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Sample records for endosomal lipid transport

  1. Lipid compartmentalization in the endosome system.

    PubMed

    Hullin-Matsuda, Françoise; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Greimel, Peter; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2014-07-01

    Lipids play an essential role in the structure of the endosomal membranes as well as in their dynamic rearrangement during the transport of internalized cargoes along the endocytic pathway. In this review, we discuss the function of endosomal lipids mainly in mammalian cells, focusing on two well-known components of the lipid rafts, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, as well as on three anionic phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, polyphosphoinositides and the atypical phospholipid, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate/lysobisphosphatidic acid. We detail the structure, metabolism, distribution and role of these lipids in the endosome system as well as their importance in pathological conditions where modification of the endosomal membrane flow can lead to various diseases such as lipid-storage diseases, myopathies and neuropathies. PMID:24747366

  2. Studying lipids involved in the endosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Bissig, Christin; Johnson, Shem; Gruenberg, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Endosomes along the degradation pathway exhibit a multivesicular appearance and differ in their lipid compositions. Association of proteins to specific membrane lipids and presumably also lipid-lipid interactions contribute to the formation of functional membrane platforms that regulate endosome biogenesis and function. This chapter provides a brief review of the functions of endosomal lipids in the degradation pathway, a discussion of techniques that allow studying lipid-based mechanisms and a selection of step-by-step protocols for in vivo and in vitro methods commonly used to study lipid roles in endocytosis. The techniques described here have been used to elucidate the function of the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid and allow the monitoring of lipid distribution, levels and dynamics, as well as the characterization of lipid-binding partners. PMID:22325596

  3. Lipid Sorting and Multivesicular Endosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bissig, Christin

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular organelles, including endosomes, show differences not only in protein but also in lipid composition. It is becoming clear from the work of many laboratories that the mechanisms necessary to achieve such lipid segregation can operate at very different levels, including the membrane biophysical properties, the interactions with other lipids and proteins, and the turnover rates or distribution of metabolic enzymes. In turn, lipids can directly influence the organelle membrane properties by changing biophysical parameters and by recruiting partner effector proteins involved in protein sorting and membrane dynamics. In this review, we will discuss how lipids are sorted in endosomal membranes and how they impact on endosome functions. PMID:24086044

  4. Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) Complexes Induce Phase-separated Microdomains in Supported Lipid Bilayers*

    PubMed Central

    Boura, Evzen; Ivanov, Vassili; Carlson, Lars-Anders; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Hurley, James H.

    2012-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) system traffics ubiquitinated cargo to lysosomes via an unusual membrane budding reaction that is directed away from the cytosol. Here, we show that human ESCRT-II self-assembles into clusters of 10–100 molecules on supported lipid bilayers. The ESCRT-II clusters are functional in that they bind to ubiquitin and the ESCRT-III subunit VPS20 at nanomolar concentrations on membranes with the same stoichiometries observed in solution and in crystals. The clusters only form when cholesterol is included in the lipid mixture at >10 mol %. The clusters induce the formation of ordered membrane domains that exclude the dye 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindodicarbo-cyanine perchlorate. These results show that ESCRT complexes are capable of inducing lateral lipid phase separation under conditions where the lipids themselves do not spontaneously phase-separate. This property could facilitate ESCRT-mediated membrane budding. PMID:22718754

  5. Endosomal Transportation via Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Robert C.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Cell survival, growth, differentiation, and homeostasis all rely on exquisite control over the abundance of particular cell surface membrane proteins. Cell surface proteins must respond appropriately to environmental as well as intracellular cues, often undergoing regulated internalization and lysosomal degradation. In addition, cell surface proteins can sustain damage and must be recognized and removed. A unifying mechanism has now emerged for the trafficking of damaged and downregulated proteins to the lysosome by their attachment to ubiquitin, which serves as a sorting signal for clathrin-mediated internalization and sorting into the lumen of late endosomes. Major questions remain as to how this broad system is governed, how it is adapted to meet the needs of particular cell surface proteins, and whether Ub serves as more than a one-way ticket to the lysosome for degradation. Here we highlight recent insights into these questions and the challenges that remain. PMID:21955996

  6. Wnt directs the endosomal flux of LDL-derived cholesterol and lipid droplet homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Cameron C; Vossio, Stefania; Vacca, Fabrizio; Snijder, Berend; Larios, Jorge; Schaad, Olivier; Guex, Nicolas; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Martin, Olivier; Chambon, Marc; Turcatti, Gerardo; Pelkmans, Lucas; Gruenberg, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt pathway, which controls crucial steps of the development and differentiation programs, has been proposed to influence lipid storage and homeostasis. In this paper, using an unbiased strategy based on high-content genome-wide RNAi screens that monitored lipid distribution and amounts, we find that Wnt3a regulates cellular cholesterol. We show that Wnt3a stimulates the production of lipid droplets and that this stimulation strictly depends on endocytosed, LDL-derived cholesterol and on functional early and late endosomes. We also show that Wnt signaling itself controls cholesterol endocytosis and flux along the endosomal pathway, which in turn modulates cellular lipid homeostasis. These results underscore the importance of endosome functions for LD formation and reveal a previously unknown regulatory mechanism of the cellular programs controlling lipid storage and endosome transport under the control of Wnt signaling. PMID:25851648

  7. Endosome-to-cytosol transport of viral nucleocapsids.

    PubMed

    Le Blanc, Isabelle; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Pons, Véronique; Ferguson, Charles; Emans, Neil; Petiot, Anne; Mayran, Nathalie; Demaurex, Nicolas; Fauré, Julien; Sadoul, Rémy; Parton, Robert G; Gruenberg, J

    2005-07-01

    During viral infection, fusion of the viral envelope with endosomal membranes and nucleocapsid release were thought to be concomitant events. We show here that for the vesicular stomatitis virus they occur sequentially, at two successive steps of the endocytic pathway. Fusion already occurs in transport intermediates between early and late endosomes, presumably releasing the nucleocapsid within the lumen of intra-endosomal vesicles, where it remains hidden. Transport to late endosomes is then required for the nucleocapsid to be delivered to the cytoplasm. This last step, which initiates infection, depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is regulated by phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) signalling via the PtdIns3P-binding protein Snx16. We conclude that the nucleocapsid is exported into the cytoplasm after the back-fusion of internal vesicles with the limiting membrane of late endosomes, and that this process is controlled by the phospholipids LBPA and PtdIns3P and their effectors. PMID:15951806

  8. ER contact sites direct late endosome transport.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Neefjes, Jacques; Berlin, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    Endosomes shuttle select cargoes between cellular compartments and, in doing so, maintain intracellular homeostasis and enable interactions with the extracellular space. Directionality of endosomal transport critically impinges on cargo fate, as retrograde (microtubule minus-end directed) traffic delivers vesicle contents to the lysosome for proteolysis, while the opposing anterograde (plus-end directed) movement promotes recycling and secretion. Intriguingly, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is emerging as a key player in spatiotemporal control of late endosome and lysosome transport, through the establishment of physical contacts with these organelles. Earlier studies have described how minus-end-directed motor proteins become discharged from vesicles engaged at such contact sites. Now, Raiborg et al. implicate ER-mediated interactions, induced by protrudin, in loading plus-end-directed motor kinesin-1 onto endosomes, thereby stimulating their transport toward the cell's periphery. In this review, we recast the prevailing concepts on bidirectional late endosome transport and discuss the emerging paradigm of inter-compartmental regulation from the ER-endosome interface viewpoint. PMID:26440125

  9. Biomechanics and Thermodynamics of Nanoparticle Interactions with Plasma and Endosomal Membrane Lipids in Cellular Uptake and Endosomal Escape

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To be effective for cytoplasmic delivery of therapeutics, nanoparticles (NPs) taken up via endocytic pathways must efficiently transport across the cell membrane and subsequently escape from the secondary endosomes. We hypothesized that the biomechanical and thermodynamic interactions of NPs with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids are involved in these processes. Using model plasma and endosomal lipid membranes, we compared the interactions of cationic NPs composed of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) modified with the dichain surfactant didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) or the single-chain surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) vs anionic unmodified NPs of similar size. We validated our hypothesis in doxorubicin-sensitive (MCF-7, with relatively fluid membranes) and resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR, with rigid membranes). Despite their cationic surface charges, DMAB- and CTAB-modified NPs showed different patterns of biophysical interaction: DMAB-modified NPs induced bending of the model plasma membrane, whereas CTAB-modified NPs condensed the membrane, thereby resisted bending. Unmodified NPs showed no effects on bending. DMAB-modified NPs also induced thermodynamic instability of the model endosomal membrane, whereas CTAB-modified and unmodified NPs had no effect. Since bending of the plasma membrane and destabilization of the endosomal membrane are critical biophysical processes in NP cellular uptake and endosomal escape, respectively, we tested these NPs for cellular uptake and drug efficacy. Confocal imaging showed that in both sensitive and resistant cells DMAB-modified NPs exhibited greater cellular uptake and escape from endosomes than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs. Further, paclitaxel-loaded DMAB-modified NPs induced greater cytotoxicity even in resistant cells than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs or drug in solution, demonstrating the potential of DMAB-modified NPs to overcome the transport barrier in resistant cells. In

  10. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle Rj; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie Sv; Figdor, Carl G; Ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer. PMID:26907999

  11. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle RJ; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie SV; Figdor, Carl G; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer. PMID:26907999

  12. Late endosomal membranes rich in lysobisphosphatidic acid regulate cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Beuchat, M H; Lindsay, M; Frias, S; Palmiter, R D; Sakuraba, H; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1999-06-01

    The fate of free cholesterol released after endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins remains obscure. Here we report that late endosomes have a pivotal role in intracellular cholesterol transport. We find that in the genetic disease Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), and in drug-treated cells that mimic NPC, cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes and sorting of the lysosomal enzyme receptor is impaired. Our results show that the characteristic network of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membranes contained within multivesicular late endosomes regulates cholesterol transport, presumably by acting as a collection and distribution device. The results also suggest that similar endosomal defects accompany the anti-phospholipid syndrome and NPC. PMID:10559883

  13. A FYVE zinc finger domain protein specifically links mRNA transport to endosome trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Pohlmann, Thomas; Baumann, Sebastian; Haag, Carl; Albrecht, Mario; Feldbrügge, Michael

    2015-01-01

    An emerging theme in cellular logistics is the close connection between mRNA and membrane trafficking. A prominent example is the microtubule-dependent transport of mRNAs and associated ribosomes on endosomes. This coordinated process is crucial for correct septin filamentation and efficient growth of polarised cells, such as fungal hyphae. Despite detailed knowledge on the key RNA-binding protein and the molecular motors involved, it is unclear how mRNAs are connected to membranes during transport. Here, we identify a novel factor containing a FYVE zinc finger domain for interaction with endosomal lipids and a new PAM2-like domain required for interaction with the MLLE domain of the key RNA-binding protein. Consistently, loss of this FYVE domain protein leads to specific defects in mRNA, ribosome, and septin transport without affecting general functions of endosomes or their movement. Hence, this is the first endosomal component specific for mRNP trafficking uncovering a new mechanism to couple mRNPs to endosomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06041.001 PMID:25985087

  14. Post-Golgi anterograde transport requires GARP-dependent endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Tetsuya; Fujita, Morihisa; Nakamura, Shota; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Murakami, Yoshiko; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2015-01-01

    The importance of endosome-to–trans-Golgi network (TGN) retrograde transport in the anterograde transport of proteins is unclear. In this study, genome-wide screening of the factors necessary for efficient anterograde protein transport in human haploid cells identified subunits of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex, a tethering factor involved in endosome-to-TGN transport. Knockout (KO) of each of the four GARP subunits, VPS51–VPS54, in HEK293 cells caused severely defective anterograde transport of both glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins from the TGN. Overexpression of VAMP4, v-SNARE, in VPS54-KO cells partially restored not only endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport, but also anterograde transport of both GPI-anchored and transmembrane proteins. Further screening for genes whose overexpression normalized the VPS54-KO phenotype identified TMEM87A, encoding an uncharacterized Golgi-resident membrane protein. Overexpression of TMEM87A or its close homologue TMEM87B in VPS54-KO cells partially restored endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport and anterograde transport. Therefore GARP- and VAMP4-dependent endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport is required for recycling of molecules critical for efficient post-Golgi anterograde transport of cell-surface integral membrane proteins. In addition, TMEM87A and TMEM87B are involved in endosome-to-TGN retrograde transport. PMID:26157166

  15. Cell-Penetrating Peptide Induces Leaky Fusion of Liposomes Containing Late Endosome-Specific Anionic Lipid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Zaitseva, Elena; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Melikov, Kamran

    2010-01-01

    Cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a promising vehicle for the delivery of macromolecular drugs. Although many studies have indicated that CPPs enter cells by endocytosis, the mechanisms by which they cross endosomal membranes remain elusive. On the basis of experiments with liposomes, we propose that CPP escape into the cytosol is based on leaky fusion (i.e., fusion associated with the permeabilization of membranes) of the bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP)-enriched membranes of late endosomes. In our experiments, prototypic CPP HIV-1 TAT peptide did not interact with liposomes mimicking the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, but it did induce lipid mixing and membrane leakage as it translocated into liposomes mimicking the lipid composition of late endosome. Both membrane leakage and lipid mixing depended on the BMP content and were promoted at acidic pH, which is characteristic of late endosomes. Substitution of BMP with its structural isomer, phosphatidylglycerol (PG), significantly reduced both leakage of the aqueous probe from liposomes and lipid mixing between liposomes. Although affinity of binding to TAT was similar for BMP and PG, BMP exhibited a higher tendency to support the inverted hexagonal phase than PG. Finally, membrane leakage and peptide translocation were both inhibited by inhibitors of lipid mixing, further substantiating the hypothesis that cationic peptides cross BMP-enriched membranes by inducing leaky fusion between them. PMID:20959093

  16. A sterol binding protein integrates endosomal lipid metabolism with TOR signaling and nitrogen sensing

    PubMed Central

    Mousley, Carl J.; Yuan, Peihua; Gaur, Naseem A.; Trettin, Kyle D.; Nile, Aaron H.; Deminoff, Stephen J.; Dewar, Brian J.; Wolpert, Max; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Herman, Paul K.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Kes1, and other oxysterol binding protein (OSBP) superfamily members, are involved in membrane and lipid trafficking through trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomal systems. We demonstrate that Kes1 represents a sterol-regulated antagonist of TGN/endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate signaling. This regulation modulates TOR activation by amino acids, and dampens gene expression driven by Gcn4; the primary transcriptional activator of the general amino acid control regulon. Kes1-mediated repression of Gcn4 transcription factor activity is characterized by nonproductive Gcn4 binding to its target sequences, involves TGN/endosome-derived sphingolipid signaling, and requires activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module of the enigmatic ‘large Mediator’ complex. These data describe a pathway by which Kes1 integrates lipid metabolism with TORC1 signaling and nitrogen sensing. PMID:22341443

  17. Peroxisomes, lipid droplets, and endoplasmic reticulum "hitchhike" on motile early endosomes.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Sofia C; Schuster, Martin; Bielska, Ewa; Dagdas, Gulay; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Meadows, Ben R A; Schrader, Michael; Steinberg, Gero

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular transport is mediated by molecular motors that bind cargo to be transported along the cytoskeleton. Here, we report, for the first time, that peroxisomes (POs), lipid droplets (LDs), and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) rely on early endosomes (EEs) for intracellular movement in a fungal model system. We show that POs undergo kinesin-3- and dynein-dependent transport along microtubules. Surprisingly, kinesin-3 does not colocalize with POs. Instead, the motor moves EEs that drag the POs through the cell. PO motility is abolished when EE motility is blocked in various mutants. Most LD and ER motility also depends on EE motility, whereas mitochondria move independently of EEs. Covisualization studies show that EE-mediated ER motility is not required for PO or LD movement, suggesting that the organelles interact with EEs independently. In the absence of EE motility, POs and LDs cluster at the growing tip, whereas ER is partially retracted to subapical regions. Collectively, our results show that moving EEs interact transiently with other organelles, thereby mediating their directed transport and distribution in the cell. PMID:26620910

  18. Peroxisomes, lipid droplets, and endoplasmic reticulum “hitchhike” on motile early endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Sofia C.; Schuster, Martin; Bielska, Ewa; Dagdas, Gulay; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Meadows, Ben R.A.; Schrader, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular transport is mediated by molecular motors that bind cargo to be transported along the cytoskeleton. Here, we report, for the first time, that peroxisomes (POs), lipid droplets (LDs), and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) rely on early endosomes (EEs) for intracellular movement in a fungal model system. We show that POs undergo kinesin-3– and dynein-dependent transport along microtubules. Surprisingly, kinesin-3 does not colocalize with POs. Instead, the motor moves EEs that drag the POs through the cell. PO motility is abolished when EE motility is blocked in various mutants. Most LD and ER motility also depends on EE motility, whereas mitochondria move independently of EEs. Covisualization studies show that EE-mediated ER motility is not required for PO or LD movement, suggesting that the organelles interact with EEs independently. In the absence of EE motility, POs and LDs cluster at the growing tip, whereas ER is partially retracted to subapical regions. Collectively, our results show that moving EEs interact transiently with other organelles, thereby mediating their directed transport and distribution in the cell. PMID:26620910

  19. Kinesin-3 and dynein mediate microtubule-dependent co-transport of mRNPs and endosomes.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Sebastian; Pohlmann, Thomas; Jungbluth, Marc; Brachmann, Andreas; Feldbrügge, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Long-distance transport of mRNAs is important in determining polarity in eukaryotes. Molecular motors shuttle large ribonucleoprotein complexes (mRNPs) containing RNA-binding proteins and associated factors along microtubules. However, precise mechanisms including the interplay of molecular motors and a potential connection to membrane trafficking remain elusive. Here, we solve the motor composition of transported mRNPs containing the RNA-binding protein Rrm4 of the pathogen Ustilago maydis. The underlying transport process determines the axis of polarity in infectious filaments. Plus-end-directed Kin3, a kinesin-3 type motor, mediates anterograde transport of mRNPs and is also present in transport units moving retrogradely. Split dynein Dyn1-Dyn2 functions in retrograde movement of mRNPs. Plus-end-directed conventional kinesin Kin1 is indirectly involved by transporting minus-end-directed dynein back to plus ends. Importantly, we additionally demonstrate that Rrm4-containing mRNPs colocalise with the t-SNARE Yup1 on shuttling endosomes and that functional endosomes are essential for mRNP movement. Either loss of Kin3 or removal of its lipid-binding pleckstrin-homology domain abolishes Rrm4-dependent movement without preventing colocalisation of Rrm4 and Yup1-positive endosomes. In summary, we uncovered the combination of motors required for mRNP shuttling along microtubules. Furthermore, intimately linked co-transport of endosomes and mRNPs suggests vesicle hitchhiking as mode of mRNP transport. PMID:22357951

  20. Entry of Bluetongue Virus Capsid Requires the Late Endosome-specific Lipid Lysobisphosphatidic Acid.

    PubMed

    Patel, Avnish; Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-06-01

    The entry of viruses into host cells is one of the key processes of infection. The mechanisms of cellular entry for enveloped virus have been well studied. The fusion proteins as well as the facilitating cellular lipid factors involved in the viral fusion entry process have been well characterized. The process of non-enveloped virus cell entry, in comparison, remains poorly defined, particularly for large complex capsid viruses of the family Reoviridae, which comprises a range of mammalian pathogens. These viruses enter cells without the aid of a limiting membrane and thus cannot fuse with host cell membranes to enter cells. Instead, these viruses are believed to penetrate membranes of the host cell during endocytosis. However, the molecular mechanism of this process is largely undefined. Here we show, utilizing an in vitro liposome penetration assay and cell biology, that bluetongue virus (BTV), an archetypal member of the Reoviridae, utilizes the late endosome-specific lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid for productive membrane penetration and viral entry. Further, we provide preliminary evidence that lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid facilitates pore expansion during membrane penetration, suggesting a mechanism for lipid factor requirement of BTV. This finding indicates that despite the lack of a membrane envelope, the entry process of BTV is similar in specific lipid requirements to enveloped viruses that enter cells through the late endosome. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that a large non-enveloped virus of the Reoviridae has specific lipid requirements for membrane penetration and host cell entry. PMID:27036941

  1. Entry of Bluetongue Virus Capsid Requires the Late Endosome-specific Lipid Lysobisphosphatidic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Avnish; Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    The entry of viruses into host cells is one of the key processes of infection. The mechanisms of cellular entry for enveloped virus have been well studied. The fusion proteins as well as the facilitating cellular lipid factors involved in the viral fusion entry process have been well characterized. The process of non-enveloped virus cell entry, in comparison, remains poorly defined, particularly for large complex capsid viruses of the family Reoviridae, which comprises a range of mammalian pathogens. These viruses enter cells without the aid of a limiting membrane and thus cannot fuse with host cell membranes to enter cells. Instead, these viruses are believed to penetrate membranes of the host cell during endocytosis. However, the molecular mechanism of this process is largely undefined. Here we show, utilizing an in vitro liposome penetration assay and cell biology, that bluetongue virus (BTV), an archetypal member of the Reoviridae, utilizes the late endosome-specific lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid for productive membrane penetration and viral entry. Further, we provide preliminary evidence that lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid facilitates pore expansion during membrane penetration, suggesting a mechanism for lipid factor requirement of BTV. This finding indicates that despite the lack of a membrane envelope, the entry process of BTV is similar in specific lipid requirements to enveloped viruses that enter cells through the late endosome. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that a large non-enveloped virus of the Reoviridae has specific lipid requirements for membrane penetration and host cell entry. PMID:27036941

  2. Discovery of a vezatin-like protein for dynein-mediated early endosome transport

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xuanli; Arst, Herbert N.; Wang, Xiangfeng; Xiang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Early endosomes are transported bidirectionally by cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-3, but how the movements are regulated in vivo remains unclear. Here our forward genetic study led to the discovery of VezA, a vezatin-like protein in Aspergillus nidulans, as a factor critical for early endosome distribution. Loss of vezA causes an abnormal accumulation of early endosomes at the hyphal tip, where microtubule plus ends are located. This abnormal accumulation depends on kinesin-3 and is due to a decrease in the frequency but not the speed of dynein-mediated early endosome movement. VezA-GFP signals are enriched at the hypha tip in an actin-dependent manner but are not obviously associated with early endosomes, thus differing from the early endosome association of the cargo adapter HookA (Hook in A. nidulans). On loss of VezA, HookA associates normally with early endosomes, but the interaction between dynein-dynactin and the early-endosome-bound HookA is significantly decreased. However, VezA is not required for linking dynein-dynactin to the cytosolic ∆C-HookA, lacking the cargo-binding C-terminus. These results identify VezA as a novel regulator required for the interaction between dynein and the Hook-bound early endosomes in vivo. PMID:26378255

  3. Association of γ-Secretase with Lipid Rafts in Post-Golgi and Endosome Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Vetrivel, Kulandaivelu S.; Cheng, Haipeng; Lin, William; Sakurai, Takashi; Li, Tong; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Wong, Philip C.; Xu, Huaxi; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease-associated β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) are generated by the sequential proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. There is growing evidence that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains are involved in regulating trafficking and processing of APP. BACE1, the major γ-secretase in neurons is a palmi-toylated transmembrane protein that resides in lipid rafts. A subset of APP is subject to amyloidogenic processing by BACE1 in lipid rafts, and this process depends on the integrity of lipid rafts. Here we describe the association of all four components of the γ-secretase complex, namely presenilin 1 (PS1)-derived fragments, mature nicastrin, APH-1, and PEN-2, with cholesterol-rich detergent insoluble membrane (DIM) domains of non-neuronal cells and neurons that fulfill the criteria of lipid rafts. In PS1−/−/PS2−/− and NCT−/− fibroblasts, γ-secretase components that still remain fail to become detergent-resistant, suggesting that raft association requires γ-secretase complex assembly. Biochemical evidence shows that subunits of the γ-secretase complex and three TGN/endosome-resident SNAREs cofractionate in sucrose density gradients, and show similar solubility or insolubility characteristics in distinct non-ionic and zwitterionic detergents, indicative of their co-residence in membrane microdomains with similar protein-lipid composition. This notion is confirmed using magnetic immunoisolation of PS1- or syntaxin 6-positive membrane patches from a mixture of membranes with similar buoyant densities following Lubrol WX extraction or sonication, and gradient centrifugation. These findings are consistent with the localization of γ-secretase in lipid raft microdomains of post-Golgi and endosomes, organelles previously implicated in amyloidogenic processing of APP. PMID:15322084

  4. Overexpression of Rab22a hampers the transport between endosomes and the Golgi apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mesa, Rosana; Magadan, Javier; Barbieri, Alejandro; Lopez, Cecilia; Stahl, Philip D.; Mayorga, Luis S. . E-mail: lmayorga@fcm.uncu.edu.ar

    2005-04-01

    The transport and sorting of soluble and membrane-associated macromolecules arriving at endosomal compartments require a complex set of Rab proteins. Rab22a has been localized to the endocytic compartment; however, very little is known about the function of Rab22a and inconsistent results have been reported in studies performed in different cell lines. To characterize the function of Rab22a in endocytic transport, the wild-type protein (Rab22a WT), a hydrolysis-deficient mutant (Rab22a Q64L), and a mutant with reduced affinity for GTP (Rab22a S19N) were expressed in CHO cells. None of the three Rab22a constructs affected the transport of rhodamine-dextran to lysosomes, the digestion of internalized proteins, or the lysosomal localization of cathepsin D. In contrast with the mild effect of Rab22a on the endosome-lysosome route, cells expressing Rab22a WT and Rab22a Q64L presented a strong delay in the retrograde transport of cholera toxin from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus. Moreover, these cells accumulated the cation independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor in endosomes. These observations indicate that Rab22a can affect the trafficking from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus probably by promoting fusion among endosomes and impairing the proper segregation of membrane domains required for targeting to the trans-Golgi network (TGN)

  5. Imaging and Quantitation Techniques for Tracking Cargo along Endosome-to-Golgi Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Gleeson, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the resolution of light microscopy, coupled with the development of a range of fluorescent-based probes, have provided new approaches to dissecting membrane domains and the regulation of membrane trafficking. Here, we review these advances, as well as highlight developments in quantitative image analysis and novel unbiased analytical approaches to quantitate protein localization. The application of these approaches to endosomal sorting and endosome-to-Golgi transport is discussed. PMID:24709647

  6. Global Analysis of Yeast Endosomal Transport Identifies the Vps55/68 Sorting Complex

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Cayetana; Lam, Karen K.Y.; Brumm, Jochen; Wu, Bella W.; Saunders, Matthew; Stevens, Tom H.

    2008-01-01

    Endosomal transport is critical for cellular processes ranging from receptor down-regulation and retroviral budding to the immune response. A full understanding of endosome sorting requires a comprehensive picture of the multiprotein complexes that orchestrate vesicle formation and fusion. Here, we use unsupervised, large-scale phenotypic analysis and a novel computational approach for the global identification of endosomal transport factors. This technique effectively identifies components of known and novel protein assemblies. We report the characterization of a previously undescribed endosome sorting complex that contains two well-conserved proteins with four predicted membrane-spanning domains. Vps55p and Vps68p form a complex that acts with or downstream of ESCRT function to regulate endosomal trafficking. Loss of Vps68p disrupts recycling to the TGN as well as onward trafficking to the vacuole without preventing the formation of lumenal vesicles within the MVB. Our results suggest the Vps55/68 complex mediates a novel, conserved step in the endosomal maturation process. PMID:18216282

  7. EHD3 regulates early-endosome-to-Golgi transport and preserves Golgi morphology

    PubMed Central

    Naslavsky, Naava; McKenzie, Jenna; Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Sheff, David; Caplan, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Summary Depletion of EHD3 affects sorting in endosomes by altering the kinetics and route of receptor recycling to the plasma membrane. Here we demonstrate that siRNA knockdown of EHD3, or its interaction partner rabenosyn-5, causes redistribution of sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) to enlarged early endosomes and disrupts transport of internalized Shiga toxin B subunit (STxB) to the Golgi. Moreover, under these conditions, Golgi morphology appears as a series of highly dispersed and fragmented stacks that maintain characteristics of cis-, medial- and trans-Golgi membranes. Although Arf1 still assembled onto these dispersed Golgi membranes, the level of AP-1 γ-adaptin recruited to the Golgi was diminished. Whereas VSV-G-secretion from the dispersed Golgi remained largely unaffected, the distribution of mannose 6-phosphate receptor (M6PR) was altered: it remained in peripheral endosomes and did not return to the Golgi. Cathepsin D, a hydrolase that is normally transported to lysosomes via an M6PR-dependent pathway, remained trapped at the Golgi. Our findings support a role for EHD3 in regulating endosome-to-Golgi transport, and as a consequence, lysosomal biosynthetic, but not secretory, transport pathways are also affected. These data also suggest that impaired endosome-to-Golgi transport and the resulting lack of recruitment of AP-1 γ-adaptin to Golgi membranes affect Golgi morphology. PMID:19139087

  8. Endosomal vesicles as vehicles for viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Adel M.; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic pathway is the principal cell entry pathway for large cargo and pathogens. Among the wide variety of specialized lipid structures within endosomes, the intraluminal vesicles formed in early endosomes and transferred to late endosomal compartments are emerging as critical effectors of viral infection and immune recognition. Various viruses deliver their genomes into these intraluminal vesicles, which serve as vehicles to transport the genome to the nuclear periphery for replication. When secreted as exosomes, intraluminal vesicles containing viral genomes can infect permissive cells, or activate immune responses in myeloid cells. We therefore propose that endosomal intraluminal vesicles and exosomes are key effectors of viral pathogenesis. PMID:24746011

  9. A Role for EHD4 in the Regulation of Early Endosomal Transport

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mahak; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2009-01-01

    All four of the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain (EHD) proteins have been implicated in the regulation of endocytic trafficking. However, the high level of amino acid sequence identity among these proteins has made it challenging to elucidate the precise function of individual EHD proteins. We demonstrate here with specific peptide antibodies that endogenous EHD4 localizes to Rab5-, early embryonic antigen 1 (EEA1)- and Arf6-containing endosomes and colocalizes with internalized transferrin in the cell periphery. Knock-down of EHD4 expression by both small interfering RNA and short hairpin RNA leads to the generation of enlarged early endosomal structures that contain Rab5 and EEA1 as well as internalized transferrin or major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. In addition, cargo destined for degradation, such as internalized low-density lipoprotein, also accumulates in the enlarged early endosomes in EHD4-depleted cells. Moreover, we have demonstrated that these enlarged early endosomes are enriched in levels of the activated GTP-bound Rab5. Finally, we show that endogenous EHD4 and EHD1 interact in cells, suggesting coordinated involvement in the regulation of receptor transport along the early endosome to endocytic recycling compartment axis. The results presented herein provide evidence that EHD4 is involved in the control of trafficking at the early endosome and regulates exit of cargo toward both the recycling compartment and the late endocytic pathway. PMID:18331452

  10. Quantitative Evaluation of DNA Dissociation from Liposome Carriers and DNA Escape from Endosomes During Lipid-Mediated Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Salomé; Duarte, Sofia; Monteiro, Gabriel A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nonviral vectors are highly attractive for gene therapy from a clinical point of view, and cationic lipid nanoparticles in particular have generated considerable interest. However, despite considerable recent advances, problems associated with low transfection efficiencies remain to be resolved to fully meet the potential of these vectors. The trafficking of plasmid DNA (pDNA) from the extracellular space up to the nucleus is prevented by several barriers, including liposome/pDNA dissociation within the endosome and pDNA escape into the cytosol. The aim of this work was to develop and optimize a tool that could offer simultaneous quantitative information both on the intracellular dissociation of oligonucleotides from lipid nanoparticles, and on the DNA escape from endocytic compartments. The ability to follow in real time both of these processes simultaneously (in a quantitative manner) is expected to be of high value in the rationalization and conception of new lipid nanoparticle vectors for gene delivery for therapeutic purposes. To this effect, a combination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and colocalization microscopy was employed. We show that it is possible to distinguish between liposome/pDNA dissociation and depletion of DNA within endosomes, providing resolution for the detection of intermediate species between endocytic particles with intact lipoplexes and endosomes devoid of DNA because of DNA escape or degradation. We demonstrate that after endocytosis, exceptionally few endocytic particles are found to exhibit simultaneously DNA/lipid colocalization and low FRET (DNA/lipid dissociation). These results clearly point to an extremely short-lived state for free plasmid within endosomes, which either escapes at once to the cytosol or is degraded within the endocytic compartment (because of exposure of DNA). It is possible that this limitation greatly contributes to reduction in probability of successful gene delivery through cationic

  11. Integrated Conformational and Lipid-Sensing Regulation of Endosomal ArfGEF BRAG2

    PubMed Central

    Aizel, Kaheina; Biou, Valérie; Navaza, Jorge; Duarte, Lionel V.; Campanacci, Valérie; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Zeghouf, Mahel

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) coordinate their subcellular targeting to their activation of small GTPases remain poorly understood. Here we analyzed how membranes control the efficiency of human BRAG2, an ArfGEF involved in receptor endocytosis, Wnt signaling, and tumor invasion. The crystal structure of an Arf1–BRAG2 complex that mimics a membrane-bound intermediate revealed an atypical PH domain that is constitutively anchored to the catalytic Sec7 domain and interacts with Arf. Combined with the quantitative analysis of BRAG2 exchange activity reconstituted on membranes, we find that this PH domain potentiates nucleotide exchange by about 2,000-fold by cumulative conformational and membrane-targeting contributions. Furthermore, it restricts BRAG2 activity to negatively charged membranes without phosphoinositide specificity, using a positively charged surface peripheral to but excluding the canonical lipid-binding pocket. This suggests a model of BRAG2 regulation along the early endosomal pathway that expands the repertoire of GEF regulatory mechanisms. Notably, it departs from the auto-inhibitory and feedback loop paradigm emerging from studies of SOS and cytohesins. It also uncovers a novel mechanism of unspecific lipid-sensing by PH domains that may allow sustained binding to maturating membranes. PMID:24058294

  12. A potential role for guanine nucleotide-binding protein in the regulation of endosomal proton transport.

    PubMed Central

    Gurich, R W; Codina, J; DuBose, T D

    1991-01-01

    The effects of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and GTP-gamma-S, known activators of GTP binding proteins, on proton transport were investigated in endosome-enriched vesicles (endosomes). Endosomes were prepared from rabbit renal cortex following the intravenous injection of FITC-dextran. The rate of intravesicular acidification was determined by measuring changes in fluorescence of FITC-dextran. Both GTP and GTP-gamma-S stimulated significantly the initial rate of proton transport. In contrast, GDP-beta-S, which does not activate GTP binding proteins, inhibited proton transport. The rank order of stimulation was GTP-gamma-S greater than GTP greater than control greater than GDP-beta-S. GTP-gamma-S stimulation of proton transport was also observed under conditions in which chloride entry was eliminated, i.e., 0 mM external chloride concentration in the presence of potassium/valinomycin voltage clamping. GTP-gamma-S did not affect proton leak in endosomes as determined by collapse of H+ ATPase-generated pH gradients. ADP ribosylation by treatment of endosomal membranes with pertussis toxin revealed two substrates corresponding to the 39-41 kD region and comigrating with alpha i subunits. Pretreatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin had no effect on proton transport in the absence of GTP or GTP-gamma-S. However, pretreatment with pertussis toxin blocked the stimulation of proton transport by GTP. In contrast, as reported in other membranes by others previously, pertussis toxin did not prevent the stimulation of proton transport by GTP-gamma-S. These findings, taken together, indicate that GTP binding proteins are present in endosomal membranes derived from renal cortex and that activation of G protein by GTP and GTP-gamma-S stimulates proton transport in a rank order identical to that reported for other transport pathways modulated by Gi proteins. Therefore, these studies suggest that G proteins are capable of stimulating the vacuolar H ATPase of endosomes

  13. Negative membrane curvature catalyzes nucleation of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Kai, Hiroyuki; Carlson, Lars-Anders; Groves, Jay T; Hurley, James H

    2015-12-29

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery functions in HIV-1 budding, cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, and other pathways, in the course of which it interacts with concave membrane necks and bud rims. To test the role of membrane shape in regulating ESCRT assembly, we nanofabricated templates for invaginated supported lipid bilayers. The assembly of the core ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B/Snf7 is preferentially nucleated in the resulting 100-nm-deep membrane concavities. ESCRT-II and CHMP6 accelerate CHMP4B assembly by increasing the concentration of nucleation seeds. Superresolution imaging was used to visualize CHMP4B/Snf7 concentration in a negatively curved annulus at the rim of the invagination. Although Snf7 assemblies nucleate slowly on flat membranes, outward growth onto the flat membrane is efficiently nucleated at invaginations. The nucleation behavior provides a biophysical explanation for the timing of ESCRT-III recruitment and membrane scission in HIV-1 budding. PMID:26668364

  14. Linkage of azurophil granule secretion in neutrophils to chloride ion transport and endosomal transcytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Fittschen, C; Henson, P M

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophils contain at least two types of secretory granules. The present work links the secretion of the (lysosomal type) azurophil granules, but not that of specific granules, to endosomal transport mechanisms. (a) Selective stimulation of azurophil granule secretion by the Na-ionophore Monensin, or nonselective stimulation by FMLP after cytochalasin B pretreatment elicited marked pinocytic activity in parallel with azurophil granule release, whereas FMLP alone, selective for specific granules, elicited little fluid pinocytosis. (b) Pinosomes thus formed fused with azurophil granules, suggesting that exocytosis of azurophil granules might occur via endosomal organelles. This hypothesis was tested by determining the effect on the endosomal pathway(s) of two treatments that selectively prevent the release of azurophil granule contents without interfering with specific granule secretion, namely replacement of Cl- with gluconate- or the addition of zinc. Replacement of Cl- was found to impair the pinocytosis process itself, whereas ZnSO4 appeared to prevent the fusion between endosomes and azurophil granules. These data support the concept that the (lysosomal type) azurophil granules, but not the specific granules, are secreted through the endosomal pathway. Images PMID:8282794

  15. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid has long been recognized as an important dietary component. Dietary lipid (fat) is a critical source of metabolic energy and a substrate for the synthesis of metabolically active compounds (essential fatty acids), and serves as a carrier for other nutrients such as the fat-soluble vitamins A, ...

