (12%) than control (1%) fish. The higher incidence of viscera expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, the authors do not recommend using one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation when juvenile salmonids may be exposed to turbine passage.

  7. Comprehensive review on endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.; Hosemann, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery is the standard procedure for surgery of most paranasal sinus diseases. Appropriate frame conditions provided, the respective procedures are safe and successful. These prerequisites encompass appropriate technical equipment, anatomical oriented surgical technique, proper patient selection, and individually adapted extent of surgery. The range of endonasal sinus operations has dramatically increased during the last 20 years and reaches from partial uncinectomy to pansinus surgery with extended surgery of the frontal (Draf type III), maxillary (grade 3–4, medial maxillectomy, prelacrimal approach) and sphenoid sinus. In addition there are operations outside and beyond the paranasal sinuses. The development of surgical technique is still constantly evolving. This article gives a comprehensive review on the most recent state of the art in endoscopic sinus surgery according to the literature with the following aspects: principles and fundamentals, surgical techniques, indications, outcome, postoperative care, nasal packing and stents, technical equipment. PMID:26770282

  8. Endoscopic Plantar Fascia Debridement for Chronic Plantar Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Cottom, James M; Baker, Joseph S

    2016-10-01

    When conservative therapy fails for chronic plantar fasciitis, surgical intervention may be an option. Surgical techniques that maintain the integrity of the plantar fascia will have less risk of destabilizing the foot and will retain foot function. Endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia can be performed reproducibly to reduce pain and maintain function of the foot. PMID:27599439

  9. Three-Dimensional Hand-to-Gland Combat: The Future of Endoscopic Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Nassimizadeh, A.; Muzaffar, S. J.; Nassimizadeh, M.; Beech, T.; Ahmed, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare two dimensional (2D), three-dimensional (3D) non–high-definition (HD), and 3D HD endoscopic surgical techniques. Methods We describe our initial operative experience with a novel 3D HD endoscopic endonasal approach involving a pituitary adenoma resection, provide a case series, and review the current literature. This is the first case in Europe using the new 3D HD endoscope. Results Although research evidence remains limited, there are no significant negative perioperative or postoperative outcomes when compared with 2D endoscopic techniques. In our experience the narrow operating corridors of endoscopic surgery cannot be addressed with 3D endoscopic techniques. The new 3D HD endoscope creates imaging quality similar to conventional 2D HD systems. Conclusion Three-dimensional endoscopic endonasal techniques provide an exciting new avenue, effectively addressing potential depth perception difficulties with current 2D systems. PMID:26623227

  10. Three-Dimensional Hand-to-Gland Combat: The Future of Endoscopic Surgery?

    PubMed

    Nassimizadeh, A; Muzaffar, S J; Nassimizadeh, M; Beech, T; Ahmed, S K

    2015-11-01

    Objective To compare two dimensional (2D), three-dimensional (3D) non-high-definition (HD), and 3D HD endoscopic surgical techniques. Methods We describe our initial operative experience with a novel 3D HD endoscopic endonasal approach involving a pituitary adenoma resection, provide a case series, and review the current literature. This is the first case in Europe using the new 3D HD endoscope. Results Although research evidence remains limited, there are no significant negative perioperative or postoperative outcomes when compared with 2D endoscopic techniques. In our experience the narrow operating corridors of endoscopic surgery cannot be addressed with 3D endoscopic techniques. The new 3D HD endoscope creates imaging quality similar to conventional 2D HD systems. Conclusion Three-dimensional endoscopic endonasal techniques provide an exciting new avenue, effectively addressing potential depth perception difficulties with current 2D systems. PMID:26623227

  11. Outcomes in Endoscopic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kiringoda, Ruwan; Kozin, Elliott D; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    Endoscopic ear surgery (EES) provides several advantages compared with traditional binocular microscopy, including a wide-field view, improved resolution with high magnification, and visual access to hidden corridors of the middle ear. Although binocular microscopic-assisted surgical techniques remain the gold standard for most otologists, EES is slowly emerging as a viable alternative for performing otologic surgery at several centers in the United States and abroad. In this review, we evaluate the current body of literature regarding EES outcomes, summarize our EES outcomes at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and compare these results with data for microscopic-assisted otologic surgery. PMID:27565392

  12. Current Endoscopic Treatment of Dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Ossoff, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    Benign laryngeal disorders result in dysphonia because of effects on glottic closure and the vibratory characteristics of the true vocal fold. Treatment is initially directed at reversing medical conditions and patterns of abuse with surgery reserved for unresolving lesions resulting in troublesome dysphonia. Benign lesions that require surgery are excised as precisely as possible sparing overlying mucosa and the underlying vocal ligament. Vocal fold scarring is currently best treated by augmentation procedures, and atrophy may be compensated for by medialization thyroplasty or by adding bulk to the affected folds. Application of current knowledge of laryngeal histology and physiology is prerequisite to endoscopic surgical intervention. PMID:18493531

  13. The Fully Endoscopic Acoustic Neuroma Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Carner, Marco; Rubini, Alessia; Nogueira, João Flávio; Masotto, Barbara; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Presutti, Livio

    2016-10-01

    Surgical approaches to vestibular schwannomas (VS) are widely known and extensively recorded. For the first time, an exclusive endoscopic approach to the internal acoustic canal (IAC) was described and used to safely remove a cochlear schwannoma involving IAC in March 2012. The aim of this article was to summarize indications and technique to treat intracanalicular VS by transcanal/transpromontorial endoscopic approach. Because management of intracanalicular VSs is complex and strongly debated, this kind of therapeutic option in the appropriate and selected cases could modify classic concepts of the management of this pathology. PMID:27565388

  14. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Assisted Pancreaticobiliary Access.

    PubMed

    Weilert, Frank; Binmoeller, Kenneth F

    2015-10-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the primary approach to drain an obstructed pancreatic or biliary duct. Failed biliary drainage is traditionally referred for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgical bypass, which carry significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates compared with ERCP and transpapillary drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound provides a real-time imaging platform to access and deliver therapy to organs and tissues outside of the bowel lumen. The bile and pancreatic ducts can be directly accessed from the stomach and duodenum, offering an alternative to ERCP when this fails or is not feasible. PMID:26431606

  15. Endoscopic Pubic Symphysectomy for Recalcitrant Osteitis Pubis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Asheesh; Redmond, John M.; Hammarstedt, Jon E.; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Martin, Timothy J.; Matsuda, Dean K.; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Recalcitrant osteitis pubis presents a challenging problem for orthopaedic surgeons. Various surgical interventions have been described for treatment, including opening-wedge resection, symphysiodesis, and curettage. We propose that endoscopic pubic symphysectomy offers an effective method of treating such a challenging problem. This article describes in detail the technique used to perform endoscopic pubic symphysectomy, and a companion video demonstrating the procedure is included. Our experience suggests that removal of the interpubic fibrocartilaginous lamina and resection of approximately 1 cm of bone can successfully eliminate all sources of pain and dysfunction caused by the recalcitrant osteitis pubis. PMID:26052486

  16. Endoscopic Pubic Symphysectomy for Recalcitrant Osteitis Pubis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asheesh; Redmond, John M; Hammarstedt, Jon E; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Martin, Timothy J; Matsuda, Dean K; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-04-01

    Recalcitrant osteitis pubis presents a challenging problem for orthopaedic surgeons. Various surgical interventions have been described for treatment, including opening-wedge resection, symphysiodesis, and curettage. We propose that endoscopic pubic symphysectomy offers an effective method of treating such a challenging problem. This article describes in detail the technique used to perform endoscopic pubic symphysectomy, and a companion video demonstrating the procedure is included. Our experience suggests that removal of the interpubic fibrocartilaginous lamina and resection of approximately 1 cm of bone can successfully eliminate all sources of pain and dysfunction caused by the recalcitrant osteitis pubis. PMID:26052486

  17. Endoscopic palliation of malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Sanjay M; Gaidhane, Monica; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary strictures often present late after the window for curative resection has elapsed. In such patients, the goal of therapy is typically focused on palliation. While historically, palliative measures were performed surgically, the advent of endoscopic intervention offers minimally invasive options to provide relief of symptoms, improve quality of life, and in some cases, increase survival of these patients. Some of these therapies, such as endoscopic biliary decompression, have become mainstays of treatment for decades, whereas newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, and photodynamic therapy offer additional options for patients with incurable biliary malignancies. PMID:26989459

  18. Endoscopic management of inflammatory bowel disease strictures

    PubMed Central

    Vrabie, Raluca; Irwin, Gerald L; Friedel, David

    2012-01-01

    Stricture formation is a common complication of Crohn’s disease, occurring in approximately one third of all patients with this condition. While the traditional management of such strictures has been largely surgical, there have been case series going back three decades highlighting the potential role of endoscopic balloon dilation in this clinical setting. This review article summarizes the stricture pathogenesis, focusing on known clinical and genetic risk factors. It then highlights the endoscopic balloon dilation research to date, with particular emphasis on three large recent case series. It concludes by describing the literature consensus regarding specific methodology and presenting avenues for future investigations. PMID:23189221

  19. Gastric intramural hematoma accompanied by severe epigastric pain and hematemesis after endoscopic mucosal resection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Tan, Shi-Yun; Liao, Guo-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Gastric intramural hematoma is a rare injury of the stomach, and is most often seen in patients with underlying disease. Such injury following endoscopic therapy is even rarer, and there are no universally accepted guidelines for its treatment. In this case report, we describe a gastric intramural hematoma which occurred within 6 h of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Past medical history of this patient was negative, and laboratory examinations revealed normal coagulation profiles and platelet count. Following EMR, the patient experienced severe epigastric pain and vomited 150 mL of gastric contents which were bright red in color. Subsequent emergency endoscopy showed a 4 cm × 5 cm diverticulum-like defect in the anterior gastric antrum wall and a 4 cm × 8 cm intramural hematoma adjacent to the endoscopic submucosal dissection lesion. Following unsatisfactory temporary conservative management, the patient was treated surgically and made a complete recovery. Retrospectively, one possible reason for the patient’s condition is that the arterioles in the submucosa or muscularis may have been damaged during deep and massive submucosal injection. Thus, endoscopists should be aware of this potential complication and improve the level of surgery, especially the skills required for submucosal injection. PMID:23323020

  20. Endoscopic endonasal cranial base surgery simulation using an artificial cranial base model created by selective laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kenichi; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Muto, Jun; de Souza, Daniel G; Gun, Ramazan; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Mastery of the expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) requires anatomical knowledge and surgical skills; the learning curve for this technique is steep. To a great degree, these skills can be gained by cadaveric dissections; however, ethical, religious, and legal considerations may interfere with this paradigm in different regions of the world. We assessed an artificial cranial base model for the surgical simulation of EEA and compared its usefulness with that of cadaveric specimens. The model is made of both polyamide nylon and glass beads using a selective laser sintering (SLS) technique to reflect CT-DICOM data of the patient's head. It features several artificial cranial base structures such as the dura mater, venous sinuses, cavernous sinuses, internal carotid arteries, and cranial nerves. Under endoscopic view, the model was dissected through the nostrils using a high-speed drill and other endonasal surgical instruments. Anatomical structures around and inside the sphenoid sinus were accurately reconstructed in the model, and several important surgical landmarks, including the medial and lateral optico-carotid recesses and vidian canals, were observed. The bone was removed with a high-speed drill until it was eggshell thin and the dura mater was preserved, a technique very similar to that applied in patients during endonasal cranial base approaches. The model allowed simulation of almost all sagittal and coronal plane EEA modules. SLS modeling is a useful tool for acquiring the anatomical knowledge and surgical expertise for performing EEA while avoiding the ethical, religious, and infection-related problems inherent with use of cadaveric specimens. PMID:25323096

  1. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  2. Possibilities of interventional endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Makoto; Togawa, Osamu; Matsukawa, Miho; Shono, Takashi; Ochiai, Yasutoshi; Nakao, Masamitsu; Ishikawa, Keiko; Arai, Shin; Kita, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    Since endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was developed in the 1990s, EUS has become widely accepted as an imaging tool. EUS is categorized into radial and linear in design. Radial endoscopes provide cross-sectional imaging of the mediastinum, gastrointestinal tract, liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, and pancreas, which has highly accuracy in the T and N staging of esophageal, lung, gastric, rectal, and pancreatic cancer. Tumor staging is common indication of radial-EUS, and EUS-staging is predictive of surgical resectability. In contrast, linear array endoscope uses a side-viewing probe and has advantages in the ability to perform EUS-guides fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), which has been established for cytologic diagnosis. For example, EUS-FNA arrows accurate nodal staging of esophageal cancer before surgery, which provides more accurate assessment of nodes than radial-EUS imaging alone. EUS-FNA has been also commonly used for diagnose of pancreatic diseases because of the highly accuracy than US or computed tomography. EUS and EUS-FNA has been used not only for TNM staging and cytologic diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but also for evaluation of chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cystic lesions, and other pancreatic masses. More recently, EUS-FNA has developed into EUS-guided fine needle injection including EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis, celiac plexus block, and other “interventional EUS” procedures. In this review, we have summarized the new possibilities offered by “interventional EUS”. PMID:22816010

  3. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  4. Possibilities of interventional endoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Makoto; Togawa, Osamu; Matsukawa, Miho; Shono, Takashi; Ochiai, Yasutoshi; Nakao, Masamitsu; Ishikawa, Keiko; Arai, Shin; Kita, Hiroto

    2012-07-16

    Since endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was developed in the 1990s, EUS has become widely accepted as an imaging tool. EUS is categorized into radial and linear in design. Radial endoscopes provide cross-sectional imaging of the mediastinum, gastrointestinal tract, liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, and pancreas, which has highly accuracy in the T and N staging of esophageal, lung, gastric, rectal, and pancreatic cancer. Tumor staging is common indication of radial-EUS, and EUS-staging is predictive of surgical resectability. In contrast, linear array endoscope uses a side-viewing probe and has advantages in the ability to perform EUS-guides fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), which has been established for cytologic diagnosis. For example, EUS-FNA arrows accurate nodal staging of esophageal cancer before surgery, which provides more accurate assessment of nodes than radial-EUS imaging alone. EUS-FNA has been also commonly used for diagnose of pancreatic diseases because of the highly accuracy than US or computed tomography. EUS and EUS-FNA has been used not only for TNM staging and cytologic diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but also for evaluation of chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cystic lesions, and other pancreatic masses. More recently, EUS-FNA has developed into EUS-guided fine needle injection including EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis, celiac plexus block, and other "interventional EUS" procedures. In this review, we have summarized the new possibilities offered by "interventional EUS". PMID:22816010

  5. Surgical Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This surgical technology program guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a surgical technology program. The program guide is designed to relate primarily to the development of those skills needed by individuals in the field to provide services in the…

  6. Endoscopic Ultrasound in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an advanced endoscopic technique currently used in the staging and diagnosis of many gastrointestinal neoplasms. The proximity of the echoendoscope to the gastrointestinal tract lends itself to a detailed view of the luminal pathology and the pancreas. This unique ability enables endoscopists to use EUS in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Diagnostic EUS allows previously unidentified NETs to be localized. EUS also determines tumor management by staging the GEP-NETS, enabling the clinicians to choose the appropriate endoscopic or surgical management. The ability to obtain a tissue diagnosis with EUS guidance enables disease confirmation. Finally, recent developments suggest that EUS may be used to deliver therapeutic agents for the treatment of NETs. This review will highlight the advances in our knowledge of EUS in the clinical management of these tumors. PMID:23170141

  7. [Per-oral endoscopic myotomy in achalasia].

    PubMed

    Ponds, Fraukje A M; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J; Fockens, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of patients with achalasia is complex due to a considerably high recurrence rate and risk of treatment-related complications. The per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a new endoscopic technique that combines the benefits of a minimally invasive endoscopic procedure with the efficacy of a surgical myotomy. Implementation of the POEM technique may lead to fewer complications, a lower recurrence rate and reduced costs. During the procedure, a myotomy of the circular muscle layer of the oesophagus is performed after creating a submucosal tunnel in the oesophagus. The first studies of this new technique show promising results. Experienced therapeutic endoscopists can learn to perform the POEM technique relatively easily. Further studies are needed to compare this technique with the current standard treatments and to evaluate long-term effects. PMID:25990334

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Săftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Andreas; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are fluid collections in the peripancreatic tissues associated with acute or chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage has become an established indication, having better results as compared to percutaneous drainage, nonguided endoscopic drainage, or surgical drainage. The aim of this review is to assess critically the current literature concerning EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage and to review the place of the procedure in the clinical decision management algorithms of these patients. PMID:26643700

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Saftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Andreas; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are fluid collections in the peripancreatic tissues associated with acute or chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage has become an established indication, having better results as compared to percutaneous drainage, nonguided endoscopic drainage, or surgical drainage. The aim of this review is to assess critically the current literature concerning EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage and to review the place of the procedure in the clinical decision management algorithms of these patients. PMID:26643700

  10. Novel Endoscopic Management of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dargent, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic procedures have been well-documented in the obesity field, but have not yet reached a sufficient level of evidence as stand-alone methods for treating obesity. It is unclear if they should take over. Although expanding, the array of bariatric surgical techniques does not fully meet the current needs, and there are not enough resources for increasing surgery. Surgery is avoided by a majority of patients, so that less aggressive procedures are necessary. For the time being, relevant endoscopic methods include intra-gastric balloons, gastric partitioning (Endo-plication), and the metabolic field (Endo-barrier). Surgical novelties and basic research are also important contributors owing to their potential combination with endoscopy. Conditions have been listed for implementation of bariatric endoscopy, because innovation is risky, expensive, and faces ethical challenges. A scientific background is being built (e.g., hormonal studies). Some techniques require additional study, while others are not ready but should be priorities. Steps and goals include the search for conceptual similarities and the respect of an ethical frame. Minimally invasive bariatric techniques are not ready for prime time, but they are already being successful as re-do procedures. A time-frame for step-strategies can be defined, and more investments from the industry are mandatory. PMID:26855921

  11. [Endoscopic management of luminal stenosis in inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; García-Planella, Esther; Moreno De Vega, Vicente; Domènech, Eugeni; Boix, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    Luminal stenosis is frequent in Crohn's disease (CD) due to transmural involvement. Before any endoscopic treatment, the presence of neoplastic stenosis should always be excluded. Endoscopic balloon dilatation has been used in several series to treat benign stenosis, mainly in CD with involvement of the distal ileon, colon or surgical anastomosis, with success rates of 51% to 85%, although recurrence is high. The concomitant use of injected steroids (triamcinolone) after endoscopic dilatation produces longer-lasting results, but there are few published reports. In patients with luminal stenosis refractory to conventional endoscopy, three emerging techniques may be useful: self-expanding metallic stents, biodegradable endoprostheses and intralesional infliximab injection. PMID:22341673

  12. Endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Maple, John T; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Hwang, Joo Ha; Komanduri, Sri; Manfredi, Michael; Konda, Vani; Murad, Faris M; Siddiqui, Uzma D; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-01-01

    ESD is an established effective treatment modality for premalignant and early-stage malignant lesions of the stomach, esophagus, and colorectum. Compared with EMR, ESD is generally associated with higher rates of en bloc, R0, and curative resections and a lower rate of local recurrence. Oncologic outcomes with ESD compare favorably with competing surgical interventions, and ESD also serves as an excellent T-staging tool to identify noncurative resections that will require further treatment. ESD is technically demanding and has a higher rate of adverse events than most endoscopic procedures including EMR. As such,sufficient training is critical to ensure safe conduct and high-quality resections. A standardized training model for Western endoscopists has not been clearly established,but will be self-directed and include courses, animal model training, and optimally an observership at an expert center.Numerous dedicated ESD devices are now available in the United States from different manufacturers. Although the use of ESD in the United States is increasing, issues related to technical difficulty, limited training opportunities and mentors, risk of adverse events, long procedure duration,and suboptimal reimbursement may limit ESD adoption in the United States to a modest number of academic referral centers for the foreseeable future. PMID:25796422

  13. Endoscopic skull base training using 3D printed models with pre-existing pathology.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Vairavan; Narayanan, Prepageran; Rajagopalan, Raman; Karuppiah, Ravindran; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Wormald, Peter-John; Van Hasselt, Charles Andrew; Waran, Vicknes

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic base of skull surgery has been growing in acceptance in the recent past due to improvements in visualisation and micro instrumentation as well as the surgical maturing of early endoscopic skull base practitioners. Unfortunately, these demanding procedures have a steep learning curve. A physical simulation that is able to reproduce the complex anatomy of the anterior skull base provides very useful means of learning the necessary skills in a safe and effective environment. This paper aims to assess the ease of learning endoscopic skull base exposure and drilling techniques using an anatomically accurate physical model with a pre-existing pathology (i.e., basilar invagination) created from actual patient data. Five models of a patient with platy-basia and basilar invagination were created from the original MRI and CT imaging data of a patient. The models were used as part of a training workshop for ENT surgeons with varying degrees of experience in endoscopic base of skull surgery, from trainees to experienced consultants. The surgeons were given a list of key steps to achieve in exposing and drilling the skull base using the simulation model. They were then asked to list the level of difficulty of learning these steps using the model. The participants found the models suitable for learning registration, navigation and skull base drilling techniques. All participants also found the deep structures to be accurately represented spatially as confirmed by the navigation system. These models allow structured simulation to be conducted in a workshop environment where surgeons and trainees can practice to perform complex procedures in a controlled fashion under the supervision of experts. PMID:25294050

  14. The AESOP robot system for video-assisted rigid endoscopic laryngosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alessandrini, M; De Padova, A; Napolitano, B; Camillo, A; Bruno, E

    2008-09-01

    Surgeons may occasionally encounter difficulty in visualizing the whole larynx with a direct laryngoscope. In such cases, rigid endoscopic laryngosurgery using a direct laryngoscope is an optimal solution. Multidirectional examination of the larynx using rigid endoscopes during direct laryngoscopy, leads to better control and management of the ventricle, inferior surface of the vocal fold and subglottis, and the anterior commissure. Currently, 0 degrees , 30 degrees , 70 degrees and 120 degrees angled rigid telescopes are used worldwide. Our experience in telescopic endolaryngeal surgery provided us the opportunity to work with AESOP 3000 (automated endoscope system for optimal positioning), coupling a robotic arm to a rigid endolaryngeal telescope. The use of this device allows the surgeon to control the field of view and operate with both hands. A total of 20 patients presenting a laryngeal lesion were randomly selected and included in this study undergoing a robot-assisted procedure. Three of 20 patients presented a difficult laryngeal exposure with direct laryngoscopy due to a rigid, short neck (1 male, 1 female) and prominent teeth (1 male). We used Karl Storz Hopkins II long rigid endoscopes having 0 degrees, 30 degrees and 70 degrees direction of view, a Storz Xenon 300 cold light, a Storz Tricam SL camera, the Kleinsasser direct laryngoscope. The instruments we used are all commercially available for microlaryngeal surgery and included upward curved instruments in case of difficult laryngeal exposure. The operative equipment was the same for all procedures. We evaluated the acquisition of skills in controlling the AESOP 3000, the feasibility of a single surgeon performing procedures with this machine, and any advantages that it might offer to endolaryngeal surgery. The use of robotic devices improves the precision of surgical procedures, offering surgeons a more comfortable working position, particularly for longer procedures, and without an assistant to

  15. Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Swallowing Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy) Do you have problems swallowing? ... Some names you might hear are: Endoscopy Endoscopic Evaluation of swallowing FEES (Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) ...

  16. Talus fractures: surgical principles.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Jennings, Meagan; Hamilton, Graham A

    2009-01-01

    Surgical treatment of talus fractures can challenge even the most skilled foot and ankle surgeon. Complicated fracture patterns combined with joint dislocation of variable degrees require accurate assessment, sound understanding of principles of fracture care, and broad command of internal fixation techniques needed for successful surgical care. Elimination of unnecessary soft tissue dissection, a low threshold for surgical reduction, liberal use of malleolar osteotomy to expose body fracture, and detailed attention to fracture reduction and joint alignment are critical to the success of treatment. Even with the best surgical care complications are common and seem to correlate with injury severity and open injuries. PMID:19121756

  17. Abortion - surgical

    MedlinePlus

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... problem. Your pregnancy is harmful to your health (therapeutic abortion). The pregnancy resulted after a traumatic event ...

  18. Endoscopic Sex Identification in Chelonians and Birds (Psittacines, Passerines, and Raptors).

    PubMed

    Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Despite the advent of DNA probes for sex identification of many avian and some reptile species, clinicians involved with zoos, conservation projects, or breeders may still be asked to perform "surgical sexing." This article describes the practical approach to performing endoscopic sex identification in psittacines and chelonians, including patient preparation, anesthesia, and endoscopic procedure. PMID:26336002

  19. Abortion - surgical

    MedlinePlus

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  20. Perigastric Abscess as a Complication of Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Gastric Cancer: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Yun; Kim, Joon Sung; Kim, Byung Wook; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Gi Jun; Ryu, Seung Ji; Kim, Young Wook; Ji, Jeong Seon; Choi, Hwang

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC) is a widely accepted and well established procedure because of its curative potential and low invasiveness compared with surgery. Perforation is a potential major complication during ESD, and non-surgical treatments such as endoscopic closure with clips are sufficient in most cases. Here, we report a case of perigastric abscess that occurred as a complication of ESD for EGC. The patient improved with administration of antibiotics without surgical intervention. PMID:26996184

  1. Endoscopic Devices for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Kartik; Dinani, Amreen M; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-06-01

    The obesity epidemic, recognized by the World Health Organization in 1997, refers to the rising incidence of obesity worldwide. Lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy are often ineffective long-term solutions; bariatric surgery remains the gold standard for long-term obesity weight loss. Despite the reported benefits, it has been estimated that only 1% of obese patients will undergo surgery. Endoscopic treatment for obesity represents a potential cost-effective, accessible, minimally invasive procedure that can function as a bridge or alternative intervention to bariatric surgery. We review the current endoscopic bariatric devices including space occupying devices, endoscopic gastroplasty, aspiration technology, post-bariatric surgery endoscopic revision, and obesity-related NOTES procedures. Given the diverse devices already FDA approved and in development, we discuss the future directions of endoscopic therapies for obesity. PMID:27115879

  2. Endoscopic parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Prades, Jean-Michel; Asanau, Alexander; Timoshenko, Andrei P; Gavid, Marie; Martin, Christian

    2011-06-01

    During the past decade, endoscopic video-assisted parathyroidectomy (EP) for primary hyper parathyroidism (PHPT) has gained wider acceptance. The endoscopic gasless procedure described by P. Miccoli (1997-1998) offers an attractive technique. A routine preoperative localization study was performed with both ultrasonography and 99m TC-Sestamibi scintigraphy for each patient with sporadic PHPT. The criteria to select patients eligible for EP included absence of significant nodular goiter, a previous neck surgery, a need for concomitant thyroidectomy, a significant obesity, and multiple enlarged parathyroid glands. The surgical outcome and the use of preoperative localization together with the operative strategy were evaluated. From 2005 to 2009, 59 out of 75 patients (78%) were potentially candidates for this approach. An enlarged parathyroid gland was located by both types of imaging for 34 patients (57%) and by 99 m Tc-Sestamibi scintigraphy for 46 patients (77%). Conversion was required in 11 cases (18%). Nine patients had a negative preoperative imaging study and five underwent a successful EP. The operating time ranged from 35 to 120 min (median 45 min). Usually patients were discharged home at 48 h. There were no cases of permanent hypocalcemia or recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Postoperative review showed that all calcium and parathyroid hormone levels remained normal at 3 months except for 1 patient with a double adenoma. EP is a quick, safe, and effective procedure in a selected group of patients. Our results show that this technique can be easily introduced into a general head and neck practice. PMID:21046411

  3. Technological fundamentals of endoscopic haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1992-01-01

    In order to perform endoscopic haemostasis there exist several different mechanical, biochemical and thermal methods, which may be applied together with rigid or fully flexible endoscopes in different situations. The technological fundamentals of convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer, the irradiation with coherent electromagnetic waves like microwaves and laser radiation and the resistive heating by RF-current are described. A review of the state of the art of haemostatic coagulation by laser radiation (photocoagulation) and radio-frequency currents (surgical diathermy, high-frequency coagulation) is given. The wavelength-dependent interactions of coherent light waves are compared especially for the three mainly different laser types, i.e., carbon-dioxide-, neodymium-YAG- and argon-ion-laser. The well-known disadvantages of the conventional RF-coagulation are overcome by the so-called electrohydrothermosation (EHT), i.e. the liquid-assisted application of resistive heating of biological tissues to perform haemostasis. Different technological solutions for bipolar RF-coagulation probes including ball-tips and forceps are shown and the first experimental results are discussed in comparison. PMID:1595405

  4. Collaboration between laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan

    2014-01-01

    Developments in endoscopy and laparoscopy have made monumental changes to the way gastrointestinal diseases are being managed. Many diseases that were traditionally managed by open surgical resection could now be treated by endoscopy alone. However, there are still instances where endoscopic treatment alone is inadequate for disease control and laparoscopic surgery is required. In addition, the collaboration between laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection or other endoscopic resectional techniques represents a new frontier for further research. The present manuscript aims to discuss the complementary role of laparoscopic surgery to endoscopic resection in the traditional context and also its future development. PMID:24188505

  5. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  6. Feasibility of purely endoscopic intramedullary fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    PubMed

    Frake, Paul C; Goodman, Joseph F; Joshi, Arjun S

    2015-01-01

    The investigators of this study hypothesized that fractures of the mandibular condyle can be repaired using short-segment intramedullary implants and purely endoscopic surgical technique, using a basic science, human cadaver model in an academic center. Endoscopic instrumentation was used through a transoral mucosal incision to place intramedullary implants of 2 cm in length into osteotomized mandibular condyles. The surgical maneuvers that required to insert these implants, including condyle positioning, reaming, implant insertion, and seating of the mandibular ramus, are described herein. Primary outcome was considered as successful completion of the procedure. Ten cadaveric mandibular condyles were successfully repaired with rigid intramedullary internal fixation without the use of external incisions. Both insertion of a peg-type implant and screwing a threaded implant into the condylar head were possible. The inferior portion of the implant remained exposed, and the ramus of the mandible was manipulated into position on the implant using retraction at the sigmoid notch. The results of this study suggest that purely endoscopic repair of fractures of the mandibular condyle is possible by using short-segment intramedullary titanium implants and a transoral endoscopic approach without the need for facial incisions or punctures. The biomechanical advantages of these intramedullary implants, including improved strength and resistance to mechanical failure compared with miniplates, have been recently established. The combination of improved implant design and purely endoscopic technique may allow for improved fixation and reduced surgical- and implant-related morbidity in the treatment of condylar fractures. PMID:25534058

  7. Current applications of endoscopic suturing

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Modayil, Rani; Friedel, David

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic suturing had previously been considered an experimental procedure only performed in a few centers and often by surgeons. Now, however, endoscopic suturing has evolved sufficiently to be easily implemented during procedures and is more commonly used by gastroenterologists. We have employed the Apollo OverStitch suturing device in a variety of ways including closure of perforations, closure of full thickness defects in the gastrointestinal wall created during endoscopic full thickness resection, closure of mucosotomies during peroral endoscopic myotomy, stent fixation, fistula closure, post endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic mucosal resection and Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery defect closures, post-bariatric surgery gastrojejunal anastomosis revision and primary sleeve gastroplasty. PMID:26191342

  8. [Development of a New Neuro-Endoscope Cylinder for Safer Neuro-Endoscopic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Toshihito; Endo, Katsuhiro; Endo, Yuji; Sato, Naoki; Ohta, Mamoru

