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Sample records for endospore biogenesis factor

  1. Factors Governing the Germination of Sulfate-Reducing Desulfotomaculum Endospores Involved in Oil Reservoir Souring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherry, A.; Bell, E.; Cueto, G.; Suarez-Suarez, A.; Pilloni, G.; Hubert, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Reservoir souring is caused by the activity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) in subsurface oil reservoirs, and is often induced by seawater injection during secondary oil recovery. Souring can potentially contribute to corrosion of infrastructure, health and safety hazards to the workforce, and reduction in value by increasing refining costs associated with producing the oil resource. Souring causes annual losses in the billions of dollars to the oil industry. Endospore-forming SRM, such as Desulfotomaculum spp., are often suspected culprits in reservoir souring. Endospores can survive unfavourable conditions for long periods, yet remain poised to germinate and become active if conditions become more favourable. Factors governing endospore germination are poorly understood, but are thought to include availability of nutrients, possibly metabolic by products of other anaerobic bioprocesses, and/or variations in temperature. Most research has focused on aerobic Bacillus spp., with very few studies dedicated to spore germination among anaerobes (order Clostridiales) including the sulfate-reducing Desulfotomaculum found in anoxic subsurface petroleum reservoirs. For Desulfotomaculum spores in deep hot oil reservoirs, cold seawater introduction during secondary oil recovery may create thermal viability zones for sulfate reduction near the injection wellbore. To evaluate these processes, sulfate-containing microcosms were prepared with different marine sediments as a source of spores, and amended with organic substrates in the presence or absence of oil. Incubation at 80°C for six days was followed by a down-shift in temperature to 60°C to mimic cold seawater injection into a hot reservoir. Souring did not occur at 80°C, but commenced within hours at 60°C. Microcosms were monitored for sulfate reduction and organic acids in combination with next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA genes (Ion Torrent, Illumina MiSeq). Through a combination of high

  2. Regulation of Senescence by microRNA Biogenesis Factors

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Srikantan, Subramanya; Kang, Min-Ju; Gorospe, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Senescence represents a state of indefinite growth arrest in cells that have reached their replicative life span, have become damaged, or express aberrant levels of cancer-related proteins. While senescence is widely considered to represent tumor-suppressive mechanism, the accumulation of senescent cells in tissues of older organisms is believed to underlie age-associated losses in physiologic function and age-related diseases. With the emergence of microRNAs (miRNAs) as a major class of molecular regulators of senescence, we review the transcriptional and post-transcriptional factors that control senescence-associated microRNA biosynthesis. Focusing on their enhancement or repression of senescence, we describe the transcription factors that govern the synthesis of primary (pri-)miRNAs, the proteins that control the nuclear processing of pri-miRNAs into precursor (pre-)miRNAs, including RNA editing enzymes, RNases, and RNA helicases, and the cytoplasmic proteins that affect the final processing of pre-miRNAs into mature miRNAs. We discuss how miRNA biogenesis proteins enhance or repress senescence, and thus influence the senescent phenotype that affects normal tissue function and pathology. PMID:22306790

  3. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ENDOSPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The possibility of a bioterrorism event resulting in the release of Bacillus anthracis endospores into a drinking water distribution system necessitates research into means by which these endospores can be inactivated. This study was designed to determine the chlorine resistance...

  4. GABP Transcription Factor (Nuclear Respiratory Factor 2) Is Required for Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhong-Fa; Drumea, Karen; Mott, Stephanie; Wang, Junling

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are membrane-bound cytoplasmic organelles that serve as the major source of ATP production in eukaryotic cells. GABP (also known as nuclear respiratory factor 2) is a nuclear E26 transformation-specific transcription factor (ETS) that binds and activates mitochondrial genes that are required for electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. We conditionally deleted Gabpa, the DNA-binding component of this transcription factor complex, from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to examine the role of Gabp in mitochondrial biogenesis, function, and gene expression. Gabpα loss modestly reduced mitochondrial mass, ATP production, oxygen consumption, and mitochondrial protein synthesis but did not alter mitochondrial morphology, membrane potential, apoptosis, or the expression of several genes that were previously reported to be GABP targets. However, the expression of Tfb1m, a methyltransferase that modifies ribosomal rRNA and is required for mitochondrial protein translation, was markedly reduced in Gabpα-null MEFs. We conclude that Gabp regulates Tfb1m expression and plays an essential, nonredundant role in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:24958105

  5. Interplay between trigger factor and other protein biogenesis factors on the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Thomas; Holtkamp, Wolf; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Nascent proteins emerging from translating ribosomes in bacteria are screened by a number of ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors, among them the chaperone trigger factor (TF), the signal recognition particle (SRP) that targets ribosomes synthesizing membrane proteins to the membrane and the modifying enzymes, peptide deformylase (PDF) and methionine aminopeptidase (MAP). Here, we examine the interplay between these factors both kinetically and at equilibrium. TF rapidly scans the ribosomes until it is stabilized on ribosomes presenting TF-specific nascent chains. SRP binding to those complexes is strongly impaired. Thus, TF in effect prevents SRP binding to the majority of ribosomes, except those presenting SRP-specific signal sequences, explaining how the small amount of SRP in the cell can be effective in membrane targeting. PDF and MAP do not interfere with TF or SRP binding to translating ribosomes, indicating that nascent-chain processing can take place before or in parallel with TF or SRP binding.

  6. Insertion of the Biogenesis Factor Rei1 Probes the Ribosomal Tunnel during 60S Maturation.

    PubMed

    Greber, Basil Johannes; Gerhardy, Stefan; Leitner, Alexander; Leibundgut, Marc; Salem, Michèle; Boehringer, Daniel; Leulliot, Nicolas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Panse, Vikram Govind; Ban, Nenad

    2016-01-14

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis depends on several hundred assembly factors to produce functional 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. The final phase of 60S subunit biogenesis is cytoplasmic maturation, which includes the proofreading of functional centers of the 60S subunit and the release of several ribosome biogenesis factors. We report the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the yeast 60S subunit in complex with the biogenesis factors Rei1, Arx1, and Alb1 at 3.4 Å resolution. In addition to the network of interactions formed by Alb1, the structure reveals a mechanism for ensuring the integrity of the ribosomal polypeptide exit tunnel. Arx1 probes the entire set of inner-ring proteins surrounding the tunnel exit, and the C terminus of Rei1 is deeply inserted into the ribosomal tunnel, where it forms specific contacts along almost its entire length. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that failure to insert the C terminus of Rei1 precludes subsequent steps of 60S maturation. PMID:26709046

  7. Biogenesis of the cytochrome bc(1) complex and role of assembly factors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pamela M; Fox, Jennifer L; Winge, Dennis R

    2012-02-01

    The cytochrome bc(1) complex is an essential component of the electron transport chain in most prokaryotes and in eukaryotic mitochondria. The catalytic subunits of the complex that are responsible for its redox functions are largely conserved across kingdoms. In eukarya, the bc(1) complex contains supernumerary subunits in addition to the catalytic core, and the biogenesis of the functional bc(1) complex occurs as a modular assembly pathway. Individual steps of this biogenesis have been recently investigated and are discussed in this review with an emphasis on the assembly of the bc(1) complex in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, a number of assembly factors have been recently identified. Their roles in bc(1) complex biogenesis are described, with special emphasis on the maturation and topogenesis of the yeast Rieske iron-sulfur protein and its role in completing the assembly of functional bc(1) complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes. PMID:22138626

  8. Reprint of: Biogenesis of the cytochrome bc(1) complex and role of assembly factors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pamela M; Fox, Jennifer L; Winge, Dennis R

    2012-06-01

    The cytochrome bc(1) complex is an essential component of the electron transport chain in most prokaryotes and in eukaryotic mitochondria. The catalytic subunits of the complex that are responsible for its redox functions are largely conserved across kingdoms. In eukarya, the bc(1) complex contains supernumerary subunits in addition to the catalytic core, and the biogenesis of the functional bc(1) complex occurs as a modular assembly pathway. Individual steps of this biogenesis have been recently investigated and are discussed in this review with an emphasis on the assembly of the bc(1) complex in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, a number of assembly factors have been recently identified. Their roles in bc(1) complex biogenesis are described, with special emphasis on the maturation and topogenesis of the yeast Rieske iron-sulfur protein and its role in completing the assembly of functional bc(1) complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes. PMID:22564912

  9. Biogenesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pheromone a-Factor, from Yeast Mating to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barrowman, Jemima

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The mating pheromone a-factor secreted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a farnesylated and carboxylmethylated peptide and is unusually hydrophobic compared to other extracellular signaling molecules. Mature a-factor is derived from a precursor with a C-terminal CAAX motif that directs a series of posttranslational reactions, including prenylation, endoproteolysis, and carboxylmethylation. Historically, a-factor has served as a valuable model for the discovery and functional analysis of CAAX-processing enzymes. In this review, we discuss the three modules comprising the a-factor biogenesis pathway: (i) the C-terminal CAAX-processing steps carried out by Ram1/Ram2, Ste24 or Rce1, and Ste14; (ii) two sequential N-terminal cleavage steps, mediated by Ste24 and Axl1; and (iii) export by a nonclassical mechanism, mediated by the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Ste6. The small size and hydrophobicity of a-factor present both challenges and advantages for biochemical analysis, as discussed here. The enzymes involved in a-factor biogenesis are conserved from yeasts to mammals. Notably, studies of the zinc metalloprotease Ste24 in S. cerevisiae led to the discovery of its mammalian homolog ZMPSTE24, which cleaves the prenylated C-terminal tail of the nuclear scaffold protein lamin A. Mutations that alter ZMPSTE24 processing of lamin A in humans cause the premature-aging disease progeria and related progeroid disorders. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that the entire a-factor pathway, including all three biogenesis modules, may be used to produce a prenylated, secreted signaling molecule involved in germ cell migration in Drosophila. Thus, additional prenylated signaling molecules resembling a-factor, with as-yet-unknown roles in metazoan biology, may await discovery. PMID:22933563

  10. Physical Isolation of Endospores from Environmental Samples by Targeted Lysis of Vegetative Cells.

    PubMed

    Wunderlin, Tina; Junier, Thomas; Paul, Christophe; Jeanneret, Nicole; Junier, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Endospore formation is a survival strategy found among some bacteria from the phylum Firmicutes. During endospore formation, these bacteria enter a morpho-physiological resting state that enhances survival under adverse environmental conditions. Even though endospore-forming Firmicutes are one of the most frequently enriched and isolated bacterial groups in culturing studies, they are often absent from diversity studies based on molecular methods. The resistance of the spore core is considered one of the factors limiting the recovery of DNA from endospores. We developed a method that takes advantage of the higher resistance of endospores to separate them from other cells in a complex microbial community using physical, enzymatic and chemical lysis methods. The endospore-only preparation thus obtained can be used for re-culturing or to perform downstream analysis such as tailored DNA extraction optimized for endospores and subsequent DNA sequencing. This method, applied to sediment samples, has allowed the enrichment of endospores and after sequencing, has revealed a large diversity of endospore-formers in freshwater lake sediments. We expect that the application of this method to other samples will yield a similar outcome. PMID:26863128

  11. BIOGENESIS FACTOR REQUIRED FOR ATP SYNTHASE 3 Facilitates Assembly of the Chloroplast ATP Synthase Complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Duan, Zhikun; Zhang, Jiao; Peng, Lianwei

    2016-06-01

    Thylakoid membrane-localized chloroplast ATP synthases use the proton motive force generated by photosynthetic electron transport to produce ATP from ADP. Although it is well known that the chloroplast ATP synthase is composed of more than 20 proteins with α3β3γ1ε1δ1I1II1III14IV1 stoichiometry, its biogenesis process is currently unclear. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of chloroplast ATP synthase, we performed extensive screening for isolating ATP synthase mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In the recently identified bfa3 (biogenesis factors required for ATP synthase 3) mutant, the levels of chloroplast ATP synthase subunits were reduced to approximately 25% of wild-type levels. In vivo labeling analysis showed that assembly of the CF1 component of chloroplast ATP synthase was less efficient in bfa3 than in the wild type, indicating that BFA3 is required for CF1 assembly. BFA3 encodes a chloroplast stromal protein that is conserved in higher plants, green algae, and a few species of other eukaryotic algae, and specifically interacts with the CF1β subunit. The BFA3 binding site was mapped to a region in the catalytic site of CF1β. Several residues highly conserved in eukaryotic CF1β are crucial for the BFA3-CF1β interaction, suggesting a coevolutionary relationship between BFA3 and CF1β. BFA3 appears to function as a molecular chaperone that transiently associates with unassembled CF1β at its catalytic site and facilitates subsequent association with CF1α during assembly of the CF1 subcomplex of chloroplast ATP synthase. PMID:27208269

  12. Identification and Expression Analysis of Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Co-orthologs in Solanum lycopersicum

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Stefan; Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Paul, Puneet; Keller, Mario; Einloft, Jens; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis involves a large inventory of proteinaceous and RNA cofactors. More than 250 ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) have been described in yeast. These factors are involved in multiple aspects like rRNA processing, folding, and modification as well as in ribosomal protein (RP) assembly. Considering the importance of RBFs for particular developmental processes, we examined the complexity of RBF and RP (co-)orthologs by bioinformatic assignment in 14 different plant species and expression profiling in the model crop Solanum lycopersicum. Assigning (co-)orthologs to each RBF revealed that at least 25% of all predicted RBFs are encoded by more than one gene. At first we realized that the occurrence of multiple RBF co-orthologs is not globally correlated to the existence of multiple RP co-orthologs. The transcript abundance of genes coding for predicted RBFs and RPs in leaves and anthers of S. lycopersicum was determined by next generation sequencing (NGS). In combination with existing expression profiles, we can conclude that co-orthologs of RBFs by large account for a preferential function in different tissue or at distinct developmental stages. This notion is supported by the differential expression of selected RBFs during male gametophyte development. In addition, co-regulated clusters of RBF and RP coding genes have been observed. The relevance of these results is discussed. PMID:25698879

  13. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ribosome biogenesis and protein translation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Jin, Zhaoqing; Yang, Xiaohan; Li, Jian-Feng; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) as one of the molecular links between abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and its regulation on protein translation. Moreover, we identified Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6) as an interacting partner of RACK1. Because the interaction between RACK1 and eIF6 in mammalian cells is known to regulate the ribosome assembly step of protein translation initiation, it was hypothesized that the same process of protein translation in Arabidopsis is also regulated by RACK1 and eIF6. In this article, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of eIF6 in different species from different lineages and discovered some intriguing differences in protein phosphorylation sites that may contribute to its action in ribosome assembly and biogenesis. In addition, we discovered that, distinct from non-plant organisms in which eIF6 is encoded by a single gene, all sequenced plant genomes contain two or more copies of eIF6 genes. While one copy of plant eIF6 is expressed ubiquitously and might possess the conserved function in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation, the other copy seems to be only expressed in specific organs and therefore may have gained some new functions. We proposed some important studies that may help us better understand the function of eIF6 in plants.

  14. The MITF family of transcription factors: Role in endolysosomal biogenesis, Wnt signaling, and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ploper, Diego; De Robertis, Edward M

    2015-09-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling influences cellular fate and proliferation through inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK3) and the subsequent stabilization of its many substrates, most notably β-Catenin, a transcriptional co-activator. MITF, a melanoma oncogene member of the microphthalmia family of transcription factors (MiT), was recently found to contain novel GSK3 phosphorylation sites and to be stabilized by Wnt. Other MiT members, TFEB and TFE3, are known to play important roles in cellular clearance pathways by transcriptionally regulating the biogenesis of lysosomes and autophagosomes via activation of CLEAR elements in gene promoters of target genes. Recent studies suggest that MITF can also upregulate many lysosomal genes. MiT family members are dysregulated in cancer and are considered oncogenes, but the underlying oncogenic mechanisms remain unclear. Here we review the role of MiT members, including MITF, in lysosomal biogenesis, and how cancers overexpressing MITF, TFEB or TFE3 could rewire the lysosomal pathway, inhibit cellular senescence, and activate Wnt signaling by increasing sequestration of negative regulators of Wnt signaling in multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Microarray studies suggest that MITF expression inhibits macroautophagy. In melanoma the MITF-driven increase in MVBs generates a positive feedback loop between MITF, Wnt, and MVBs. PMID:26003288

  15. Diversity of the piRNA pathway for nonself silencing: worm-specific piRNA biogenesis factors

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Natsuko; Tomari, Yukihide

    2014-01-01

    The PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway protects animal germline cells from transposable elements and other genomic invaders. Although the genome defense function of piRNAs has been well established, the mechanisms of their biogenesis remain poorly understood. In this issue of Genes & Development, three groups identify novel factors required for piRNA biogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans. These works greatly expand our understanding of the piRNA pathway in worms, highlighting both its shared and its unique properties. PMID:24696451

  16. Pre-40S ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr1 is an inactive structural mimic of translational GTPases

    PubMed Central

    McCaughan, Urszula M.; Jayachandran, Uma; Shchepachev, Vadim; Chen, Zhuo Angel; Rappsilber, Juri; Tollervey, David; Cook, Atlanta G.