  16. An ER-Associated Pathway Defines Endosomal Architecture for Controlled Cargo Transport.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Berlin, Ilana; Wijdeven, Ruud H M; Janssen, Lennert; Janssen, George M C; Garstka, Malgorzata A; Janssen, Hans; Mensink, Mark; van Veelen, Peter A; Spaapen, Robbert M; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-06-30

    Through a network of progressively maturing vesicles, the endosomal system connects the cell's interior with extracellular space. Intriguingly, this network exhibits a bilateral architecture, comprised of a relatively immobile perinuclear vesicle "cloud" and a highly dynamic peripheral contingent. How this spatiotemporal organization is achieved and what function(s) it curates is unclear. Here, we reveal the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-located ubiquitin ligase Ring finger protein 26 (RNF26) as the global architect of the entire endosomal system, including the trans-Golgi network (TGN). To specify perinuclear vesicle coordinates, catalytically competent RNF26 recruits and ubiquitinates the scaffold p62/sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1), in turn attracting ubiquitin-binding domains (UBDs) of various vesicle adaptors. Consequently, RNF26 restrains fast transport of diverse vesicles through a common molecular mechanism operating at the ER membrane, until the deubiquitinating enzyme USP15 opposes RNF26 activity to allow vesicle release into the cell's periphery. By drawing the endosomal system's architecture, RNF26 orchestrates endosomal maturation and trafficking of cargoes, including signaling receptors, in space and time. PMID:27368102

  17. Cationic Polymer Intercalation into the Lipid Membrane Enables Intact Polyplex DNA Escape from Endosomes for Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Chen, Junjie; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2016-06-01

    Developing improved cationic polymer-DNA polyplexes for gene delivery requires improved understanding of DNA transport from endosomes into the nucleus. Using a FRET-capable oligonucleotide molecular beacon (OMB), we monitored the transport of intact DNA to cell organelles. We observed that for effective (jetPEI) and ineffective (G5 PAMAM) vectors, the fraction of cells displaying intact OMB in the cytosol (jetPEI ≫ G5 PAMAM) quantitatively predicted the fraction expressing transgene (jetPEI ≫ G5 PAMAM). Intact OMB delivered with PAMAM and confined to endosomes could be released to the cytosol by the subsequent addition of L-PEI, with a corresponding 10-fold increase in transgene expression. These results suggest that future vector development should optimize vectors for intercalation into, and destabilization of, the endosomal membrane. Finally, the study highlights a two-step strategy in which the pDNA is loaded in cells using one vector and endosomal release is mediated by a second agent. PMID:27111496

  18. Visualization of Rab9-mediated vesicle transport from endosomes to the trans-Golgi in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Pierre; Bittova, Lenka; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2002-01-01

    Mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs) are transported from endosomes to the trans-Golgi via a transport process that requires the Rab9 GTPase and the cargo adaptor TIP47. We have generated green fluorescent protein variants of Rab9 and determined their localization in cultured cells. Rab9 is localized primarily in late endosomes and is readily distinguished from the trans-Golgi marker galactosyltransferase. Coexpression of fluorescent Rab9 and Rab7 revealed that these two late endosome Rabs occupy distinct domains within late endosome membranes. Cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptors are enriched in the Rab9 domain relative to the Rab7 domain. TIP47 is likely to be present in this domain because it colocalizes with the receptors in fixed cells, and a TIP47 mutant disrupted endosome morphology and sequestered MPRs intracellularly. Rab9 is present on endosomes that display bidirectional microtubule-dependent motility. Rab9-positive transport vesicles fuse with the trans-Golgi network as followed by video microscopy of live cells. These data provide the first indication that Rab9-mediated endosome to trans-Golgi transport can use a vesicle (rather than a tubular) intermediate. Our data suggest that Rab9 remains vesicle associated until docking with the Golgi complex and is rapidly removed concomitant with or just after membrane fusion. PMID:11827983

  19. Regulation of membrane trafficking by signalling on endosomal and lysosomal membranes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinran; Garrity, Abigail G; Xu, Haoxing

    2013-01-01

    Endosomal and lysosomal membrane trafficking requires the coordination of multiple signalling events to control cargo sorting and processing, and endosome maturation. The initiation and termination of signalling events in endosomes and lysosomes is not well understood, but several key regulators have been identified, which include small GTPases, phosphoinositides, and Ca2+. Small GTPases act as master regulators and molecular switches in a GTP-dependent manner, initiating signalling cascades to regulate the direction and specificity of endosomal trafficking. Phosphoinositides are membrane-bound lipids that indicate vesicular identities for recruiting specific cytoplasmic proteins to endosomal membranes, thus allowing specificity of membrane fusion, fission, and cargo sorting to occur within and between specific vesicle compartments. In addition, phosphoinositides regulate the function of membrane proteins such as ion channels and transporters in a compartment-specific manner to mediate transport and signalling. Finally, Ca2+, a locally acting second messenger released from intracellular ion channels, may provide precise spatiotemporal regulation of endosomal signalling and trafficking events. Small GTPase signalling can regulate phosphoinositide conversion during endosome maturation, and electrophysiological studies on isolated endosomes have shown that endosomal and lysosomal Ca2+ channels are directly modulated by endosomal lipids. Thus trafficking and maturation of endosomes and lysosomes can be precisely regulated by dynamic changes in GTPases and membrane lipids, as well as Ca2+ signalling. Importantly, impaired phosphoinositide and Ca2+ signalling can cause endosomal and lysosomal trafficking defects at the cellular level, and a spectrum of lysosome storage diseases. PMID:23878375

  20. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and absorption. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...

  1. Retromer guides STxB and CD8-M6PR from early to recycling endosomes, EHD1 guides STxB from recycling endosome to Golgi

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Jenna E.; Raisley, Brent; Zhou, Xin; Naslavsky, Naava; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Caplan, Steve; Sheff, David

    2012-01-01

    Retrograde trafficking transports proteins, lipids and toxins from the plasma membrane to the Golgi and ER. To reach the Golgi, these cargos must transit the endosomal system, consisting of early endosomes, recycling endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes. All cargos pass through early endosomes, but may take different routes to the Golgi. Retromer dependent cargos bypass the late endosomes to reach the Golgi. We compared how two very different retromer dependent cargos negotiate the endosomal sorting system. Shiga toxin B, bound to the external layer of the plasma membrane, and chimeric CD8-Mannose-6-Phosphate Receptor, which is anchored via a transmembrane domain. Both appear to pass through the recycling endosome. Ablation of the recycling endosome diverted both of these cargos to an aberrant compartment and prevented them from reaching the Golgi. Once in the recycling endosome, Shiga toxin required EHD1 to traffic to the TGN, while the CD8-Mannose-6-Phosphate Receptor was not significantly dependent on EHD1. Knockdown of retromer components left cargo in the early endosomes, suggesting that it is required for retrograde exit from this compartment. This work establishes the recycling endosome as a required step in retrograde traffic of at least these two retromer dependent cargos. Along this pathway, retromer is associated with EE to recycling endosome traffic, while EHD1 is associated with recycling endosome to TGN traffic of STxB. PMID:22540229

  2. Endosomal transport function in yeast requires a novel AAA-type ATPase, Vps4p.

    PubMed Central

    Babst, M; Sato, T K; Banta, L M; Emr, S D

    1997-01-01

    In a late-Golgi compartment of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, vacuolar proteins such as carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) are actively sorted away from the secretory pathway and transported to the vacuole via a pre-vacuolar, endosome-like intermediate. The vacuolar protein sorting (vps) mutant vps4 accumulates vacuolar, endocytic and late-Golgi markers in an aberrant multilamellar pre-vacuolar compartment. The VPS4 gene has been cloned and found to encode a 48 kDa protein which belongs to the protein family of AAA-type ATPases. The Vps4 protein was purified and shown to exhibit an N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive ATPase activity. A single amino acid change within the AAA motif of Vps4p yielded a protein that lacked ATPase activity and did not complement the protein sorting or morphological defects of the vps4 delta1 mutant. Indeed, when expressed at normal levels in wild-type cells, the mutant vps4 gene acted as a dominant-negative allele. The phenotypic characterization of a temperature-sensitive vps4 allele showed that the immediate consequence of loss of Vps4p function is a defect in vacuolar protein delivery. In this mutant, precursor CPY was not secreted but instead accumulated in an intracellular compartment, presumably the pre-vacuolar endosome. Electron microscopy revealed that upon temperature shift, exaggerated stacks of curved cisternal membranes (aberrant endosome) also accumulated in the vps4ts mutant. Based on these and other observations, we propose that Vps4p function is required for efficient transport out of the pre-vacuolar endosome. PMID:9155008

  3. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibril-Induced Membrane Disruption Is Enhanced by Endosomal Lipids and Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Sophia C.; Sheynis, Tania; Thompson, Rebecca; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Ranson, Neil A.; Beales, Paul A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of amyloidoses are not well understood, the interaction between amyloid proteins and cell membranes is thought to play a role in several amyloid diseases. Amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), have been shown to cause disruption of anionic lipid bilayers in vitro. However, the effect of lipid composition and the chemical environment in which β2m-lipid interactions occur have not been investigated previously. Here we examine membrane damage resulting from the interaction of β2m monomers and fibrils with lipid bilayers. Using dye release, tryptophan fluorescence quenching and fluorescence confocal microscopy assays we investigate the effect of anionic lipid composition and pH on the susceptibility of liposomes to fibril-induced membrane damage. We show that β2m fibril-induced membrane disruption is modulated by anionic lipid composition and is enhanced by acidic pH. Most strikingly, the greatest degree of membrane disruption is observed for liposomes containing bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) at acidic pH, conditions likely to reflect those encountered in the endocytic pathway. The results suggest that the interaction between β2m fibrils and membranes of endosomal origin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of β2m amyloid-associated osteoarticular tissue destruction in DRA. PMID:25100247

  4. Late endosomal transport and tethering are coupled processes controlled by RILP and the cholesterol sensor ORP1L.

    PubMed

    van der Kant, Rik; Fish, Alexander; Janssen, Lennert; Janssen, Hans; Krom, Sabine; Ho, Nataschja; Brummelkamp, Thijn; Carette, Jan; Rocha, Nuno; Neefjes, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    Late endosomes and lysosomes are dynamic organelles that constantly move and fuse to acquire cargo from early endosomes, phagosomes and autophagosome. Defects in lysosomal dynamics cause severe neurodegenerative and developmental diseases, such as Niemann-Pick type C disease and ARC syndrome, yet little is known about the regulation of late endosomal fusion in a mammalian system. Mammalian endosomes destined for fusion need to be transported over very long distances before they tether to initiate contact. Here, we describe that lysosomal tethering and transport are combined processes co-regulated by one multi-protein complex: RAB7-RILP-ORP1L. We show that RILP directly and concomitantly binds the tethering HOPS complex and the p150(Glued) subunit of the dynein motor. ORP1L then functions as a cholesterol-sensing switch controlling RILP-HOPS-p150(Glued) interactions. We show that RILP and ORP1L control Ebola virus infection, a process dependent on late endosomal fusion. By combining recruitment and regulation of both the dynein motor and HOPS complex into a single multiprotein complex, the RAB7-RILP-ORP1L complex efficiently couples and regulates the timing of microtubule minus-end transport and fusion, two major events in endosomal biology. PMID:23729732

  5. Molecular assemblies and membrane domains in multivesicular endosome dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Falguieres, Thomas; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Gruenberg, Jean

    2009-05-15

    Along the degradation pathway, endosomes exhibit a characteristic multivesicular organization, resulting from the budding of vesicles into the endosomal lumen. After endocytosis and transport to early endosomes, activated signaling receptors are incorporated into these intralumenal vesicles through the action of the ESCRT machinery, a process that contributes to terminate signaling. Then, the vesicles and their protein cargo are further transported towards lysosomes for degradation. Evidence also shows that intralumenal vesicles can undergo 'back-fusion' with the late endosome limiting membrane, a route exploited by some pathogens and presumably followed by proteins and lipids that need to be recycled from within the endosomal lumen. This process depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is presumably coupled to the invagination of the endosomal limiting membrane at the molecular level via ESCRT proteins. In this review, we discuss the intra-endosomal transport routes in mammalian cells, and in particular the different mechanisms involved in membrane invagination, vesicle formation and fusion in a space inaccessible to proteins known to control intracellular membrane traffic.

  6. Molecular assemblies and membrane domains in multivesicular endosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Falguières, Thomas; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe; Gruenberg, Jean

    2009-05-15

    Along the degradation pathway, endosomes exhibit a characteristic multivesicular organization, resulting from the budding of vesicles into the endosomal lumen. After endocytosis and transport to early endosomes, activated signaling receptors are incorporated into these intralumenal vesicles through the action of the ESCRT machinery, a process that contributes to terminate signaling. Then, the vesicles and their protein cargo are further transported towards lysosomes for degradation. Evidence also shows that intralumenal vesicles can undergo "back-fusion" with the late endosome limiting membrane, a route exploited by some pathogens and presumably followed by proteins and lipids that need to be recycled from within the endosomal lumen. This process depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is presumably coupled to the invagination of the endosomal limiting membrane at the molecular level via ESCRT proteins. In this review, we discuss the intra-endosomal transport routes in mammalian cells, and in particular the different mechanisms involved in membrane invagination, vesicle formation and fusion in a space inaccessible to proteins known to control intracellular membrane traffic. PMID:19133258

  7. Yeast Gga coat proteins function with clathrin in Golgi to endosome transport.

    PubMed

    Costaguta, G; Stefan, C J; Bensen, E S; Emr, S D; Payne, G S

    2001-06-01

    Gga proteins represent a newly recognized, evolutionarily conserved protein family with homology to the "ear" domain of the clathrin adaptor AP-1 gamma subunit. Yeast cells contain two Gga proteins, Gga1p and Gga2p, that have been proposed to act in transport between the trans-Golgi network and endosomes. Here we provide genetic and physical evidence that yeast Gga proteins function in trans-Golgi network clathrin coats. Deletion of Gga2p (gga2Delta), the major Gga protein, accentuates growth and alpha-factor maturation defects in cells carrying a temperature-sensitive allele of the clathrin heavy chain gene. Cells carrying either gga2Delta or a deletion of the AP-1 beta subunit gene (apl2Delta) alone are phenotypically normal, but cells carrying both gga2Delta and apl2Delta are defective in growth, alpha-factor maturation, and transport of carboxypeptidase S to the vacuole. Disruption of both GGA genes and APL2 results in cells so severely compromised in growth that they form only microcolonies. Gga proteins can bind clathrin in vitro and cofractionate with clathrin-coated vesicles. Our results indicate that yeast Gga proteins play an important role in cargo-selective clathrin-mediated protein traffic from the trans-Golgi network to endosomes. PMID:11408593

  8. Uptake mechanism and endosomal fate of drug-phospholipid lipid nanoparticles in subcutaneous and in situ hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Liu, Peifeng; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun; Duan, Yourong; Zhang, Zhirong

    2014-06-01

    Drug-phospholipid lipid nanoparticles (DPLNs) can effectively enhance the properties of traditional solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), as previously demonstrated by our research group and others. To date, however, very few studies have focused on the cellular uptake mechanism and fate of DPLNs in hepatoma. Therefore, we systematically studied the cellular uptake mechanism and endosomal fate of DPLNs through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry demonstrated that the Raw264.7 cell line (macrophage Raw264.7 cells), Chang cells (a human liver cell line) and HepG2 cells (a human hepatoma cell line) exhibited distinct uptake mechanisms. The Raw264.7 cells served as a model for examining liver-targeting ability. The results from mice with subcutaneous hepatomas and in situ hepatomas confirmed that the liver tumor-targeting property of the DPLNs was associated with the liver drug reservoir function. These findings further improve our understanding of DPLNs for clinical applications. PMID:24749394

  9. The protein transportation pathway from Golgi to vacuoles via endosomes plays a role in enhancement of methylmercury toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gi-Wook; Murai, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Naganuma, Akira

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury causes serious damage to the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms of methylmercury toxicity are only marginally understood. In this study, we used a gene-deletion mutant library of budding yeast to conduct genome-wide screening for gene knockouts affecting the sensitivity of methylmercury toxicity. We successfully identified 31 genes whose deletions confer resistance to methylmercury in yeast, and 18 genes whose deletions confer hypersensitivity to methylmercury. Yeast genes whose deletions conferred resistance to methylmercury included many gene encoding factors involved in protein transport to vacuoles. Detailed examination of the relationship between the factors involved in this transport system and methylmercury toxicity revealed that mutants with loss of the factors involved in the transportation pathway from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome, protein uptake into the endosome, and endosome-vacuole fusion showed higher methylmercury resistance than did wild-type yeast. The results of our genetic engineering study suggest that this vesicle transport system (proteins moving from the TGN to vacuole via endosome) is responsible for enhancing methylmercury toxicity due to the interrelationship between the pathways. There is a possibility that there may be proteins in the cell that enhance methylmercury toxicity through the protein transport system.

  10. Nanoparticle-assisted optical tethering of endosomes reveals the cooperative function of dyneins in retrograde axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, Praveen D.; Che, Daphne L.; Kaplan, Luke; Chen, Ou; Pu, Kanyi; Bawendi, Moungi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2015-01-01

    Dynein-dependent transport of organelles from the axon terminals to the cell bodies is essential to the survival and function of neurons. However, quantitative knowledge of dyneins on axonal organelles and their collective function during this long-distance transport is lacking because current technologies to do such measurements are not applicable to neurons. Here, we report a new method termed nanoparticle-assisted optical tethering of endosomes (NOTE) that made it possible to study the cooperative mechanics of dyneins on retrograde axonal endosomes in live neurons. In this method, the opposing force from an elastic tether causes the endosomes to gradually stall under load and detach with a recoil velocity proportional to the dynein forces. These recoil velocities reveal that the axonal endosomes, despite their small size, can recruit up to 7 dyneins that function as independent mechanical units stochastically sharing load, which is vital for robust retrograde axonal transport. This study shows that NOTE, which relies on controlled generation of reactive oxygen species, is a viable method to manipulate small cellular cargos that are beyond the reach of current technology. PMID:26656461

  11. Neuroblastoma Tyrosine Kinase Signaling Networks Involve FYN and LYN in Endosomes and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ailan; Stokes, Matthew P.; Kuehn, Emily D.; George, Lynn; Comb, Michael; Grimes, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a central role in creating a highly dynamic network of interacting proteins that reads and responds to signals from growth factors in the cellular microenvironment. Cells of the neural crest employ multiple signaling mechanisms to control migration and differentiation during development. It is known that defects in these mechanisms cause neuroblastoma, but how multiple signaling pathways interact to govern cell behavior is unknown. In a phosphoproteomic study of neuroblastoma cell lines and cell fractions, including endosomes and detergent-resistant membranes, 1622 phosphorylated proteins were detected, including more than half of the receptor tyrosine kinases in the human genome. Data were analyzed using a combination of graph theory and pattern recognition techniques that resolve data structure into networks that incorporate statistical relationships and protein-protein interaction data. Clusters of proteins in these networks are indicative of functional signaling pathways. The analysis indicates that receptor tyrosine kinases are functionally compartmentalized into distinct collaborative groups distinguished by activation and intracellular localization of SRC-family kinases, especially FYN and LYN. Changes in intracellular localization of activated FYN and LYN were observed in response to stimulation of the receptor tyrosine kinases, ALK and KIT. The results suggest a mechanism to distinguish signaling responses to activation of different receptors, or combinations of receptors, that govern the behavior of the neural crest, which gives rise to neuroblastoma. PMID:25884760

  12. α/β Hydrolase Domain-containing 6 (ABHD6) Degrades the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Lipid Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate*

    PubMed Central

    Pribasnig, Maria A.; Mrak, Irina; Grabner, Gernot F.; Taschler, Ulrike; Knittelfelder, Oskar; Scherz, Barbara; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Heier, Christoph; Grumet, Lukas; Kowaliuk, Jakob; Romauch, Matthias; Holler, Stefan; Anderl, Felix; Wolinski, Heimo; Lass, Achim; Breinbauer, Rolf; Marsche, Gunther; Brown, J. Mark; Zimmermann, Robert

    2015-01-01

    α/β Hydrolase domain-containing 6 (ABHD6) can act as monoacylglycerol hydrolase and is believed to play a role in endocannabinoid signaling as well as in the pathogenesis of obesity and liver steatosis. However, the mechanistic link between gene function and disease is incompletely understood. Here we aimed to further characterize the role of ABHD6 in lipid metabolism. We show that mouse and human ABHD6 degrade bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) with high specific activity. BMP, also known as lysobisphosphatidic acid, is enriched in late endosomes/lysosomes, where it plays a key role in the formation of intraluminal vesicles and in lipid sorting. Up to now, little has been known about the catabolism of this lipid. Our data demonstrate that ABHD6 is responsible for ∼90% of the BMP hydrolase activity detected in the liver and that knockdown of ABHD6 increases hepatic BMP levels. Tissue fractionation and live-cell imaging experiments revealed that ABHD6 co-localizes with late endosomes/lysosomes. The enzyme is active at cytosolic pH and lacks acid hydrolase activity, implying that it degrades BMP exported from acidic organelles or de novo-formed BMP. In conclusion, our data suggest that ABHD6 controls BMP catabolism and is therefore part of the late endosomal/lysosomal lipid-sorting machinery. PMID:26491015

  13. α/β Hydrolase Domain-containing 6 (ABHD6) Degrades the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Lipid Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate.

    PubMed

    Pribasnig, Maria A; Mrak, Irina; Grabner, Gernot F; Taschler, Ulrike; Knittelfelder, Oskar; Scherz, Barbara; Eichmann, Thomas O; Heier, Christoph; Grumet, Lukas; Kowaliuk, Jakob; Romauch, Matthias; Holler, Stefan; Anderl, Felix; Wolinski, Heimo; Lass, Achim; Breinbauer, Rolf; Marsche, Gunther; Brown, J Mark; Zimmermann, Robert

    2015-12-11

    α/β Hydrolase domain-containing 6 (ABHD6) can act as monoacylglycerol hydrolase and is believed to play a role in endocannabinoid signaling as well as in the pathogenesis of obesity and liver steatosis. However, the mechanistic link between gene function and disease is incompletely understood. Here we aimed to further characterize the role of ABHD6 in lipid metabolism. We show that mouse and human ABHD6 degrade bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) with high specific activity. BMP, also known as lysobisphosphatidic acid, is enriched in late endosomes/lysosomes, where it plays a key role in the formation of intraluminal vesicles and in lipid sorting. Up to now, little has been known about the catabolism of this lipid. Our data demonstrate that ABHD6 is responsible for ∼ 90% of the BMP hydrolase activity detected in the liver and that knockdown of ABHD6 increases hepatic BMP levels. Tissue fractionation and live-cell imaging experiments revealed that ABHD6 co-localizes with late endosomes/lysosomes. The enzyme is active at cytosolic pH and lacks acid hydrolase activity, implying that it degrades BMP exported from acidic organelles or de novo-formed BMP. In conclusion, our data suggest that ABHD6 controls BMP catabolism and is therefore part of the late endosomal/lysosomal lipid-sorting machinery. PMID:26491015

  14. Pep7p provides a novel protein that functions in vesicle-mediated transport between the yeast Golgi and endosome.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, G C; Zhang, J; Garlow, S J; Wesp, A; Riezman, H; Jones, E W

    1997-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae pep7 mutants are defective in transport of soluble vacuolar hydrolases to the lysosome-like vacuole. PEP7 is a nonessential gene that encodes a hydrophilic protein of 515 amino acids. A cysteine-rich tripartite motif in the N-terminal half of the polypeptide shows striking similarity to sequences found in many other eukaryotic proteins. Several of these proteins are thought to function in the vacuolar/lysosomal pathway. Mutations that change highly conserved cysteine residues in this motif lead to a loss of Pep7p function. Kinetic studies demonstrate that Pep7p function is required for the transport of the Golgi-precursors of the soluble hydrolases carboxypeptidase Y, proteinase A, and proteinase B to the endosome. Integral membrane hydrolase alkaline phosphatase is transported to the vacuole by a parallel intracellular pathway that does not require Pep7p function. pep7 mutants accumulate a 40-60-nm vesicle population, suggesting that Pep7p functions in a vesicle consumption step in vesicle-mediated transport of soluble hydrolases to the endosome. Whereas pep7 mutants demonstrate no defects in endocytic uptake at the plasma membrane, the mutants demonstrate defects in transport of receptor-mediated macromolecules through the endocytic pathway. Localization studies indicate that Pep7p is found both as a soluble cytoplasmic protein and associated with particulate fractions. We conclude that Pep7p functions as a novel regulator of vesicle docking and/or fusion at the endosome. Images PMID:9168472

  15. Design of Ionizable Lipids To Overcome the Limiting Step of Endosomal Escape: Application in the Intracellular Delivery of mRNA, DNA, and siRNA.

    PubMed

    Habrant, Damien; Peuziat, Pauline; Colombani, Thibault; Dallet, Laurence; Gehin, Johan; Goudeau, Emilie; Evrard, Bérangère; Lambert, Olivier; Haudebourg, Thomas; Pitard, Bruno

    2016-04-14

    The intracellular delivery of nucleic acid molecules is a complex process involving several distinct steps; among these the endosomal escape appeared to be of particular importance for an efficient protein production (or inhibition) into host cells. In the present study, a new series of ionizable vectors, derived from naturally occurring aminoglycoside tobramycin, was prepared using improved synthetic procedures that allow structural variations on the linker and hydrophobic domain levels. Complexes formed between the new ionizable lipids and mRNA, DNA, or siRNA were characterized by cryo-TEM experiments and their transfection potency was evaluated using different cell types. We demonstrated that lead molecule 30, bearing a biodegradable diester linker, formed small complexes with nucleic acids and provided very high transfection efficiency with all nucleic acids and cell types tested. The obtained results suggested that the improved and "universal" delivery properties of 30 resulted from an optimized endosomal escape, through the lipid-mixing mechanism. PMID:26943260

  16. The Serotonin Transporter Undergoes Constitutive Internalization and Is Primarily Sorted to Late Endosomes and Lysosomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Bay, Tina; Eriksen, Jacob; Gether, Ulrik; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) plays a critical role in regulating serotonin signaling by mediating reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT levels in the membrane remain poorly understood. To study trafficking of the surface resident SERT, two functional epitope-tagged variants were generated. Fusion of a FLAG-tagged one-transmembrane segment protein Tac to the SERT N terminus generated a transporter with an extracellular epitope suited for trafficking studies (TacSERT). Likewise, a construct with an extracellular antibody epitope was generated by introducing an HA (hemagglutinin) tag in the extracellular loop 2 of SERT (HA-SERT). By using TacSERT and HA-SERT in antibody-based internalization assays, we show that SERT undergoes constitutive internalization in a dynamin-dependent manner. Confocal images of constitutively internalized SERT demonstrated that SERT primarily co-localized with the late endosomal/lysosomal marker Rab7, whereas little co-localization was observed with the Rab11, a marker of the “long loop” recycling pathway. This sorting pattern was distinct from that of a prototypical recycling membrane protein, the β2-adrenergic receptor. Furthermore, internalized SERT co-localized with the lysosomal marker LysoTracker and not with transferrin. The sorting pattern was further confirmed by visualizing internalization of SERT using the fluorescent cocaine analog JHC1-64 and by reversible and pulse-chase biotinylation assays showing evidence for lysosomal degradation of the internalized transporter. Finally, we found that SERT internalized in response to stimulation with 12-myristate 13-acetate co-localized primarily with Rab7- and LysoTracker-positive compartments. We conclude that SERT is constitutively internalized and that the internalized transporter is sorted mainly to degradation. PMID:24973209

  17. Yeast ABC transporters in lipid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Banerjee, Atanu

    2016-08-01

    Throughout its evolution, the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily has experienced a rapid expansion in its substrate repertoire and functions. Of the diverse functions that these pumps offer, their drug transport properties have attracted considerable attention primarily owing to their clinical significance. Despite this fact, emerging evidence suggests that physiological substrates of transporters also affect the overall functioning of an organism. Lipids, as substrates of ABC transporters, constitute one feature found in all representative groups of the living kingdom. Due to the importance of lipid species in the cellular physiology of an organism, their proper distribution within cells is crucial. This fact is well exemplified by the vast number of medical conditions that have been caused as a result of perturbations in ABC transporter-mediated lipid transport in higher organisms. In yeasts, apart from providing transport functions, ABC transporters also coordinate regulatory networks with lipids. This review focuses on yeast ABC transporters involved in the transport of lipids and briefly discusses the integration of their regulatory network with that of the lipid species. PMID:27259587

  18. Vps10p transport from the trans-Golgi network to the endosome is mediated by clathrin-coated vesicles.

    PubMed

    Deloche, O; Yeung, B G; Payne, G S; Schekman, R

    2001-02-01

    A native immunoisolation procedure has been used to investigate the role of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) in the transport of vacuolar proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the prevacuolar/endosome compartments in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that Apl2p, one large subunit of the adaptor protein-1 complex, and Vps10p, the carboxypeptidase Y vacuolar protein receptor, are associated with clathrin molecules. Vps10p packaging in CCVs is reduced in pep12 Delta and vps34 Delta, two mutants that block Vps10p transport from the TGN to the endosome. However, Vps10p sorting is independent of Apl2p. Interestingly, a Vps10C(t) Delta p mutant lacking its C-terminal cytoplasmic domain, the portion of the receptor responsible for carboxypeptidase Y sorting, is also coimmunoprecipitated with clathrin. Our results suggest that CCVs mediate Vps10p transport from the TGN to the endosome independent of direct interactions between Vps10p and clathrin coats. The Vps10p C-terminal domain appears to play a principal role in retrieval of Vps10p from the prevacuolar compartment rather than in sorting from the TGN. PMID:11179429

  19. Multifunctional cationic lipid-based nanoparticles facilitate endosomal escape and reduction-triggered cytosolic siRNA release.

    PubMed

    Gujrati, Maneesh; Malamas, Anthony; Shin, Tesia; Jin, Erlei; Sun, Yunlu; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2014-08-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has garnered much attention in recent years as a promising avenue for cancer gene therapy due to its ability to silence disease-related genes. Effective gene silencing is contingent upon the delivery of siRNA into the cytosol of target cells and requires the implementation of delivery systems possessing multiple functionalities to overcome delivery barriers. The present work explores the multifunctional properties and biological activity of a recently developed cationic lipid carrier, (1-aminoethyl)iminobis[N-(oleicylcysteinyl-1-amino-ethyl)propionamide]) (ECO). The physicochemical properties and biological activity of ECO/siRNA nanoparticles were assessed over a range of N/P ratios to optimize the formulation. Potent and sustained luciferase silencing in a U87 glioblastoma cell line was observed, even in the presence of serum proteins. ECO/siRNA nanoparticles exhibited pH-dependent membrane disruption at pH levels corresponding to various stages of the intracellular trafficking pathway. It was found that disulfide linkages created during nanoparticle formation enhanced the protection of siRNA from degradation and facilitated site-specific siRNA release in the cytosol by glutathione-mediated reduction. Confocal microscopy confirmed that ECO/siRNA nanoparticles readily escaped from late endosomes prior to cytosolic release of the siRNA cargo. These results demonstrate that the rationally designed multifunctionality of ECO/siRNA nanoparticles is critical for intracellular siRNA delivery and the continuing development of safe and effective delivery systems. PMID:25020033

  20. Touché! STARD3 and STARD3NL tether the ER to endosomes.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Léa P; Tomasetto, Catherine; Alpy, Fabien

    2016-04-15

    Membrane contact sites (MCSs) are subcellular regions where the membranes of distinct organelles come into close apposition. These specialized areas of the cell, which are involved in inter-organelle metabolite exchange, are scaffolded by specific complexes. STARD3 [StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein)-related lipid transfer domain-3] and its close paralogue STARD3NL (STARD3 N-terminal like) are involved in the formation of contacts between late-endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The lipid transfer protein (LTP) STARD3 and STARD3NL, which are both anchored on the limiting membrane of late endosomes (LEs), interact with ER-anchored VAP [VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein)-associated protein] (VAP-A and VAP-B) proteins. This direct interaction allows ER-endosome contact formation. STARD3 or STARD3NL-mediated ER-endosome contacts, which affect endosome dynamics, are believed to be involved in cholesterol transport. PMID:27068960

  1. Live cell imaging of endosomal trafficking in fungi.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Sebastian; Takeshita, Norio; Grün, Nathalie; Fischer, Reinhard; Feldbrügge, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Endosomes are multipurpose membranous carriers important for endocytosis and secretion. During membrane trafficking, endosomes transport lipids, proteins, and even RNAs. In highly polarized cells such as fungal hyphae, they shuttle bidirectionally along microtubules mediated by molecular motors like kinesins and dynein. For in vivo studies of these highly dynamic protein/membrane complexes, advanced fluorescence microscopy is instrumental. In this chapter, we describe live cell imaging of endosomes in two distantly related fungal model systems, the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis and the ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans. We provide insights into live cell imaging of dynamic endosomal proteins and RNA, dual-color detection for colocalization studies, as well as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) for quantification and photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) for super-resolution. These methods described in two well-studied fungal model systems are applicable to a broad range of other organisms. PMID:25702128

  2. Importance of the N-Terminal Domain of the Qb-SNARE Vti1p for Different Membrane Transport Steps in the Yeast Endosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Gossing, Michael; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) on transport vesicles and target membranes are crucial for vesicle targeting and fusion. They form SNARE complexes, which contain four α-helical SNARE motifs contributed by three or four different SNAREs. Most SNAREs function only in a single transport step. The yeast SNARE Vti1p participates in four distinct SNARE complexes in transport from the trans Golgi network to late endosomes, in transport to the vacuole, in retrograde transport from endosomes to the trans Golgi network and in retrograde transport within the Golgi. So far, all vti1 mutants investigated had mutations within the SNARE motif. Little is known about the function of the N-terminal domain of Vti1p, which forms a three helix bundle called Habc domain. Here we generated a temperature-sensitive mutant of this domain to study the effects on different transport steps. The secondary structure of wild type and vti1-3 Habc domain was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The amino acid exchanges identified in the temperature-sensitive vti1-3 mutant caused unfolding of the Habc domain. Transport pathways were investigated by immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized proteins after pulse-chase labeling and by fluorescence microscopy of a GFP-tagged protein cycling between plasma membrane, early endosomes and Golgi. In vti1-3 cells transport to the late endosome and assembly of the late endosomal SNARE complex was blocked at 37°C. Retrograde transport to the trans Golgi network was affected while fusion with the vacuole was possible but slower. Steady state levels of SNARE complexes mediating these steps were less affected than that of the late endosomal SNARE complex. As different transport steps were affected our data demonstrate the importance of a folded Vti1p Habc domain for transport. PMID:23776654

  3. Transport through recycling endosomes requires EHD1 recruitment by a phosphatidylserine translocase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shoken; Uchida, Yasunori; Wang, Jiao; Matsudaira, Tatsuyuki; Nakagawa, Takatoshi; Kishimoto, Takuma; Mukai, Kojiro; Inaba, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Molday, Robert S; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    P4-ATPases translocate aminophospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine (PS), to the cytosolic leaflet of membranes. PS is highly enriched in recycling endosomes (REs) and is essential for endosomal membrane traffic. Here, we show that PS flipping by an RE-localized P4-ATPase is required for the recruitment of the membrane fission protein EHD1. Depletion of ATP8A1 impaired the asymmetric transbilayer distribution of PS in REs, dissociated EHD1 from REs, and generated aberrant endosomal tubules that appear resistant to fission. EHD1 did not show membrane localization in cells defective in PS synthesis. ATP8A2, a tissue-specific ATP8A1 paralogue, is associated with a neurodegenerative disease (CAMRQ). ATP8A2, but not the disease-causative ATP8A2 mutant, rescued the endosomal defects in ATP8A1-depleted cells. Primary neurons from Atp8a2−/− mice showed a reduced level of transferrin receptors at the cell surface compared to Atp8a2+/+ mice. These findings demonstrate the role of P4-ATPase in membrane fission and give insight into the molecular basis of CAMRQ. PMID:25595798

  4. Annexin A1 Tethers Membrane Contact Sites that Mediate ER to Endosome Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    Eden, Emily R; Sanchez-Heras, Elena; Tsapara, Anna; Sobota, Andrzej; Levine, Tim P; Futter, Clare E

    2016-06-01

    Membrane contact sites between the ER and multivesicular endosomes/bodies (MVBs) play important roles in endosome positioning and fission and in neurite outgrowth. ER-MVB contacts additionally function in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase downregulation by providing sites where the ER-localized phosphatase, PTP1B, interacts with endocytosed EGFR before the receptor is sorted onto intraluminal vesicles (ILVs). Here we show that these contacts are tethered by annexin A1 and its Ca(2+)-dependent ligand, S100A11, and form a subpopulation of differentially regulated contact sites between the ER and endocytic organelles. Annexin A1-regulated contacts function in the transfer of ER-derived cholesterol to the MVB when low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in endosomes is low. This sterol traffic depends on interaction between ER-localized VAP and endosomal oxysterol-binding protein ORP1L, and is required for the formation of ILVs within the MVB and thus for the spatial regulation of EGFR signaling. PMID:27270042

  5. Recycling endosome tubule morphogenesis from sorting endosomes requires the kinesin motor KIF13A

    PubMed Central

    Delevoye, Cédric; Miserey-Lenkei, Stéphanie; Montagnac, Guillaume; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Giordano, Francesca; Waharte, François; Marks, Michael S.; Goud, Bruno; Raposo, Graça

    2014-01-01

    Summary Early endosomes consist of vacuolar sorting and tubular recycling domains that segregate components fated for degradation in lysosomes or reuse by recycling to the plasma membrane or Golgi. The tubular transport intermediates that constitute recycling endosomes function in cell polarity, migration and cytokinesis. Endosomal tubulation and fission require both actin and intact microtubules, but while factors that stabilize recycling endosomal tubules have been identified, those required for tubule generation from vacuolar sorting endosomes remain unknown. We show that the microtubule motor KIF13A associates with recycling endosome tubules and controls their morphogenesis. Interfering with KIF13A function impairs the formation of endosomal tubules from sorting endosomes with consequent defects in endosome homeostasis and cargo recycling. Moreover, KIF13A interacts and cooperates with RAB11 to generate endosomal tubules. Our data illustrate how a microtubule motor couples early endosome morphogenesis to its motility and function. PMID:24462287

  6. Mathematical model with spatially uniform regulation explains long-range bidirectional transport of early endosomes in fungal hyphae.