    2016-09-01

    Objective:Successful endoscopic surgery for intracerebral hemorrhage has previously been hampered by impaired visualization during the operation to remove the clot, leading to a relatively low removal efficiency for hematomas. However, in multiple case series, intracerebral hematomas have been reported to be removed using endoscopic visualization. Although using tubular retractors in cranial surgery is one technique to gain access to deep-seated lesions, it is difficult to confirm the depth of the retractor's sheath in the surgical field using only the outer sheath. We built various-sized cylinders, developed by the Japan Science and Technology Agency's(JST)program for revitalization promotion, with scales that are visible during both endoscopic and radiographic procedures. We report the use of these cylinders in clinical cases. Method and Results:The JST-developed cylinders benefit from new techniques for plating and tantalum film implantation used to form tubes made of fluorinated ethylene propylene. We successfully removed various hematomas using these cylinders, as we were able to clearly visualize the border of the brain parenchyma and the depth of the hematoma using the cylinder. Conclusion:Cylinders with visible scales for both endoscopic and radiographic uses developed by the JST programs may provide greater patient safety during endoscopic surgery. We next plan to improve the hardness, length, and smoothness of the groove on the cylinder. PMID:27605475

  9. Image Guided Endoscopic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chad M; Vespa, Paul; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Carmichael, Stanley T.; Alger, Jeffry; Frazee, John; Starkman, Sid; Liebeskind, David; Nenov, Valeriy; Elashoff, Robert; Martin, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. ICH lacks an effective medical or surgical treatment despite the acknowledged pathophysiological benefits of achieved hemostasis and clot removal. Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma evacuation is a promising minimally invasive approach designed to limit operative injury and maximize hematoma removal. Methods A single center randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of stereotactic hematoma evacuation compared to best medical management. Patients were randomized within 24 hours of hemorrhage in a 3:2 fashion to best medical management plus endoscopic hematoma evacuation or best medical management alone. Data was collected to assess efficacy and safety of hematoma evacuation and to identify procedural components requiring technical improvement. Results 10 patients have been enrolled and randomized to treatment. Six patients underwent endoscopic evacuation with a hematoma volume reduction of 80% +/−13 at 24 hours post procedure. The medical arm demonstrated a hematoma enlargement of 78% +/−142 during this same period. Rehemorrhage rates and deterioration rates were similar in the two groups. Mortality was 20% in the endoscopic group and 50% in the medical treatment cohort. The endoscopic technique was shown to be effective in identification and evacuation of hematomas while reduction in the number of endoscopic passes and maintenance of hemostasis require further study. Conclusion Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma removal is a promising minimally invasive technique that is effective in immediate hematoma evacuation. This technique deserves further investigation to determine its role in ICH management. PMID:18424298

  10. Approach to the endoscopic resection of duodenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Jonathan P; Stelow, Edward B; Wang, Andrew Y

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal polyps or lesions are uncommonly found on upper endoscopy. Duodenal lesions can be categorized as subepithelial or mucosally-based, and the type of lesion often dictates the work-up and possible therapeutic options. Subepithelial lesions that can arise in the duodenum include lipomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and carcinoids. Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle aspiration is useful in the characterization and diagnosis of subepithelial lesions. Duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors and large or multifocal carcinoids are best managed by surgical resection. Brunner’s gland tumors, solitary Peutz-Jeghers polyps, and non-ampullary and ampullary adenomas are mucosally-based duodenal lesions, which can require removal and are typically amenable to endoscopic resection. Several anatomic characteristics of the duodenum make endoscopic resection of duodenal lesions challenging. However, advanced endoscopic techniques exist that enable the resection of large mucosally-based duodenal lesions. Endoscopic papillectomy is not without risk, but this procedure can effectively resect ampullary adenomas and allows patients to avoid surgery, which typically involves pancreaticoduodenectomy. Endoscopic mucosal resection and its variations (such as cap-assisted, cap-band-assisted, and underwater techniques) enable the safe and effective resection of most duodenal adenomas. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is possible but very difficult to safely perform in the duodenum. PMID:26811610

  11. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  12. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  13. Endoscopic Thermal Fasciotomy for Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Voleti, Pramod B.; Lebrun, Drake G.; Roth, Cameron A.; Kelly, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is an activity-induced condition that occurs when intracompartmental pressures within an osteofascial envelope increase during exercise, leading to reversible ischemic symptoms such as pain, cramping, numbness, or weakness. Nonoperative treatment options for this condition have shown limited success and are often undesirable for the patient given the requirement for activity modification. Traditional surgical treatment options involving open or subcutaneous fasciotomies have more favorable results, but these techniques are associated with significant morbidity. Endoscopically assisted fasciotomy techniques afford the advantages of being minimally invasive, providing excellent visualization, and allowing accelerated rehabilitation. The purpose of this article is to describe a technique for performing endoscopically assisted fasciotomies for chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the lower leg using an entirely endoscopic thermal ablating device. The endoscopic thermal fasciotomy technique is associated with minimal morbidity, ensures excellent hemostasis, and affords an early return to sports. PMID:26900549

  14. Endoscopic Thermal Fasciotomy for Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Pramod B; Lebrun, Drake G; Roth, Cameron A; Kelly, John D

    2015-10-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is an activity-induced condition that occurs when intracompartmental pressures within an osteofascial envelope increase during exercise, leading to reversible ischemic symptoms such as pain, cramping, numbness, or weakness. Nonoperative treatment options for this condition have shown limited success and are often undesirable for the patient given the requirement for activity modification. Traditional surgical treatment options involving open or subcutaneous fasciotomies have more favorable results, but these techniques are associated with significant morbidity. Endoscopically assisted fasciotomy techniques afford the advantages of being minimally invasive, providing excellent visualization, and allowing accelerated rehabilitation. The purpose of this article is to describe a technique for performing endoscopically assisted fasciotomies for chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the lower leg using an entirely endoscopic thermal ablating device. The endoscopic thermal fasciotomy technique is associated with minimal morbidity, ensures excellent hemostasis, and affords an early return to sports. PMID:26900549

  15. Endoscopic management of chronic radiation proctitis

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy occurs in 5%-20% of patients following pelvic radiotherapy. Although many cases resolve spontaneously, some lead to chronic symptoms including diarrhea, tenesmus, urgency and persistent rectal bleeding with iron deficiency anemia requiring blood transfusions. Treatments for chronic radiation proctitis remain unsatisfactory and the basis of evidence for various therapies is generally insufficient. There are very few controlled or prospective trials, and comparisons between therapies are limited because of different evaluation methods. Medical treatments, including formalin, topical sucralfate, 5-amino salicylic acid enemas, and short chain fatty acids have been used with limited success. Surgical management is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy using modalities such as the heater probe, neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser, potassium titanyl phosphate laser and bipolar electrocoagulation has been reported to be of some benefit, but with frequent complications. Argon plasma coagulation is touted to be the preferred endoscopic therapy due to its efficacy and safety profile. Newer methods of endoscopic ablation such as radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy have been recently described which may afford broader areas of treatment per application, with lower rate of complications. This review will focus on endoscopic ablation therapies, including such newer modalities, for chronic radiation proctitis. PMID:22147960

  16. Visual SLAM for Handheld Monocular Endoscope.

    PubMed

    Grasa, Óscar G; Bernal, Ernesto; Casado, Santiago; Gil, Ismael; Montiel, J M M

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) methods provide real-time estimation of 3-D models from the sole input of a handheld camera, routinely in mobile robotics scenarios. Medical endoscopic sequences mimic a robotic scenario in which a handheld camera (monocular endoscope) moves along an unknown trajectory while observing an unknown cavity. However, the feasibility and accuracy of SLAM methods have not been extensively validated with human in vivo image sequences. In this work, we propose a monocular visual SLAM algorithm tailored to deal with medical image sequences in order to provide an up-to-scale 3-D map of the observed cavity and the endoscope trajectory at frame rate. The algorithm is validated over synthetic data and human in vivo sequences corresponding to 15 laparoscopic hernioplasties where accurate ground-truth distances are available. It can be concluded that the proposed procedure is: 1) noninvasive, because only a standard monocular endoscope and a surgical tool are used; 2) convenient, because only a hand-controlled exploratory motion is needed; 3) fast, because the algorithm provides the 3-D map and the trajectory in real time; 4) accurate, because it has been validated with respect to ground-truth; and 5) robust to inter-patient variability, because it has performed successfully over the validation sequences. PMID:24107925

  17. Endoscopic Endonasal Repair of Spontaneous and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: A Review and Local Experience.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Lior; Monteiro, Eric; Klironomos, George; Alghonaim, Yazeed; Vescan, Allan; Zadeh, Gelareh; Gentili, Fred

    2015-07-01

    This article presents an overview of endoscopic endonasal repair of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. In recent years, endoscopic repair has become the standard of care for managing this condition, because it gradually replaces the traditional open transcranial approach. Discussion includes the etiologic classification of CSF rhinorrhea, management paradigm for each category, diagnosis algorithm, comprehensive description of the surgical technique, and an updated review of the literature regarding the safety and efficacy of this procedure. In addition, the authors present their experience, including 2 surgical videos demonstrating endoscopic repair of CSF rhinorrhea in 2 distinct clinical scenarios. PMID:26141354

  18. Endoscopic Management of Attic Cholesteatoma: Long-Term Results.

    PubMed

    Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Marchioni, Daniele; Kakehata, Seiji; Presutti, Livio; Villari, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    The main application of endoscopic surgery relies on the middle ear cholesteatoma surgical treatment, although for a definitive validation and acceptance by scientific community, long-term results are needed about recurrent and residual rates of the pathology. The aim of the present paper was to analyze the single institution experience with the long-term results of surgical treatment of attic cholesteatoma. PMID:27565391

  19. Review of Pure Endoscopic Full-Thickness Resection of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-09-23

    Natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) using flexible endoscopy has attracted attention as a minimally invasive surgical method that does not cause an operative wound on the body surface. However, minimizing the number of devices involved in endoscopic, compared to laparoscopic, surgeries has remained a challenge, causing endoscopic surgeries to gradually be phased out of use. If a flexible endoscopic full-thickness suturing device and a counter-traction device were developed to expand the surgical field for gastrointestinal-tract collapse, then endoscopic full-thickness resection using NOTES, which is seen as an extension of endoscopic submucosal dissection for full-thickness excision of tumors involving the gastrointestinal-tract wall, might become an extremely minimally invasive surgical method that could be used to resect only full-thickness lesions approached by the shortest distance via the mouth. It is expected that gastroenterological endoscopists will use this surgery if device development is advanced. This extremely minimally invasive surgery would have an immeasurable impact with regard to mitigating the burden on patients and reducing healthcare costs. Development of a new surgical method using a multi-purpose flexible endoscope is therefore considered a socially urgent issue. PMID:26343069

  20. Robotic path planning for surgeon skill evaluation in minimally-invasive sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Ahmidi, Narges; Hager, Gregory D; Ishii, Lisa; Gallia, Gary L; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    We observe that expert surgeons performing MIS learn to minimize their tool path length and avoid collisions with vital structures. We thus conjecture that an expert surgeon's tool paths can be predicted by minimizing an appropriate energy function. We hypothesize that this reference path will be closer to an expert with greater skill, as measured by an objective measurement instrument such as objective structured assessment of technical skill (OSATS). To test this hypothesis, we have developed a surgical path planner (SPP) for functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). We measure the similarity between an automatically generated reference path and surgical motions of subjects. We also develop a complementary similarity metric by translating tool motion to a coordinate-independent coding of motion, which we call the descriptive curve coding (DCC) method. We evaluate our methods on surgical motions recorded from FESS training tasks. The results show that the SPP reference path predicts the OSATS scores with 88% accuracy. We also show that motions coded with DCC predict OSATS scores with 90% accuracy. Finally, the combination of SPP and DCC identifies surgical skill with 93% accuracy. PMID:23285585

  1. Endoscopic Removal of a Scapular Osteophyte Using Scapulothoracic Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lycke, Christian; Theopold, Jan-Dirk; Marquass, Bastian; von Dercks, Nikolaus; Hepp, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the removal of a scapular osteophyte from the subscapular space by scapulothoracic arthroscopy. The endoscopic technique allows a gentle approach to the subscapular space without causing a large amount of surgical trauma and therefore leads to good cosmetic and functional results. PMID:27073768

  2. Endoscopic cystogastrostomy: minimally invasive approach for pancreatic pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Sial, Gull-Zareen Khan; Qazi, Abid Quddus; Yusuf, Mohammed Aasim

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts in children are not uncommon. Non-resolving pseudocysts often require surgical intervention. Endoscopic cystogastrostomy is a minimally invasive procedure which is recommended for this condition. We report a large pancreatic pseudocyst in a 4-year old child, which developed following therapy with PEG-Asparaginase for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It was managed with minimally invasive procedure. PMID:25628993

  3. Endoscopic Cystogastrostomy: Minimally Invasive Approach for Pancreatic Pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Sial, Gull-Zareen Khan; Yusuf, Mohammed Aasim

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts in children are not uncommon. Non-resolving pseudocysts often require surgical intervention. Endoscopic cystogastrostomy is a minimally invasive procedure which is recommended for this condition. We report a large pancreatic pseudocyst in a 4-year old child, which developed following therapy with PEG-Asparaginase for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It was managed with minimally invasive procedure. PMID:25628993

  4. 21 CFR 876.4300 - Endoscopic electrosurgical unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endoscopic electrosurgical unit and accessories. 876.4300 Section 876.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  5. Current Innovations in Endoscopic Therapy for the Management of Colorectal Cancer: From Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection to Endoscopic Full-Thickness Resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Morishita, Asahiro; Izuishi, Kunihiko; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is accepted as a minimally invasive treatment for colorectal cancer. However, due to technical difficulties and an increased rate of complications, ESD is not widely used in the colorectum. In some cases, endoscopic treatment alone is insufficient for disease control, and laparoscopic surgery is required. The combination of laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection represents a new frontier in cancer treatment. Recent developments in advanced polypectomy and minimally invasive surgical techniques will enable surgeons and endoscopists to challenge current practice in colorectal cancer treatment. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) of the colon offers the potential to decrease the postoperative morbidity and mortality associated with segmental colectomy while enhancing the diagnostic yield compared to current endoscopic techniques. However, closure is necessary after EFTR and natural transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). Innovative methods and new devices for EFTR and suturing are being developed and may potentially change traditional paradigms to achieve minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. The present paper aims to discuss the complementary role of ESD and the future development of EFTR. We focus on the possibility of achieving EFTR using the ESD method and closing devices. PMID:24877148

  6. Peroral endoscopic myotomy: establishing a new program.

    PubMed

    Kumta, Nikhil A; Mehta, Shivani; Kedia, Prashant; Weaver, Kristen; Sharaiha, Reem Z; Fukami, Norio; Minami, Hitomi; Casas, Fernando; Gaidhane, Monica; Lambroza, Arnon; Kahaleh, Michel

    2014-09-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and aperistalsis of the esophageal body. Treatment of achalasia is aimed at decreasing the resting pressure in the LES. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), derived from natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), presents a novel, minimally invasive, and curative endoscopic treatment for achalasia. POEM involves an esophageal mucosal incision followed by creation of a submucosal tunnel crossing the esophagogastric junction and myotomy before closure of the mucosal incision. Although the procedure is technically demanding and requires a certain degree of skill and competency, treatment success is high (90%) with low complication rates. Since the first described POEM in humans in 2010, it has been used increasingly at centers worldwide. This article reviews available published clinical studies demonstrating POEM efficacy and safety in order to present a proposal on how to establish a dedicated POEM program and reach base proficiency for the procedure. PMID:25324996

  7. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy: Establishing a New Program

    PubMed Central

    Kumta, Nikhil A.; Mehta, Shivani; Kedia, Prashant; Weaver, Kristen; Sharaiha, Reem Z.; Fukami, Norio; Minami, Hitomi; Casas, Fernando; Gaidhane, Monica; Lambroza, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and aperistalsis of the esophageal body. Treatment of achalasia is aimed at decreasing the resting pressure in the LES. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), derived from natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) and advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), presents a novel, minimally invasive, and curative endoscopic treatment for achalasia. POEM involves an esophageal mucosal incision followed by creation of a submucosal tunnel crossing the esophagogastric junction and myotomy before closure of the mucosal incision. Although the procedure is technically demanding and requires a certain degree of skill and competency, treatment success is high (90%) with low complication rates. Since the first described POEM in humans in 2010, it has been used increasingly at centers worldwide. This article reviews available published clinical studies demonstrating POEM efficacy and safety in order to present a proposal on how to establish a dedicated POEM program and reach base proficiency for the procedure. PMID:25324996

  8. Evaluation of resident's training for endoscopic sinus surgery using a sheep's head.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Vargas, Beatriz; Romero-Salazar, Azucena Lloris; Reyes Burneo, Pablo M; Vásquez Hincapie, Catalina; de Los Santos Granado, Gonzalo; Del Castillo López, Raúl; Frágola Arnau, Claudio; Cobeta Marco, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    Training in functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is an essential part of each ENT resident and it takes place on a very fragile area. This study focus on showing the learning curve of FESS, using an anatomical model such as the sheep's head. Four residents in our centre performed dissections. Each of these residents operated eight sheep's head. They performed an endoscopic septoplasty followed by maxillary antrostomy, total ethmoidectomy and frontal sinusotomy on every head. A staff member guided all procedures and checked for the appropriate dissection and complications occurred. Analysis was made upon the residents' performance of their first four septoplasties and eight nasal sides against their subsequent performance of the same. Final procedures presented better outcomes than the initial ones on every step of them. Results were measured by means of decrease of time (P < 0.0001) and complications, showing no major complications on the latest ones. Sheep's head is a suitable substitute for the cadaveric human head, to obtain the surgical skills needed for FESS procedures. Sheep's nasal cavity allows gaining dexterity and it is an easy model to obtain. PMID:26739302

  9. Understanding EUS (Endoscopic Ultrasonography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification (MOC) Course Calendar GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Endoscopic Learning Library IT&T Hands-On Training Training and ... ASGE Endorsed Activities Ambassador Program Trainee Resources Traveling Learning ... MANAGEMENT GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Featured Courses ...

  10. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Erik P.; Andrews, Paul E.; Lingeman, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to document the evolution of a new surgical procedure for the treatment of carefully selected patients with organ confined localized prostate cancer. Natural orifice surgery represents a paradigm shift in the surgical approach to disease, although its adoption into clinical practice has been limited to date. This manuscript describes the development of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgical radical prostatectomy (NOTES RP). The laboratory, animal, preclinical and early clinical experiences are described and detailed. While the early experiences with this approach are promising and encouraging, more information is required. Despite the early successes with the procedure, long-term oncological and functional outcomes are essential and more work needs to be done to facilitate the teaching and ease of the NOTES RP. PMID:22295043

  11. Endoscopic Techniques in Tympanoplasty.

    PubMed

    Anzola, Jesus Franco; Nogueira, João Flávio

    2016-10-01

    The endoscope has transformed the way we observe, understand, and treat chronic ear disease. Improved view, exclusive transcanal techniques, assessment of ventilation routes and mastoid tissue preservation have led to decreased morbidity and functional enhancement of minimally invasive reconstruction of the middle ear. The philosophical identity of endoscopic ear surgery is evolving; new research, long-term results, and widespread acknowledgement of its postulates will undoubtedly define its role in otology. PMID:27565390

  12. Standardized endoscopic reporting.

    PubMed

    Aabakken, Lars; Barkun, Alan N; Cotton, Peter B; Fedorov, Evgeny; Fujino, Masayuki A; Ivanova, Ekaterina; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Kuznetzov, Konstantin; de Lange, Thomas; Matsuda, Koji; Moine, Olivier; Rembacken, Björn; Rey, Jean-Francois; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Rösch, Thomas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Yao, Kenshi; Waye, Jerome D

    2014-02-01

    The need for standardized language is increasingly obvious, also within gastrointestinal endoscopy. A systematic approach to the description of endoscopic findings is vital for the development of a universal language, but systematic also means structured, and structure is inherently a challenge when presented as an alternative to the normal spoken word. The efforts leading to the "Minimal Standard Terminology" (MST) of gastrointestinal endoscopy offer a standardized model for description of endoscopic findings. With a combination of lesion descriptors and descriptor attributes, this system gives guidance to appropriate descriptions of lesions and also has a normative effect on endoscopists in training. The endoscopic report includes a number of items not related to findings per se, but to other aspects of the procedure, formal, technical, and medical. While the MST sought to formulate minimal lists for some of these aspects (e.g. indications), they are not all well suited for the inherent structure of the MST, and many are missing. Thus, the present paper offers a recommended standardization also of the administrative, technical, and other "peri-endoscopic" elements of the endoscopic report; important also are the numerous quality assurance initiatives presently emerging. Finally, the image documentation of endoscopic findings is becoming more obvious-and accessible. Thus, recommendations for normal procedures as well as for focal and diffuse pathology are presented. The recommendations are "minimal," meaning that expansions and subcategories will likely be needed in most centers. Still, with a stronger common grounds, communication within endoscopy will still benefit. PMID:24329727

  13. Endoscopic video manifolds.

    PubMed

    Atasoy, Selen; Mateus, Diana; Lallemand, Joe; Meining, Alexander; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Navab, Nassir

    2010-01-01

    Postprocedural analysis of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic videos is a difficult task because the videos often suffer from a large number of poor-quality frames due to the motion or out-of-focus blur, specular highlights and artefacts caused by turbid fluid inside the GI tract. Clinically, each frame of the video is examined individually by the endoscopic expert due to the lack of a suitable visualisation technique. In this work, we introduce a low dimensional representation of endoscopic videos based on a manifold learning approach. The introduced endoscopic video manifolds (EVMs) enable the clustering of poor-quality frames and grouping of different segments of the GI endoscopic video in an unsupervised manner to facilitate subsequent visual assessment. In this paper, we present two novel inter-frame similarity measures for manifold learning to create structured manifolds from complex endoscopic videos. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed method yields high precision and recall values for uninformative frame detection (90.91% and 82.90%) and results in well-structured manifolds for scene clustering. PMID:20879345

  14. [THE ROLE OF SIMULATION IN SURGICAL TRAINING--A NEW ERA].

    PubMed

    Rofe, Guy; Lissak, Arie; Brandes-Klein, Orly; Segev, Eran; Paz, Moran; Hod, Yael; Barzilai, Menashe; Auslender, Ron; Shapira, Chen; Kaufman, Yuval

    2015-06-01

    Surgical training, which was traditionally based on the apprentice model, is undergoing a fundamental change since the introduction of virtual reality simulators into the training program of surgical residents. With the introduction of these simulators we can expect to see an improvement in the surgical abilities of new surgeons and a decrease in costs--as seen in the aviation world. Virtual reality simulators include a visual and tactile interface which is meant to train young surgeons in full procedure before the actual surgery. The available operation encompasses a multitude of surgical disciplines--gynecology, urology, orthopedics, vascular surgery, general surgery and more. The simulator allows the surgeon to practice complicated procedures and to be exposed to emergency situations without risking the patient's life. We opened in the Carmel Medical Center a multi disciplinary simulation center 18 months ago. The center includes simulators for gynecology, orthopedics, urology, general surgery, vascular surgery and advanced cardiac life support. The center cooperates with the Faculty of Medicine at the Technion in order to train young surgeons in all surgical disciplines. In this period of time we followed the improvement in the endoscopic abilities of the basic skills course participants. PMID:26281087

  15. Computer-Enhanced Visual Learning Method to Teach Endoscopic Correction of Vesicoureteral Reflux: An Invitation to Residency Training Programs to Utilize the CEVL Method

    PubMed Central

    Bauschard, Michael; Maizels, Max; Kirsch, Andrew; Koyle, Martin; Chaviano, Tony; Liu, Dennis; Stoltz, Rachel Stork; Maizels, Evelyn; Prasad, Michaella; Marks, Andrew; Bolnick, David

    2012-01-01

    Herein we describe a standardized approach to teach endoscopic injection therapy to repair vesicoureteral reflux utilizing the CEVL method, an internet-accessed platform. The content was developed through collaboration of the authors' clinical and computer expertises. This application provides personnel training, examination, and procedure skill documentation through the use of online text with narration, pictures, and video. There is also included feedback and remediation of skill performance and teaching “games.” We propose that such standardized teaching and procedure performance will ultimate in improved surgical results. The electronic nature of communication in this journal is ideal to rapidly disseminate this information and to develop a structure for collaborative research. PMID:22272196

  16. Submucosal tunnel endoscopy: Peroral endoscopic myotomy and peroral endoscopic tumor resection

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheriadis, Nikolas; Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Onimaru, Manabu; Maselli, Roberta; Santi, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an innovative, minimally invasive, endoscopic treatment for esophageal achalasia and other esophageal motility disorders, emerged from the natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery procedures, and since the first human case performed by Inoue in 2008, showed exciting results in international level, with more than 4000 cases globally up to now. POEM showed superior characteristics than the standard 100-year-old surgical or laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM), not only for all types of esophageal achalasia [classical (I), vigorous (II), spastic (III), Chicago Classification], but also for advanced sigmoid type achalasia (S1 and S2), failed LHM, or other esophageal motility disorders (diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or Jackhammer esophagus). POEM starts with a mucosal incision, followed by submucosal tunnel creation crossing the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) and myotomy. Finally the mucosal entry is closed with endoscopic clip placement. POEM permitted relatively free choice of myotomy length and localization. Although it is technically demanding procedure, POEM can be performed safely and achieves very good control of dysphagia and chest pain. Gastroesophageal reflux is the most common troublesome side effect, and is well controllable with proton pump inhibitors. Furthermore, POEM opened the era of submucosal tunnel endoscopy, with many other applications. Based on the same principles with POEM, in combination with new technological developments, such as endoscopic suturing, peroral endoscopic tumor resection (POET), is safely and effectively applied for challenging submucosal esophageal, EGJ and gastric cardia tumors (submucosal tumors), emerged from muscularis propria. POET showed up to know promising results, however, it is restricted to specialized centers. The present article reviews the recent data of POEM and POET and discussed controversial issues that need further study and future perspectives. PMID

  17. Submucosal tunnel endoscopy: Peroral endoscopic myotomy and peroral endoscopic tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Nikolas; Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Onimaru, Manabu; Maselli, Roberta; Santi, Grace

    2016-01-25

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an innovative, minimally invasive, endoscopic treatment for esophageal achalasia and other esophageal motility disorders, emerged from the natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery procedures, and since the first human case performed by Inoue in 2008, showed exciting results in international level, with more than 4000 cases globally up to now. POEM showed superior characteristics than the standard 100-year-old surgical or laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM), not only for all types of esophageal achalasia [classical (I), vigorous (II), spastic (III), Chicago Classification], but also for advanced sigmoid type achalasia (S1 and S2), failed LHM, or other esophageal motility disorders (diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or Jackhammer esophagus). POEM starts with a mucosal incision, followed by submucosal tunnel creation crossing the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) and myotomy. Finally the mucosal entry is closed with endoscopic clip placement. POEM permitted relatively free choice of myotomy length and localization. Although it is technically demanding procedure, POEM can be performed safely and achieves very good control of dysphagia and chest pain. Gastroesophageal reflux is the most common troublesome side effect, and is well controllable with proton pump inhibitors. Furthermore, POEM opened the era of submucosal tunnel endoscopy, with many other applications. Based on the same principles with POEM, in combination with new technological developments, such as endoscopic suturing, peroral endoscopic tumor resection (POET), is safely and effectively applied for challenging submucosal esophageal, EGJ and gastric cardia tumors (submucosal tumors), emerged from muscularis propria. POET showed up to know promising results, however, it is restricted to specialized centers. The present article reviews the recent data of POEM and POET and discussed controversial issues that need further study and future perspectives. PMID

  18. Gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy’s lesion: Clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, and endoscopic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-01-01

    Although relatively uncommon, Dieulafoy’s lesion is an important cause of acute gastrointestinal bleeding due to the frequent difficulty in its diagnosis; its tendency to cause severe, life-threatening, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding; and its amenability to life-saving endoscopic therapy. Unlike normal vessels of the gastrointestinal tract which become progressively smaller in caliber peripherally, Dieulafoy’s lesions maintain a large caliber despite their peripheral, submucosal, location within gastrointestinal wall. Dieulafoy’s lesions typically present with severe, active, gastrointestinal bleeding, without prior symptoms; often cause hemodynamic instability and often require transfusion of multiple units of packed erythrocytes. About 75% of lesions are located in the stomach, with a marked proclivity of lesions within 6 cm of the gastroesophageal junction along the gastric lesser curve, but lesions can also occur in the duodenum and esophagus. Lesions in the jejunoileum or colorectum have been increasingly reported. Endoscopy is the first diagnostic test, but has only a 70% diagnostic yield because the lesions are frequently small and inconspicuous. Lesions typically appear at endoscopy as pigmented protuberances from exposed vessel stumps, with minimal surrounding erosion and no ulceration (visible vessel sans ulcer). Endoscopic therapy, including clips, sclerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation, thermocoagulation, or electrocoagulation, is the recommended initial therapy, with primary hemostasis achieved in nearly 90% of cases. Dual endoscopic therapy of epinephrine injection followed by ablative or mechanical therapy appears to be effective. Although banding is reportedly highly successful, it entails a small risk of gastrointestinal perforation from banding deep mural tissue. Therapeutic alternatives after failed endoscopic therapy include repeat endoscopic therapy, angiography, or surgical wedge resection. The mortality has declined from about 30

  19. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastrointestinal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kakushima, Naomi; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced technique of therapeutic endoscopy for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms. Three steps characterize it: injecting fluid into the submucosa to elevate the lesion, cutting the surrounding mucosa of the lesion, and dissecting the submucosa beneath the lesion. The ESD technique has rapidly permeated in Japan for treatment of early gastric cancer, due to its excellent results of en-bloc resection compared to endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Although there is still room for improvement to lessen its technical difficulty, ESD has recently been applied to esophageal and colorectal neoplasms. Favorable short-term results have been reported, but the application of ESD should be well considered by three aspects: (1) the possibility of nodal metastases of the lesion, (2) technical difficulty such as location, ulceration and operator’s skill, and (3) organ characteristics. PMID:18494043

  20. How to establish endoscopic submucosal dissection in Western countries

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Tsuneo; Yahagi, Naohisa; Ponchon, Thierry; Kiesslich, Tobias; Berr, Frieder

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been invented in Japan to provide resection for cure of early cancer in the gastrointestinal tract. Professional level of ESD requires excellent staging of early neoplasias with image enhanced endoscopy (IEE) to make correct indications for ESD, and high skills in endoscopic electrosurgical dissection. In Japan, endodiagnostic and endosurgical excellence spread through personal tutoring of skilled endoscopists by the inventors and experts in IEE and ESD. To translocate this expertise to other continents must overcome two fundamental obstacles: (1) inadequate expectations as to the complexity of IEE and ESD; and (2) lack of suitable lesions and master-mentors for ESD trainees. Leading endoscopic mucosal resection-proficient endoscopists must pioneer themselves through the long learning curve to proficient ESD experts. Major referral centers for ESD must arise in Western countries on comparable professional level as in Japan. In the second stage, the upcoming Western experts must commit themselves to teach skilled endoscopists from other referral centers, in order to spread ESD in Western countries. Respect for patients with early gastrointestinal cancer asks for best efforts to learn endoscopic categorization of early neoplasias and skills for ESD based on sustained cooperation with the masters in Japan. The strategy is discussed here. PMID:26523097

  1. How to establish endoscopic submucosal dissection in Western countries.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tsuneo; Yahagi, Naohisa; Ponchon, Thierry; Kiesslich, Tobias; Berr, Frieder

    2015-10-28

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been invented in Japan to provide resection for cure of early cancer in the gastrointestinal tract. Professional level of ESD requires excellent staging of early neoplasias with image enhanced endoscopy (IEE) to make correct indications for ESD, and high skills in endoscopic electrosurgical dissection. In Japan, endodiagnostic and endosurgical excellence spread through personal tutoring of skilled endoscopists by the inventors and experts in IEE and ESD. To translocate this expertise to other continents must overcome two fundamental obstacles: (1) inadequate expectations as to the complexity of IEE and ESD; and (2) lack of suitable lesions and master-mentors for ESD trainees. Leading endoscopic mucosal resection-proficient endoscopists must pioneer themselves through the long learning curve to proficient ESD experts. Major referral centers for ESD must arise in Western countries on comparable professional level as in Japan. In the second stage, the upcoming Western experts must commit themselves to teach skilled endoscopists from other referral centers, in order to spread ESD in Western countries. Respect for patients with early gastrointestinal cancer asks for best efforts to learn endoscopic categorization of early neoplasias and skills for ESD based on sustained cooperation with the masters in Japan. The strategy is discussed here. PMID:26523097

  2. [Acute complications after endoscopic resection of duodenal adenomas].