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast Tsr1 is a ribosome biogenesis factor with sequence similarity to GTPases, which is essential for cytoplasmic steps in 40S subunit maturation. Here we present the crystal structure of Tsr1 at 3.6 Å. Tsr1 has a similar domain architecture to translational GTPases such as EF-Tu and the selenocysteine incorporation factor SelB. However, active site residues required for GTP binding and hydrolysis are absent, explaining the lack of enzymatic activity in previous analyses. Modelling of Tsr1 into cryo-electron microscopy maps of pre-40S particles shows that a highly acidic surface of Tsr1 is presented on the outside of pre-40S particles, potentially preventing premature binding to 60S subunits. Late pre-40S maturation also requires the GTPase eIF5B and the ATPase Rio1. The location of Tsr1 is predicted to block binding by both factors, strongly indicating that removal of Tsr1 is an essential step during cytoplasmic maturation of 40S ribosomal subunits. PMID:27250689

  17. Pre-40S ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr1 is an inactive structural mimic of translational GTPases.

    PubMed

    McCaughan, Urszula M; Jayachandran, Uma; Shchepachev, Vadim; Chen, Zhuo Angel; Rappsilber, Juri; Tollervey, David; Cook, Atlanta G

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast Tsr1 is a ribosome biogenesis factor with sequence similarity to GTPases, which is essential for cytoplasmic steps in 40S subunit maturation. Here we present the crystal structure of Tsr1 at 3.6 Å. Tsr1 has a similar domain architecture to translational GTPases such as EF-Tu and the selenocysteine incorporation factor SelB. However, active site residues required for GTP binding and hydrolysis are absent, explaining the lack of enzymatic activity in previous analyses. Modelling of Tsr1 into cryo-electron microscopy maps of pre-40S particles shows that a highly acidic surface of Tsr1 is presented on the outside of pre-40S particles, potentially preventing premature binding to 60S subunits. Late pre-40S maturation also requires the GTPase eIF5B and the ATPase Rio1. The location of Tsr1 is predicted to block binding by both factors, strongly indicating that removal of Tsr1 is an essential step during cytoplasmic maturation of 40S ribosomal subunits. PMID:27250689

  18. Participation of Candida albicans Transcription Factor RLM1 in Cell Wall Biogenesis and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Silva, Yolanda; Vaz, Catarina; Carvalho-Pereira, Joana; Carneiro, Catarina; Nogueira, Eugénia; Correia, Alexandra; Carreto, Laura; Silva, Sónia; Faustino, Augusto; Pais, Célia; Oliveira, Rui; Sampaio, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans cell wall is important for growth and interaction with the environment. RLM1 is one of the putative transcription factors involved in the cell wall integrity pathway, which plays an important role in the maintenance of the cell wall integrity. In this work we investigated the involvement of RLM1 in the cell wall biogenesis and in virulence. Newly constructed C. albicans Δ/Δrlm1 mutants showed typical cell wall weakening phenotypes, such as hypersensitivity to Congo Red, Calcofluor White, and caspofungin (phenotype reverted in the presence of sorbitol), confirming the involvement of RLM1 in the cell wall integrity. Additionally, the cell wall of C. albicans Δ/Δrlm1 showed a significant increase in chitin (213%) and reduction in mannans (60%), in comparison with the wild-type, results that are consistent with cell wall remodelling. Microarray analysis in the absence of any stress showed that deletion of RLM1 in C. albicans significantly down-regulated genes involved in carbohydrate catabolism such as DAK2, GLK4, NHT1 and TPS1, up-regulated genes involved in the utilization of alternative carbon sources, like AGP2, SOU1, SAP6, CIT1 or GAL4, and genes involved in cell adhesion like ECE1, ALS1, ALS3, HWP1 or RBT1. In agreement with the microarray results adhesion assays showed an increased amount of adhering cells and total biomass in the mutant strain, in comparison with the wild-type. C. albicans mutant Δ/Δrlm1 strain was also found to be less virulent than the wild-type and complemented strains in the murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Overall, we showed that in the absence of RLM1 the modifications in the cell wall composition alter yeast interaction with the environment, with consequences in adhesion ability and virulence. The gene expression findings suggest that this gene participates in the cell wall biogenesis, with the mutant rearranging its metabolic pathways to allow the use of alternative carbon sources. PMID:24466000

  19. Giant peroxisomes in a moss (Physcomitrella patens) peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11 mutant.

    PubMed

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Mitsuya, Shiro; El-Shami, Mahmoud; Knight, Celia D; Cuming, Andrew C; Baker, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11 (PEX11) proteins are found in yeasts, mammals and plants, and play a role in peroxisome morphology and regulation of peroxisome division. The moss Physcomitrella patens has six PEX11 isoforms which fall into two subfamilies, similar to those found in monocots and dicots. We carried out targeted gene disruption of the Phypa_PEX11-1 gene and compared the morphological and cellular phenotypes of the wild-type and mutant strains. The mutant grew more slowly and the development of gametophores was retarded. Mutant chloronemal filaments contained large cellular structures which excluded all other cellular organelles. Expression of fluorescent reporter proteins revealed that the mutant strain had greatly enlarged peroxisomes up to 10 μm in diameter. Expression of a vacuolar membrane marker confirmed that the enlarged structures were not vacuoles, or peroxisomes sequestered within vacuoles as a result of pexophagy. Phypa_PEX11 targeted to peroxisome membranes could rescue the knock out phenotype and interacted with Fission1 on the peroxisome membrane. Moss PEX11 functions in peroxisome division similar to PEX11 in other organisms but the mutant phenotype is more extreme and environmentally determined, making P. patens a powerful system in which to address mechanisms of peroxisome proliferation and division. PMID:26542980

  20. Small G proteins in peroxisome biogenesis: the potential involvement of ADP-ribosylation factor 6

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Peroxisomes execute diverse and vital functions in virtually every eukaryote. New peroxisomes form by budding from pre-existing organelles or de novo by vesiculation of the ER. It has been suggested that ADP-ribosylation factors and COPI coatomer complexes are involved in these processes. Results Here we show that all viable Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in one of the small GTPases which have an important role in the regulation of vesicular transport contain functional peroxisomes, and that the number of these organelles in oleate-grown cells is significantly upregulated in the arf1 and arf3 null strains compared to the wild-type strain. In addition, we provide evidence that a portion of endogenous Arf6, the mammalian orthologue of yeast Arf3, is associated with the cytoplasmic face of rat liver peroxisomes. Despite this, ablation of Arf6 did neither influence the regulation of peroxisome abundance nor affect the localization of peroxisomal proteins in cultured fetal hepatocytes. However, co-overexpression of wild-type, GTP hydrolysis-defective or (dominant-negative) GTP binding-defective forms of Arf1 and Arf6 caused mislocalization of newly-synthesized peroxisomal proteins and resulted in an alteration of peroxisome morphology. Conclusion These observations suggest that Arf6 is a key player in mammalian peroxisome biogenesis. In addition, they also lend strong support to and extend the concept that specific Arf isoform pairs may act in tandem to regulate exclusive trafficking pathways. PMID:19686593

  1. Essential ribosome assembly factor Fap7 regulates a hierarchy of RNA-protein interactions during small ribosomal subunit biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Ute A; Weis, Benjamin L; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kaiser, Marco; Christ, Nina A; Hantke, Katharina; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico; Wöhnert, Jens

    2013-09-17

    Factor activating Pos9 (Fap7) is an essential ribosome biogenesis factor important for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit with an uncommon dual ATPase and adenylate kinase activity. Depletion of Fap7 or mutations in its ATPase motifs lead to defects in small ribosomal subunit rRNA maturation, the absence of ribosomal protein Rps14 from the assembled subunit, and retention of the nascent small subunit in a quality control complex with the large ribosomal subunit. The molecular basis for the role of Fap7 in ribosome biogenesis is, however, not yet understood. Here we show that Fap7 regulates multiple interactions between the precursor rRNA, ribosomal proteins, and ribosome assembly factors in a hierarchical manner. Fap7 binds to Rps14 with a very high affinity. Fap7 binding blocks both rRNA-binding elements of Rps14, suggesting that Fap7 inhibits premature interactions of Rps14 with RNA. The Fap7/Rps14 interaction is modulated by nucleotide binding to Fap7. Rps14 strongly activates the ATPase activity but not the adenylate kinase activity of Fap7, identifying Rps14 as an example of a ribosomal protein functioning as an ATPase-activating factor. In addition, Fap7 inhibits the RNA cleavage activity of Nob1, the endonuclease responsible for the final maturation step of the small subunit rRNA, in a nucleotide independent manner. Thus, Fap7 may regulate small subunit biogenesis at multiple stages. PMID:24003121

  2. DNA damage triggers SAF-A and RNA biogenesis factors exclusion from chromatin coupled to R-loops removal.

    PubMed

    Britton, Sébastien; Dernoncourt, Emma; Delteil, Christine; Froment, Carine; Schiltz, Odile; Salles, Bernard; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    We previously identified the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein SAF-A/hnRNP U as a substrate for DNA-PK, a protein kinase involved in DNA damage response (DDR). Using laser micro-irradiation in human cells, we report here that SAF-A exhibits a two-phase dynamics at sites of DNA damage, with a rapid and transient recruitment followed by a prolonged exclusion. SAF-A recruitment corresponds to its binding to Poly(ADP-ribose) while its exclusion is dependent on the activity of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK and reflects the dissociation from chromatin of SAF-A associated with ongoing transcription. Having established that SAF-A RNA-binding domain recapitulates SAF-A dynamics, we show that this domain is part of a complex comprising several mRNA biogenesis proteins of which at least two, FUS/TLS and TAFII68/TAF15, exhibit similar biphasic dynamics at sites of damage. Using an original reporter for live imaging of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops), we show a transient transcription-dependent accumulation of R-loops at sites of DNA damage that is prolonged upon inhibition of RNA biogenesis factors exclusion. We propose that a new component of the DDR is an active anti-R-loop mechanism operating at damaged transcribed sites which includes the exclusion of mRNA biogenesis factors such as SAF-A, FUS and TAF15. PMID:25030905

  3. DNA damage triggers SAF-A and RNA biogenesis factors exclusion from chromatin coupled to R-loops removal

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Sébastien; Dernoncourt, Emma; Delteil, Christine; Froment, Carine; Schiltz, Odile; Salles, Bernard; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein SAF-A/hnRNP U as a substrate for DNA-PK, a protein kinase involved in DNA damage response (DDR). Using laser micro-irradiation in human cells, we report here that SAF-A exhibits a two-phase dynamics at sites of DNA damage, with a rapid and transient recruitment followed by a prolonged exclusion. SAF-A recruitment corresponds to its binding to Poly(ADP-ribose) while its exclusion is dependent on the activity of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK and reflects the dissociation from chromatin of SAF-A associated with ongoing transcription. Having established that SAF-A RNA-binding domain recapitulates SAF-A dynamics, we show that this domain is part of a complex comprising several mRNA biogenesis proteins of which at least two, FUS/TLS and TAFII68/TAF15, exhibit similar biphasic dynamics at sites of damage. Using an original reporter for live imaging of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops), we show a transient transcription-dependent accumulation of R-loops at sites of DNA damage that is prolonged upon inhibition of RNA biogenesis factors exclusion. We propose that a new component of the DDR is an active anti-R-loop mechanism operating at damaged transcribed sites which includes the exclusion of mRNA biogenesis factors such as SAF-A, FUS and TAF15. PMID:25030905

  4. The Nutrient-Responsive Transcription Factor TFE3, Promotes Autophagy, Lysosomal Biogenesis, and Clearance of Cellular Debris

    PubMed Central

    Martina, José A.; Diab, Heba I.; Lishu, Li; Jeong-A, Lim; Patange, Simona; Raben, Nina; Puertollano, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a gene network regulating lysosomal biogenesis and its transcriptional regulator TFEB revealed that cells monitor lysosomal function and respond to degradation requirements and environmental cues. Here, we report the identification of transcription factor E3 (TFE3) as another regulator of lysosomal homeostasis that induced expression of genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis in ARPE-19 cells in response to starvation and lysosomal stress. We found that in nutrient-replete cells, TFE3 was recruited to lysosomes through interaction with active Rag GTPases and exhibited mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation. Phosphorylated TFE3 was retained in the cytosol through its interaction with the cytosolic chaperone 14-3-3. Following starvation, TFE3 rapidly translocated to the nucleus and bound to the CLEAR elements present in the promoter region of many lysosomal genes, thereby inducing lysosomal biogenesis. Depletion of endogenous TFE3 entirely abolished the response of ARPE-19 cells to starvation, suggesting that TFE3 plays a critical role in nutrient sensing and regulation of energy metabolism. Furthermore, overexpression of TFE3 triggered lysosomal exocytosis and resulted in efficient cellular clearance in a cellular model of a lysosomal storage disorder, Pompe disease, thus identifying TFE3 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of lysosomal disorders. PMID:24448649

  5. mRNA biogenesis-related helicase eIF4AIII from Arabidopsis thaliana is an important factor for abiotic stress adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pascuan, Cecilia; Frare, Romina; Alleva, Karina; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel; Soto, Gabriela

    2016-05-01

    Similar to other plant species, Arabidopsis has a huge repertoire of predicted helicases, including the eIF4AIII factor, a putative component of the exon junction complex related to mRNA biogenesis. In this article, we integrated evolutionary and functional approaches to have a better understanding of eIF4AIII function in plants. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the mRNA biogenesis-related helicase eIF4AIII is the ortholog of the stress-related helicases PDH45 from Pisum sativum and MH1 from Medicago sativa, suggesting evolutionary and probably functional equivalences between mRNA biogenesis and stress-related plant helicases. Molecular and genetic analyses confirmed the relevance of eIF4AIII during abiotic stress adaptation in Arabidopsis. Therefore, in addition to its function in mRNA biogenesis, eIF4AIII can play a role in abiotic stress adaptation. PMID:26883227

  6. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies factors required for distinct stages of C. elegans piRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Wee-Siong Sho; Seah, Jun Wen Eugene; Harrison, Emily J.; Chen, Caifu; Hammell, Christopher M.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    In animals, piRNAs and their associated Piwi proteins guard germ cell genomes against mobile genetic elements via an RNAi-like mechanism. In Caenorhabditis elegans, 21U-RNAs comprise the piRNA class, and these collaborate with 22G RNAs via unclear mechanisms to discriminate self from nonself and selectively and heritably silence the latter. Recent work indicates that 21U-RNAs are post-transcriptional processing products of individual transcription units that produce ∼26-nucleotide capped precursors. However, nothing is known of how the expression of precursors is controlled or how primary transcripts give rise to mature small RNAs. We conducted a genome-wide RNAi screen to identify components of the 21U biogenesis machinery. Screening by direct, quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based measurements of mature 21U-RNA levels, we identified 22 genes important for 21U-RNA production, termed TOFUs (Twenty-One-u Fouled Ups). We also identified seven genes that normally repress 21U production. By measuring mature 21U-RNA and precursor levels for the seven strongest hits from the screen, we assigned factors to discrete stages of 21U-RNA production. Our work identifies for the first time factors separately required for the transcription of 21U precursors and the processing of these precursors into mature 21U-RNAs, thereby providing a resource for studying the biogenesis of this important small RNA class. PMID:24696458

  7. Decreased levels of proapoptotic factors and increased key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis constitute new potential beneficial features of long-lived growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    PubMed

    Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej

    2013-06-01

    Decreased somatotrophic signaling is among the most important mechanisms associated with extended longevity. Mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the growth hormone (GH) receptor gene (GH receptor knockout; GHRKO) are obese and dwarf, are characterized by a reduced weight and body size, undetectable levels of GH receptor, high concentration of serum GH, and greatly reduced plasma levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I, and are remarkably long lived. Recent results suggest new features of GHRKO mice that may positively affect longevity-decreased levels of proapoptotic factors and increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. The alterations in levels of the proapoptotic factors and key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis were not further improved by two other potential life-extending interventions-calorie restriction and visceral fat removal. This may attribute the primary role to GH resistance in the regulation of apoptosis and mitochondrial biogenesis in GHRKO mice in terms of increased life span. PMID:23197187

  8. Pressure Inactivation of Bacillus Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Margosch, Dirk; Gänzle, Michael G.; Ehrmann, Matthias A.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2004-01-01

    The inactivation of bacterial endospores by hydrostatic pressure requires the combined application of heat and pressure. We have determined the resistance of spores of 14 food isolates and 5 laboratory strains of Bacillus subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens, and B. licheniformis to treatments with pressure and temperature (200 to 800 MPa and 60 to 80°C) in mashed carrots. A large variation in the pressure resistance of spores was observed, and their reduction by treatments with 800 MPa and 70°C for 4 min ranged from more than 6 log units to no reduction. The sporulation conditions further influenced their pressure resistance. The loss of dipicolinic acid (DPA) from spores that varied in their pressure resistance was determined, and spore sublethal injury was assessed by determination of the detection times for individual spores. Treatment of spores with pressure and temperature resulted in DPA-free, phase-bright spores. These spores were sensitive to moderate heat and exhibited strongly increased detection times as judged by the time required for single spores to grow to visible turbidity of the growth medium. The role of DPA in heat and pressure resistance was further substantiated by the use of the DPA-deficient mutant strain B. subtilis CIP 76.26. Taken together, these results indicate that inactivation of spores by combined pressure and temperature processing is achieved by a two-stage mechanism that does not involve germination. At a pressure between 600 and 800 MPa and a temperature greater than 60°C, DPA is released predominantly by a physicochemical rather than a physiological process, and the DPA-free spores are inactivated by moderate heat independent of the pressure level. Relevant target organisms for pressure and temperature treatment of foods are proposed, namely, strains of B. amyloliquefaciens, which form highly pressure-resistant spores. PMID:15574932