    PubMed

    Gou, Jia; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah; Allard, Jun

    2014-08-15

    In many cellular contexts, cargo is transported bidirectionally along microtubule bundles by dynein and kinesin-family motors. Upstream factors influence how individual cargoes are locally regulated, as well as how long-range transport is regulated at the whole-cell scale. Although the details of local, single-cargo bidirectional switching have been extensively studied, it remains to be elucidated how this results in cell-scale spatial organization. Here we develop a mathematical model of early endosome transport in Ustilago maydis. We demonstrate that spatiotemporally uniform regulation, with constant transition rates, results in cargo dynamics that is consistent with experimental data, including data from motor mutants. We find that microtubule arrays can be symmetric in plus-end distribution but asymmetric in binding-site distribution in a manner that affects cargo dynamics and that cargo can travel past microtubule ends in microtubule bundles. Our model makes several testable predictions, including secondary features of dynein and cargo distributions. PMID:24943842

  7. D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol alters cellular cholesterol homeostasis by modulating the endosome lipid domains.

    PubMed

    Makino, Asami; Ishii, Kumiko; Murate, Motohide; Hayakawa, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Yusuke; Suzuki, Minoru; Ito, Kazuki; Fujisawa, Tetsuro; Matsuo, Hirotami; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2006-04-11

    D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (D-PDMP) is a frequently used inhibitor of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis. However, some interesting characteristics of D-PDMP cannot be explained by the inhibition of glycolipid synthesis alone. In the present study, we showed that d-PDMP inhibits the activation of lysosomal acid lipase by late endosome/lysosome specific lipid, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (also called as lysobisphosphatidic acid), through alteration of membrane structure of the lipid. When added to cultured fibroblasts, D-PDMP inhibits the degradation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and thus accumulates both cholesterol ester and free cholesterol in late endosomes/lysosomes. This accumulation results in the inhibition of LDL-derived cholesterol esterification and the decrease of cell surface cholesterol. We showed that D-PDMP alters cellular cholesterol homeostasis in a glycosphingolipid-independent manner using L-PDMP, a stereoisomer of D-PDMP, which does not inhibit glycosphingolipid synthesis, and mutant melanoma cell which is defective in glycolipid synthesis. Altering cholesterol homeostasis by D-PDMP explains the unique characteristics of sensitizing multidrug resistant cells by this drug. PMID:16584188

  8. The Human ABCG1 Transporter Mobilizes Plasma Membrane and Late Endosomal Non-Sphingomyelin-Associated-Cholesterol for Efflux and Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Edward B.; O’Brien, Katherine; Walts, Avram D.; Stonik, John A.; Malide, Daniela; Combs, Christian A.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that GFP-tagged human ABCG1 on the plasma membrane (PM) and in late endosomes (LE) mobilizes sterol on both sides of the membrane lipid bilayer, thereby increasing cellular cholesterol efflux to lipid surfaces. In the present study, we examined ABCG1-induced changes in membrane cholesterol distribution, organization, and mobility. ABCG1-GFP expression increased the amount of mobile, non-sphingomyelin(SM)-associated cholesterol at the PM and LE, but not the amount of SM-associated-cholesterol or SM. ABCG1-mobilized non-SM-associated-cholesterol rapidly cycled between the PM and LE and effluxed from the PM to extracellular acceptors, or, relocated to intracellular sites of esterification. ABCG1 increased detergent-soluble pools of PM and LE cholesterol, generated detergent-resistant, non-SM-associated PM cholesterol, and increased resistance to both amphotericin B-induced (cholesterol-mediated) and lysenin-induced (SM-mediated) cytolysis, consistent with altered organization of both PM cholesterol and SM. ABCG1 itself resided in detergent-soluble membrane domains. We propose that PM and LE ABCG1 residing at the phase boundary between ordered (Lo) and disordered (Ld) membrane lipid domains alters SM and cholesterol organization thereby increasing cholesterol flux between Lo and Ld, and hence, the amount of cholesterol available for removal by acceptors on either side of the membrane bilayer for either efflux or esterification. PMID:25485894

  9. A novel Sec18p/NSF-dependent complex required for Golgi-to-endosome transport in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Burd, C G; Peterson, M; Cowles, C R; Emr, S D

    1997-01-01

    The vacuolar protein-sorting (VPS) pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mediates localization of proteins from the trans-Golgi to the vacuole via a prevacuolar endosome compartment. Mutations in class D vacuolar protein-sorting (vps) genes affect vesicle-mediated Golgi-to-endosome transport and result in secretion of vacuolar proteins. Temperature-sensitive-for-function (tsf) and dominant negative mutations in PEP12, encoding a putative SNARE vesicle receptor on the endosome, and tsf mutations in VAC1, a gene implicated in vacuole inheritance and vacuolar protein sorting, were constructed and used to demonstrate that Pep12p and Vac1p are components of the VPS pathway. The sequence of Vac1p contains two putative zinc-binding RING motifs, a zinc finger motif, and a coiled-coil motif. Site-directed mutations in the carboxyl-terminal RING motif strongly affected vacuolar protein sorting. Vac1p was found to be tightly associated with membranes as a monomer and in a large SDS-resistant complex. By using Pep12p affinity chromatography, we found that Vac1p, Vps45p (SEC1 family member), and Sec18p (yeast N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive factor, NSF) bind Pep12p. Consistent with a functional role for this complex in vacuolar protein sorting, double pep12tsfvac1tsf and pep12tsf vps45tsf mutants exhibited synthetic Vps- phenotypes, the tsf phenotype of the vac1tsf mutant was rescued by overexpression of VPS45 or PEP12, overexpression of a dominant pep12 allele in a sec18-1 strain resulted in a severe synthetic growth defect that was rescued by deletion of PEP12 or VAC1, and subcellular fractionation of vac1 delta cells revealed a striking change in the fractionation of Pep12p and Vps21p, a rab family GTPase required for vacuolar protein sorting. The functions of Pep12p, Vps45p, and Vps21p indicate that key aspects of Golgi-to-endosome trafficking are similar to other vesicle-mediated transport steps, although the role of Vac1p suggests that there are also novel components of the VPS

  10. Lipid Transport in the Lactating Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    McManaman, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells depend on phospholipid (PL) and fatty acid (FA) transport to maintain membrane structure and organization, and to fuel and regulate cellular functions. In mammary glands of lactating animals, copious milk secretion, including large quantities of lipid in some species, requires adaptation and integration of PL and FA synthesis and transport processes to meet secretion demands. At present few details exist about how these processes are regulated within the mammary gland. However, recent advances in our understanding of the structural and molecular biology of membrane systems and cellular lipid trafficking provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the regulation and integration of PL and FA transport processes the lactating mammary gland. This review discusses the PL and FA transport processes required to maintain the structural integrity and organization of the mammary gland and support its secretory functions within the context of current molecular and cellular models of their regulation. PMID:24567110

  11. A Membrane Coat Complex Essential for Endosome-to-Golgi Retrograde Transport in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, Matthew N.J.; Michael McCaffery, J.; Emr, Scott D.

    1998-01-01

    We have recently characterized three yeast gene products (Vps35p, Vps29p, and Vps30p) as candidate components of the sorting machinery required for the endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of the vacuolar protein sorting receptor Vps10p (Seaman, M.N.J., E.G. Marcusson, J.-L. Cereghino, and S.D. Emr. 1997. J. Cell Biol. 137:79–92). By genetic and biochemical means we now show that Vps35p and Vps29p interact and form part of a multimeric membrane-associated complex that also contains Vps26p, Vps17p, and Vps5p. This complex, designated here as the retromer complex, assembles from two distinct subcomplexes comprising (a) Vps35p, Vps29p, and Vps26p; and (b) Vps5p and Vps17p. Density gradient fractionation of Golgi/endosomal/vesicular membranes reveals that Vps35p cofractionates with Vps5p/Vps17p in a vesicle-enriched dense membrane fraction. Furthermore, gel filtration analysis indicates that Vps35p and Vps5p are present on a population of vesicles and tubules slightly larger than COPI/coatomer-coated vesicles. We also show by immunogold EM that Vps5p is localized to discrete regions at the rims of the prevacuolar endosome where vesicles appear to be budding. Size fractionation of cytosolic and recombinant Vps5p reveals that Vps5p can self-assemble in vitro, suggesting that Vps5p may provide the mechanical impetus to drive vesicle formation. Based on these findings we propose a model in which Vps35p/Vps29p/Vps26p function to select cargo for retrieval, and Vps5p/Vps17p assemble onto the membrane to promote vesicle formation. Conservation of the yeast retromer complex components in higher eukaryotes suggests an important general role for this complex in endosome-to-Golgi retrieval. PMID:9700157

  12. Rab8b Regulates Transport of West Nile Virus Particles from Recycling Endosomes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shintaro; Suzuki, Tadaki; Kawaguchi, Akira; Phongphaew, Wallaya; Yoshii, Kentaro; Iwano, Tomohiko; Harada, Akihiro; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Orba, Yasuko; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-18

    West Nile virus (WNV) particles assemble at and bud into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted from infected cells through the secretory pathway. However, the host factor related to these steps is not fully understood. Rab proteins, belonging to the Ras superfamily, play essential roles in regulating many aspects of vesicular trafficking. In this study, we sought to determine which Rab proteins are involved in intracellular trafficking of nascent WNV particles. RNAi analysis revealed that Rab8b plays a role in WNV particle release. We found that Rab8 and WNV antigen were colocalized in WNV-infected human neuroblastoma cells, and that WNV infection enhanced Rab8 expression in the cells. In addition, the amount of WNV particles in the supernatant of Rab8b-deficient cells was significantly decreased compared with that of wild-type cells. We also demonstrated that WNV particles accumulated in the recycling endosomes in WNV-infected cells. In summary, these results suggest that Rab8b is involved in trafficking of WNV particles from recycling endosomes to the plasma membrane. PMID:26817838

  13. Formation of α-synuclein Lewy neurite–like aggregates in axons impedes the transport of distinct endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Volpicelli-Daley, Laura A.; Gamble, Karen L.; Schultheiss, Christine E.; Riddle, Dawn M.; West, Andrew B.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2014-01-01

    Aggregates of α-synuclein (α-syn) accumulate in neurons in Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. These inclusions predominantly localize to axons even in the early stages of the disease, but their affect on axon function has remained unknown. Previously we established a model in which the addition of preformed α-syn fibrils to primary neurons seeds formation of insoluble α-syn inclusions built from endogenously expressed α-syn that closely recapitulate the neuropathological phenotypes of Lewy neurites found in human diseased brains. Here we show, using live-cell imaging, that immobile α-syn inclusions accumulate in axons from the recruitment of α-syn located on mobile α-syn–positive vesicles. Ultrastructural analyses and live imaging demonstrate that α-syn accumulations do not cause a generalized defect in axonal transport; the inclusions do not fill the axonal cytoplasm, disrupt the microtubule cytoskeleton, or affect the transport of synaptophysin or mitochondria. However, the α-syn aggregates impair the transport of Rab7 and TrkB receptor–containing endosomes, as well as autophagosomes. In addition, the TrkB receptor–associated signaling molecule pERK5 accumulates in α-syn aggregate–bearing neurons. Thus α-syn pathology impairs axonal transport of signaling and degradative organelles. These early effects of α-syn accumulations may predict points of intervention in the neurodegenerative process. PMID:25298402

  14. Endocytosis and Endosomal Trafficking in Plants.

    PubMed

    Paez Valencia, Julio; Goodman, Kaija; Otegui, Marisa S

    2016-04-29

    Endocytosis and endosomal trafficking are essential processes in cells that control the dynamics and turnover of plasma membrane proteins, such as receptors, transporters, and cell wall biosynthetic enzymes. Plasma membrane proteins (cargo) are internalized by endocytosis through clathrin-dependent or clathrin-independent mechanism and delivered to early endosomes. From the endosomes, cargo proteins are recycled back to the plasma membrane via different pathways, which rely on small GTPases and the retromer complex. Proteins that are targeted for degradation through ubiquitination are sorted into endosomal vesicles by the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery for degradation in the vacuole. Endocytic and endosomal trafficking regulates many cellular, developmental, and physiological processes, including cellular polarization, hormone transport, metal ion homeostasis, cytokinesis, pathogen responses, and development. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that mediate the recognition and sorting of endocytic and endosomal cargos, the vesiculation processes that mediate their trafficking, and their connection to cellular and physiological responses in plants. PMID:27128466

  15. Old world arenaviruses enter the host cell via the multivesicular body and depend on the endosomal sorting complex required for transport.

    PubMed

    Pasqual, Giulia; Rojek, Jillian M; Masin, Mark; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-09-01

    The highly pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) and the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) use α-dystroglycan as a cellular receptor and enter the host cell by an unusual endocytotic pathway independent of clathrin, caveolin, dynamin, and actin. Upon internalization, the viruses are delivered to acidified endosomes in a Rab5-independent manner bypassing classical routes of incoming vesicular trafficking. Here we sought to identify cellular factors involved in the unusual and largely unknown entry pathway of LASV and LCMV. Cell entry of LASV and LCMV required microtubular transport to late endosomes, consistent with the low fusion pH of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Productive infection with recombinant LCMV expressing LASV envelope glycoprotein (rLCMV-LASVGP) and LCMV depended on phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) as well as lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), an unusual phospholipid that is involved in the formation of intraluminal vesicles (ILV) of the multivesicular body (MVB) of the late endosome. We provide evidence for a role of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) in LASV and LCMV cell entry, in particular the ESCRT components Hrs, Tsg101, Vps22, and Vps24, as well as the ESCRT-associated ATPase Vps4 involved in fission of ILV. Productive infection with rLCMV-LASVGP and LCMV also critically depended on the ESCRT-associated protein Alix, which is implicated in membrane dynamics of the MVB/late endosomes. Our study identifies crucial cellular factors implicated in Old World arenavirus cell entry and indicates that LASV and LCMV invade the host cell passing via the MVB/late endosome. Our data further suggest that the virus-receptor complexes undergo sorting into ILV of the MVB mediated by the ESCRT, possibly using a pathway that may be linked to the cellular trafficking and degradation of the cellular receptor. PMID:21931550

  16. Old World Arenaviruses Enter the Host Cell via the Multivesicular Body and Depend on the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport

    PubMed Central

    Pasqual, Giulia; Rojek, Jillian M.; Masin, Mark; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Old World arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) and the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) use α-dystroglycan as a cellular receptor and enter the host cell by an unusual endocytotic pathway independent of clathrin, caveolin, dynamin, and actin. Upon internalization, the viruses are delivered to acidified endosomes in a Rab5-independent manner bypassing classical routes of incoming vesicular trafficking. Here we sought to identify cellular factors involved in the unusual and largely unknown entry pathway of LASV and LCMV. Cell entry of LASV and LCMV required microtubular transport to late endosomes, consistent with the low fusion pH of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Productive infection with recombinant LCMV expressing LASV envelope glycoprotein (rLCMV-LASVGP) and LCMV depended on phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) as well as lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), an unusual phospholipid that is involved in the formation of intraluminal vesicles (ILV) of the multivesicular body (MVB) of the late endosome. We provide evidence for a role of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) in LASV and LCMV cell entry, in particular the ESCRT components Hrs, Tsg101, Vps22, and Vps24, as well as the ESCRT-associated ATPase Vps4 involved in fission of ILV. Productive infection with rLCMV-LASVGP and LCMV also critically depended on the ESCRT-associated protein Alix, which is implicated in membrane dynamics of the MVB/late endosomes. Our study identifies crucial cellular factors implicated in Old World arenavirus cell entry and indicates that LASV and LCMV invade the host cell passing via the MVB/late endosome. Our data further suggest that the virus-receptor complexes undergo sorting into ILV of the MVB mediated by the ESCRT, possibly using a pathway that may be linked to the cellular trafficking and degradation of the cellular receptor. PMID:21931550

  17. Interactions between EHD Proteins and Rab11-FIP2: A Role for EHD3 in Early Endosomal TransportD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Naslavsky, Naava; Rahajeng, Juliati; Sharma, Mahak; Jović, Marko; Caplan, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Eps15 homology domain (EHD) 1 enables membrane recycling by controlling the exit of internalized molecules from the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) en route to the plasma membrane, similar to the role described for Rab11. However, no physical or functional connection between Rab11 and EHD-family proteins has been demonstrated yet, and the mode by which they coordinate their regulatory activity remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that EHD1 and EHD3 (the closest EHD1 paralog), bind to the Rab11-effector Rab11-FIP2 via EH–NPF interactions. The EHD/Rab11-FIP2 associations are affected by the ability of the EHD proteins to bind nucleotides, and Rab11-FIP2 is recruited to EHD-containing membranes. These results are consistent with a coordinated role for EHD1 and Rab11-FIP2 in regulating exit from the ERC. However, because no function has been attributed to EHD3, the significance of its interaction with Rab11-FIP2 remained unclear. Surprisingly, loss of EHD3 expression prevented the delivery of internalized transferrin and early endosomal proteins to the ERC, an effect differing from that described upon EHD1 knockdown. Moreover, the subcellular localization of Rab11-FIP2 and endogenous Rab11 were altered upon EHD3 knockdown, with both proteins absent from the ERC and retained in the cell periphery. The results presented herein promote a coordinated role for EHD proteins and Rab11-FIP2 in mediating endocytic recycling and provide evidence for the function of EHD3 in early endosome to ERC transport. PMID:16251358

  18. Molecular Transport Studies Through Unsupported Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, William; Parekh, Sapun; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-03-01

    Dendrimers, spherical polymeric nanoparticles made from branched monomers around a central core, show great promise as drug delivery vehicles. Dendrimer size, core contents, and surface functionality can be synthetically tuned, providing unprecedented versatility. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers have been shown to enter cells; however, questions remain about their biophysical interactions with the cell membrane, specifically about the presence and size of transient pores. We monitor dendrimer-lipid bilayer interactions using unsupported black lipid membranes (BLMs) as model cell membranes. Custom bilayer slides contain two vertically stacked aqueous chambers separated by a 25 μm Teflon sheet with a 120 μm aperture where the bilayer is formed. We vary the composition of model membranes (cholesterol content and lipid phase) to create biomimetic systems and study the interaction of PAMAM G6 and G3 dendrimers with these bilayers. Dendrimers, dextran cargo, and bilayers are monitored and quantified using time-lapse fluorescence imaging. Electrical capacitance measurements are simultaneously recorded to determine if the membrane is porous, and the pore size is deduced by monitoring transport of fluorescent dextrans of increasing molecular weight. These experiments shed light on the importance of cholesterol content and lipid phase on the interaction of dendrimer nanoparticles with membranes.

  19. Recycling endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Goldenring, James R

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal membrane recycling system represents a dynamic conduit for sorting and re-exporting internalized membrane constituents. The recycling system is composed of multiple tubulovesicular recycling pathways that likely confer distinct trafficking pathways for individual cargoes. In addition, elements of the recycling system are responsible for assembly and maintenance of apical membrane specializations including primary cilia and apical microvilli. The existence of multiple intersecting and diverging recycling tracks likely accounts for specificity in plasma membrane recycling trafficking. PMID:26022676

  20. Memoryless self-reinforcing directionality in endosomal active transport within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejia; Wang, Bo; Granick, Steve

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to Brownian transport, the active motility of microbes, cells, animals and even humans often follows another random process known as truncated Lévy walk. These stochastic motions are characterized by clustered small steps and intermittent longer jumps that often extend towards the size of the entire system. As there are repeated suggestions, although disagreement, that Lévy walks have functional advantages over Brownian motion in random searching and transport kinetics, their intentional engineering into active materials could be useful. Here, we show experimentally in the classic active matter system of intracellular trafficking that Brownian-like steps self-organize into truncated Lévy walks through an apparent time-independent positive feedback such that directional persistence increases with the distance travelled persistently. A molecular model that allows the maximum output of the active propelling forces to fluctuate slowly fits the experiments quantitatively. Our findings offer design principles for programming efficient transport in active materials.

  1. Apolipoprotein E: from lipid transport to neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Paul S.; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Ryan, Robert O.

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E has a storied history as a lipid transport protein. The integral association between cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein clearance from circulation are intimately related to apoE's function as a ligand for cell surface receptors of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. The receptor binding properties of apoE are strongly influenced by isoform specific amino acid differences as well as the lipidation state of the protein. As understanding of apoE as a structural component of circulating plasma lipoproteins has evolved, exciting developments in neurobiology have revitalized interest in apoE. The strong and enduring correlation between the apoE4 isoform and age of onset and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease has catapulted apoE to the forefront of neurobiology. Using genetic tools generated for study of apoE lipoprotein metabolism, transgenic “knock-in” and gene-disrupted mice are now favored models for study of its role in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Key structural knowledge of apoE and isoform specific differences is driving research activity designed to elucidate how a single amino acid change can manifest such profoundly significant pathological consequences. This review describes apoE through a lens of structure-based knowledge that leads to hypotheses that attempt to explain the functions of apoE and isoform specific effects relating to disease mechanism. PMID:20854843

  2. P4-ATPase Requirement for AP-1/Clathrin Function in Protein Transport from the trans-Golgi Network and Early Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Surendhran, Kavitha; Nothwehr, Steven F.

    2008-01-01

    Drs2p is a resident type 4 P-type ATPase (P4-ATPase) and potential phospholipid translocase of the trans-Golgi network (TGN) where it has been implicated in clathrin function. However, precise protein transport pathways requiring Drs2p and how it contributes to clathrin-coated vesicle budding remain unclear. Here we show a functional codependence between Drs2p and the AP-1 clathrin adaptor in protein sorting at the TGN and early endosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic criteria indicate that Drs2p and AP-1 operate in the same pathway and that AP-1 requires Drs2p for function. In addition, we show that loss of AP-1 markedly increases Drs2p trafficking to the plasma membrane, but does not perturb retrieval of Drs2p from the early endosome back to the TGN. Thus AP-1 is required at the TGN to sort Drs2p out of the exocytic pathway, presumably for delivery to the early endosome. Moreover, a conditional allele that inactivates Drs2p phospholipid translocase (flippase) activity disrupts its own transport in this AP-1 pathway. Drs2p physically interacts with AP-1; however, AP-1 and clathrin are both recruited normally to the TGN in drs2Δ cells. These results imply that Drs2p acts independently of coat recruitment to facilitate AP-1/clathrin-coated vesicle budding from the TGN. PMID:18508916

  3. ER–endosome contact sites: molecular compositions and functions

    PubMed Central

    Raiborg, Camilla; Wenzel, Eva M; Stenmark, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the existence of numerous contact sites between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and endosomes in mammalian cells. Such contacts increase during endosome maturation and play key roles in cholesterol transfer, endosome positioning, receptor dephosphorylation, and endosome fission. At least 7 distinct contact sites between the ER and endosomes have been identified to date, which have diverse molecular compositions. Common to these contact sites is that they impose a close apposition between the ER and endosome membranes, which excludes membrane fusion while allowing the flow of molecular signals between the two membranes, in the form of enzymatic modifications, or ion, lipid, or protein transfer. Thus, ER–endosome contact sites ensure coordination of molecular activities between the two compartments while keeping their general compositions intact. Here, we review the molecular architectures and cellular functions of known ER–endosome contact sites and discuss their implications for human health. PMID:26041457

  4. Function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ABC proteins in lipid transport.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Antje; Devaux, Philippe F; Herrmann, Andreas

    2005-03-21

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic origins are implicated in the transport of lipids. In humans, members of the ABC protein families A, B, C, D and G are mutated in a number of lipid transport and metabolism disorders, such as Tangier disease, Stargardt syndrome, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, adrenoleukodystrophy or sitosterolemia. Studies employing transfection, overexpression, reconstitution, deletion and inhibition indicate the transbilayer transport of endogenous lipids and their analogs by some of these proteins, modulating lipid transbilayer asymmetry. Other proteins appear to be involved in the exposure of specific lipids on the exoplasmic leaflet, allowing their uptake by acceptors and further transport to specific sites. Additionally, lipid transport by ABC proteins is currently being studied in non-human eukaryotes, e.g. in sea urchin, trypanosomatides, arabidopsis and yeast, as well as in prokaryotes such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis. Here, we review current information about the (putative) role of both pro- and eukaryotic ABC proteins in the various phenomena associated with lipid transport. Besides providing a better understanding of phenomena like lipid metabolism, circulation, multidrug resistance, hormonal processes, fertilization, vision and signalling, studies on pro- and eukaryotic ABC proteins might eventually enable us to put a name on some of the proteins mediating transbilayer lipid transport in various membranes of cells and organelles. It must be emphasized, however, that there are still many uncertainties concerning the functions and mechanisms of ABC proteins interacting with lipids. In particular, further purification and reconstitution experiments with an unambiguous role of ATP hydrolysis are needed to demonstrate a clear involvement of ABC proteins in lipid transbilayer asymmetry. PMID:15749056

  5. Fatty Acid and Lipid Transport in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nannan; Xu, Changcheng; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Philippar, Katrin

    2016-02-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) and lipids are essential - not only as membrane constituents but also for growth and development. In plants and algae, FAs are synthesized in plastids and to a large extent transported to the endoplasmic reticulum for modification and lipid assembly. Subsequently, lipophilic compounds are distributed within the cell, and thus are transported across most membrane systems. Membrane-intrinsic transporters and proteins for cellular FA/lipid transfer therefore represent key components for delivery and dissemination. In addition to highlighting their role in lipid homeostasis and plant performance, different transport mechanisms for land plants and green algae - in the model systems Arabidopsis thaliana, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii - are compared, thereby providing a current perspective on protein-mediated FA and lipid trafficking in photosynthetic cells. PMID:26616197

  6. Fluorescence microscopy colocalization of lipid-nucleic acid nanoparticles with wildtype and mutant Rab5-GFP: A platform for investigating early endosomal events.

    PubMed

    Majzoub, Ramsey N; Chan, Chia-Ling; Ewert, Kai K; Silva, Bruno F B; Liang, Keng S; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2015-06-01

    Endosomal entrapment is known to be a major bottleneck to successful cytoplasmic delivery of nucleic acids (NAs) using cationic liposome-NA nanoparticles (NPs). Quantitative measurements of distributions of NPs within early endosomes (EEs) have proven difficult due to the sub-resolution size and short lifetime of wildtype EEs. In this study we used Rab5-GFP, a member of the large family of GTPases which cycles between the plasma membrane and early endosomes, to fluorescently label early endosomes. Using fluorescence microscopy and quantitative image analysis of cells expressing Rab5-GFP, we found that at early time points (t<1h), only a fraction (≈35%) of RGD-tagged NPs (which target cell surface integrins) colocalize with wildtype EEs, independent of the NP's membrane charge density. In comparison, a GTP-hydrolysis deficient mutant, Rab5-Q79L, which extends the size and lifetime of EEs yielding giant early endosomes (GEEs), enabled us to resolve and localize individual NPs found within the GEE lumen. Remarkably, nearly all intracellular NPs are found to be trapped within GEEs implying little or no escape at early time points. The observed small degree of colocalization of NPs and wildtype Rab5 is consistent with recycling of Rab5-GDP to the plasma membrane and not indicative of NP escape from EEs. Taken together, our results show that endosomal escape of PEGylated nanoparticles occurs downstream of EEs i.e., from late endosomes/lysosomes. Our studies also suggest that Rab5-Q79L could be used in a robust imaging assay which allows for direct visualization of NP interactions with the luminal membrane of early endosomes. PMID:25753113

  7. Fluorescence microscopy colocalization of lipid-nucleic acid nanoparticles with wildtype and mutant Rab5-GFP: A platform for investigating early endosomal events

    PubMed Central

    Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Chan, Chia-Ling; Ewert, Kai K.; Silva, Bruno F. B.; Liang, Keng S.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2015-01-01

    Endosomal entrapment is known to be a major bottleneck to successful cytoplasmic delivery of nucleic acids (NAs) using cationic liposome-NA nanoparticles (NPs). Quantitative measurements of distributions of NPs within early endosomes (EEs) have proven difficult due to the sub-resolution size and short lifetime of wildtype EEs. In this study we used Rab5-GFP, a member of the large family of GTPases which cycles between the plasma membrane and early endosomes to fluorescently label early endosomes. Using fluorescence microscopy and quantitative image analysis of cells expressing Rab5-GFP, we found that at early time points (t < 1 h), only a fraction (≈35%) of RGD-tagged NPs (which target cell surface integrins) colocalize with wildtype EEs, independent of the NP’s membrane charge density. In comparison, a GTP-hydrolysis deficient mutant, Rab5-Q79L, which extends the size and lifetime of EEs yielding giant early endosomes (GEEs), enabled us to resolve and localize individual NPs found within the GEE lumen. Remarkably, nearly all intracellular NPs are found to be trapped within GEEs implying little or no escape at early time points. The observed small degree of colocalization of NPs and wildtype Rab5 is consistent with recycling of Rab5-GDP to the plasma membrane and not indicative of NP escape from EEs. Taken together, our results show that endosomal escape of PEGylated nanoparticles occurs downstream of EEs i.e., from late endosomes/lysosomes. Our studies also suggest that Rab5-Q79L could be used in a robust imaging assay which allows for direct visualization of NP interactions with the luminal membrane of early endosomes. PMID:25753113

  8. Lxr-driven enterocyte lipid droplet formation delays transport of ingested lipids[S

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Garcia, Lourdes; Schlegel, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    Liver X receptors (Lxrs) are master regulators of cholesterol catabolism, driving the elimination of cholesterol from the periphery to the lumen of the intestine. Development of pharmacological agents to activate Lxrs has been hindered by synthetic Lxr agonists’ induction of hepatic lipogenesis and hypertriglyceridemia. Elucidating the function of Lxrs in regulating enterocyte lipid handling might identify novel aspects of lipid metabolism that are pharmacologically amenable. We took a genetic approach centered on the single Lxr gene nr1h3 in zebrafish to study the role of Lxr in enterocyte lipid metabolism. Loss of nr1h3 function causes anticipated gene regulatory changes and cholesterol intolerance, collectively reflecting high evolutionary conservation of zebrafish Lxra function. Intestinal nr1h3 activation delays transport of absorbed neutral lipids, with accumulation of neutral lipids in enterocyte cytoplasmic droplets. This delay in transport of ingested neutral lipids protects animals from hypercholesterolemia and hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet. On a gene regulatory level, Lxra induces expression of acsl3a, which encodes acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3a, a lipid droplet-anchored protein that directs fatty acyl chains into lipids. Forced overexpression of acls3a in enterocytes delays, in part, the appearance of neutral lipids in the vasculature of zebrafish larvae. Activation of Lxr in the intestine cell-autonomously regulates the rate of delivery of absorbed lipids by inducting a temporary lipid intestinal droplet storage depot. PMID:25030662

  9. Fusion of Enveloped Viruses in Endosomes.

    PubMed

    White, Judith M; Whittaker, Gary R

    2016-06-01

    Ari Helenius launched the field of enveloped virus fusion in endosomes with a seminal paper in the Journal of Cell Biology in 1980. In the intervening years, a great deal has been learned about the structures and mechanisms of viral membrane fusion proteins as well as about the endosomes in which different enveloped viruses fuse and the endosomal cues that trigger fusion. We now recognize three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins based on structural criteria and four mechanisms of fusion triggering. After reviewing general features of viral membrane fusion proteins and viral fusion in endosomes, we delve into three characterized mechanisms for viral fusion triggering in endosomes: by low pH, by receptor binding plus low pH and by receptor binding plus the action of a protease. We end with a discussion of viruses that may employ novel endosomal fusion-triggering mechanisms. A key take-home message is that enveloped viruses that enter cells by fusing in endosomes traverse the endocytic pathway until they reach an endosome that has all of the environmental conditions (pH, proteases, ions, intracellular receptors and lipid composition) to (if needed) prime and (in all cases) trigger the fusion protein and to support membrane fusion. PMID:26935856

  10. Constitutive Tor2 Activity Promotes Retention of the Amino Acid Transporter Agp3 at Trans-Golgi/Endosomes in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingbin; Ma, Yan; Zhou, Xin; Furuyashiki, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid transporters are located at specific subcellular compartments, and their localizations are regulated by the extracellular availability of amino acids. In yeast, target of rapamycin (TOR) activation induces the internalization of amino acid transporters located at the plasma membrane. However, whether and how TOR signaling regulates other amino acid transporters located at intracellular compartments remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that in the fission yeast, the TOR inhibitor Torin–1 induces the transfer of several yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-fused intracellular amino acid transporters, including Agp3, Isp5, Aat1, and Put4, from trans-Golgi/endosomes into the vacuoles. By contrast, the localizations of YFP-fused Can1, Fnx1, and Fnx2 transporter proteins were unaffected upon Torin–1 treatment. There are two TOR isoforms in fission yeast, Tor1 and Tor2. Whereas tor1 deletion did not affect the Torin-1-induced transfer of Agp3-YFP, Tor2 inhibition using a temperature-sensitive mutant induced the transfer of Agp3-YFP to the vacuolar lumen, similar to the effects of Torin–1 treatment. Tor2 inhibition also induced the transfer of the YFP-fused Isp5, Aat1, and Put4 transporter proteins to the vacuoles, although only partial transfer of the latter two transporters was observed. Under nitrogen depletion accompanied by reduced Tor2 activity, Agp3-YFP was transferred from the trans-Golgi/endosomes to the plasma membrane and then to the vacuoles, where it was degraded by the vacuolar proteases Isp6 and Psp3. Mutants with constitutively active Tor2 showed delayed transfer of Agp3-YFP to the plasma membrane upon nitrogen depletion. Cells lacking Tsc2, a negative regulator of Tor2, also showed a delay in this process in a Tor2-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings suggest that constitutive Tor2 activity is critical for the retention of amino acid transporters at trans-Golgi/endosomes. Moreover, nitrogen depletion suppresses Tor2 activity

  11. New molecular mechanisms of inter-organelle lipid transport.

    PubMed

    Drin, Guillaume; von Filseck, Joachim Moser; Čopič, Alenka

    2016-04-15

    Lipids are precisely distributed in cell membranes, along with associated proteins defining organelle identity. Because the major cellular lipid factory is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a key issue is to understand how various lipids are subsequently delivered to other compartments by vesicular and non-vesicular transport pathways. Efforts are currently made to decipher how lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) work either across long distances or confined to membrane contact sites (MCSs) where two organelles are at close proximity. Recent findings reveal that proteins of the oxysterol-binding protein related-proteins (ORP)/oxysterol-binding homology (Osh) family are not all just sterol transporters/sensors: some can bind either phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and sterol or PtdIns(4)P and phosphatidylserine (PS), exchange these lipids between membranes, and thereby use phosphoinositide metabolism to create cellular lipid gradients. Lipid exchange is likely a widespread mechanism also utilized by other LTPs to efficiently trade lipids between organelle membranes. Finally, the discovery of more proteins bearing a lipid-binding module (SMP or START-like domain) raises new questions on how lipids are conveyed in cells and how the activities of different LTPs are coordinated. PMID:27068959

  12. RhoGAP68F controls transport of adhesion proteins in Rab4 endosomes to modulate epithelial morphogenesis of Drosophila leg discs

    PubMed Central

    de Madrid, Beatriz Hernandez; Greenberg, Lina; Hatini, Victor

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Elongation and invagination of epithelial tissues are fundamental developmental processes that contribute to the morphogenesis of embryonic and adult structures and are dependent on coordinated remodeling of cell-cell contacts. The morphogenesis of Drosophila leg imaginal discs depends on extensive remodeling of cell contacts and thus provides a useful system with which to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The small Rho GTPase regulator RhoGAP68F has been previously implicated in leg morphogenesis. It consists of an N-terminal Sec14 domain and a C-terminal GAP domain. Here we examined the molecular function and role of RhoGAP68F in epithelial remodeling. We find that depletion of RhoGAP68F impairs epithelial remodeling from a pseudostratified to simple, while overexpression of RhoGAP68F causes tears of lateral cell-cell contacts and thus impairs epithelial integrity. We show that the RhoGAP68F protein localizes to Rab4 recycling endosomes and forms a complex with the Rab4 protein. The Sec14 domain is sufficient for localizing to Rab4 endosomes, while the activity of the GAP domain is dispensable. RhoGAP68F, in turn, inhibits the scission and movement of Rab4 endosomes involved in transport the adhesion proteins Fasciclin3 and E-cadherin back to cell-cell contacts. Expression of RhoGAP68F is upregulated during prepupal development suggesting that RhoGAP68F decreases the transport of key adhesion proteins to the cell surface during this developmental stage to decrease the strength of adhesive cell-cell contacts and thereby facilitate epithelial remodeling and leg morphogenesis. PMID:25617722

  13. The cytosolic C-terminus of the glucose transporter GLUT4 contains an acidic cluster endosomal targeting motif distal to the dileucine signal.

    PubMed Central

    Shewan, A M; Marsh, B J; Melvin, D R; Martin, S; Gould, G W; James, D E

    2000-01-01

    The insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4 is targeted to a post-endocytic compartment in adipocytes, from where it moves to the cell surface in response to insulin. Previous studies have identified two cytosolic targeting motifs that regulate the intracellular sequestration of this protein: FQQI(5-8) in the N-terminus and LL(489,490) (one-letter amino acid notation) in the C-terminus. In the present study we show that a GLUT4 chimaera in which the C-terminal 12 amino acids in GLUT4 have been replaced with the same region from human GLUT3 is constitutively targeted to the plasma membrane when expressed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. To further dissect this domain it was divided into three regions, each of which was mutated en bloc to alanine residues. Analysis of these constructs revealed that the targeting information is contained within the residues TELEYLGP(498-505). Using the transferrin-horseradish peroxidase endosomal ablation technique in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we show that mutants in which this C-terminal domain has been disrupted are more sensitive to chemical ablation than wild-type GLUT4. These data indicate that GLUT4 contains a targeting signal in its C-terminus, distal to the dileucine motif, that regulates its sorting into a post-endosomal compartment. Similar membrane-distal, acidic-cluster-based motifs are found in the cytosolic tails of the insulin-responsive aminopeptidase IRAP (insulin-regulated aminopeptidase) and the proprotein convertase PC6B, indicating that this type of motif may play an important role in the endosomal sequestration of a number of different proteins. PMID:10926832

  14. Transport Rates of a Glutamate Transporter Homologue Are Influenced by the Lipid Bilayer*

    PubMed Central

    McIlwain, Benjamin C.; Vandenberg, Robert J.; Ryan, Renae M.