    PubMed

    König, J; Kaiser, A; Opfermann, P; Manner, H; Pohl, J; Ell, C; May, A D

    2014-02-01

    With the increasing technological development of endoscopy in recent years the diagnosis of and endoscopic therapy for duodenal adenomas has gained in importance. Due to its potentially malignant transformation an effective and safe therapy is necessary. The endoscopic resection has been shown to be safe and effective, even in cases of resection of large duodenal adenomas. Several studies have supported this thesis but are based on relatively small numbers of patients. In our clinic we have performed endoscopic resections of 178 duodenal adenomas over a period of 14 years, including sporadic duodenal adenomas as well as adenomas in familial polyposis syndromes. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to determine the acute complications associated with this technique. The rate of severe complications such as major bleeding or perforations was 9%. Further complications were minor bleeding (15.7%), pain needing treatment with analgesia (6.7%), fever (2.8%) and pancreatitis (0.6%). Summing up our experience with the endoscopic resection of adenomas of the small bowel we also consider the endoscopic resection of duodenal adenomas in most cases as a safe and effective alternative to surgical therapy. Because of the potential complications and their management especially in the resection of large adenomas with a size more than 2 cm, the endoscopic resection should be performed on an inpatient basis in experienced centres. PMID:24526403

  3. [Early Diagnosis And Endoscopic Minimally Invasive Treatment of Gastrointestinal Tumor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-ping; Wu, Jun-chao

    2015-11-01

    Gastrointestinal tumor could be aggressive and life threaten if it was not be diagnosed and treated at early stage. Digestive endoscopy plays a very important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal tumor, and shows rapid evolution with novel technologies in the past years, such as endoscopic ultrasonography, magnifying endoscopy, electronic staining endoscopy, endoscopic confocal laser microscopy. Nowaday it becomes feasible to learn more about the endoscopic manifestation in early stage GI tumor. Besides, several new endoscopic surgical techniques, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), endoscopicsubmucosal tunnel dissection (ESTD), submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection (STER), has been applied in clinical treatment of early stage GI tumor with curative effect. However, there are some new problems emerged, such as how to determine the depth of the lesion, how to avoid or reduce the incidence of postoperative complications, and how to standardize the pathological classification and the treatment of positive margin, which need multidisciplinary solution with the efforts from endoscopist, clinician and pathologist. With the deep insight on, molecular pathogenesis of GI tumor, new technologies combinding endoscopy, imaging and pathological measures, will promote more GI tumor early diagnosed and effectively treated, thus improve the survival and prognosis of GI tumor patients. PMID:26867326

  4. Endoscopic management of gastrointestinal perforations, leaks and fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Pawel; Daniluk, Jaroslaw; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Wroblewski, Eugeniusz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforations, leaks and fistulas may be serious and life-threatening. The increasing number of endoscopic procedures with a high risk of perforation and the increasing incidence of leakage associated with bariatric operations call for a minimally invasive treatment for these complications. The therapeutic approach can vary greatly depending on the size, location, and timing of gastrointestinal wall defect recognition. Some asymptomatic patients can be treated conservatively, while patients with septic symptoms or cardio-pulmonary insufficiency may require intensive care and urgent surgical treatment. However, most gastrointestinal wall defects can be satisfactorily treated by endoscopy. Although the initial endoscopic closure rates of chronic fistulas is very high, the long-term results of these treatments remain a clinical problem. The efficacy of endoscopic therapy depends on several factors and the best mode of treatment will depend on a precise localization of the site, the extent of the leak and the endoscopic appearance of the lesion. Many endoscopic tools for effective closure of gastrointestinal wall defects are currently available. In this review, we summarized the basic principles of the management of acute iatrogenic perforations, as well as of postoperative leaks and chronic fistulas of the gastrointestinal tract. We also described the effectiveness of various endoscopic methods based on current research and our experience. PMID:26457014

  5. Navigation in endoscopic soft tissue surgery: perspectives and limitations.

    PubMed

    Baumhauer, Matthias; Feuerstein, Marco; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Rassweiler, J

    2008-04-01

    Despite rapid developments in the research areas of medical imaging, medical image processing, and robotics, the use of computer assistance in surgical routine is still limited to diagnostics, surgical planning, and interventions on mostly rigid structures. In order to establish a computer-aided workflow from diagnosis to surgical treatment and follow-up, several proposals for computer-assisted soft tissue interventions have been made in recent years. By means of different pre- and intraoperative information sources, such as surgical planning, intraoperative imaging, and tracking devices, surgical navigation systems aim to support surgeons in localizing anatomical targets, observing critical structures, and sparing healthy tissue. Current research in particular addresses the problem of organ shift and tissue deformation, and obstacles in communication between navigation system and surgeon. In this paper, we review computer-assisted navigation systems for soft tissue surgery. We concentrate on approaches that can be applied in endoscopic thoracic and abdominal surgery, because endoscopic surgery has special needs for image guidance due to limitations in perception. Furthermore, this paper informs the reader about new trends and technologies in the area of computer-assisted surgery. Finally, a balancing of the key challenges and possible benefits of endoscopic navigation refines the perspectives of this increasingly important discipline of computer-aided medical procedures. PMID:18366319

  6. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related perforations: Diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Vezakis, Antonios; Fragulidis, Georgios; Polydorou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become an important therapeutic modality for biliary and pancreatic disorders. Perforation is one of the most feared complications of ERCP and endoscopic sphincterotomy. A MEDLINE search was performed from 2000-2014 using the keywords “perforation”, “ERCP” and “endoscopic sphincterotomy”. All articles including more than nine cases were reviewed. The incidence of ERCP-related perforations was low (0.39%, 95%CI: 0.34-0.69) with an associated mortality of 7.8% (95%CI: 3.80-13.07). Endoscopic sphincterotomy was responsible for 41% of perforations, insertion and manipulations of the endoscope for 26%, guidewires for 15%, dilation of strictures for 3%, other instruments for 4%, stent insertion or migration for 2% and in 7% of cases the etiology was unknown. The diagnosis was made during ERCP in 73% of cases. The mechanism, site and extent of injury, suggested by clinical and radiographic findings, should guide towards operative or non-operative management. In type I perforations early surgical repair is indicated, unless endoscopic closure can be achieved. Patients with type II perforations should be treated initially non-operatively. Non-operative treatment includes biliary stenting, fasting, intravenous fluid resuscitation, nasogastric drainage, broad spectrum antibiotics, percutaneous drainage of fluid collections. Non-operative treatment was successful in 79% of patients with type II injuries, with an overall mortality of 9.4%. Non-operative treatment was sufficient in all patients with type III injuries. Surgical technique depends on timing, site and size of defect and clinical condition of the patient. In conclusion, diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion and clinical and radiographic findings. Whilst surgery is usually indicated in patients with type I injuries, patients with type II or III injuries should be treated initially non-operatively. A minority of them will finally require surgical

  7. Characterization of complications associated with open and endoscopic craniosynostosis surgery at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Han, Rowland H; Nguyen, Dennis C; Bruck, Brent S; Skolnick, Gary B; Yarbrough, Chester K; Naidoo, Sybill D; Patel, Kamlesh B; Kane, Alex A; Woo, Albert S; Smyth, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT The authors present a retrospective cohort study examining complications in patients undergoing surgery for craniosynostosis using both minimally invasive endoscopic and open approaches. METHODS Over the past 10 years, 295 nonsyndromic patients (140 undergoing endoscopic procedures and 155 undergoing open procedures) and 33 syndromic patients (endoscopic procedures in 10 and open procedures in 23) met the authors' criteria. Variables analyzed included age at surgery, presence of a preexisting CSF shunt, skin incision method, estimated blood loss, transfusions of packed red blood cells, use of intravenous steroids or tranexamic acid, intraoperative durotomies, procedure length, and length of hospital stay. Complications were classified as either surgically or medically related. RESULTS In the nonsyndromic endoscopic group, the authors experienced 3 (2.1%) surgical and 5 (3.6%) medical complications. In the nonsyndromic open group, there were 2 (1.3%) surgical and 7 (4.5%) medical complications. Intraoperative durotomies occurred in 5 (3.6%) endoscopic and 12 (7.8%) open cases, were repaired primarily, and did not result in reoperations for CSF leakage. Similar complication rates were seen in syndromic cases. There was no death or permanent morbidity. Additionally, endoscopic procedures were associated with significantly decreased estimated blood loss, transfusions, procedure length, and length of hospital stay compared with open procedures. CONCLUSIONS Rates of intraoperative durotomies and surgical and medical complications were comparable between endoscopic and open techniques. This is the largest direct comparison to date between endoscopic and open interventions for synostosis, and the results are in agreement with previous series that endoscopic surgery confers distinct advantages over open surgery in appropriate patient populations. PMID:26588461

  8. Characterization of Complications Associated with Open and Endoscopic Craniosynostosis Surgery at a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rowland H.; Nguyen, Dennis C.; Bruck, Brent S.; Skolnick, Gary B.; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Naidoo, Sybill D.; Patel, Kamlesh B.; Kane, Alex A.; Woo, Albert S.; Smyth, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Object We present a retrospective cohort study examining complications in patients undergoing surgery for craniosynostosis using both minimally invasive endoscopic and open approaches. Methods Over the past ten years, 295 non-syndromic patients (140 endoscopic, 155 open) and 33 syndromic patients (10 endoscopic, 23 open) met our criteria. Variables analyzed included: age at surgery, presence of pre-existing CSF shunt, skin incision method, estimated blood loss (EBL), transfusions of packed red blood cells (PRBC), use of intravenous (IV) steroids or tranexamic acid (TXA), intraoperative durotomies, procedure length, and length of hospital stay. Complications were classified as either surgically or medically related. Results In the non-syndromic endoscopic group, we experienced 3 (2.1%) surgical and 5 (3.6%) medical complications. In the non-syndromic open group, there were 2 (1.3%) surgical and 7 (4.5%) medical complications. Intraoperative durotomies occurred in 5 (3.6%) endoscopic and 12 (7.8%) open cases, were repaired primarily, and did not result in reoperations for CSF leakage. Syndromic cases resulted in similar complication rates. No mortality or permanent morbidity occurred. Additionally, endoscopic procedures were associated with significantly decreased EBL, transfusions, procedure lengths, and lengths of hospital stay compared to open procedures. Conclusions Rates of intraoperative durotomies, surgical and medical complications were comparable between endoscopic and open techniques. This is the largest direct comparison to date between endoscopic and open interventions for synostosis, and the results are in agreement with previous series that endoscopic surgery confers distinct advantages over open in appropriate patient populations. PMID:26588461

  9. Maintaining surgical skills for military general surgery: the potential role for multivisceral organ retrieval in military general surgery training and practice.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, David; Lordan, J; Streets, C; Midwinter, M; Mirza, D

    2016-08-01

    The closure of the Medical Treatment facility in Camp BASTION and the return to contingency operations presents a new challenge in training and maintaining the skills of military surgeons. Multivisceral organ retrieval presents a unique opportunity to practice some of the more unusual techniques required in military surgery in the National Health Service. This article details the experience that organ retrieval offers and matches this to the needs of military surgeons. National Organ Retrieval Service teams need skilled surgeons, and a mutually beneficial partnership is in prospect. PMID:26243807

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS provides access to many organs and lesions which are in proximity to the gastrointestinal tract and thus giving an opportunity to target them for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. This modality also provides a real time opportunity to target the required area while avoiding adjacent vascular and other structures. Therapeutic EUS has found role in management of pancreatic fluid collections, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of gallbladder, celiac plexus neurolysis/blockage, drainage of mediastinal and intra-abdominal abscesses and collections and in targeted cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Infact, therapeutic EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice for management of pancreatic pseudocysts and recent innovations like fully covered removable metallic stents have improved results in patients with organised necrosis. Similarly, EUS guided drainage of biliary tract and pancreatic duct helps drainage of these systems in patients with failed cannulation, inaccessible papilla as with duodenal/gastric obstruction or surgically altered anatomy. EUS guided gall bladder drainage is a useful emergent procedure in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not fit for surgery. EUS guided celiac plexus neurolysis and blockage is more effective and less morbid vis-à-vis the percutaneous technique. The field of interventional EUS is rapidly advancing and many more interventions are being continuously added. This review focuses on the current status of evidence vis-à-vis the established indications of therapeutic EUS. PMID:26078831

  11. Endoscopic Management of Osgood-Schlatter Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-01-01

    Osgood-Schlatter disease is a common cause of anterior knee pain in sports-practicing adolescents. The long-term outcomes have not always been favorable, and some adolescents have persisting knee pain into adulthood. Excision of the ossicle together with debridement of the tibial tuberosity is indicated if the pain is not relieved with conservative measures. An endoscopic technique for excision of the ossicle associated with Osgood-Schlatter disease is reported. It has the advantages of avoidance of painful surgical scars and preservation of the integrity of the patellar tendon, with the potential for improved cosmetic and functional results. PMID:27073771

  12. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy.

    PubMed

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score. PMID:27298743

  13. Operative technique of endoscopic thyroidectomy: a narration of general principles.

    PubMed

    Bhargav, P R K; Amar, V

    2013-06-01

    Endoscopic thyroidectomy is fast becoming a reality with increasing experience in endocrine surgery. Many techniques of minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy through cervical and extra-cervical routes such as chest wall, transaxillary, trans-oral, post-auricular, trans-luminal approach have been attempted. At present anterior chest wall or trans-axillary routes are favourite extra-cervical routes. In this context, we describe our operative technique of endoscopic thyroidectomy through chest wall to highlight the surgical steps of practical importance. PMID:24426430

  14. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score. PMID:27298743

  15. Critical Assessment of Endoscopic Techniques for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wai-Kit; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Over the past 2 decades, a number of new endoscopic techniques have been developed for management of gastroesophageal (GE) reflux disease symptoms as alternatives to medical management and surgical fundoplication. These devices include application of radiofrequency treatment (Stretta), endoscopic plication (EndoCinch, Plicator, Esophyx, MUSE), and injection of bulking agents (Enteryx, Gatekeeper, Plexiglas, Duragel). Their goal was symptom relief through reduction of tissue compliance and enhancement of anatomic resistance at the GE junction. In this review, we critically assess the research behind the efficacy, safety, and durability of these treatments to better understand their roles in contemporary GE reflux disease management. PMID:26241152

  16. Surgical simulation: where have we come from? Where are we now? Where are we going?

    PubMed

    Munro, Malcolm G

    2012-01-01

    It is now clear to most stakeholders that acquisition of surgical psychomotor skills is best achieved outside of the clinical operating room, in the context of a simulated environment. Endoscopic simulation can be accomplished using simple "box" simulators or video trainers, and virtual reality simulation is now possible using microprocessor-controlled systems. Structured surgical training performed outside of the operating room environment is relatively new to health care, a circumstance different from the process of pilot training, in which simulation has been a mainstay for more than 75 years and in which virtual reality simulation is now the norm. Those charged with surgical education are faced with a dilemma as, while attempting to understand the basic goals of simulation, they are simultaneously faced with choice between relatively inexpensive video trainers and the often prohibitively expensive virtual reality systems. This article explores the history of simulation, reports the results of a modified systematic review of currently available systems and performance, and identifies the gaps in current research and development. It is apparent that available video trainers provide the opportunity for skill development that at present is not surpassed by virtual reality systems. In the future, there will likely be an increasing role for virtual reality; however, challenges remain that include determination of the appropriate metrics and system design, and the fiscal resources necessary for the required hardware and related software development. PMID:22546418

  17. Brief history of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery--from Philipp Bozzini to the First World Congress of Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Doglietto, Francesco; Prevedello, Daniel M; Jane, John A; Han, Joseph; Laws, Edward R

    2005-12-15

    Since its inception, one of the major issues in transsphenoidal surgery has been the adequate visualization of anatomical structures. As transsphenoidal surgery evolved, technical advancements improved the surgical view of the operative field and the orientation. The operating microscope replaced Cushing's headlight and Dott's lighted speculum retractor, and fluoroscopy provided intraoperative imaging. These advances led to the modern concept of microsurgical transsphenoidal procedures in the early 1970s. For the past 30 years the endoscope has been used for the treatment of diseases of the sinus and, more recently, in the surgical treatment of pituitary tumors. The collaboration between neurological and otorhinolaryngological surgeons has led to the development of novel surgical procedures for the treatment of various pathological conditions in the skull base. In this paper the authors review the history of the endoscope--its technical development and its application--from the first endoscope described by Philipp Bozzini to the First World Congress of Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery held in 2005 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Specifically, in this review the history of endoscopy and its application in endonasal neurosurgery are presented. PMID:16398480

  18. Transvaginal endoscopic appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eung Jin; Jeong, Gui Ae; Jung, Jun Chul; Cho, Gyu Seok; Lim, Chul Wan; Kim, Hyung Chul; Song, Ok Pyung

    2010-12-01

    Since Kalloo and colleagues first reported the feasibility and safety of a peroral transgastric approach in the porcine model in 2004, various groups have reported more complex natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedures, such as the cholecystectomy, splenectomy and liver biopsy, in the porcine model. Natural orifice access to the abdominal cavity, such as transgastric, transvesical, transcolonic, and transvaginal, has been described. Although a novel, minimally invasive approach to the abdominal cavity is a peroral endoscopic transgastric approach, there are still some challenging issues, such as the risk of infection and leakage, and the method of gastric closure. Hybrid-NOTES is an ideal first step in humans. Human hybrid transvaginal access has been used for years by many surgeons for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Here, we report a transvaginal flexible endoscopic appendectomy, with a 5-mm umbilical port using ultrasonic scissors in a 74-year-old woman with acute appendicitis. PMID:21221245

  19. Successful endoscopic closure of a colonic perforation one day after endoscopic mucosal resection of a lesion in the transverse colon.

    PubMed

    Inoki, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Taku; Sekiguchi, Masau; Yamada, Masayoshi; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2016-08-16

    A 73-year-old man underwent endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of a 20-mm flat elevated lesion on the transverse colon. The morning after the procedure, he started to have severe right upper quadrant pain after his first meal. A computed tomography scan revealed free air and a stomach filled with food. He was diagnosed to have delayed post-EMR intestinal perforation. He underwent emergent colonoscopy and clipping of the perforated site. He was discharged 8 d after the endoscopic closure without the need for surgical intervention. The meal was not the cause of the colon transversum perforation. PMID:27574613

  20. Successful endoscopic closure of a colonic perforation one day after endoscopic mucosal resection of a lesion in the transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Inoki, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Taku; Sekiguchi, Masau; Yamada, Masayoshi; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of a 20-mm flat elevated lesion on the transverse colon. The morning after the procedure, he started to have severe right upper quadrant pain after his first meal. A computed tomography scan revealed free air and a stomach filled with food. He was diagnosed to have delayed post-EMR intestinal perforation. He underwent emergent colonoscopy and clipping of the perforated site. He was discharged 8 d after the endoscopic closure without the need for surgical intervention. The meal was not the cause of the colon transversum perforation. PMID:27574613

  1. Adjustable-Viewing-Angle Endoscopic Tool for Skull Base and Brain Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam; Liao, Anna; Manohara, Harish; Shahinian, Hrayr

    2008-01-01

    The term Multi-Angle and Rear Viewing Endoscopic tooL (MARVEL) denotes an auxiliary endoscope, now undergoing development, that a surgeon would use in conjunction with a conventional endoscope to obtain additional perspective. The role of the MARVEL in endoscopic brain surgery would be similar to the role of a mouth mirror in dentistry. Such a tool is potentially useful for in-situ planetary geology applications for the close-up imaging of unexposed rock surfaces in cracks or those not in the direct line of sight. A conventional endoscope provides mostly a frontal view that is, a view along its longitudinal axis and, hence, along a straight line extending from an opening through which it is inserted. The MARVEL could be inserted through the same opening as that of the conventional endoscope, but could be adjusted to provide a view from almost any desired angle. The MARVEL camera image would be displayed, on the same monitor as that of the conventional endoscopic image, as an inset within the conventional endoscopic image. For example, while viewing a tumor from the front in the conventional endoscopic image, the surgeon could simultaneously view the tumor from the side or the rear in the MARVEL image, and could thereby gain additional visual cues that would aid in precise three-dimensional positioning of surgical tools to excise the tumor. Indeed, a side or rear view through the MARVEL could be essential in a case in which the object of surgical interest was not visible from the front. The conceptual design of the MARVEL exploits the surgeon s familiarity with endoscopic surgical tools. The MARVEL would include a miniature electronic camera and miniature radio transmitter mounted on the tip of a surgical tool derived from an endo-scissor (see figure). The inclusion of the radio transmitter would eliminate the need for wires, which could interfere with manipulation of this and other surgical tools. The handgrip of the tool would be connected to a linkage similar to

  2. Technicalities of endoscopic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N; Ignacio, J G

    1995-11-01

    Despite the wealth of biopsy forceps currently available, it is obvious that there are sufficient drawbacks and shortcomings to reconsider the overall design of the endoscopic biopsy depth, the short lifespan of reusable forceps, damage to the working channel, excessive time consumption, cleaning and disinfection difficulties, etc. Improvements should be possible that approach the same degree of sophistication as is currently available in endoscopic equipment. Fully-automated, repetitive, quickly targeted biopsy sampling should be possible, but it will require the utmost technical ingenuity and expertise to achieve. PMID:8903983

  3. Endoscopic Sedation: Medicolegal Considerations.

    PubMed

    Kralios, Andreas A; Feld, Kayla A; Feld, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Goals of endoscopic sedation are to provide patients with a successful procedure, and ensure that they remain safe and are relieved from anxiety and discomfort; agents should provide efficient, appropriate sedation and allow patients to recover rapidly. Sedation is usually safe and effective; however, complications may ensue. This paper outlines some medicolegal aspects of endoscopic sedation, including informed consent, possible withdrawal of consent during the procedure, standard of care for monitoring sedation, use of anesthesia personnel to deliver sedation, and new agents and devices. PMID:27372770

  4. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-10-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  5. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  6. Ampullary neuroendocrine tumor diagnosed by endoscopic papillectomy in previously confirmed ampullary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung Ho; Lee, Tae Hoon; Jang, Si-Hyong; Choi, Chi Young; Lee, Won Myung; Min, Ji Hey; Cho, Hyun Deuk; Park, Sang-Heum

    2016-04-01

    Ampullary adenoma is a common indication for endoscopic papillectomy. Ampullary neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is a rare disease for which complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. However, because of the morbidity and mortality associated with surgical resection, endoscopic papillectomy is increasingly used in selected cases of low grade, with no metastasis and no invasion of the pancreatic or bile duct. Also, confirmed and complete endoscopic resection of ampullary NET accompanied by adenoma has not been reported to date. We report herein a rare case of an ampullary NET accompanied with adenoma, which was successfully and completely resected via endoscopic papillectomy. Prior to papillectomy, this case was diagnosed as an ampullary adenoma. PMID:27053861

  7. The Perforated Intrauterine Device: Endoscopic Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Heinberg, Eric M.; McCoy, Travis W.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Uterine perforation is the most serious complication associated with an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD). Minimally invasive techniques, such as hysteroscopy and advanced laparoscopy, are ideally suited to the diagnosis and surgical management of the perforated IUD. Case Reports: Three cases of uterine perforation caused by an IUD and treated with endoscopic surgery are presented. In all 3 cases, the IUD was located by using x-rays, ultrasonography, or pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed to identify the specific location of the IUD and to remove it. All patients recovered without incident. Conclusion: The gynecologic surgeon should acquire familiarity with the complications of, and proficiency in managing, perforated and ectopic IUDs by using modern surgical techniques that permit the patient's rapid return to health. PMID:18402749

  8. The 'difficult' polyp: pitfalls for endoscopic removal.

    PubMed

    Jung, M

    2012-01-01

    Adenomatous polyps are early neoplasias of colorectal cancer (adenoma-carcinoma sequence). The majority of adenomas or early invasive cancers (T1sm1) can be resected by endoscopy. Endoscopic resection techniques include classic loop polypectomy, endoscopic mucosectomy with preceding lifting of the (almost flat) lesion, endoscopic submucosal dissection and transanal microsurgical resection, an alternative to endoscopic submucosal dissection in the rectum. Endoscopic polyp removal should always aim to resect the lesion in 'one piece' and avoid, whenever possible, 'piecemeal resection'. One-piece polypectomy is the basis for a precise histopathological analysis and for proving complete removal of the lesion. Preceding injection of saline solution into the submucosa to lift the targeted polyp is a therapeutic modality to remove even-flat and flat-depressed adenomas. In addition, a positive lifting sign is regarded as a criterion of lower superficial malignancy. Lifting of a polyp can be negatively influenced by an already advanced cancer (T1sm3/T2) in the deep parts of the submucosa as well as by scars and connective tissue in the upper two layers of the colorectal wall. Hence, a negative lifting sign may lead to incorrect macroscopic evaluation of the lesion before removal. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is mostly performed in large laterally spreading tumors in the rectum and in the preanal region. The technique has a relatively long learning curve and is somewhat time consuming. A 'difficult polyp' may be characterized by: (1) the size (>3 cm), pedunculated or sessile (Ip/Is); (2) morphological type (classification of Paris 2003), in particular the flat type II lesions IIa-c flat, flat depressed; laterally spreading tumors and the large sessile-serrated lesions; and (3) the difficult assessment of the grade of malignancy before removal [e.g. dysplasia-associated lesions or masses (DALMs), sporadic adenoma, colitis carcinoma]. Chromoendoscopy (with indigo carmine

  9. Building a Successful Endoscopic Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery Practice.

    PubMed

    Sindwani, Raj; Woodard, Troy D; Recinos, Pablo F

    2016-02-01

    Building an endoscopic cranial base practice can be challenging and is predicated on the right team. Successful outcomes stem from an efficient and talented team that improves its skills experientially in a supportive environment. As with most new endeavors that are beyond the traditional approach, there is a great deal of up-front effort and investment required. This article explores some of the key building blocks necessary for a successful endoscopic cranial base and pituitary program and highlights some of the lessons learned during the authors' journey at the Cleveland Clinic. PMID:26614825

  10. Minimizing the Submandibular Incision in Endoscopic Subcondylar Fracture Repair.

    PubMed

    Aboelatta, Yasser Abdallah; Elbarbary, Amir S; Abdelazeem, Sarah; Massoud, Karim S; Safe, Ikram I

    2015-12-01

    Endoscope-assisted treatment of mandibular condylar fractures is an evolving surgical technique of this controversial subject. The approach is performed through an intraoral and additional submandibular incision. This study presents a technique for minimizing the length of the optional submandibular incision. Ten patients with displaced subcondylar fractures and malocclusion underwent endoscope-assisted open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). A limited (<1 cm) submandibular incision (dissected under endoscopic guidance from within) was needed in eight patients to complement the intraoral incision and facilitate the reduction in the fractures. Satisfactory small scar could be obtained in all patients with neither wound complications nor facial nerve injuries. Our technique depends on dissection first then incision. Performing the external incision after complete intraoral dissection is safe for the facial nerve and minimizes scarring markedly. This very limited submandibular incision facilitates reduction in relatively difficult cases and enables clear visualization of posterior border of the mandible to confirm adequate fracture reduction. PMID:26576236

  11. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-05-16

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  12. Endoscopic Pubic Symphysectomy for Athletic Osteitis Pubis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Sehgal, Bantoo; Matsuda, Nicole A.

    2015-01-01

    Osteitis pubis is a common form of athletic pubalgia associated with femoroacetabular impingement. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy was developed as a less invasive option than open surgical curettage for recalcitrant osteitis pubis. This technical note demonstrates the use of the anterior and suprapubic portals in the supine lithotomy position for endoscopic burr resection of pubic symphyseal fibrocartilage and hyaline endplates. Key steps include use of the suprapubic portal for burr resection of the posteroinferior symphysis and preservation of the posterior and arcuate ligaments. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy is a minimally invasive bone-conserving surgery that retains stability and may be useful in the treatment of recalcitrant osteitis pubis or osteoarthritis. It nicely complements arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement and may find broader application in this group of co-affected athletes. PMID:26258039

  13. Endoscopic vacuum therapy for esophageal perforations and leakages

    PubMed Central

    Möschler, Oliver; Nies, Christoph; Mueller, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Injuries to the esophageal wall, such as perforations and anastomotic leaks, are serious complications of surgical and endoscopic interventions. Since 2006, a new treatment has been introduced, in the form of endoscopically placed vacuum sponge therapy. Patients and methods: Between April 2012 and October 2014, 10 patients (5 men and 5 women) aged 57 to 94 years were treated at our institution using endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Results: The defect in the esophageal wall was successfully closed in seven of the 10 patients (70 %). No severe complications occurred. Conclusions: EVT is a valuable tool for management of defects in the esophageal wall and should be considered as a treatment option for patients with this condition. PMID:26716111

  14. Endoscopic resection of a mucocele of the crista galli.

    PubMed

    Shidanshid, Mani; Taghi, Ali S; Kuchai, Romana; Saleh, Hesham A

    2015-09-01

    Mucoceles expand by the process of bone resorption and new bone formation, which leads to local destruction and displacement of adjacent structures. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman who presented with recurrent headaches, nausea, and vomiting, all of which were believed to have occurred secondary to a mucocele of the crista galli. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 similar case has been previously reported in the world literature; in that case, the crista galli was drained externally. In our patient, resolution of symptoms was achieved by endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy, endoscopic frontal sinusotomy, and drainage of the mucocele under image guidance. We recommend that an endoscopic surgical approach be considered for the management of mucoceles of the crista galli. PMID:26401677

  15. Endoscopic Pubic Symphysectomy for Athletic Osteitis Pubis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Sehgal, Bantoo; Matsuda, Nicole A

    2015-06-01

    Osteitis pubis is a common form of athletic pubalgia associated with femoroacetabular impingement. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy was developed as a less invasive option than open surgical curettage for recalcitrant osteitis pubis. This technical note demonstrates the use of the anterior and suprapubic portals in the supine lithotomy position for endoscopic burr resection of pubic symphyseal fibrocartilage and hyaline endplates. Key steps include use of the suprapubic portal for burr resection of the posteroinferior symphysis and preservation of the posterior and arcuate ligaments. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy is a minimally invasive bone-conserving surgery that retains stability and may be useful in the treatment of recalcitrant osteitis pubis or osteoarthritis. It nicely complements arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement and may find broader application in this group of co-affected athletes. PMID:26258039

  16. Non-endoscopic management strategies for acute esophagogastric variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Satapathy, Sanjaya K.; Sanyal, Arun J

    2014-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is a potentially life threatening complication of portal hypertension. Management consists of emergent hemostasis, therapy directed at hemodynamic resuscitation, protection of the airway, and prevention and treatment of complications including prophylactic use of antibiotics. Endoscopic treatment remains the mainstay in the management of acute variceal bleeding in combination with pharmacotherapy aimed at reducing portal pressure. Patients failing first-line therapy are triaged for non-endoscopic means of achieving hemostasis such as TIPS, BRTO or surgically created shunt procedures as rescue procedures, the choice depends on the source of bleeding (esophageal or gastric), size of the varices, portal vein patency, presence or absence of gastro-renal shunt, hepatic reserve and local expertise. The current chapter, intends to highlight only the current non endoscopic treatment approaches for control of acute variceal bleeding. PMID:25440928

  17. Endoscopic management of post-liver transplant biliary complications

    PubMed Central

    Girotra, Mohit; Soota, Kaartik; Klair, Jagpal S; Dang, Shyam M; Aduli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Biliary complications are being increasingly encountered in post liver transplant patients because of increased volume of transplants and longer survival of these recipients. Overall management of these complications may be challenging, but with advances in endoscopic techniques, majority of such patients are being dealt with by endoscopists rather than the surgeons. Our review article discusses the recent advances in endoscopic tools and techniques that have proved endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with various interventions, like sphincterotomy, bile duct dilatation, and stent placement, to be the mainstay for management of most of these complications. We also discuss the management dilemmas in patients with surgically altered anatomy, where accessing the bile duct is challenging, and the recent strides towards making this prospect a reality. PMID:25992185

  18. Endoscopic laser scalpel for head and neck cancer surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Snehal; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Kirov, Stefan; Li, Yongbiao; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques, such as laparoscopic surgery and endoscopy, provide reliable disease control with reduced impact on the function of the diseased organ. Surgical lasers can ablate, cut and excise tissue while sealing small blood vessels minimizing bleeding and risk of lymphatic metastases from tumors. Lasers with wavelengths in the IR are readily absorbed by water causing minimal thermal damage to adjacent tissue, ideal for surgery near critical anatomical structures. MIS techniques have largely been unable to adopt the use of lasers partly due to the difficulty in bringing the laser into the endoscopic cavity. Hollow waveguide fibers have been adapted to bring surgical lasers to endoscopy. However, they deliver a beam that diverges rapidly and requires careful manipulation of the fiber tip relative to the target. Thus, the principal obstacle for surgical lasers in MIS procedures has been a lack of effective control instruments to manipulate the laser in the body cavity and accurately deliver it to the targeted tissue. To overcome this limitation, we have designed and built an endoscopic laser system that incorporates a miniature dual wedge beam steering device, a video camera, and the control system for remote and /or robotic operation. The dual wedge Risley device offers the smallest profile possible for endoscopic use. Clinical specifications and design considerations will be presented together with descriptions of the device and the development of its control system.