  9. Arabidopsis cotyledon-specific chloroplast biogenesis factor CYO1 is a protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Mariko; Ogura, Kan; Froehlich, John E; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Shirano, Yumiko; Shibata, Daisuke; Masuda, Shinji; Mori, Kazuki; Takamiya, Ken-Ichiro

    2007-10-01

    Chloroplast development in cotyledons differs in a number of ways from that in true leaves, but the cotyledon-specific program of chloroplast biogenesis has not been clarified. The cyo1 mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana has albino cotyledons but normal green true leaves. Chloroplasts develop abnormally in cyo1 mutant plants grown in the light, but etioplasts are normal in mutants grown in the dark. We isolated CYO1 by T-DNA tagging and verified that the mutant allele was responsible for the albino cotyledon phenotype by complementation. CYO1 has a C(4)-type zinc finger domain similar to that of Escherichia coli DnaJ. CYO1 is expressed mainly in young plants under light conditions, and the CYO1 protein localizes to the thylakoid membrane in chloroplasts. Transcription of nuclear photosynthetic genes is generally unaffected by the cyo1 mutation, but the level of photosynthetic proteins is decreased in cyo1 mutants. Recombinant CYO1 accelerates disulfide bond reduction in the model substrate insulin and renatures RNase A, indicating that CYO1 has protein disulfide isomerase activity. These results suggest that CYO1 has a chaperone-like activity required for thylakoid biogenesis in cotyledons. PMID:17921316

  10. Structure of BamA, an essential factor in outer membrane protein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Faulstich, Michaela; Bermejo, Ivan; Rudel, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Zeth, Kornelius

    2014-06-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is an essential process for maintaining the bacterial cell envelope and involves the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) for OMP recognition, folding and assembly. In Escherichia coli this function is orchestrated by five proteins: the integral outer membrane protein BamA of the Omp85 superfamily and four associated lipoproteins. To unravel the mechanism underlying OMP folding and insertion, the structure of the E. coli BamA β-barrel and P5 domain was determined at 3 Å resolution. These data add information beyond that provided in the recently published crystal structures of BamA from Haemophilus ducreyi and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and are a valuable basis for the interpretation of pertinent functional studies. In an `open' conformation, E. coli BamA displays a significant degree of flexibility between P5 and the barrel domain, which is indicative of a multi-state function in substrate transfer. E. coli BamA is characterized by a discontinuous β-barrel with impaired β1-β16 strand interactions denoted by only two connecting hydrogen bonds and a disordered C-terminus. The 16-stranded barrel surrounds a large cavity which implies a function in OMP substrate binding and partial folding. These findings strongly support a mechanism of OMP biogenesis in which substrates are partially folded inside the barrel cavity and are subsequently released laterally into the lipid bilayer. PMID:24914988

  11. Cockayne syndrome protein A is a transcription factor of RNA polymerase I and stimulates ribosomal biogenesis and growth

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sylvia; Garcia Gonzalez, Omar; Assfalg, Robin; Schelling, Adrian; Schäfer, Patrick; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Iben, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) protein account for 20% of Cockayne syndrome (CS) cases, a childhood disorder of premature aging and early death. Hitherto, CSA has exclusively been described as DNA repair factor of the transcription-coupled branch of nucleotide excision repair. Here we show a novel function of CSA as transcription factor of RNA polymerase I in the nucleolus. Knockdown of CSA reduces pre-rRNA synthesis by RNA polymerase I. CSA associates with RNA polymerase I and the active fraction of the rDNA and stimulates re-initiation of rDNA transcription by recruiting the Cockayne syndrome proteins TFIIH and CSB. Moreover, compared with CSA deficient parental CS cells, CSA transfected CS cells reveal significantly more rRNA with induced growth and enhanced global translation. A previously unknown global dysregulation of ribosomal biogenesis most likely contributes to the reduced growth and premature aging of CS patients. PMID:24781187

  12. Pasteuria endospore attachment to Pratylenchus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pasteuria spp. are endospore-forming bacteria, and most of them are obligate parasites of nematodes. A number of studies have demonstrated that Pasteuria can effectively suppress nematode populations in natural fields and have promising potential as biocontrol agents. However, parasitism of nematode...

  13. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1

    PubMed Central

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem–loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3′ splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing. PMID:26546116

  14. Analyzing the Role of Periplasmic Folding Factors in the Biogenesis of OMPs and Members of the Type V Secretion System.

    PubMed

    Bodelón, Gustavo; Marín, Elvira; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is highly packed with OM proteins (OMPs) and the trafficking and assembly of OMPs in gram-negative bacteria is a subject of intense research. Structurally, OMPs vary in the number of β-strands and in the size and complexity of extra-membrane domains, with extreme examples being the members of the type V protein secretion system (T5SS), such as the autotransporter (AT) and intimin/invasin families of secreted proteins, in which a large extracellular "passenger" domain is linked to a β-barrel that inserts in the OM. Despite their structural and functional diversity, OMPs interact in the periplasm with a relatively small set of protein chaperones that facilitate their transport from the inner membrane (IM) to the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM complex), preventing aggregation and assisting their folding in various aspects including disulfide bond formation. This chapter is focused on the periplasmic folding factors involved in the biogenesis of integral OMPs and members of T5SS in E. coli, which are used as a model system in this field. Background information on these periplasmic folding factors is provided along with genetic methods to generate conditional mutants that deplete these factors from E. coli and biochemical methods to analyze the folding, surface display, disulfide formation and oligomerization state of OMPs/T5SS in these mutants. PMID:26427678

  15. A supracellular system of actin-lined canals controls biogenesis and release of virulence factors in parasitoid venom glands.

    PubMed

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Morales, Jorge; Fimiarz, Daniel; Webb, Bruce A; Govind, Shubha

    2009-07-01

    Parasitoid wasps produce virulence factors that bear significant resemblance to viruses and have the ability to block host defense responses. The function of these virulence factors, produced predominantly in wasp venom glands, and the ways in which they interfere with host development and physiology remain mysterious. Here, we report the discovery of a specialized system of canals in venom glands of five parasitoid wasps that differ in their infection strategies. This supracellular canal system is made up of individual secretory units, one per secretory cell. Individual units merge into the canal lumen. The membrane surface of the proximal end of each canal within the secretory cell assumes brush border morphology, lined with bundles of F-actin. Systemic administration of cytochalasin D compromises the integrity of the secretory unit. We show a dynamic and continuous association of p40, a protein of virus-like particles from a Drosophila parasitoid, L. heterotoma, with the canal and venom gland lumen. Similar structures in three Leptopilina species and Ganaspis xanthopoda, parasitoids of Drosophila spp., and Campoletis sonorenesis, a parasitoid of Heliothis virescens, suggest that this novel supracellular canal system is likely to be a common trait of parasitoid venom glands that is essential for efficient biogenesis and delivery of virulence factors. PMID:19561216

  16. A supracellular system of actin-lined canals controls biogenesis and release of virulence factors in parasitoid venom glands

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Morales, Jorge; Fimiarz, Daniel; Webb, Bruce A.; Govind, Shubha

    2009-01-01

    Summary Parasitoid wasps produce virulence factors that bear significant resemblance to viruses and have the ability to block host defense responses. The function of these virulence factors, produced predominantly in wasp venom glands, and the ways in which they interfere with host development and physiology remain mysterious. Here, we report the discovery of a specialized system of canals in venom glands of five parasitoid wasps that differ in their infection strategies. This supracellular canal system is made up of individual secretory units, one per secretory cell. Individual units merge into the canal lumen. The membrane surface of the proximal end of each canal within the secretory cell assumes brush border morphology, lined with bundles of F-actin. Systemic administration of cytochalasin D compromises the integrity of the secretory unit. We show a dynamic and continuous association of p40, a protein of virus-like particles from a Drosophila parasitoid, L. heterotoma, with the canal and venom gland lumen. Similar structures in three Leptopilina species and Ganaspis xanthopoda, parasitoids of Drosophila spp., and Campoletis sonorenesis, a parasitoid of Heliothis virescens, suggest that this novel supracellular canal system is likely to be a common trait of parasitoid venom glands that is essential for efficient biogenesis and delivery of virulence factors. PMID:19561216

  17. STA1, an Arabidopsis pre-mRNA processing factor 6 homolog, is a new player involved in miRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ben Chaabane, Samir; Liu, Renyi; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Kwon, Yerim; Park, Joo-hyuk; Kim, Seo Yeon; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Yang, Seong Wook; Lee, Byeong-ha

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs that have important regulatory roles in numerous developmental and metabolic processes in most eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, DICER-LIKE1 (DCL1), HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1, SERRATE, HUA ENHANCER1 and HASTY are involved in processing of primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) to yield precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) and eventually miRNAs. In addition to these components, mRNA cap-binding proteins, CBP80/ABA HYPERSENSITIVE1 and CBP20, also participate in miRNA biogenesis. Here, we show that STABILIZED1 (STA1), an Arabidopsis pre-mRNA processing factor 6 homolog, is also involved in the biogenesis of miRNAs. Similar to other miRNA biogenesis-defective mutants, sta1-1 accumulated significantly lower levels of mature miRNAs and concurrently higher levels of pri-miRNAs than wild type. The dramatic reductions of mature miRNAs were associated with the accumulation of their target gene transcripts and developmental defects. Furthermore, sta1-1 impaired splicing of intron containing pri-miRNAs and decreased transcript levels of DCL1. These results suggest that STA1 is involved in miRNA biogenesis directly by functioning in pri-miRNA splicing and indirectly by modulating the DCL1 transcript level. PMID:23268445

  18. Loss-of-function mutations in the RNA biogenesis factor NAF1 predispose to pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Susan E; Gable, Dustin L; Wagner, Christa L; Carlile, Thomas M; Hanumanthu, Vidya Sagar; Podlevsky, Joshua D; Khalil, Sara E; DeZern, Amy E; Rojas-Duran, Maria F; Applegate, Carolyn D; Alder, Jonathan K; Parry, Erin M; Gilbert, Wendy V; Armanios, Mary

    2016-08-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis have been hypothesized to represent premature aging phenotypes. At times, they cluster in families, but the genetic basis is not understood. We identified rare, frameshift mutations in the gene for nuclear assembly factor 1, NAF1, a box H/ACA RNA biogenesis factor, in pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema patients. The mutations segregated with short telomere length, low telomerase RNA levels, and extrapulmonary manifestations including myelodysplastic syndrome and liver disease. A truncated NAF1 was detected in cells derived from patients, and, in cells in which the frameshift mutation was introduced by genome editing, telomerase RNA levels were reduced. The mutant NAF1 lacked a conserved carboxyl-terminal motif, which we show is required for nuclear localization. To understand the disease mechanism, we used CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease) to generate Naf1(+/-) mice and found that they had half the levels of telomerase RNA. Other box H/ACA RNA levels were also decreased, but rRNA pseudouridylation, which is guided by snoRNAs, was intact. Moreover, first-generation Naf1(+/-) mice showed no evidence of ribosomal pathology. Our data indicate that disease in NAF1 mutation carriers is telomere-mediated; they show that NAF1 haploinsufficiency selectively disturbs telomere length homeostasis by decreasing the levels of telomerase RNA while sparing rRNA pseudouridylation. PMID:27510903

  19. Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; O'Connor, Marie N.; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; White, Ian J.; Al-Shawi, Raya; Simons, J. Paul; Mössinger, Julia; Haucke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIα and PI4KIIβ in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIα-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function. PMID:27068535

  20. Low frequency of endospore-specific genes in subseafloor sedimentary metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Mikihiko; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Takami, Hideto; Inagaki, Fumio

    2015-04-01

    Spore formation is considered to be one of the microbial strategies for long-term survival in subseafloor sedimentary habitats. However, our knowledge of the genetic and physiological characteristics of subseafloor microbes is limited. Here, we studied the distribution and frequency of genes that are related to endospore formation in 10 subseafloor sedimentary metagenomes from Site C9001 off Japan and Site 1229 off Peru. None or very low frequencies of endospore-specific genes (e.g. dpaA, dpaB, sspA, spo0A, spoIIGA, spoIIM, spoIIIAB, spoIVA, spoIVB, yabP, yunB, spoVM) were observed in the subseafloor metagenomes. Based on the number of universally conserved single copy genes, the frequency ratio of putative endospore-formers was estimated to be < 10%, which is consistent with the frequency of Clostridia-derived genomes (2-4%) but is lower than previous estimates based on the concentration of dipicolinic acid. Conceivable explanations for this discrepancy are as follows: the efficiency of lysis and DNA extraction of subseafloor endospore cells may have been lower than those of vegetative cells, conversion factor of dipicolinic acid content per cell may differ, and/or sporulation-related genes and other functional strategies for long-term survival in the deep subseafloor biosphere are evolutionarily distinct from known spore-forming gene repertoires. PMID:25472775

  1. The Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Nol11 Is Required for Optimal rDNA Transcription and Craniofacial Development in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, John N.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; del Viso, Florencia; Baserga, Susan J.; Khokha, Mustafa K.

    2015-01-01

    The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC) of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival. PMID:25756904

  2. The ribosome biogenesis factor Nol11 is required for optimal rDNA transcription and craniofacial development in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John N; Sondalle, Samuel B; Del Viso, Florencia; Baserga, Susan J; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2015-03-01

    The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC) of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival. PMID:25756904

  3. The cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis factor AtCOX17 modulates stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lucila; Welchen, Elina; Gey, Uta; Arce, Agustín L; Steinebrunner, Iris; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2016-03-01

    COX17 is a soluble protein from the mitochondrial intermembrane space that participates in the transfer of copper for cytochrome c oxidase (COX) assembly in eukaryotic organisms. In this work, we studied the function of both Arabidopsis thaliana AtCOX17 genes using plants with altered expression levels of these genes. Silencing of AtCOX17-1 in a cox17-2 knockout background generates plants with smaller rosettes and decreased expression of genes involved in the response of plants to different stress conditions, including several genes that are induced by mitochondrial dysfunctions. Silencing of either of the AtCOX17 genes does not affect plant development or COX activity but causes a decrease in the response of genes to salt stress. In addition, these plants contain higher reactive oxygen and lipid peroxidation levels after irrigation with high NaCl concentrations and are less sensitive to abscisic acid. In agreement with a role of AtCOX17 in stress and abscisic acid responses, both AtCOX17 genes are induced by several stress conditions, abscisic acid and mutation of the transcription factor ABI4. The results indicate that AtCOX17 is required for optimal expression of a group of stress-responsive genes, probably as a component of signalling pathways that link stress conditions to gene expression responses. PMID:26436309

  4. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY - BIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesisSM soil washing technology was developed by BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. to remove organic compounds from soil. The technology uses a proprietary solution (BioGenesisSM cleaner) to transfer organic compounds from the soil matrix to a liquid phase. BioGenesis claims...

  5. MTR4, a putative RNA helicase and exosome co-factor, is required for proper rRNA biogenesis and development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lange, Heike; Sement, François M; Gagliardi, Dominique

    2011-10-01

    The exosome is a conserved protein complex that is responsible for essential 3'→5' RNA degradation in both the nucleus and the cytosol. It is composed of a nine-subunit core complex to which co-factors confer both RNA substrate recognition and ribonucleolytic activities. Very few exosome co-factors have been identified in plants. Here, we have characterized a putative RNA helicase, AtMTR4, that is involved in the degradation of several nucleolar exosome substrates in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that AtMTR4, rather than its closely related protein HEN2, is required for proper rRNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis. AtMTR4 is mostly localized in the nucleolus, a subcellular compartmentalization that is shared with another exosome co-factor, RRP6L2. AtMTR4 and RRP6L2 cooperate in several steps of rRNA maturation and surveillance, such as processing the 5.8S rRNA and removal of rRNA maturation by-products. Interestingly, degradation of the Arabidopsis 5' external transcribed spacer (5' ETS) requires cooperation of both the 5'→3' and 3'→5' exoribonucleolytic pathways. Accumulating AtMTR4 targets give rise to illegitimate small RNAs; however, these do not affect rRNA metabolism or contribute to the phenotype of mtr4 mutants. Plants lacking AtMTR4 are viable but show several developmental defects, including aberrant vein patterning and pointed first leaves. The mtr4 phenotype resembles that of several ribosomal protein and nucleolin mutants, and may be explained by delayed ribosome biogenesis, as we observed a reduced rate of rRNA accumulation in mtr4 mutants. Taken together, these data link AtMTR4 with rRNA biogenesis and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:21682783

  6. THERMOPHILE ENDOSPORES HAVE RESPONSIVE EXOSPORIUM FOR ATTACHMENT

    SciTech Connect

    PANESSA-WARREN,B.; TORTORA,G.T.; WARREN,J.; SABATINI,R.