    2015-01-01

    The aspartate transporter from Pyrococcus horikoshii (GltPh) is a model for the structure of the SLC1 family of amino acid transporters. Crystal structures of GltPh provide insight into mechanisms of ion coupling and substrate transport; however, structures have been solved in the absence of a lipid bilayer so they provide limited information regarding interactions that occur between the protein and lipids of the membrane. Here, we investigated the effect of the lipid environment on aspartate transport by reconstituting GltPh into liposomes of defined lipid composition where the primary lipid is phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or its methyl derivatives. We showed that the rate of aspartate transport and the transmembrane orientation of GltPh were influenced by the primary lipid in the liposomes. In PE liposomes, we observed the highest transport rate and showed that 85% of the transporters were orientated right-side out, whereas in trimethyl PE liposomes, 50% of transporters were right-side out, and we observed a 4-fold reduction in transport rate. Differences in orientation can only partially explain the lipid composition effect on transport rate. Crystal structures of GltPh revealed a tyrosine residue (Tyr-33) that we propose interacts with lipid headgroups during the transport cycle. Based on site-directed mutagenesis, we propose that a cation-π interaction between Tyr-33 and the lipid headgroups can influence conformational flexibility of the trimerization domain and thus the rate of transport. These results provide a specific example of how interactions between membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins can influence function and highlight the importance of the role of the membrane in transporter function. PMID:25713135

  15. Autoantibodies to protein transport and messenger RNA processing pathways: endosomes, lysosomes, Golgi complex, proteasomes, assemblyosomes, exosomes, and GW bodies.

    PubMed

    Stinton, Laura M; Eystathioy, Theophany; Selak, Sanja; Chan, Edward K L; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2004-01-01

    Over 50 years ago the lupus erythematosus (LE) cell phenomenon was described and this was quickly followed by the introduction of the LE cell test and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) to detect antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in clinical laboratories. Recently, attention has turned to the identification of the autoantigens that bind to cytoplasmic organelles such as the Golgi complex, endosomes and other "cytoplasmic somes". Three endosome autoantigens include early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1, 160 kDa), cytoplasmic linker protein-170 (CLIP-170, 170 kDa), and lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). Antibodies to EEA1 were seen in a variety of conditions but approximately 40% of the patients had a neurological disease. Despite the prominence of lysosomes in cells and tissues, reports of autoantibodies are limited to the lysosomal antigen h-LAMP-2 and the cytoplasmic antineutrophil antibodies (cANCA). Autoantigens in the Golgi complex include giantin/macrogolgin, golgin-245, golgin 160, golgin-97, golgin 95/gm130, and golgin-67. More recently, there has been an interest in autoantibodies that bind components of the "SMN complex" or the "assemblyosome". Arginine/glycine (RG)-rich domains in components of the SMN complex interact with Sm, like-Sm (LSm), fibrillarin, RNA helicase A (Gu), and coilin proteins, all of which are antigen targets in a variety of diseases. More recently, components of a novel cytoplasmic structure named GW bodies (GWBs) have been identified as targets of human autoantibodies. Components of GWBs include GW182, a unique mRNA-binding protein, like Sm proteins (LSms), and decapping (hDcp1) and exonuclease (Xrn) enzymes. Current evidence suggests that GWBs are involved in the cytoplasmic processing of mRNAs. Autoantibodies to the "cytoplasmic somes" are relatively uncommon and serological tests to detect most of them are not widely available. PMID:14962794

  16. Lysobisphosphatidic acid controls endosomal cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Julien; Chamoun, Zeina; Jiang, Guowei; Prestwich, Glenn; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan; Parton, Robert G; Gruenberg, Jean

    2008-10-10

    Most cell types acquire cholesterol by endocytosis of circulating low density lipoprotein, but little is known about the mechanisms of intra-endosomal cholesterol transport and about the primary cause of its aberrant accumulation in the cholesterol storage disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC). Here we report that lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), an unconventional phospholipid that is only detected in late endosomes, regulates endosomal cholesterol levels under the control of Alix/AlP1, which is an LBPA-interacting protein involved in sorting into multivesicular endosomes. We find that Alix down-expression decreases both LBPA levels and the lumenal vesicle content of late endosomes. Cellular cholesterol levels are also decreased, presumably because the storage capacity of endosomes is affected and thus cholesterol clearance accelerated. Both lumenal membranes and cholesterol can be restored in Alix knockdown cells by exogenously added LBPA. Conversely, we also find that LBPA becomes limiting upon pathological cholesterol accumulation in NPC cells, because the addition of exogenous LBPA, but not of LBPA isoforms or analogues, partially reverts the NPC phenotype. We conclude that LBPA controls the cholesterol capacity of endosomes. PMID:18644787

  17. Mobilization of late-endosomal cholesterol is inhibited by Rab guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hölttä-Vuori, M; Määttä, J; Ullrich, O; Kuismanen, E; Ikonen, E

    2000-01-27

    Cholesterol entering cells in low-density lipoproteins (LDL) via receptor-mediated endocytosis is transported to organelles of the late endocytic pathway for degradation of the lipoprotein particles. The fate of the free cholesterol released remains poorly understood, however. Recent observations suggest that late-endosomal cholesterol sequestration is regulated by the dynamics of lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA)-rich membranes [1]. Genetic studies have pinpointed a protein, Niemann-Pick C-1 (NPC-1), that is required for the mobilization of late-endosomal/lysosomal cholesterol by an unknown mechanism [2]. Here, we report the removal of accumulated cholesterol by overexpression of the NPC-1 protein in NPC-1-deficient fibroblasts from patients with Niemann-Pick disease, and in normal fibroblasts upon release of a progesterone-induced block of cholesterol transport. We show that late-endosomal/lysosomal cholesterol mobilization is specifically inhibited by microinjection of Rab GDP-dissociation inhibitor (Rab-GDI). Moreover, clearance of the cholesterol deposits by NPC-1 in patients' fibroblasts is accompanied by the redistribution of LBPA and of a lysosomal hydrolase that utilizes the mannose-6-phosphate receptor. Our results reveal, for the first time, the involvement of a specific molecular component of the membrane-trafficking machinery in cholesterol transport and the coupling of late-endosomal cholesterol egress to the trafficking of other lipid and protein cargo. PMID:10662671

  18. Late endosomes: sorting and partitioning in multivesicular bodies.

    PubMed

    Piper, R C; Luzio, J P

    2001-09-01

    Late endosomes, which have the morphological characteristics of multivesicular bodies, have received relatively little attention in comparison with early endosomes and lysosomes. Recent work in mammalian and yeast cells has given insights into their structure and function, including the generation of their multivesicular morphology. Lipid partitioning to create microdomains enriched in specific lipids is observed in late endosomes, with some lumenal vesicles enriched in lysobisphosphatidic acid and others in phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Sorting of membrane proteins into the lumenal vesicles may occur because of the properties of their trans-membrane domains, or as a result of tagging with ubiquitin. Yeast class E Vps proteins and their mammalian orthologs are the best candidates to make up the protein machinery that controls inward budding, a process that starts in early endosomes. Late endosomes are able to undergo homotypic fusion events and also heterotypic fusion with lysosomes, a process that delivers endocytosed macromolecules for proteolytic degradation. PMID:11555415

  19. A Novel Mechanism of Regulating the ATPase VPS4 by Its Cofactor LIP5 and the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-III Protein CHMP5*

    PubMed Central

    Vild, Cody J.; Li, Yan; Guo, Emily Z.; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Disassembly of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery from biological membranes is a critical final step in cellular processes that require the ESCRT function. This reaction is catalyzed by VPS4, an AAA-ATPase whose activity is tightly regulated by a host of proteins, including LIP5 and the ESCRT-III proteins. Here, we present structural and functional analyses of molecular interactions between human VPS4, LIP5, and the ESCRT-III proteins. The N-terminal domain of LIP5 (LIP5NTD) is required for LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4, and the ESCRT-III protein CHMP5 strongly inhibits the stimulation. Both of these observations are distinct from what was previously described for homologous yeast proteins. The crystal structure of LIP5NTD in complex with the MIT (microtubule-interacting and transport)-interacting motifs of CHMP5 and a second ESCRT-III protein, CHMP1B, was determined at 1 Å resolution. It reveals an ESCRT-III binding induced moderate conformational change in LIP5NTD, which results from insertion of a conserved CHMP5 tyrosine residue (Tyr182) at the core of LIP5NTD structure. Mutation of Tyr182 partially relieves the inhibition displayed by CHMP5. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of VPS4 regulation in metazoans, where CHMP5 functions as a negative allosteric switch to control LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4. PMID:25637630

  20. Carotenoid binding to proteins: Modeling pigment transport to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reszczynska, Emilia; Welc, Renata; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Trebacz, Kazimierz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-10-15

    Carotenoid pigments play numerous important physiological functions in human organism. Very special is a role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the retina of an eye and in particular in its central part, the macula lutea. In the retina, carotenoids can be directly present in the lipid phase of the membranes or remain bound to the protein-pigment complexes. In this work we address a problem of binding of carotenoids to proteins and possible role of such structures in pigment transport to lipid membranes. Interaction of three carotenoids, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin with two proteins: bovine serum albumin and glutathione S-transferase (GST) was investigated with application of molecular spectroscopy techniques: UV-Vis absorption, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Interaction of pigment-protein complexes with model lipid bilayers formed with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine was investigated with application of FTIR, Raman imaging of liposomes and electrophysiological technique, in the planar lipid bilayer models. The results show that in all the cases of protein and pigment studied, carotenoids bind to protein and that the complexes formed can interact with membranes. This means that protein-carotenoid complexes are capable of playing physiological role in pigment transport to biomembranes. PMID:26361975

  1. Proteinases inhibit H(+)-ATPase and Na+/H+ exchange but not water transport in apical and endosomal membranes from rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Sabolić, I; Shi, L B; Brown, D; Ausiello, D A; Verkman, A S

    1992-01-10

    A marked increase in water permeability can be induced in Xenopus oocytes by injection of mRNA from tissues that express water channels, suggesting that the water channel is a protein. In view of this and previous reports which showed that proteinases may interfere with mercurial inhibition of water transport in red blood cells (RBC), we examined the influence of trypsin, chymotrypsin, papain, pronase, subtilisin and thermolysin on water permeability as well as on ATPase activity, H(+)-pump, passive H+ conductance, and Na+/H+ exchange in apical brush-border vesicles (BBMV) and endosomal (EV) vesicles from rat renal cortex. H+ transport was measured by Acridine orange fluorescence quenching and water transport by stopped-flow light scattering. As measured by potential-driven H+ accumulation in BBMV and EV, proteinase treatment had little effect on vesicle integrity. In BBMV, ecto-ATPase activity was inhibited by 15-30%, Na+/H+ exchange by 20-55%, and H+ conductance was unchanged. Osmotic water permeability (Pf) was 570 microns/s and was inhibited 85-90% by 0.6 mM HgCl2; proteinase treatment did not affect Pf or the HgCl2 inhibition. In EV, NEM-sensitive H+ accumulation and ATPase activity were inhibited by greater than 95%. Pf (140 microns/s) and HgCl2 inhibition (75-85%) were not influenced by proteinase treatment. SDS-PAGE showed selective digestion of multiple polypeptides by proteinases. These results confirm the presence of water channels in BBMV and EV and demonstrate selective inhibition of ATPase function and Na+/H+ exchange by proteinase digestion. The lack of effect of proteinases on water transport by mercurials. We conclude that the water channel may be a small integral membrane protein which, unlike the H(+)-ATPase and Na+/H+ exchanger, has no functionally important membrane domains that are sensitive to proteolysis. PMID:1309658

  2. Studying Lipid Metabolism and Transport During Zebrafish Development.

    PubMed

    Zeituni, Erin M; Farber, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish model facilitates the study of lipid metabolism and transport during development. Here, we outline methods to introduce traceable fluorescent or radiolabeled fatty acids into zebrafish embryos and larvae at various developmental stages. Labeled fatty acids can be injected into the large yolk cell prior to the development of digestive organs when the larvae is entirely dependent on the yolk for its nutrition (lecithotrophic state). Once zebrafish are able to consume exogenous food, labeled fatty acids can be incorporated into their food. Our group and others have demonstrated that the transport and processing of these injected or ingested fatty acid analogs can be followed through microscopy and/or biochemical analysis. These techniques can be easily combined with targeted antisense approaches, transgenics, or drug treatments (see Note 1 ), allowing studies of lipid cell biology and metabolism that are exceedingly difficult or impossible in mammals. PMID:27464812

  3. Endosomal escape: a bottleneck in intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Shete, Harshad K; Prabhu, Rashmi H; Patravale, Vandana B

    2014-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic science, apart from drugs, newer bioactive moieties like oligonucleotides, proteins, peptides, enzymes and antibodies are constantly being introduced for the betterment of therapeutic efficacy. These moieties have intracellular components of the cells like cytoplasm and nucleus as one of their pharmacological sites for exhibiting therapeutic activity. Despite their promising efficacy, their intracellular bioavailability has been critically hampered leading to failure in the treatment of numerous diseases and disorders. The endosomal uptake pathway is known to be a rate-limiting barrier for such systems. Bioactive molecules get trapped in the endosomal vesicles and degraded in the lysosomal compartment, necessitating the need for effective strategies that facilitate the endosomal escape and enhance the cytosolic bioavailability of bioactives. Microbes like viruses and bacteria have developed their innate mechanistic tactics to translocate their genome and toxins by efficiently penetrating the host cell membrane. Understanding this mechanism and exploring it further for intracellular delivery has opened new avenues to surmount the endosomal barrier. These strategies include membrane fusion, pore formation and proton sponge effects. On the other hand, progress in designing a novel smart polymeric carrier system that triggers endosomal escape by undergoing modulations in the intracellular milieu has further led to an improvement in intracellular delivery. These comprise pH, enzyme and temperature-induced modulators, synthetic cationic lipids and photo-induced physical disruption. Each of the aforementioned strategies has its own unique mechanism to escape the endosome. This review recapitulates the numerous strategies designed to surmount the bottleneck of endosomal escape and thereby achieve successful intracellular uptake of bioactives. PMID:24730275

  4. Detection of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport in Entamoeba histolytica and Characterization of the EhVps4 Protein

    PubMed Central

    López-Reyes, Israel; García-Rivera, Guillermina; Bañuelos, Cecilia; Herranz, Silvia; Vincent, Olivier; López-Camarillo, César; Marchat, Laurence A.; Orozco, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic endocytosis involves multivesicular bodies formation, which is driven by endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT). Here, we showed the presence and expression of homologous ESCRT genes in Entamoeba histolytica. We cloned and expressed the Ehvps4 gene, an ESCRT member, to obtain the recombinant EhVps4 and generate specific antibodies, which immunodetected EhVps4 in cytoplasm of trophozoites. Bioinformatics and biochemical studies evidenced that rEhVps4 is an ATPase, whose activity depends on the conserved E211 residue. Next, we generated trophozoites overexpressing EhVps4 and mutant EhVps4-E211Q FLAG-tagged proteins. The EhVps4-FLAG was located in cytosol and at plasma membrane, whereas the EhVps4-E211Q-FLAG was detected as abundant cytoplasmic dots in trophozoites. Erythrophagocytosis, cytopathic activity, and hepatic damage in hamsters were not improved in trophozoites overexpressing EhVps4-FLAG. In contrast, EhVps4-E211Q-FLAG protein overexpression impaired these properties. The localization of EhVps4-FLAG around ingested erythrocytes, together with our previous results, strengthens the role for EhVps4 in E. histolytica phagocytosis and virulence. PMID:20508821

  5. Genetic Interactions between a Pep7 Mutation and the Pep12 and Vps45 Genes: Evidence for a Novel Snare Component in Transport between the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Golgi Complex and Endosome

    PubMed Central

    Webb, G. C.; Hoedt, M.; Poole, L. J.; Jones, E. W.

    1997-01-01

    The PEP7 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a 59-kD hydrophilic polypeptide that is required for transport of soluble vacuolar hydrolase precursors from the TGN to the endosome. This study presents the results of a high-copy suppression analysis of pep7-20 mutant phenotypes. This analysis demonstrated that both VPS45 and PEP12 are allele-specific high-copy suppressors of pep7-20 mutant phenotypes. Overexpression of VPS45 was able to completely suppress the Zn(2+) sensitivity and partially suppress the carboxypeptidase Y deficiency. Overexpression of PEP12 was able to do the same, but to a lesser extent. Vps45p and Pep12p are Sec1p and syntaxin (t-SNARE) homologues, respectively, and are also thought to function in transport between the TGN and endosome. Two additional vacuole pathway SNARE complex homologues, Vps33p (Sec1p) and Pth1p (syntaxin), when overexpressed, were unable to suppress pep7-20 or any other pep7 allele, further supporting the specificity of the interactions of pep7-20 with PEP12 and VPS45. Because several other vesicle docking/fusion reactions take place in the cell without discernible participation of Pep7p homologues, we suggest that Pep7p is a step-specific regulator of docking and/or fusion of TGN-derived transport vesicles onto the endosome. PMID:9335586

  6. A kinetic concepto of lipid transport in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Palmquist, D L

    1976-03-01

    Summarization of the literature shows a strong correlation between dietary fatty acid intake and total lipid concentration in plasma in lactating cows whereas total milk fat secreted is related to neither of these. In the process of plasma triglyceride removal, chylomicra and very low density lipoproteins are converted to low density lipoproteins. Limited kinetic data indicate that the fractional removal rates for chulomicra and very low density lipoproteins are rapid in lactating cows whereas fractional removal of low density lipoproteins is slower, resulting in accumulation of the latter in plasma. Under such conditions, low density lipoprotein concentrations of plasma would not be expected to reflect quantitatively the transfer of plasma triglyceride fatty acids to milk fat. Quantitative analysis or triglyceride fatty acid turnover in density less than 1.006 lipoproteins should delineate the role of plasma lipid transport in milk fat synthesis. High fat diets protected from rumen biohydrogenation have proven to be a useful approach in studying ruminant fat metabolism and may be used more extensively to elucidate the role of cholesterol in plasma lipid transport and the metabolism of essential fatty acids in ruminants. PMID:4477

  7. Controlled Transport of Functionalized Nanochannel though Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Via the Dissipative Particle Dynamics approach, we study the directed transport of a transmembrane nanochannel to a desired location within a lipid bilayer. Each nanochannel encompasses an ABA architecture, with a hydrophobic shaft (B) with two hydrophilic ends (A). One of the ends of the nanochannel is functionalized with hydrophilic functional groups, or hairs. The hydrophilic hairs serve a dual role: (a) control transport across the membrane barrier, and (b) enable the channel relocation to a specific membrane site. Our system comprises a lipid membrane with an embedded transmembrane nanochannel with the hairs extending into solution. First, we hold a suitably functionalized pipette above the membrane while the nanochannel freely diffuses within the membrane. For an optimal range of parameters, we demonstrate that the hairs find the pipette and spontaneously anchor onto it. We then show that by moving the pipette for a range of velocities, we can effectively transport the channel to any location within the membrane. This prototype assembly can provide guidelines for designing a number of systems for biomimetic applications.

  8. Regulation of polar auxin transport by protein and lipid kinases

    PubMed Central

    Jaillais, Yvon

    2016-01-01

    The directional transport of auxin, known as polar auxin transport, allows asymmetric distribution of this hormone in different cells and tissues. This system creates local auxin maxima, minima and gradients that are instrumental in both organ initiation and shape determination. As such, polar auxin transport is crucial for all aspects of plant development but also for environmental interaction, notably in shaping plant architecture to its environment. Cell-to-cell auxin transport is mediated by a network of auxin carriers that are regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Here we review our current knowledge on some aspects of the ‘non-genomic’ regulation of auxin transport, putting an emphasis on how phosphorylation by protein and lipid kinases controls the polarity, intracellular trafficking, stability and activity of auxin carriers. We describe the role of several AGC kinases, including PINOID, D6PK and the blue light photoreceptor phot1, in phosphorylating auxin carriers from the PIN and ABCB families. We also highlight the function of some Receptor-Like Kinases (RLK) and two-component histidine kinase receptors in polar auxin transport, noticing that there are likely RLKs involved in coordinating auxin distribution yet to be discovered. In addition, we describe the emerging role of phospholipid phosphorylation in polarity establishment and intracellular trafficking of PIN proteins. We outline these various phosphorylation mechanisms in the context of primary and lateral root development, leaf cell shape acquisition as well as root gravitropism and shoot phototropism. PMID:27242371

  9. Effectiveness of a dynein team in a tug of war helped by reduced load sensitivity of detachment: evidence from the study of bidirectional endosome transport in D. discoideum.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2012-08-01

    Bidirectional cargo transport by molecular motors in cells is a complex phenomenon in which the cargo (usually a vesicle) alternately moves in retrograde and anterograde directions. In this case, teams of oppositely pulling motors (e.g., kinesin and dynein) bind to the cargo, simultaneously, and 'coordinate' their activity such that the motion consists of spells of positively and negatively directed segments, separated by pauses of varying duration. A set of recent experiments have analyzed the bidirectional motion of endosomes in the amoeba D. discoideum in detail. It was found that in between directional switches, a team of five to six dyneins stall a cargo against a stronger kinesin in a tug of war, which lasts for almost a second. As the mean detachment time of a kinesin under its stall load was also observed to be ∼1 s, we infer that the collective detachment time of the dynein assembly must also be similar. Here, we analyze this inference from a modeling perspective, using experimentally measured single-molecule parameters as inputs. We find that the commonly assumed exponential load-dependent detachment rate is inconsistent with observations, as it predicts that a five-dynein assembly will detach under its combined stall load in less than a hundredth of a second. A modified model where the load-dependent unbinding rate is assumed to saturate at stall-force level for super-stall loads gives results which are in agreement with experimental data. Our analysis suggests that the load-dependent detachment of a dynein in a team is qualitatively different at sub-stall and super-stall loads, a conclusion which is likely to have implications in other situations involving collective effects of many motors. PMID:22733140

  10. Proton-Assisted Amino Acid Transporter PAT1 Complexes with Rag GTPases and Activates TORC1 on Late Endosomal and Lysosomal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ögmundsdóttir, Margrét H.; Heublein, Sabine; Kazi, Shubana; Reynolds, Bruno; Visvalingam, Shivanthy M.; Shaw, Michael K.; Goberdhan, Deborah C. I.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by growth factor-regulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/Rheb signalling and extracellular amino acids (AAs) to promote growth and proliferation. These AAs induce translocation of mTOR to late endosomes and lysosomes (LELs), subsequent activation via mechanisms involving the presence of intralumenal AAs, and interaction between mTORC1 and a multiprotein assembly containing Rag GTPases and the heterotrimeric Ragulator complex. However, the mechanisms by which AAs control these different aspects of mTORC1 activation are not well understood. We have recently shown that intracellular Proton-assisted Amino acid Transporter 1 (PAT1)/SLC36A1 is an essential mediator of AA-dependent mTORC1 activation. Here we demonstrate in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells that PAT1 is primarily located on LELs, physically interacts with the Rag GTPases and is required for normal AA-dependent mTOR relocalisation. We also use the powerful in vivo genetic methodologies available in Drosophila to investigate the regulation of the PAT1/Rag/Ragulator complex. We show that GFP-tagged PATs reside at both the cell surface and LELs in vivo, mirroring PAT1 distribution in several normal mammalian cell types. Elevated PI3K/Akt/Rheb signalling increases intracellular levels of PATs and synergistically enhances PAT-induced growth via a mechanism requiring endocytosis. In light of the recent identification of the vacuolar H+-ATPase as another Rag-interacting component, we propose a model in which PATs function as part of an AA-sensing engine that drives mTORC1 activation from LEL compartments. PMID:22574197

  11. Dietary Lipid and Carbohydrate Interactions: Implications on Lipid and Glucose Absorption, Transport in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Juveniles.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carolina; Corraze, Geneviève; Basto, Ana; Larroquet, Laurence; Panserat, Stéphane; Oliva-Teles, Aires

    2016-06-01

    A digestibility trial was performed with gilthead sea bream juveniles (IBW = 72 g) fed four diets differing in lipid source (fish oil, FO; or a blend of vegetable oil, VO) and starch content (0 %, CH-; or 20 %, CH+) to evaluate the potential interactive effects between carbohydrates and VO on the processes involved in digestion, absorption and transport of lipids and glucose. In fish fed VO diets a decrease in lipid digestibility and in cholesterol (C), High Density Lipoprotein(HDL)-C and Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-C (only in CH+ group) were recorded. Contrarily, dietary starch induced postprandial hyperglycemia and time related alterations on serum triacylglycerol (TAG), phospholipid (PL) and C concentrations. Fish fed a CH+ diet presented lower serum TAG than CH- group at 6 h post-feeding, and the reverse was observed at 12 h post-feeding for TAG and PL. Lower serum C and PL at 6 h post-feeding were recorded only in VOCH+ group. No differences between groups were observed in hepatic and intestinal transcript levels of proteins involved in lipid transport and hydrolysis (FABP, DGAT, GPAT, MTP, LPL, LCAT). Lower transcript levels of proteins related to lipid transport (ApoB, ApoA1, FABP2) were observed in the intestine of fish fed the CH+ diet, but remained unchanged in the liver. Overall, transcriptional mechanisms involved in lipid transport and absorption were not linked to changes in lipid serum and digestibility. Dietary starch affected lipid absorption and transport, probably due to a delay in lipid absorption. This study suggests that a combination of dietary VO and starch may negatively affect cholesterol absorption and transport. PMID:27023202

  12. Regulation of polar auxin transport by protein and lipid kinases.

    PubMed

    Armengot, Laia; Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Jaillais, Yvon

    2016-07-01

    The directional transport of auxin, known as polar auxin transport (PAT), allows asymmetric distribution of this hormone in different cells and tissues. This system creates local auxin maxima, minima, and gradients that are instrumental in both organ initiation and shape determination. As such, PAT is crucial for all aspects of plant development but also for environmental interaction, notably in shaping plant architecture to its environment. Cell to cell auxin transport is mediated by a network of auxin carriers that are regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Here we review our current knowledge on some aspects of the 'non-genomic' regulation of auxin transport, placing an emphasis on how phosphorylation by protein and lipid kinases controls the polarity, intracellular trafficking, stability, and activity of auxin carriers. We describe the role of several AGC kinases, including PINOID, D6PK, and the blue light photoreceptor phot1, in phosphorylating auxin carriers from the PIN and ABCB families. We also highlight the function of some receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and two-component histidine kinase receptors in PAT, noting that there are probably RLKs involved in co-ordinating auxin distribution yet to be discovered. In addition, we describe the emerging role of phospholipid phosphorylation in polarity establishment and intracellular trafficking of PIN proteins. We outline these various phosphorylation mechanisms in the context of primary and lateral root development, leaf cell shape acquisition, as well as root gravitropism and shoot phototropism. PMID:27242371

  13. Transport through the yeast endocytic pathway occurs through morphologically distinct compartments and requires an active secretory pathway and Sec18p/N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hicke, L; Zanolari, B; Pypaert, M; Rohrer, J; Riezman, H

    1997-01-01

    Molecules travel through the yeast endocytic pathway from the cell surface to the lysosome-like vacuole by passing through two sequential intermediates. Immunofluorescent detection of an endocytosed pheromone receptor was used to morphologically identify these intermediates, the early and late endosomes. The early endosome is a peripheral organelle that is heterogeneous in appearance, whereas the late endosome is a large perivacuolar compartment that corresponds to the prevacuolar compartment previously shown to be an endocytic intermediate. We demonstrate that inhibiting transport through the early secretory pathway in sec mutants quickly impedes transport from the early endosome. Treatment of sensitive cells with brefeldin A also blocks transport from this compartment. We provide evidence that Sec18p/N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein, a protein required for membrane fusion, is directly required in vivo for forward transport early in the endocytic pathway. Inhibiting protein synthesis does not affect transport from the early endosome but causes endocytosed proteins to accumulate in the late endosome. As newly synthesized proteins and the late steps of secretion are not required for early to late endosome transport, but endoplasmic reticulum through Golgi traffic is, we propose that efficient forward transport in the early endocytic pathway requires delivery of lipid from secretory organelles to endosomes. Images PMID:9017592

  14. The lymph lipid precursor pool is a key determinant of intestinal lymphatic drug transport.

    PubMed

    Trevaskis, Natalie L; Porter, Christopher J H; Charman, William N

    2006-02-01

    The influence of the size and turnover kinetics of the enterocyte-based lymph lipid precursor pool (LLPP) on intestinal lymphatic drug transport has been examined. Mesenteric lymph duct-cannulated rats were infused intraduodenally with low (2-5 mg/h) or high (20 mg/h) lipid-dose formulations containing 100 microg/h halofantrine (Hf, a model drug) and 1 microCi/h (14)C-oleic acid (OA) (as a marker for lipid transport) until steady-state rates of lipid(dX(L)/dt)(ss) and drug (dD(L)/dt)(ss) transport in lymph were obtained. After 5 h, the infusion was changed to formulations of the same composition but excluding (14)C-OA and Hf, allowing calculation of the first order rate constants describing turnover of lipid (K(X)) and drug (K(D)) from the LLPP into the lymph from the washout kinetics. The mass of lipid (X(LP)) and drug (D(LP)) in the LLPP was also determined. Biliary-lipid output was determined in a separate group of rats that had been infused with the same formulations. The results indicate that after administration of high lipid doses, lymphatic drug transport is dependent on the mass of exogenous lipid available in the LLPP and the rate of lipid pool turnover into the lymph. In contrast, after administration of low lipid doses, biliary-derived endogenous lipids are most likely to be the primary drivers of drug incorporation into the LLPP and lymph. Therefore, the LLPP size and composition seem to be major determinants of lymphatic drug transport, and formulation components, which increase lipid pool size, may therefore enhance lymphatic drug transport. PMID:16249368

  15. Drosophila Strip serves as a platform for early endosome organization during axon elongation

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Chisako; Kawauchi, Takeshi; Haraguchi, Shuka; Shikanai, Mima; Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Luo, Liqun; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Early endosomes are essential for regulating cell signalling and controlling the amount of cell surface molecules during neuronal morphogenesis. Early endosomes undergo retrograde transport (clustering) before their homotypic fusion. Small GTPase Rab5 is known to promote early endosomal fusion, but the mechanism linking the transport/clustering with Rab5 activity is unclear. Here we show that Drosophila Strip is a key regulator for neuronal morphogenesis. strip knockdown disturbs the early endosome clustering and Rab5-positive early endosomes become smaller and scattered. Strip genetically and biochemically interacts with both Glued (the regulator of dynein-dependent transport) and Sprint (the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab5), suggesting that Strip is a molecular linker between retrograde transport and Rab5 activation. Overexpression of an active form of Rab5 in strip mutant neurons suppresses the axon elongation defects. Thus, Strip acts as a molecular platform for the early endosome organization that plays important roles in neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:25312435

  16. Plant endosomal NHX antiporters: Activity and function.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Quan-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    The Arabidopsis NHX antiporter family contains eight members that are divided into three subclasses: vacuolar, endosomal, and plasma membrane. While the plasma membrane and vacuolar NHXs have been studied extensively, the activity and function of the endosomal NHXs are beginning to be discovered. AtNHX5 and AtNHX6 are endosomal Na(+),K(+)/H(+) antiporters that share high sequence similarity. They are localized in the Golgi, trans-Golgi network (TGN), and prevacuolear compartment (PVC). Studies have shown that AtNHX5 and AtNHX6 mediate K(+) and Na(+) transport, and regulate cellular pH homeostasis. Sequence alignment has found that AtNHX5 and AtNHX6 contain four conserved acidic amino acid residues in transmembrane domains that align with yeast and human NHXs. Three of these conserved acidic residues are critical for K(+) transport and seedling growth in Arabidopsis. Moreover, studies have shown that the precursors of the seed storage proteins are missorted to the apoplast in the nhx5 nhx6 knockout mutant, suggesting that AtNHX5 and AtNHX6 regulate protein transport into the vacuole. Further analysis found that AtNHX5 and AtNHX6 regulated the binding of VSR to its cargoes. Taken together, AtNHX5 and AtNHX6 play an important role in cellular ion and pH homeostasis, and are essential for protein transport into the vacuole. PMID:26890367

  17. Lysosomal Lipid Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Heike; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Lysosomal lipid storage diseases, or lipidoses, are inherited metabolic disorders in which typically lipids accumulate in cells and tissues. Complex lipids, such as glycosphingolipids, are constitutively degraded within the endolysosomal system by soluble hydrolytic enzymes with the help of lipid binding proteins in a sequential manner. Because of a functionally impaired hydrolase or auxiliary protein, their lipid substrates cannot be degraded, accumulate in the lysosome, and slowly spread to other intracellular membranes. In Niemann-Pick type C disease, cholesterol transport is impaired and unesterified cholesterol accumulates in the late endosome. In most lysosomal lipid storage diseases, the accumulation of one or few lipids leads to the coprecipitation of other hydrophobic substances in the endolysosomal system, such as lipids and proteins, causing a “traffic jam.” This can impair lysosomal function, such as delivery of nutrients through the endolysosomal system, leading to a state of cellular starvation. Therapeutic approaches are currently restricted to mild forms of diseases with significant residual catabolic activities and without brain involvement. PMID:21502308

  18. Risk factors, endothelial cell turnover and lipid transport in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, S J

    1996-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain to be the 4th rank of top ten causes of mortality in Taiwan in recent years. Atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, which often culminating in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure, are responsible for the majority of these death. One of the prominent features of atherosclerotic lesion is local accumulation of lipids, mainly in the forms of cholesteryl ester and free cholesterol, either within cells or extracellularly in matrix. Repeated endothelial injury and enhanced lipid infiltration are critical events in the development of atherosclerosis. Plasma lipoproteins may enter the arterial wall through endothelium, either transcellularly via vesicular transport or paracellularly via intercellular junction. Our previous studies have demonstrated that most of the arterial endothelial cells in mitosis are associated with the leakage of fluorescently labeled albumin and low density lipoproteins. Subsequently, such transendothelial leakage of macromolecules is also shown to be associated with endothelial cell death as assessed by immunocytochemical staining for IgG. These findings suggested that transiently leaky junctions occurring during endothelial cell turnover may provide potentially important pathways for increasing transport or leakage of macromolecules, including atherogenic LDL, across the vascular endothelium. Electron microscopic study using horseradish peroxidase as a tracer revealed markedly widening of intercellular junctions around endothelial cells in mitosis providing direct evidence in support of "cell turnover-leaky junction" theory for the localization of atherogenesis. Hypertension, smoking, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia are well-known major risk factors for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. In a series of investigations, we examined the hypothesis that hypertension smoking, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia increase the arterial endothelial cell turnover and hence

  19. Chasing Ebola through the Endosomal Labyrinth

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During virus entry, the surface glycoprotein of Ebola virus (EBOV) undergoes a complex set of transformations within the endosomal network. Tools to study EBOV entry have been limited to static immunofluorescence or biochemical and functional analysis. In a recent article in mBio, Spence et al. reported a novel, live-cell-imaging method that tracks this transformational journey of EBOV in real time [J. S. Spence, T. B. Krause, E. Mittler, R. K. Jangra, and K. Chandran, mBio 7(1):e01857-15, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01857-15]. The assay validates known mechanisms of EBOV entry and sheds light on some novel intricacies. Direct evidence supports the hypothesis that fusion is a rare event that starts in maturing early endosomes, is completed in late endosomes, and occurs entirely in Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1)-positive (NPC1+) compartments. The study demonstrated that lipid mixing and productive fusion are temporally decoupled, with different energetic barriers and a protease-dependent step between the two events. Analysis of the mechanism of action of an important class of EBOV neutralizing antibodies, such as KZ52 and ZMapp, provides direct evidence that these antibodies act by inhibiting the membrane fusion. PMID:27006455

  20. Annexin A8 Regulates Late Endosome Organization and Function

    PubMed Central

    Goebeler, Verena; Poeter, Michaela; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Gerke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Different classes of endosomes exhibit a characteristic intracellular steady-state distribution governed by interactions with the cytoskeleton. Late endosomes, organelles of the degradative lysosomal route, seem to require associated actin filaments for proper localization and function. We show here that the F-actin and phospholipid binding protein annexin A8 is associated specifically with late endosomes. Altering intracellular annexin A8 levels drastically affected the morphology and intracellular distribution of late endosomes. Trafficking through the degradative pathway was delayed in the absence of annexin A8, resulting in attenuated ligand-induced degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and prolonged epidermal growth factor-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. Depletion of annexin A8 reduced the association of late endosomal membranes with actin filaments. These results indicate that the defective cargo transport through the late endocytic pathway and the imbalanced signaling of activated receptors observed in the absence of annexin A8 results from the disturbed association of late endosomal membranes with the actin network, resulting in impaired actin-based late endosome motility. PMID:18923148

  1. Ceramide formation mediated by acid sphingomyelinase facilitates endosomal escape of caliciviruses.

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Vinay; Kim, Yunjeong; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2015-09-01

    Our recent results demonstrated that bile acids facilitate virus escape from the endosomes into the cytoplasm for successful replication of porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC). We report a novel finding that bile acids can be substituted by cold treatment for endosomal escape and virus replication. This endosomal escape by cold treatment or bile acids is associated with ceramide formation by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). ASM catalyzes hydrolysis of sphingomyelin into ceramide, which is known to destabilize lipid bilayer. Treatment of LLC-PK cells with bile acids or cold led to ceramide formation, and small molecule antagonists or siRNA of ASM blocked ceramide formation in the endosomes and significantly reduced PEC replication. Inhibition of ASM resulted in the retention of PEC, feline calicivirus or murine norovirus in the endosomes in correlation with reduced viral replication. These results suggest the importance of viral escape from the endosomes for the replication of various caliciviruses. PMID:25985440

  2. Carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Laprade, R; Grenier, F; Pagé-Dansereau, M; Dansereau, J

    1984-08-01

    The electrical properties predicted by a widely accepted model for carrier-mediated ion transport in lipid bilayers are described. The different steps leading to ion transport and their associated rate constants are reaction at the interface between an ion in the aqueous phase and a carrier in the membrane (kRi), followed by translocation of the ion-carrier complex across the membrane interior (kis) and its dissociation at the other interface (kDi) after which the free carrier crosses back the membrane interior (ks). Results on glyceryl monooleate (GMO) membranes for a family of homologue carriers, the macrotetralide actin antibiotics (nonactin, monactin, dinactin, trinactin, and tetranactin) and a variety of ions (Na+, Cs+, Rb+, K+, NH4+, and Tl+) are presented. Internally consistent data obtained from steady-state electrical measurements (zero-current potential and conductance, current-voltage relationship) allow us to obtain the equilibrium permeability ratios for the different ions and show that for a given carrier kRi is relatively invariant from one ion to the other, except for Tl+ (larger), which implies that the ionic selectivity is controlled by the dissociation of the complex. The values of the individual rate constants obtained from current relaxation experiments are also presented and confirm the findings from steady-state measurements, as well as the isostericity concept for complexes of different ions with the same carrier (kis invariant). These also allow us to determine the aqueous phase membrane and torus membrane partition coefficients. Finally, the observed increase in kis from nonactin to tetranactin and, for all homologues, from GMO-decane to solvent-free GMO membranes, together with the concomitant decrease in kDi, can be explained in terms of modifications of electrostatic energy profiles induced by variations in carrier size and membrane thickness. PMID:6498590