  19. Mirizzi Syndrome with Endoscopic Ultrasound Image

    PubMed Central

    Rayapudi, K.; Gholami, P.; Olyaee, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 66-year-old Caucasian man with type 1 Mirizzi syndrome diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound. He presented with acute onset of jaundice, malaise, dark urine over 3–4 days, and was found to have obstructive jaundice on lab testing. CT scan of the abdomen showed intrahepatic biliary ductal dilation, a 1.5 cm common bile duct (CBD) above the pancreas, and possible stones in the CBD, but no masses. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) by a community gastroenterologist failed to cannulate the CBD. At the University Center, type 1 Mirizzi syndrome was noted on endoscopic ultrasound with narrowing of the CBD with extrinsic compression from cystic duct stone. During repeat ERCP, the CBD could be cannulated over the pancreatic duct wire. A mid CBD narrowing, distal CBD stones, proximal CBD and extrahepatic duct dilation were noted, and biliary sphincterotomy was performed. A small stone in the distal CBD was removed with an extraction balloon. The cystic duct stone was moved with the biliary balloon into the CBD, mechanical basket lithotripsy was performed and stone fragments were delivered out with an extraction balloon. The patient was seen 7 weeks later in the clinic. Skin and scleral icterus had cleared up and he is scheduled for an elective cholecystectomy. Mirizzi syndrome refers to biliary obstruction resulting from impacted stone in the cystic duct or neck of the gallbladder and commonly presents with obstructive jaundice. Type 1 does not have cholecystocholedochal fistulas, but they present in types 2, 3 and 4. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy. Endoscopic treatment is effective and can also be used as a temporizing measure or definitive treatment in poor surgical risk candidates. PMID:23741207

  20. Surgical treatment: Myomectomy and hysterectomy; Endoscopy: A major advancement.

    PubMed

    Thubert, Thibault; Foulot, Hervé; Vinchant, Marie; Santulli, Pietro; Marzouk, Paul; Borghese, Bruno; Chapron, Charles

    2016-07-01

    Uterine fibroids affect 25% of women worldwide. Symptomatic women can be treated by either medical or surgical treatment. Development of endoscopic surgery has widely changed the management of myoma. Currently, although laparoscopic or laparoscopic robot-assisted myomectomies or hysterectomies are common, there has been no consensual guideline concerning the surgical techniques, operative route, and usefulness of preoperative treatment. Hysteroscopy management is a major advancement avoiding invasive surgery. This study deals with a literature review concerning surgical management of fibroids. PMID:27400649

  1. Evaluation of a navigation system for ENT with surgical efficiency criteria.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Gero; Koulechov, Kirill; Röttger, Stefan; Bahner, Jenny; Trantakis, Christos; Hofer, Mathias; Korb, Werner; Burgert, Oliver; Meixensberger, Juergen; Manzey, Dietrich; Dietz, Andreas; Lüth, Tim

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of a navigation system (NaviBase) for ENT surgery. For this purpose, a new methodology for the evaluation of surgical and ergonomic system properties has been developed. The practicability of the evaluation instruments will be examined using the example of the overall assessment of the system in comparison with the current surgical standard and with other systems using clinical efficiency criteria. The evaluation is based on 102 ENT surgical applications; of these, 89 were functional endoscopic sinus surgeries (FESS). The evaluation of surgical and ergonomic performance factors was performed by seven ENT surgeons. To evaluate surgical system properties, the Level of Quality (LOQ) in 89 cases of the FESS was determined. It compares the existing information of the surgeon with that of the navigation system on a scale of 0 to 100 and with a mean value of 50 and places it in a relationship to the clinical impact. The intraoperative change of the planned surgical strategy (Change of Surgical Strategy) was documented. The ergonomic factors of the system with the categories of Overall Confidence (Trust), awareness of the situation (Situation Awareness), influence on the operating team, requirements for specific skills (Skill Set Requirement), and cognitive load (Workload Shift) were recorded for all surgical procedures as Level of Reliance (LOR). In the evaluation of the surgical system properties, an average evaluation of the quality of the information, as an LOQ of 63.59, resulted. Every second application of the navigation system (47.9%), on average, led to a change in the surgical strategy. An extension/enhancement of the indication of the endonasal approach through the use of the navigation system was shown in 7 of 102 (6.8%) cases. The completion of the resection in the FESS was rated by 74% of group I and 11% of group II as better in comparison with the standard approach. Total confidence shows a positive evaluation of 3

  2. Outcomes and Complications of Endoscopic Versus Microscopic Transsphenoidal Surgery in Pituitary Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Guvenc, Gonul; Kizmazoglu, Ceren; Pinar, Ercan; Imre, Abdülkadir; Kaya, Ismail; Bezircioglu, Hamdi; Yuceer, Nurullah

    2016-06-01

    This retrospective study aimed to define outcomes and complications of endoscopic versus microscopic transsphenoidal surgery in pituitary adenoma. Data of 94 patients who underwent transsphenoidal endoscopic (n = 45) or microscopic surgery (n = 49) between June 2000 and June 2014 for pituitary adenoma, performed at Katip Çelebi University Hospital, were retrospectively analyzed. The patients' symptomatology, type of adenoma, radiologic findings, surgical outcomes, and preoperative and postoperative complications were investigated. The total subtotal resection rate was 73.4% (69 patients) and partial resection rate was 26.6% (25 patients). Total subtotal resection rate was 77.6% (38 patients) in the microscopic group and 68.9% (31 patients) in the endoscopic group. Total resection was seen more often in the endoscopic group than in the microscopic group, with no significant difference between the groups. Four patients (8.2%) in the microscopic group had postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak compared with 3 patients (6.7%) in the endoscopic group. Two patients (2.1%) had hematoma, with 1 patient each in the endoscopic and microscopic group. Panhypopituitarism development rate was higher in the endoscopic group (no significant difference between the 2 groups). One patient (2%) developed blindness in the microscopic group and 1 (2.2%) had meningitis in the endoscopic group. Based on this study, the total resection rate was higher in the microscopic group than in the endoscopic group. However, outcomes and complication rate did not differ significantly between the 2 surgical techniques. Both techniques have advantages and disadvantages. Prospective randomized controlled trials should be conducted to compare the 2 surgical methods. PMID:27213744

  3. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  4. Endoscopic treatment of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Swidnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Wróblewski, Eugeniusz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increasing incidence of obesity and overweight among children and adolescents will be reflected by the imminent increase in the number of obese patients who require more definitive methods of treatment. There is great interest in new, safe, simple, nonsurgical procedures for weight loss. OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of new endoscopic methods for the treatment of obesity. METHODS: An English-language literature search on endoscopic interventions, endoscopically placed devices and patient safety was performed in the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases. RESULTS: The literature search yielded the following weight loss methods: space-occupying devices (widely used), gastric capacity reduction, modifying gastric motor function and malabsorptive procedures. A commercially available intragastric balloon was the most commonly used device for weight loss. In specific subgroups of patients, it improved quality of life, decreased comorbidities and served as a bridge to surgery. More evidence regarding the potential benefits and safety of other commercially available intragastric balloons is needed to clarify whether they are superior to the most commonly used one. Moreover, early experiences with transoral gastroplasty, the duodenaljejunal bypass sleeve and an adjustable, totally implantable intragastric prosthesis, indicate that they may be viable options for obesity treatment. Other agents, such as botulinum toxin and a device known as the ‘butterfly’, are currently at the experimental stage. CONCLUSION: New endoscopic methods for weight loss may be valuable in the treatment of obesity; however, more clinical experience and technical improvements are necessary before implementing their widespread use. PMID:22059171

  5. Visceral artery embolization after endoscopic injection of Enteryx for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Helo, Naseem; Wu, Alex; Moon, Eunice; Wang, Weiping

    2014-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be difficult to manage medically and may require endoscopic or surgical interventions. The Enteryx procedure was designed to enhance the gastroesophageal barrier function by endoscopic injection of a copolymer into the lower esophageal sphincter. We present a rare case of a patient who was found to have migration of the copolymer into the celiac trunk and bilateral renal arteries during a work-up for persistent intermittent hematuria, which began shortly after Enteryx therapy for GERD. PMID:25426247

  6. Endoscopic surgery for tumors of the pineal region via a paramedian infratentorial supracerebellar keyhole approach (PISKA).

    PubMed

    Thaher, Firas; Kurucz, Peter; Fuellbier, Lars; Bittl, Markus; Hopf, Nikolai J

    2014-10-01

    The tumors of the pineal region represent a significant challenge in terms of patient selection and surgical approach. Traditional surgical options were commonly used to approach this area causing considerable surgical morbidity and mortality. We report for the first time on a series of endoscopic procedures for lesions of the pineal region performed via an infratentorial supracerebellar keyhole approach (PISKA) in the prone position using endoscope-assisted and endoscope-controlled technique. A single-institution series of 11 consecutive patients (five male and six female patients [11 total cases]; mean age 21 years, range 1-75 years) treated via the endoscope-assisted and endoscope-controlled PISKA for a pathological entity in the pineal region was retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up time was 24 months. The endoscopic PISKA was successfully used to approach a variety of pineal lesions, including pineocytoma (three patients), pineal cysts (four patients), germinoma, lipoma, medulloblastoma, and glioblastoma (one patient each). Gross total resection was achieved in ten cases and subtotal resection in one case. The mean preoperative tumor volumes were approximately 2 × 2 cm. Five patients developed postoperatively transient Parinaud's syndrome. One patient underwent surgical revision for cerebrospinal fluid leak. There was no mortality. Ten patients had an uneventful postoperative course with restitutio ad integrum after a mean follow-up duration of 13.5 months. The endoscopically PISKA is a safe and effective minimally invasive approach that enables endoscopic treatment of different lesions of the pineal region with comparable results to standard microsurgical technique but less morbidity. PMID:25106132

  7. Combined Endoscopic and Percutaneous Treatment of a Duodenocutaneous Fistula Using an Amplatzer Septal Occluder

    SciTech Connect

    Boulougouri, K.; Theodoropoulos, Emmanouil Karydas, G.; Tachtaras, E.; Hatzinikolaou, A.; Georgountzos, V.

    2009-03-15

    We describe an innovative interventional technique for the repair of a postoperative enterocutaneous fistula (ECF). In the reported case, surgical repair of the ECF was contraindicated, while endoscopic closure was unsuccessful. Correction of this high-outflow fistula was achieved using an Amplatzer septal occluder, which was deployed under simultaneous fluoroscopic and endoscopic guidance. The use of an Amplatzer septal occluder should be taken into consideration when there is a need to treat high-outflow ECF in patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  8. Role of endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, David K; Nguyen, Nam Q; Merrett, Neil D; Dixson, Hugh; Leong, Rupert W L; Biankin, Andrew V

    2009-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths in Western societies. It is an aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection offers the only possibility of cure and long-term survival for patients suffering from PC; however, unfortunately, fewer than 20% of patients suffering from PC have disease that is amendable to surgical resection. Therefore, it is important to accurately diagnose and stage these patients to enable optimal treatment of their disease. The imaging modalities involved in the diagnosis and staging of PC include multidetector CT scanning, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography and MRI. The roles and relative importance of these imaging modalities have changed over the last few decades and continue to change owing to the rapid technological advances in medical imaging, but these investigations continue to be complementary. EUS was first introduced in the mid-1980s in Japan and Germany and has quickly gained acceptance. Its widespread use in the last decade has revolutionized the management of pancreatic disease as it simultaneously provides primary diagnostic and staging information, as well as enabling tissue biopsy. This article discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of EUS in the primary diagnosis, staging and assessment of resectability, and EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration in PC. Difficult diagnostic scenarios and pitfalls are also discussed. A suggested management algorithm for patients with suspected PC is also presented. PMID:19485810

  9. Automated endoscope reprocessors.

    PubMed

    Desilets, David; Kaul, Vivek; Tierney, William M; Banerjee, Subhas; Diehl, David L; Farraye, Francis A; Kethu, Sripathi R; Kwon, Richard S; Mamula, Petar; Pedrosa, Marcos C; Rodriguez, Sarah A; Wong Kee Song, Louis-Michel

    2010-10-01

    The ASGE Technology Committee provides reviews of existing, new, or emerging endoscopic technologies that have an impact on the practice of GI endoscopy. Evidence-based methodology is used, with a MEDLINE literature search to identify pertinent clinical studies on the topic and a MAUDE (U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health) database search to identify the reported complications of a given technology. Both are supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed and by scrutinizing pertinent references cited by the identified studies. Controlled clinical trials are emphasized, but in many cases data from randomized, controlled trials are lacking. In such cases, large case series, preliminary clinical studies, and expert opinions are used. Technical data are gathered from traditional and Web-based publications, proprietary publications, and informal communications with pertinent vendors. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are drafted by 1 or 2 members of the ASGE Technology Committee, reviewed and edited by the committee as a whole, and approved by the Governing Board of the ASGE. When financial guidance is indicated, the most recent coding data and list prices at the time of publication are provided. For this review, the MEDLINE database was searched through February 2010 for articles related to automated endoscope reprocessors, using the words endoscope reprocessing, endoscope cleaning, automated endoscope reprocessors, and high-level disinfection. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are scientific reviews provided solely for educational and informational purposes. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are not rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment or payment for such treatment. PMID:20883843

  10. Endoscopic-assisted minimally invasive resection of a papillary muscle blood cyst in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kazuma; Kudo, Mikihiko; Hayashi, Kanako; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2016-02-01

    We describe endoscopic-assisted minimally invasive resection of a blood cyst originating from the papillary muscle that caused severe mitral regurgitation and necessitated mitral valve replacement in an active adult woman, as well as a review of the relevant literature. An endoscopic view increases the visibility of the surgical target and facilitates a precise observation of the tumour and dissection at the appropriate layer. The On-X mechanical valve was chosen for mitral valve repair to minimize thromboembolic risk. This patient additionally benefited from endoscopic-assisted right minithoracotomy in terms of both cosmetic and functional aspects. PMID:26586675

  11. Nonfluoroscopic endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage of pseudocysts: A pictorial technical review

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts (PP) are one of the important local complications of pancreatitis and can be treated by surgical, laparoscopic, percutaneous, or endoscopic methods. The endoscopic methods of drainage include transpapillary or transmural drainage or a combination of these two routes. The transmural drainage can be done using conventional duodenoscope without endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance or under EUS guidance. The EUS-guided transmural drainage of PP is done under EUS and fluoroscopic guidance. We have earlier reported nonfluoroscopic EUS-guided transmural drainage of walled-off pancreatic necrosis. In this pictorial technical review, we will discuss in detail this method of nonfluoroscopic EUS-guided drainage of PP. PMID:26020042

  12. Endoscopic ear surgery: A case series and first United Kingdom experience

    PubMed Central

    Kanona, Hala; Virk, Jagdeep Singh; Owa, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present the United Kingdom’s first case series of 70 otological cases of endoscopic and non-endoscopic ear surgeries. METHODS: Prospective case series incorporating a range of endoscopic procedures performed using a 4 mm, 18 cm rigid endoscope, performed by a single surgeon at a single centre. Primary outcome measures included mean average pre and post-operative air-bone gap hearing thresholds and duration of surgery. RESULTS: Thirty-eight patients underwent endoscopic assisted ear surgery and 32 underwent non-endoscopic assisted ear surgery. In both surgical groups, there was a significant difference between pre and post-operative mean air-bone gaps (P = 0.02). Mean operating time was comparable between both groups. Eight patients developed post-operative complications. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic ear surgery can be performed safely in a range of otological procedures. This has the potential to become a well-established surgical option for middle ear surgery in the near future. Advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:25789304

  13. Endoscopic and Keyhole Endoscope-assisted Neurosurgical Approaches: A Qualitative Survey on Technical Challenges and Technological Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Hani J; Cundy, Thomas P; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Nandi, Dipankar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The literature reflects a resurgence of interest in endoscopic and keyhole endoscope-assisted neurosurgical approaches as alternatives to conventional microsurgical approaches in carefully selected cases. The aim of this study was to assess the technical challenges of neuroendoscopy, and the scope for technological innovations to overcome these barriers. Materials and Methods All full members of the Society of British Neurosurgeons (SBNS) were electronically invited to participate in an online survey. The open-ended structured survey asked three questions; firstly, whether the surgeon presently utilises or has experience with endoscopic or endoscope-assisted approaches; secondly, what they consider to be the major technical barriers to adopting such approaches; and thirdly, what technological advances they foresee improving safety and efficacy in the field. Responses were subjected to a qualitative research method of multi-rater emergent themes analysis. Results Three clear themes emerged: 1) surgical approach and better integration with image-guidance systems (20%), 2) intra-operative visualisation and improvements in neuroendoscopy (49%), and 3) surgical manipulation and improvements in instruments (74%). Discussion The analysis of responses to our open-ended survey revealed that although opinion was varied three major themes could be identified. Emerging technological advances such as augmented reality, high-definition stereo-endoscopy, and robotic joint-wristed instruments may help overcome the technical difficulties associated with neuroendoscopic approaches. Conclusions Results of this qualitative survey provide consensus amongst the technology end-user community such that unambiguous goals and priorities may be defined. Systems integrating these advances could improve the safety and efficacy of endoscopic and endoscope-assisted neurosurgical approaches. PMID:24533591

  14. Current issues result in a paradigm shift in reprocessing medical and surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Alfa, Michelle J

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this report is to review the available scientific data on reprocessing of medical and surgical instruments and discuss the current issues related to cleaning and disinfection of flexible endoscopes and intracavitary ultrasound probes. PMID:27131134

  15. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in ruptured liver hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Borahma, Mohamed; Afifi, Rajaa; Benelbarhdadi, Imane; Ajana, Fatima Zahra; Essamri, Wafaa; Essaid, Abdellah

    2015-07-01

    One of the most common and serious complications of hepatic hydatid cyst disease is communication between the cyst and the biliary tree. Surgical management of biliary fistula is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively reviewed the effectiveness of endoscopic treatment of ruptured hydatid cyst into intrahepatic bile ducts. Diagnosis of intrabiliary rupture of hydatid cyst was mostly suspected by acute cholangitis, jaundice, pain, and/or persistent external biliary fistula after surgery. The diagnosis was confirmed by radiology and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings. We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, imagery, and ERCP findings for all patients. The therapeutic methods performed were endoscopic sphincterotomy, extraction by balloon or Dormia basket, stenting, or nasobiliary drainage. Sixteen patients with ruptured hepatic hydatid cyst into bile ducts were seen in 9 years. Nine of 16 patients had a surgical history of hepatic hydatid cyst and three patients had a percutanous treatment history. We carried out ERCP with sphincterotomy and extraction of hydatid materials (extraction balloon n = 11; Dormia basket n = 5) or biliary drainage (nasobiliary drainage n = 1; biliary stenting n = 1). The fistula healed in 80 % of patients with a median time of 6 weeks [range, 1-12] after endoscopic treatment. ERCP was an effective method of treatment for hepatic hydatid cyst with biliary fistula. PMID:26345677

  16. 3D navigation of endoscopic rhizotomy at the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Thorsten; Sprengel, Kai; Peterer, Lorenz; Mica, Ladislav; Werner, Clément M L

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed description of the surgical technique and the preliminary results of an endoscopic denervation for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) originating from the facet joints (FJ). Endoscopic denervation of the medial branches of the dorsal rami supplying the FJ has recently been appraised as providing excellent intraoperative visualization and long term pain relief for these patients. Conventional endoscopic rhizotomy has been expanded to include a the precise localization of 3D navigation. A surgical description and the results of our first four patients treated with 3D navigated endoscopic rhizotomy (3DNER) are presented. Four patients with a mean age of 59years and a follow-up time of 2months were included. All patients reported pain reduction in the immediate postoperative period, while three patients (75%) had long lasting relief. The patient without persisting relief had previously sustained a lumbar disc prolapse and only achieved minor pain relief with preoperative FJ infiltration, compared to the significant relief that was seen in the other patients. In contrast to conventional rhizotomy, 3DNER enables the surgeon to ablate more precisely and extensively, which is especially useful if scar tissue is present from previous injuries or surgeries. When successful, this technique may provide long lasting pain relief, especially if the preoperative FJ infiltrations are followed by a substantial pain reduction. PMID:26628214

  17. A high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope for tissue characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ji; Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    The contrast mechanism of medical endoscopy is mainly based on metrics of optical intensity and wavelength. As another fundamental property of light, polarization can not only reveal tissue scattering and absorption information from a different perspective, but can also provide insight into directional tissue birefringence properties to monitor pathological changes in collagen and elastin. Here we demonstrate a low cost wide field high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope with minimal alterations to a rigid endoscope. We show that this novel endoscopic imaging modality is able to provide a number of image contrast mechanisms besides traditional unpolarized radiation intensity, including linear depolarization, circular depolarization, cross-polarization, directional birefringence and dichroism. This enhances tissue features of interest, and additionally reveals tissue micro-structure and composition, which is of central importance for tissue diagnosis and image guidance for surgery. The potential applications of the Mueller polarimetric endoscope include wide field early epithelial cancer diagnosis, surgical margin detection and energy-based tissue fusion monitoring, and could further benefit a wide range of endoscopic investigations through intra-operative guidance. PMID:27173145

  18. A high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope for tissue characterisation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ji; Elson, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    The contrast mechanism of medical endoscopy is mainly based on metrics of optical intensity and wavelength. As another fundamental property of light, polarization can not only reveal tissue scattering and absorption information from a different perspective, but can also provide insight into directional tissue birefringence properties to monitor pathological changes in collagen and elastin. Here we demonstrate a low cost wide field high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope with minimal alterations to a rigid endoscope. We show that this novel endoscopic imaging modality is able to provide a number of image contrast mechanisms besides traditional unpolarized radiation intensity, including linear depolarization, circular depolarization, cross-polarization, directional birefringence and dichroism. This enhances tissue features of interest, and additionally reveals tissue micro-structure and composition, which is of central importance for tissue diagnosis and image guidance for surgery. The potential applications of the Mueller polarimetric endoscope include wide field early epithelial cancer diagnosis, surgical margin detection and energy-based tissue fusion monitoring, and could further benefit a wide range of endoscopic investigations through intra-operative guidance. PMID:27173145

  19. Design of a handheld optical coherence microscopy endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korde, Vrushali R.; Liebmann, Erica; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2009-02-01

    Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) combines coherence gating, high numerical aperture optics, and a fiber core pinhole to provide high axial and lateral resolution with relatively large depth of imaging. We present a handheld rigid OCM endoscope with a 6 mm diameter tip, 1 mm scan width, and 1 mm imaging depth. This probe will allow noninvasive imaging of fine structural detail in vivo. X-Y scanning is performed distally with mirrors mounted to micro galvonometer scanners incorporated into the endoscope handle. Two scanning doublet lenses relay the stop from the galvonometers to the afocal relay stop. The endoscope optical design consists of an afocal Hopkins relay lens system and a 0.4 NA objective. To allow focusing at various depths in the tissue, the endoscope housing is designed in two pieces screwed together with a fine pitch threads. A small rotation of the outer housing moves the lenses proximal and distal relative to the window, causing the focal location in the tissue to change. The space between the final objective lens and the window is filled with distilled water to avoid misalignment of the focus and coherence gate. A knife edge test was performed and the line spread function FWHM was measured to be 2.25 μm. The MTF has at least 0.3 contrast at a 5 μm line pair. This rigid handheld OCM endoscope will be useful for application ranging from minimally invasive surgical imaging to assessing dysplasia and sun damage in skin.

  20. A high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope for tissue characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ji; Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    The contrast mechanism of medical endoscopy is mainly based on metrics of optical intensity and wavelength. As another fundamental property of light, polarization can not only reveal tissue scattering and absorption information from a different perspective, but can also provide insight into directional tissue birefringence properties to monitor pathological changes in collagen and elastin. Here we demonstrate a low cost wide field high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope with minimal alterations to a rigid endoscope. We show that this novel endoscopic imaging modality is able to provide a number of image contrast mechanisms besides traditional unpolarized radiation intensity, including linear depolarization, circular depolarization, cross-polarization, directional birefringence and dichroism. This enhances tissue features of interest, and additionally reveals tissue micro-structure and composition, which is of central importance for tissue diagnosis and image guidance for surgery. The potential applications of the Mueller polarimetric endoscope include wide field early epithelial cancer diagnosis, surgical margin detection and energy-based tissue fusion monitoring, and could further benefit a wide range of endoscopic investigations through intra-operative guidance.

  1. Evaluation of a compound eye type tactile endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Sasaki, Nagisa; Takeda, Maki; Shimizu, Sachiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Ohno, Yuko

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques for endoscope become widely used, for example, laparoscopic operation, NOTES (Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery), robotic surgery and so on. There are so many demand and needs for endoscopic diagnosis. Especially, palpation is most important diagnosis on any surgery. However, conventional endoscopic system has no tactile sensibility. There are many studies about tactile sensor for medical application. These sensors can measure object at a point. It is necessary to sense in areas for palpation. To overcome this problem, we propose compound eye type tactile endoscope. The proposed system consists of TOMBO (Thin Observation Module by Bound Optics) and clear silicon rubber. Our proposed system can estimate hardness of target object by measuring deformation of a projected pattern on the silicon rubber. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the proposed system. At first, we introduce approximated models of the silicone and the object. We formulate the stiffness of object, the deformation of silicone, and the whole object. We investigate the accuracy of measured silicone's lower surface for deformation of silicone by prototype system. Finally, we evaluate the calculated stiffness of the soft object.

  2. Total Endoscopic Thyroidectomy with Intraoperative Laryngeal Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bin; Zhang, Bin; Zeng, Qing-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of laryngeal nerve (LN) monitoring (LNM) during total endoscopic thyroidectomy via breast approach, with emphasis on the identification rates for RLN and EBSLN and the incidence of RLN paralysis. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study included 280 patients who underwent endoscopic thyroidectomy with or without LNM. RLN and EBSLN were identified using endoscopic magnification in the control group, while they were localized additionally by LNM in the LNM group. Demographic parameters and surgical outcomes were analyzed by statistical methods. Patients in the control group were also stratified by the side of thyroidectomy to determine difference in left and right RLN injury rates. Results. All procedures were successfully conducted without permanent LN damage. The identification rates for RLN and EBSLN were high in the LNM group compared to those of the control group, and the risk difference (RD) of temporary RLN injury between two groups was 6.3%. The risk of damage was slightly higher for the left RLN than for the right RLN in the control group, which was performed by a right-hand surgeon. Conclusion. The joint application of LNM and endoscopic magnified view endows total endoscopic thyroidectomy with ease, safety, and efficiency. PMID:27413372

  3. Mapping of endoscopic images to object surfaces via ray-traced texture mapping for image guidance in neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Damini; Gobbi, David G.; Surry, Kathleen J. M.; Slomka, Piotr J.; Peters, Terence M.

    2000-04-01

    A major limitation of the use of endoscopes in minimally invasive surgery is the lack of relative context between the endoscope and its surroundings. The purpose of this work is to map endoscopic images to surfaces obtained from 3D preoperative MR or CT data, for assistance in surgical planning and guidance. To test our methods, we acquired pre- operative CT images of a standard brain phantom from which object surfaces were extracted. Endoscopic images were acquired using a neuro-endoscope tracked with an optical tracking system, and the optical properties of the endoscope were characterized using a simple calibration procedure. Registration of the phantom and CT images was accomplished using markers that could be identified both on the physical object and in the pre-operative images. The endoscopic images were rectified for radial lens distortion, and then mapped onto the extracted surfaces via a ray-traced texture- mapping algorithm, which explicitly accounts for surface obliquity. The optical tracker has an accuracy of about 0.3 mm, which allows the endoscope tip to be localized to within mm. The mapping operation allows the endoscopic images to be effectively 'painted' onto the surfaces as they are acquired. Panoramic and stereoscopic visualization and navigation of the painted surfaces may then be reformed from arbitrary orientations, that were not necessarily those from which the original endoscopic views were acquired.