    1999-08-01

    Recently studies examining the colonization of Clostridial pathogens on agar and human tissue culture cells, demonstrated that (C. sporogenes ATCC 3584, C. difficile ATCC 43594 [patient isolate], C. difficile ATCC 9689 [non-clinical], C. clostridioforme [patient isolate]) bacterial spores (endospores) of the genus Clostridia have an outer membrane that becomes responsive at activation and exhibits extensions of the exosporial membrane that facilitate and maintain spore attachment to a nutritive substrate during germination and initial outgrowth of the newly developed bacterial cell. Therefore this attachment phenomenon plays an important role in insuring bacterial colonization of a surface and the initial stages of the infective process. To see if other non-clinical members of this genus also have this ability to attach to a substrate or food-source during spore germination, and how this attachment process in environmental thermophiles compares to the clinical paradigm (in relation to time sequence, exosporial membrane structure, type of attachment structures, composition of the membrane etc...), sediment samples were collected in sterile transport containers at 4 geothermal sites at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Because spore forming bacteria will produce spores when conditions are unfavorable for growth, the samples were sealed and stored at 4 C. After 8 months the samples were screened for the presence of spores by light microscope examination using malachite green/safranin, and traditional endospores were identified in significant quantities from the Terrace Spring site (a 46 C lake with bacterial mats and a rapidly moving run-off channel leading to a traditional hot spring). The highest spore population was found in the top sediment and benthic water of the run-off channel, pH 8.1.

  7. Method bacterial endospore quantification using lanthanide dipicolinate luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor); Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J. (Inventor); Kirby, James Patrick (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A lanthanide is combined with a medium to be tested for endospores. The dipicolinic acid released from the endospores binds the lanthanides, which have distinctive emission (i.e., luminescence) spectra, and are detected using photoluminescence. The concentration of spores is determined by preparing a calibration curve generated from photoluminescence spectra of lanthanide complex mixed with spores of a known concentration. A lanthanide complex is used as the analysis reagent, and is comprised of lanthanide ions bound to multidentate ligands that increase the dipicolinic acid binding constant through a cooperative binding effect with respect to lanthanide chloride. The resulting combined effect of increasing the binding constant and eliminating coordinated water and multiple equilibria increase the sensitivity of the endospore assay by an estimated three to four orders of magnitude over prior art of endospore detection based on lanthanide luminescence.

  8. Fast Sterility Assessment by Germinable-Endospore Biodosimetry▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Pun To; Ponce, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    The increased demand for sterile products has created the need for rapid technologies capable of validating the hygiene of industrial production processes. Bacillus endospores are in standard use as biological indicators for evaluating the effectiveness of sterilization processes. Currently, culture-based methods, requiring more than 2 days before results become available, are employed to verify endospore inactivation. We describe a rapid, microscopy-based endospore viability assay (μEVA) capable of enumerating germinable endospores in less than 15 min. μEVA employs time-gated luminescence microscopy to enumerate single germinable endospores via terbium-dipicolinate (Tb-DPA) luminescence, which is triggered under UV excitation as 108 DPA molecules are released during germination on agarose containing Tb3+ and a germinant (e.g., l-alanine). Inactivation of endospore populations to sterility was monitored with μEVA as a function of thermal and UV dosage. A comparison of culturing results yielded nearly identical decimal reduction values, thus validating μEVA as a rapid biodosimetry method for monitoring sterilization processes. The simple Tb-DPA chemical test for germinability is envisioned to enable fully automated instrumentation for in-line monitoring of hygiene in industrial production processes. PMID:18836020

  9. Effect of sonic stimulation on Bacillus endospore germination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si Li; Wu, Wen Jie; Yung, Pun To

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of sonic stimulation on Bacillus endospore germination. Germinating endospores in a microtiter plate were exposed to audible sound wave generated by an array of piezoelectric transducers. In situ germination kinetics was measured by terbium-dipicolinate fluorescence assay, optical density measurement and phase contrast microscopy. Fluorescence results revealed that sonic stimulation (5 kHz at 90 dB) promoted the germination speed by 43.7% ± 11.3% and final germination level by 61.7% ± 11.9% of Bacillus atrophaeus. This acoustic energy absorbed by endospores is postulated to change membrane permeability and increase enzyme activities; thereby, expediting the germination process. This also raises the likelihood of dormant endospores undergoing germination because of a rapid release of unidentified chemical mediators for quorum sensing. On the other hand, acoustic effect was not observed in B. subtilis endospores. This may be attributed to the different spore aspect ratio, 1.43 ± 0.05 for B. atrophaeus and 2.02 ± 0.08 for B. subtilis, which results in a difference in specific absorption rates towards audible sound waves. Our results demonstrate the modulation of endospore germination by an external field to shed light on germination mechanism and cell-wave interaction. PMID:26607285

  10. Fast sterility assessment by germinable-endospore biodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Yung, Pun To; Ponce, Adrian

    2008-12-01

    The increased demand for sterile products has created the need for rapid technologies capable of validating the hygiene of industrial production processes. Bacillus endospores are in standard use as biological indicators for evaluating the effectiveness of sterilization processes. Currently, culture-based methods, requiring more than 2 days before results become available, are employed to verify endospore inactivation. We describe a rapid, microscopy-based endospore viability assay (microEVA) capable of enumerating germinable endospores in less than 15 min. MicroEVA employs time-gated luminescence microscopy to enumerate single germinable endospores via terbium-dipicolinate (Tb-DPA) luminescence, which is triggered under UV excitation as 10(8) DPA molecules are released during germination on agarose containing Tb(3+) and a germinant (e.g., L-alanine). Inactivation of endospore populations to sterility was monitored with microEVA as a function of thermal and UV dosage. A comparison of culturing results yielded nearly identical decimal reduction values, thus validating microEVA as a rapid biodosimetry method for monitoring sterilization processes. The simple Tb-DPA chemical test for germinability is envisioned to enable fully automated instrumentation for in-line monitoring of hygiene in industrial production processes. PMID:18836020

  11. Endospores of thermophilic bacteria as tracers of microbial dispersal by ocean currents.

    PubMed

    Müller, Albert Leopold; de Rezende, Júlia Rosa; Hubert, Casey R J; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Berry, David; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Loy, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    Microbial biogeography is influenced by the combined effects of passive dispersal and environmental selection, but the contribution of either factor can be difficult to discern. As thermophilic bacteria cannot grow in the cold seabed, their inactive spores are not subject to environmental selection. We therefore conducted a global experimental survey using thermophilic endospores that are passively deposited by sedimentation to the cold seafloor as tracers to study the effect of dispersal by ocean currents on the biogeography of marine microorganisms. Our analysis of 81 different marine sediments from around the world identified 146 species-level 16S rRNA phylotypes of endospore-forming, thermophilic Firmicutes. Phylotypes showed various patterns of spatial distribution in the world oceans and were dispersal-limited to different degrees. Co-occurrence of several phylotypes in locations separated by great distances (west of Svalbard, the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of California) demonstrated a widespread but not ubiquitous distribution. In contrast, Arctic regions with water masses that are relatively isolated from global ocean circulation (Baffin Bay and east of Svalbard) were characterized by low phylotype richness and different compositions of phylotypes. The observed distribution pattern of thermophilic endospores in marine sediments suggests that the impact of passive dispersal on marine microbial biogeography is controlled by the connectivity of local water masses to ocean circulation. PMID:24351936

  12. The Stability of Ribosome Biogenesis Factor WBSCR22 Is Regulated by Interaction with TRMT112 via Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Õunap, Kadri; Leetsi, Lilian; Matsoo, Maarja; Kurg, Reet

    2015-01-01

    The human WBSCR22 protein is a 18S rRNA methyltransferase involved in pre-rRNA processing and ribosome 40S subunit biogenesis. Recent studies have shown that the protein function in ribosome synthesis is independent of its enzymatic activity. In this work, we have studied the WBSCR22 protein interaction partners by SILAC-coupled co-immunoprecipitation assay and identified TRMT112 as the interaction partner of WBSCR22. Knock-down of TRMT112 expression decreased the WBSCR22 protein level in mammalian cells, suggesting that the stability of WBSCR22 is regulated through the interaction with TRMT112. The localization of the TRMT112 protein is determined by WBSCR22, and the WBSCR22-TRMT112 complex is localized in the cell nucleus. We provide evidence that the interaction between WBSCR22/Bud23 and TRMT112/Trm112 is conserved between mammals and yeast, suggesting that the function of TRMT112 as a co-activator of methyltransferases is evolutionarily conserved. Finally, we show that the transiently expressed WBSCR22 protein is ubiquitinated and degraded through the proteasome pathway, revealing the tight control of the WBSCR22 protein level in the cells. PMID:26214185

  13. Role for Serine Protease HtrA (DegP) of Streptococcus pyogenes in the Biogenesis of Virulence Factors SpeB and the Hemolysin Streptolysin S

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, William R.; Caparon, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    The serine protease HtrA is involved in the folding and maturation of secreted proteins, as well as in the degradation of proteins that misfold during secretion. Depletion of HtrA has been shown to affect the sensitivity of many organisms to thermal and environmental stresses, as well as being essential for virulence in many pathogens. In the present study, we compared the behaviors of several different HtrA mutants of the gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus). Consistent with prior reports, insertional inactivation of htrA, the gene that encodes HtrA, resulted in a mutant that grew poorly at 37°C. However, an identical phenotype was observed when a similar polar insertion was placed immediately downstream of htrA in the streptococcal chromosome, suggesting that the growth defect of the insertion mutant was not a direct result of insertional inactivation of htrA. This conclusion was supported by the observation that a nonpolar deletion mutation of htrA did not produce the growth defect. However, this mutation did affect the production of several secreted virulence factors whose biogenesis requires extensive processing. For the SpeB cysteine protease, the loss of HtrA was associated with a failure to proteolytically process the zymogen to an active protease. For the streptolysin S hemolysin, a dramatic increase in hemolytic activity resulted from the depletion of HtrA. Interestingly, HtrA-deficient mutants were not attenuated in a murine model of subcutaneous infection. These data add to the growing body of information that implies an important role for HtrA in the biogenesis of secreted proteins in gram-positive bacteria. PMID:14977969

  14. Role for serine protease HtrA (DegP) of Streptococcus pyogenes in the biogenesis of virulence factors SpeB and the hemolysin streptolysin S.

    PubMed

    Lyon, William R; Caparon, Michael G

    2004-03-01

    The serine protease HtrA is involved in the folding and maturation of secreted proteins, as well as in the degradation of proteins that misfold during secretion. Depletion of HtrA has been shown to affect the sensitivity of many organisms to thermal and environmental stresses, as well as being essential for virulence in many pathogens. In the present study, we compared the behaviors of several different HtrA mutants of the gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus). Consistent with prior reports, insertional inactivation of htrA, the gene that encodes HtrA, resulted in a mutant that grew poorly at 37 degrees C. However, an identical phenotype was observed when a similar polar insertion was placed immediately downstream of htrA in the streptococcal chromosome, suggesting that the growth defect of the insertion mutant was not a direct result of insertional inactivation of htrA. This conclusion was supported by the observation that a nonpolar deletion mutation of htrA did not produce the growth defect. However, this mutation did affect the production of several secreted virulence factors whose biogenesis requires extensive processing. For the SpeB cysteine protease, the loss of HtrA was associated with a failure to proteolytically process the zymogen to an active protease. For the streptolysin S hemolysin, a dramatic increase in hemolytic activity resulted from the depletion of HtrA. Interestingly, HtrA-deficient mutants were not attenuated in a murine model of subcutaneous infection. These data add to the growing body of information that implies an important role for HtrA in the biogenesis of secreted proteins in gram-positive bacteria. PMID:14977969

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-α impairs adiponectin signalling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and myogenesis in primary human myotubes cultures.

    PubMed

    Sente, Tahnee; Van Berendoncks, An M; Fransen, Erik; Vrints, Christiaan J; Hoymans, Vicky Y

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal muscle metabolic changes are common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Previously, we demonstrated a functional skeletal muscle adiponectin resistance in HF patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF). We aimed to examine the impact of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) deficiency and TNF-α treatment on adiponectin signaling, proliferative capacity, myogenic differentiation, and mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human skeletal muscle cells. Primary cultures of myoblasts and myotubes were initiated from the musculus vastus lateralis of 10 HFrEF patients (left ventricular ejection fraction; 31.30 ± 2.89%) and 10 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Healthy control cultures were transfected with siAdipoR1 and/or exposed to TNF-α (10 ng/ml; 72 h). Primary cultures from HFrEF patients preserved the features of adiponectin resistance in vivo. AdipoR1 mRNA was negatively correlated with time to reach maximal cell index (r = -0.7319, P = 0.003). SiRNA-mediated AdipoR1 silencing reduced pAMPK (P < 0.01), AMPK activation (P = 0.046), and myoblast proliferation rate (xCELLigence Real-Time Cellular Analysis; P < 0.0001). Moreover, TNF-α decreased the mRNA expression of genes involved in glucose (APPL1, P = 0.0002; AMPK, P = 0.021), lipid (PPARα, P = 0.025; ACADM, P = 0.003), and mitochondrial (FOXO3, P = 0.018) metabolism, impaired myogenesis (MyoD1, P = 0.053; myogenin, P = 0.048) and polarized cytokine secretion toward a growth-promoting phenotype (IL-10, IL-1β, IFN-γ, P < 0.05 for all; Meso Scale Discovery Technology). Major features of adiponectin resistance are retained in primary cultures from the skeletal muscle of HFrEF patients. In addition, our results suggest that an increased inflammatory constitution contributes to adiponectin resistance and confers alterations in skeletal muscle differentiation, growth, and function. PMID:26921438

  16. Bacillus subtilis Systems Biology: Applications of -Omics Techniques to the Study of Endospore Formation.

    PubMed

    Bate, Ashley R; Bonneau, Richard; Eichenberger, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    Endospore-forming bacteria, with Bacillus subtilis being the prevalent model organism, belong to the phylum Firmicutes. Although the last common ancestor of all Firmicutes is likely to have been an endospore-forming species, not every lineage in the phylum has maintained the ability to produce endospores (hereafter, spores). In 1997, the release of the full genome sequence for B. subtilis strain 168 marked the beginning of the genomic era for the study of spore formation (sporulation). In this original genome sequence, 139 of the 4,100 protein-coding genes were annotated as sporulation genes. By the time a revised genome sequence with updated annotations was published in 2009, that number had increased significantly, especially since transcriptional profiling studies (transcriptomics) led to the identification of several genes expressed under the control of known sporulation transcription factors. Over the past decade, genome sequences for multiple spore-forming species have been released (including several strains in the Bacillus anthracis/Bacillus cereus group and many Clostridium species), and phylogenomic analyses have revealed many conserved sporulation genes. Parallel advances in transcriptomics led to the identification of small untranslated regulatory RNAs (sRNAs), including some that are expressed during sporulation. An extended array of -omics techniques, i.e., techniques designed to probe gene function on a genome-wide scale, such as proteomics, metabolomics, and high-throughput protein localization studies, have been implemented in microbiology. Combined with the use of new computational methods for predicting gene function and inferring regulatory relationships on a global scale, these -omics approaches are uncovering novel information about sporulation and a variety of other bacterial cell processes. PMID:26105826

  17. When ribosomes go bad: diseases of ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Emily F.; Bleichert, Franziska; Dutca, Laura M.; Baserga, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    Ribosomes are vital for cell growth and survival. Until recently, it was believed that mutations in ribosomes or ribosome biogenesis factors would be lethal, due to the essential nature of these complexes. However, in the last few decades, a number of diseases of ribosome biogenesis have been discovered. It remains a challenge in the field to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying them. PMID:20174677

  18. The miRNA biogenesis factors, p72/DDX17 and KHSRP regulate the protein level of Ago2 in human cells.

    PubMed

    Connerty, Patrick; Bajan, Sarah; Remenyi, Judit; Fuller-Pace, Frances V; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (21-23nt long) RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in plants and animals. They are key regulators in all biological processes. In mammalian cells miRNAs are loaded into one of the four members of the Argonaute (Ago) protein family to form the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISCs inhibit the translation of mRNAs that share sequence complementarity with their loaded miRNAs. miRNA processing and miRNA-mediated gene regulation are highly regulated processes and involve many RNA-binding proteins as auxiliary factors. Here we show that the two RNA-binding proteins, p72 and KHSRP, both with known roles in promoting miRNA biogenesis, regulate the protein level of human Ago2 in transformed human cells. We determined that p72 and KHSRP influence Ago2 stability by regulating miRNA levels in the cell and that loss of p72/KHSRP results in a decrease of unloaded Ago2. PMID:27478153

  19. Resistance of Bacillus Endospores to Extreme Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Environments

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Wayne L.; Munakata, Nobuo; Horneck, Gerda; Melosh, Henry J.; Setlow, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Endospores of Bacillus spp., especially Bacillus subtilis, have served as experimental models for exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the incredible longevity of spores and their resistance to environmental insults. In this review we summarize the molecular laboratory model of spore resistance mechanisms and attempt to use the model as a basis for exploration of the resistance of spores to environmental extremes both on Earth and during postulated interplanetary transfer through space as a result of natural impact processes. PMID:10974126

  20. Detecting inactivated endospores in fluorescence microscopy using propidium monoazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Alexander; Mahnert, Alexander; Weber, Christina; Haberer, Klaus; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2012-04-01

    The differentiation between living and dead bacterial endospores is crucial in many research areas of microbiology. The identification of inactivated, non-pathogenic Bacillus anthracis spores is one reason why improvement of decontamination protocols is so desirable. Another field interested in spore viability is planetary protection, a sub-discipline of astrobiology that estimates the bioburden of spacecraft prior to launch in order to avoid interplanetary cross-contamination. We developed a dedicated, rapid and cost-effective method for identifying bacterial endospores that have been inactivated and consequently show a compromised spore wall. This novel protocol is culture-independent and is based on fluorescence microscopy and propidium monoazide (PMA) as a fluorescent marker, which is suggested to bind to DNA of spores with compromised spore coat, cortex and membranes based on our results. Inactivated preparations (treated with wet heat, irradiation, ultracentrifugation) showed a significant increase in spores that were PMA stained in their core; moreover, Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus safensis and Geobacillus stearothermophilus seemed to be best suited for this technique, as the spore cores of all these endospores could be positively stained after inactivation. Lastly, we describe an additional counter-staining protocol and provide an example of the application of the coupled staining methods for planetary protection purposes. The introduction of this novel protocol is expected to provide an initial insight into the various possible future applications of PMA as a non-viability marker for spores in, for example, B. anthracis-related studies, food microbiology and astrobiology.