  3. Cooperation of MICAL-L1, syndapin2, and phosphatidic acid in tubular recycling endosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam; Cai, Bishuang; Vitale, Nicolas; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Endocytic transport necessitates the generation of membrane tubules and their subsequent fission to transport vesicles for sorting of cargo molecules. The endocytic recycling compartment, an array of tubular and vesicular membranes decorated by the Eps15 homology domain protein, EHD1, is responsible for receptor and lipid recycling to the plasma membrane. It has been proposed that EHD dimers bind and bend membranes, thus generating recycling endosome (RE) tubules. However, recent studies show that molecules interacting with CasL-Like1 (MICAL-L1), a second, recently identified RE tubule marker, recruits EHD1 to preexisting tubules. The mechanisms and events supporting the generation of tubular recycling endosomes were unclear. Here, we propose a mechanism for the biogenesis of RE tubules. We demonstrate that MICAL-L1 and the BAR-domain protein syndapin2 bind to phosphatidic acid, which we identify as a novel lipid component of RE. Our studies demonstrate that direct interactions between these two proteins stabilize their association with membranes, allowing for nucleation of tubules by syndapin2. Indeed, the presence of phosphatidic acid in liposomes enhances the ability of syndapin2 to tubulate membranes in vitro. Overall our results highlight a new role for phosphatidic acid in endocytic recycling and provide new insights into the mechanisms by which tubular REs are generated. PMID:23596323

  4. Lipid metabolism in mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membranes have a unique lipid composition necessary for proper shape and function of the organelle. Mitochondrial lipid metabolism involves biosynthesis of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, the latter is a precursor of the late endosomal lipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. It also includes mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis necessary for the formation of the lipid cofactor lipoic acid. Furthermore the synthesis of coenzyme Q takes place in mitochondria as well as essential parts of the steroid and vitamin D metabolism. Lipid transport and remodelling, which are necessary for tailoring and maintaining specific membrane properties, are just partially unravelled. Mitochondrial lipids are involved in organelle maintenance, fission and fusion, mitophagy and cytochrome c-mediated apoptosis. Mutations in TAZ, SERAC1 and AGK affect mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism and cause Barth syndrome, MEGDEL and Sengers syndrome, respectively. In these disorders an abnormal mitochondrial energy metabolism was found, which seems to be due to disturbed protein-lipid interactions, affecting especially enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation. Since a growing number of enzymes and transport processes are recognised as parts of the mitochondrial lipid metabolism, a further increase of lipid-related disorders can be expected. PMID:25082432

  5. In Vivo Linking of Membrane Lipids and the Anion Transporter Band 3 with Thiourea-modified Amphiphilic Lipid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Akihiro; Katagiri, Naohiro; Nishimura, Shinichi; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins interact with membrane lipids for their structural stability and proper function. However, lipid–protein interactions are poorly understood at a molecular level especially in the live cell membrane, due to current limitations in methodology. Here, we report that amphiphilic lipid probes can be used to link membrane lipids and membrane proteins in vivo. Cholesterol and a phospholipid were both conjugated to a fluorescent tag through a linker containing thiourea. In the erythrocyte, the cholesterol probe fluorescently tagged the anion transporter band 3 via thiourea. Tagging by the cholesterol probe, but not by the phospholipid probe, was competitive with an anion transporter inhibitor, implying the presence of a specific binding pocket for cholesterol in this ~100 kDa protein. This method could prove an effective strategy for analyzing lipid–protein interactions in vivo in the live cell membrane. PMID:26616474

  6. OSBP-Related Protein Family: Mediators of Lipid Transport and Signaling at Membrane Contact Sites.

    PubMed

    Kentala, Henriikka; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its related protein homologs, ORPs, constitute a conserved family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) expressed ubiquitously in eukaryotes. The ligand-binding domain of ORPs accommodates cholesterol and oxysterols, but also glycerophospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). ORPs have been implicated as intracellular lipid sensors or transporters. Most ORPs carry targeting determinants for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and non-ER organelle membrane. ORPs are located and function at membrane contact sites (MCSs), at which ER is closely apposed with other organelle limiting membranes. Such sites have roles in lipid transport and metabolism, control of Ca(2+) fluxes, and signaling events. ORPs are postulated either to transport lipids over MCSs to maintain the distinct lipid compositions of organelle membranes, or to control the activity of enzymes/protein complexes with functions in signaling and lipid metabolism. ORPs may transfer PI4P and another lipid class bidirectionally. Transport of PI4P followed by its hydrolysis would in this model provide the energy for transfer of the other lipid against its concentration gradient. Control of organelle lipid compositions by OSBP/ORPs is important for the life cycles of several pathogenic viruses. Targeting ORPs with small-molecular antagonists is proposed as a new strategy to combat viral infections. Several ORPs are reported to modulate vesicle transport along the secretory or endocytic pathways. Moreover, antagonists of certain ORPs inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Thus, ORPs are LTPs, which mediate interorganelle lipid transport and coordinate lipid signals with a variety of cellular regimes. PMID:26811291

  7. The Recycling Endosome of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells Is a Mildly Acidic Compartment Rich in Raft Components

    PubMed Central

    Gagescu, Raluca; Demaurex, Nicolas; Parton, Robert G.; Hunziker, Walter; Huber, Lukas A.; Gruenberg, Jean

    2000-01-01

    We present a biochemical and morphological characterization of recycling endosomes containing the transferrin receptor in the epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney cell line. We find that recycling endosomes are enriched in molecules known to regulate transferrin recycling but lack proteins involved in early endosome membrane dynamics, indicating that recycling endosomes are distinct from conventional early endosomes. We also find that recycling endosomes are less acidic than early endosomes because they lack a functional vacuolar ATPase. Furthermore, we show that recycling endosomes can be reached by apically internalized tracers, confirming that the apical endocytic pathway intersects the transferrin pathway. Strikingly, recycling endosomes are enriched in the raft lipids sphingomyelin and cholesterol as well as in the raft-associated proteins caveolin-1 and flotillin-1. These observations may suggest that a lipid-based sorting mechanism operates along the Madin-Darby canine kidney recycling pathway, contributing to the maintenance of cell polarity. Altogether, our data indicate that recycling endosomes and early endosomes differ functionally and biochemically and thus that different molecular mechanisms regulate protein sorting and membrane traffic at each step of the receptor recycling pathway. PMID:10930469

  8. A role for Rab5 activity in the biogenesis of endosomal and lysosomal compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Yuko; Kuronita, Toshio; Fujita, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshitaka

    2007-12-07

    Rab5 is a small GTPase that plays roles in the homotypic fusion of early endosomes and regulation of intracellular vesicle transport. We show here that expression of GFP-tagged GTPase-deficient form of Rab5b (Rab5bQ79L) in NRK cells results in the sequential formation of three morphologically and functionally distinct types of endosomes. Expression of GFP-Rab5bQ79L initially caused a homotypic fusion of early endosomes accompanying a redistribution of the TGN-resident cargo molecules, and subsequent fusion with late endosomes/lysosomes, leading to the formation of giant hybrid organelles with features of early endosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes. Surprisingly, the giant endosomes gradually fragmented and shrunk, leading to the accumulation of early endosome clusters and concurrent reformation of late endosomes/lysosomes, a process accelerated by treatment with a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI(3)K) inhibitor, wortmannin. We postulate that such sequential processes reflect the biogenesis and maintenance of late endosomes/lysosomes, presumably via direct fusion with early endosomes and subsequent fission from hybrid organelles. Thus, our findings suggest a regulatory role for Rab5 in not only the early endocytic pathway, but also the late endocytic pathway, of membrane trafficking in coordination with PI(3)K activity.

  9. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis.

    PubMed

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2015-11-01

    Integrin-containing focal adhesions transmit extracellular signals across the plasma membrane to modulate cell adhesion, signalling and survival. Although integrins are known to undergo continuous endo/exocytic traffic, the potential impact of endocytic traffic on integrin-induced signals is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to cell-ECM adhesions and identify an endosomal signalling platform that supports integrin signalling away from the plasma membrane. We show that active focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an established marker of integrin-ECM downstream signalling, localizes with active integrins on endosomes. Integrin endocytosis positively regulates adhesion-induced FAK activation, which is early endosome antigen-1 and small GTPase Rab21 dependent. FAK binds directly to purified endosomes and becomes activated on them, suggesting a role for endocytosis in enhancing distinct integrin downstream signalling events. Finally, endosomal integrin signalling contributes to cancer-related processes such as anoikis resistance, anchorage independence and metastasis. PMID:26436690

  10. Lipid transfer protein transports compounds from lipid nanoparticles to plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Seki, Junzo; Sonoke, Satoru; Saheki, Akira; Koike, Tomohiro; Fukui, Hiroshi; Doi, Masaharu; Mayumi, Tadanori

    2004-05-01

    Nanometer-sized lipid emulsion particles with a diameter of 25-50 nm, called Lipid Nano-Sphere (LNS), are expected as a promising drug carrier to show prolonged plasma half-life of an incorporating drug. In terms of successful drug delivery using LNS, a drug should be incorporated into the lipid particles and remain within the particle, not only in the formulation in vitro but also after administration into the systemic blood circulation. In this study, we showed that phospholipids and some water-insoluble molecules also moved from lipid particles to plasma lipoproteins or albumin in serum and plasma half-lives of these compounds did not reflect that of the drug carriers. It was suggested that phospholipid or its derivative were transferred from LNS particles to plasma lipoproteins by lipid transfer proteins (LTP) in the circulation. These phenomena leaded to unsuccessful delivery of the drug with lipid-particulate drug carriers. On the other hand, lipophilic derivatives with cholesterol pro-moiety tested in this study were not released from LNS particles and showed prolonged plasma half-lives. Lipophilicity is known to be an important parameter for incorporating drugs into lipid particles but substrate specificity for LTP seems to be another key to success promising drug design using lipid emulsion particulate delivery system. PMID:15081154

  11. Vps1 in the late endosome-to-vacuole traffic.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Jacob; Williams, Michelle; Granich, Ann; Ahn, Hyoeun; Tenay, Brandon; Lukehart, Joshua; Highfill, Chad; Dobard, Sarah; Kim, Kyoungtae

    2013-03-01

    Vacuolar protein sorting 1 (Vps1), the yeast homolog to human dynamin, is a GTP hydrolyzing protein, which plays an important role in protein sorting and targeting between the Golgi and late endosomal compartments. In this study, we assessed the functional significance of Vps1 in the membrane traffic towards the vacuole. We show here that vps1 delta cells accumulated FM4-64 to a greater extent than wild-type (WT))cells, suggesting slower endocytic degradation traffic toward the vacuole. In addition, we observed that two endosome-to-vacuole traffic markers, DsRed-FYVE and Ste2-GFP, were highly accumulated in Vps1-deficient cells, further supporting Vps1's implication in efficient trafficking of endocytosed materials to the vacuole. Noteworthy, a simultaneous imaging analysis in conjunction with FM4-64 pulse-chase experiment further revealed that Vps1 plays a role in late endosome to the vacuole transport. Consistently, our subcellular localization analysis showed that Vps1 is present at the late endosome. The hyperaccumulation of endosomal intermediates in the vps1 mutant cells appears to be caused by the disruption of integrity of HOPS tethering complexes, manifested by mislocalization of Vps39 to the cytoplasm. Finally, we postulate that Vps1 functions together with the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) complex at the late endosomal compartments, based on the observation that the double mutants, in which VPS1 along with singular ESCRT I, II and III genes have been disrupted, exhibited synthetic lethality. Together, we propose that Vps1 is required for correct and efficient trafficking from the late endosomal compartments to the vacuole. PMID:23385815

  12. The TULIP superfamily of eukaryotic lipid-binding proteins as a mediator of lipid sensing and transport.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The tubular lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily has emerged in recent years as a major mediator of lipid sensing and transport in eukaryotes. It currently encompasses three protein families, SMP-like, BPI-like, and Takeout-like, which share a common fold. This fold consists of a long helix wrapped in a highly curved anti-parallel β-sheet, enclosing a central, lipophilic cavity. The SMP-like proteins, which include subunits of the ERMES complex and the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), appear to be mainly located at membrane contacts sites (MCSs) between organelles, mediating inter-organelle lipid exchange. The BPI-like proteins, which include the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein (LBP), the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), are either involved in innate immunity against bacteria through their ability to sense lipopolysaccharides, as is the case for BPI and LBP, or in lipid exchange between lipoprotein particles, as is the case for CETP and PLTP. The Takeout-like proteins, which are comprised of insect juvenile hormone-binding proteins and arthropod allergens, transport, where known, lipid hormones to target tissues during insect development. In all cases, the activity of these proteins is underpinned by their ability to bind large, hydrophobic ligands in their central cavity and segregate them away from the aqueous environment. Furthermore, where they are involved in lipid exchange, recent structural studies have highlighted their ability to establish lipophilic, tubular channels, either between organelles in the case of SMP domains or between lipoprotein particles in the case of CETP. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure, versatile functions, and evolution of the TULIP superfamily. We propose a deep evolutionary split in this superfamily, predating the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, between the SMP-like proteins, which act on

  13. Regulation of liver metabolism by the endosomal GTPase Rab5.

    PubMed

    Zeigerer, Anja; Bogorad, Roman L; Sharma, Kirti; Gilleron, Jerome; Seifert, Sarah; Sales, Susanne; Berndt, Nikolaus; Bulik, Sascha; Marsico, Giovanni; D'Souza, Rochelle C J; Lakshmanaperumal, Naharajan; Meganathan, Kesavan; Natarajan, Karthick; Sachinidis, Agapios; Dahl, Andreas; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Koteliansky, Victor; Zerial, Marino

    2015-05-12

    The liver maintains glucose and lipid homeostasis by adapting its metabolic activity to the energy needs of the organism. Communication between hepatocytes and extracellular environment via endocytosis is key to such homeostasis. Here, we addressed the question of whether endosomes are required for gluconeogenic gene expression. We took advantage of the loss of endosomes in the mouse liver upon Rab5 silencing. Strikingly, we found hepatomegaly and severe metabolic defects such as hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, and glycogen accumulation that phenocopied those found in von Gierke's disease, a glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency. G6Pase deficiency alone can account for the reduction in hepatic glucose output and glycogen accumulation as determined by mathematical modeling. Interestingly, we uncovered functional alterations in the transcription factors, which regulate G6Pase expression. Our data highlight a requirement of Rab5 and the endosomal system for the regulation of gluconeogenic gene expression that has important implications for metabolic diseases. PMID:25937276

  14. Role of malate transporter in lipid accumulation of oleaginous fungus Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Cánovas-Márquez, José T; Tang, Xin; Chen, Haiqin; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei; Garre, Victoriano; Song, Yuanda; Ratledge, Colin

    2016-02-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis in oleaginous fungi requires the supply of reducing power, NADPH, and the precursor of fatty acids, acetyl-CoA, which is generated in the cytosol being produced by ATP: citrate lyase which requires citrate to be, transported from the mitochondrion by the citrate/malate/pyruvate transporter. This transporter, which is within the mitochondrial membrane, transports cytosolic malate into the mitochondrion in exchange for mitochondrial citrate moving into the cytosol (Fig. 1). The role of malate transporter in lipid accumulation in oleaginous fungi is not fully understood, however. Therefore, the expression level of the mt gene, coding for a malate transporter, was manipulated in the oleaginous fungus Mucor circinelloides to analyze its effect on lipid accumulation. The results showed that mt overexpression increased the lipid content for about 70 % (from 13 to 22 % dry cell weight, CDW), whereas the lipid content in mt knockout mutant decreased about 27 % (from 13 to 9.5 % CDW) compared with the control strain. Furthermore, the extracellular malate concentration was decreased in the mt overexpressing strain and increased in the mt knockout strain compared with the wild-type strain. This work suggests that the malate transporter plays an important role in regulating lipid accumulation in oleaginous fungus M. circinelloides. PMID:26512004

  15. Arsenic-lipid complex formatinon during the active transport of arsenate in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cerbón, J

    1969-02-01

    In studying formation of an arsenic-lipid complex during the active transport of (74)As-arsenate in yeast, it was found that adaptation of yeast to arsenate resulted in cell populations which showed a deficient inflow of arsenate as compared to the nonadapted yeast. Experiments with both types of cells showed a direct correlation between the arsenate taken up and the amount of As-lipid complex formed. (74)As-arsenate was bound exclusively to the phosphoinositide fraction of the cellular lipids. When arsenate transport was inhibited by dinitrophenol and sodium azide, the formation of the As-lipid complex was also inhibited. Phosphate did not interfere with the arsenate transport at a non-inhibitory concentration of external arsenate (10(-9)m). The As-adapted cells but not the unadapted cells were able to take up phosphate when growing in the presence of 10(-2)m arsenate. PMID:5773018

  16. Arsenic-Lipid Complex Formation During the Active Transport of Arsenate in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cerbón, Jorge

    1969-01-01

    In studying formation of an arsenic-lipid complex during the active transport of 74As-arsenate in yeast, it was found that adaptation of yeast to arsenate resulted in cell populations which showed a deficient inflow of arsenate as compared to the nonadapted yeast. Experiments with both types of cells showed a direct correlation between the arsenate taken up and the amount of As-lipid complex formed. 74As-arsenate was bound exclusively to the phosphoinositide fraction of the cellular lipids. When arsenate transport was inhibited by dinitrophenol and sodium azide, the formation of the As-lipid complex was also inhibited. Phosphate did not interfere with the arsenate transport at a non-inhibitory concentration of external arsenate (10−9m). The As-adapted cells but not the unadapted cells were able to take up phosphate when growing in the presence of 10−2m arsenate. PMID:5773018

  17. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Integrin containing focal adhesions (FAs) transmit extracellular signals across the plasma membrane to modulate cell adhesion, signalling and survival. Although integrins are known to undergo continuous endo/exocytic traffic, potential impact of endocytic traffic on integrin-induced signals is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to cell-ECM adhesions and identify an endosomal signalling platform that supports integrin signalling away from the plasma membrane. We show that active focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an established marker of integrin-ECM downstream signalling, localises with active integrins on endosomes. Integrin endocytosis positively regulates adhesion-induced FAK activation, which is early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) and small GTPase Rab21 dependent. FAK binds directly to purified endosomes and becomes activated on them, suggesting a role for endocytosis in enhancing distinct integrin downstream signalling events. Finally, endosomal integrin signalling contributes to cancer-related processes such as anoikis resistance, anchorage-independence and metastasis. Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion receptors functioning as integrators of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) driven cues, the cellular cytoskeleton and the cellular signalling apparatus 1.Upon adhesion, integrins trigger the formation of plasma-membrane proximal large mechanosensing and signal-transmitting protein clusters depicted as “adhesomes” 2, 3. In addition, integrins undergo constant endocytic traffic to facilitate focal adhesion turnover, cell migration, invasion and cytokinesis 4. For other receptor systems it is well established that endocytic membrane traffic regulates bioavailability of cell-surface molecules and therefore the intensity and/or specificity of receptor-initiated signals 5, 6. Although active integrins and their ligands have been detected in endosomes 7–9 and increased integrin recycling to the plasma membrane contributes

  18. A subset of annular lipids is linked to the flippase activity of an ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechara, Chérine; Nöll, Anne; Morgner, Nina; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Tampé, Robert; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are critical components of membranes that could affect the properties of membrane proteins, yet the precise compositions of lipids surrounding membrane-embedded protein complexes is often difficult to discern. Here we report that, for the heterodimeric ABC transporter TmrAB, the extent of delipidation can be controlled by timed exposure to detergent. We subsequently characterize the cohort of endogenous lipids that are extracted in contact with the membrane protein complex, and show that with prolonged delipidation the number of neutral lipids is reduced in favour of their negatively charged counterparts. We show that lipid A is retained by the transporter and that the extent of its binding decreases during the catalytic cycle, implying that lipid A release is linked to adenosine tri-phosphate hydrolysis. Together, these results enable us to propose that a subset of annular lipids is invariant in composition, with negatively charged lipids binding tightly to TmrAB, and imply a role for this exporter in glycolipid translocation.

  19. A subset of annular lipids is linked to the flippase activity of an ABC transporter.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Nöll, Anne; Morgner, Nina; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Tampé, Robert; Robinson, Carol V

    2015-03-01

    Lipids are critical components of membranes that could affect the properties of membrane proteins, yet the precise compositions of lipids surrounding membrane-embedded protein complexes is often difficult to discern. Here we report that, for the heterodimeric ABC transporter TmrAB, the extent of delipidation can be controlled by timed exposure to detergent. We subsequently characterize the cohort of endogenous lipids that are extracted in contact with the membrane protein complex, and show that with prolonged delipidation the number of neutral lipids is reduced in favour of their negatively charged counterparts. We show that lipid A is retained by the transporter and that the extent of its binding decreases during the catalytic cycle, implying that lipid A release is linked to adenosine tri-phosphate hydrolysis. Together, these results enable us to propose that a subset of annular lipids is invariant in composition, with negatively charged lipids binding tightly to TmrAB, and imply a role for this exporter in glycolipid translocation. PMID:25698336

  20. Specificity of the transport of lipid II by FtsW in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Tamimount; Sijbrandi, Robert; Lutters, Mandy; Verheul, Jolanda; Martin, Nathaniel I; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2014-05-23

    Synthesis of biogenic membranes requires transbilayer movement of lipid-linked sugar molecules. This biological process, which is fundamental in prokaryotic cells, remains as yet not clearly understood. In order to obtain insights into the molecular basis of its mode of action, we analyzed the structure-function relationship between Lipid II, the important building block of the bacterial cell wall, and its inner membrane-localized transporter FtsW. Here, we show that the predicted transmembrane helix 4 of Escherichia coli FtsW (this protein consists of 10 predicted transmembrane segments) is required for the transport activity of the protein. We have identified two charged residues (Arg(145) and Lys(153)) within this segment that are specifically involved in the flipping of Lipid II. Mutating these two amino acids to uncharged ones affected the transport activity of FtsW. This was consistent with loss of in vivo activity of the mutants, as manifested by their inability to complement a temperature-sensitive strain of FtsW. The transport activity of FtsW could be inhibited with a Lipid II variant having an additional size of 420 Da. Reducing the size of this analog by about 274 Da resulted in the resumption of the transport activity of FtsW. This suggests that the integral membrane protein FtsW forms a size-restricted porelike structure, which accommodates Lipid II during transport across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:24711460

  1. Specificity of the Transport of Lipid II by FtsW in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Tamimount; Sijbrandi, Robert; Lutters, Mandy; Verheul, Jolanda; Martin, Nathaniel I.; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of biogenic membranes requires transbilayer movement of lipid-linked sugar molecules. This biological process, which is fundamental in prokaryotic cells, remains as yet not clearly understood. In order to obtain insights into the molecular basis of its mode of action, we analyzed the structure-function relationship between Lipid II, the important building block of the bacterial cell wall, and its inner membrane-localized transporter FtsW. Here, we show that the predicted transmembrane helix 4 of Escherichia coli FtsW (this protein consists of 10 predicted transmembrane segments) is required for the transport activity of the protein. We have identified two charged residues (Arg145 and Lys153) within this segment that are specifically involved in the flipping of Lipid II. Mutating these two amino acids to uncharged ones affected the transport activity of FtsW. This was consistent with loss of in vivo activity of the mutants, as manifested by their inability to complement a temperature-sensitive strain of FtsW. The transport activity of FtsW could be inhibited with a Lipid II variant having an additional size of 420 Da. Reducing the size of this analog by about 274 Da resulted in the resumption of the transport activity of FtsW. This suggests that the integral membrane protein FtsW forms a size-restricted porelike structure, which accommodates Lipid II during transport across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:24711460

  2. Interplay between group function of kinesin based transport and lipid bilayer mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Joseph; Hirst, Linda; Xu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Motor proteins, discovered in recent decades, are important building blocks to life. These molecular machines transport cargo and although indispensable to cell function, are not well understood at present. Single kinesin transport properties have been documented, but their group function remains unknown. In this project, the properties of kinesin-based transport by multiple motors are investigated in-vitro to establish a link between travel distance and lipid diffusion in the vesicle membrane. In the experiments, silica beads coated in a supported lipid membrane and giant lipid vesicles are transported along a microtubule by embedded kinesin motors. In an alternate geometry, this system can be inverted, whereby motors are bound to a surface of a lipid bilayer and microtubules are deposited. We have characterized motor function with respect to the fluidity of the membrane. To measure the diffusion properties of different membranes, planar lipid bilayers are prepared on silica slides and supported by bovine serum albumin protein. To establish a diffusion constant at room temperature for the lipid membrane we use the FRAP technique (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). Using this method we can investigate if there is any interplay between group travel function and membrane fluidity.

  3. EFFECT OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN T-DOMAIN ON ENDOSOMAL pH.

    PubMed

    Labyntsev, A J; Korotkevych, N V; Kolybo, D V; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A key step in the mode of cytotoxic action of diphtheria toxin (DT) is the transfer of its catalytic domain (Cd) from endosomes into the cytosol. The main activity in this process is performed by the transport domain (Td), but the molecular mechanism of its action remains unknown. We have previously shown that Td can have some influence on the endosomal transport of DT The aim of this work was to study the effect of diphtheria toxin on the toxin compartmentalization in the intracellular transporting pathway and endosomal pH. We used recombinant fragments of DT which differed only by the presence of Td in their structure, fused with fluorescent proteins. It was shown that the toxin fragment with Td moved slower by the pathway early-late endosomes-lysosomes, and had a slightly different pattern of colocalization with endosomal markers than DT fragment without Td. In addition, endosomes containing DT fragments with Td had a constant pH of about 6.5 from the 10th to 50th minute of observation, for the same time endosomes containing DT fragments without Td demonstrated a decrease in pH from 6.3 to 5.5. These results indicate that Td inhibits acidification of endosomal medium. One of possible explanations for this may be the effect of the ion channel formed by the T-domain on the process of the endosomal acidification. This property of Td may not only inhibit maturation of endosomes but also inhibit activation of endosomal pH-dependent proteases, and this promotes successful transport of Cd into the cell cytosol. PMID:26547959

  4. A tissue engineered model of the intestinal lacteal for evaluating lipid transport by lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J. Brandon; Raghunathan, Sandeep; Swartz, Melody A.

    2010-01-01

    Lacteals are the entry point of all dietary lipids into the circulation, yet little is known about the active regulation of lipid uptake by these lymphatic vessels, and there lacks in vitro models to study the lacteal – enterocyte interface. We describe an in vitro model of the human intestinal microenvironment containing differentiated Caco-2 cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). We characterize the model for fatty acid, lipoprotein, albumin, and dextran transport, and compare to qualitative uptake of fatty acids into lacteals in vivo. We demonstrate relevant morphological features of both cell types and strongly polarized transport of fatty acid in the intestinal-to-lymphatic direction. We found much higher transport rates of lipid than of dextran or albumin across the lymphatic endothelial monolayer, suggesting most lipid transport is active and intracellular. This was confirmed with confocal imaging of Bodipy, a fluorescent fatty acid, along with transmission electron microscopy. Since our model recapitulates crucial aspects of the in vivo lymphatic-enterocyte interface, it is useful for studying the biology of lipid transport by lymphatics and as a tool for screening drugs and nanoparticles that target intestinal lymphatics. PMID:19396808

  5. Lipids in Grape Roots in Relation to Chloride Transport 1

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Pieter J. C.

    1968-01-01

    A comparison was made between the lipids of the roots of 5 grape rootstocks which differ markedly in the extent to which they permit chloride accumulation in leaves. Monogalactose diglyceride concentration was directly related to chloride accumulation in the leaves of the 5 rootstocks. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were inversely related to chloride accumulation. The variety with the highest chloride accumulation contained an unusually small amount of sterols. A striking negative correlation between content of lignoceric acid and chloride accumulation was observed. The lignoceric acid concentration ranged from 11.9% in the rootstock with the lowest chloride accumulation to 0.8% in the rootstock with the highest chloride accumulation. This fatty acid was found mainly in the phosphatidylcholine and the phosphatidylethanolamine lipid fractions. PMID:16656921

  6. Separation and characterization of late endosomal membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshihide; Beuchat, Marie-Hélène; Chevallier, Julien; Makino, Asami; Mayran, Nathalie; Escola, Jean-Michel; Lebrand, Cecile; Cosson, Pierre; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Gruenberg, Jean

    2002-08-30

    Very little is known about the biophysical properties and the lipid or protein composition of membrane domains presumably present in endocytic and biosynthetic organelles. Here we analyzed the membrane composition of late endosomes by suborganellar fractionation in the absence of detergent. We found that the internal membranes of this multivesicular organelle can be separated from the limiting membrane and that each membrane population exhibited a defined composition. Our data also indicated that internal membranes may consist of at least two populations, containing primarily phosphatidylcholine or lysobisphosphatidic acid as major phospholipid, arguing for the existence of significant microheterogeneity within late endosomal membranes. We also found that lysobisphosphatidic acid exhibited unique pH-dependent fusogenic properties, and we speculated that this lipid is an ideal candidate to regulate the dynamic properties of this internal membrane mosaic. PMID:12065580

  7. Zn2+ depletion blocks endosome fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Aballay, A; Sarrouf, M N; Colombo, M I; Stahl, P D; Mayorga, L S

    1995-01-01

    Fusion among endosomes is an important step for transport and sorting of internalized macromolecules. Working in a cell-free system, we previously reported that endosome fusion requires cytosol and ATP, and is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Fusion is regulated by monomeric and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins. We now report that fusion can proceed at very low Ca2+ concentrations, i.e. < 30 nM. Moreover, fusion is not affected when intravesicular Ca2+ is depleted by preincubation of vesicles with calcium ionophores (5 microM ionomycin or A23187) in the presence of calcium chelators (5 mM EGTA or 60 mM EDTA). The results indicate that fusion can proceed at extremely low concentrations of intravesicular and extravesicular Ca2+. However, BAPTA [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid], a relatively specific Ca2+ chelator, inhibits fusion. BAPTA binds other metals besides Ca2+. We present evidence that BAPTA inhibition is due not to Ca2+ chelation but to Zn2+ depletion. TPEN [N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine], another metal-ion chelator with low affinity for Ca2+, also inhibited fusion. TPEN- and BAPTA-inhibited fusions were restored by addition of Zn2+. Zn(2+)-dependent fusion presents the same characteristics as control fusion. In intact cells, TPEN inhibited transport along the endocytic pathway. The results indicate that Zn2+ depletion blocks endosome fusion, suggesting that this ion is necessary for the function of one or more factors involved in the fusion process. Images Figure 1 PMID:8554539

  8. Role of LBPA and Alix in multivesicular liposome formation and endosome organization.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hirotami; Chevallier, Julien; Mayran, Nathalie; Le Blanc, Isabelle; Ferguson, Charles; Fauré, Julien; Blanc, Nathalie Sartori; Matile, Stefan; Dubochet, Jacques; Sadoul, Rémy; Parton, Robert G; Vilbois, Francis; Gruenberg, Jean

    2004-01-23

    What are the components that control the assembly of subcellular organelles in eukaryotic cells? Although membranes can clearly be distorted by cytosolic factors, very little is known about the intrinsic mechanisms that control the biogenesis, shape, and organization of organellar membranes. Here, we found that the unconventional phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) could induce the formation of multivesicular liposomes that resembled the multivesicular endosomes that exist where this lipid is found in vivo. This process depended on the same pH gradient that exists across endosome membranes in vivo and was selectively controlled by Alix. In turn, Alix regulated the organization of LBPA-containing endosomes in vivo. PMID:14739459

  9. Mechanism of ionophoric transport of indium-111 cations through a lipid bilayer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H.O.; Hwang, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The use of mobile ionophores to facilitate the transport of /sup 111/In through a lipid bilayer membrane has broad applications in liposome technology and cell labeling. However, the mechanism of such ionophore-mediated transport of /sup 111/In through a lipid bilayer membrane is not completely clear. The present report describes the correlations of the behaviors of ionophoric loading of /sup 111/In into liposomes with the lipophilicity and the indium-binding affinity of three ionophores, namely, 8-hydroxyquinoline, acetylacetone, and tropolone. Our results suggest that the mechanism of the ionophoric transport of /sup 111/In through a lipid bilayer membrane involves the rapid exchange of /sup 111/In cations among the ionophores in both the aqueous solution and the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, the effectiveness of an ionophore in facilitating the transport of /sup 111/In from the external aqueous compartment to the entrapped nitrilotriacetic acid depends not only on the lipophilicity of the (/sup 111/In)ionophore complex, but also on the lipophilicity of the free ionophore itself and the competition of /sup 111/In between nitrilotriacetic acid inside the inner aqueous compartment of the liposome and the ionophore imbedded in the lipid bilayer membrane of the liposome.

  10. Mechanistic evaluation of the transfection barriers involved in lipid-mediated gene delivery: interplay between nanostructure and composition.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, D; Marchini, C; Cardarelli, F; Salomone, F; Coppola, S; Montani, M; Zabaleta, M Elexpuru; Digman, M A; Gratton, E; Colapicchioni, V; Caracciolo, G

    2014-03-01

    Here we present a quantitative mechanism-based investigation aimed at comparing the cell uptake, intracellular trafficking, endosomal escape and final fate of lipoplexes and lipid-protamine/deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (LPD) nanoparticles (NPs) in living Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. As a model, two lipid formulations were used for comparison. The first formulation is made of the cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) and the zwitterionic lipid dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC), while the second mixture is made of the cationic 3β-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-Chol) and the zwitterionic helper lipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Our findings indicate that lipoplexes are efficiently taken up through fluid-phase macropinocytosis, while a less efficient uptake of LPD NPs occurs through a combination of both macropinocytosis and clathrin-dependent pathways. Inside the cell, both lipoplexes and LPD NPs are actively transported towards the cell nucleus, as quantitatively addressed by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS). For each lipid formulation, LPD NPs escape from endosomes more efficiently than lipoplexes. When cells were treated with DOTAP-DOPC-containing systems the majority of the DNA was trapped in the lysosome compartment, suggesting that extensive lysosomal degradation was the rate-limiting factors in DOTAP-DOPC-mediated transfection. On the other side, escape from endosomes is large for DC-Chol-DOPE-containing systems most likely due to DOPE and cholesterol-like molecules, which are able to destabilize the endosomal membrane. The lipid-dependent and structure-dependent enhancement of transfection activity suggests that DNA is delivered to the nucleus synergistically: the process requires both the membrane-fusogenic activity of the nanocarrier envelope and the employment of lipid species with intrinsic endosomal rupture ability. PMID:24296066

  11. Nanogold Labeling of the Yeast Endosomal System for Ultrastructural Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Muriel; Griffith, Janice; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Endosomes are one of the major membrane sorting checkpoints in eukaryotic cells and they regulate recycling or destruction of proteins mostly from the plasma membrane and the Golgi. As a result the endosomal system plays a central role in maintaining cell homeostasis, and mutations in genes belonging to this network of organelles interconnected by vesicular transport, cause severe pathologies including cancer and neurobiological disorders. It is therefore of prime relevance to understand the mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and organization of the endosomal system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been pivotal in this task. To specifically label and analyze at the ultrastructural level the endosomal system of this model organism, we present here a detailed protocol for the positively charged nanogold uptake by spheroplasts followed by the visualization of these particles through a silver enhancement reaction. This method is also a valuable tool for the morphological examination of mutants with defects in endosomal trafficking. Moreover, it is not only applicable for ultrastructural examinations but it can also be combined with immunogold labelings for protein localization investigations. PMID:25046212

  12. Rab11-endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 and endosomes in mitosis. Here we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11-depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively-active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization and generates robust spindles. This suggests a fundamental role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes co-contribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  13. Rab11 endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle organization and orientation.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-03-10

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 endosomes in mitosis. Here, we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11 depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization, and generates robust spindles. This suggests a role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes cocontribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  14. Pattern formation and molecular transport of histidine-tagged GFPs using supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Kazuaki; Kashimura, Yoshiaki; Sumitomo, Koji; Shinozaki, Youichi; Torimitsu, Keiichi

    2010-08-01

    We fabricated a heterogeneous supported lipid bilayer (SLB) by employing binary lipid mixtures comprising a saturated acyl chain DSPC and an unsaturated acyl chain nickel-chelating lipid. By using the specific adsorption properties of histidine-tagged proteins (His-tagged GFPs) in relation to nickel-chelating lipids, we demonstrated protein pattern formation on the SLB corresponding to the phase separation pattern of the SLB. In addition, by using a lipid mixture consisting of an unsaturated acyl chain DOPC and a nickel-chelating lipid, and His-tagged GFPs, we succeeded in transporting the proteins along a hydrophilic micropattern on a SiO(2) substrate. The protein transport is induced by the self-spreading behavior of a fluid SLB with a kinetic spreading coefficient beta = 10.4 microm(2) s(-1). This method provides a guide for strategically carrying various biomolecules to specific positions by using a soft biointerface on a solid surface. In addition, the results demonstrate the importance of using techniques that allow the controlled manipulation of biomolecules based on the static or dynamic properties of the SLB platform. PMID:20666418

  15. Structural insights into nonvesicular lipid transport by the oxysterol binding protein homologue family.

    PubMed

    Tong, Junsen; Manik, Mohammad Kawsar; Yang, Huiseon; Im, Young Jun

    2016-08-01

    Sterols such as cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi are essential membrane components and play a key role in membrane function and in cell signaling. The intracellular distribution and processing of sterols and other phospholipids are in part carried out by oxysterol binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) in eukaryotes. Seven ORPs (Osh1-Osh7 proteins) in yeast have distinct functions in maintaining distribution, metabolism and signaling of intracellular lipids but they share at least one essential function. Significant progress has been made in understanding the ligand specificity and mechanism of non-vesicular lipid transport by ORPs. The unique structural features of Osh proteins explain the diversity and specificity of functions in PI(4)P-coupled lipid transport optimized in membrane contact sites. This review discusses the current advances in structural biology regarding this protein family and its potential functions, introducing them as the key players in the novel pathways of phosphoinositide-coupled directional transport of various lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26784528

  16. Clock genes, intestinal transport and plasma lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2009-05-01

    Light and food are two major environmental factors that impact daily life. Light entrainment is centrally controlled by suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. Food entrainment might require cooperation between the intestine and dorsomedial hypothalamus. Clock genes that are essential for light entrainment also play a part in food entrainment. Understanding the role of clock genes in the entrainment of intestinal functions, as well as in gut-brain communication during food entrainment, will enhance our understanding of gastrointestinal and metabolic disorders. This review highlights recent studies examining light- and food-entrained regulation of plasma lipids and of various intestinal activities and offers insight into the role of the intestine in food entrainment. PMID:19349191

  17. Endosomal Interactions during Root Hair Growth.

    PubMed

    von Wangenheim, Daniel; Rosero, Amparo; Komis, George; Šamajová, Olga; Ovečka, Miroslav; Voigt, Boris; Šamaj, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic localization of endosomal compartments labeled with targeted fluorescent protein tags is routinely followed by time lapse fluorescence microscopy approaches and single particle tracking algorithms. In this way trajectories of individual endosomes can be mapped and linked to physiological processes as cell growth. However, other aspects of dynamic behavior including endosomal interactions are difficult to follow in this manner. Therefore, we characterized the localization and dynamic properties of early and late endosomes throughout the entire course of root hair formation by means of spinning disc time lapse imaging and post-acquisition automated multitracking and quantitative analysis. Our results show differential motile behavior of early and late endosomes and interactions of late endosomes that may be specified to particular root hair domains. Detailed data analysis revealed a particular transient interaction between late endosomes-termed herein as dancing-endosomes-which is not concluding to vesicular fusion. Endosomes preferentially located in the root hair tip interacted as dancing-endosomes and traveled short distances during this interaction. Finally, sizes of early and late endosomes were addressed by means of super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to corroborate measurements on the spinning disc. This is a first study providing quantitative microscopic data on dynamic spatio-temporal interactions of endosomes during root hair tip growth. PMID:26858728

  18. Transport and uptake effects of marine complex lipid liposomes in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Yang, Yu-Hong; Xu, Jie; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2016-04-20

    Nowadays, marine complex lipids, including starfish phospholipids (SFP) and cerebrosides (SFC) separated from Asterias amurensis as well as sea cucumber phospholipids (SCP) and cerebrosides (SCC) isolated from Cucumaria frondosa, have received much attention because of their potent biological activities. However, little information is known on the transport and uptake of these lipids in liposome forms in small intestinal cells. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of these complex lipid liposomes on transport and uptake in Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. The results revealed that SFP and SCP contained 42% and 47.9% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), respectively. The average particle sizes of liposomes prepared in this study were from 169 to 189 nm. We found that the transport of the liposomes across the M cell monolayer model was much higher than the Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The liposomes consisting of SFP or SCP showed significantly higher transport and uptake than soy phospholipid (soy-PL) liposomes in both Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. Our results also exhibited that treatment with 1 mM liposomes composed of SFP or SCP for 3 h tended to increase the EPA content in phospholipid fractions of both differentiated Caco-2 and M cells. Moreover, it was also found that the hybrid liposomes consisting of SFP/SFC/cholesterol (Chol) revealed higher transport and uptake across the M cell monolayer in comparison with other liposomes. Furthermore, treatment with SFP/SFC/Chol liposomes could notably decrease the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) values of Caco-2 and M cell monolayers. The present data also showed that the cell viability of differentiated Caco-2 and M cells was not affected after the treatment with marine complex lipids or soy-PL liposomes. Based on the data in this study, it was suggested that marine complex lipid liposomes exhibit prominent transport and uptake in small intestinal epithelial cell models. PMID

  19. The Insertion and Transport of Anandamide in Synthetic Lipid Membranes Are Both Cholesterol-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Di Pasquale, Eric; Chahinian, Henri; Sanchez, Patrick; Fantini, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background Anandamide is a lipid neurotransmitter which belongs to a class of molecules termed the endocannabinoids involved in multiple physiological functions. Anandamide is readily taken up into cells, but there is considerable controversy as to the nature of this transport process (passive diffusion through the lipid bilayer vs. involvement of putative proteic transporters). This issue is of major importance since anandamide transport through the plasma membrane is crucial for its biological activity and intracellular degradation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the involvement of cholesterol in membrane uptake and transport of anandamide. Methodology/Principal Findings Molecular modeling simulations suggested that anandamide can adopt a shape that is remarkably complementary to cholesterol. Physicochemical studies showed that in the nanomolar concentration range, anandamide strongly interacted with cholesterol monolayers at the air-water interface. The specificity of this interaction was assessed by: i) the lack of activity of structurally related unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid and arachidonic acid at 50 nM) on cholesterol monolayers, and ii) the weak insertion of anandamide into phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin monolayers. In agreement with these data, the presence of cholesterol in reconstituted planar lipid bilayers triggered the stable insertion of anandamide detected as an increase in bilayer capacitance. Kinetics transport studies showed that pure phosphatidylcholine bilayers were weakly permeable to anandamide. The incorporation of cholesterol in phosphatidylcholine bilayers dose-dependently stimulated the translocation of anandamide. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that cholesterol stimulates both the insertion of anandamide into synthetic lipid monolayers and bilayers, and its transport across bilayer membranes. In this respect, we suggest that besides putative anandamide protein-transporters, cholesterol could

  20. Functional mechanisms of neurotransmitter transporters regulated by lipid-protein interactions of their terminal loops.