  4. Endoscopic procedures of the upper-thoracic sympathetic chain. A review.

    PubMed

    Drott, C; Göthberg, G; Claes, G

    1993-02-01

    The upsurge of endoscopic surgical procedures now includes procedures of the thoracic sympathetic chain. The number of articles on this issue is rapidly increasing. This article reviews the indications for as well as the technique, complications, side effects, and results of endoscopic upper-thoracic sympathetic ablation. Since 1977, nearly 900 cases have been described in the literature. The main indication is usually hyperhidrosis. The described techniques vary in detail, but the common denominators are simplicity, expedience, minimal surgical trauma, few complications, and low cost compared with standard methods of open surgery. The results are excellent, durable, and stand well compared with results of previous open techniques. Due to the overwhelming advantages of endoscopic methods, we can foresee an increasing adoption of these techniques and a subsequent relegation of the various open surgical procedures of the upper-thoracic sympathetic chain. PMID:8431126

  5. Minimally invasive endoscopic surgery for treatment of spontaneous intracerebral haematomas.

    PubMed

    Beynon, Christopher; Schiebel, Patrick; Bösel, Julian; Unterberg, Andreas W; Orakcioglu, Berk

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with a mortality rate of more than 40 % and a high morbidity rate with 10-15 % of survivors remaining fully dependent [11]. The role of surgical treatment of ICH remains a matter of controversy and ongoing investigation. Advances in neurosurgical techniques such as endoscopy and neuronavigation have been established in various fields of neurosurgery. Results of reported case series have suggested that some patients with ICH may benefit from haematoma evacuation through minimally invasive endoscopic procedures. In this article, we focus on the pathophysiologic rationales behind minimally invasive haematoma evacuation through endoscopic surgery and provide an overview of technical developments and reported patient series. In addition, the modalities of the surgical procedure at the authors' institution are described. Controlled clinical trials are needed to evaluate the full potential and limitations of this promising technique. PMID:25687253

  6. Transforaminal Endoscopic Solution to a Kyphoplasty Complication: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ralf; Telfeian, Albert E; Iprenburg, Menno; Krzok, Guntram; Gokaslan, Ziya; Choi, David B; Pucci, Francesco G; Oyelese, Adetkumbo

    2016-07-01

    Kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive spine surgical procedure performed to stabilize and treat the pain caused by a spine compression fracture. Complications are rare with kyphoplasty and include cement extrusion into the vertebral canal leading to spinal cord or nerve root compression. Herein, the authors present a case of a 72-year-old woman who presented with symptoms of a right L2 radiculopathy after a kyphoplasty procedure. Computed tomography imaging showed leakage of the kyphoplasty cement into the neural foramen above and medial to the right L2 pedicle. A transforaminal endoscopic surgical approach was used to remove the cement and decompress the L2 nerve. The patient's postoperative clinical course was uneventful. Clinicians should be aware that for the treatment of complications to vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty procedures, minimally invasive transforaminal endoscopic surgery is one option to avoid the destabilizing effects of laminectomy and facetectomy. PMID:27072335

  7. Endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection salvage technique for ulcerative early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Seo, Min Ho; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Ryu, Ho Sang

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection is an effective treatment modality for early gastric cancer (EGC), though the submucosal fibrosis found in ulcerative EGC is an obstacle for successful treatment. This report presents two cases of ulcerative EGC in two males, 73- and 80-year-old, with severe fibrosis. As endoscopic ultrasonography suggested that the EGCs had invaded the submucosal layer, the endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection salvage technique was utilized for complete resection of the lesions. Although surgical gastrectomy was originally scheduled, the two patients had severe coronary heart disease, and surgeries were refused because of the risks associated with their heart conditions. The endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection salvage technique procedures described in these cases were performed under conscious sedation, and were completed within 30 min. The complete en bloc resection of EGC using endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection salvage technique was possible with a free resection margin, and no other complications were noted during the procedure. This is the first known report concerning the use of the endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection salvage technique salvage technique for treatment of ulcerative EGC. We demonstrate that endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection salvage technique it is a feasible method showing several advantages over endoscopic submucosal dissection for cases of EGC with fibrosis. PMID:25083097

  8. [Endoscopic Therapy for Esophageal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatment for esophageal neoplasms includes endoscopic resection, argon plasma coagulation(APC), photodynamic therapy( PDT) and stent placement. Endoscopic resection is widely used as an effective, less invasive treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma in Japan. APC is considered to be safe and effective treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma which cannot be resected endoscopically because of severe comorbidities, as well as for local recurrence after endoscopic resection or chemoradiotherapy. PDT is thought to be an effective option as salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy. Stent placement mainly using self-expanding metallic stents have been used as a minimally invasive and effective modality for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction. Endoscopic treatment is expected to have more important role in the treatment of esophageal neoplasms in the future. PMID:27440040

  9. [Avoiding and dealing with bleeding during endoscopic sinus surgery].

    PubMed

    Leunig, A

    2006-04-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery is one of the most frequent surgical ENT-procedures. Bleeding during surgery may increase complications and may have negative effects on surgery and outcome. The present paper describes strategies to prevent and deal with bleeding during sinus surgery. Preoperative conservative treatment of mucosal inflammation as well the use of adrenalin for decongestion may reduce intraoperative bleeding and hence complications. PMID:16615029

  10. Endoscopic Gastrointestinal Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buchi, Kenneth N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of flexible fibers for the delivery of laser energy led to the first endoscopic laser applications in humans in the early 1970s. Since that time, much has been learned about applications throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The risks appear to be minimal. The coagulative effect of laser energy is used to treat gastrointestinal hemorrhage and small, benign mucosal lesions. The ablative effect of the Nd:YAG laser on tissue is used for palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal disorders and incisional therapy for anatomic lesions such as strictures or cysts. New laser modalities that potentially can be tuned throughout large segments of the electromagnetic spectrum, new fiber-optic delivery systems with specialized tips and new methods of sensitizing tissue to laser energy all indicate that the endoscopic laser should continue to have many new and innovative applications. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:3911589

  11. Fluorescence endoscopic video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayan, G. V.; Kang, Uk

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes a fluorescence endoscopic video system intended for the diagnosis of diseases of the internal organs. The system operates on the basis of two-channel recording of the video fluxes from a fluorescence channel and a reflected-light channel by means of a high-sensitivity monochrome television camera and a color camera, respectively. Examples are given of the application of the device in gastroenterology.

  12. [Endoscopic interventions in pulmonology].

    PubMed

    Gompelmann, D; Herth, F J F

    2016-08-01

    Bronchoscopy plays a significant role in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Hemoptysis, or central airway obstruction, is a common indication for interventional bronchoscopy. In addition, the treatment of early lung cancer is the domain of bronchoscopy in inoperable patients. In recent years, endoscopic techniques have also been established as new therapeutic options in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and uncontrolled bronchial asthma. PMID:27351790

  13. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  14. New Endoscopic Hemostasis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Leung Ki, En-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic treatment for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding has evolved over decades. Injection with diluted epinephrine is considered as a less than adequate treatment, and the current standard therapy should include second modality if epinephrine injection is used initially. Definitive hemostasis rate following mono-therapy with either thermo-coagulation or hemo-clipping compares favorably with dual therapies. The use of adsorptive powder (Hemo-spray) is a promising treatment although it needs comparative studies between hemospray and other modalities. Stronger hemo-clips with better torque control and wider span are now available. Over-the-scope clips capture a large amount of tissue and may prove useful in refractory bleeding. Experimental treatments include an endoscopic stitch device to over-sew the bleeding lesion and targeted therapy to the sub-serosal bleeding artery as guided by echo-endoscopy. Angiographic embolization of bleeding artery should be considered in chronic ulcers that fail endoscopic treatment especially in elderly patients with a major bleed manifested in hypotension. PMID:22977807

  15. New endoscopic hemostasis methods.

    PubMed

    Leung Ki, En-Ling; Lau, James Y W

    2012-09-01

    Endoscopic treatment for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding has evolved over decades. Injection with diluted epinephrine is considered as a less than adequate treatment, and the current standard therapy should include second modality if epinephrine injection is used initially. Definitive hemostasis rate following mono-therapy with either thermo-coagulation or hemo-clipping compares favorably with dual therapies. The use of adsorptive powder (Hemo-spray) is a promising treatment although it needs comparative studies between hemospray and other modalities. Stronger hemo-clips with better torque control and wider span are now available. Over-the-scope clips capture a large amount of tissue and may prove useful in refractory bleeding. Experimental treatments include an endoscopic stitch device to over-sew the bleeding lesion and targeted therapy to the sub-serosal bleeding artery as guided by echo-endoscopy. Angiographic embolization of bleeding artery should be considered in chronic ulcers that fail endoscopic treatment especially in elderly patients with a major bleed manifested in hypotension. PMID:22977807

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Carlo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Maimone, Antonella; Polifemo, Anna Maria; Tarantino, Ilaria; Cennamo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) develop secondary to either fluid leakage or liquefaction of pancreatic necrosis following acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, surgery or abdominal trauma. Pancreatic fluid collections include acute fluid collections, acute and chronic pancreatic pseudocysts, pancreatic abscesses and pancreatic necrosis. Before the introduction of linear endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the 1990s and the subsequent development of endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage (EUS-GD) procedures, the available options for drainage in symptomatic PFCs included surgical drainage, percutaneous drainage using radiological guidance and conventional endoscopic transmural drainage. In recent years, it has gradually been recognized that, due to its lower morbidity rate compared to the surgical and percutaneous approaches, endoscopic treatment may be the preferred first-line approach for managing symptomatic PFCs. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage has the following advantages, when compared to other alternatives such as surgical, percutaneous and non-EUS-guided endoscopic drainage. EUS-GD is less invasive than surgery and therefore does not require general anesthesia. The morbidity rate is lower, recovery is faster and the costs are lower. EUS-GD can avoid local complications related to percutaneous drainage. Because the endoscope is placed adjacent to the fluid collection, it can have direct access to the fluid cavity, unlike percutaneous drainage which traverses the abdominal wall. Complications such as bleeding, inadvertent puncture of adjacent viscera, secondary infection and prolonged periods of drainage with resultant pancreatico-cutaneous fistulae may be avoided. The only difference between EUS and non-EUS drainage is the initial step, namely, gaining access to the pancreatic fluid collection. All the subsequent steps are similar, i.e., insertion of guide-wires with fluoroscopic guidance, balloon dilatation of the cystogastrostomy and insertion of

  17. Development of a dual-view endoscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Takaomi; Ito, Eiichi; Kanai, Moriyasu; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate a new endoscope system for laparoscopic surgery that provides two different views simultaneously. One is a 'wide view' and the other is an 'enlarged view' derived from the wide view with an optical image-shifting mechanism. By using this endoscope, surgeons can observe a surgical area as an enlarged view without moving or rotating the endoscope. Moreover, the wide view is useful for examining the outside of a surgical area. They can move the enlarged view within the area of the wide view by using the image-shifting mechanism. This system consists of a rigid scope and a 'zoom unit.' The rigid scope includes a set of optical lenses for the wide view angle (120 degrees) and light-guide fibers built in for illumination. These fibers are connected to a light source directly. The zoom unit includes imaging optical elements and two CCD cameras. In the zoom unit, an image provided by the rigid scope is divided into two ways by a half-mirror. One image is captured by the first CCD camera with relay lenses for a wide view. The other passes through a Porro prism (II), which is used to shift the enlarged view vertically and horizontally, and zoom lenses with a three variable power. Then, the image is captured by the second CCD camera for an enlarged view. A working distance between the tip of the rigid scope and the surface of viscera is 100mm that is sufficient for surgical operation.

  18. Endoscopic-Assisted Repair of Superior Canal Dehiscence.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yew Song; Kozin, Elliott D; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    Superior canal dehiscence (SCD) is a bony defect of the superior canal that can cause vestibular and/or auditory symptoms. Surgical repair of SCD provides effective relief from symptoms, and the middle fossa craniotomy approach with binocular microscopy offers direct visualization and surgical access to the arcuate eminence. However, for SCDs located along the downsloping tegmen medial to the peak of the arcuate eminence, a direct light of sight may be obscured, rendering visualization with traditional microscopy difficult. The endoscope is the ideal adjunct in middle fossa craniotomy approach SCD surgery and offers a safe, effective means to identify and repair arcuate eminence defects hidden from microscopic view. PMID:27565386

  19. Standard Endoscopic Approaches in Frontal Sinus Surgery: Technical Pearls and Approach Selection.

    PubMed

    Korban, Zeina R; Casiano, Roy R

    2016-08-01

    The mainstay of frontal sinus surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis is to achieve and maintain an adequate frontal outflow tract. Using a stepwise approach and identifying critical endoscopic anatomic landmarks, to minimize complications and obtain long-term good endoscopic surgical results, should achieve this. The goal is to relieve the patient's symptoms, restore functional mucociliary flow, achieve a wide frontal sinus ostium and prevent long-term scarring and stenosis. Meticulous dissection and appropriate use of instrumentation and techniques aids in preventing unnecessary damage to normal mucosa while achieving one's goal of an adequate surgical ostium. PMID:27450617

  20. A novel method for endoscopic perforation management by using abdominal exploration and full-thickness sutured closure

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Thompson, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Perforation of the GI tract during endoscopy can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and immediate management of endoscopic perforation are essential to optimize outcome. Larger perforations, defects with complex geometry, and those complicated by leakage of luminal contents have traditionally required surgical management. Objective To assess the feasibility of a new method for managing complex perforations that incorporates abdominal exploration and endoscopic sutured closure. Design Case series. Setting Tertiary care center. Patients Two patients with large, complicated perforations and peritoneal contamination. Interventions Endoscopic exploration of abdomen with angiocatheter placement under direct visualization, management of leaked luminal contents, and full-thickness sutured defect closure. Results Endoscopic abdominal exploration through the perforation site allowed safe placement of an angiocatheter for management of pneumoperitoneum, inspection for injury that may warrant surgical management, and removal of leaked luminal contents. Endoscopic sutured closure allowed safe and robust perforation management. Repair of gastrojejunal anastomotic perforation required 2 sutures and 63 minutes. Repair of gastric perforation required 4 sutures and 48 minutes. Patients had successful endoscopic defect closure confirmed by an upper GI series and were discharged 1 day later. Limitations Report of a new method in 2 patients performed at tertiary care center. Conclusions We demonstrate successful management of complex perforations with peritoneal contamination by incorporating endoscopic exploration and sutured closure with standard treatment measures. Traditional practice would have directed these patients to surgical management, which introduces additional morbidity and cost. A means for safe and broad implementation of these techniques should be evaluated. PMID:24721517

  1. Comparison of visualization of the middle ear by microscope and endoscopes of 30° and 45° through posterior tympanotomy

    PubMed Central

    Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Orłowski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Endoscopic-assisted microsurgery of the middle ear enables the field of view of the surgeon to be expanded during the removal of inflammatory tissue from the tympanic cavity and during myringo- and ossiculoplasty. Canal wall up tympanoplasty with posterior tympanotomy is a gold standard in surgical treatment of chronic otitis media. Most applications of endoscopy in middle ear surgery concern exclusively the endoscopic transcanal approach. Aim To determine the usefulness of endoscopic visualization during the standard surgical approach through the posterior tympanotomy. Material and methods The study compared the visualization of the elements of the middle ear through the posterior tympanotomy by endoscopes with 30° and 45° optics and a microscope. Posterior tympanotomy was performed in eleven temporal bones. Visualization of the tympanic recesses was assessed on a subjective scale. A microscope and 30° and 45° endoscopes were used for inspection of the hypotympanum, sinus tympani, Eustachian tube, Prussak's space and footplate. Friedman ANOVA test and Dunn's multiple comparisons test were used for statistical analysis of the data. Results Visualization of particular recesses by endoscopes, both 30° and 45°, was excellent, while the microscopic view was statistically significantly worse, especially for sinus tympani, Prussak's space and footplate. There were no significant differences in visibility of the middle ear spaces between the two types of endoscopic optics. Conclusions Additional application of the endoscopes during middle ear surgery provides valuable information due to excellent visualization of key recesses usually hidden from the microscope. PMID:25097700

  2. Realistic Anatomical Prostate Models for Surgical Skills Workshops Using Ballistic Gelatin for Nerve-Sparing Radical Prostatectomy and Fruit for Simple Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Uri; Klotz, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Understanding of prostate anatomy has evolved as techniques have been refined and improved for radical prostatectomy (RP), particularly regarding the importance of the neurovascular bundles for erectile function. The objectives of this study were to develop inexpensive and simple but anatomically accurate prostate models not involving human or animal elements to teach the terminology and practical aspects of nerve-sparing RP and simple prostatectomy (SP). Materials and Methods The RP model used a Foley catheter with ballistics gelatin in the balloon and mesh fabric (neurovascular bundles) and balloons (prostatic fascial layers) on either side for the practice of inter- and intrafascial techniques. The SP model required only a ripe clementine, for which the skin represented compressed normal prostate, the pulp represented benign tissue, and the pith mimicked fibrous adhesions. A modification with a balloon through the fruit center acted as a "urethra." Results Both models were easily created and successfully represented the principles of anatomical nerve-sparing RP and SP. Both models were tested in workshops by urologists and residents of differing levels with positive feedback. Conclusions Low-fidelity models for prostate anatomy demonstration and surgical practice are feasible. They are inexpensive and simple to construct. Importantly, these models can be used for education on the practical aspects of nerve-sparing RP and SP. The models will require further validation as educational and competency tools, but as we move to an era in which human donors and animal experiments become less ethical and more difficult to complete, so too will low-fidelity models become more attractive. PMID:21379431

  3. Endoscope-Assisted Combined Supracerebellar Infratentorial and Endoscopic Transventricular Approach to the Pineal Region: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Hasan R; Ryan, Joshua E; Jean, Walter C; Anaizi, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    Neoplasms of the pineal region comprise less than 2% of all intracranial lesions. A variety of techniques have been adapted to gain access to the pineal region. Classic approaches employ the use of the microscope. More recently, the endoscope has been utilized to improve access to such deep-seated lesions. A 62-year-old female presented with a heterogeneously enhancing lesion in the pineal region with associated hydrocephalus. On exam, the patient exhibited Parinaud’s syndrome. The patient initially underwent a single burr hole endoscopic third ventriculostomy and biopsy of the lesion. Initial pathology was consistent with a grade III astrocytoma. Following a period of recuperation, she returned for definitive surgical resection. A suboccipital craniectomy was performed in the sitting position. Prior to dural opening, an endoscope was inserted into the right lateral ventricle through the prior burr hole.The endoscope was passed through the foramen of Monro and the tumor could be visualized along the posterior third ventricle. The patient underwent a standard supracerebellar infratentorial approach aided by the microscope. After initial debulking of the pineal lesion, an endoscope was utilized to guide the depth of resection and assist in dissection with transventricular manipulation of the tumor. During the final stages of resection from the craniotomy, the endoscope was used to help visualize the posterior supracerebellar corridor. This assisted in the assessment of the extent of resection. The endoscope was also utilized for the removal of intraventricular blood products following tumor resection. The patient was extubated and transferred to the intensive care unit. A postoperative contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed greater than 95% resection, with expected residual within the midbrain. The combined supracerebellar infratentorial and transventricular endoscope-assisted approach provided maximum visualization and aided in optimal

  4. Evolving Educational Techniques in Surgical Training.

    PubMed

    Evans, Charity H; Schenarts, Kimberly D

    2016-02-01

    Training competent and professional surgeons efficiently and effectively requires innovation and modernization of educational methods. Today's medical learner is quite adept at using multiple platforms to gain information, providing surgical educators with numerous innovative avenues to promote learning. With the growth of technology, and the restriction of work hours in surgical education, there has been an increase in use of simulation, including virtual reality, robotics, telemedicine, and gaming. The use of simulation has shifted the learning of basic surgical skills to the laboratory, reserving limited time in the operating room for the acquisition of complex surgical skills". PMID:26612021

  5. Endoscopic surveillance strategy after endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Tsutomu; Tsujii, Masahiko; Kato, Motohiko; Hayashi, Yoshito; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Iijima, Hideki; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of early gastric cancer (EGC) is important to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic modalities and treatment devices, such as image-enhanced endoscopy and high-frequency generators, may make endoscopic treatment, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection, a therapeutic option for gastric intraepithelial neoplasia. Consequently, short-term outcomes of endoscopic resection (ER) for EGC have improved. Therefore, surveillance with endoscopy after ER for EGC is becoming more important, but how to perform endoscopic surveillance after ER has not been established, even though the follow-up strategy for more advanced gastric cancer has been outlined. Therefore, a surveillance strategy for patients with EGC after ER is needed. PMID:24891981

  6. Surgical revolutions.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2008-01-01

    Many surgical revolutions distinguish the history and evolution of surgery. They come in different sizes and exert a variable effect on the development and practice of the discipline. As science and technology rapidly evolve, so too does the creation of new paradigms, ideas and innovations or discoveries for the improvement of the surgical sciences. Surgical revolutions are not new, and have existed for centuries even though they have been more frequently recognized since the middle of the 19th century, 20th century and down to the present. Surgical revolutionaries are indispensable in the conception and completion of any surgical revolution. However, scientific and technological advances have supported the culmination of each revolution. PMID:18615311

  7. Development of AR Surgical Navigation Systems for Multiple Surgical Regions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Iimura, Jiro; Otori, Nobuyoshi; Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to develop surgical navigation systems to enhance surgical safety. Our systems make use of augmented reality technology to superimpose, on the surgery screen on a real time basis, patients' organ models reconstructed in 3D from their X-ray CT data taken before surgery. By doing so, the systems display anatomical risk materials, tumors and blood vessels which surgeons cannot see with their naked eyes. This will in turn lead to surgeons intuitively grasping the inner structures of the operational fields. We so far have been developing navigation systems that can conduct surgeries in various fields. The basic structure of the navigation systems are the same. The navigation systems uses different peripheral equipment and different methods to display navigation images which best meet the demands of each type of surgery. In this thesis, we report on our navigation systems for 2 types of surgery - endoscopic sinus surgery and hepatobilialy-pancreatic surgery. PMID:24732545

  8. Endoscopic and robotic parathyroidectomy in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Brunaud, Laurent; Li, Zhen; Van Den Heede, Klaas; Cuny, Thomas; Van Slycke, Sam

    2016-06-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is one of the most common endocrine disorders for which parathyroidectomy is the most effective therapy. Until late 1970s, the standard approach to parathyroidectomy was a four-gland exploration using a large skin incision. However, 80 to 85 percent of cases of PHPT are caused by a single adenoma. As such, the concept of performing a bilateral exploration in order to visualize all four glands has been argued to be excessive since in the majority of cases, there is only one abnormal gland. Focused exploration (one gland) is currently the standard technique for parathyroidectomy worldwide. Despite a rapid acceptance of minimally invasive approaches in most endocrine surgery centers, the use of an endoscope with or without the use of a robotic system to perform parathyroidectomy remains controversial. The goal of this study was to review current available data about surgical approaches using an endoscope with or without the use of a robotic system in the management of patients with PHPT. For conventional endoscopic and video assisted parathyroidectomy, several comparative studies have demonstrated some advantages in terms of reduced postoperative pain, better cosmetic results and higher patient satisfaction compared to open non-endoscopic minimally invasive parathyroidectomy. Robot-assisted transaxillary parathyroidectomy has the advantage of leaving no scar in the neck but its role has not yet been delineated clearly given the limited number of published series. Subjective postoperative cosmetic evaluation is good by concealing the scar in the axilla or infraclavicular area. However, this approach is associated with more extensive dissection than during conventional open or endoscopic neck access surgical procedures. Patients with true ectopic mediastinal parathyroid glands are good candidates for conventional or robot-assisted thoracoscopic approaches because these glands are in remote and narrow anatomical locations. PMID:27294044

  9. Endoscopic and robotic parathyroidectomy in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Van Den Heede, Klaas; Cuny, Thomas; Van Slycke, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is one of the most common endocrine disorders for which parathyroidectomy is the most effective therapy. Until late 1970s, the standard approach to parathyroidectomy was a four-gland exploration using a large skin incision. However, 80 to 85 percent of cases of PHPT are caused by a single adenoma. As such, the concept of performing a bilateral exploration in order to visualize all four glands has been argued to be excessive since in the majority of cases, there is only one abnormal gland. Focused exploration (one gland) is currently the standard technique for parathyroidectomy worldwide. Despite a rapid acceptance of minimally invasive approaches in most endocrine surgery centers, the use of an endoscope with or without the use of a robotic system to perform parathyroidectomy remains controversial. The goal of this study was to review current available data about surgical approaches using an endoscope with or without the use of a robotic system in the management of patients with PHPT. For conventional endoscopic and video assisted parathyroidectomy, several comparative studies have demonstrated some advantages in terms of reduced postoperative pain, better cosmetic results and higher patient satisfaction compared to open non-endoscopic minimally invasive parathyroidectomy. Robot-assisted transaxillary parathyroidectomy has the advantage of leaving no scar in the neck but its role has not yet been delineated clearly given the limited number of published series. Subjective postoperative cosmetic evaluation is good by concealing the scar in the axilla or infraclavicular area. However, this approach is associated with more extensive dissection than during conventional open or endoscopic neck access surgical procedures. Patients with true ectopic mediastinal parathyroid glands are good candidates for conventional or robot-assisted thoracoscopic approaches because these glands are in remote and narrow anatomical locations. PMID:27294044

  10. Rinsability of orthophthalaldehyde from endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Miner, Norman; Harris, Valerie; Lukomski, Natalie; Ebron, Towanda

    2012-01-01

    Orthophthalaldehyde high level disinfectants are contraindicated for use with urological instruments such as cystoscopes due to anaphylaxis-like allergic reactions during surveillance of bladder cancer patients. Allergic reactions and mucosal injuries have also been reported following colonoscopy, laryngoscopy, and transesophageal echocardiography with devices disinfected using orthophthalaldehyde. Possibly these endoscopes were not adequately rinsed after disinfection by orthophthalaldehyde. We examined this possibility by means of a zone-of-inhibition test, and also a test to extract residues of orthophthalaldehyde with acetonitrile, from sections of endoscope insertion tube materials, to measure the presence of alkaline glutaraldehyde, or glutaraldehyde plus 20% w/w isopropanol, or ortho-phthalaldehyde that remained on the endoscope materials after exposure to these disinfectants followed by a series of rinses in water, or by aeration overnight. Zones of any size indicated the disinfectant had not been rinsed away from the endoscope material. There were no zones of inhibition surrounding endoscope materials soaked in glutaraldehyde or glutaraldehyde plus isopropanol after three serial water rinses according to manufacturers' rinsing directions. The endoscope material soaked in orthophthalaldehyde produced zones of inhibition even after fifteen serial rinses with water. Orthophthalaldehyde was extracted from the rinsed endoscope material by acetonitrile. These data, and other information, indicate that the high level disinfectant orthophthalaldehyde, also known as 1,2-benzene dialdehyde, cannot be rinsed away from flexible endoscope material with any practical number of rinses with water, or by drying overnight. PMID:22665966

  11. New trend in endoscopic surgery: transvaginal appendectomy NOTES (Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery).

    PubMed

    Tabutsadze, T; Kipshidze, N

    2009-03-01

    Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery is a new method of mini invasive surgery, which involves passing surgical instruments, and a tiny camera, through a natural orifice, such as the mouth, vagina, urethra or rectum, what provides the access to the desired organ. The procedure is approved due to its benefits - less pain, quicker recoveries, fewer complications and no scar - as it lets us avoid major incisions through the skin, muscle and nerves of the abdomen. Besides that the transluminal access is considered to be the most safe and feasible for clinical application. Here are discussed the two operations of Transvaginal Appendectomy performed in Caucasus - Academician N. Kipshidze University Hospital in Tbilisi. The first patient - a 28-year woman, weight - 72 kg, height - 180 cm, married, has one child - was submitted to the hospital with anamnesis of 48 hours acute appendicitis, typical clinical semiotics and laboratory records. In the second case the patient was a 22-year old woman, height - 170 cm, weight - 68 kg, married, with 2 children. She was hospitalized with 24 hours acute appendicitis anamnesis and typical clinical semiotics and laboratory records. Both operations were performed under general anesthesia, using Karl Storz GmbH & Co. equipment. The duration of the first procedure was 76 minutes and the second operation lasted for 88 minutes. The operations were made without any technical difficulties or complications. None of the patients had the need of non-narcotic analgesia during the post-operational period. No gynecological or surgical problems or any complications were detected during the observation period. The patients had superior postoperative evolution, so the stationary stay made up 36 hours after the first operation and 30 hours after the second. Essentially NOTES is a new trend in endoscopic surgery - the non-scar surgery with major advantages compared to the conventional - the NOTES takes endoscopic surgery one step further in

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  13. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Bauder, Markus; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Management of subepithelial tumors (SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection of SET arising from deeper layers of the gastrointestinal wall requires advanced endoscopic methods and harbours the risk of perforation. Innovative techniques such as submucosal tunneling and full thickness resection have expanded the frontiers of endoscopic therapy in the past years. This review will give an overview about endoscopic resection techniques of SET with a focus on novel methods. PMID:25512768

  14. Endoscopic treatment of oesophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Krige, J E; Bornman, P C

    2000-12-01

    Major variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. Therapy for bleeding may be difficult and requires expertise and appropriate facilities. Endoscopic therapy using either injection sclerotherapy or band ligation after adequate resuscitation and diagnostic endoscopy is the preferred first-line treatment. Bleeding not controlled by initial endoscopic therapy requires balloon tamponade followed by repeat variceal ligation or sclerotherapy. Patients who continue to bleed after endoscopic therapy are best treated with percutaneous radiological transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent (TIPSS) insertion. After variceal eradication, patients require lifelong surveillance endoscopy and re-obliteration of varices by endoscopic therapy if they recur. Beta-blockers to prevent recurrent bleeding are reserved for selected patients. Patients with severe liver decompensation have a poor prognosis and should be evaluated for liver transplantation. Prophylactic endoscopic therapy in patients who have never bled from varices is contraindicated as it is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:11424860

  15. Aspects of computer vision in surgical endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Vincent; Ayache, Alain; Berreni, N.

    1993-09-01

    This work is related to a project of medical robotics applied to surgical endoscopy, led in collaboration with Doctor Berreni from the Saint Roch nursing-home in Perpignan, France). After taking what Doctor Berreni advises, two aspects of endoscopic color image processing have been brought out: (1) The help to the diagnosis by the automatic detection of the sick areas after a learning phase. (2) The 3D reconstruction of the analyzed cavity by using a zoom.

  16. Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The objective was to prove the advantage of endoscopic laser-urethroplasty over internal urethrotomy in acquired urethral strictures. Patients and Method: From January, 1996 to June, 2005, 35 patients with a mean age of 66 years were submitted to endoscopic laser-urethroplasty for strictures of either the bulbar (30) or membranous (5) urethra. The operations were carried out under general anesthesia. First of all, the strictures were incised at the 4, 8 and 12 o'clock position by means of a Sachse-urethrotom. Then the scar flap between the 4 and 8 o'clock position was vaporized using a Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1060 nm and a 600 pm bare fiber, the latter always being in contact with the tissue. The laser worked at 40W power in continuous mode. The total energy averaged 2574 J. An indwelling catheter was kept in place overnight and the patients were discharged the following day. Urinalysis, uroflowmetry and clinical examination were performed at two months after surgery and from then on every six months. Results: No serious complications were encountered. Considering a mean follow-up of 18 months, the average peak flow improved from 7.3 ml/s preoperatively to 18.7 mVs postoperatively. The treatment faded in 5 patients ( 14.3% ) who finally underwent open urethroplasty. Conclusions: Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty yields better short-term results than internal visual urethrotomy. Long-term follow-up has yet to confirm its superiority in the treatment of acquired urethral strictures.

  17. Endoscopic extraperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Hourlay, P; Vangertruyden, G; Verduyckt, F; Trimpeneers, F; Hendrickx, J

    1995-05-01

    From June 24, 1993, until November 9, 1993, eight sympathectomies were performed by extraperitoneal endoscopy for treatment of Sudeck atrophy. Seventy-five percent of the patients were satisfied with the result of the intervention. A follow-up after 4 months shows that four patients are free of pain. Two are satisfied, but some pain remains. In two cases, the intensity of the pain remains unchanged but the character of the pain has changed. This new technique is safe and offers the well-known advantages of minimal invasive surgery. Moreover, this endoscopic approach opens perspectives for the exploration of the entire retroperitoneum. PMID:7545831

  18. Therapeutic Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology has evolved dramatically over the past 20 years, from being a supplementary diagnostic aid available only in large medical centers to being a core diagnostic and therapeutic tool that is widely available. Although formal recommendations and practice guidelines have not been developed, there are considerable data supporting the use of EUS for its technical accuracy in diagnosing pancreaticobiliary and gastrointestinal pathology. Endosonography is now routine practice not only for pathologic diagnosis and tumor staging but also for drainage of cystic lesions and celiac plexus neurolysis. In this article, we cover the use of EUS in biliary and pancreatic intervention, ablative therapy, enterostomy, and vascular intervention. PMID:27118942

  19. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  20. Hydatid Cyst Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Castro-Poças, F; Araújo, Tarcísio; Coelho, André; Silva, Donzilia; Pedroto, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with unremarkable past history underwent endoscopy for dyspepsia. She denied weight loss or anorexia. Upper endoscopy revealed a bulge in the lesser curvature and posterior wall of the stomach with 4-5 cm. Endoscopic ultrasound was performed which showed a heterogeneous lesion, anechogenic in the major part, with a floating membrane inside, the greatest diameter of 90.8 × 17.2 mm, originated in the left liver lobe. Surgical resection was performed. Pathologic examination revealed a cystic lesion with an acellular thick fibrous wall, surrounded by a conspicuous inflammatory reaction. The cyst wall revealed a characteristic lamellar pattern of the fibers. In the internal surface of the lesion, there were remains of membranous structures, amidst which a vestigial Protoscolex was noted. In the presented case, a floating membrane was observed, which is a pathognomonic feature, establishing the diagnosis of hydatid cyst type 3. Fine needle aspiration guided by ultrasound was not performed due to the certainty in the diagnosis. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first images by endoscopic ultrasound of hydatid cyst of liver presented as a bulge in the stomach with pathognomonic features, which allowed the definitive diagnosis with no need for further diagnostic tests. PMID:27446863

  1. Laparoscopic-Assisted Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Adarsh M; Sedarat, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    There are a variety of techniques for gastrostomy tube placement. Endoscopic and radiologic approaches have almost entirely superseded surgical placement. However, an aging population and significant advancements in modern healthcare have resulted in patients with increasingly complex medical issues or postsurgical anatomy. The rising prevalence of obesity has also created technical challenges for proceduralists of many specialties. When patients with these comorbidities develop the need for long-term enteral nutrition and feeding tube placement, standard approaches such as percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) by endoscopists and percutaneous image-guided gastrostomy (PIG) by interventional radiologists may be technically difficult or impossible. For these challenging situations, laparoscopic-assisted PEG (LAPEG) is an alternative option. LAPEG combines the advantages of PEG with direct intraperitoneal visualization, helping ensure a safe tube placement tract free of intervening organs or structures. In this review, we highlight some of the important factors of first-line gastrostomy techniques, with an emphasis on the utility and procedural technique of LAPEG when they are not feasible. PMID:27422123

  2. Endoscopes integrated into instruments for spinal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, E.; Hollinger, Jeffrey O.; Winn, Shelley R.