  1. Bacillus cereus endospores exhibit a heterogeneous response to heat treatment and low-temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Ultan P; Wilkinson, Martin G

    2008-04-01

    Bacillus cereus endospores were challenged by heat treatments simulating typical domestic/industrial cooking regimes and the resulting effects on germination, viability and sub-lethal heat damage determined using differential plate counting on a rich versus selective medium, flow cytometry (FCM), beta-D-glucuronidase (GUD) activity and OD(600) measurement. Additionally, these techniques were used to investigate the effect on endospores of storage in a non-nutrient medium at 4 degrees C for 1 month. Plate counting revealed that heating generated sub-populations of sub-lethally damaged endospores, with the more severe heat treatments generating larger proportions of sub-lethally damaged endospores. These findings were also reflected in FCM analyses, which detected large amounts of heterogeneity among the populations of heat-treated endospores and uncovered differences in the proportions of membrane-damaged endospores and those displaying esterase activity pre- and post-treatment. Plate count data suggested that both the control and heat-treated endospores lost viability during storage, with FCM data indicating that the proportion of membrane-damaged endospores increased and those displaying the esterase activity decreased. The FCM, GUD and OD(600) data suggested that germination rates decreased with the increasing severity of heat treatment. This study demonstrates that a combination of plate counting and FCM can be used to detect heterogeneity in the response of endospores to insults. PMID:18206765

  2. The neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to confer tolerance of neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells to the mitochondrial stressor rotenone

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Kristin Kathleen; Uittenbogaard, Martine; Chiaramello, Anne

    2012-10-15

    The fundamental question of how and which neuronal specific transcription factors tailor mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics to the need of developing neuronal cells has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we report that the neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD6 possesses mitochondrial biogenic properties by amplifying the mitochondrial DNA content and TFAM expression levels, a key regulator for mitochondrial biogenesis. NeuroD6-mediated increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in the neuronal progenitor-like PC12-NEUROD6 cells is concomitant with enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetic functions, including increased expression levels of specific subunits of respiratory complexes of the electron transport chain, elevated mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic capacity of PC12-NEUROD6 cells to generate an energetic reserve, which confers tolerance to the mitochondrial stressor, rotenone. We found that NeuroD6 induces an adaptive bioenergetic response throughout rotenone treatment involving maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in conjunction with preservation of the actin network. In conclusion, our results support the concept that NeuroD6 plays an integrative role in regulating and coordinating the onset of neuronal differentiation with acquisition of adequate mitochondrial mass and energetic capacity to ensure energy demanding events, such as cytoskeletal remodeling, plasmalemmal expansion, and growth cone formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 induces mitochondrial biogenesis in neuroprogenitor-like cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 augments the bioenergetic reserve of the neuronal PC12-NeuroD6 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NeuroD6 confers tolerance to rotenone via an adaptive

  3. Rewiring of the Ppr1 Zinc Cluster Transcription Factor from Purine Catabolism to Pyrimidine Biogenesis in the Saccharomycetaceae.

    PubMed

    Tebung, Walters Aji; Choudhury, Baharul I; Tebbji, Faiza; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2016-07-11

    Metabolic pathways are largely conserved in eukaryotes, but the transcriptional regulation of these pathways can sometimes vary between species; this has been termed "rewiring." Recently, it has been established that in the Saccharomyces lineage starting from Naumovozyma castellii, genes involved in allantoin breakdown have been genomically relocated to form the DAL cluster. The formation of the DAL cluster occurred along with the loss of urate permease (UAP) and urate oxidase (UOX), reducing the requirement for oxygen and bypassing the candidate Ppr1 inducer, uric acid. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this allantoin catabolism cluster is regulated by the transcription factor Dal82, which is not present in many of the pre-rearrangement fungal species. We have used ChIP-chip analysis, transcriptional profiling of an activated Ppr1 protein, bioinformatics, and nitrogen utilization studies to establish that in Candida albicans the zinc cluster transcription factor Ppr1 controls this allantoin catabolism regulon. Intriguingly, in S. cerevisiae, the Ppr1 ortholog binds the same DNA motif (CGG(N6)CCG) as in C. albicans but serves as a regulator of pyrimidine biosynthesis. This transcription factor rewiring appears to have taken place at the same phylogenetic step as the formation of the rearranged DAL cluster. This transfer of the control of allantoin degradation from Ppr1 to Dal82, together with the repositioning of Ppr1 to the regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis, may have resulted from a switch to a metabolism that could exploit hypoxic conditions in the lineage leading to N. castellii and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27321996

  4. The complexity of human ribosome biogenesis revealed by systematic nucleolar screening of Pre-rRNA processing factors.

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Lionel; Zorbas, Christiane; Langhendries, Jean-Louis; Mullineux, Sahra-Taylor; Stamatopoulou, Vassiliki; Mullier, Romain; Wacheul, Ludivine; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2013-08-22

    Mature ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are produced from polycistronic precursors following complex processing. Precursor (pre)-rRNA processing has been extensively characterized in yeast and was assumed to be conserved in humans. We functionally characterized 625 nucleolar proteins in HeLa cells and identified 286 required for processing, including 74 without a yeast homolog. For selected candidates, we demonstrated that pre-rRNA processing defects are conserved in different cell types (including primary cells), defects are not due to activation of a p53-dependent nucleolar tumor surveillance pathway, and they precede cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. We also investigated the exosome's role in processing internal transcribed spacers (ITSs) and report that 3' end maturation of 18S rRNA involves EXOSC10/Rrp6, a yeast ITS2 processing factor. We conclude that human cells adopt unique strategies and recruit distinct trans-acting factors to carry out essential processing steps, posing fundamental implications for understanding ribosomopathies at the molecular level and developing effective therapeutic agents. PMID:23973377

  5. HlyF Produced by Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Is a Virulence Factor That Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kazunori; Martin, Patricia; Porcheron, Gaëlle; Houle, Sébastien; Helloin, Emmanuelle; Pénary, Marie; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dozois, Charles M; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Oswald, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Escherichia coli can cause extraintestinal infections in humans and animals. The hlyF gene is epidemiologically associated with virulent strains of avian pathogenic E. coli and human neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli. We demonstrated that culture supernatants of E. coli expressing HlyF induced autophagy in eukaryotic cells. This phenotype coincided with an enhanced production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) by bacteria expressing HlyF. The HlyF protein displays a predicted catalytic domain of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. This conserved domain was involved the ability of HlyF to promote the production of OMVs. The increased production of OMVs was associated with the release of toxins. hlyF was shown to be expressed during extraintestinal infection and to play a role in the virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli in a chicken model of colibacillosis. This is the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria produce a virulence factor directly involved in the production of OMVs. PMID:26494774

  6. Oligomerization of heme o synthase in cytochrome oxidase biogenesis is mediated by cytochrome oxidase assembly factor Coa2.

    PubMed

    Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kim, Hyung; Watts, Talina; Perez-Martinez, Xochitl; Winge, Dennis R

    2012-08-01

    The synthesis of the heme a cofactor used in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is dependent on the sequential action of heme o synthase (Cox10) and heme a synthase (Cox15). The active state of Cox10 appears to be a homo-oligomeric complex, and formation of this complex is dependent on the newly synthesized CcO subunit Cox1 and the presence of an early Cox1 assembly intermediate. Cox10 multimerization is triggered by progression of Cox1 from the early assembly intermediate to downstream intermediates. The CcO assembly factor Coa2 appears important in coupling the presence of newly synthesized Cox1 to Cox10 oligomerization. Cells lacking Coa2 are impaired in Cox10 complex formation as well as the formation of a high mass Cox15 complex. Increasing Cox1 synthesis in coa2Δ cells restores respiratory function if Cox10 protein levels are elevated. The C-terminal segment of Cox1 is important in triggering Cox10 oligomerization. Expression of the C-terminal 54 residues of Cox1 appended to a heterologous matrix protein leads to efficient Cox10 complex formation in coa2Δ cells, but it fails to induce Cox15 complex formation. The state of Cox10 was evaluated in mutants, which predispose human patients to CcO deficiency and the neurological disorder Leigh syndrome. The presence of the D336V mutation in the yeast Cox10 backbone results in a catalytically inactive enzyme that is fully competent to oligomerize. Thus, Cox10 oligomerization and catalytic activation are separate processes and can be uncoupled. PMID:22669974

  7. Comparison of in vitro methods for the production of Paenibacillus larvae endospores.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Israel; Elekonich, Michelle M; Abel-Santos, Ernesto; Wing, Helen J

    2015-09-01

    Paenibacillus larvae endospores are the infectious particles of the honey bee brood disease, American Foulbrood. We demonstrate that our previously published protocol (Alvarado et al., 2013) consistently yields higher numbers and purer preparations of P. larvae endospores, than previously described protocols, regardless of the strain tested (B-3650, B-3554 or B-3685). PMID:26130193

  8. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  9. Plant Peroxisomes: Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianping; Baker, Alison; Bartel, Bonnie; Linka, Nicole; Mullen, Robert T.; Reumann, Sigrun; Zolman, Bethany K.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are eukaryotic organelles that are highly dynamic both in morphology and metabolism. Plant peroxisomes are involved in numerous processes, including primary and secondary metabolism, development, and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Considerable progress has been made in the identification of factors involved in peroxisomal biogenesis, revealing mechanisms that are both shared with and diverged from non-plant systems. Furthermore, recent advances have begun to reveal an unexpectedly large plant peroxisomal proteome and have increased our understanding of metabolic pathways in peroxisomes. Coordination of the biosynthesis, import, biochemical activity, and degradation of peroxisomal proteins allows for highly dynamic responses of peroxisomal metabolism to meet the needs of a plant. Knowledge gained from plant peroxisomal research will be instrumental to fully understanding the organelle’s dynamic behavior and defining peroxisomal metabolic networks, thus allowing the development of molecular strategies for rational engineering of plant metabolism, biomass production, stress tolerance, and pathogen defense. PMID:22669882

  10. MYC and Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Hockenbery, David

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, face two imperatives concerning biogenesis. The first is the requirement for dividing cells to replicate their mitochondrial content by growth of existing mitochondria. The second is the dynamic regulation of mitochondrial content in response to organismal and cellular cues (e.g., exercise, caloric restriction, energy status, temperature). MYC provides the clearest example of a programmed expansion of mitochondrial content linked to the cell cycle. As an oncogene, MYC also presents intriguing questions about the role of its mitochondrial targets in cancer-related phenotypes, such as the Warburg effect and MYC-dependent apoptosis. PMID:24789872

  11. Peroxisome Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Navneet; Reumann, Sigrun; Hu, Jianping

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisomes are small and single membrane-delimited organelles that execute numerous metabolic reactions and have pivotal roles in plant growth and development. In recent years, forward and reverse genetic studies along with biochemical and cell biological analyses in Arabidopsis have enabled researchers to identify many peroxisome proteins and elucidate their functions. This review focuses on the advances in our understanding of peroxisome biogenesis and metabolism, and further explores the contribution of large-scale analysis, such as in sillco predictions and proteomics, in augmenting our knowledge of peroxisome function In Arabidopsis. PMID:22303249

  12. Curli Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Michelle M.; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Curli are the major proteinaceous component of a complex extra-cellular matrix produced by many Enterobacteriaceae. Curli were first discovered in the late 1980s on Escherichia coli strains that caused bovine mastitis, and have since been implicated in many physiological and pathogenic processes of E. coli and Salmonella spp. Curli fibers are involved in adhesion to surfaces, cell aggregation, and biofilm formation. Curli also mediate host cell adhesion and invasion, and they are potent inducers of the host inflammatory response. The structure and biogenesis of curli are unique among bacterial fibers that have been described to date. Structurally and biochemically, curli belong to a growing class of fibers known as amyloids. Amyloid fiber formation is responsible for several human diseases including Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and prion diseases, although the process of in vivo amyloid formation is not well understood. Curli provide a unique system to study macromolecular assembly in bacteria and in vivo amyloid fiber formation. Here, we review curli biogenesis, regulation, role in biofilm formation, and role in pathogenesis. PMID:16704339

  13. Analysis of photosystem II biogenesis in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Steffen; Liauw, Pasqual; Nickelsen, Jörg; Nowaczyk, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Photosystem II (PSII), a large multisubunit membrane protein complex found in the thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria, algae and plants, catalyzes light-driven oxygen evolution from water and reduction of plastoquinone. Biogenesis of PSII requires coordinated assembly of at least 20 protein subunits, as well as incorporation of various organic and inorganic cofactors. The stepwise assembly process is facilitated by numerous protein factors that have been identified in recent years. Further analysis of this process requires the development or refinement of specific methods for the identification of novel assembly factors and, in particular, elucidation of the unique role of each. Here we summarize current knowledge of PSII biogenesis in cyanobacteria, focusing primarily on the impact of methodological advances and innovations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26592144

  14. Use of the fluorescent probe LAURDAN to label and measure inner membrane fluidity of endospores of Clostridium spp.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Simmon; Denter, Christian; Winter, Roland; McMullen, Lynn M; Gänzle, Michael G

    2012-10-01

    A method for measuring the fluidity of inner membranes of populations of endospores of Clostridium spp. with a fluorescent dye was developed. Cells of Clostridium beijerinckii ATCC 8260 and Clostridium sporogenes ATCC 7955 were allowed to sporulate in the presence of 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (LAURDAN) on a soil-based media. Labeling of endospores with LAURDAN did not affect endospore viability. Removal of the outer membranes of endospores was done using a chemical treatment and confirmed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and generalized polarization (GP) measurements were used to assess fluorescence of endospores. Lipid composition analysis of cells and endospores was done to determine whether differences in GP values are attributable to differences in membrane composition. Removal of the outer membranes of endospores did not significantly impact GP values. Decoated, labeled endospores of C. sporogenes ATCC 7955 and C. beijerinckii ATCC 8260 exhibited GP values of 0.77±0.031 and 0.74±0.027 respectively. Differences in ratios of fatty acids between cells and endospores are unlikely to be responsible for high GP values observed in endospores. These GP values indicate high levels of lipid order and the exclusion of water from within inner membranes of endospores. PMID:22884687

  15. Temperature Effects on the Attachment of Pasteuria penetrans Endospores to Meloidogyne arenaria Race 1.

    PubMed

    Freitas, L G; Mitchell, D J; Dickson, D W

    1997-12-01

    Pasteuria penetrans is a gram positive bacterium that prevents Meloidogyne spp. from reproducing and diminishes their ability to penetrate roots. The attachment of the endospores to the cuticle of the nematodes is the first step in the life cycle of the bacterium and is essential for its reproduction. As a preliminary study to a field solarization test, the effects of temperature on the attachment of P. penetrans on Meloidogyne arenaria race 1 were investigated. Preexposing second-stage juveniles (J2) of M. arenaria to approximately 30 degrees C in water before exposing them to endospores increased their receptivity to endospore attachment when compared to treating J2 at 25 degrees C or 35 degrees C. In tests with soil, highest attachment occurred when J2 were incubated in soil infested with endospores and maintained at 20 degrees C to 30 degrees C for 4 days. Heating J2 in soil to sublethal temperatures (35 degrees C to 40 degrees C) decreased endospore attachment. Incubating P. penetrans endospores in soil at 30 degrees C to 70 degrees C for 5 hours a day over 10 days resulted in reductions of endospore attachment to nematodes as temperatures of incubation increased to 50 degrees C and higher. PMID:19274192

  16. Temperature Effects on the Attachment of Pasteuria penetrans Endospores to Meloidogyne arenaria Race 1

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, L. G.; Mitchell, D. J.; Dickson, D. W.