    PubMed

    Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-09-01

    The physiological functions of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) in reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synapse into the presynaptic nerve have been shown to be complemented by their involvement, together with non-plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters, in the reverse transport of substrate (efflux) in response to psychostimulants. Recent experimental evidence implicates highly anionic phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP(2)) lipids in such functions of the serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT) transporters. Thus, for both SERT and DAT, neurotransmitter efflux has been shown to be strongly regulated by the presence of PIP(2) lipids in the plasma membrane, and the electrostatic interaction of the N-terminal region of DAT with the negatively charged PIP(2) lipids. We examine the experimentally established phenotypes in a structural context obtained from computational modeling based on recent crystallographic data. The results are shown to set the stage for a mechanistic understanding of physiological actions of neurotransmitter transporters in the NSS family of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:25847498

  1. APPL endosomes are not obligatory endocytic intermediates but act as stable cargo-sorting compartments

    PubMed Central

    Kalaidzidis, Inna; Miaczynska, Marta; Brewińska-Olchowik, Marta; Hupalowska, Anna; Ferguson, Charles; Parton, Robert G.; Kalaidzidis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis allows cargo to enter a series of specialized endosomal compartments, beginning with early endosomes harboring Rab5 and its effector EEA1. There are, however, additional structures labeled by the Rab5 effector APPL1 whose role in endocytic transport remains unclear. It has been proposed that APPL1 vesicles are transport intermediates that convert into EEA1 endosomes. Here, we tested this model by analyzing the ultrastructural morphology, kinetics of cargo transport, and stability of the APPL1 compartment over time. We found that APPL1 resides on a tubulo-vesicular compartment that is capable of sorting cargo for recycling or degradation and that displays long lifetimes, all features typical of early endosomes. Fitting mathematical models to experimental data rules out maturation of APPL1 vesicles into EEA1 endosomes as a primary mechanism for cargo transport. Our data suggest instead that APPL1 endosomes represent a distinct population of Rab5-positive sorting endosomes, thus providing important insights into the compartmental organization of the early endocytic pathway. PMID:26459602

  2. Mechanistic evaluation of the transfection barriers involved in lipid-mediated gene delivery: Interplay between nanostructure and composition

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, D.; Marchini, C.; Cardarelli, F.; Salomone, F.; Coppola, S.; Montani, M.; Zabaleta, M. Elexpuru; Digman, M.A.; Gratton, E.; Colapicchioni, V.; Caracciolo, G.

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a quantitative mechanism-based investigation aimed at comparing the cell uptake, intracellular trafficking, endosomal escape and final fate of lipoplexes and lipid–protamine/deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (LPD) nanoparticles (NPs) in living Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. As a model, two lipid formulations were used for comparison. The first formulation is made of the cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) and the zwitterionic lipid dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC), while the second mixture is made of the cationic 3β-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-Chol) and the zwitterionic helper lipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Our findings indicate that lipoplexes are efficiently taken up through fluid-phase macropinocytosis, while a less efficient uptake of LPD NPs occurs through a combination of both macropinocytosis and clathrin-dependent pathways. Inside the cell, both lipoplexes and LPD NPs are actively transported towards the cell nucleus, as quantitatively addressed by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS). For each lipid formulation, LPD NPs escape from endosomes more efficiently than lipoplexes. When cells were treated with DOTAP–DOPC-containing systems the majority of the DNA was trapped in the lysosome compartment, suggesting that extensive lysosomal degradation was the rate-limiting factors in DOTAP–DOPC-mediated transfection. On the other side, escape from endosomes is large for DC-Chol–DOPE-containing systems most likely due to DOPE and cholesterol-like molecules, which are able to destabilize the endosomal membrane. The lipid-dependent and structure-dependent enhancement of transfection activity suggests that DNA is delivered to the nucleus synergistically: the process requires both the membrane-fusogenic activity of the nanocarrier envelope and the employment of lipid species with intrinsic endosomal rupture ability. PMID:24296066

  3. Stochastic transport through carbon nanotubes in lipid bilayers and live cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jia; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Jianfei; Escalada, Artur; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Comolli, Luis R.; Allen, Frances I.; Shnyrova, Anna V.; Cho, Kang Rae; Munoz, Dayannara; Wang, Y. Morris; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M.; Frolov, Vadim A.; Noy, Aleksandr

    2014-10-01

    There is much interest in developing synthetic analogues of biological membrane channels with high efficiency and exquisite selectivity for transporting ions and molecules. Bottom-up and top-down methods can produce nanopores of a size comparable to that of endogenous protein channels, but replicating their affinity and transport properties remains challenging. In principle, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) should be an ideal membrane channel platform: they exhibit excellent transport properties and their narrow hydrophobic inner pores mimic structural motifs typical of biological channels. Moreover, simulations predict that CNTs with a length comparable to the thickness of a lipid bilayer membrane can self-insert into the membrane. Functionalized CNTs have indeed been found to penetrate lipid membranes and cell walls, and short tubes have been forced into membranes to create sensors, yet membrane transport applications of short CNTs remain underexplored. Here we show that short CNTs spontaneously insert into lipid bilayers and live cell membranes to form channels that exhibit a unitary conductance of 70-100 picosiemens under physiological conditions. Despite their structural simplicity, these `CNT porins' transport water, protons, small ions and DNA, stochastically switch between metastable conductance substates, and display characteristic macromolecule-induced ionic current blockades. We also show that local channel and membrane charges can control the conductance and ion selectivity of the CNT porins, thereby establishing these nanopores as a promising biomimetic platform for developing cell interfaces, studying transport in biological channels, and creating stochastic sensors.

  4. Wirelike charge transport dynamics for DNA-lipid complexes in chloroform.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ashutosh Kumar; Young, Ryan M; Wasielewski, Michael R; Lewis, Frederick D

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of charge separation and charge recombination have been determined for lipid complexes of DNA capped hairpins possessing stilbene electron-acceptor and -donor chromophores separated by base-pair domains that vary in length and base sequence in chloroform solution by means of femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The results obtained for the DNA-lipid complexes are compared with those previously obtained in our laboratories for the same hairpins in aqueous buffer. The charge separation and charge recombination times for the lipid complexes are consistently much shorter than those determined in aqueous solution and are only weakly dependent on the number of base pairs separating the acceptor and donor. The enhanced rate constants for forward and return charge transport in DNA-lipid complexes support proposals that solvent gating is responsible, to a significant extent, for the relatively low rates of charge transport for DNA in water. Moreover, they suggest that DNA-lipid complexes may prove useful in the development of DNA-based molecular electronic devices. PMID:25299823

  5. Effects of waterborne Cu exposure on intestinal copper transport and lipid metabolism of Synechogobius hasta.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Luo, Zhi; Chen, Guang-Hui; Shi, Xi; Liu, Xu; Song, Yu-Feng; Pan, Ya-Xiong

    2016-09-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the effects of waterborne Cu exposure on intestinal Cu transport and lipid metabolism of Synechogobius hasta. S. hasta were exposed to 0, 0.4721 and 0.9442μM Cu, respectively. Sampling occurred on days 0, 21 and 42, respectively. Growth performance, intestinal lipid deposition, Cu content, and activities and mRNA expression of enzymes and genes involved in Cu transport and lipid metabolism were analyzed. Cu exposure decreased WG and SGR on days 21 and 42. Cu exposure increased intestinal Cu and lipid contents. Increased Cu accumulation was attributable to increased enzymatic activities (Cu-ATPase and Cu, Zn-SOD) and genes' (CTR1, CTR2, DMT1, ATP7a, ATP7b, MT1 and MT2) expression involved in Cu transport. Waterborne Cu exposure also increased activities of lipogenic enzymes (6PGD and ICDH on both days 21 and 42, ME on day 42), up-regulated mRNA levels of lipogenic genes (G6PD, 6PGD, ME, ICDH, FAS and ACCa), lipolytic genes (ACCb, CPT I and HSLa) and genes involved in intestinal fatty acid uptake (IFABP and FATP4) on both days 21 and 42. The up-regulation of lipolysis may result from the increased metabolic expenditure for detoxification and maintenance of the normal body functions in a response to Cu exposure. Meantime, Cu exposure increased lipogenesis and fatty acid uptake, leading to net lipid accumulation in the intestine despite increased lipolysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report involved in intestinal lipid metabolism in combination with intestinal Cu absorption following waterborne Cu exposure, which provides new insights and evidence into Cu toxicity in fish. PMID:27509383

  6. Rab5-family guanine nucleotide exchange factors bind retromer and promote its recruitment to endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Bjorn D. M.; Davey, Michael; Snider, Jamie; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Tinney, Matthew; Stagljar, Igor; Babu, Mohan; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The retromer complex facilitates the sorting of integral membrane proteins from the endosome to the late Golgi. In mammalian cells, the efficient recruitment of retromer to endosomes requires the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) as well as Rab5 and Rab7 GTPases. However, in yeast, the role of Rabs in recruiting retromer to endosomes is less clear. We identified novel physical interactions between retromer and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS9-domain Rab5-family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) Muk1 and Vps9. Furthermore, we identified a new yeast VPS9 domain-containing protein, VARP-like 1 (Vrl1), which is related to the human VARP protein. All three VPS9 domain–containing proteins show localization to endosomes, and the presence of any one of them is necessary for the endosomal recruitment of retromer. We find that expression of an active VPS9-domain protein is required for correct localization of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Vps34 and the production of endosomal PI3P. These results suggest that VPS9 GEFs promote retromer recruitment by establishing PI3P-enriched domains at the endosomal membrane. The interaction of retromer with distinct VPS9 GEFs could thus link GEF-dependent regulatory inputs to the temporal or spatial coordination of retromer assembly or function. PMID:25609093

  7. Lipid transport to avian oocytes and to the developing embryo

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Wolfgang J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies of receptor-mediated lipoprotein metabolic pathways in avian species have revealed that physiological intricacies of specific cell types are highly analogous to those in mammals. A prime example for the power of comparative studies across different animal kingdoms, elucidated in the chicken, is that the expression of different lipoprotein receptors in somatic cells and oocytes are the key to oocyte growth. In avian species, yolk precursor transport from the hen's liver to rapidly growing oocytes and the subsequent transfer of yolk nutrients via the yolk sac to the developing embryo are highly efficient processes. Oocytes grow from a diameter of 5 mm to 2.5-3 cm in only 7 days, and the yolk sac transfers nutrients from the yolk stored in the mature oocyte to the embryo within just 2 weeks. The underlying key transport mechanism is receptor-mediated endocytosis of macromolecules, i.e., of hepatically synthesized yolk precursors for oocyte growth, and of mature yolk components for embryo nutrition, respectively. Recently, the receptors involved, as well as the role of lipoprotein synthesis in the yolk sac have been identified. As outlined here, lipoprotein degradation/resynthesis cycles and the expression of lipoprotein receptors are not only coordinated with the establishment of the follicular architecture embedding the oocyte, but also with the generation of the yolk sac vasculature essential for nutrient transfer to the embryo. PMID:26585559

  8. Attolitre-sized lipid bilayer chamber array for rapid detection of single transporters

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Naoki; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We present an attolitre-sized arrayed lipid bilayer chamber system (aL-ALBiC) for rapid and massively parallel single-molecule assay of membrane transporter activity. Because of the small reaction volume (200 aL), the aL-ALBiC performed fast detection of single transporter activity, thereby enhancing the sensitivity, throughput, and accuracy of the analysis. Thus, aL-ALBiC broadens the opportunities for single-molecule analysis of various membrane transporters and can be used in pharmaceutical applications such as drug screening. PMID:26052065

  9. Lipid-assisted protein transport: A diffusion-reaction model supported by kinetic experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, Carmelo; Scalisi, Silvia; Lolicato, Fabio; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The protein transport inside a cell is a complex phenomenon that goes through several difficult steps. The facilitated transport requires sophisticated machineries involving protein assemblies. In this work, we developed a diffusion-reaction model to simulate co-transport kinetics of proteins and lipids. We assume the following: (a) there is always a small lipid concentration of order of the Critical Micellar Concentration (CMC) in equilibrium with the membrane; (b) the binding of lipids to proteins modulates the hydrophobicity of the complexes and, therefore, their ability to interact and merge with the bilayer; and (c) some lipids leave the bilayer to replenish those bound to proteins. The model leads to a pair of integral equations for the time-evolution of the adsorbed proteins in the lipid bilayer. Relationships between transport kinetics, CMC, and lipid-protein binding constants were found. Under particular conditions, a perturbation analysis suggests the onset of kinks in the protein adsorption kinetics. To validate our model, we performed leakage measurements of vesicles composed by either high or low CMC lipids interacting with Islet Amyloid PolyPeptide (IAPP) and Aβ (1-40) used as sample proteins. Since the lipid-protein complex stoichiometry is not easily accessible, molecular dynamics simulations were performed using monomeric IAPP interacting with an increasing number of phospholipids. Main results are the following: (a) 1:1 lipid-protein complexes generally show a faster insertion rate proportional to the complex hydrophobicity and inversely related to lipid CMC; (b) on increasing the number of bound lipids, the protein insertion rate decreases; and (c) at slow lipids desorption rate, the lipid-assisted proteins transport might exhibit a discontinuous behavior and does non-linearly depend on protein concentration.

  10. A coat of filamentous actin prevents clustering of late-endosomal vacuoles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Drengk, Anja; Fritsch, Jürgen; Schmauch, Christian; Rühling, Harald; Maniak, Markus

    2003-10-14

    The endocytic pathway depends on the actin cytoskeleton. Actin contributes to internalization at the plasma membrane and to subsequent trafficking steps like propulsion through the cytoplasm, fusion of phagosomes with early endosomes, and transport from early to late endosomes. In vitro studies with mammalian endosomes and yeast vacuoles implicate actin in membrane fusion. Here, we investigate the function of the actin coat that surrounds late endosomes in Dictyostelium. Latrunculin treatment leads to aggregation of these endosomes into grape-like clusters and completely blocks progression of endocytic marker. In addition, the cells round up and stop moving. Because this drug treatment perturbs all actin assemblies in the cell simultaneously, we used a novel targeting approach to specifically study the function of the cytoskeleton in one subcellular location. To this end, we constructed a hybrid protein targeting cofilin, an actin depolymerizing protein, to late endosomes. As a consequence, the endosomal compartments lost their actin coats and aggregated, but these cells remained morphologically normal, and the kinetics of endocytic marker trafficking were unaltered. Therefore, the actin coat prevents the clustering of endosomes, which could be one safeguard mechanism precluding their docking and fusion. PMID:14561408

  11. How to move an amphipathic molecule across a lipid bilayer: different mechanisms for different ABC transporters?

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Frederica L; Carrier, David J; Schaedler, Theresia A; Baldwin, Stephen A; Baker, Alison

    2016-06-15

    Import of β-oxidation substrates into peroxisomes is mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters belonging to subfamily D. In order to enter the β-oxidation pathway, fatty acids are activated by conversion to fatty acyl-CoA esters, a reaction which is catalysed by acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs). Here, we present evidence for an unusual transport mechanism, in which fatty acyl-CoA substrates are accepted by ABC subclass D protein (ABCD) transporters, cleaved by the transporters during transit across the lipid bilayer to release CoA, and ultimately re-esterified in the peroxisome lumen by ACSs which interact with the transporter. We propose that this solves the biophysical problem of moving an amphipathic molecule across the peroxisomal membrane, since the intrinsic thioesterase activity of the transporter permits separate membrane translocation pathways for the hydrophobic fatty acid moiety and the polar CoA moiety. The cleavage/re-esterification mechanism also has the potential to control entry of disparate substrates into the β-oxidation pathway when coupled with distinct peroxisomal ACSs. A different solution to the movement of amphipathic molecules across a lipid bilayer is deployed by the bacterial lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) flippase, PglK, in which the hydrophilic head group and the hydrophobic polyprenyl tail of the substrate are proposed to have distinct translocation pathways but are not chemically separated during transport. We discuss a speculative alternating access model for ABCD proteins based on the mammalian ABC transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and compare it to the novel mechanism suggested by the recent PglK crystal structures and biochemical data. PMID:27284041

  12. How to move an amphipathic molecule across a lipid bilayer: different mechanisms for different ABC transporters?

    PubMed Central

    Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Carrier, David J.; Schaedler, Theresia A.; Baldwin, Stephen A.; Baker, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Import of β-oxidation substrates into peroxisomes is mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters belonging to subfamily D. In order to enter the β-oxidation pathway, fatty acids are activated by conversion to fatty acyl-CoA esters, a reaction which is catalysed by acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs). Here, we present evidence for an unusual transport mechanism, in which fatty acyl-CoA substrates are accepted by ABC subclass D protein (ABCD) transporters, cleaved by the transporters during transit across the lipid bilayer to release CoA, and ultimately re-esterified in the peroxisome lumen by ACSs which interact with the transporter. We propose that this solves the biophysical problem of moving an amphipathic molecule across the peroxisomal membrane, since the intrinsic thioesterase activity of the transporter permits separate membrane translocation pathways for the hydrophobic fatty acid moiety and the polar CoA moiety. The cleavage/re-esterification mechanism also has the potential to control entry of disparate substrates into the β-oxidation pathway when coupled with distinct peroxisomal ACSs. A different solution to the movement of amphipathic molecules across a lipid bilayer is deployed by the bacterial lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) flippase, PglK, in which the hydrophilic head group and the hydrophobic polyprenyl tail of the substrate are proposed to have distinct translocation pathways but are not chemically separated during transport. We discuss a speculative alternating access model for ABCD proteins based on the mammalian ABC transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and compare it to the novel mechanism suggested by the recent PglK crystal structures and biochemical data. PMID:27284041

  13. Aggregation of endosomal-vacuolar compartments in the Aovps24-deleted strain in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumi, Akinori; Shoji, Jun-ya; Kikuma, Takashi; Arioka, Manabu; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2007-10-19

    Previously, we found that deletion of Aovps24, an ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS24, that encodes an ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport)-III component required for late endosomal function results in fragmented and aggregated vacuoles. Although defective late endosomal function is likely responsible for this phenotype, critical lack of our knowledge on late endosomes in filamentous fungi prevented us from further characterization. In this study, we identified late endosomes of Aspergillus oryzae, by expressing a series of fusion proteins of fluorescent proteins with orthologs of late endosomal proteins. Using these fusion proteins as markers, we observed late endosomes in the wild type strain and the Aovps24 disruptant and demonstrated that late endosomes are aberrantly aggregated in the Aovps24 disruptant. Moreover, we revealed that the aggregated late endosomes have features of vacuoles as well. As deletion of another ESCRT-III component-encoding gene, Aovps2, resulted in similar phenotypes to that in the Aovps24 disruptant, phenotypes of the Aovps24 disruptant are probably due to defective late endosomal function.

  14. NGF signaling in sensory neurons: evidence that early endosomes carry NGF retrograde signals.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, Jean-Dominique; Valletta, Janice S; Wu, Chengbiao; Hunt, Stephen J; Kowal, Anthony S; Mobley, William C

    2003-07-01

    Target-derived NGF promotes the phenotypic maintenance of mature dorsal root ganglion (DRG) nociceptive neurons. Here, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the presence within DRG neurons of endosomes containing NGF, activated TrkA, and signaling proteins of the Rap1/Erk1/2, p38MAPK, and PI3K/Akt pathways. Signaling endosomes were shown to be retrogradely transported in the isolated sciatic nerve in vitro. NGF injection in the peripheral target of DRG neurons increased the retrograde transport of p-Erk1/2, p-p38, and pAkt in these membranes. Conversely, NGF antibody injections decreased the retrograde transport of p-Erk1/2 and p-p38. Our results are evidence that signaling endosomes, with the characteristics of early endosomes, convey NGF signals from the target of nociceptive neurons to their cell bodies. PMID:12848933

  15. Sphingolipid metabolism and interorganellar transport: localization of sphingolipid enzymes and lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    In recent decades, many sphingolipid enzymes, sphingolipid-metabolism regulators and sphingolipid transfer proteins have been isolated and characterized. This review will provide an overview of the intracellular localization and topology of sphingolipid enzymes in mammalian cells to highlight the locations where respective sphingolipid species are produced. Interestingly, three sphingolipids that reside or are synthesized in cytosolic leaflets of membranes (ceramide, glucosylceramide and ceramide-1-phosphate) all have cytosolic lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). These LTPs consist of ceramide transfer protein (CERT), four-phosphate adaptor protein 2 (FAPP2) and ceramide-1-phosphate transfer protein (CPTP), respectively. These LTPs execute functions that affect both the location and metabolism of the lipids they bind. Molecular details describing the mechanisms of regulation of LTPs continue to emerge and reveal a number of critical processes, including competing phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions and binding interactions with regulatory proteins and lipids that influence the transport, organelle distribution and metabolism of sphingolipids. PMID:25382749

  16. Functional mechanisms of neurotransmitter transporters regulated by lipid-protein interactions of their terminal loops

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-01-01

    The physiological functions of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) in reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synapse into the presynaptic nerve have been shown to be complemented by their involvement, together with non-plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters, in the reverse transport of substrate (efflux) in response to psychostimulants. Recent experimental evidence implicates highly anionic phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) lipids in such functions of the serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT) transporters. Thus, for both SERT and DAT, neurotransmitter efflux has been shown to be strongly regulated by the presence of PIP2 lipids in the plasma membrane, and the electrostatic interaction of the N-terminal region of DAT with the negatively charged PIP2 lipids. We examine the experimentally established phenotypes in a structural context obtained from computational modeling based on recent crystallographic data. The results are shown to set the stage for a mechanistic understanding of physiological actions of neurotransmitter transporters in the NSS family of membrane proteins. PMID:25847498

  17. Endosomal Interactions during Root Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    von Wangenheim, Daniel; Rosero, Amparo; Komis, George; Šamajová, Olga; Ovečka, Miroslav; Voigt, Boris; Šamaj, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic localization of endosomal compartments labeled with targeted fluorescent protein tags is routinely followed by time lapse fluorescence microscopy approaches and single particle tracking algorithms. In this way trajectories of individual endosomes can be mapped and linked to physiological processes as cell growth. However, other aspects of dynamic behavior including endosomal interactions are difficult to follow in this manner. Therefore, we characterized the localization and dynamic properties of early and late endosomes throughout the entire course of root hair formation by means of spinning disc time lapse imaging and post-acquisition automated multitracking and quantitative analysis. Our results show differential motile behavior of early and late endosomes and interactions of late endosomes that may be specified to particular root hair domains. Detailed data analysis revealed a particular transient interaction between late endosomes—termed herein as dancing-endosomes—which is not concluding to vesicular fusion. Endosomes preferentially located in the root hair tip interacted as dancing-endosomes and traveled short distances during this interaction. Finally, sizes of early and late endosomes were addressed by means of super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to corroborate measurements on the spinning disc. This is a first study providing quantitative microscopic data on dynamic spatio-temporal interactions of endosomes during root hair tip growth. PMID:26858728

  18. Analysis of Signaling Endosome Composition and Dynamics Using SILAC in Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Debaisieux, Solène; Encheva, Vesela; Chakravarty, Probir; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons require efficient transport mechanisms such as fast axonal transport to ensure neuronal homeostasis and survival. Neurotrophins and their receptors are conveyed via fast axonal retrograde transport of signaling endosomes to the soma, where they elicit transcriptional responses. Despite the essential roles of signaling endosomes in neuronal differentiation and survival, little is known about their molecular identity, dynamics, and regulation. Gaining a better mechanistic understanding of these organelles and their kinetics is crucial, given the growing evidence linking vesicular trafficking deficits to neurodegeneration. Here, we exploited an affinity purification strategy using the binding fragment of tetanus neurotoxin (HCT) conjugated to monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs), which in motor neurons, is transported in the same carriers as neurotrophins and their receptors. To quantitatively assess the molecular composition of HCT-containing signaling endosomes, we have developed a protocol for triple Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) in embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons. After HCT internalization, retrograde carriers were magnetically isolated at different time points and subjected to mass-spectrometry and Gene Ontology analyses. This purification strategy is highly specific, as confirmed by the presence of essential regulators of fast axonal transport in the make-up of these organelles. Our results indicate that signaling endosomes undergo a rapid maturation with the acquisition of late endosome markers following a specific time-dependent kinetics. Strikingly, signaling endosomes are specifically enriched in proteins known to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases and neuroinfection. Moreover, we highlighted the presence of novel components, whose precise temporal recruitment on signaling endosomes might be essential for proper sorting and/or transport of these organelles. This study provides the first

  19. How cholesterol interacts with proteins and lipids during its intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Wüstner, Daniel; Solanko, Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    Sterols, as cholesterol in mammalian cells and ergosterol in fungi, are indispensable molecules for proper functioning and nanoscale organization of the plasma membrane. Synthesis, uptake and efflux of cholesterol are regulated by a variety of protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. Similarly, membrane lipids and their physico-chemical properties directly affect cholesterol partitioning and thereby contribute to the highly heterogeneous intracellular cholesterol distribution. Movement of cholesterol in cells is mediated by vesicle trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways as well as by non-vesicular sterol exchange between organelles. In this article, we will review recent progress in elucidating sterol-lipid and sterol-protein interactions contributing to proper sterol transport in living cells. We outline recent biophysical models of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in membranes and explain how such models are related to sterol flux between organelles. An overview of various sterol-transfer proteins is given, and the physico-chemical principles of their function in non-vesicular sterol transport are explained. We also discuss selected experimental approaches for characterization of sterol-protein interactions and for monitoring intracellular sterol transport. Finally, we review recent work on the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol import into mammalian cells and describe the process of cellular cholesterol efflux. Overall, we emphasize how specific protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions help overcoming the extremely low water solubility of cholesterol, thereby controlling intracellular cholesterol movement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. PMID:26004840

  20. Mutation in AP-3 delta in the mocha mouse links endosomal transport to storage deficiency in platelets, melanosomes, and synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kantheti, P; Qiao, X; Diaz, M E; Peden, A A; Meyer, G E; Carskadon, S L; Kapfhamer, D; Sufalko, D; Robinson, M S; Noebels, J L; Burmeister, M

    1998-07-01

    The mouse mutant mocha, a model for the Hermansky-Pudlak storage pool deficiency syndrome, is characterized by defective platelets, coat and eye color dilution, lysosomal abnormalities, inner ear degeneration, and neurological deficits. Here, we show that mocha is a null allele of the delta subunit of the adaptor-like protein complex AP-3, which is associated with coated vesicles budding from the trans-Golgi network, and that AP-3 is missing in mocha tissues. In mocha brain, the ZnT-3 transporter is reduced, resulting in a lack of zinc-associated Timm historeactivity in hippocampal mossy fibers. Our results demonstrate that the AP-3 complex is responsible for cargo selection to lysosome-related organelles such as melanosomes and platelet dense granules as well as to neurotransmitter vesicles. PMID:9697856

  1. High density lipoprotein: it’s not just about lipid transport anymore

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Scott M.; Hofmann, Susanna; Askew, David S.; Davidson, W. Sean

    2011-01-01

    Plasma levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) have long been associated with protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD) in large populations. However, HDL-C has been significantly less useful for predicting CVD risk in individual patients. This has ignited a new debate on the merits of measuring HDL quantity versus quality in terms of protective potential. In addition, numerous recent studies have begun to uncover HDL functions that vary surprisingly from traditional lipid transport roles. In this paper, we review recent findings that point to important functions for HDL that go well beyond lipid transport. These discoveries suggest that HDL might be a platform that mediates protection from a host of disease states ranging from CVD to diabetes to infectious disease. PMID:21067941

  2. Cooperation of phosphoinositides and BAR domain proteins in endosomal tubulation.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Narikawa, Naeko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shibasaki, Yoshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) regulate many intracellular events, including vesicular trafficking and actin remodeling, by recruiting proteins to their sites of function. PtdIns(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and related phosphoinositides are mainly synthesized by type I PtdIns-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks). We found that PIP5K induces endosomal tubules in COS-7 cells. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 6 has been shown to act upstream of PIP5K and regulate endocytic transport and tubulation. ARF GAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat, and pleckstrin homology domains 1 (ACAP1) has guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) activity for ARF6. While there were few tubules induced by the expression of ACAP1 alone, numerous endosomal tubules were induced by coexpression of PIP5K and ACAP1. ACAP1 has a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain known to bind phosphoinositide and a Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain that has been reported to detect membrane curvature. Truncated and point mutations in the ACAP1 BAR and PH domains revealed that both BAR and PH domains are required for tubulation. These results suggest that two ARF6 downstream molecules, PIP5K and ACAP1, function together in endosomal tubulation and that phosphoinositide levels may regulate endosomal dynamics. PMID:17010122

  3. Mechanism of electroinduced ionic species transport through a multilamellar lipid system.

    PubMed Central

    Chizmadzhev, Y A; Zarnitsin, V G; Weaver, J C; Potts, R O

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical model for electroporation of multilamellar lipid system due to a series of large electrical pulses is presented and then used to predict the functional dependence of the transport of charged molecules. Previously, electroporation has been considered only for single bilayer systems such as artificial planar bilayer membranes and cell membranes. The former have been extensively studied with respect to electrical and mechanical behavior, and the latter with respect to molecular transport. Recent experimental results for both molecular transport and electrical resistance changes in the stratum corneum (SC) suggest that electroporation also occurs in the multilamellar lipid membranes of the SC. In addition, there is the possibility that other skin structures (the "appendages") also experience electroporation. A compartment model is introduced to describe the transport of charged species across the SC, and the predicted dependence is compared with available data. In this model, the SC is assumed to contain many hydrophilic compartments in series separated by boundary bilayers, so that these compartments become connected only upon electroporation. Two limiting cases for the transport of charged molecules are considered: (1) transport along tortuous inter-bilayer pathways in each compartment, followed by transport across individual boundary bilayers due to electroporation, and (2) transport along straight-through pathways in the boundary bilayers with fast mixing in each compartment, which includes the interior space of corneocytes. Both models were fitted to the experimental data. The large electropore radius (rt approximately 200 A) and porated fractional area (ft approximately 10(-3) obtained from the fitting for the tortuous model relative to the more reasonable values obtained for the straight-through model (rs approximately 4 A, fs approximately 10(-6) suggest that the latter is a more realistic description of electroinduced transport of ionized species

  4. OSBP-Related Protein Family in Lipid Transport Over Membrane Contact Sites

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Vesa M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) localize at membrane contact sites, which are high-capacity platforms for inter-organelle exchange of small molecules and information. ORPs can simultaneously associate with the two apposed membranes and transfer lipids across the interbilayer gap. Oxysterol-binding protein moves cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to trans-Golgi, driven by the retrograde transport of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). Analogously, yeast Osh6p mediates the transport of phosphatidylserine from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in exchange for PI4P, and ORP5 and -8 are suggested to execute similar functions in mammalian cells. ORPs may share the capacity to bind PI4P within their ligand-binding domain, prompting the hypothesis that bidirectional transport of a phosphoinositide and another lipid may be a common theme among the protein family. This model, however, needs more experimental support and does not exclude a function of ORPs in lipid signaling. PMID:26715851

  5. Peroxisomes move by hitchhiking on early endosomes using the novel linker protein PxdA.

    PubMed

    Salogiannis, John; Egan, Martin J; Reck-Peterson, Samara L

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells use microtubule-based intracellular transport for the delivery of many subcellular cargos, including organelles. The canonical view of organelle transport is that organelles directly recruit molecular motors via cargo-specific adaptors. In contrast with this view, we show here that peroxisomes move by hitchhiking on early endosomes, an organelle that directly recruits the transport machinery. Using the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans we found that hitchhiking is mediated by a novel endosome-associated linker protein, PxdA. PxdA is required for normal distribution and long-range movement of peroxisomes, but not early endosomes or nuclei. Using simultaneous time-lapse imaging, we find that early endosome-associated PxdA localizes to the leading edge of moving peroxisomes. We identify a coiled-coil region within PxdA that is necessary and sufficient for early endosome localization and peroxisome distribution and motility. These results present a new mechanism of microtubule-based organelle transport in which peroxisomes hitchhike on early endosomes and identify PxdA as the novel linker protein required for this coupling. PMID:26811422

  6. Improved Experimental Techniques for Analyzing Nucleic Acid Transport Through Protein Nanopores in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Justin A.