    2000-06-01

    With minimally invasive approaches the visual path to guide instruments becomes constricted. Often one is unable to visualize adequately interaction of the instrument with tissue. We have incorporated 1.2-mm diameter 10,000 pixel fiberoptic endoscopes into instruments for spinal surgery. With these instruments one has a direct view of the instrument's interaction with the surgical anatomy. We have studied a variety of endoscopic instruments including malleable forceps, retractors and punches in over 40 cases of lateral disc herniations, migrated disc fragments and spinal stenosis. The instruments provided excellent visualization of spinal structures. The size and effect of the pathologic process could be readily evaluated, as could neural decompression. Operative times were not significantly increased and there were no complications attributable to the instruments. This preliminary work documents that 'seeing instruments' can be safely used and add to our appreciation of operative anatomy. It is suggested that these instruments may provide more complete decompression through a more limited, less invasive, access. Further study of these instruments may provide better understanding of their overall utility.

  3. Endoscopic management of polypoid early colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, C B; Saunders, B P; Talbot, I C

    2000-09-01

    Endoscopic management of polypoid early colonic cancer (malignant polyps and polypoid carcinomas) is no longer controversial. When the endoscopist is satisfied that excision is complete and histology is "favorable" (a resection margin of 2 mm and well or moderately well differentiated tumor), surgery is unnecessary. When histology show "unfavorable" characteristics (which a few histologists still take to include invasion into lymphatics), surgical or laparoscopic resection may be indicated, providing the patient is considered at suitable risk. Surgery kills some patients without finding residual cancer and cannot save others with metastases, so it should be recommended only with due clinical consideration. Sessile or broad-based polyps, especially those in the rectum, are more likely to be "high risk" and merit specialist management if local removal is to be attempted and to allow proper histologic assessment. Endoscopic approaches such as saline injection polypectomy, india-ink tattooing, and use of the argon beam coagulator are applicable in some cases. New approaches that still require trials include ultrasonographic probes, which occasionally clarify the degree of invasion, and prototype stapling devices to allow full-thickness histologic specimens to be obtained. PMID:11036280

  4. Hemostasis in Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Guimaraes, Francisco; Su, Shirley Y; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Eric W; Snyderman, Carl H; Gardner, Paul A

    2015-08-01

    William Halsted established the basic principles of modern surgical technique highlighting the importance of meticulous hemostasis and careful tissue handling. These concepts hold true today and are even more critical for endoscopic visualization, making hemostasis one of the most relevant cornerstones for the safe practice of endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES) of the skull base. During preoperative assessment, patients at higher risk for serious hemorrhagic complications must be recognized. From an anatomical point of view, EES can be grossly divided in two major components: sinonasal surgery and sellar-cranial base surgery. This division affects the choice of appropriate technique for control of bleeding that relies mainly on the source of hemorrhage, the tissue involved, and the proximity of critical neurovascular structures. Pistol-grip or single-shaft instruments constitute the most important and appropriately designed instruments available for EES. Electrocoagulation and a variety of hemostatic materials are also important tools and should be applied wisely. This article describes the experience of our team in the management of hemorrhagic events during EES with an emphasis on technical nuances. PMID:26225320

  5. Hydatid Cyst Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Poças, F.; Araújo, Tarcísio; Coelho, André; Silva, Donzilia; Pedroto, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with unremarkable past history underwent endoscopy for dyspepsia. She denied weight loss or anorexia. Upper endoscopy revealed a bulge in the lesser curvature and posterior wall of the stomach with 4-5 cm. Endoscopic ultrasound was performed which showed a heterogeneous lesion, anechogenic in the major part, with a floating membrane inside, the greatest diameter of 90.8 × 17.2 mm, originated in the left liver lobe. Surgical resection was performed. Pathologic examination revealed a cystic lesion with an acellular thick fibrous wall, surrounded by a conspicuous inflammatory reaction. The cyst wall revealed a characteristic lamellar pattern of the fibers. In the internal surface of the lesion, there were remains of membranous structures, amidst which a vestigial Protoscolex was noted. In the presented case, a floating membrane was observed, which is a pathognomonic feature, establishing the diagnosis of hydatid cyst type 3. Fine needle aspiration guided by ultrasound was not performed due to the certainty in the diagnosis. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first images by endoscopic ultrasound of hydatid cyst of liver presented as a bulge in the stomach with pathognomonic features, which allowed the definitive diagnosis with no need for further diagnostic tests. PMID:27446863

  6. Minimally invasive surgical training: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Pierorazio, Phillip M; Allaf, Mohamad E

    2009-01-01

    Treatment options for urological malignancies continue to increase and include endoscopic, laparoscopic, robotic, and image-guided percutaneous techniques. This ever expanding array of technically demanding management options coupled with a static training paradigm introduces challenges to training the urological oncologist of the future. Minimally invasive learning opportunities continue to evolve, and include an intensive experience during residency, postgraduate short courses or mini-apprenticeships, and full time fellowship programs. Incorporation of large animal surgery and surgical simulators may help shorten the necessary learning curve. Ultimately, programs must provide an intense hands-on experience to trainees in all minimally invasive surgical aspects for optimal training. PMID:19285236

  7. Surgical Technologists

    MedlinePlus

    ... in place during the procedure, or set up robotic surgical equipment. Technologists also may handle specimens taken ... sterilization techniques, how to set up technical or robotic equipment, and preventing and controlling infections. In addition ...

  8. Surgical Mesh

    MedlinePlus

    ... Device Safety Safety Communications Surgical Mesh: FDA Safety Communication Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Prolapse and Stress Urinary Incontinence More in Safety Communications Information About Heparin Preventing Tubing and Luer Misconnections ...

  9. Endoscopic therapy for weight loss: Gastroplasty, duodenal sleeves, intragastric balloons, and aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm in the treatment of obesity and metabolic disease is developing. The global obesity epidemic continues to expand despite the availability of diet and lifestyle counseling, pharmacologic therapy, and weight loss surgery. Endoscopic procedures have the potential to bridge the gap between medical therapy and surgery. Current primary endoscopic bariatric therapies can be classified as restrictive, bypass, space-occupying, or aspiration therapy. Restrictive procedures include the USGI Primary Obesity Surgery Endolumenal procedure, endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty using Apollo OverStitch, TransOral GAstroplasty, gastric volume reduction using the ACE stapler, and insertion of the TERIS restrictive device. Intestinal bypass has been reported using the EndoBarrier duodenal-jejunal bypass liner. A number of space-occupying devices have been studied or are in use, including intragastric balloons (Orbera, Reshape Duo, Heliosphere BAG, Obalon), Transpyloric Shuttle, and SatiSphere. The AspireAssist aspiration system has demonstrated efficacy. Finally, endoscopic revision of gastric bypass to address weight regain has been studied using Apollo OverStitch, the USGI Incisionless Operating Platform Revision Obesity Surgery Endolumenal procedure, Stomaphyx, and endoscopic sclerotherapy. Endoscopic therapies for weight loss are potentially reversible, repeatable, less invasive, and lower cost than various medical and surgical alternatives. Given the variety of devices under development, in clinical trials, and currently in use, patients will have multiple endoscopic options with greater efficacy than medical therapy, and with lower invasiveness and greater accessibility than surgery. PMID:26240686

  10. Endoscopic therapy for weight loss: Gastroplasty, duodenal sleeves, intragastric balloons, and aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin

    2015-07-25

    A new paradigm in the treatment of obesity and metabolic disease is developing. The global obesity epidemic continues to expand despite the availability of diet and lifestyle counseling, pharmacologic therapy, and weight loss surgery. Endoscopic procedures have the potential to bridge the gap between medical therapy and surgery. Current primary endoscopic bariatric therapies can be classified as restrictive, bypass, space-occupying, or aspiration therapy. Restrictive procedures include the USGI Primary Obesity Surgery Endolumenal procedure, endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty using Apollo OverStitch, TransOral GAstroplasty, gastric volume reduction using the ACE stapler, and insertion of the TERIS restrictive device. Intestinal bypass has been reported using the EndoBarrier duodenal-jejunal bypass liner. A number of space-occupying devices have been studied or are in use, including intragastric balloons (Orbera, Reshape Duo, Heliosphere BAG, Obalon), Transpyloric Shuttle, and SatiSphere. The AspireAssist aspiration system has demonstrated efficacy. Finally, endoscopic revision of gastric bypass to address weight regain has been studied using Apollo OverStitch, the USGI Incisionless Operating Platform Revision Obesity Surgery Endolumenal procedure, Stomaphyx, and endoscopic sclerotherapy. Endoscopic therapies for weight loss are potentially reversible, repeatable, less invasive, and lower cost than various medical and surgical alternatives. Given the variety of devices under development, in clinical trials, and currently in use, patients will have multiple endoscopic options with greater efficacy than medical therapy, and with lower invasiveness and greater accessibility than surgery. PMID:26240686

  11. Early experience in endoscopic management of massive intraventricular hemorrhage with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Raj, Jason; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2014-01-01

    Massive intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is nearly always associated with hydrocephalus and is often treated with prolonged external ventricular drainage (EVD); however this procedure can lead to bacterial ventriculitis and meningitis, which can worsen the clinical outcomes. Endoscopic burr hole surgery to remove the hematomas in lateral and third ventricles is an alternative treatment option. We describe the surgical techniques and benefits of endoscopic surgery for acute massive IVH in four patients and discuss the current published literature-related to this condition. Four patients were treated endoscopically for massive IVH. Three patients presented with secondary IVH due to vascular malformation, tumoral bleed and chronic hypertension, while one case presented as massive primary IVH. Endoscopic wash out and removal of hematomas was normally performed together with an endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Recombinant factor VIIa was only administered prior to surgery for IVH secondary to vascular malformation and for cases with postoperative rebleeding which required second endoscopic surgery. Weaning from ventilator and EVD commenced on day 4 postoperatively. All treated patients recovered and did not require further shunt surgery. Good outcomes obtained may be related to early removal of hematomas, creation of new cerebrospinal fluid diversion pathway after thorough wash-out, early weaning from ventilator and EVD. Endoscopic surgery is beneficial in treating poor grade IVH with Graeb score of more than 6. PMID:25685202

  12. Endoscopic treatment of mandibular condylar fractures in live minipigs: benefits of the operative learning curve.

    PubMed

    Foletti, Jean-Marc; Bruneau, Stéphane; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Berdah, Stéphane V; Guyot, Laurent

    2013-10-01

    Endoscopic treatment of mandibular condyle fractures is a minimally invasive technique that avoids the complications of open reduction and internal fixation. We have used live minipigs as an animal model for learning and training the technique. Fourteen condylar fractures were created, reduced, and internally plated in 7 minipigs using an endoscopic approach by a surgeon with no previous experience of the technique. The mandibles were reduced and fixed successfully in each animal. Operating time was reduced as the surgeon became more familiar with the technique. Minipigs are useful as a model for the endoscopic approach to the treatment of mandibular condylar fractures. Surgeons have the opportunity to train and gain surgical endoscopic experience before treating patients. PMID:23246351

  13. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery: what indications in 2013?

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Mario; Allaix, Marco E.

    2013-01-01

    Thanks to major advances in the field of surgical techniques and neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, along with more accurate pre-operative staging tools and the widespread introduction of population-based screening programs, treatment of rectal cancer has been evolving over the past few decades, moving towards a more tailored approach. This has brought a shift in the treatment algorithm of benign rectal lesions and selected early rectal cancers, for which today transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) is accepted as an effective alternative to abdominal surgery. In 2013, topics of controversy are the role of TEM in the treatment of more advanced rectal cancers, in cases of complete pathological response after chemoradiation therapy and the role of TEM as a platform for single-port surgery and NOTES. This article reviews the current indications for TEM and the future perspectives of this approach in the treatment of rectal tumors. PMID:24759812

  14. Endoscopic Resection of the Bicipitoradial Bursa.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit; Pan, Xiao Hua

    2016-03-01

    The bicipitoradial bursa lies at the insertion of the biceps tendon on the radial tuberosity. It is an unusual site for chronic bursitis. It can be treated conservatively with aspiration and steroid injection. Surgical excision of the bursa is indicated in case of infection cause, failed conservative treatment with recurrence of the enlarged bursa and pain after aspiration, the presence of nerve compression with neurological impairment, mechanical limitation to flexion and extension of the elbow or biceps tendon degeneration, and/or functional impairment. Open resection through the anterior approach requires extensive dissection to expose the radial tuberosity and the radial neck, which increases the risk of neurovascular injury. Endoscopic resection is possible through distal biceps tendoscopy and endoscopy around the radial neck. It is technically demanding and should be reserved to the experienced elbow arthroscopist. PMID:26752772

  15. Endoscopic thyroidectomy: retroauricular approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh Young; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Jung, Kwang-Yoong

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has abruptly increased recently, with a female predominance. Conventional thyroidectomy using transcervical incision inevitably leaves an unfavorable neck scar; therefore, various extracervical approaches have been introduced to improve cosmetic satisfaction after thyroidectomy. Several reports demonstrated that these extracervical approaches have advantages not only in terms of cosmesis but also in terms of surgical outcomes and postoperative functional preservation. The retroauricular approach has advantages as the dissection area is smaller than that in the transaxillary approach (TA) and surgical anatomy is familiar to the head and neck surgeons. In addition, there is no concern about paresthesia around the nipple or anterior chest, and surgical direction makes central neck dissection easier than with the other extracervical approaches. Herein, we aim to introduce the surgical procedure of retroauricular approach thyroidectomy and present our experiences of postoperative outcomes. PMID:27294041

  16. Endoscopic thyroidectomy: retroauricular approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Doh Young; Baek, Seung-Kuk

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has abruptly increased recently, with a female predominance. Conventional thyroidectomy using transcervical incision inevitably leaves an unfavorable neck scar; therefore, various extracervical approaches have been introduced to improve cosmetic satisfaction after thyroidectomy. Several reports demonstrated that these extracervical approaches have advantages not only in terms of cosmesis but also in terms of surgical outcomes and postoperative functional preservation. The retroauricular approach has advantages as the dissection area is smaller than that in the transaxillary approach (TA) and surgical anatomy is familiar to the head and neck surgeons. In addition, there is no concern about paresthesia around the nipple or anterior chest, and surgical direction makes central neck dissection easier than with the other extracervical approaches. Herein, we aim to introduce the surgical procedure of retroauricular approach thyroidectomy and present our experiences of postoperative outcomes. PMID:27294041

  17. Hybrid Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery with Sentinel Lymph Node Navigation for Deep Early Gastric Cancer in the Fundic Region

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon Suk; Kim, Seong Hwan; Ryu, Hee Yun; Cho, Young Kwan; Jo, Yun Ju; Son, Tae il; Hong, Young Ok

    2016-01-01

    For patients refusing surgical treatment for deep early gastric cancer, hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery with sentinel lymph node navigation is a potential treatment option, particularly when the anatomic location of the cancer has low probability of lymph node metastasis. We report a case of deep early gastric cancer of the fundus beyond the endoscopic submucosal dissection indication that was treated by hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery with sentinel lymph node navigation. In a conventional approach, a total gastrectomy would have been needed; however, the patient refused surgical intervention. In this case, since the patient showed no positivity of the sentinel lymph node on intraoperative navigation, laparoscopic basin lymph node dissection was not performed. Hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery might be considered for specific regions such as the safety zone where lymph node metastases are less likely to occur. PMID:27020308

  18. Endoscopic Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Titus D.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective: Endoscopic neck surgery for the thyroid and parathyroid is being tested as an alternative to open thyroidectomy. The aim of this study was to determine the safety and feasibility of endoscopic transaxillary total thyroidectomy (ETTT). Methods and Results: Twenty-two consecutive patients from January 2006 to September 2008 underwent ETTT. No conversions to open were necessary. Mean age was 49.3±12.9 years, 20 were female, and 2 were male. Mean operating time was 238 minutes±72.7. Mean blood loss was 40mL±28.3mL. Mean weight of the gland was 137.05g±129.21g. The recurrent laryngeal nerve was identified with no permanent injury. Six patients developed hoarseness of the voice for a mean of 15.1±8.01 days. No patient developed tetany or hypocalcemia requiring treatment. Six patients experienced transient numbness in the anterior chest wall lasting 2 weeks in 5 patients and 2 months in one. All patients were discharged within 24 hours of admission. Conclusion: ETTT requires additional operative time compared with the open approach, but is cosmetically favorable. Visualization of the nerve and parathyroid is much better. Although the learning curve is steep, with experience the operative time will decrease. ETTT is different but safe and feasible. PMID:20202393

  19. Transforaminal endoscopic surgery for lumbar stenosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nellensteijn, Jorm; Bartels, Ronald; Peul, Wilco; van Royen, Barend; van Tulder, Maurits

    2010-01-01

    Transforaminal endoscopic techniques have become increasingly popular in surgery of patients with lumbar stenosis. The literature has not yet been systematically reviewed. A comprehensive systematic literature review up to November 2009 to assess the effectiveness of transforaminal endoscopic surgery in patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis was made. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts and relevant full text articles for inclusion criteria. Included articles were assessed for quality, and relevant data, including outcomes, were extracted by two reviewers independently. No randomized controlled trials were identified, but seven observational studies. The studies were of poor methodological quality and heterogeneous regarding patient selection, indications, operation techniques, follow-up period and outcome measures. Overall, 69–83% reported the outcome as satisfactory and a complication rate of 0–8.3%. The reported re-operation rate varied from 0 to 20%. At present, there is no valid evidence from randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of transforaminal endoscopic surgery for lumbar stenosis. Randomized controlled trials comparing transforaminal endoscopic surgery with other surgical techniques are direly needed. PMID:20087610

  20. Implementation of real-time digital endoscopic image processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chul Gyu; Lee, Young Mook; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Won Ky; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Myoung Ho

    1997-10-01

    Endoscopy has become a crucial diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in clinical areas. Over the past four years, we have developed a computerized system to record and store clinical data pertaining to endoscopic surgery of laparascopic cholecystectomy, pelviscopic endometriosis, and surgical arthroscopy. In this study, we developed a computer system, which is composed of a frame grabber, a sound board, a VCR control board, a LAN card and EDMS. Also, computer system controls peripheral instruments such as a color video printer, a video cassette recorder, and endoscopic input/output signals. Digital endoscopic data management system is based on open architecture and a set of widely available industry standards; namely Microsoft Windows as an operating system, TCP/IP as a network protocol and a time sequential database that handles both images and speech. For the purpose of data storage, we used MOD and CD- R. Digital endoscopic system was designed to be able to store, recreate, change, and compress signals and medical images. Computerized endoscopy enables us to generate and manipulate the original visual document, making it accessible to a virtually unlimited number of physicians.

  1. Endoscopic treatment of the isolated sphenoid sinus lesions.

    PubMed

    Castelnuovo, Paolo; Pagella, Fabio; Semino, Lucia; De Bernardi, Francesca; Delù, Giovanni

    2005-02-01

    Presenting symptoms of the isolated sphenoid sinus lesion are often vague and non-specific. Diagnostic nasal endoscopy procedures and imaging techniques are of great value for an early and precise diagnosis. Moreover, endoscopic sinus surgery is a safe and effective technique that allows a direct route to the sphenoid sinus. Because of its close vicinity to important and vulnerable structures of the skull base, delay in diagnosis and treatment can be potentially lethal. Endoscopically controlled procedures for the sphenoid sinus provide the surgeon with an obvious alternative to the traditional approaches. From November 1994 to May 2001 the authors operated on 41 patients with isolated sphenoid lesions. The pathology spectrum was rather wide and included 11 cases of isolated fungal sinusitis, 10 mucoceles, 7 bacterial sinusitis, 7 cerebrospinal fluid leaks, 3 inverted papillomas, 1 chondrosarcoma, 1 ossifying fibroma and 1 foreign body. The sphenoid sinus was the only sinus involved, and lesions arising from adjacent tissues were excluded. In this paper, the authors present clinical symptoms, endoscopic findings and imaging data as well as endoscopic surgical techniques for the treatment of sphenoid sinus disease. PMID:15060830

  2. Role of endoscopic clipping in the treatment of oesophageal perforations

    PubMed Central

    Lázár, György; Paszt, Attila; Mán, Eszter

    2016-01-01

    With advances in endoscopic technologies, endoscopic clips have been used widely and successfully in the treatment of various types of oesophageal perforations, anastomosis leakages and fistulas. Our aim was to summarize the experience with two types of clips: The through-the-scope (TTS) clip and the over-the-scope clip (OTSC). We summarized the results of oesophageal perforation closure with endoscopic clips. We processed the data from 38 articles and 127 patients using PubMed search. Based on evidence thus far, it can be stated that both clips can be used in the treatment of early (< 24 h), iatrogenic, spontaneous oesophageal perforations in the case of limited injury or contamination. TTS clips are efficacious in the treatment of 10 mm lesions, while bigger (< 20 mm) lesions can be treated successfully with OTSC clips, whose effectiveness is similar to that of surgical treatment. However, the clinical success rate is significantly lower in the case of fistulas and in the treatment of anastomosis insufficiency. Tough prospective randomized multicentre trials, which produce the largest amount of evidence, are still missing. Based on experience so far, endoscopic clips represent a possible therapeutic alternative to surgery in the treatment of oesophageal perforations under well-defined conditions. PMID:26788259

  3. Endoscope-Assisted Enucleation of Mandibular Odontogenic Keratocyst Tumors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Antonio; Orabona, Giovanni D A; Abbate, Vincenzo; Maglitto, Fabio; Solari, Domenico; Iaconetta, Giorgio; Califano, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    The keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT) represents a rare and benign but locally aggressive developmental cystic lesion usually affecting the posterior aspect of the mandible bone, the treatment of which has always been raising debate, since Philipsen first described it as a distinct pathological entity in 1956.Recent studies have proposed the use of endoscope-assisted surgical technique, due to the possibility given by the endoscope of improving the effectiveness of the treatment of these lesions thanks to a better visualization of operative field and though a better understanding of the pathology. In this article, we would like to present our experience with the endoscope-assisted treatment of KCOT of the posterior region of the mandible.From April 2000 to April 2012, 32 patients treated for KCOT were enrolled in our retrospective study: patients were divided in 2 groups according to the type of treatment, that is, 18 were treated with traditional enucleation surgery (TES), and 14 patients underwent endoscopic assisted enucleation surgery (EES).Fischer exact test and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare the outcomes between the 2 focusing on the recurrence and complication rates. In the TES group, patients we found a higher recurrence rate (39%) and higher postoperative complication rate at 5-year follow-up.Our data suggested, though, that EES seems to be a feasible alternative for the treatment of posterior mandibular KCOT. Further studies and larger series are needed to confirm these results. PMID:27607111

  4. Role of endoscopic clipping in the treatment of oesophageal perforations.

    PubMed

    Lázár, György; Paszt, Attila; Mán, Eszter

    2016-01-10

    With advances in endoscopic technologies, endoscopic clips have been used widely and successfully in the treatment of various types of oesophageal perforations, anastomosis leakages and fistulas. Our aim was to summarize the experience with two types of clips: The through-the-scope (TTS) clip and the over-the-scope clip (OTSC). We summarized the results of oesophageal perforation closure with endoscopic clips. We processed the data from 38 articles and 127 patients using PubMed search. Based on evidence thus far, it can be stated that both clips can be used in the treatment of early (< 24 h), iatrogenic, spontaneous oesophageal perforations in the case of limited injury or contamination. TTS clips are efficacious in the treatment of 10 mm lesions, while bigger (< 20 mm) lesions can be treated successfully with OTSC clips, whose effectiveness is similar to that of surgical treatment. However, the clinical success rate is significantly lower in the case of fistulas and in the treatment of anastomosis insufficiency. Tough prospective randomized multicentre trials, which produce the largest amount of evidence, are still missing. Based on experience so far, endoscopic clips represent a possible therapeutic alternative to surgery in the treatment of oesophageal perforations under well-defined conditions. PMID:26788259

  5. [Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery: current situation].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Salvadora; Ibarzábal, Ainitze; Fernández-Esparrach, Glòria

    2008-10-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is the paradigm of the evolution of minimally invasive surgery. The laparoscopic has introduced new ideas in general surgery, one of them being that modern surgery is the work of multidisciplinary teams. A clear example of this is provided by NOTES. The aim of this type of surgery is to perform conventional laparoscopic procedures without incision, using flexible endoscopic technology usually employed in the diagnosis and treatment of intraluminal lesions and reaching the inside of the abdominal cavity through natural orifices (mouth, anus, vagina and even urethra). This type of access opens a highly interesting field for certain types of patients, such as those with high surgical risk, the morbidly obese, and those with multiple prior abdominal interventions or surgical wound infections. Animal models have shown that a wide variety of interventions (cholecystectomy, appendicectomy, splenectomy, hysterectomy, tubal ligations, gastroenteroanastomosis, peritoneoscopy, liver biopsy and herniorrhaphy, among others) can be performed. However, before use in humans, this new technique must be shown to be safe and to provide real advantages for patients. To do this, a series of issues, including safe methods for closure of the gastric incision and the avoidance of infections, among others, must be solved. Another critical element for the development of this new type of surgery is the creation of appropriate instrumentation, requiring input not only from medical professionals but also from engineers and industry. The present article describes the major advances made in NOTES since this technique was first described and analyzes the risks and potential benefits associated with this novel procedure. PMID:18928752

  6. Fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT and endoscopic video for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Prisman, E.; Vescan, A.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Weersink, R.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2010-02-01

    Methods for accurate registration and fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) with endoscopic video have been developed and integrated into a system for surgical guidance that accounts for intraoperative anatomical deformation and tissue excision. The system is based on a prototype mobile C-Arm for intraoperative CBCT that provides low-dose 3D image updates on demand with sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility, and also incorporates subsystems for real-time tracking and navigation, video endoscopy, deformable image registration of preoperative images and surgical plans, and 3D visualization software. The position and pose of the endoscope are geometrically registered to 3D CBCT images by way of real-time optical tracking (NDI Polaris) for rigid endoscopes (e.g., head and neck surgery), and electromagnetic tracking (NDI Aurora) for flexible endoscopes (e.g., bronchoscopes, colonoscopes). The intrinsic (focal length, principal point, non-linear distortion) and extrinsic (translation, rotation) parameters of the endoscopic camera are calibrated from images of a planar calibration checkerboard (2.5×2.5 mm2 squares) obtained at different perspectives. Video-CBCT registration enables a variety of 3D visualization options (e.g., oblique CBCT slices at the endoscope tip, augmentation of video with CBCT images and planning data, virtual reality representations of CBCT [surface renderings]), which can reveal anatomical structures not directly visible in the endoscopic view - e.g., critical structures obscured by blood or behind the visible anatomical surface. Video-CBCT fusion is evaluated in pre-clinical sinus and skull base surgical experiments, and is currently being incorporated into an ongoing prospective clinical trial in CBCT-guided head and neck surgery.

  7. Thoracoscopy: a collaborative surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Brand, A F

    1995-07-01

    Perioperative nurses, surgeons, anesthesiologists, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and pharmacists are meeting the challenge of decreasing thoracic surgical patients' length of hospital stay with thoracoscopy. This innovative alternative to traditional thoracotomy procedures has been achieved through an attentive team approach using the fundamental perioperative skills of assessment, positioning, safety, and sharing of knowledge. PMID:7647761

  8. Giant Petrous Bone Cholesteatoma: Combined Microscopic Surgery and an Adjuvant Endoscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Savastano, Ersilia; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Re, Massimo; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Petrous bone cholesteatomas (PBCs) are epidermoid cysts, which have developed in the petrous portion of the temporal bone and may be congenital or acquired. Cholesteatomas arising in this region have a tendency to invade bone and functional structures and the middle and posterior fossae reaching an extensive size. Traditionally, surgery of a giant PBC contemplates lateral transtemporal or middle fossa microscopic surgery; however, in recent years, endoscopic surgical techniques (primary or complementary endoscopic approach) are starting to receive a greater consensus for middle ear and mastoid surgeries. We report the rare case of an 83-year-old Caucasian male affected by a giant cholesteatoma that eroded the labyrinth and the posterior fossa dura and extended to the infralabyrinthine region, going beyond the theca and reaching the first cervical vertebra. The giant cholesteatoma was managed through a combined approach (microscopic and, subsequently, complementary endoscopic approach). In this case report, we illustrate some advantages of this surgical choice. PMID:26937334

  9. Giant Petrous Bone Cholesteatoma: Combined Microscopic Surgery and an Adjuvant Endoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Iannella, Giannicola; Savastano, Ersilia; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Re, Massimo; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Petrous bone cholesteatomas (PBCs) are epidermoid cysts, which have developed in the petrous portion of the temporal bone and may be congenital or acquired. Cholesteatomas arising in this region have a tendency to invade bone and functional structures and the middle and posterior fossae reaching an extensive size. Traditionally, surgery of a giant PBC contemplates lateral transtemporal or middle fossa microscopic surgery; however, in recent years, endoscopic surgical techniques (primary or complementary endoscopic approach) are starting to receive a greater consensus for middle ear and mastoid surgeries. We report the rare case of an 83-year-old Caucasian male affected by a giant cholesteatoma that eroded the labyrinth and the posterior fossa dura and extended to the infralabyrinthine region, going beyond the theca and reaching the first cervical vertebra. The giant cholesteatoma was managed through a combined approach (microscopic and, subsequently, complementary endoscopic approach). In this case report, we illustrate some advantages of this surgical choice. PMID:26937334

  10. Is Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection the Option for Early Gastric Cancer Patients with Contraindication to Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Said; Coriat, Romain; Audard, Virginie; Leblanc, Sarah; Prat, Frederic; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2010-01-01

    Surgical therapy is the traditional approach for early gastric cancer. Patients with comorbidities cannot benefit from this treatment because of high surgical morbidities and mortalities. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is a new technique for complete en bloc resection of early gastric cancer. We report the case of a patient with severe cardiomyopathy who developed early gastric cancer without metastases present on CT scan. The patient underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection because of the high risk associated to surgery due to severe comorbidity. The patient had complete submucosal dissection with complete en bloc resection. The lateral and deep margins were free of cancerous cells based on histopathology study. The patient was controlled every 6 months for 30 months by endoscopy. Systematic biopsies were done. No recurrences were diagnosed. This report supports the application of endoscopic treatment for patients with early gastric cancer and at high risk for surgery due to comorbidities. PMID:21060691

  11. Danger points, complications and medico-legal aspects in endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hosemann, W.; Draf, C.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery represents the overall accepted type of surgical treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis. Notwithstanding raised and still evolving quality standards, surgeons performing routine endoscopic interventions are faced with minor complications in 5% and major complications in 0.5–1%. A comprehensive review on all minor and major complications of endoscopic surgery of the paranasal sinuses and also on the anterior skull base is presented listing the actual scientific literature. The pathogenesis, signs and symptoms of each complication are reviewed and therapeutic regimens are discussed in detail relating to actual publication references. Potential medico-legal aspects are explicated and recent algorithms of avoidance are mentioned taking into account options in surgical training and education. PMID:24403974

  12. Delayed perforation after endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer: Clinical features and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Takafumi; Tanabe, Satoshi; Ishido, Kenji; Azuma, Mizutomo; Wada, Takuya; Suzuki, Mizuto; Kawanishi, Natsuko; Yamane, Sakiko; Sasaki, Tohru; Katada, Chikatoshi; Mikami, Tetsuo; Katada, Natsuya; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2016-01-01

    Perforation is an important procedural complication of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer. Although the incidence of delayed perforation after ESD is low, extreme caution is necessary because many cases require surgical intervention. Among 1984 lesions of early gastric cancer treated in our hospital by ESD in 1588 patients from September 2002 through March 2015, delayed perforation developed in 4 patients (4 lesions, 0.25%). A diagnosis of delayed perforation requires prompt action, including surgical intervention when required. PMID:27114751

  13. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis PMID:22816012

  14. Guideline Implementation: Processing Flexible Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Marie A

    2016-09-01

    The updated AORN "Guideline for processing flexible endoscopes" provides guidance to perioperative, endoscopy, and sterile processing personnel for processing all types of reusable flexible endoscopes and accessories in all procedural settings. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel safely and effectively process flexible endoscopes to prevent infection transmission. The key points address verification of manual cleaning, mechanical cleaning and processing, storage in a drying cabinet, determination of maximum storage time before reprocessing is needed, and considerations for implementing a microbiologic surveillance program. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. PMID:27568535

  15. [Endoscopic management of biliary stones].