    1997-01-01

    Pasteuria penetrans is a gram positive bacterium that prevents Meloidogyne spp. from reproducing and diminishes their ability to penetrate roots. The attachment of the endospores to the cuticle of the nematodes is the first step in the life cycle of the bacterium and is essential for its reproduction. As a preliminary study to a field solarization test, the effects of temperature on the attachment of P. penetrans on Meloidogyne arenaria race 1 were investigated. Preexposing second-stage juveniles (J2) of M. arenaria to approximately 30 °C in water before exposing them to endospores increased their receptivity to endospore attachment when compared to treating J2 at 25 °C or 35 °C. In tests with soil, highest attachment occurred when J2 were incubated in soil infested with endospores and maintained at 20 °C to 30 °C for 4 days. Heating J2 in soil to sublethal temperatures (35 °C to 40 °C) decreased endospore attachment. Incubating P. penetrans endospores in soil at 30 °C to 70 °C for 5 hours a day over 10 days resulted in reductions of endospore attachment to nematodes as temperatures of incubation increased to 50 °C and higher. PMID:19274192

  17. In vitro studies on the mechanisms of endospore release by Rhinosporidium seeberi.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, L; Herr, R A; Arseculeratne, S N; Ajello, L

    1999-01-01

    Studies of Rhinosporidium seeberi have demonstrated that this organism has a complex life cycle in infected tissues. Its in vivo life cycle is initiated with the release of endospores into a host's tissues from its spherical sporangia. However, little is known about the mechanisms of sporangium formation and endospore release since this pathogen is intractable to culture. We have studied the in vitro mechanisms of endospore release from viable R. seeberi's sporangia. It was found that watery substances visibly stimulates the mature sporangia of R. seeberi to the point of endospore discharge. The internal rearrangement of the endospores within the mature sporangia, the opening of an apical pore in R. seeberi's cell wall, and the active release of the endospores were the main features of this process. Only one pore per sporangium was observed. The finding of early stages of pore development in juvenile and intermediate sporangia suggested that its formation is genetically programmed and that it is not a random process. The stimulation of R. seeberi's sporangia by water supports the epidemiological studies that had linked this pathogen with wet environments. It also explains, in part, its affinities for mucous membranes in infected hosts. The microscopic features of endospore discharge suggest a connection with organisms classified in the Kingdom Protoctista. This study strongly supports a recent finding that placed R. seeberi with organisms in the protoctistan Mesomycetozoa clade. PMID:11086480

  18. Applications of a rapid endospore viability assay for monitoring UV inactivation and characterizing arctic ice cores.

    PubMed

    Shafaat, Hannah S; Ponce, Adrian

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a rapid endospore viability assay (EVA) in which endospore germination serves as an indicator for viability and applied it to (i) monitor UV inactivation of endospores as a function of dose and (ii) determine the proportion of viable endospores in arctic ice cores (Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 [GISP2] cores; 94 m). EVA is based on the detection of dipicolinic acid (DPA), which is released from endospores during germination. DPA concentrations were determined using the terbium ion (Tb3+)-DPA luminescence assay, and germination was induced by L-alanine addition. The concentrations of germinable endospores were determined by comparison to a standard curve. Parallel EVA and phase-contrast microscopy experiments to determine the percentage of germinable spores yielded comparable results (54.3% +/- 3.8% and 48.9% +/- 4.5%, respectively), while only 27.8% +/- 7.6% of spores produced CFU. EVA was applied to monitor the inactivation of spore suspensions as a function of UV dose, yielding reproducible correlations between EVA and CFU inactivation data. The 90% inactivation doses were 2,773 J/m2, 3,947 J/m2, and 1,322 J/m2 for EVA, phase-contrast microscopy, and CFU reduction, respectively. Finally, EVA was applied to quantify germinable and total endospore concentrations in two GISP2 ice cores. The first ice core contained 295 +/- 19 germinable spores/ml and 369 +/- 36 total spores/ml (i.e., the percentage of germinable endospores was 79.9% +/- 9.3%), and the second core contained 131 +/- 4 germinable spores/ml and 162 +/- 17 total spores/ml (i.e., the percentage of germinable endospores was 80.9% +/- 8.8%), whereas only 2 CFU/ml were detected by culturing. PMID:17021233

  19. Disruption of snRNP biogenesis factors Tgs1 and pICln induces phenotypes that mirror aspects of SMN-Gemins complex perturbation in Drosophila, providing new insights into spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Borg, Rebecca M; Fenech Salerno, Benji; Vassallo, Neville; Bordonne, Rémy; Cauchi, Ruben J

    2016-10-01

    The neuromuscular disorder, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), results from insufficient levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Together with Gemins 2-8 and Unrip, SMN forms the large macromolecular SMN-Gemins complex, which is known to be indispensable for chaperoning the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). It remains unclear whether disruption of this function is responsible for the selective neuromuscular degeneration in SMA. In the present study, we first show that loss of wmd, the Drosophila Unrip orthologue, has a negative impact on the motor system. However, due to lack of a functional relationship between wmd/Unrip and Gemin3, it is likely that Unrip joined the SMN-Gemins complex only recently in evolution. Second, we uncover that disruption of either Tgs1 or pICln, two cardinal players in snRNP biogenesis, results in viability and motor phenotypes that closely resemble those previously uncovered on loss of the constituent members of the SMN-Gemins complex. Interestingly, overexpression of both factors leads to motor dysfunction in Drosophila, a situation analogous to that of Gemin2. Toxicity is conserved in the yeast S. pombe where pICln overexpression induces a surplus of Sm proteins in the cytoplasm, indicating that a block in snRNP biogenesis is partly responsible for this phenotype. Importantly, we show a strong functional relationship and a physical interaction between Gemin3 and either Tgs1 or pICln. We propose that snRNP biogenesis is the pathway connecting the SMN-Gemins complex to a functional neuromuscular system, and its disturbance most likely leads to the motor dysfunction that is typical in SMA. PMID:27388936

  20. Poxvirus Membrane Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poxviruses differ from most DNA viruses by replicating entirely within the cytoplasm. The first discernible viral structures are crescents and spherical immature virions containing a single lipoprotein membrane bilayer with an external honeycomb lattice. Because this viral membrane displays no obvious continuity with a cellular organelle, a de novo origin was suggested. Nevertheless, transient connections between viral and cellular membranes could be difficult to resolve. Despite the absence of direct evidence, the intermediate compartment (ERGIC) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus and the ER itself were considered possible sources of crescent membranes. A break-through in understanding poxvirus membrane biogenesis has come from recent studies of the abortive replication of several vaccinia virus null mutants. Novel images showing continuity between viral crescents and the ER and the accumulation of immature virions in the expanded ER lumen provide the first direct evidence for a cellular origin of this poxvirus membrane. PMID:25728299

  1. Poxvirus membrane biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    Poxviruses differ from most DNA viruses by replicating entirely within the cytoplasm. The first discernible viral structures are crescents and spherical immature virions containing a single lipoprotein membrane bilayer with an external honeycomb lattice. Because this viral membrane displays no obvious continuity with a cellular organelle, a de novo origin was suggested. Nevertheless, transient connections between viral and cellular membranes could be difficult to resolve. Despite the absence of direct evidence, the intermediate compartment (ERGIC) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus and the ER itself were considered possible sources of crescent membranes. A break-through in understanding poxvirus membrane biogenesis has come from recent studies of the abortive replication of several vaccinia virus null mutants. Novel images showing continuity between viral crescents and the ER and the accumulation of immature virions in the expanded ER lumen provide the first direct evidence for a cellular origin of this poxvirus membrane. PMID:25728299

  2. Detection of Bacterial Endospores in Soil by Terbium Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Brandes Ammann, Andrea; Kölle, Linda; Brandl, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Spore formation is a survival mechanism of microorganisms when facing unfavorable environmental conditions resulting in “dormant” states. We investigated the occurrence of bacterial endospores in soils from various locations including grasslands (pasture, meadow), allotment gardens, and forests, as well as fluvial sediments. Bacterial spores are characterized by their high content of dipicolinic acid (DPA). In the presence of terbium, DPA forms a complex showing a distinctive photoluminescence spectrum. DPA was released from soil by microwaving or autoclaving. The addition of aluminium chloride reduced signal quenching by interfering compounds such as phosphate. The highest spore content (up to 109 spores per gram of dry soil) was found in grassland soils. Spore content is related to soil type, to soil depth, and to soil carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Our study might provide a basis for the detection of “hot spots” of bacterial spores in soil. PMID:21754939

  3. Dynamic periplasmic chaperone reservoir facilitates biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Costello, Shawn M; Plummer, Ashlee M; Fleming, Patrick J; Fleming, Karen G

    2016-08-16

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is critical to bacterial physiology because the cellular envelope is vital to bacterial pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. The process of OMP biogenesis has been studied in vivo, and each of its components has been studied in isolation in vitro. This work integrates parameters and observations from both in vivo and in vitro experiments into a holistic computational model termed "Outer Membrane Protein Biogenesis Model" (OMPBioM). We use OMPBioM to assess OMP biogenesis mathematically in a global manner. Using deterministic and stochastic methods, we are able to simulate OMP biogenesis under varying genetic conditions, each of which successfully replicates experimental observations. We observe that OMPs have a prolonged lifetime in the periplasm where an unfolded OMP makes, on average, hundreds of short-lived interactions with chaperones before folding into its native state. We find that some periplasmic chaperones function primarily as quality-control factors; this function complements the folding catalysis function of other chaperones. Additionally, the effective rate for the β-barrel assembly machinery complex necessary for physiological folding was found to be higher than has currently been observed in vitro. Overall, we find a finely tuned balance between thermodynamic and kinetic parameters maximizes OMP folding flux and minimizes aggregation and unnecessary degradation. In sum, OMPBioM provides a global view of OMP biogenesis that yields unique insights into this essential pathway. PMID:27482090

  4. Peroxisomal Biogenesis in Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer M.; Nelson, Jonathan W.; Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Wenri; Mader, Sarah; Davis, Catherine M.; Morrison, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Peroxisomes are highly adaptable and dynamic organelles, adjusting their size, number, and enzyme composition to changing environmental and metabolic demands. We determined whether peroxisomes respond to ischemia, and whether peroxisomal biogenesis is an adaptive response to cerebral ischemia. Results: Focal cerebral ischemia induced peroxisomal biogenesis in peri-infarct neurons, which was associated with a corresponding increase in peroxisomal antioxidant enzyme catalase. Peroxisomal biogenesis was also observed in primary cultured cortical neurons subjected to ischemic insult induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). A catalase inhibitor increased OGD-induced neuronal death. Moreover, preventing peroxisomal proliferation by knocking down dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) exacerbated neuronal death induced by OGD, whereas enhancing peroxisomal biogenesis pharmacologically using a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha agonist protected against neuronal death induced by OGD. Innovation: This is the first documentation of ischemia-induced peroxisomal biogenesis in mammalian brain using a combined in vivo and in vitro approach, electron microscopy, high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy, and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that neurons respond to ischemic injury by increasing peroxisome biogenesis, which serves a protective function, likely mediated by enhanced antioxidant capacity of neurons. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 109–120. PMID:25226217

  5. A Rapid Endospore Viability Assay for Astrobiology, Planatery Protection and Biodefense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    Bacillus endospores are in standard use as biological indicators for evaluating the effectiveness of sterilization processes. We describe a rapid endospore viability assay (EVA) capable of enumerating germinable endospores, which release 108 molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) when immobilized onto terbium ion (T b3 +)/L-alanine-doped agarose. Under UV excitation, endospore germination results in green luminescent spots that are enumerated using timegated Tb3+-DPA luminescence microscopy (i.e., MicroEVA). The luminescence intensity time courses were characteristic of the stage I germination dynamics. MicroEVA was applied to monitor inactivation to sterility of initial 5x106 CFU endospore populations in aqueous suspension as a function of thermal (95C) and UV (254nm, 22uW/cm2 ) dosage. MicroEVA and NASA Standard Assay culturing yielded similar D-values for both inactivation methods; thermal inactivation D-values were 10 min and 9.5 min, respectively, while UV inactivation D-values were 32 minutes and 35 minutes, respectively. In addition, MicroEVA was applied to investigate survival of endospores in extreme environments, including Atacama Desert soils and Greenland ice cores.

  6. Evaluation of high-intensity ultrasonication for the inactivation of endospores of 3 bacillus species in nonfat milk.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Som Nath; Anand, Sanjeev; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan

    2014-10-01

    Endospores of Bacillus licheniformis [American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 6634], Bacillus coagulans (ATCC 12245), and Geobacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 15952) were spiked in sterile nonfat milk, and subjected to high intensity batch ultrasonication treatment at different amplitudes (80 or 100%) and durations (1 to 10 min). Increasing the amplitude from 80 to 100% did not result in enhanced inactivation of G. stearothermophilus endospores. However, an increase in the duration of ultrasonication from 1 to 10 min significantly increased the inactivation of endospores of all 3 species. About 48.96% of the G. stearothermophilus endospores were inactivated by ultrasonication alone, whereas ultrasonication and pasteurization combined increased the inactivation to 65.74%. Inactivation of endospores could be further enhanced to 75.32% by ultrasonication and higher heat (80 °C/1 min) combination. Endospores of B. licheniformis and B. coagulans were inactivated to a lesser extent compared with G. stearothermophilus spores. Ultrasonicated B. licheniformis endospores germinated in higher numbers when compared with untreated endospores resulting in their greater inactivation during the combined treatment. During microstructure imaging of ultrasonicated endospores, although no structural damage was noticed, they showed irregular shrinkage and wrinkles with surface coarseness. This may also have contributed to their reduced thermal resistance, in addition to sporulation. PMID:25087024

  7. Sporosarcina saromensis sp. nov., an aerobic endospore-forming bacterium.

    PubMed

    An, Sun-Young; Haga, Tomomi; Kasai, Hiroaki; Goto, Keiichi; Yokota, Akira

    2007-08-01

    Two Gram-positive, endospore-forming, rod-shaped bacterial strains, HG645(T) and HG711, were respectively isolated from surface water of a brackish lake and sediment of a fishery harbour in Japan and were subsequently characterized taxonomically using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains HG645(T) and HG711 are affiliated phylogenetically to the genus Sporosarcina, and they exhibit sequence similarities of 95.7-97.3 % to the type strains of Sporosarcina species. DNA-DNA relatedness between strain HG645(T) and the type strain of the phylogenetically related species Sporosarcina aquimarina was less than 10 %. The DNA G+C content of strains HG645(T) and HG711 were respectively 46.0 and 45.2 mol%. Major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The cell-wall peptidoglycan type (Lys-Glu), major cellular fatty acids (iso-C(15 : 0) and anteiso-C(15 : 0)) and quinone type (MK-7) of the isolates support their affiliation to the genus Sporosarcina. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and physiological and chemotaxonomic data, the isolates represent a novel species of the genus Sporosarcina, for which the name Sporosarcina saromensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain HG645(T) (=MBIC08270(T)=IAM 15429(T) =KCTC 13119(T)). PMID:17684272

  8. Helicase-like transcription factor (Hltf) regulates G2/M transition, Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a cardiac transcription networks, and collagen biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Helmer, Rebecca A; Martínez-Zaguilán, Raul; Dertien, Janet S; Fulford, Candra; Foreman, Oded; Peiris, Vasum; Chilton, Beverly S

    2013-01-01

    HLTF/Hltf regulates transcription, remodels chromatin, and coordinates DNA damage repair. Hltf is expressed in mouse brain and heart during embryonic and postnatal development. Silencing Hltf is semilethal. Seventy-four percent of congenic C57BL/6J Hltf knockout mice died, 75% within 12-24 hours of birth. Previous studies in neonatal (6-8 hour postpartum) brain revealed silencing Hltf disrupted cell cycle progression, and attenuated DNA damage repair. An RNA-Seq snapshot of neonatal heart transcriptome showed 1,536 of 20,000 total transcripts were altered (p < 0.05) - 10 up- and 1,526 downregulated. Pathway enrichment analysis with MetaCore™ showed Hltf's regulation of the G2/M transition (p=9.726E(-15)) of the cell cycle in heart is nearly identical to its role in brain. In addition, Brca1 and 12 members of the Brca1 associated genome surveillance complex are also downregulated. Activation of caspase 3 coincides with transcriptional repression of Bcl-2. Hltf loss caused downregulation of Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a signaling cascades as well as Myh7b/miR499 transcription. Hltf-specific binding to promoters and/or regulatory regions of these genes was authenticated by ChIP-PCR. Hif-1a targets for prolyl (P4ha1, P4ha2) and lysyl (Plod2) collagen hydroxylation, PPIase enzymes (Ppid, Ppif, Ppil3) for collagen trimerization, and lysyl oxidase (Loxl2) for collagen-elastin crosslinking were downregulated. However, transcription of genes for collagens, fibronectin, Mmps and their inhibitors (Timps) was unaffected. The collective downregulation of genes whose protein products control collagen biogenesis caused disorganization of the interstitial and perivascular myocardial collagen fibrillar network as viewed with picrosirius red-staining, and authenticated with spectral imaging. Wavy collagen bundles in control hearts contrasted with collagen fibers that were thin, short and disorganized in Hltf null hearts. Collagen bundles in Hltf null hearts were tangled and fragmented. Thus

  9. Magnetosome biogenesis in magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Uebe, René; Schüler, Dirk

    2016-09-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria derive their magnetic orientation from magnetosomes, which are unique organelles that contain nanometre-sized crystals of magnetic iron minerals. Although these organelles have evident potential for exciting biotechnological applications, a lack of genetically tractable magnetotactic bacteria had hampered the development of such tools; however, in the past decade, genetic studies using two model Magnetospirillum species have revealed much about the mechanisms of magnetosome biogenesis. In this Review, we highlight these new insights and place the molecular mechanisms of magnetosome biogenesis in the context of the complex cell biology of Magnetospirillum spp. Furthermore, we discuss the diverse properties of magnetosome biogenesis in other species of magnetotactic bacteria and consider the value of genetically 'magnetizing' non-magnetotactic bacteria. Finally, we discuss future prospects for this highly interdisciplinary and rapidly advancing field. PMID:27620945