    The translocation of nucleic acid polymers across cell membranes is a fundamental requirement for complex life and has greatly contributed to genomic molecular evolution. The diversity of pathways that have evolved to transport DNA and RNA across membranes include protein receptors, active and passive transporters, endocytic and pinocytic processes, and various types of nucleic acid conducting channels known as nanopores. We have developed a series of experimental techniques, collectively known as "Wicking", that greatly improves the biophysical analysis of nucleic acid transport through protein nanopores in planar lipid bilayers. We have verified the Wicking method using numerous types of classical ion channels including the well-studied chloride selective channel, CLIC1. We used the Wicking technique to reconstitute α-hemolysin and found that DNA translocation events of types A and B could be routinely observed using this method. Furthermore, measurable differences were observed in the duration of blockade events as DNA length and composition was varied, consistent with previous reports. Finally, we tested the ability of the Wicking technology to reconstitute the dsRNA transporter Sid-1. Exposure to dsRNAs of increasing length and complexity showed measurable differences in the current transitions suggesting that the charge carrier was dsRNA. However, the translocation events occurred so infrequently that a meaningful electrophysiological analysis was not possible. Alterations in the lipid composition of the bilayer had a minor effect on the frequency of translocation events but not to such a degree as to permit rigorous statistical analysis. We conclude that in many instances the Wicking method is a significant improvement to the lipid bilayer technique, but is not an optimal method for analyzing transport through Sid-1. Further refinements to the Wicking method might have future applications in high throughput DNA sequencing, DNA computation, and

  7. Lipid-assisted protein transport: A diffusion-reaction model supported by kinetic experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Carmelo; Scalisi, Silvia; Lolicato, Fabio; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    The protein transport inside a cell is a complex phenomenon that goes through several difficult steps. The facilitated transport requires sophisticated machineries involving protein assemblies. In this work, we developed a diffusion-reaction model to simulate co-transport kinetics of proteins and lipids. We assume the following: (a) there is always a small lipid concentration of order of the Critical Micellar Concentration (CMC) in equilibrium with the membrane; (b) the binding of lipids to proteins modulates the hydrophobicity of the complexes and, therefore, their ability to interact and merge with the bilayer; and (c) some lipids leave the bilayer to replenish those bound to proteins. The model leads to a pair of integral equations for the time-evolution of the adsorbed proteins in the lipid bilayer. Relationships between transport kinetics, CMC, and lipid-protein binding constants were found. Under particular conditions, a perturbation analysis suggests the onset of kinks in the protein adsorption kinetics. To validate our model, we performed leakage measurements of vesicles composed by either high or low CMC lipids interacting with Islet Amyloid PolyPeptide (IAPP) and Aβ (1-40) used as sample proteins. Since the lipid-protein complex stoichiometry is not easily accessible, molecular dynamics simulations were performed using monomeric IAPP interacting with an increasing number of phospholipids. Main results are the following: (a) 1:1 lipid-protein complexes generally show a faster insertion rate proportional to the complex hydrophobicity and inversely related to lipid CMC; (b) on increasing the number of bound lipids, the protein insertion rate decreases; and PMID:27179503

  8. The Central Role of Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 in Septic Pathogen Lipid Transport and Clearance.

    PubMed

    Walley, Keith R; Francis, Gordon A; Opal, Steven M; Stein, Evan A; Russell, James A; Boyd, John H

    2015-12-01

    Microbial cell walls contain pathogenic lipids, including LPS in gram-negative bacteria, lipoteichoic acid in gram-positive bacteria, and phospholipomannan in fungi. These pathogen lipids are major ligands for innate immune receptors and figure prominently in triggering the septic inflammatory response. Alternatively, pathogen lipids can be cleared and inactivated, thus limiting the inflammatory response. Accordingly, biological mechanisms for sequestering and clearing pathogen lipids from the circulation have evolved. Pathogen lipids released into the circulation are initially bound by transfer proteins, notably LPS binding protein and phospholipid transfer protein, and incorporated into high-density lipoprotein particles. Next, LPS binding protein, phospholipid transfer protein, and other transfer proteins transfer these lipids to ApoB-containing lipoproteins, including low-density (LDL) and very-low-density lipoproteins and chylomicrons. Pathogen lipids within these lipoproteins and their remnants are then cleared from the circulation by the liver. Hepatic clearance involves the LDL receptor (LDLR) and possibly other receptors. Once absorbed by the liver, these lipids are then excreted in the bile. Recent evidence suggests pathogen lipid clearance can be modulated. Importantly, reduced proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 activity increases recycling of the LDLR and thereby increases LDLR on the surface of hepatocytes, which increases clearance by the liver of pathogen lipids transported in LDL. Increased pathogen lipid clearance, which can be achieved by inhibiting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, may decrease the systemic inflammatory response to sepsis and improve clinical outcomes. PMID:26252194

  9. ESCRT-I Mediates FLS2 Endosomal Sorting and Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Spallek, Thomas; Beck, Martina; Ben Khaled, Sara; Salomon, Susanne; Bourdais, Gildas; Schellmann, Swen; Robatzek, Silke

    2013-01-01

    The plant immune receptor FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) is present at the plasma membrane and is internalized following activation of its ligand flagellin (flg22). We show that ENDOSOMAL SORTING COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT)-I subunits play roles in FLS2 endocytosis in Arabidopsis. VPS37-1 co-localizes with FLS2 at endosomes and immunoprecipitates with the receptor upon flg22 elicitation. Vps37-1 mutants are reduced in flg22-induced FLS2 endosomes but not in endosomes labeled by Rab5 GTPases suggesting a defect in FLS2 trafficking rather than formation of endosomes. FLS2 localizes to the lumen of multivesicular bodies, but this is altered in vps37-1 mutants indicating compromised endosomal sorting of FLS2 by ESCRT-I loss-of-function. VPS37-1 and VPS28-2 are critical for immunity against bacterial infection through a role in stomatal closure. Our findings identify that VPS37-1, and likewise VPS28-2, regulate late FLS2 endosomal sorting and reveals that ESCRT-I is critical for flg22-activated stomatal defenses involved in plant immunity. PMID:24385929

  10. Defect of zinc transporter ZRT1 ameliorates cadmium induced lipid accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Selvaraj; Ravi, Chidambaram; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential divalent heavy metal that enters the cells by utilizing the transport pathways of the essential metals, like zinc (Zn), in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This work focuses on Cd accumulation and its impact on deletion of Zn transporters Zrt1p and Zrt2p and lipid homeostasis. Cd exposure reduces the Zn levels in the mutant strains, and the effect was higher in zrt2Δ cells. Upon Cd exposure, the wild-type and zrt2Δ cells follow a similar pattern, but an opposite pattern was observed in zrt1Δ cells. The Cd influx and ROS levels were high in both wild-type cells and zrt2Δ cells but significantly reduced in zrt1Δ cells. Cd exposure led to accumulation of triacylglycerol and lipid droplets in wild-type cells and zrt2Δ cells but these levels were decreased in zrt1Δ cells. Hence, these studies suggest that the zrt1Δ cells provide resistance towards Cd and aid in the maintenance of lipid homeostasis in yeast cells. PMID:26999708

  11. The influence of erythrocyte maturity on ion transport and membrane lipid composition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vokurková, M; Rauchová, H; Dobešová, Z; Loukotová, J; Nováková, O; Kuneš, J; Zicha, J

    2016-01-01

    Significant relationships between ion transport and membrane lipid composition (cholesterol, total phospholipids and sphingomyelins) were found in erythrocytes of salt hypertensive Dahl rats. In these animals mean cellular hemoglobin content correlated negatively with Na(+)-K(+) pump activity and Na(+) leak but positively with Na(+)-K(+) cotransport activity. Immature erythrocytes exhibit lower mean cellular hemoglobin content (MCHC) than mature ones. The aim of the present study was to find a relationship between erythrocyte maturity, membrane lipid composition and ion transport activity in Wistar rats aged three months which were subjected to repeated hemorrhage (blood loss 2 ml/day for 6 days) to enrich circulating erythrocytes with immature forms. Immature and mature erythrocyte fractions in control and hemorrhaged rats were separated by repeated centrifugation. Hemorrhaged rats had increased number of reticulocytes but reduced hematocrit and MCHC compared to control rats. Immature erythrocytes of hemorrhaged rats differed from mature ones of control animals by elevated Na(+)-K(+) pump activity, reduced Na(+)-K(+) cotransport activity and increased Rb(+) leak. These ion transport changes in immature erythrocytes were accompanied by higher concentration of total phospholipids in their cell membranes. Membrane phospholipid content correlated positively with Na(+)-K(+) pump activity and cation leaks but negatively with Na(+)-K(+) cotransport activity. Moreover, they were also negatively related with MCHC which correlated negatively with Na(+)-K(+) pump activity and Rb(+) leak but positively with Na(+)-K(+) cotransport activity. Thus certain abnormalities of erythrocyte ion transport and membrane lipid composition detected in hypertensive animals might be caused by higher incidence of immature cells. PMID:26988297

  12. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vale-Costa, Sílvia; Amorim, Maria João

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral–host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab) GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition. PMID:27005655

  13. Interaction of anti-phospholipid antibodies with late endosomes of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Galve-de Rochemonteix, B; Kobayashi, T; Rosnoblet, C; Lindsay, M; Parton, R G; Reber, G; de Maistre, E; Wahl, D; Kruithof, E K; Gruenberg, J; de Moerloose, P

    2000-02-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APLAs) are associated with thrombosis and/or recurrent pregnancy loss. APLAs bind to anionic phospholipids directly or indirectly via a cofactor such as beta(2)-glycoprotein 1 (beta(2)GPI). The lipid target of APLA is not yet established. Recently, we observed that APLAs in vitro can bind lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). The internal membranes of late endosomes are enriched in this phospholipid. The current study was undertaken to determine to what extent binding of APLA to LBPA is correlated with binding to cardiolipin and to beta(2)GPI and to determine whether patient antibodies interact with late endosomes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and thus modify the intracellular trafficking of proteins. Binding of patient immunoglobulin G (n=37) to LBPA was correlated significantly with binding to cardiolipin. Although LBPA binding was correlated to a lesser extent with beta(2)GPI binding, we observed that beta(2)GPI binds with high affinity to LBPA. Immunofluorescence studies showed that late endosomes of HUVECs contain LBPA. Patient but not control antibodies recognized late endosomes, but not cardiolipin-rich mitochondria, even when we used antibodies that were immunopurified on cardiolipin. Incubation of HUVECs with patient plasma samples immunoreactive toward LBPA resulted in an accumulation of the antibodies in late endosomes and led to a redistribution of the insulinlike growth factor 2/mannose-6-phosphate receptor from the Golgi apparatus to late endosomes. Our results suggest that LBPA is an important lipid target of APLA in HUVECs. These antibodies are internalized by the cells and accumulate in late endosomes. By modifying the intracellular trafficking of proteins, APLA could contribute to several of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms leading to the antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:10669657

  14. Dynein Clusters into Lipid Microdomains on Phagosomes to Drive Rapid Transport toward Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Ashim; Pathak, Divya; Thakur, Shreyasi; Singh, Shampa; Dubey, Alok Kumar; Mallik, Roop

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diverse cellular processes are driven by motor proteins that are recruited to and generate force on lipid membranes. Surprisingly little is known about how membranes control the force from motors and how this may impact specific cellular functions. Here, we show that dynein motors physically cluster into microdomains on the membrane of a phagosome as it matures inside cells. Such geometrical reorganization allows many dyneins within a cluster to generate cooperative force on a single microtubule. This results in rapid directed transport of the phagosome toward microtubule minus ends, likely promoting phagolysosome fusion and pathogen degradation. We show that lipophosphoglycan, the major molecule implicated in immune evasion of Leishmania donovani, inhibits phagosome motion by disrupting the clustering and therefore the cooperative force generation of dynein. These findings appear relevant to several pathogens that prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion by targeting lipid microdomains on phagosomes. PMID:26853472

  15. Dynein Clusters into Lipid Microdomains on Phagosomes to Drive Rapid Transport toward Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ashim; Pathak, Divya; Thakur, Shreyasi; Singh, Shampa; Dubey, Alok Kumar; Mallik, Roop

    2016-02-11

    Diverse cellular processes are driven by motor proteins that are recruited to and generate force on lipid membranes. Surprisingly little is known about how membranes control the force from motors and how this may impact specific cellular functions. Here, we show that dynein motors physically cluster into microdomains on the membrane of a phagosome as it matures inside cells. Such geometrical reorganization allows many dyneins within a cluster to generate cooperative force on a single microtubule. This results in rapid directed transport of the phagosome toward microtubule minus ends, likely promoting phagolysosome fusion and pathogen degradation. We show that lipophosphoglycan, the major molecule implicated in immune evasion of Leishmania donovani, inhibits phagosome motion by disrupting the clustering and therefore the cooperative force generation of dynein. These findings appear relevant to several pathogens that prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion by targeting lipid microdomains on phagosomes. PMID:26853472

  16. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Jähne, Sebastian; Rizzoli, Silvio O.; Helm, Martin S.

    2015-07-15

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures.

  17. Membrane Tethering Complexes in the Endosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Spang, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Vesicles that are generated by endocytic events at the plasma membrane are destined to early endosomes. A prerequisite for proper fusion is the tethering of two membrane entities. Tethering of vesicles to early endosomes is mediated by the class C core vacuole/endosome tethering (CORVET) complex, while fusion of late endosomes with lysosomes depends on the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complex. Recycling through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and to the plasma membrane is facilitated by the Golgi associated retrograde protein (GARP) and endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP) complexes, respectively. However, there are other tethering functions in the endosomal system as there are multiple pathways through which proteins can be delivered from endosomes to either the TGN or the plasma membrane. Furthermore, proteins that may be part of novel tethering complexes have been recently identified. Thus, it is likely that more tethering factors exist. In this review, I will provide an overview of different tethering complexes of the endosomal system and discuss how they may provide specificity in membrane traffic. PMID:27243003

  18. Arrayed lipid bilayer chambers allow single-molecule analysis of membrane transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Fujita, Daishi; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Yamauchi, Lisa; Hyeon Kim, Soo; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Suga, Hiroaki; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Nano- to micron-size reaction chamber arrays (femtolitre chamber arrays) have facilitated the development of sensitive and quantitative biological assays, such as single-molecule enzymatic assays, digital PCR and digital ELISA. However, the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays is limited to reactions that occur in aqueous solutions. Here we report an arrayed lipid bilayer chamber system (ALBiC) that contains sub-million femtolitre chambers, each sealed with a stable 4-μm-diameter lipid bilayer membrane. When reconstituted with a limiting amount of the membrane transporter proteins α-hemolysin or F0F1-ATP synthase, the chambers within the ALBiC exhibit stochastic and quantized transporting activities. This demonstrates that the single-molecule analysis of passive and active membrane transport is achievable with the ALBiC system. This new platform broadens the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays and paves the way for novel applications aimed at furthering our mechanistic understanding of membrane proteins’ function. PMID:25058452

  19. Analysis of Ion Transport through a Single Channel of Gramicidin A in Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Shintaro; Shirai, Osamu; Kitazumi, Yuki; Kano, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Ion transport through a single channel of gramicidin A (GA) within the bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) between two aqueous phases (W1 and W2) has been analyzed based on the electroneutrality principle. The single-channel current increases in proportion to the magnitude of the applied membrane potential and is also dependent on the permeability coefficients of electrolyte ions (K(+) and Cl(-)). By varying the ratio of the concentration of KCl in W1 to that in W2, the ratio of the diffusion coefficient of K(+) in the BLM to that of Cl(-) in the BLM can be evaluated. PMID:26860564

  20. Motor coupling through lipid membranes enhances transport velocities for ensembles of myosin Va

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shane R.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Warshaw, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Myosin Va is an actin-based molecular motor responsible for transport and positioning of a wide array of intracellular cargoes. Although myosin Va motors have been well characterized at the single-molecule level, physiological transport is carried out by ensembles of motors. Studies that explore the behavior of ensembles of molecular motors have used nonphysiological cargoes such as DNA linkers or glass beads, which do not reproduce one key aspect of vesicular systems—the fluid intermotor coupling of biological lipid membranes. Using a system of defined synthetic lipid vesicles (100- to 650-nm diameter) composed of either 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) (fluid at room temperature) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) (gel at room temperature) with a range of surface densities of myosin Va motors (32–125 motors per μm2), we demonstrate that the velocity of vesicle transport by ensembles of myosin Va is sensitive to properties of the cargo. Gel-state DPPC vesicles bound with multiple motors travel at velocities equal to or less than vesicles with a single myosin Va (∼450 nm/s), whereas surprisingly, ensembles of myosin Va are able to transport fluid-state DOPC vesicles at velocities significantly faster (>700 nm/s) than a single motor. To explain these data, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation that suggests that these reductions in velocity can be attributed to two distinct mechanisms of intermotor interference (i.e., load-dependent modulation of stepping kinetics and binding-site exclusion), whereas faster transport velocities are consistent with a model wherein the normal stepping behavior of the myosin is supplemented by the preferential detachment of the trailing motor from the actin track. PMID:25201964

  1. Proton Gradients as a Key Physical Factor in the Evolution of the Forced Transport Mechanism Across the Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strbak, Oliver; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Krafcik, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    A critical phase in the transition from prebiotic chemistry to biological evolution was apparently an asymmetric ion flow across the lipid membrane. Due to imbalance in the ion flow, the early lipid vesicles could selectively take the necessary molecules from the environment, and release the side-products from the vesicle. Natural proton gradients played a definitively crucial role in this process, since they remain the basis of energy transfer in the present-day cells. On the basis of this supposition, and the premise of the early vesicle membrane's impermeability to protons, we have shown that the emergence of the proton gradient in the lipid vesicle could be a key physical factor in the evolution of the forced transport mechanism (pore formation and active transport) across the lipid bilayer. This driven flow of protons across the membrane is the result of the electrochemical proton gradient and osmotic pressures on the integrity of the lipid vesicle. At a critical number of new lipid molecules incorporated into the vesicle, the energies associated with the creation of the proton gradient exceed the bending stiffness of the lipid membrane, and overlap the free energy of the lipid bilayer pore formation.

  2. Identification of FtsW as a transporter of lipid-linked cell wall precursors across the membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Tamimount; van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Vernet, Thierry; Zapun, André; Bouhss, Ahmed; Diepeveen-de Bruin, Marlies; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cell growth necessitates synthesis of peptidoglycan. Assembly of this major constituent of the bacterial cell wall is a multistep process starting in the cytoplasm and ending in the exterior cell surface. The intracellular part of the pathway results in the production of the membrane-anchored cell wall precursor, Lipid II. After synthesis this lipid intermediate is translocated across the cell membrane. The translocation (flipping) step of Lipid II was demonstrated to require a specific protein (flippase). Here, we show that the integral membrane protein FtsW, an essential protein of the bacterial division machinery, is a transporter of the lipid-linked peptidoglycan precursors across the cytoplasmic membrane. Using Escherichia coli membrane vesicles we found that transport of Lipid II requires the presence of FtsW, and purified FtsW induced the transbilayer movement of Lipid II in model membranes. This study provides the first biochemical evidence for the involvement of an essential protein in the transport of lipid-linked cell wall precursors across biogenic membranes. PMID:21386816

  3. Identification of FtsW as a transporter of lipid-linked cell wall precursors across the membrane.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Tamimount; van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Vernet, Thierry; Zapun, André; Bouhss, Ahmed; Diepeveen-de Bruin, Marlies; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2011-04-20

    Bacterial cell growth necessitates synthesis of peptidoglycan. Assembly of this major constituent of the bacterial cell wall is a multistep process starting in the cytoplasm and ending in the exterior cell surface. The intracellular part of the pathway results in the production of the membrane-anchored cell wall precursor, Lipid II. After synthesis this lipid intermediate is translocated across the cell membrane. The translocation (flipping) step of Lipid II was demonstrated to require a specific protein (flippase). Here, we show that the integral membrane protein FtsW, an essential protein of the bacterial division machinery, is a transporter of the lipid-linked peptidoglycan precursors across the cytoplasmic membrane. Using Escherichia coli membrane vesicles we found that transport of Lipid II requires the presence of FtsW, and purified FtsW induced the transbilayer movement of Lipid II in model membranes. This study provides the first biochemical evidence for the involvement of an essential protein in the transport of lipid-linked cell wall precursors across biogenic membranes. PMID:21386816

  4. MmpL transporter-mediated export of cell-wall associated lipids and siderophores in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chalut, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacteria produce a large variety of surface-exposed lipids with unusual structures. Some of these compounds are ubiquitously present in mycobacteria and play an important role in the structural organization of the cell envelope, while others are species-specific. The biosynthesis of most of these lipids requires modular polyketide synthases (PKS) or non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) that are intracellular, suggesting that the assembly of these compounds takes place in the cytosolic compartment or near the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The molecular mechanisms that mediate the export of these lipid components across the cell envelope remain poorly understood. Mycobacterial membrane protein Large (MmpL) transporters, a subclass of Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND) transporters, appear to play a major role in this process, acting as scaffold proteins that couple lipid synthesis and transport. Recent studies have shown that this family of transporters also contributes to siderophore secretion in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The goal of this review is to provide the most recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lipid and siderophore transport mediated by MmpL transporters. PMID:27553408

  5. Revealing the mechanism of passive transport in lipid bilayers via phonon-mediated nanometre-scale density fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Bolmatov, Dima; Soloviov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P.; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Bosak, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.

    2016-01-01

    The passive transport of molecules through a cell membrane relies on thermal motions of the lipids. However, the nature of transmembrane transport and the precise mechanism remain elusive and call for a comprehensive study of phonon excitations. Here we report a high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering study of the in-plane phonon excitations in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine above and below the main transition temperature. In the gel phase, for the first time, we observe low-frequency transverse modes, which exhibit a phonon gap when the lipid transitions into the fluid phase. We argue that the phonon gap signifies the formation of short-lived nanometre-scale lipid clusters and transient pores, which facilitate the passive molecular transport across the bilayer plane. Our findings suggest that the phononic motion of the hydrocarbon tails provides an effective mechanism of passive transport, and illustrate the importance of the collective dynamics of biomembranes. PMID:27175859

  6. Revealing the mechanism of passive transport in lipid bilayers via phonon-mediated nanometre-scale density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Bolmatov, Dima; Soloviov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P.; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Bosak, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.

    2016-05-01

    The passive transport of molecules through a cell membrane relies on thermal motions of the lipids. However, the nature of transmembrane transport and the precise mechanism remain elusive and call for a comprehensive study of phonon excitations. Here we report a high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering study of the in-plane phonon excitations in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine above and below the main transition temperature. In the gel phase, for the first time, we observe low-frequency transverse modes, which exhibit a phonon gap when the lipid transitions into the fluid phase. We argue that the phonon gap signifies the formation of short-lived nanometre-scale lipid clusters and transient pores, which facilitate the passive molecular transport across the bilayer plane. Our findings suggest that the phononic motion of the hydrocarbon tails provides an effective mechanism of passive transport, and illustrate the importance of the collective dynamics of biomembranes.

  7. Revealing the mechanism of passive transport in lipid bilayers via phonon-mediated nanometre-scale density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Bolmatov, Dima; Soloviov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Bosak, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q

    2016-01-01

    The passive transport of molecules through a cell membrane relies on thermal motions of the lipids. However, the nature of transmembrane transport and the precise mechanism remain elusive and call for a comprehensive study of phonon excitations. Here we report a high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering study of the in-plane phonon excitations in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine above and below the main transition temperature. In the gel phase, for the first time, we observe low-frequency transverse modes, which exhibit a phonon gap when the lipid transitions into the fluid phase. We argue that the phonon gap signifies the formation of short-lived nanometre-scale lipid clusters and transient pores, which facilitate the passive molecular transport across the bilayer plane. Our findings suggest that the phononic motion of the hydrocarbon tails provides an effective mechanism of passive transport, and illustrate the importance of the collective dynamics of biomembranes. PMID:27175859

  8. ER-endosome contact sites in endosome positioning and protrusion outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Raiborg, Camilla; Wenzel, Eva M; Pedersen, Nina M; Stenmark, Harald

    2016-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) makes abundant contacts with endosomes, and the numbers of contact sites increase as endosomes mature. It is already clear that such contact sites have diverse compositions and functions, but in this mini-review we will focus on two particular types of ER-endosome contact sites that regulate endosome positioning. Formation of ER-endosome contact sites that contain the cholesterol-binding protein oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 1L (ORP1L) is coordinated with loss of the minus-end-directed microtubule motor Dynein from endosomes. Conversely, formation of ER-endosome contact sites that contain the Kinesin-1-binding protein Protrudin results in transfer of the plus-end-directed microtubule motor Kinesin-1 from ER to endosomes. We discuss the possibility that formation of these two types of contact sites is coordinated as a 'gear-shift' mechanism for endosome motility, and we review evidence that Kinesin-1-mediated motility of late endosomes (LEs) to the cell periphery promotes outgrowth of neurites and other protrusions. PMID:27068952

  9. Rab5-mediated endosome-endosome fusion regulates hemoglobin endocytosis in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudha B; Tandon, Ruchi; Krishnamurthy, Ganga; Vikram, Rajagopal; Sharma, Nimisha; Basu, Sandip K; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2003-11-01

    To understand the trafficking of endocytosed hemoglobin (Hb) in Leishmania, we investigated the characteristics of in vitro fusion between endosomes containing biotinylated Hb (BHb) and avidin-horseradish peroxidase (AHRP). We showed that early endosome fusion in Leishmania is temperature and cytosol dependent and is inhibited by ATP depletion, ATPgammaS, GTPgammaS and N-ethylmaleimide treatment. The Rab5 homolog from Leishmania donovani, LdRab5, was cloned and expressed. Our results showed that homotypic fusion between the early endosomes in Leishmania is Rab5 dependent. Early endosomes containing BHb fused efficiently with late endosomes in a process regulated by Rab7, whereas no fusion between early and late endosomes was detected using fluid phase markers. Pre-treatment of early endosomes containing BHb with monoclonal antibody specific for the C-terminus of the Hb receptor (HbR) or the addition of the C-terminal cytoplasmic fragment of the HbR specifically inhibited the fusion with late endosomes, suggesting that signal(s) mediated through the HbR cytoplasmic tail promotes the fusion of early endosomes containing Hb with late endosomes. PMID:14592970

  10. Hydration-Driven Transport of Deformable Lipid Vesicles through Fine Pores and the Skin Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Cevc, Gregor; Gebauer, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    We studied aggregate transport through semipermeable, nano-porous barriers experimentally and theoretically. By measuring and modeling the effect of hydration gradient across such barriers, spontaneous transbarrier transport of suitable lipid aggregates in vesicular form was proven to be driven by partial aggregate dehydration at the application site. By generalizing the Onsager transport model we derived a set of equations that rationalize all pertinent observations. Dehydration-induced vesicle motion starts with a lag time. This corresponds to the time needed to reach the limiting vesicle hydration; both are proportional to the starting excess water volume and decrease with increasing relative humidity at application site. The rate of transbarrier transport is insensitive to these parameters but increases with vesicle deformability and volume exchange capability. Both these properties depend on membrane composition. Reversible demixing of bilayer components is the cause of nonlinear bilayer characteristics and also potentially affects the effective membrane hydrophilicity. High hydrophilicity of vesicle surface and extreme aggregate shape adaptability together are necessary for successful material transport across the skin. This demonstrates the significance of basic biophysical investigations for better understanding of biological systems and for the practical use of artificial, nature-inspired carriers in drug delivery. PMID:12547782

  11. Lipid Droplets Purified from Drosophila Embryos as an Endogenous Handle for Precise Motor Transport Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Tobias F.; Longoria, Rafael A.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Shubeita, George T.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motor proteins are responsible for long-range transport of vesicles and organelles. Recent works have elucidated the richness of the transport complex, with multiple teams of similar and dissimilar motors and their cofactors attached to individual cargoes. The interaction among these different proteins, and with the microtubules along which they translocate, results in the intricate patterns of cargo transport observed in cells. High-precision and high-bandwidth measurements are required to capture the dynamics of these interactions, yet the crowdedness in the cell necessitates performing such measurements in vitro. Here, we show that endogenous cargoes, lipid droplets purified from Drosophila embryos, can be used to perform high-precision and high-bandwidth optical trapping experiments to study motor regulation in vitro. Purified droplets have constituents of the endogenous transport complex attached to them and exhibit long-range motility. A novel method to determine the quality of the droplets for high-resolution measurements in an optical trap showed that they compare well with plastic beads in terms of roundness, homogeneity, position sensitivity, and trapping stiffness. Using high-resolution and high-bandwidth position measurements, we demonstrate that we can follow the series of binding and unbinding events that lead to the onset of active transport. PMID:24010661

  12. Role of Annular Lipids in the Functional Properties of Leucine Transporter LeuT Proteomicelles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the choice of the type and concentration of detergent used for the solubilization of membrane proteins can strongly influence the results of functional experiments. In particular, the amino acid transporter LeuT can bind two substrate molecules in low concentrations of n-dodecyl β-d-maltopyranoside (DDM), whereas high concentrations reduce the molar binding stoichiometry to 1:1. Subsequent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of LeuT in DDM proteomicelles revealed that DDM can penetrate to the extracellular vestibule and make stable contacts in the functionally important secondary substrate binding site (S2), suggesting a potential competitive mechanism for the reduction in binding stoichiometry. Because annular lipids can be retained during solubilization, we performed MD simulations of LeuT proteomicelles at various stages of the solubilization process. We find that at low DDM concentrations, lipids are retained around the protein and penetration of detergent into the S2 site does not occur, whereas at high concentrations, lipids are displaced and the probability of DDM binding in the S2 site is increased. This behavior is dependent on the type of detergent, however, as we find in the simulations that the detergent lauryl maltose-neopentyl glycol, which is approximately twice the size of DDM and structurally more closely resembles lipids, does not penetrate the protein even at very high concentrations. We present functional studies that confirm the computational findings, emphasizing the need for careful consideration of experimental conditions, and for cautious interpretation of data in gathering mechanistic information about membrane proteins. PMID:26811944

  13. Mobilization of ectopic yolk in Gallus gallus domesticus: a novel reverse lipid transport process.

    PubMed

    Cornax, Ingrid; Walzem, Rosemary L; Larner, Craig; Macfarlane, Ronald D; Klasing, Kirk C

    2013-05-15

    In many oviparous animals, bursting type atresia of ovarian follicles occurs during the reproductive cycle, resulting in the escape of yolk into the extracellular compartment. In birds, this ectopic yolk is rapidly cleared by an unknown process that involves the appearance of yolk-engorged macrophage-like cells. To study this unique type of lipid transport, we injected young male chickens intra-abdominally with egg yolk. Absorption of egg yolk from the body cavity markedly increased the triacylglyceride-rich fraction (TRL) of plasma lipoproteins and was coincident with increased levels of plasma triacylglycerides (TAGs) but not non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs). Thus, the transport of yolk lipids from the abdominal cavity appears to occur in lipoproteins and be more similar to the transport of hepatic TAGs to the periphery via lipoproteins than to transport of adipose TAGs to the periphery via NEFAs released by the action of lipases. When macrophages were exposed to yolk in vitro, they quickly phagocytized yolk; however, it is unclear whether this level of phagocytosis contributes significantly to total yolk clearance. Instead, the chicken macrophage may function more as a facilitator of yolk clearance through the modification of yolk lipoproteins and the regulation of the local and systemic immune response to ectopic yolk. Yolk appears to be anti-inflammatory in nature. Yolk did not increase levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and IFNγ either in vivo or in vitro; in fact, yolk dampened many inflammatory changes caused by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Conversely, LPS-induced inflammation retarded yolk clearance from the abdominal cavity and plasma TAG levels. PMID:23348941

  14. Chemogenetic E-MAP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Identification of Membrane Transporters Operating Lipid Flip Flop

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Hector M.; Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Mallela, Shamroop k.; Schneiter, Roger; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    While most yeast enzymes for the biosynthesis of glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and ergosterol are known, genes for several postulated transporters allowing the flopping of biosynthetic intermediates and newly made lipids from the cytosolic to the lumenal side of the membrane are still not identified. An E-MAP measuring the growth of 142'108 double mutants generated by systematically crossing 543 hypomorphic or deletion alleles in genes encoding multispan membrane proteins, both on media with or without an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, was generated. Flc proteins, represented by 4 homologous genes encoding presumed FAD or calcium transporters of the ER, have a severe depression of sphingolipid biosynthesis and elevated detergent sensitivity of the ER. FLC1, FLC2 and FLC3 are redundant in granting a common function, which remains essential even when the severe cell wall defect of flc mutants is compensated by osmotic support. Biochemical characterization of some other genetic interactions shows that Cst26 is the enzyme mainly responsible for the introduction of saturated very long chain fatty acids into phosphatidylinositol and that the GPI lipid remodelase Cwh43, responsible for introducing ceramides into GPI anchors having a C26:0 fatty acid in sn-2 of the glycerol moiety can also use lyso-GPI protein anchors and various base resistant lipids as substrates. Furthermore, we observe that adjacent deletions in several chromosomal regions show strong negative genetic interactions with a single gene on another chromosome suggesting the presence of undeclared suppressor mutations in certain chromosomal regions that need to be identified in order to yield meaningful E-map data. PMID:27462707

  15. Chemogenetic E-MAP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Identification of Membrane Transporters Operating Lipid Flip Flop.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Hector M; Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Mallela, Shamroop K; Schneiter, Roger; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    While most yeast enzymes for the biosynthesis of glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and ergosterol are known, genes for several postulated transporters allowing the flopping of biosynthetic intermediates and newly made lipids from the cytosolic to the lumenal side of the membrane are still not identified. An E-MAP measuring the growth of 142'108 double mutants generated by systematically crossing 543 hypomorphic or deletion alleles in genes encoding multispan membrane proteins, both on media with or without an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, was generated. Flc proteins, represented by 4 homologous genes encoding presumed FAD or calcium transporters of the ER, have a severe depression of sphingolipid biosynthesis and elevated detergent sensitivity of the ER. FLC1, FLC2 and FLC3 are redundant in granting a common function, which remains essential even when the severe cell wall defect of flc mutants is compensated by osmotic support. Biochemical characterization of some other genetic interactions shows that Cst26 is the enzyme mainly responsible for the introduction of saturated very long chain fatty acids into phosphatidylinositol and that the GPI lipid remodelase Cwh43, responsible for introducing ceramides into GPI anchors having a C26:0 fatty acid in sn-2 of the glycerol moiety can also use lyso-GPI protein anchors and various base resistant lipids as substrates. Furthermore, we observe that adjacent deletions in several chromosomal regions show strong negative genetic interactions with a single gene on another chromosome suggesting the presence of undeclared suppressor mutations in certain chromosomal regions that need to be identified in order to yield meaningful E-map data. PMID:27462707

  16. Arv1 lipid transporter function is conserved between pathogenic and nonpathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Gallo-Ebert, Christina; McCourt, Paula C.; Donigan, Melissa; Villasmil, Michelle L.; Chen, WeiWei; Pandya, Devanshi; Franco, Judith; Romano, Desiree; Chadwick, Sean; Gygax, Scott; Nickels, Joseph T.