    PubMed

    Barinagarrementería, R

    1990-07-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy is one of the more effective therapeutic procedures for the management of some biliary tree abnormalities. In choledocolitiasis, a 90% succesfull rate has been obtained. Complications include bleeding, perforation, cholangitis, and pancreatitis. Mortality rates between 1.0 to 1.3% are informed. Contraindications are the same as for panendoscopy as well as the presence of stones greater than 2.5 cms. In giant stones, some other endoscopic approaches can be used, including mechanical lithotripsy, chemical treatment, electrohydraulic shockwaves, laser and biliary stent application. Endoscopic sphincterotomy is also indicated as an adjuvant therapy previous to extracorporeal lithotripsy. PMID:19256137

  16. Extraocular muscle injury during endoscopic sinus surgery: an ophthalmologic perspective.

    PubMed

    Park, K-A; Oh, S Y

    2016-05-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics and treatment results of medial rectus muscle (MR) transection incurred during endoscopic sinus surgery.MethodsThis retrospective study included 16 patients with MR transection incurred during endoscopic sinus surgery between 1994 and 2015. The operative notes of the surgical procedure, the pattern of strabismus, the type of muscle injury, the type of corrective strabismus surgery, and the surgical outcomes were reviewed.ResultsNine patients had partial resection of MR and seven patients had complete transection of MR, resulting from an injury incurred during endoscopic sinus surgery. Three of the nine patients with partial resection injury were initially diagnosed as complete resection and subsequently re-diagnosed as partial resection in a review of the images during this study. Five of the nine patients with partial MR resection underwent only simple recession/resection surgery. Patients with complete MR transection underwent muscle transposition or globe fixation surgeries and often multiple operations were required.ConclusionsThe results of this study showed that the treatment strategies could vary depending on the nature of muscle injury. In cases with complete transection, muscle transposition or globe fixation surgeries are often required, with multiple operations. However, partial muscle resection with only simple recession/resection surgery shows a favorable outcome in many cases. The use of proper imaging techniques, a thorough review of the images with various planes, and close follow-up are important for determining the nature of the muscle injury. PMID:26892024

  17. The Novel Transvestibule Approach for Endoscopic Thyroidectomy: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Ding, Boni; Lin, Changwei; Li, Wanwan

    2016-01-01

    Object: To evaluate the feasibility of NOTES for thyroid by the transvestibule approach. Methods: Six patients diagnosed with benign thyroid diseases were enrolled and underwent transvestibule endoscopic thyroidectomy in our hospital from October 2013 to September 2014. Results: All 6 patients completed transvestibule endoscopic thyroidectomy successfully with no conversion to open surgery. The mean operation time was 122 minutes (100 to 150 min). The average blood loss during surgery was 30 mL (10 to 40 mL). The pathologic diagnosis coincided with the preoperative diagnosis, which was 1 case of thyroid adenoma and 5 cases of thyroid goiters. The mean length of hospital stay was 8.2 days (8 to 10 d). No severe complications were reported during the 3 to 13 months’ follow-up. Conclusions: Transvestibule endoscopic thyroidectomy is feasible, with a satisfactory cosmetic effect; yet, further improvement of surgical techniques are required on account of the complexity of the surgical procedure and the prolonged operation time. PMID:26813240

  18. Endoscopic goniotomy probe for holmium:YAG laser delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Ren, Qiushi

    1994-06-01

    Goniotomy is an effective treatment for primary infantile glaucoma. Because a cloudy cornea may prevent a clear view of the anterior chamber angle through the operating microscope, we investigated whether an endoscope can be combined with a cutting laser to perform laser goniotomy in a surgical model of primary infantile glaucoma. The anterior chambers of cadaver procine eyes were deepened with a viscoelastic material. A 300-micron-diameter silica fiber coupled to an Olympus 0.8-mm-diameter flexible fiber optic endoscope entered the anterior chambers through 4-mm corneal incisions. The anterior chamber angles were clearly observed on a videoscreen as the endoscopic fiber optic laser scalpel approached the pectinate ligaments. With the guidance of a He-Ne aiming beam, the anterior chamber angle pectinate ligaments were cut over a 160 degree arc with a pulsed Ho:YAG laser (2.1 micrometers wavelength, 50 mJ, 5 Hz repetition). The specimens were fixed in glutaraldehyde and processed for scanning electron microscopy, or fixed in formalin and processed for light microscopy. The treated area demonstrated incision of the pectinate ligaments with opening of the underlying trabecular meshwork. The edoscopic fiber optic laser scalpel is capable of cutting the pectinate ligaments in a surgical model of primary infantile glaucoma. Therefore, it may be a useful instrument for performing goniotomy when a cloudy cornea in primary infantile glaucoma prevents visualization of the anterior chamber angle with a goniotomy lens.

  19. Mentoring in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Prem; Narra, Maruthi; Woo, Henry

    2015-04-01

    Surgical mentors have helped trainees develop fulfilling and academically productive careers, while supervisors are formally assigned to impart skills and oversee training. This paper reviews the comparative roles of the supervisor and mentor and how they overlap, while exploring the impact of the 'unknown' mentor. While the supervisor's role in directing the student is formally recognized, the mentee will personally select a mentor who successfully models the career and life balance to which the mentee aspires. The unknown mentor is known only to the mentee. The mentee's commitment to communicating with both mentor and supervisor is crucial to success. Better processes can be used to guide the mentor relationship. Confusion between the two roles - mentor and supervisor - is due to their complementary nature as well as an overlap in roles. Both remain essential to the growth and development of the surgical trainee. The unknown mentor could give detached advice and guidance to the student, while acting as a positive role model. PMID:25649003

  20. Endoscopic management of intragastric penetrated adjustable gastric band for morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Giovanni D De; Formato, Antonio; Pilone, Vincenzo; Rega, Maria; Giuliano, Maria Elena; Simeoli, Immacolata; Forestieri, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    This report describes a case of successful endoscopic management of intragastric penetrated adjustable gastric band in a patient with morbid obesity. The favorable course of the case described here demonstrates that adjustable gastric bands in the process of migration need not be removed surgically in patients who are asymptomatic. PMID:16810770

  1. 21 CFR 884.4150 - Bipolar endoscopic coagulator-cutter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bipolar endoscopic coagulator-cutter and accessories. 884.4150 Section 884.4150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Surgical Devices § 884.4150...

  2. Endoscopic hip osteotomies: less invasive approaches to peri-acetabular, proximal femoral and pubic symphyseal procedures

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Matsuda, Nicole A.

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the recent expansion of extra-articular hip arthroscopy into the peri-trochanteric and subgluteal space, this instructional course lecture introduces three innovative procedures: endoscopy-assisted periacetabular osteotomy, closed derotational proximal femoral osteotomy and endoscopic pubic symphysectomy. Supportive rationale, evolving indications, key surgical techniques and emerging outcomes are presented for these innovative less invasive procedures. PMID:27011827

  3. Successful Retrieval of a Retained Capsule Endoscope with Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yoshihiko; Kawai, Masaya; Takehara, Kazuhiro; Munakata, Shinya; Ishiyama, Shun; Sugimoto, Kiichi; Takahashi, Makoto; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Shibuya, Tomoyoshi; Osada, Taro; Watanabe, Sumio; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is commonly used for examining and diagnosing gastrointestinal disease, especially small bowel disease. Capsule retention is a well-known and significant complication of CE and requires surgical or endoscopic removal. Most reports described the retrieval of retained CE via laparotomy. We report a case of successful retrieval of the capsule using single incision laparoscopic surgery. PMID:25028577

  4. Long Term Variceal Sclerotherapy: Is Endoscopic Sclerosis a Unique Therapeutic Approach and a True Alternative to Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, A.; Rambach, W.

    1991-01-01

    Endoscopic sclerotherapy has been used to control acute variceal haemorrhage which persists despite conservative therapy, prevent recurrent variceal haemorrhage in patients with a history of oesophageal haemorrhage, and to prevent a haemorrhage in patients with oesophageal varices who never bled. In this short paper I will cover our personal experience with more than 2000 patients receiving particularly paravariceal endoscopic sclerotherapy of bleeding esophageal varices, and especially present the results of our prospective and controlled randomized trials (Table 1) and underline the thesis that endoscopic sclerotherapy and surgical procedures for patients with portal hypertension are complementary supporting measures or options. PMID:1911473

  5. Advances in endoscopic management of biliary complications after living donor liver transplantation: Comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shin, Milljae; Joh, Jae-Won

    2016-07-21

    Apart from noticeable improvements in surgical techniques and immunosuppressive agents, biliary complications remain the major causes of morbidity and mortality after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Bile leakage and stricture are the predominant complications. The reported incidence of biliary complications is 15%-40%, and these are known to occur more frequently in living donors than in deceased donors. Despite the absence of a confirmed therapeutic algorithm, many approaches have been used for treatment, including surgical, endoscopic, and percutaneous transhepatic techniques. In recent years, nonsurgical approaches have largely replaced reoperation. Among these, the endoscopic approach is currently the preferred initial treatment for patients who undergo duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction. Previously, endoscopic management was achieved most optimally through balloon dilatation and single or multiple stents placement. Recently, there have been significant developments in endoscopic devices, such as novel biliary stents, as well as advances in endoscopic technologies, including deep enteroscopy, the rendezvous technique, magnetic compression anastomosis, and direct cholangioscopy. These developments have resulted in almost all patients being managed by the endoscopic approach. Multiple recent publications suggest superior long-term results, with overall success rates ranging from 58% to 75%. This article summarizes the advances in endoscopic management of patients with biliary complications after LDLT. PMID:27468208

  6. Advances in endoscopic management of biliary complications after living donor liver transplantation: Comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Milljae; Joh, Jae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Apart from noticeable improvements in surgical techniques and immunosuppressive agents, biliary complications remain the major causes of morbidity and mortality after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Bile leakage and stricture are the predominant complications. The reported incidence of biliary complications is 15%-40%, and these are known to occur more frequently in living donors than in deceased donors. Despite the absence of a confirmed therapeutic algorithm, many approaches have been used for treatment, including surgical, endoscopic, and percutaneous transhepatic techniques. In recent years, nonsurgical approaches have largely replaced reoperation. Among these, the endoscopic approach is currently the preferred initial treatment for patients who undergo duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction. Previously, endoscopic management was achieved most optimally through balloon dilatation and single or multiple stents placement. Recently, there have been significant developments in endoscopic devices, such as novel biliary stents, as well as advances in endoscopic technologies, including deep enteroscopy, the rendezvous technique, magnetic compression anastomosis, and direct cholangioscopy. These developments have resulted in almost all patients being managed by the endoscopic approach. Multiple recent publications suggest superior long-term results, with overall success rates ranging from 58% to 75%. This article summarizes the advances in endoscopic management of patients with biliary complications after LDLT. PMID:27468208

  7. Endoscopic management of Dieulafoy’s lesion using Isoamyl-2-cyanoacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek M Aly; Yoko, Nakamura; Hiroki, Moriguchi; Afify, Mohamed; Asar, Mohamed; Ismael, Badr; Salah, Magdy

    2013-01-01

    Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL) is a rare but important cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding that may be overlooked during diagnostic endoscopy. Mortality rates are similar to those of other causes for gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnosis by upper endoscopy is the modality of choice during acute bleeding. In the absence of active bleeding, the lesion resembles a raised nipple or visible vessel. There are no guidelines regarding effective selective therapy for DL, when diagnosed, endoscopist experience is the major determinant of the treatment strategy. Following our strategy, an expert endoscopist with a skilled assistant should have a high rate of successful DL diagnosis when an obscured gastrointestinal lesion is suspected. Cyanoacryltes compounds have been used successfully in management of Gastric varices and DLs. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports regarding use of isoamyl-2-cyanoacrylate (AMCRYLATE®; Concord Drugs Ltd., Hyderabad, India) as an effective therapy for gastric DL without serious complications. In our case study, Isoamyl-2-cyanoacrylate (AMCRYLATE®) was effective and safe for treating DL. Surgical wedge resection of the lesion should be considered as a therapeutic option if endoscopic therapy fails. PMID:23951399

  8. The Evolution and Advancement of Endoscopic Foraminal Surgery: One Surgeon's Experience Incorporating Adjunctive Techologies

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background Endoscopic spine surgery has evolved gradually through improvements in endoscope design, instrumentation, and surgical techniques. The ability to visualize and treat painful pathology endoscopically through the foramen has opened the door for the diagnosis and treatment of degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine (from T10 to S1). Other endoscopic techniques for treating a painful disc have been focused on a posterior approach and has been compared with micro–lumbar discectomy. These procedures have not been more effective than open microdiscectomy but are less invasive, have less surgical morbidity, and allow for more rapid surgical recovery. Spinal decompression and fusion was the fallback procedure when nonsurgical treatment or discectomy failed to relieve sciatica and back pain. Foraminal endoscopic surgery, however, provides a truly minimally invasive alternative approach to the pathoanatomy of the lumbar spine because it preserves the multifidus muscle, maintains motion, and eliminates or, at worst, delays the need for fusion. Methods The following developments helped facilitate the evolution of a transforaminal endoscopic surgery procedure for disc herniations from a foraminal disc decompression, also known as percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy, to a more complete foraminal surgical technique that can address spinal stenosis and spinal instability. This expanded capability gives foraminal endoscopic surgery distinct advantages and flexibility for certain painful degenerative conditions compared with open surgery. Advancement of the technique occurred when needle trajectory and placement was refined to better target each type of herniation with precise needle and cannula positioning directed at the herniation. New instrumentation and inclusion of a biportal technique also facilitated removal of extruded, migrated, and sequestered disc herniations. The further development of foraminoscopes with larger working channels and high speed

  9. Cooperative laparoscopic endoscopic and hybrid laparoscopic surgery for upper gastrointestinal tumors: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Mavrogenis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cooperative laparoscopic and endoscopic techniques used for the resection of upper gastrointestinal tumors. METHODS: A systematic research of the literature was performed in PubMed for English and French language articles about laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative, combined, hybrid and rendezvous techniques. Only original studies using these techniques for the resection of early gastric cancer, benign tumors and gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach and the duodenum were included. By excluding case series of less than 10 patients, 25 studies were identified. The study design, number of cases, tumor pathology size and location, the operative technique name, the endoscopy team and surgical team role, operative time, type of closure of visceral wall defect, blood loss, complications and length of hospital stay of these studies were evaluated. Additionally all cooperative techniques found were classified and are presented in a systematic approach. RESULTS: The studies identified were case series and retrospective cohort studies. A total of 706 patients were operated on with a cooperative technique. The tumors resected were only gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in 4 studies, GIST and various benign submucosal tumors in 22 studies, early gastric cancer (pT1a and pT1b) in 6 studies and early duodenal cancer in 1 study. There was important heterogeneity between the studies. The operative techniques identified were: laparoscopic assisted endoscopic resection, endoscopic assisted wedge resection, endoscopic assisted transgastric and intragastric surgery, laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS), laparoscopic assisted endoscopic full thickness resection (LAEFR), clean non exposure technique and non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS). Each technique is illustrated with the roles of the endoscopic and laparoscopic teams; the indications, characteristics and short term results are described. CONCLUSION: Along with

  10. [Complications of endoscopic video-assisted surgical interventions in gynaecology].

    PubMed

    Polushin, Iu S; Varatanova, I V; Shirokov, D M; Bezhenar', V F

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of specific complications in gynaecological endovideosurgery has been conducted, such as occurrence of extra-abdominal gas after laparoscopic surgery or resorption of the irrigation solution in hysteroscopy. Possible mechanisms of subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, mediastinal emphysema and hyperhydration development are presented along with discussion of diagnosing and treatment methods. PMID:21404454

  11. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is done in a procedure called a biopsy: the physician eases a long, thin tube called ... the tissue using instruments passed through the endoscope. Biopsy of the small intestine is the only way ...

  12. Foveated endoscopic lens

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We present a foveated miniature endoscopic lens implemented by amplifying the optical distortion of the lens. The resulting system provides a high-resolution region in the central field of view and low resolution in the outer fields, such that a standard imaging fiber bundle can provide both the high resolution needed to determine tissue health and the wide field of view needed to determine the location within the inspected organ. Our proof of concept device achieves 7∼8  μm resolution in the fovea and an overall field of view of 4.6 mm. Example images and videos show the foveated lens’ capabilities. PMID:22463022

  13. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Pande, Sonjjay; Namdev, Hemant; Agarwal, Moneet

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is considered as a treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus. It is indicated in hydrocephalus secondary to congenital aqueductal stenosis, posterior third ventricle tumor, cerebellar infarct, Dandy-Walker malformation, vein of Galen aneurism, syringomyelia with or without Chiari malformation type I, intraventricular hematoma, post infective, normal pressure hydrocephalus, myelomeningocele, multiloculated hydrocephalus, encephalocele, posterior fossa tumor and craniosynostosis. It is also indicated in block shunt or slit ventricle syndrome. Proper Pre-operative imaging for detailed assessment of the posterior communicating arteries distance from mid line, presence or absence of Liliequist membrane or other membranes, located in the prepontine cistern is useful. Measurement of lumbar elastance and resistance can predict patency of cranial subarachnoid space and complex hydrocephalus, which decides an ultimate outcome. Water jet dissection is an effective technique of ETV in thick floor. Ultrasonic contact probe can be useful in selected patients. Intra-operative ventriculo-stomography could help in confirming the adequacy of endoscopic procedure, thereby facilitating the need for shunt. Intraoperative observations of the patent aqueduct and prepontine cistern scarring are predictors of the risk of ETV failure. Such patients may be considered for shunt surgery. Magnetic resonance ventriculography and cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging are effective in assessing subarachnoid space and stoma patency after ETV. Proper case selection, post-operative care including monitoring of ICP and need for external ventricular drain, repeated lumbar puncture and CSF drainage, Ommaya reservoir in selected patients could help to increase success rate and reduce complications. Most of the complications develop in an early post-operative, but fatal complications can develop late which indicate an importance of long term follow

  14. Emergency transvaginal hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Noguera, J F; Cuadrado, A; Sánchez-Margallo, F M; Dolz, C; Asencio, J M; Olea, J M; Morales, R; Lozano, L; Vicens, J C

    2011-05-01

    In a clinical series, 10 consecutive female patients with intra-abdominal infections were successfully treated with natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) performed transvaginally. The surgery, which consisted of a hybrid NOTES procedure using a transvaginal approach, was performed on an emergency basis by the surgical team on call. The indications for surgery were acute cholecystitis (n = 6), acute appendicitis (n = 2), and pelvic peritonitis (n = 2) with intra-abdominal infection. The procedure was successfully performed in all patients using a dual-channel endoscope and mini-laparoscopy assistance. This is the first clinical series in which NOTES has been performed on an emergency basis to treat intra-abdominal infections. Transvaginal surgery for intra-abdominal infection is a feasible procedure for groups experienced in the elective NOTES approach. PMID:21165824

  15. [Endoscopic Duodenal Snare Papillectomy Induced Complication: Prevention and Management].

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Deok; Cha, Sang Woo

    2016-08-25

    Tumors of the major duodenal papilla are being recognized more often because of the increased use of diagnostic upper endoscopy and ERCP. The standard of management for ampullary tumor is local surgical excision or pancreaticoduodenectomy, but these procedures are associated with significant mortality, as well as post-operative and long-term morbidity. Endoscopic snare papillectomy was introduced as an alternative to surgery, but post-procedure complications are serious drawback. The most serious complications are perforation, delayed bleeding and pancreatitis. Identification of high risk patients, early recognition of complications, and aggressive management abates frequency and severity. Prevention and management of endoscopic duodenal papillectomy-induced complications will be reviewed in this article. PMID:27554212

  16. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy: emerging indications and evolving techniques.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Haji, Amyn; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Hashiguchi, Keiichi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a benign esophageal motility disorder resulting from an impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. The principles of treatment involve disruption of the sphincter at the esophagogastric junction. Treatment techniques include balloon dilatation, botulinum toxin injection, and surgical myotomy. In 2008, per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) was introduced by Inoue et al. as an endoscopic myotomy with no skin incision. The procedure has been well accepted and widely applied owing to its minimal invasiveness and high cure rates. Moreover, there have been discussions on wider indications for POEM and new technical developments have been reported. The present article reviews the historical background and present status of POEM, as well as future prospects for its application in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:25040806

  17. Endoscopic excision of intraventricular neurocysticercosis blocking foramen of Monro bilaterally

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Harshil Chimanlal; Jain, Kapil; Shah, Jaimin Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infestation of the central nervous system. NCC parasitic infestation can be misdiagnosed as hydatid cyst or intraventricular epidermoid cyst that can cause a diagnostic dilemma. A 23-year-old male patient presented with headache and vomiting for 3–4 days and giddiness for 4–5 days. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast was suggestive of a rim-enhancing lesion at the level of the foramen of Monro. Endoscopic excision of the lesion was done, and the patient had relief of a headache and vomiting immediately after the procedure. He is being followed up regularly. Intraventricular NCC occluding both foramen of Monro is a rare entity. Complete endoscopic surgical excision followed by appropriate drug therapy should be given to achieve a cure. PMID:27057236

  18. Pediatric functional endoscopic sinus surgery: is a second look necessary?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R B; Pereira, K D; Younis, R T; Lazar, R H

    1997-09-01

    Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) has become the surgical procedure of choice for the treatment of chronic sinusitis that is refractory to medical treatment. It has become routine to perform endoscopy in children under general anesthesia 2 to 3 weeks after FESS to facilitate examination and cleaning of the operative site. We compared the clinical outcome of 50 children who underwent FESS without a second-look endoscopy with 50 children who underwent a routine second look. Patients with systemic disease (cystic fibrosis, immotile ciliary syndrome, immunoglobulin deficiency) or undergoing a revision procedure were excluded from the study. The results show that the postoperative improvement in nasal obstruction, nasal drainage, and chronic cough was the same for both groups. We conclude that in the vast majority of children without systemic disease and not undergoing a revision procedure, a second endoscopic procedure may not offer any apparent advantage. PMID:9292615

  19. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery in the management of rectal wall endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Banky, Balazs; Saleki, Mahsa; Gill, Talvinder S

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with known history of endometriosis was referred to colorectal outpatient clinic from gynaecology with a history of intermittent rectal bleeding and no associated bowel symptoms. Flexible sigmoidoscopy in concordance with pelvic MRI revealed a 3×2×2 cm sessile lesion in the anterior rectal wall. The lesion was also palpable as a firm mass on digital rectal examination. From the gynaecological point of view no intra-abdominal exploration was required; the sole rectal wall lesion was removed with the minimally invasive surgical technique of transanal endoscopic microsurgery. Full thickness rectal wall excision sample was reported to be histologically complete and confirmed endometriosis. No recurrence was detected at endoscopic follow-up at 6 months. The patient remained symptom free. Therefore, we demonstrated a case of minimally invasive removal of a rectal wall large endometriosis nodule in a fertile woman with a complete, symptomatic, uneventful recovery. PMID:27495176

  20. CAD-based graphical computer simulation in endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kuehnapfel, U G; Neisius, B

    1993-06-01

    This article presents new techniques for three-dimensional, kinematic realtime simulation of dextrous endoscopic instruments. The integrated simulation package KISMET is used for engineering design verification and evaluation. Geometric and kinematic computer models of the mechanisms and the laparoscopic workspace were created. Using the advanced capabilities of high-performance graphical workstations combined with state-of-the-art simulation software, it is possible to generate displays of the surgical instruments acting realistically on the organs of the digestive system. The organ geometry is modelled in a high degree of detail. Apart from discussing the use of KISMET for the development of MFM-II (Modular Flexible MIS Instrument, Release II), the paper indicates further applications of realtime 3D graphical simulation methods in endoscopic surgery. PMID:8055320

  1. Storage, access, and retrieval of endoscopic and laparoscopic video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaire, Gunter; Steines, Daniel; Graschew, Georgi; Thiel, Andreas; Bernarding, Johannes; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Schlag, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The system presented here enhances documentation and data- secured, second-opinion facilities by integrating video into DICOM3.0. Digital stereoscopic video sequences (DSVS) are especially in demand for surgery (laparoscopy, microsurgery, surgical microscopy, second opinion, virtual reality). Therefore DSVS are also integrated into the DICOM video concept. We present an implementation for a medical video server extended by a DICOM interface. Security mechanisms conforming with DICOM are integrated to enable secure internet access. Digital (stereoscopic) video sequences relevant for surgery should be examined regarding the clip length necessary for diagnosis and documentation and the clip size manageable with today's hardware. Methods for DSVS compression are described, implemented, and tested. Image sources relevant for this paper include, among others, a stereoscopic laparoscope and a monoscopic endoscope. Additionally, an approach is presented to analyze the motion of the endoscopic camera for future automatic video- cutting.

  2. Endoscopic Distal Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-04-01

    Chronic distal tibiofibular syndesmosis disruption can be managed by endoscopic arthrodesis of the syndesmosis. This is performed through the proximal anterolateral and posterolateral portals. The scar tissue and bone block are resected to facilitate the subsequent reduction of the syndesmosis. The reduction of the syndesmosis can be guided either arthroscopically or endoscopically. The tibial and fibular surfaces of the tibiofibular overlap can be microfractured to facilitate subsequent fusion. PMID:27462544

  3. Endoscopic Management of Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busafi, Said A.; Ghali, Peter; Wong, Philip; Deschenes, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Cirrhosis is the leading cause of portal hypertension worldwide, with the development of bleeding gastroesophageal varices being one of the most life-threatening consequences. Endoscopy plays an indispensible role in the diagnosis, staging, and prophylactic or active management of varices. With the expected future refinements in endoscopic technology, capsule endoscopy may one day replace traditional gastroscopy as a diagnostic modality, whereas endoscopic ultrasound may more precisely guide interventional therapy for gastric varices. PMID:22830037

  4. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

  5. Pressurized Cadaver Model in Cardiothoracic Surgical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Greene, Christina L; Minneti, Michael; Sullivan, Maura E; Baker, Craig J

    2015-09-01

    Simulation is increasingly recognized as an integral aspect of thoracic surgery education. A number of simulators have been introduced to teach component cardiothoracic skills; however, no good model exists for numerous essential skills including redo sternotomy and internal mammary artery takedown. These procedures are often relegated to thoracic surgery residents but have significant negative implications if performed incorrectly. Fresh tissue dissection is recognized as the gold standard for surgical simulation, but the lack of circulating blood volume limits surgical realism. Our aim is to describe the technique of the pressurized cadaver for use in cardiothoracic surgical procedures, focusing on internal mammary artery takedown. PMID:26354651

  6. Endoscopic management of hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage with obstructive hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Mukerji, Gaurav; Shenoy, Ravikiran; Basoor, Abhijeet; Jain, Gaurav; Nelson, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Background Intracranial haemorrhage accounts for 30–60 % of all stroke admissions into a hospital, with hypertension being the main risk factor. Presence of intraventricular haematoma is considered a poor prognostic factor due to the resultant obstruction to CSF and the mass effect following the presence of blood resulting in raised intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus. We report the results following endoscopic decompression of obstructive hydrocephalus and evacuation of haematoma in patients with hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage. Methods During a two year period, 25 patients diagnosed as having an intraventricular haemorrhage with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to hypertension were included in this study. All patients underwent endoscopic evacuation of the haematoma under general anaesthesia. Post operative evaluation was done by CT scan and Glasgow outcome scale. Results Of the 25 patients, thalamic haemorrhage was observed in 12 (48%) patients, while, 11 (44%) had a putaminal haematoma. Nine (36%) patients had a GCS of 8 or less pre-operatively. Resolution of hydrocephalus following endoscopic evacuation was observed in 24 (96%) patients. No complications directly related to the surgical technique were encountered in our study. At six months follow-up, a mortality rate of 6.3% and 55.5% was observed in patients with a pre-operative GCS of ≥ 9 and ≤ 8 respectively. Thirteen of the 16 (81.3%) patients with a pre-operative GCS ≥ 9 had good recovery. Conclusion Endoscopic technique offers encouraging results in relieving hydrocephalus in hypertensive intraventricular haemorrhage. Final outcome is better in patient with a pre-operative GCS of >9. Future improvements in instrumentation and surgical techniques, with careful case selection may help improve outcome in these patients. PMID:17204141

  7. The role of student surgical interest groups and surgical Olympiads in anatomical and surgical undergraduate training in Russia.