  10. Aβ25-35 Suppresses Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiguo; Wang, Feng; Guo, Wanqing; Zheng, Xuehua; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Wenguang; Shi, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial content, morphology, and function. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis has been observed in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) has been shown to cause mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured neurons, but its role in mitochondrial biogenesis in neurons remains poorly defined. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) are key energy-sensing molecules regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, is a target for SIRT1 deacetylase activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aβ25-35 on mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured hippocampal neurons and the underlying mechanisms. In primary hippocampal neurons, we found that 24-h incubation with Aβ25-35 suppressed both phosphorylations of AMPK and SIRT1 expression and increased PGC-1α acetylation expression. In addition, Aβ25-35 also resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number, as well as decreases in the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors (PGC-1α, NRF 1, NRF 2, and Tfam). Taken together, these data show that Aβ25-35 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis in hippocampal neurons. Aβ25-35-induced impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis may be associated with the inhibition of the AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α pathway. PMID:26055049

  11. Ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr3 is the aminocarboxypropyl transferase responsible for 18S rRNA hypermodification in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Sharma, Sunny; Immer, Carina; Pogoryelov, Denys; Kötter, Peter; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The chemically most complex modification in eukaryotic rRNA is the conserved hypermodified nucleotide N1-methyl-N3-aminocarboxypropyl-pseudouridine (m1acp3Ψ) located next to the P-site tRNA on the small subunit 18S rRNA. While S-adenosylmethionine was identified as the source of the aminocarboxypropyl (acp) group more than 40 years ago the enzyme catalyzing the acp transfer remained elusive. Here we identify the cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis protein Tsr3 as the responsible enzyme in yeast and human cells. In functionally impaired Tsr3-mutants, a reduced level of acp modification directly correlates with increased 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The crystal structure of archaeal Tsr3 homologs revealed the same fold as in SPOUT-class RNA-methyltransferases but a distinct SAM binding mode. This unique SAM binding mode explains why Tsr3 transfers the acp and not the methyl group of SAM to its substrate. Structurally, Tsr3 therefore represents a novel class of acp transferase enzymes. PMID:27084949

  12. Ribosome biogenesis factor Tsr3 is the aminocarboxypropyl transferase responsible for 18S rRNA hypermodification in yeast and humans.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britta; Wurm, Jan Philip; Sharma, Sunny; Immer, Carina; Pogoryelov, Denys; Kötter, Peter; Lafontaine, Denis L J; Wöhnert, Jens; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2016-05-19

    The chemically most complex modification in eukaryotic rRNA is the conserved hypermodified nucleotide N1-methyl-N3-aminocarboxypropyl-pseudouridine (m(1)acp(3)Ψ) located next to the P-site tRNA on the small subunit 18S rRNA. While S-adenosylmethionine was identified as the source of the aminocarboxypropyl (acp) group more than 40 years ago the enzyme catalyzing the acp transfer remained elusive. Here we identify the cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis protein Tsr3 as the responsible enzyme in yeast and human cells. In functionally impaired Tsr3-mutants, a reduced level of acp modification directly correlates with increased 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The crystal structure of archaeal Tsr3 homologs revealed the same fold as in SPOUT-class RNA-methyltransferases but a distinct SAM binding mode. This unique SAM binding mode explains why Tsr3 transfers the acp and not the methyl group of SAM to its substrate. Structurally, Tsr3 therefore represents a novel class of acp transferase enzymes. PMID:27084949

  13. MicroRNA biogenesis pathways in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuibin; Gregory, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of gene expression. Amplification and overexpression of individual ‘oncomiRs’ or genetic loss of tumour suppressor miRNAs are associated with human cancer and are sufficient to drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. Furthermore, global miRNA depletion caused by genetic and epigenetic alterations in components of the miRNA biogenesis machinery is oncogenic. This, together with the recent identification of novel miRNA regulatory factors and pathways, highlights the importance of miRNA dysregulation in cancer. PMID:25998712

  14. Exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Wu, Y; Zhang, P; Sha, H; Jia, J; Hu, Y; Zhu, J

    2012-03-15

    Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have suggested both exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to improved post-ischemic recovery of brain function. However, the exact mechanism underlying this effect is unclear. On the other hand, the benefit of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in brain has been confirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine whether treadmill exercise induces functional improvement through regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia. We subjected adult male rats to ischemia, followed by either treadmill exercise or non-exercise and analyzed the effect of exercise on the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors, and mitochondrial protein. In the ischemia-exercise group, only peroxisome proliferator activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1) expression was increased significantly after 3 days of treadmill training. However, after 7 days of training, the levels of mtDNA, nuclear respiratory factor 1, NRF-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, and the mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) and heat shock protein-60 (HSP60) also increased above levels observed in non-exercised ischemic animals. These changes followed with significant changes in behavioral scores and cerebral infarct volume. The results indicate that exercise can promote mitochondrial biogenesis after ischemic injury, which may serve as a novel component of exercise-induced repair mechanisms of the brain. Understanding the molecular basis for exercise-induced neuroprotection may be beneficial in the development of therapeutic approaches for brain recovery from the ischemic injury. Based upon our findings, stimulation or enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis may prove a novel neuroprotective strategy in the future. PMID:22266265

  15. Cellulose biogenesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Organisms that synthesize cellulose can be found amongst the bacteria, protistans, fungi, and animals, but it is in plants that the importance of cellulose in function (as the major structural constituent of plant cell walls) and economic use (as wood and fiber) can be best appreciated. The structure of cellulose and its biosynthesis have been the subjects of intense investigation. One of the most important insights gained from these studies is that the synthesis of cellulose by living organisms involves much more than simply the polymerization of glucose into a (1{r_arrow}4)-{beta}-linked polymer. The number of glucoses in a polymer (the degree of polymerization), the crystalline form assumed by the glucan chains when they crystallize to form a microfibril, and the dimensions and orientation of the microfibrils are all subject to cellular control. Instead of cellulose biosynthesis, a more appropriate term might be cellulose biogenesis, to emphasize the involvement of cellular structures and mechanisms in controlling polymerization and directing crystallization and deposition. Dictyostelium discoideum is uniquely suitable for the study of cellulose biogenesis because of its amenability to experimental study and manipulation and the extent of our knowledge of its basic cellular mechanisms (as will be evident from the rest of this volume). In this chapter, I will summarize what is known about cellulose biogenesis in D. discoideum, emphasizing its potential to illuminate our understanding both of D. discoideum development and plant cellulose biogenesis.

  16. Isolation of endophytic endospore-forming bacteria from Theobroma cacao as potential biological control agents of cacao dieseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endospore-forming bacterial endophytes were isolated from Theobroma cacao to access the present and diversity of endospore-forming bacteria in cacao. Cacao leaves, pods, branches, and flower cushions were removed from cacao trees escaping disease on INIAP’s Tropical Research Station in Pichilingue, ...

  17. SWP25, a novel protein associated with the Nosema bombycis endospore.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengli; Li, Yanhong; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang; Xiang, Zhonghuai

    2009-01-01

    Microsporidia are eukaryotic, obligate intracellular, spore-forming parasites. The resistant spores, which harbor a rigid cell wall, are critical for their host-to-host transmission and persistence in the environment. The spore wall comprises two major layers: the exospore and the endospore. In Nosema bombycis, two spore wall proteins have been characterized--an endosporal protein, SWP30, and an exosporal protein, SWP32. Here, we report the identification of the third spore wall protein of N. bombycis, SWP25, the gene of which has no known homologue. SWP25 is predicted to posses a signal peptide and a heparin-binding motif. Immunoelectron microscopy analysis showed that this protein is localized to the endospore. This characterization of a new spore wall protein of N. bombycis may facilitate our investigation of the relationship between N. bombycis and its host, Bombyx mori. PMID:19457051

  18. Under-detection of endospore-forming Firmicutes in metagenomic data.

    PubMed

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Lo, Chien-Chi; Li, Po-E; Chain, Patrick S; Junier, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Microbial diversity studies based on metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the microbial world. However, one caveat is the fact that not all microorganisms are equally well detected, questioning the universality of this approach. Firmicutes are known to be a dominant bacterial group. Several Firmicutes species are endospore formers and this property makes them hardy in potentially harsh conditions, and thus likely to be present in a wide variety of environments, even as residents and not functional players. While metagenomic libraries can be expected to contain endospore formers, endospores are known to be resilient to many traditional methods of DNA isolation and thus potentially undetectable. In this study we evaluated the representation of endospore-forming Firmicutes in 73 published metagenomic datasets using two molecular markers unique to this bacterial group (spo0A and gpr). Both markers were notably absent in well-known habitats of Firmicutes such as soil, with spo0A found only in three mammalian gut microbiomes. A tailored DNA extraction method resulted in the detection of a large diversity of endospore-formers in amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA and spo0A genes. However, shotgun classification was still poor with only a minor fraction of the community assigned to Firmicutes. Thus, removing a specific bias in a molecular workflow improves detection in amplicon sequencing, but it was insufficient to overcome the limitations for detecting endospore-forming Firmicutes in whole-genome metagenomics. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of understanding the specific methodological biases that can contribute to improve the universality of metagenomic approaches. PMID:25973144

  19. Under-detection of endospore-forming Firmicutes in metagenomic data

    SciTech Connect

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Lo, Chien -Chi; Li, Po -E; Chain, Patrick S.; Junier, Pilar

    2015-04-25

    Microbial diversity studies based on metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the microbial world. However, one caveat is the fact that not all microorganisms are equally well detected, questioning the universality of this approach. Firmicutes are known to be a dominant bacterial group. Several Firmicutes species are endospore formers and this property makes them hardy in potentially harsh conditions, and thus likely to be present in a wide variety of environments, even as residents and not functional players. While metagenomic libraries can be expected to contain endospore formers, endospores are known to be resilient to many traditional methods of DNA isolation and thus potentially undetectable. In this study we evaluated the representation of endospore-forming Firmicutes in 73 published metagenomic datasets using two molecular markers unique to this bacterial group (spo0A and gpr). Both markers were notably absent in well-known habitats of Firmicutes such as soil, with spo0A found only in three mammalian gut microbiomes. A tailored DNA extraction method resulted in the detection of a large diversity of endospore-formers in amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA and spo0A genes. However, shotgun classification was still poor with only a minor fraction of the community assigned to Firmicutes. Thus, removing a specific bias in a molecular workflow improves detection in amplicon sequencing, but it was insufficient to overcome the limitations for detecting endospore-forming Firmicutes in whole-genome metagenomics. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of understanding the specific methodological biases that can contribute to improve the universality of metagenomic approaches.

  20. Under-detection of endospore-forming Firmicutes in metagenomic data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Lo, Chien -Chi; Li, Po -E; Chain, Patrick S.; Junier, Pilar

    2015-04-25

    Microbial diversity studies based on metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the microbial world. However, one caveat is the fact that not all microorganisms are equally well detected, questioning the universality of this approach. Firmicutes are known to be a dominant bacterial group. Several Firmicutes species are endospore formers and this property makes them hardy in potentially harsh conditions, and thus likely to be present in a wide variety of environments, even as residents and not functional players. While metagenomic libraries can be expected to contain endospore formers, endospores are known to be resilient to many traditional methodsmore » of DNA isolation and thus potentially undetectable. In this study we evaluated the representation of endospore-forming Firmicutes in 73 published metagenomic datasets using two molecular markers unique to this bacterial group (spo0A and gpr). Both markers were notably absent in well-known habitats of Firmicutes such as soil, with spo0A found only in three mammalian gut microbiomes. A tailored DNA extraction method resulted in the detection of a large diversity of endospore-formers in amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA and spo0A genes. However, shotgun classification was still poor with only a minor fraction of the community assigned to Firmicutes. Thus, removing a specific bias in a molecular workflow improves detection in amplicon sequencing, but it was insufficient to overcome the limitations for detecting endospore-forming Firmicutes in whole-genome metagenomics. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of understanding the specific methodological biases that can contribute to improve the universality of metagenomic approaches.« less

  1. Dispersal of thermophilic Desulfotomaculum endospores into Baltic Sea sediments over thousands of years

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Júlia Rosa; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Hubert, Casey R J; Finster, Kai; Loy, Alexander; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of microbial biogeography result from a combination of dispersal, speciation and extinction, yet individual contributions exerted by each of these mechanisms are difficult to isolate and distinguish. The influx of endospores of thermophilic microorganisms to cold marine sediments offers a natural model for investigating passive dispersal in the ocean. We investigated the activity, diversity and abundance of thermophilic endospore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in Aarhus Bay by incubating pasteurized sediment between 28 and 85 °C, and by subsequent molecular diversity analyses of 16S rRNA and of the dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase (dsrAB) genes within the endospore-forming SRB genus Desulfotomaculum. The thermophilic Desulfotomaculum community in Aarhus Bay sediments consisted of at least 23 species-level 16S rRNA sequence phylotypes. In two cases, pairs of identical 16S rRNA and dsrAB sequences in Arctic surface sediment 3000 km away showed that the same phylotypes are present in both locations. Radiotracer-enhanced most probable number analysis revealed that the abundance of endospores of thermophilic SRB in Aarhus Bay sediment was ca. 104 per cm3 at the surface and decreased exponentially to 100 per cm3 at 6.5 m depth, corresponding to 4500 years of sediment age. Thus, a half-life of ca. 300 years was estimated for the thermophilic SRB endospores deposited in Aarhus Bay sediments. These endospores were similarly detected in the overlying water column, indicative of passive dispersal in water masses preceding sedimentation. The sources of these thermophiles remain enigmatic, but at least one source may be common to both Aarhus Bay and Arctic sediments. PMID:22832348

  2. Maintaining Ancient Organelles: Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Rick B.; Horton, Julie L.; Kelly, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the cardiac myocyte is remarkable for the high density of mitochondria tightly packed between sarcomeres. This structural organization is designed to provide energy in the form of ATP to fuel normal pump function of the heart. A complex system comprised of regulatory factors and energy metabolic machinery, encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, is required for the coordinate control of cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis, maturation, and high-capacity function. This process involves the action of a transcriptional regulatory network that builds and maintains the mitochondrial genome, and to drive the expression of the energy transduction machinery. This finely tuned system is responsive to developmental and physiological cues as well as changes in fuel substrate availability. Deficiency of components critical for mitochondrial energy production frequently manifests as a cardiomyopathic phenotype, underscoring the requirement to maintain high respiration rates in the heart. Although a precise causative role is not clear, there is increasing evidence that perturbations in this regulatory system occur in the hypertrophied and failing heart. This review summarizes current knowledge and highlights recent advances in our understanding of the transcriptional regulatory factors and signaling networks that serve to regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the mammalian heart. PMID:25999422

  3. Sterilization of bacterial endospores by an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Lim, Jin P.; Li, Shou Z.

    2007-06-25

    Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as free from toxic biological warfare agents. However, the spore-killing efficiency of the atmospheric-pressure argon-oxygen jet depends very sensitively on the oxygen concentration in the argon gas.

  4. Quantification of Endospore Concentrations of Pasteuria penetrans in Tomato Root Material

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z. X.; Dickson, D. W.; Hewlett, T. E.