    2011-01-01

    The lipid transporter Arv1 regulates sterol trafficking, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol and sphingolipid biosyntheses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ScArv1 contains an Arv1 homology domain (AHD) that is conserved at the amino acid level in the pathogenic fungal species, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Here we show S. cerevisiae cells lacking Arv1 are highly susceptible to antifungal drugs. In the presence of drug, Scarv1 cells are unable to induce ERG gene expression, have an altered pleiotrophic drug response, and are defective in multi-drug resistance efflux pump expression. All phenotypes are remediated by ectopic expression of CaARV1 or CgARV1. The AHDs of these pathogenic fungi are required for specific drug tolerance, demonstrating conservation of function. In order to understand how Arv1 regulates antifungal susceptibility, we examined sterol trafficking. CaARV1/CgARV1 expression suppressed the sterol trafficking defect of Scarv1 cells. Finally, we show that C. albicans arv1/arv1 cells are avirulent using a BALB/c disseminated mouse model. We suggest that overall cell survival in response to antifungal treatment requires the lipid transporter function of Arv1. PMID:22142782

  17. The AAA ATPase VPS4/SKD1 regulates endosomal cholesterol trafficking independently of ESCRT-III.

    PubMed

    Du, Ximing; Kazim, Abdulla S; Dawes, Ian W; Brown, Andrew J; Yang, Hongyuan

    2013-01-01

    The exit of low-density lipoprotein derived cholesterol (LDL-C) from late endosomes (LE)/lysosomes (Ly) is mediated by Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a multipass integral membrane protein on the limiting membranes of LE/Ly, and by NPC2, a cholesterol-binding protein in the lumen of LE/Ly. NPC2 delivers cholesterol to the N-terminal domain of NPC1, which is believed to insert cholesterol into the limiting membrane for subsequent transport to other subcellular organelles. Few cytoplasmic factors have been identified to govern cholesterol efflux from LE/Ly, and much less is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we establish VPS4, an AAA ATPase that has a well-established role in disassembling the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport)-III polymer, as an important regulator of endosomal cholesterol transport. Knocking down VPS4 in HeLa cells resulted in prominent accumulation of LDL-C in LE/Ly, and disrupted cholesterol homeostatic responses at the endoplasmic reticulum. The level and localization of NPC1 and NPC2 appeared to be normal in VPS4 knockdown cells. Importantly, depleting any of the ESCRT-III components did not exert a significant effect on endosomal cholesterol transport. Our results thus identify an important cytoplasmic regulator of endosomal cholesterol trafficking and represent the first functional separation of VPS4 from ESCRT-III. PMID:23009658

  18. Novel Biotinylated Lipid Prodrugs of Acyclovir for the Treatment of Herpetic Keratitis (HK): Transporter Recognition, Tissue Stability and Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Earla, Ravinder; Sirimulla, Suman; Bailey, Jake Brain; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Biotinylated lipid prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV) were designed to target the sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) on the cornea to facilitate enhanced cellular absorption of ACV. Methods All the prodrugs were screened for in vitro cellular uptake, interaction with SMVT, docking analysis, cytotoxicity, enzymatic stability and antiviral activity. Results Uptake of biotinylated lipid prodrugs of ACV (B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV) was significantly higher than biotinylated prodrug (B-ACV), lipid prodrugs (R-ACV and 12HS-ACV) and ACV in corneal cells. Transepithelial transport across rabbit corneas indicated the recognition of the prodrugs by SMVT. Average Vina scores obtained from docking studies further confirmed that biotinylated lipid prodrugs possess enhanced affinity towards SMVT. All the prodrugs studied did not cause any cytotoxicity and were found to be safe and non-toxic. B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV were found to be relatively more stable in ocular tissue homogenates and exhibited excellent antiviral activity. Conclusions Biotinylated lipid prodrugs demonstrated synergistic improvement in cellular uptake due to recognition of the prodrugs by SMVT on the cornea and lipid mediated transcellular diffusion. These biotinylated lipid prodrugs appear to be promising drug candidates for the treatment of herpetic keratitis (HK) and may lower ACV resistance in patients with poor clinical response. PMID:23657675

  19. Cargo trafficking from the trans-Golgi network towards the endosome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoungtae

    2016-08-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) is a major sorting, packing and delivering station of newly synthesised proteins and lipids to their final destination. These cargo molecules follow the secretory pathway, which is a vital part of cellular trafficking machinery in all eukaryotic cells. This secretory pathway is well conserved in all eukaryotes from low-level eukaryotes, such as yeast, to higher level eukaryotes like mammals. The molecular mechanisms of protein sorting by adaptor proteins, membrane elongation and transport to the final destinations by motor proteins and the cytoskeleton, and membrane pinching-off by scission proteins must be choreographically managed for efficient cargo delivery, and the understanding of these detailed processes is not yet completed. Functionally, defects in these mechanisms are associated with the pathology of prominent diseases such as acute myeloid leukaemia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, I-cell disease and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. The present review points out the recent advances in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the transportation of the cargo from the TGN towards the endosome. PMID:27061938

  20. Hrs recognizes a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in cytokine receptors during ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yuji; Yamashita, Yuki; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Yoshino, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Takeshita, Toshikazu

    2011-04-29

    Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a component of the ESCRT-0 protein complex that captures ubiquitylated cargo proteins and sorts them to the lysosomal pathway. Although Hrs acts as a key transporter for ubiquitin-dependent endosomal sorting, we previously reported that Hrs is also involved in ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of interleukin-2 receptor β (IL-2Rβ). Here, we show direct interactions between bacterially expressed Hrs and interleukin-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα), indicating that their binding is not required for ubiquitylation of the receptors, similar to the case for IL-2Rβ. Examinations of the Hrs binding regions of the receptors reveal that a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in both IL-2Rβ and IL-4Rα is essential for the binding. Whereas the wild-type receptors are delivered to LAMP1-positive late endosomes, mutant receptors lacking the hydrophobic amino acid cluster are sorted to lysobisphosphatidic acid-positive late endosomes rather than LAMP1-positive late endosomes. We also show that the degradation of these mutant receptors is attenuated. Accordingly, Hrs functions during ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of the receptors by recognizing the hydrophobic amino acid cluster. These findings suggest the existence of a group of cargo proteins that have this hydrophobic amino acid cluster as a ubiquitin-independent sorting signal. PMID:21362618

  1. γ-SNAP stimulates disassembly of endosomal SNARE complexes and regulates endocytic trafficking pathways.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroki; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Tanaka, Ayaka; Hosoi, Kaori; Ichimura, Kaoru; Arasaki, Kohei; Wakana, Yuichi; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Tani, Katsuko; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2015-08-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) that reside in the target membranes and transport vesicles assemble into specific SNARE complexes to drive membrane fusion. N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) and its attachment protein, α-SNAP (encoded by NAPA), catalyze disassembly of the SNARE complexes in the secretory and endocytic pathways to recycle them for the next round of fusion events. γ-SNAP (encoded by NAPG) is a SNAP isoform, but its function in SNARE-mediated membrane trafficking remains unknown. Here, we show that γ-SNAP regulates the endosomal trafficking of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) and transferrin. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analyses revealed that γ-SNAP interacts with a limited range of SNAREs, including endosomal ones. γ-SNAP, as well as α-SNAP, mediated the disassembly of endosomal syntaxin-7-containing SNARE complexes. Overexpression and small interfering (si)RNA-mediated depletion of γ-SNAP changed the morphologies and intracellular distributions of endosomes. Moreover, the depletion partially suppressed the exit of EGFR and transferrin from EEA1-positive early endosomes to delay their degradation and uptake. Taken together, our findings suggest that γ-SNAP is a unique SNAP that functions in a limited range of organelles - including endosomes - and their trafficking pathways. PMID:26101353

  2. The Role of the Photoreceptor ABC Transporter ABCA4 in Lipid Transport and Stargardt Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molday, Robert S.; Zhong, Ming; Quazi, Faraz

    2009-01-01

    ABCA4 is a member of the ABCA subfamily of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters that is expressed in rod and cone photoreceptors of the vertebrate retina. ABCA4, also known as the Rim protein and ABCR, is a large 2273 amino acid glycoprotein organized as two tandem halves, each containing a single membrane spanning segment followed sequentially by a large exocytoplasmic domain, a multispanning membrane domain and a nucleotide binding domain. Over 500 mutations in the gene encoding ABCA4 are associated with a spectrum of related autosomal recessive retinal degenerative diseases including Stargardt macular degeneration, cone-rod dystrophy and a subset of retinitis pigmentosa. Biochemical studies on the purified ABCA4 together with analysis of abca4 knockout mice and patients with Stargardt disease have implicated ABCA4 as a retinylidene-phosphatidylethanolamine transporter that facilitates the removal of potentially reactive retinal derivatives from photoreceptors following photoexcitation. Knowledge of the genetic and molecular basis for ABCA4 related retinal degenerative diseases is being used to develop rationale therapeutic treatments for this set of disorders. PMID:19230850

  3. Modulation of Endosomal Escape of IRQ-PEGylated Nano-carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudhakir, Diky; Akita, Hidetaka; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2011-12-01

    The novel IRQ peptide is one of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) that has ability to induce endosomal escape. It has been demonstrated that IRQ ligand had ability to facilitate an escape of liposomes encapsulating siRNA from the endosomes presumably by fusion-independent mechanism [1,2]. In the present study, we attempted to modulate the intracellular trafficking of IRQ-modified nano-carrier in term of escaping process by changing the lipid composition. The peptide was attached to the terminal end of maleimide group of polyethylene glycol-modified liposomes (IRQ-PEG-Lip). The liposomes were composed of DOTAP, DOPE and cholesterol and it was labeled by water soluble sulpho-rhodamine B (Sr-B). The escape of PEG-coated liposomes was then observed by confocal laser scanning microscope after the endosomes were stained with Lysosensor. The results exhibited that IRQ-PEG-Lip was escaped from endosomal compartment after 1 h transfection when 40% of DOPE was incorporated into the nanostructure comparing to that of PEG-Lip. These results are consistent with the previous results that the IRQ facilitates endosomal escape via independent-mechanism. However, IRQ-PEG-Lip were then completely co-localized in the acidic compartment when density of DOPE was reduced approximately 20%. These results indicated that the utilizing of DOPE is important for the escape process even in the presence of hydrophilic PEG polymer. In conclusion, the regulation of endosomal escape ability of the PEGylated-IRQ nano-carrier was induced by fusion-independent manner as well as fusogenic lipid.

  4. Direct endosomal acidification by the outwardly rectifying CLC-5 Cl−/H+ exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew J; Lippiat, Jonathan D

    2010-01-01

    The voltage-gated Cl− channel (CLC) family comprises cell surface Cl− channels and intracellular Cl−/H+ exchangers. CLCs in organelle membranes are thought to assist acidification by providing a passive chloride conductance that electrically counterbalances H+ accumulation. Following recent descriptions of Cl−/H+ exchange activity in endosomal CLCs we have re-evaluated their role. We expressed human CLC-5 in HEK293 cells, recorded currents under a range of Cl− and H+ gradients by whole-cell patch clamp, and examined the contribution of CLC-5 to endosomal acidification using a targeted pH-sensitive fluorescent protein. We found that CLC-5 only conducted outward currents, corresponding to Cl− flux into the cytoplasm and H+ from the cytoplasm. Inward currents were never observed, despite the range of intracellular and extracellular Cl− concentrations and pH used. Endosomal acidification in HEK293 cells was prevented by 25 μm bafilomycin-A1, an inhibitor of vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase), which actively pumps H+ into the endosomal lumen. Overexpression of CLC-5 in HEK293 cells conferred an additional bafilomycin-insensitive component to endosomal acidification. This effect was abolished by making mutations in CLC-5 that remove H+ transport, which result in either no current (E268A) or bidirectional Cl− flux (E211A). Endosomal acidification in a proximal tubule cell line was partially sensitive to inhibition of v-ATPase by bafilomycin-A1. Furthermore, in the presence of bafilomycin-A1, acidification was significantly reduced and nearly fully ablated by partial and near-complete knockdown of endogenous CLC-5 by siRNA. These data suggest that CLC-5 is directly involved in endosomal acidification by exchanging endosomal Cl− for H+. PMID:20421284

  5. Amyloid beta-peptide impairs glucose transport in hippocampal and cortical neurons: involvement of membrane lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Pang, Z; Geddes, J W; Uchida, K; Mattson, M P

    1997-02-01

    A deficit in glucose uptake and a deposition of amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) each occur in vulnerable brain regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is not known whether mechanistic links exist between A beta deposition and impaired glucose transport. We now report that A beta impairs glucose transport in cultured rat hippocampal and cortical neurons by a mechanism involving membrane lipid peroxidation. A beta impaired 3H-deoxy-glucose transport in a concentration-dependent manner and with a time course preceding neurodegeneration. The decrease in glucose transport was followed by a decrease in cellular ATP levels. Impairment of glucose transport, ATP depletion, and cell death were each prevented in cultures pretreated with antioxidants. Exposure to FeSO4, an established inducer of lipid peroxidation, also impaired glucose transport. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses showed that exposure of cultures to A beta induced conjugation of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, to the neuronal glucose transport protein GLUT3. HNE induced a concentration-dependent impairment of glucose transport and subsequent ATP depletion. Impaired glucose transport was not caused by a decreased energy demand in the neurons, because ouabain, which inhibits Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity and thereby reduces neuronal ATP hydrolysis rate, had little or no effect on glucose transport. Collectively, the data demonstrate that lipid peroxidation mediates A beta-induced impairment of glucose transport in neurons and suggest that this action of A beta may contribute to decreased glucose uptake and neuronal degeneration in AD. PMID:8994059

  6. Spatial segregation of transport and signalling functions between human endothelial caveolae and lipid raft proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, Richard R.; Fontijn, Ruud D.; van Marle, Jan; Pannekoek, Hans; Horrevoets, Anton J. G.

    2006-01-01

    Lipid rafts and caveolae are biochemically similar, specialized domains of the PM (plasma membrane) that cluster specific proteins. However, they are morphologically distinct, implying different, possibly complementary functions. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis preceding identification of proteins by MS was used to compare the relative abundance of proteins in DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) isolated from HUVEC (human umbilical-vein endothelial cells), and caveolae immunopurified from DRM fractions. Various signalling and transport proteins were identified and additional cell-surface biotinylation revealed the majority to be exposed, demonstrating their presence at the PM. In resting endothelial cells, the scaffold of immunoisolated caveolae consists of only few resident proteins, related to structure [CAV1 (caveolin-1), vimentin] and transport (V-ATPase), as well as the GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-linked, surface-exposed protein CD59. Further quantitative characterization by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy of well-known [eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) and CAV1], less known [SNAP-23 (23 kDa synaptosome-associated protein) and BASP1 (brain acid soluble protein 1)] and novel [C8ORF2 (chromosome 8 open reading frame 2)] proteins showed different subcellular distributions with none of these proteins being exclusive to either caveolae or DRM. However, the DRM-associated fraction of the novel protein C8ORF2 (∼5% of total protein) associated with immunoseparated caveolae, in contrast with the raft protein SNAP-23. The segregation of caveolae from lipid rafts was visually confirmed in proliferating cells, where CAV1 was spatially separated from eNOS, SNAP-23 and BASP1. These results provide direct evidence for the previously suggested segregation of transport and signalling functions between specialized domains of the endothelial plasma membrane. PMID:16886909

  7. Lipid transport in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its implications in virulence and drug development.

    PubMed

    Bailo, Rebeca; Bhatt, Apoorva; Aínsa, José A

    2015-08-01

    Tuberculosis is still a major health problem worldwide and one of the main causes of death by a single infectious agent. Only few drugs are really effective to treat tuberculosis, hence, the emergence of multiple, extensively, and totally drug resistant bacilli compromises the already difficult antituberculosis treatments. Given the persistent global burden of tuberculosis, it is crucial to understand the underlying mechanisms required for the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causal agent of tuberculosis, in order to pave the way for developing better drugs and strategies to treat and prevent tuberculosis. The exclusive mycobacterial cell wall lipids such as trehalose monomycolate and dimycolate (TMM, TDM), phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM), sulpholipid-1 (SL-1), diacyl trehalose (DAT), and pentacyl trehalose (PAT), among others, are known to play an important role in pathogenesis; thus, proteins responsible for their transport are potential virulence factors. MmpL and MmpS proteins mediate transport of important cell wall lipids across the mycobacterial membrane. In Mtb, MmpL3, MmpL7 and MmpL8 transport TMM, PDIM and SL-1 respectively. The translocation of DAT and biosynthesis of PAT is likely due to MmpL10. MmpL and MmpS proteins are involved in other processes such as drug efflux (MmpL5 and MmpL7), siderophore export (MmpL4/MmpS4 and MmpL5/MmpS5), and heme uptake (MmpL3 and MmpL11). Altogether, these proteins can be regarded as new potential targets for antituberculosis drug development. We will review recent advances in developing inhibitors of MmpL proteins, in the challenging context of targeting membrane proteins and the future prospects for potential antituberculosis drug candidates. PMID:25986884

  8. TOM1 is a PI5P effector involved in the regulation of endosomal maturation.

    PubMed

    Boal, Frédéric; Mansour, Rana; Gayral, Marion; Saland, Estelle; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Xuereb, Jean-Marie; Marcellin, Marlène; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Payrastre, Bernard; Tronchère, Hélène

    2015-02-15

    Phosphoinositides represent a major class of lipids specifically involved in the organization of signaling cascades, maintenance of the identity of organelles and regulation of multiple intracellular trafficking steps. We previously reported that phosphatidylinositol 5-monophosphate (PI5P), produced by the Shigella flexneri phosphatase IpgD, is implicated in the endosomal sorting of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Here, we show that the adaptor protein TOM1 is a new direct binding partner of PI5P. We identify the domain of TOM1 involved in this interaction and characterize the binding motif. Finally, we demonstrate that the recruitment of TOM1 by PI5P on signaling endosomes is responsible for the delay in EGFR degradation and fluid-phase bulk endocytosis. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that PI5P enrichment in signaling endosomes prevents endosomal maturation through the recruitment of TOM1, and point to a new function of PI5P in regulating discrete maturation steps in the endosomal system. PMID:25588840

  9. Celastrus Orbiculatus Thunb. Reduces Lipid Accumulation by Promoting Reverse Cholesterol Transport in Hyperlipidemic Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Si, Yanhong; Zhai, Lei; Guo, Shoudong; Zhao, Jilong; Sang, Hui; Pang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Xue; Chen, Anbin; Qin, Shucun

    2016-06-01

    Previously, we found that Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. (COT) decreases athero-susceptibility in lipoproteins and the aorta of guinea pigs fed a high-fat diet, and increases high-density lipoprotein (HDL). In the present study, we investigated the effect of COT in reducing lipid accumulation and promoting reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in vivo and vitro. Healthy male mice were treated with high-fat diet alone, high-fat diet with COT (10.0 g/kg/d), or general fodder for 6 weeks. Serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), HDL-C, non-HDL-C, and (3)H-cholesterol in plasma, liver, bile, and feces were determined. Pathological changes and the levels of TC and TG in liver were examined. The expression of hepatic genes and protein associated with RCT were analyzed. COT administration reduced lipid accumulation in the liver, ameliorated the pathological changes, and lessened liver injury, the levels of TG, TC, and non-HDL-C in plasma were decreased significantly, and COT led to a significant increase in plasma HDL-C and apolipoprotein A (apoA1). (3)H-cholesterol in plasma, liver, bile, and feces was also significantly increased in COT-treated mice compared to controls. Both mRNA and protein expression of SRB1, CYP7A1, LDLR, ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCA1, ABCG5, and LXRα were improved in COT-treated mice. An in vitro isotope tracing experiment showed that COT and its bioactive ingredients, such as celastrol, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, and quercetin, significantly increased the efflux of (3)H-cholesterol. They also increased the expression of SRB1, ABCA1, and ABCG1 significantly in macrophages. Our findings provided a positive role of COT in reducing lipid accumulation by promoting RCT. These effects may be achieved by activating the SRB1 and ABC transporter pathway and promoting cholesterol metabolism via the CYP7A1 pathway in vivo. The effective ingredients in vitro are celastrol, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, and quercetin. PMID

  10. Polyelectrolyte-Mediated Transport of Doxorubicin Through the Bilayer Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavov, Alexander A.; Kitaeva, Marina V.; Melik-Nubarov, Nikolay S.; Menger, Frederic M.

    A model is developed for the effect of ionic polymers on the transport of doxorubicin, an antitumor drug, through a bilayer membrane. Accordingly, a protonated (cationic) form of doxorubicin binds to an anionic polymer, poly(acrylic acid), the resulting complex being several hundred nanometers in size. Nevertheless, large complex species associate with neutral egg lecithin liposomes by means of hydrophobic attraction between the doxorubicin and the liposome bilayer. Then, the doxorubicin enters the liposome interior which has been imparted with an acidic buffer to protonate the doxorubicin. The rate of transmembrane Dox permeation decreases when elevating the polyacid-to-doxorubicin ratio. A cationic polymer, polylysine, being coupled with liposomes containing the negative lipid cardiolipin, accelerates membrane transport of doxorubicin with the maximum rate at a complete neutralization of the membrane charge by an interacting polycation. The effect of a polycation on doxorubicin transport becomes more pronounced as small negative liposomes (60-80 nm in diameter) are changed to larger ones (approx. 600 nm in diameter). An opportunity thus opens up for the manipulation of the kinetics of drug uptake by cells and, ultimately, the control of the pharmaceutical action of drugs.

  11. Rab11 and Lysotracker Markers Reveal Correlation between Endosomal Pathways and Transfection Efficiency of Surface-Functionalized Cationic Liposome-DNA Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Majzoub, Ramsey N; Wonder, Emily; Ewert, Kai K; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Teesalu, Tambet; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2016-07-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are widely studied as carriers of DNA and short-interfering RNA for gene delivery and silencing, and related clinical trials are ongoing. Optimization of transfection efficiency (TE) requires understanding of CL-nucleic acid nanoparticle (NP) interactions with cells, NP endosomal pathways, endosomal escape, and events leading to release of active nucleic acid from the lipid carrier. Here, we studied endosomal pathways and TE of surface-functionalized CL-DNA NPs in PC-3 prostate cancer cells displaying overexpressed integrin and neuropilin-1 receptors. The NPs contained RGD-PEG-lipid or RPARPAR-PEG-lipid, targeting integrin, and neuropilin-1 receptors, respectively, or control PEG-lipid. Fluorescence colocalization using Rab11-GFP and Lysotracker enabled simultaneous colocalization of NPs with recycling endosome (Rab11) and late endosome/lysosome (Rab7/Lysotracker) pathways at increasing mole fractions of pentavalent MVL5 (+5 e) at low (10 mol %), high (50 mol %), and very high (70 mol %) membrane charge density (σM). For these cationic NPs (lipid/DNA molar charge ratio, ρchg = 5), the influence of membrane charge density on pathway selection and transfection efficiency is similar for both peptide-PEG NPs, although, quantitatively, the effect is larger for RGD-PEG compared to RPARPAR-PEG NPs. At low σM, peptide-PEG NPs show preference for the recycling endosome over the late endosome/lysosome pathway. Increases in σM, from low to high, lead to decreases in colocalization with recycling endosomes and simultaneous increases in colocalization with the late endosome/lysosome pathway. Combining colocalization and functional TE data at low and high σM shows that higher TE correlates with a larger fraction of NPs colocalized with the late endosome/lysosome pathway while lower TE correlates with a larger fraction of NPs colocalized with the Rab11 recycling pathway. The findings lead to a hypothesis that increases in σM, leading to enhanced

  12. Protein kinase A dependent membrane protein phosphorylation and chloride conductance in endosomal vesicles from kidney cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Reenstra, W.W.; Bae, H.R.; Verkman, A.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Sabolic, I. Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA )

    1992-01-14

    Regulation of Cl conductance by protein kinase A action, cell-free measurements of Cl transport and membrane protein phosphorylation were carried out in apical endocytic vesicles from rabbit kidney proximal tubule. Cl transport was measured by a stopped-flow quenching assay in endosomes labeled in vivo with the fluorescent Cl indicator 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium. Phosphorylation was studied in a purified endosomal preparation by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography of membrane proteins labeled by ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. These results suggest that, in a cell-free system, protein kinase A increases Cl conductance in endosomes from kidney proximal tubule by a phosphorylation mechanism. The labeled protein has a size similar to that of the 64-kDa putative kidney Cl channel reported by Landry et al. but is much smaller than the {approximately}170-kDa cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein.

  13. A diffusive ink transport model for lipid dip-pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urtizberea, A.; Hirtz, M.

    2015-09-01

    Despite diverse applications, phospholipid membrane stacks generated by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) still lack a thorough and systematic characterization that elucidates the whole ink transport process from writing to surface spreading, with the aim of better controlling the resulting feature size and resolution. We report a quantitative analysis and modeling of the dependence of lipid DPN features (area, height and volume) on dwell time and relative humidity. The ink flow rate increases with humidity in agreement with meniscus size growth, determining the overall feature size. The observed time dependence indicates the existence of a balance between surface spreading and the ink flow rate that promotes differences in concentration at the meniscus/substrate interface. Feature shape is controlled by the substrate surface energy. The results are analyzed within a modified model for the ink transport of diffusive inks. At any humidity the dependence of the area spread on the dwell time shows two diffusion regimes: at short dwell times growth is controlled by meniscus diffusion while at long dwell times surface diffusion governs the process. The critical point for the switch of regime depends on the humidity.Despite diverse applications, phospholipid membrane stacks generated by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) still lack a thorough and systematic characterization that elucidates the whole ink transport process from writing to surface spreading, with the aim of better controlling the resulting feature size and resolution. We report a quantitative analysis and modeling of the dependence of lipid DPN features (area, height and volume) on dwell time and relative humidity. The ink flow rate increases with humidity in agreement with meniscus size growth, determining the overall feature size. The observed time dependence indicates the existence of a balance between surface spreading and the ink flow rate that promotes differences in concentration at the meniscus

  14. Lipids, curvature stress, and the action of lipid prodrugs: free fatty acids and lysolipid enhancement of drug transport across liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, Henrik; Andersen, Jonas H; Ditzel, Henrik J; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2012-01-01

    Molecular shape and its impact on bilayer curvature stress are powerful concepts for describing the effects of lipids and fatty acids on fundamental membrane properties, such as passive permeability and derived properties like drug transport across liposomal membranes. We illustrate these relationships by studying the effects of fatty acids and lysolipids on the permeation of a potent anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, across the bilayer of a liposome in which the drug is encapsulated. Using a simple fluorescence assay, we have systematically studied the passive permeation of doxorubicin across liposomal membranes in different lipid phases: the solid-ordered phase (DPPC bilayers), the liquid-disordered phase (POPC lipid bilayers), and the liquid-ordered phase induced by high levels of cholesterol (DOPC + cholesterol lipid bilayers). The effect of different free fatty acids (FA) and lysolipids (LL), separately and in combination, on permeability was assessed to elucidate the possible mechanism of phospholipase A(2)-triggered release in cancer tissue of liposomal doxorubicin formulations. In all cases, FAs applied separately lead to significant enhancement of permeability, most pronounced in liquid-disordered bilayers and less pronounced in solid and solid-ordered bilayers. LLs applied separately had only a marginal effect on permeability. FA and LL applied in combination lead to a synergistic enhancement of permeability in solid bilayers, whereas in liquid-disordered bilayers, the combined effect suppressed the otherwise strong permeability enhancement due to the FAs. PMID:21839138

  15. Structural and functional analysis of endosomal compartments in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bay, Andres E Perez; Schreiner, Ryan; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells display segregated early endosomal compartments, termed apical sorting endosomes and basolateral sorting endosomes, that converge into a common late endosomal-lysosomal degradative compartment and common recycling endosomes (CREs). Unlike recycling endosomes of nonpolarized cells, CREs have the ability to sort apical and basolateral plasma membrane proteins into distinct apical and basolateral recycling routes, utilizing mechanisms similar to those employed by the trans Golgi network in the biosynthetic pathway. The apical recycling route includes an additional compartment, the apical recycling endosomes, consisting of multiple vesicles bundled around the basal body. Recent evidence indicates that, in addition to their role in internalizing ligands and recycling their receptors back to the cell surface, endosomal compartments act as intermediate stations in the biosynthetic routes to the plasma membrane. Here we review methods employed by our laboratory to study the endosomal compartments of epithelial cells and their multiple trafficking roles. PMID:26360040

  16. IFITM3 Restricts Influenza A Virus Entry by Blocking the Formation of Fusion Pores following Virus-Endosome Hemifusion

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Christopher R.; Savidis, George; Brass, Abraham L.; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) inhibit infection of diverse enveloped viruses, including the influenza A virus (IAV) which is thought to enter from late endosomes. Recent evidence suggests that IFITMs block virus hemifusion (lipid mixing in the absence of viral content release) by altering the properties of cell membranes. Consistent with this mechanism, excess cholesterol in late endosomes of IFITM-expressing cells has been reported to inhibit IAV entry. Here, we examined IAV restriction by IFITM3 protein using direct virus-cell fusion assay and single virus imaging in live cells. IFITM3 over-expression did not inhibit lipid mixing, but abrogated the release of viral content into the cytoplasm. Although late endosomes of IFITM3-expressing cells accumulated cholesterol, other interventions leading to aberrantly high levels of this lipid did not inhibit virus fusion. These results imply that excess cholesterol in late endosomes is not the mechanism by which IFITM3 inhibits the transition from hemifusion to full fusion. The IFITM3's ability to block fusion pore formation at a post-hemifusion stage shows that this protein stabilizes the cytoplasmic leaflet of endosomal membranes without adversely affecting the lumenal leaflet. We propose that IFITM3 interferes with pore formation either directly, through partitioning into the cytoplasmic leaflet of a hemifusion intermediate, or indirectly, by modulating the lipid/protein composition of this leaflet. Alternatively, IFITM3 may redirect IAV fusion to a non-productive pathway, perhaps by promoting fusion with intralumenal vesicles within multivesicular bodies/late endosomes. PMID:24699674

  17. Endosomes Derived from Clathrin-Independent Endocytosis Serve as Precursors for Endothelial Lumen Formation

    PubMed Central

    Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Weigert, Roberto; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2013-01-01

    Clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) is a form of bulk plasma membrane (PM) endocytosis that allows cells to sample and evaluate PM composition. Once in endosomes, the internalized proteins and lipids can be recycled back to the PM or delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Endosomes arising from CIE contain lipid and signaling molecules suggesting that they might be involved in important biological processes. During vasculogenesis, new blood vessels are formed from precursor cells in a process involving internalization and accumulation of endocytic vesicles. Here, we found that CIE has a role in endothelial lumen formation. Specifically, we found that human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) utilize CIE for internalization of distinct cargo molecules and that in three-dimensional cultures CIE membranes are delivered to the newly formed lumen. PMID:24282620

  18. Defective Lipid Transport and Biosynthesis in Recessive and Dominant Stargardt Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molday, Robert S.; Zhang, Kang

    2010-01-01

    Stargardt disease is a common inherited macular degeneration characterized by a significant loss in central vision in the first or second decade of life, bilateral atrophic changes in the central retina associated with degeneration of photoreceptors and underlying retinal pigment epithelial cells, and the presence of yellow flecks extending from the macula. Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease, the most common macular dystrophy, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding ABCA4, a photoreceptor ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter. Biochemical studies together with analysis of abca4 knockout mice and Stargardt patients have implicated ABCA4 as a lipid transporter that facilitates the removal of potentially toxic retinal compounds from photoreceptors following photoexcitation. An autosomal dominant form of Stargardt disease also known as Stargardt-like dystrophy is caused by mutations in a gene encoding ELOVL4, an enzyme that catalyzes the elongation of very long chain fatty acids in photoreceptors and other tissues. This review focuses on the molecular characterization of ABCA4 and ELOVL4 and their role in photoreceptor cell biology and the pathogenesis of Stargardt disease. PMID:20633576

  19. Quantifying the transport properties of lipid mesophases by theoretical modelling of diffusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Antognini, Luca M; Assenza, Salvatore; Speziale, Chiara; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-08-28

    Lyotropic Liquid Crystals (LLCs) are a class of lipid-based membranes with a strong potential for drug-delivery employment. The characterization and control of their transport properties is a central issue in this regard, and has recently prompted a notable volume of research on the topic. A promising experimental approach is provided by the so-called diffusion setup, where the drug molecules diffuse from a feeding chamber filled with water to a receiving one passing through a LLC. In the present work we provide a theoretical framework for the proper description of this setup, and validate it by means of targeted experiments. Due to the inhomogeneity of the system, a rich palette of different diffusion dynamics emerges from the interplay of the different time- and lengthscales thereby present. Our work paves the way to the employment of diffusion experiments to quantitatively characterize the transport properties of LLCs, and provides the basic tools for device diffusion setups with controlled kinetic properties. PMID:27586942

  20. Nanoscale electron transport and photodynamics enhancement in lipid-depleted bacteriorhodopsin monomers.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Cohen, Sidney R; Marchak, Debora; Friedman, Noga; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2014-08-26

    Potential future use of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a solid-state electron transport (ETp) material requires the highest possible active protein concentration. To that end we prepared stable monolayers of protein-enriched bR on a conducting HOPG substrate by lipid depletion of the native bR. The ETp properties of this construct were then investigated using conducting probe atomic force microscopy at low bias, both in the ground dark state and in the M-like intermediate configuration, formed upon excitation by green light. Photoconductance modulation was observed upon green and blue light excitation, demonstrating the potential of these monolayers as optoelectronic building blocks. To correlate protein structural changes with the observed behavior, measurements were made as a function of pressure under the AFM tip, as well as humidity. The junction conductance is reversible under pressure changes up to ∼300 MPa, but above this pressure the conductance drops irreversibly. ETp efficiency is enhanced significantly at >60% relative humidity, without changing the relative photoactivity significantly. These observations are ascribed to changes in protein conformation and flexibility and suggest that improved electron transport pathways can be generated through formation of a hydrogen-bonding network. PMID:25003581

  1. A diffusive ink transport model for lipid dip-pen nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Urtizberea, A; Hirtz, M

    2015-10-14

    Despite diverse applications, phospholipid membrane stacks generated by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) still lack a thorough and systematic characterization that elucidates the whole ink transport process from writing to surface spreading, with the aim of better controlling the resulting feature size and resolution. We report a quantitative analysis and modeling of the dependence of lipid DPN features (area, height and volume) on dwell time and relative humidity. The ink flow rate increases with humidity in agreement with meniscus size growth, determining the overall feature size. The observed time dependence indicates the existence of a balance between surface spreading and the ink flow rate that promotes differences in concentration at the meniscus/substrate interface. Feature shape is controlled by the substrate surface energy. The results are analyzed within a modified model for the ink transport of diffusive inks. At any humidity the dependence of the area spread on the dwell time shows two diffusion regimes: at short dwell times growth is controlled by meniscus diffusion while at long dwell times surface diffusion governs the process. The critical point for the switch of regime depends on the humidity. PMID:26267408

  2. Mechanism of lipid mobilization by the small intestine after transport blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J.; Tso, P.; Mansbach, C.M. II

    1988-07-01

    The nonionic detergent, Pluronic L-81 (L-81) has been shown to block the transport of intestinal mucosal triacylglycerol (TG) in chylomicrons. This results in large lipid masses within the enterocyte that are greater in diameter than chylomicrons. On removal of L-81, mucosal TG is rapidly mobilized and appears in the lymph. We questioned whether the blocked TG requires partial or complete hydrolysis before its transport. Rats were infused intraduodenally with (3H)glyceryl, (14C)oleoyl trioleate (TO) and 0.5 mg L-81/h for 8 h, followed by 120 mumol/h linoleate for 18 h. Mesenteric lymph was collected and analyzed for TG content and radioactivity. An HPLC method was developed to separate TG on the basis of its acyl group species. The assumed acyl group composition was confirmed by gas liquid chromatography analysis. TG lymphatic output was low for the first 8 h but increased to 52 mumol/h at the 11th h of infusion (3 h after stopping L-81). 38% of the infused TO was retained in the mucosa after the 8-h infusion. 95% of mucosal TG was TO, 92% of the radioactivity was in TG, and 2.4% of the 14C disintegrations per minute was in fatty acid. HPLC analysis of lymph at 6, 10, 12, and 14.5 h of infusion showed a progressive rise in TG composed of one linoleate and two oleates, to 39%; and in TG composed of two linoleates and one oleate to 20% at 14.5 h of infusion. On a mass basis, however, 80% of the TG acyl groups were oleate. 3H/14C ratios in the various TG acyl group species reflected the decrease in oleate. We conclude that first, unlike liver, most mucosal TG is not hydrolyzed before transport. The mechanism of how the large lipid masses present in mucosal cells after L-81 infusion are converted to the much smaller chylomicrons is unknown. Second, the concomitant infusion of linoleate did not impair lymph TG delivery after L-81 blockade.

  3. Distinct Roles for TGN/Endosome Epsin-like Adaptors Ent3p and Ent5p

    PubMed Central

    Costaguta, Giancarlo; Duncan, Mara C.; Fernández, G. Esteban; Huang, Grace H.

    2006-01-01

    Clathrin adaptors are key factors in clathrin-coated vesicle formation, coupling clathrin to cargo and/or the lipid bilayer. A physically interacting network of three classes of adaptors participate in clathrin-mediated traffic between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes: AP-1, Gga proteins, and epsin-like proteins. Here we investigate functional relationships within this network through transport assays and protein localization analysis in living yeast cells. We observed that epsin-like protein Ent3p preferentially localized with Gga2p, whereas Ent5p distributed equally between AP-1 and Gga2p. Ent3p was mislocalized in Gga-deficient but not in AP-1–deficient cells. In contrast, Ent5p retained localization in cells lacking either or both AP-1 and Gga proteins. The Ent proteins were dispensable for AP-1 or Gga localization. Synthetic genetic growth and α-factor maturation defects were observed when ent5Δ but not ent3Δ was introduced together with deletions of the GGA genes. In AP-1–deficient cells, ent3Δ and to a lesser extent ent5Δ caused minor α-factor maturation defects, but together resulted in a near-lethal phenotype. Deletions of ENT3 and ENT5 also displayed synthetic defects similar to, but less severe than, synthetic effects of AP-1 and Gga inactivation. These results differentiate Ent3p and Ent5p function in vivo, suggesting that Ent3p acts primarily with Gga proteins, whereas Ent5p acts with both AP-1 and Gga proteins but is more critical for AP-1–mediated transport. The data also support a model in which the Ent adaptors provide important accessory functions to AP-1 and Gga proteins in TGN/endosome traffic. PMID:16790491

  4. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  5. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-06-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ~95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes.

  6. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  7. Convergence of Non-clathrin- and Clathrin-derived Endosomes Involves Arf6 Inactivation and Changes in Phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Naslavsky, Naava; Weigert, Roberto; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2003-01-01

    The trafficking of two plasma membrane (PM) proteins that lack clathrin internalization sequences, major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI), and interleukin 2 receptor α subunit (Tac) was compared with that of PM proteins internalized via clathrin. MHCI and Tac were internalized into endosomes that were distinct from those containing clathrin cargo. At later times, a fraction of these internalized membranes were observed in Arf6-associated, tubular recycling endosomes whereas another fraction acquired early endosomal autoantigen 1 (EEA1) before fusion with the “classical” early endosomes containing the clathrin-dependent cargo, LDL. After convergence, cargo molecules from both pathways eventually arrived, in a Rab7-dependent manner, at late endosomes and were degraded. Expression of a constitutively active mutant of Arf6, Q67L, caused MHCI and Tac to accumulate in enlarged PIP2-enriched vacuoles, devoid of EEA1 and inhibited their fusion with clathrin cargo-containing endosomes and hence blocked degradation. By contrast, trafficking and degradation of clathrin-cargo was not affected. A similar block in transport of MHCI and Tac was reversibly induced by a PI3-kinase inhibitor, implying that inactivation of Arf6 and acquisition of PI3P are required for convergence of endosomes arising from these two pathways. PMID:12589044

  8. HookA is a novel dynein–early endosome linker critical for cargo movement in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Qiu, Rongde; Arst, Herbert N.; Peñalva, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports membranous cargoes along microtubules, but the mechanism of dynein–cargo interaction is unclear. From a genetic screen, we identified a homologue of human Hook proteins, HookA, as a factor required for dynein-mediated early endosome movement in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. HookA contains a putative N-terminal microtubule-binding domain followed by coiled-coil domains and a C-terminal cargo-binding domain, an organization reminiscent of cytoplasmic linker proteins. HookA–early endosome interaction occurs independently of dynein–early endosome interaction and requires the C-terminal domain. Importantly, HookA interacts with dynein and dynactin independently of HookA–early endosome interaction but dependent on the N-terminal part of HookA. Both dynein and the p25 subunit of dynactin are required for the interaction between HookA and dynein–dynactin, and loss of HookA significantly weakens dynein–early endosome interaction, causing a virtually complete absence of early endosome movement. Thus, HookA is a novel linker important for dynein–early endosome interaction in vivo. PMID:24637327

  9. First-Generation Antipsychotic Haloperidol Alters the Functionality of the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Compartment in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Barrio, Luis C; Lerma, Milagros; de la Peña, Gema; Serna, Jorge; Pastor, Oscar; Lasunción, Miguel A; Busto, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    First- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs, respectively), have the ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and also to interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking, interfering with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes/lysosomes. In the present work, we examined the effects of FGA haloperidol on the functionality of late endosomes/lysosomes in vitro. In HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells incubated in the presence of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanineperchlorate (DiI)-LDL, treatment with haloperidol caused the enlargement of organelles positive for late endosome markers lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) and LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid), which also showed increased content of both free-cholesterol and DiI derived from LDL. This indicates the accumulation of LDL-lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment caused by haloperidol. In contrast, LDL traffic through early endosomes and the Golgi apparatus appeared to be unaffected by the antipsychotic as the distribution of both early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) and coatomer subunit β (β-COP) were not perturbed. Notably, treatment with haloperidol significantly increased the lysosomal pH and decreased the activities of lysosomal protease and β-d-galactosidase in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the alkalinization of the lysosomes' internal milieu induced by haloperidol affects lysosomal functionality. PMID:26999125

  10. First-Generation Antipsychotic Haloperidol Alters the Functionality of the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Compartment in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Barrio, Luis C.; Lerma, Milagros; de la Peña, Gema; Serna, Jorge; Pastor, Oscar; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Busto, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    First- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs, respectively), have the ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and also to interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking, interfering with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes/lysosomes. In the present work, we examined the effects of FGA haloperidol on the functionality of late endosomes/lysosomes in vitro. In HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells incubated in the presence of 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanineperchlorate (DiI)-LDL, treatment with haloperidol caused the enlargement of organelles positive for late endosome markers lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) and LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid), which also showed increased content of both free-cholesterol and DiI derived from LDL. This indicates the accumulation of LDL-lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment caused by haloperidol. In contrast, LDL traffic through early endosomes and the Golgi apparatus appeared to be unaffected by the antipsychotic as the distribution of both early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) and coatomer subunit β (β-COP) were not perturbed. Notably, treatment with haloperidol significantly increased the lysosomal pH and decreased the activities of lysosomal protease and β-d-galactosidase in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the alkalinization of the lysosomes’ internal milieu induced by haloperidol affects lysosomal functionality. PMID:26999125