    PubMed

    Dydykin, Sergey; Kapitonova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Traditional department-based surgical interest groups in Russian medical schools are useful tools for student-based selection of specialty training. They also form a nucleus for initiating research activities among undergraduate students. In Russia, the Departments of Topographical Anatomy and Operative Surgery play an important role in initiating student-led research and providing learners with advanced, practical surgical skills. In tandem with department-led activities, student surgical interest groups prepare learners through surgical competitions, known as "Surgical Olympiads," which have been conducted in many Russian centers on a regular basis since 1988. Surgical Olympiads stimulate student interest in the development of surgical skills before graduation and encourage students to choose surgery as their postgraduate specialty. Many of the participants in these surgical Olympiads have become highly qualified specialists in general surgery, orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, and emergency medicine. The present article emphasizes the role of student interest groups and surgical Olympiads in clinical anatomical and surgical undergraduate training in Russia. PMID:25688979

  8. Asian perspective on endoscopic thyroidectomy -- a review of 193 cases.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Tanaka, Shigeo

    2003-04-01

    Endoscopic surgery has become widely used, so much so that recent technical and mechanical advances have led to "endoscopic surgery" being synonymous with "minimally invasive surgery". In particular, endoscopic thyroid surgery has developed rapidly and been increasingly refined in recent years. The incidence of thyroid diseases is markedly higher in women than in men, and operations for these diseases result in a scar on the anterior neck that is exposed when open-necked clothing is worn. Therefore, a technique for endoscopic endocrine neck surgery that results in a better cosmetic appearance is desirable. We have developed a totally gasless endoscopic surgical technique using an anterior neck-skin lifting method for thyroid and parathyroid diseases. This technique is called the video-assisted neck surgery (VANS) method. Since our original report, we have treated more than 200 cases of thyroid and parathyroid disease using this technique. In cases of benign thyroid tumours, near total lobectomy was the most common procedure followed by total lobectomy. The maximum resected tumour size was 7.4 cm in diameter. For malignant tumours, the indication for the VANS method was limited to thyroid papillary microcarcinomas measuring less than 1 cm in diameter. Total lobectomy and prophylactic neck dissection were performed in all 10 of these cases. A subtotal thyroidectomy was performed for only a few cases of Graves' disease. The operating time and the amount of bleeding were statistically significantly reduced, as the surgeon gained experience with the technique. In conclusion, the VANS method is a feasible, practical and safe procedure, with excellent cosmetic benefits. PMID:12732493

  9. Endoscopic evaluation of a complex ballistic injury.

    PubMed

    Eardley, W G P; Beaven, A; Sargeant, I

    2011-12-01

    The current conflict in Afghanistan is characterised by significant injuries resulting from the use of Improvised Explosive Devices. Increasing survivability from battlefield injury, escalating musculoskeletal ballistic trauma and the use of blast weaponry combine to produce an injury profile which defines contemporary combat casualty care. Such complex multi-system trauma challenges current wound care rationale. Ballistic injury of the perineum, often associated with proximal femoral injury and significant tissue loss, raises particular management difficulties. These cases demand an individualised, flexible approach due both to the extent of their wounds, logistical issues with positioning and often limited surgical approaches. Routine positioning and approaches around the pelvis may not be available to the surgical team due to presence of external fixators and tenuous skin bridges. The availability of donor skin to cover soft tissue defects is limited and as such, approaches to wounds with minimal additional tissue trauma are of particular use. We describe the benefits of endoscopic techniques and equipment in the evaluation and management of such an injury. PMID:22319987

  10. Role of surgical residents in undergraduate surgical education

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Marc; Belliveau, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To identify the role and impact of surgical residents on the various activities of a senior (4th year) surgical clerkship, and to explore students’ perceptions of differences between the teaching behaviours of attending physicians and residents. Design A survey by questionnaire. Setting McGill University, Montreal. Method A 67-item questionnaire was administered to fourth-year medical students at the end of their 8-week surgical clerkship. Analysis of the data was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Dunn’s multiple comparison test and mean average. Main outcome measures Overall satisfaction with the clerkship, teaching behaviours and teaching of clinical skills and basic principles. Results Overall satisfaction with the clerkship was 6.31 out of 10. Surgical residents were perceived as being significantly more active than the attending staff in 14 out of 15 teaching behaviours. They were also seen as important in teaching certain clinical skills such as suturing, assisting in the operating room and managing emergency situations. They also contributed significantly to teaching the basic principles of surgery such as infections, surgical bleeding and fluid and electrolytes. On a 10-point scale, students felt that more learning was achieved by independent reading, tutorials and residents’ teaching than by other teaching modalities, including attending physicians’ and nurses’ teaching. Conclusions Medical students perceive surgical residents as being significantly more active in their education process than the attending staff. Residents appear to be responsible for teaching various technical and patient management skills necessary for patient care. Along with independent reading and tutorials, resident teaching contributes a significant portion of the medical student’s acquisition of knowledge and appears to contribute to the students’ choice of surgery as a career. PMID:10593247

  11. Real-time endoscopic oxygenation imaging using single snapshot of optical properties (SSOP) imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, Joseph P.; van de Giessen, Martijn; Gioux, Sylvain

    2016-03-01

    With 50% of all interventional procedures in the US being minimally invasive, there is a need for objective tools to help guide surgeons in this challenging environment. Tissue oxygenation is a useful biomarker of tissue viability and suitable for surgical guidance. Here we present our efforts to perform real-time quantitative optical imaging through a rigid endoscope using Single Snapshot of Optical Properties (SSOP) imaging. In particular, in this work we introduce for the first time 3 dimensionally-corrected dual wavelength optical properties imaging using SSOP through an endoscope, allowing accurate oxygenation maps to be obtained on tissue simulating phantoms and in vivo samples. We compared the results with state-of-the-art wide-field spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI). Overall, results from the novel endoscopic imaging system agreed within 10% in absorption, reduced scattering, and oxygenation. Moreover, we introduce here real-time, video-rate quantitative optical imaging with 3D profile correction through an endoscope. These results demonstrate the potential of endoscopic SSOP as an objective surgical guidance tool for the clinic.

  12. [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation: an alternative option for the treatment of pancreatic insulinoma].

    PubMed

    Bor, Renáta; Farkas, Klaudia; Bálint, Anita; Molnár, Tamás; Nagy, Ferenc; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Sepp, Krisztián; Tiszlavicz, László; Hamar, Sándor; Szepes, Zoltán

    2014-10-12

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate imaging modality for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle injection has already been used for palliative interventions. Surgical resection is currently the standard treatment for pancreatic insulinoma. Medical treatment may be necessary for symptomatic patients with unresectable disease. Case reports have been published about the success of endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcoholic ablation, but it has not been reported previously in Hungarian literature. The authors present the history of an 83-year-old woman who was evaluated because of repeated hypoglycemic coma occurring during the night. Endosonographic image and laboratory findings (elevated serum insulin and chromogranin A) revealed pancreatic insulinoma. Because of severe comorbidities and high risk of surgical resection, the decision was made to ablate the insulinoma by endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcohol injection. A total of 3 mL 95% ethanol was injected into the tumor. Despite the discontinuation of the diazoxide therapy the hypoglycemic episodes disappeared. This case history confirms that endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcoholic ablation is a novel, minimal invasive alternative treatment for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in whom surgery is not feasible. PMID:25282110

  13. Biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy: Optimization of endoscopic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Bišćanin, Alen; Pavić, Tajana; Nikolić, Marko; Budimir, Ivan; Mijić, August; Đuzel, Ana

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the results of endoscopic treatment of postoperative biliary leakage occurring after urgent cholecystectomy with a long-term follow-up. METHODS: This is an observational database study conducted in a tertiary care center. All consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) for presumed postoperative biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy in the period between April 2008 and April 2013 were considered for this study. Patients with bile duct transection and biliary strictures were excluded. Biliary leakage was suspected in the case of bile appearance from either percutaneous drainage of abdominal collection or abdominal drain placed at the time of cholecystectomy. Procedural and main clinical characteristics of all consecutive patients with postoperative biliary leakage after urgent cholecystectomy, such as indication for cholecystectomy, etiology and type of leakage, ERC findings and post-ERC complications, were collected from our electronic database. All patients in whom the leakage was successfully treated endoscopically were followed-up after they were discharged from the hospital and the main clinical characteristics, laboratory data and common bile duct diameter were electronically recorded. RESULTS: During a five-year period, biliary leakage was recognized in 2.2% of patients who underwent urgent cholecystectomy. The median time from cholecystectomy to ERC was 6 d (interquartile range, 4-11 d). Endoscopic interventions to manage biliary leakage included biliary stent insertion with or without biliary sphincterotomy. In 23 (77%) patients after first endoscopic treatment bile flow through existing surgical drain ceased within 11 d following biliary therapeutic endoscopy (median, 4 d; interquartile range, 2-8 d). In those patients repeat ERC was not performed and the biliary stent was removed on gastroscopy. In seven (23%) patients repeat ERC was done within one to fourth week after their first ERC

  14. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  15. Registered nurse-administered sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2015-01-01

    The rising use of nonanesthesiologist-administered sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy has clinical significances. Most endoscopic patients require some forms of sedation and/or anesthesia. The goals of this sedation are to guard the patient’s safety, minimize physical discomfort, to control behavior and to diminish psychological responses. Generally, moderate sedation for these procedures has been offered by the non-anesthesiologist by using benzodiazepines and/or opioids. Anesthesiologists and non-anesthesiologist personnel will need to work together for these challenges and for safety of the patients. The sedation training courses including clinical skills and knowledge are necessary for the registered nurses to facilitate the patient safety and the successful procedure. However, appropriate patient selection and preparation, adequate monitoring and regular training will ensure that the use of nurse-administered sedation is a feasible and safe technique for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. PMID:26191341

  16. A physical simulator for endoscopic endonasal drilling techniques: technical note.

    PubMed

    Tai, Bruce L; Wang, Anthony C; Joseph, Jacob R; Wang, Page I; Sullivan, Stephen E; McKean, Erin L; Shih, Albert J; Rooney, Deborah M

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the authors present a physical model developed to teach surgeons the requisite drilling techniques when using an endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) to the skull base. EEA is increasingly used for treating pathologies of the ventral and ventrolateral cranial base. Endonasal drilling is a unique skill in terms of the instruments used, the long reach required, and the restricted angulation, and gaining competency requires much practice. Based on the successful experience in creating custom simulators, the authors used 3D printing to build an EEA training model from post-processed thin-cut head CT scans, formulating the materials to provide realistic haptic feedback and endoscope handling. They performed a preliminary assessment at 2 institutions to evaluate content validity of the simulator as the first step of the validation process. Overall results were positive, particularly in terms of bony landmarks and haptic response, though minor refinements were suggested prior to use as a training device. PMID:26339850

  17. Per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy for Achalasia: A Detailed Description of the Technique and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Kevin L; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-05-01

    Historically, the most robust outcomes in treatment of achalasia were seen with surgical myotomy. Per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) introduced an endoscopic method for creating a surgical myotomy. Thousands of cases of POEM have been performed; however, there is no standard technique, and the rates of clinical success and adverse events vary widely among centers. This article presents a detailed description of the POEM technique, including the rationale and potential pitfalls of the main variations, in the context of the international literature. PMID:27112254

  18. Ensuring the Safety of Your Endoscopic Procedure

    MedlinePlus

    ... an endoscope are as follows: Mechanical cleaning The operating channels and external portions of the endoscope are ... that there are no leaks in its internal operating channels. This not only ensures peak performance of ...

  19. [SUBFASCIAL ENDOSCOPIC PERFORATOR VEIN SURGERY IN THE TREATMENT OF SEVERE VARICOSE VEINS].

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Atsushi; Masaki, Hisao; Tanemoto, Kazuo

    2015-05-01

    Surgical treatment of severe varicose veins (CEAP classification : C4b-C6) should involve not only interruption of incompetent superficial veins to prevent venous regurgitation due to valve incompetence but also interruption of incompetent perforator veins. Subfascial endoscopic perforator vein surgery (SEPS) is performed via a small skin incision and involves interruption of perforator veins by the insertion of an endoscope into the subfascial space. SEPS produces good surgical outcomes: it is accurate in detecting and transecting perforator veins; has a low frequency of surgical wound complications; prevents lipodermatosclerosis and formation of pigmented skin lesions; and is minimally invasive compared with Linton's operation. Thus, SEPS is an excellent procedure for patients with incompetent perforator veins. SEPS has been covered by the Japanese national health insurance system since April 2014, and it is expected that SEPS will be further developed and become more widespread in use. PMID:26281656

  20. Endoscopic Removal of a Supernumerary Premolar in the Mandible during a Dental Implant Placement

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Víctor; Cantín, Mario; Fuentes, Ramón; Engelke, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    The surgical removal of supernumerary teeth is necessary in some cases, especially before the commencement of any orthodontic or implant treatment procedure. In the mandibular supernumerary premolar, a more conservative approach is required because of the presence of complications associated with conventional surgery due to the close proximity of the said premolar to the alveolar inferior and mental nerves, and the need for bone conservation for implant placement. The endoscopic surgical approach has been used for the removal of the maxillary supernumerary tooth, impacted third molar, and implants. In this case report, we present an endoscopically assisted surgical technique for the removal of an unerupted supernumerary premolar in the mandible associated with a dental implant placement procedure. PMID:24772355

  1. In-vivo endoscopic visualization of patho-anatomy in painful degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Anthony T; Yeung, Christopher A

    2006-01-01

    The degenerative processes in an aging spine have been defined traditionally only by our knowledge of the biology of disc and facet degeneration, as well as interpretation of post-mortem cryosections by forensic anatomist Wolfgang Rauschning, M.D. In this chapter, visualization of in-vivo patho-anatomy in a degenerating disc and spinal segment is demonstrated at surgery using the Yeung Endoscopic Spine System (Y.E.S.S.), (Richard Wolf Surgical Instrument Company, Vernon Hills, IL, USA). An Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved study of endoscopic treatment for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine incorporated intraoperative probing under local anesthesia and endoscopic treatment of the visualized patho-anatomy. An intraoperative evocative chromo-discogram, using indigocarmine, was used to elicit discogenic pain and label the fissured and degenerative nucleus pulposus for surgical removal and thermal modulation. Painful patho-anatomy was probed in a conscious patient. The most common endoscopic finding was Inflammatory tissue in the disc and annulus. Inflammation was correlated with the presence of annular tears. Patho-physiologic changes that affect the exiting nerve, which contains the Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG), was associated with stenotic and chemical irritation. Unavoidable postoperative dysesthesia was associated with the presence of an inflammatory membrane, and removal or thermal coagulation of "anomalous" furcal nerves in the foramen that branched off of the exiting spinal nerve. Neo-angiogenesis and neurogenesis in the inflammatory membrane present in the foraminal triangle was a new finding not reported in traditional clinical studies. Visualization and treatment of pathologic findings inside (annular tears) and outside the disc in Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (HNP), synovial cysts, foraminal stenosis, central stenosis, spondylolisthesis, is demonstrated. The endoscopic foraminal approach to the spine and disc is a technique that provides access

  2. Recurrent colorectal cancer after endoscopic resection when additional surgery was recommended

    PubMed Central

    Takatsu, Yukiko; Fukunaga, Yosuke; Hamasaki, Shunsuke; Ogura, Atsushi; Nagata, Jun; Nagasaki, Toshiya; Akiyoshi, Takashi; Konishi, Tsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Nagayama, Satoshi; Ueno, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the type of recurrence after endoscopic resection in colorectal cancer patients and whether rescue was possible by salvage operation. METHODS: Among 4972 patients who underwent surgical resection at our institution for primary or recurrent colorectal cancers from January 2005 to February 2015, we experienced eight recurrent colorectal cancers after endoscopic resection when additional surgical resection was recommended. RESULTS: The recurrence patterns were: intramural local recurrence (five cases), regional lymph node recurrence (three cases), and associated with simultaneous distant metastasis (three cases). Among five cases with lymphatic invasion observed histologically in endoscopic resected specimens, four cases recurred with lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis. All cases were treated laparoscopically and curative surgery was achieved in six cases. Among four cases located in the rectum, three cases achieved preservation of the anus. Postoperative complications occurred in two cases (enteritis). CONCLUSION: For high-risk submucosal invasive colorectal cancers after endoscopic resection, additional surgical resection with lymphadenectomy is recommended, particularly in cases with lymphovascular invasion. PMID:26900295

  3. Evaluation of endoscopic salpingectomy for sterilization of female Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis).

    PubMed

    Yu, Pin-Huan; Weng, Chia-Chun; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Chi, Chau-Hwa

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated the safety and postsurgical outcomes of endoscopic salpingectomy for sterilization of female Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis) as a method of population control. Nineteen adult female Formosan macaques were included in our study. The fallopian tubes of each anesthetized macaque were cauterized and excised endoscopically using a 2.7-mm rigid endoscope system. We recorded the complications encountered, and objectively scored the amount of hemorrhage throughout the procedure. Postoperative ovarian function was evaluated by monitoring the serum levels of sex hormones in ten of the macaques for two ovarian cycles following the salpingectomy. Two to 13 months later, eight of the 19 macaques underwent laparoscopy for the objective evaluation of inflammation at the surgical sites on the fallopian tubes. No major anesthetic- or surgical-associated complications were observed in any of the macaques. The hormonal evaluation showed cyclic ovarian function after salpingectomy in all of the ten macaques examined, and the parameters were comparable to those of other macaque species. The long-term postoperative level of inflammation at the surgical site was minimal to low, and was lower than that reported for other tubal occlusion techniques used in macaques. The use of a 2.7-mm rigid endoscope for salpingectomy in macaques is safe and efficient, with fewer postoperative complications than comparable sterilization techniques. PMID:25407314

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Endoscope Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is effective and safe for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of gastrointestinal disease. However, issues regarding endoscope-transmitted infections are emerging. Many countries have established and continuously revise guidelines for endoscope reprocessing in order to prevent infections. While there are common processes used in endoscope reprocessing, differences exist among these guidelines. It is important that the reprocessing of gastrointestinal endoscopes be carried out in accordance with the recommendations for each step of the process. PMID:26473117

  5. Endoscopic Transaxillary Near Total Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ejeh, Ijeoma Acholonu; Speights, Fredne; Rashid, Qammar N.; Ideis, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Background: Since first reported in 1996, endoscopic minimally invasive surgery of the cervical region has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of benign thyroid and parathyroid disease. The endoscopic transaxillary technique uses a remote lateral approach to the thyroid gland. Because of the perceived difficulty in accessing the contralateral anatomy of the thyroid gland, this technique has typically been reserved for patients with unilateral disease. Objectives: The present study examines the safety and feasibility of the transaxillary technique in dissecting and assessment of both thyroid lobes in performing near total thyroidectomy. Methods: Prior to this study we successfully performed endoscopic transaxillary thyroid lobectomy in 32 patients between August 2003 and August 2005. Technical feasibility in performing total thyroidectomy using this approach was accomplished first utilizing a porcine model followed by three human cadaver models prior to proceeding to human surgery. After IRB approval three female patients with histories of enlarging multinodular goiter were selected to undergo endoscopic near total thyroidectomy. Results: The average operative time for all models was 142 minutes (range 57–327 min). The three patients in this study had clinically enlarging multinodular goiters with an average size of 4 cm. The contralateral recurrent laryngeal nerve and parathyroid glands were identified in all cases. There was no post-operative bleeding, hoarseness or subcutaneous emphysema. Conclusion: Endoscopic transaxillary near total thyroidectomy is feasible and can be performed safely in human patients with bilateral thyroid disease. PMID:16882421

  6. Coelioscopic and Endoscope-Assisted Sterilization of Chelonians.

    PubMed

    Proença, Laila M; Divers, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    Elective sterilization is a safe and well-established surgical procedure performed in dogs and cats worldwide. Conversely, chelonian sterilization has been mostly performed therapeutically, because of the intricate anatomy and difficult access to the reproductive organs, and consequently, reproductive problems and diseases remain common. With the advance of veterinary endoscopy, novel techniques of soft tissue prefemoral coelioscopic and endoscope-assisted sterilization have been published, and preventative chelonian sterilization is now a reality. Nevertheless, extrapolations between species should be carefully considered, and further studies are warranted. This article summarizes and describes the current coelioscopic and coelioscope-assisted sterilization techniques for chelonia. PMID:26336003

  7. Review of current and evolving clinical indications for endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Anjuli K; Evans, John A

    2016-01-01

    For the first several years after its development, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was primarily limited to identification of pancreatic malignancies. Since this time, the field of EUS has advanced at a tremendous speed in terms of additional clinical diagnostic and therapeutic uses. The combination of ultrasound with endoscopy provides a unique interventional modality that is a minimally invasive alternative to various surgical interventions. Given the expanding recommended indications for EUS, this article will serve to review the most common uses with supporting evidence, while also exploring innovative endeavors that may soon become common clinical practice. PMID:26862365

  8. [Successful Removal of Hard Sigmoid Fecaloma Using Endoscopic Cola Injection].

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Jin; Kim, Jeong Wook

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal fecaloma is hardening of feces into lumps of varying size that is much harder in consistency than a fecal impaction. Complications of colorectal fecaloma include ulceration, bleeding, perforation and obstruction of the colon. Most fecalomas are successfully removed by conservative treatment with laxatives, enemas and rectal evacuation to relieve fecal impaction. When conservative treatments have failed, a surgical intervention may be needed. Herein, we report a case of 4.7 cm sized sigmoid fecaloma showing no response to conservative treatments that was successfully removed by endoscopic fragmentation with Coca-Cola injection instead of surgery. PMID:26194129

  9. All-Endoscopic Single-Row Repair of Full-Thickness Gluteus Medius Tears

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Grzybowski, Jeffrey S.; Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2016-01-01

    Abductor tendon tears typically develop insidiously in middle-aged women and can lead to debilitating lateral hip pain and a Trendelenburg limp. The gluteus medius tendon is most commonly torn and may show fatty degeneration over time, similar to the rotator cuff muscles of the shoulder. Endoscopic repair offers a therapeutic alternative to traditional open techniques. This article describes the workup, examination, and endoscopic repair of a full-thickness gluteus medius tear presenting as lateral hip pain and weakness. The surgical repair for this case used a single-row suture anchor technique. In addition, the indications and technique for a double-row repair will be discussed. PMID:27073767

  10. The Role of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Management of Pancreatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Riff, Brian P; Chandrasekhara, Vinay

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is an effective platform for a variety of therapies in the management of benign and malignant disease of the pancreas. Over the last 50 years, endotherapy has evolved into the first-line therapy in the majority of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the pancreas. As this field advances, it is important that gastroenterologists maintain an adequate knowledge of procedure indication, maintain sufficient procedure volume to handle complex pancreatic endotherapy, and understand alternate approaches to pancreatic diseases including medical management, therapy guided by endoscopic ultrasonography, and surgical options. PMID:26895680

  11. [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledocho-duodenostomy in advanced pancreatic cancer with duodenal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Mella, José Manuel; Guidi, Martín; De María, Julio; Hwang, Hui-Jer; Curvale, Cecilia R; Matano, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is considered the first-approach for biliary drainage. In cases of ERCP failure, patients are usually referred for percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgical biliary bypass. In the last decade, the indications of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer have increased, and numerous cases of EUS-guided biliary drainage have been reported in patients with failures during the ERCP. Our goal is to report a patient with locally advanced pancreatic cancer who presented with painless jaundice and cholestasis with biliary and duodenal obstruction. A EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy was performed by placement of a self-expanding metal stent. PMID:26502467

  12. Completely endoscopic removal of a dislocated Amplatzer atrial septal defect closure device.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, Johannes; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Müller, Silvana; Bartel, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Surgical treatment of residual shunts after transcatheter occlusion of atrial septal defect or patent foramen ovale is reported in approximately one to two percent of these percutaneous interventions. Minimally invasive surgery on the atrial septum is getting more and more common but little data is available on Amplatzer device explantation through limited access. No completely endoscopic device removal has been described previously. We report a case of a 57-year-old woman in whom an Amplatzer device was removed in a robotic totally endoscopic fashion through ports only using the daVinci telemanipulation system. PMID:17951273

  13. Endoscopic Endonasal and Keyhole Surgery for the Management of Skull Base Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Joshua W; Zada, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    The resection of anterior skull base meningiomas has traditionally been performed via pterional or unilateral/bilateral subfrontal craniotomies. The supraorbital keyhole approach and the endoscopic endonasal approach, techniques in which the endoscope is used to aid visualization, were developed to provide alternative, less-invasive approaches to aid the resection of these tumors. The individual characteristics of each tumor, such as location and size, are the main determinants guiding the choice of approach. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed, along with complications specific to each technique. Furthermore, a detailed procedural description of each surgical approach is described. PMID:27012385

  14. Endoscopic and non-endoscopic approaches for the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Joseph Paul; Wong, Andrew Thomas; Schwartz, David; Martinez, Manuel; Aytaman, Ayse; Schreiber, David

    2016-08-21

    Pelvic radiation is a commonly utilized treatment for malignancy of the genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal tract. Radiation proctitis and the resultant clinical picture varies from asymptomatic to potentially life threatening. Similarly, treatment options also vary greatly, from medical therapy to surgical intervention. Commonly utilized medical therapy includes sucralfate enemas, antibiotics, 5-aminosalicylic acid derivatives, probiotics, antioxidants, short-chain fatty acids, formalin instillation and fractionated hyperbaric oxygen. More invasive treatments include endoscopic-based, focally ablative interventions such as dilation, heater and bipolar cautery, neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet argon laser, radiofrequency ablation or argon plasma coagulation. Despite its relatively common frequency, there is a dearth of existing literature reporting head-to-head comparisons of the various treatment options via a randomized controlled approach. The purpose of our review was to present the reader a consolidation of the existing evidence-based literature with the goal of highlighting the comparative effectiveness and risks of the various treatment approaches. Finally, we outline a pragmatic approach to the treatment of radiation proctitis. In light of the lack of randomized data, our goal is to pursue as least invasive an approach as possible, with escalation of care tailored to the severity of the patient's symptoms. For those cases that are clinically asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic, observation or medical management can be considered. Once a patient fails such management or symptoms become more severe, invasive procedures such as endoscopically based focal ablation or surgical intervention can be considered. Although not all recommendations are supported by level I evidence, reported case series and single-institutional studies in the literature suggest that successful treatment with cessation of symptoms can be obtained in the majority of cases. PMID

  15. Endoscopic and non-endoscopic approaches for the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Joseph Paul; Wong, Andrew Thomas; Schwartz, David; Martinez, Manuel; Aytaman, Ayse; Schreiber, David

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic radiation is a commonly utilized treatment for malignancy of the genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal tract. Radiation proctitis and the resultant clinical picture varies from asymptomatic to potentially life threatening. Similarly, treatment options also vary greatly, from medical therapy to surgical intervention. Commonly utilized medical therapy includes sucralfate enemas, antibiotics, 5-aminosalicylic acid derivatives, probiotics, antioxidants, short-chain fatty acids, formalin instillation and fractionated hyperbaric oxygen. More invasive treatments include endoscopic-based, focally ablative interventions such as dilation, heater and bipolar cautery, neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet argon laser, radiofrequency ablation or argon plasma coagulation. Despite its relatively common frequency, there is a dearth of existing literature reporting head-to-head comparisons of the various treatment options via a randomized controlled approach. The purpose of our review was to present the reader a consolidation of the existing evidence-based literature with the goal of highlighting the comparative effectiveness and risks of the various treatment approaches. Finally, we outline a pragmatic approach to the treatment of radiation proctitis. In light of the lack of randomized data, our goal is to pursue as least invasive an approach as possible, with escalation of care tailored to the severity of the patient’s symptoms. For those cases that are clinically asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic, observation or medical management can be considered. Once a patient fails such management or symptoms become more severe, invasive procedures such as endoscopically based focal ablation or surgical intervention can be considered. Although not all recommendations are supported by level I evidence, reported case series and single-institutional studies in the literature suggest that successful treatment with cessation of symptoms can be obtained in the majority of cases

  16. Efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic resections of colorectal neoplasia: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Passera, Roberto; Migliore, Marco; Cirocchi, Roberto; Galloro, Giuseppe; Manta, Raffaele; Morino, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic local resections for colorectal lesions not suitable for endoscopic resection. Summary background data The combined laparo-endoscopic approach has been proposed for large colorectal lesions unsuitable for endoscopic resection, in order to reduce morbidity of common laparoscopic resection. However, data on the efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic local resections are still controversial. Methods An Embase search of papers published during the period 1985–2014 was performed. Published studies that evaluated laparo-endoscopic resections for colorectal lesions were assessed using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations by two authors. Forest plots on primary (per-lesion rate of further surgery, including surgery for complications and surgery for oncologic radical treatment) and secondary outcomes were produced based on fixed and random effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Risk for within-study bias was ascertained with QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies) system. Results A total of 11 studies provided data on 707 lesions treated with a combined laparo-endoscopic approach. A variety of techniques were reported. The overall per-lesion rate of further surgery was 9.5%, while per-lesion rate of further surgery for oncologic treatment was 7.9%, per-lesion rate of further surgery for complications treatment was 3.5%, incidence of adenocarcinoma was 10.5%, incidence of overall complications was 7.9%, incidence of conversion to open surgery 4.3% and incidence of recurrence was 5.4%. Conclusions Despite laparo-endoscopic approach ensures limited invasiveness, it is affected by a consistent rate of complications and oncologic inadequacy that often requires further surgical treatment. PMID:26668744

  17. Motion magnification for endoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Baxter, John S. H.; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic and laparoscopic surgeries are used for many minimally invasive procedures but limit the visual and haptic feedback available to the surgeon. This can make vessel sparing procedures particularly challenging to perform. Previous approaches have focused on hardware intensive intraoperative imaging or augmented reality systems that are difficult to integrate into the operating room. This paper presents a simple approach in which motion is visually enhanced in the endoscopic video to reveal pulsating arteries. This is accomplished by amplifying subtle, periodic changes in intensity coinciding with the patient's pulse. This method is then applied to two procedures to illustrate its potential. The first, endoscopic third ventriculostomy, is a neurosurgical procedure where the floor of the third ventricle must be fenestrated without injury to the basilar artery. The second, nerve-sparing robotic prostatectomy, involves removing the prostate while limiting damage to the neurovascular bundles. In both procedures, motion magnification can enhance subtle pulsation in these structures to aid in identifying and avoiding them.

  18. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  19. Endoscopic inter laminar management of lumbar disease

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Kher, Yatin; Bhatele, Pushp Raj

    2016-01-01

    Discectomy for lumbar disc provides faster relief in acute attack than does conservative management. Long-term results of open, microscopy-, and endoscopy-assisted discectomy are same. Early results of endoscopy-assisted surgery are better as compared to that of open surgery in terms of better visualization, smaller incision, reduced hospital stay, better education, lower cost, less pain, early return to work, and rehabilitation. Although microscopic discectomy also has comparable advantages, endoscopic-assisted technique better addresses opposite side pathology. Inter laminar technique (ILT) and trans foraminal technique (TFT) are two main endoscopic approaches for lumbar pathologies. Endoscopy-assisted ILT can be performed in recurrent, migrated, and calcified discs. All lumbar levels including L5-S1 level, intracanalicular, foraminal disc, lumbar canal and lateral recess stenosis, multiple levels, and bilateral lesions can be managed by ILT. Migrated, calcified discs, L5-S1 pathology, lumbar canal, and lateral recess stenosis can be better approached by ILT than by TFT. Most spinal surgeons are familiar with anatomy of ILT. It can be safely performed in foramen stenosis and in uncooperative and anxious patients. There is less risk of exiting nerve root damage, especially in short pedicles and in presence of facet osteophytes as compared to TFT. On the other hand, ILT is more invasive than TFT with more chances of perforations of the dura matter, pseudomeningocele formation, and cerebrospinal fluid fistula in early learning curve. Obtaining microsurgical experience, attending workshops, and suitable patient selection can help shorten the learning curve. Once adequate skill is acquired, this procedure is safe and effective. The surgeon must be prepared to convert to an open procedure, especially in early learning curve. Spinal endoscopy is likely to achieve more roles in future. Endoscopy-assisted ILT is a safer alternative to the microscopic technique. PMID

  20. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Gastric Cancer: Getting It Right!

    PubMed

    Oda, Ichiro; Suzuki, Harushisa; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection is a widely accepted less-invasive treatment technique for local resection of early gastric cancer (EGC) lesions with a negligible risk of lymph node metastasis. Remarkable progress has been made during the last decade in this field, both in terms of expansion of the indications (to larger lesions and to lesions with ulceration) and in terms of technical improvements from endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) to endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Previously, larger lesions and lesions with ulceration were resected surgically because of the difficulty in effectively using EMR in this context. ESD however allows a high rate of en bloc resections, regardless of tumor location, tumor size, or the presence of ulceration. Nonetheless, ESD also has drawbacks: the procedure time is increased, ESD is more technically challenging compared to EMR, and, finally, ESD is associated with a slightly higher risk of complications. In order to overcome these limitations and minimize complications, a step-by-step process is important for learning ESD techniques. This chapter addresses the indications, results, some technical tips, and complications of ESD for EGC. PMID:27573778