    1996-01-01

    Six methods for quantification of the endospore concentrations of Pasteuria penetrans from tomato roots are described. Mortar disruption and machine disruption methods gave the highest estimations (endospores per gram of root material) of 83.7 and 79.0 million, respectively. These methods were significantly superior to incubation bioassay (47.7 million), enzymatic disruption (32.1 million), and enzymatic disruption + flotation (25.8 million) methods. A centrifugation bioassay method gave the lowest estimation of 12.7 million. PMID:19277345

  5. Mitochondrial biogenesis is required for axonal growth.

    PubMed

    Vaarmann, Annika; Mandel, Merle; Zeb, Akbar; Wareski, Przemyslaw; Liiv, Joanna; Kuum, Malle; Antsov, Eva; Liiv, Mailis; Cagalinec, Michal; Choubey, Vinay; Kaasik, Allen

    2016-06-01

    During early development, neurons undergo complex morphological rearrangements to assemble into neuronal circuits and propagate signals. Rapid growth requires a large quantity of building materials, efficient intracellular transport and also a considerable amount of energy. To produce this energy, the neuron should first generate new mitochondria because the pre-existing mitochondria are unlikely to provide a sufficient acceleration in ATP production. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial biogenesis and ATP production are required for axonal growth and neuronal development in cultured rat cortical neurons. We also demonstrate that growth signals activating the CaMKKβ, LKB1-STRAD or TAK1 pathways also co-activate the AMPK-PGC-1α-NRF1 axis leading to the generation of new mitochondria to ensure energy for upcoming growth. In conclusion, our results suggest that neurons are capable of signalling for upcoming energy requirements. Earlier activation of mitochondrial biogenesis through these pathways will accelerate the generation of new mitochondria, thereby ensuring energy-producing capability for when other factors for axonal growth are synthesized. PMID:27122166

  6. Unravelling the mechanisms regulating muscle mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hood, David A; Tryon, Liam D; Carter, Heather N; Kim, Yuho; Chen, Chris C W

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle is a tissue with a low mitochondrial content under basal conditions, but it is responsive to acute increases in contractile activity patterns (i.e. exercise) which initiate the signalling of a compensatory response, leading to the biogenesis of mitochondria and improved organelle function. Exercise also promotes the degradation of poorly functioning mitochondria (i.e. mitophagy), thereby accelerating mitochondrial turnover, and preserving a pool of healthy organelles. In contrast, muscle disuse, as well as the aging process, are associated with reduced mitochondrial quality and quantity in muscle. This has strong negative implications for whole-body metabolic health and the preservation of muscle mass. A number of traditional, as well as novel regulatory pathways exist in muscle that control both biogenesis and mitophagy. Interestingly, although the ablation of single regulatory transcription factors within these pathways often leads to a reduction in the basal mitochondrial content of muscle, this can invariably be overcome with exercise, signifying that exercise activates a multitude of pathways which can respond to restore mitochondrial health. This knowledge, along with growing realization that pharmacological agents can also promote mitochondrial health independently of exercise, leads to an optimistic outlook in which the maintenance of mitochondrial and whole-body metabolic health can be achieved by taking advantage of the broad benefits of exercise, along with the potential specificity of drug action. PMID:27470593

  7. Genome Sequence of Anoxybacillus geothermalis Strain GSsed3, a Novel Thermophilic Endospore-Forming Species

    PubMed Central

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Roussel-Delif, Ludovic; Jeanneret, Nicole; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Vetter, Alexandra; Regenspurg, Simona; McMurry, Kim; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Lo, Chien-Chi; Li, Paul; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Anoxybacillus geothermalis strain GSsed3 is an endospore-forming thermophilic bacterium isolated from filter deposits in a geothermal site. This novel species has a larger genome size (7.2 Mb) than that of any other Anoxybacillus species, and it possesses genes that support its phenotypic metabolic characterization and suggest an intriguing link to metals. PMID:26067952

  8. A Monoclonal Antibody That Tracks Endospore Formation in the Microsporidium Nosema bombycis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhong; Tao, Meiling; Ma, Fuping; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang; Wu, Zhengli

    2015-01-01

    Nosema bombycis, the first identified microsporidium, is a destructive pathogen of the silkworm Bombyx mori and causes severe worldwide economic losses in sericulture. Major microsporidian structural proteins, such as the spore wall protein (SWP), are known to be involved in host invasion. In this study, the reactivity of the monoclonal antibody 2B10 was tested against an endospore protein of N. bombycis with a molecular weight size at 50-kDa, using Western blotting. The antigen was purified after immunoprecipitation and was further identified as EOB13320 according to MALDI-TOF MS assay. We found that EOB13320 locates to the surface of the different developmental stages of the parasite, mostly the sporoblast stage and the mature spore after immunoelectron microscopy examination. EOB13320 was also widely distributed in the developing endospore, especially at the sporoblast stage. This endospore protein also accumulated in the cytoplasm of both the merogony and sporoblast stages. These results imply that EOB13320 detected by monoclonal antibody 2B10 is expressed throughout the life cycle of the parasite, notably during the stage when the endospore is formed, and that this protein is important for spore-coat formation and parasite maintenance. Our study could be instrumental in the understanding of spore wall formation and will help to gain greater insight into the biology of this parasite. PMID:25811182

  9. A monoclonal antibody that tracks endospore formation in the microsporidium Nosema bombycis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Tao, Meiling; Ma, Fuping; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang; Wu, Zhengli

    2015-01-01

    Nosema bombycis, the first identified microsporidium, is a destructive pathogen of the silkworm Bombyx mori and causes severe worldwide economic losses in sericulture. Major microsporidian structural proteins, such as the spore wall protein (SWP), are known to be involved in host invasion. In this study, the reactivity of the monoclonal antibody 2B10 was tested against an endospore protein of N. bombycis with a molecular weight size at 50-kDa, using Western blotting. The antigen was purified after immunoprecipitation and was further identified as EOB13320 according to MALDI-TOF MS assay. We found that EOB13320 locates to the surface of the different developmental stages of the parasite, mostly the sporoblast stage and the mature spore after immunoelectron microscopy examination. EOB13320 was also widely distributed in the developing endospore, especially at the sporoblast stage. This endospore protein also accumulated in the cytoplasm of both the merogony and sporoblast stages. These results imply that EOB13320 detected by monoclonal antibody 2B10 is expressed throughout the life cycle of the parasite, notably during the stage when the endospore is formed, and that this protein is important for spore-coat formation and parasite maintenance. Our study could be instrumental in the understanding of spore wall formation and will help to gain greater insight into the biology of this parasite. PMID:25811182

  10. Genome Sequence of Anoxybacillus geothermalis Strain GSsed3, a Novel Thermophilic Endospore-Forming Species.

    PubMed

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Roussel-Delif, Ludovic; Jeanneret, Nicole; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Vetter, Alexandra; Regenspurg, Simona; Johnson, Shannon L; McMurry, Kim; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Lo, Chien-Chi; Li, Paul; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick S; Junier, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Anoxybacillus geothermalis strain GSsed3 is an endospore-forming thermophilic bacterium isolated from filter deposits in a geothermal site. This novel species has a larger genome size (7.2 Mb) than that of any other Anoxybacillus species, and it possesses genes that support its phenotypic metabolic characterization and suggest an intriguing link to metals. PMID:26067952

  11. Minotaur is critical for primary piRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vagin, Vasily V.; Yu, Yang; Jankowska, Anna; Luo, Yicheng; Wasik, Kaja A.; Malone, Colin D.; Harrison, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam; Wakimoto, Barbara T.; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Muerdter, Felix; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Piwi proteins and their associated small RNAs are essential for fertility in animals. In part, this is due to their roles in guarding germ cell genomes against the activity of mobile genetic elements. piRNA populations direct Piwi proteins to silence transposon targets and, as such, form a molecular code that discriminates transposons from endogenous genes. Information ultimately carried by piRNAs is encoded within genomic loci, termed piRNA clusters. These give rise to long, single-stranded, primary transcripts that are processed into piRNAs. Despite the biological importance of this pathway, neither the characteristics that define a locus as a source of piRNAs nor the mechanisms that catalyze primary piRNA biogenesis are well understood. We searched an EMS-mutant collection annotated for fertility phenotypes for genes involved in the piRNA pathway. Twenty-seven homozygous sterile strains showed transposon-silencing defects. One of these, which strongly impacted primary piRNA biogenesis, harbored a causal mutation in CG5508, a member of the Drosophila glycerol-3-phosphate O-acetyltransferase (GPAT) family. These enzymes catalyze the first acylation step on the path to the production of phosphatidic acid (PA). Though this pointed strongly to a function for phospholipid signaling in the piRNA pathway, a mutant form of CG5508, which lacks the GPAT active site, still functions in piRNA biogenesis. We have named this new biogenesis factor Minotaur. PMID:23788724

  12. Stress triggers mitochondrial biogenesis to preserve steroidogenesis in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Gak, Igor A; Radovic, Sava M; Dukic, Aleksandra R; Janjic, Marija M; Stojkov-Mimic, Natasa J; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2015-10-01

    Adaptability to stress is a fundamental prerequisite for survival. Mitochondria are a key component of the stress response in all cells. For steroid-hormones-producing cells, including also Leydig cells of testes, the mitochondria are a key control point for the steroid biosynthesis and regulation. However, the mitochondrial biogenesis in steroidogenic cells has never been explored. Here we show that increased mitochondrial biogenesis is the adaptive response of testosterone-producing Leydig cells from stressed rats. All markers of mitochondrial biogenesis together with transcription factors and related kinases are up-regulated in Leydig cells from rats exposed to repeated psychophysical stress. This is followed with increased mitochondrial mass. The expression of PGC1, master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and integrator of environmental signals, is stimulated by cAMP-PRKA, cGMP, and β-adrenergic receptors. Accordingly, stress-triggered mitochondrial biogenesis represents an adaptive mechanism and does not only correlate with but also is an essential for testosterone production, being both events depend on the same regulators. Here we propose that all events induced by acute stress, the most common stress in human society, provoke adaptive response of testosterone-producing Leydig cells and activate PGC1, a protein required to make new mitochondria but also protector against the oxidative damage. Given the importance of mitochondria for steroid hormones production and stress response, as well as the role of steroid hormones in stress response and metabolic syndrome, we anticipate our result to be a starting point for more investigations since stress is a constant factor in life and has become one of the most significant health problems in modern societies. PMID:26036344

  13. Biogenesis and Assembly of Eukaryotic Cytochrome c Oxidase Catalytic Core

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Liu, Jingjing; Barrientos, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. COX is a multimeric enzyme formed by subunits of dual genetic origin which assembly is intricate and highly regulated. The COX catalytic core is formed by three mitochondrial DNA encoded subunits, Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, conserved in the bacterial enzyme. Their biogenesis requires the action of messenger-specific and subunit-specific factors which facilitate the synthesis, membrane insertion, maturation or assembly of the core subunits. The study of yeast strains and human cell lines from patients carrying mutations in structural subunits and COX assembly factors has been invaluable to identify these ancillary factors. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the biogenesis and assembly of the eukaryotic COX catalytic core and discuss the degree of conservation of the players and mechanisms operating from yeast to human. PMID:21958598

  14. EVALUATION OF THE BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. (BioGenesis) soil washing technology was demonstrated as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program in November 1992. The demonstration was conducted over three days at a petrol...

  15. Single-shot detection of bacterial endospores via coherent Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pestov, Dmitry; Wang, Xi; Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Murawski, Robert K.; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Dogariu, Arthur; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in coherent Raman spectroscopy hold exciting promise for many potential applications. For example, a technique, mitigating the nonresonant four-wave-mixing noise while maximizing the Raman-resonant signal, has been developed and applied to the problem of real-time detection of bacterial endospores. After a brief review of the technique essentials, we show how extensions of our earlier experimental work [Pestov D, et al. (2007) Science 316:265–268] yield single-shot identification of a small sample of Bacillus subtilis endospores (≈104 spores). The results convey the utility of the technique and its potential for “on-the-fly” detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis. The application of optimized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering scheme to problems requiring chemical specificity and short signal acquisition times is demonstrated. PMID:18184801

  16. Monitoring the kinetics of Bacillus subtilis endospore germination via surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Jacquitta K; Caldwell, Thomas P; Christensen, Kenneth A; Chumanov, George

    2006-03-01

    Mirror sandwich SERS substrates (M3S) were used to monitor the kinetics of Bacillus subtilis endospore germination. The sandwich configuration of the substrates allows real-time observation of germination in samples that contained only several hundred endospores. The enhancement provided by the substrates is attributed to the enhanced local electromagnetic field that originates from coupling between the Ag nanoparticles and the underlying metal film as well as from coupling between the Ag nanoparticles themselves. The germination kinetics at varying concentrations of l-alanine and different temperatures were studied by monitoring the intensity and growth of the Raman peak at 1010 cm(-1), which is characteristic of dipicolinic acid. A total of four concentrations (50, 75, 100, and 150 mM) of l-alanine and three different temperatures (30, 37, and 55 degrees C) were investigated. PMID:16503629

  17. Temporal Formation and Immunolocalization of an Endospore Surface Epitope During Pasteuria penetrans Sporogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brito, J. A.; Preston, J. F.; Dickson, D. W.; Giblin-Davis, R. M.; Williams, D. S.; Aldrich, H. C.; Rice, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis and localization of an endospore surface epitope associated with the development of Pasteuria penetrans was determined using a monoclonal antibody (MAb) as a probe. Nematodes, uninfected or infected with P. penetrans, were harvested at 12, 16, 24, and 38 days after inoculation (DAI) and then examined to determine the developmental stage of the bacterium. Vegetative growth of P. penetrans was observed only in infected nematodes harvested at 12 and 16 DAI, whereas cells at different stages of sporulation and mature endospores were observed at 24 and 38 DAI. ELISA and immunoblot analysis revealed that the adhesin-associated epitope was first detected at 24 DAI, and increased in the later stages of sporogenesis. These results indicate that the synthesis of adhesin-related proteins occurred at a certain developmental stage relative to the sporulation process, and was associated with endospore maturation. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that the distribution of the epitope is nearly uniform on the periphery of each spore, as defined by parasporal fibers. Immunocytochemistry at the ultrastructural level indicated a distribution of the epitope over the parasporal fibers. The epitope also was detected over other structures such as sporangium and exosporium during the sporogenesis process, but it was not observed over the cortex, inner-spore coat, outer-spore coat, or protoplasm. The appearance of the adhesin epitope first at stage III of sporogenesis and its presence on the parasporal fibers are consistent with an adhesin-related role in the attachment of the mature endospore to the cuticle of the nematode host. PMID:19262762

  18. Endospore surface properties of commonly used Bacillus anthracis surrogates vary in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    White, Colin P; Popovici, Jonathan; Lytle, Darren A; Rice, Eugene W

    2014-08-01

    The hydrophobic character and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microorganisms are vital aspects of understanding their interactions with the environment. These properties are fundamental in fate-and-transport, physiological, and virulence studies, and thus integral in surrogate selection. Hydrophobic and electrostatic forces are significant contributors to particle and microorganism mobility in the environment. Herein, the surface properties of commonly used Bacillus anthracis surrogate endospores were tested under comparable conditions with respect to culture, endospore purification, buffer type and strength. Additionally, data is presented of endospores suspended in dechlorinated tap water to evaluate the surrogates in regard to a breach of water infrastructure security. The surface properties of B. anthracis were found to be the most hydrophobic and least electronegative among the six Bacillus species tested across buffer strength. The effect of EPM on hydrophobicity varies in a species-specific manner. This study demonstrates that surrogate surface properties differ and care must be taken when choosing the most suitable surrogate. Moreover, it is shown that Bacillus thuringensis best represents Bacillus anthracis-Sterne with respect to both EPM and hydrophobicity across all test buffers. PMID:24817579

  19. Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius endospores function as nuclei for the formation of single calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Murai, Rie; Yoshida, Naoto

    2013-05-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius colonies were placed on an agar hydrogel containing acetate, calcium ions, and magnesium ions, resulting in the formation of single calcite crystals (calcites) within and peripheral to the plating area or parent colony. Microscopic observation of purified calcites placed on the surface of soybean casein digest (SCD) nutrient medium revealed interior crevices from which bacterial colonies originated. Calcites formed on the gel contained [1-(13)C]- and [2-(13)C]acetate, demonstrating that G. thermoglucosidasius utilizes carbon derived from acetate for calcite formation. During calcite formation, vegetative cells swam away from the parent colony in the hydrogel. Hard-agar hydrogel inhibited the formation of calcites peripheral to the parent colony. The calcite dissolved completely in 1 M HCl, with production of bubbles, and the remaining endospore-like particles were easily stained with Brilliant green dye. The presence of DNA and protein in calcites was demonstrated by electrophoresis. We propose that endospores initiate the nucleation of calcites. Endospores of G. thermoglucosidasius remain alive and encapsulated in calcites. PMID:23455343

  20. Quantitative X-ray phase contrast waveguide imaging of bacterial endospores1

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, R. N.; Hoppert, M.; Krenkel, M.; Bartels, M.; Salditt, T.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative waveguide-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has been carried out on the level of single, unstained, unsliced and freeze-dried bacterial cells of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus subtilis using hard X-rays of 7.9 keV photon energy. The cells have been prepared in the metabolically dormant state of an endospore. The quantitative phase maps obtained by iterative phase retrieval using a modified hybrid input–output algorithm allow for mass and mass density determinations on the level of single individual endospores but include also large field of view investigations. Additionally, a direct reconstruction based on the contrast transfer function is investigated, and the two approaches are compared. Depending on the field of view and method, a resolution down to 65 nm was achieved at a maximum applied dose of below 5 × 105 Gy. Masses in the range of about ∼110–190 (20) fg for isolated endospores have been obtained. PMID:25844079

  1. Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Endospores Function as Nuclei for the Formation of Single Calcite Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Rie

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius colonies were placed on an agar hydrogel containing acetate, calcium ions, and magnesium ions, resulting in the formation of single calcite crystals (calcites) within and peripheral to the plating area or parent colony. Microscopic observation of purified calcites placed on the surface of soybean casein digest (SCD) nutrient medium revealed interior crevices from which bacterial colonies originated. Calcites formed on the gel contained [1-13C]- and [2-13C]acetate, demonstrating that G. thermoglucosidasius utilizes carbon derived from acetate for calcite formation. During calcite formation, vegetative cells swam away from the parent colony in the hydrogel. Hard-agar hydrogel inhibited the formation of calcites peripheral to the parent colony. The calcite dissolved completely in 1 M HCl, with production of bubbles, and the remaining endospore-like particles were easily stained with Brilliant green dye. The presence of DNA and protein in calcites was demonstrated by electrophoresis. We propose that endospores initiate the nucleation of calcites. Endospores of G. thermoglucosidasius remain alive and encapsulated in calcites. PMID:23455343

  2. Resveratrol Induces Hepatic Mitochondrial Biogenesis Through the Sequential Activation of Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Joe, Yeonsoo; Zheng, Min; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Yu, Jae-Kyoung; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Chang, Ki Churl; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Ryter, Stefan W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nitric oxide (NO) can induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured cells, through increased guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP), and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). We sought to determine the role of NO, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and its reaction product (carbon monoxide [CO]) in the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis by the natural antioxidant resveratrol. Results: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), an NO donor, induced mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 hepatoma cells, and in vivo, through stimulation of PGC-1α. NO-induced mitochondrial biogenesis required cGMP, and was mimicked by the cGMP analogue (8-bromoguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate [8-Br-cGMP]). Activation of mitochondrial biogenesis by SNAP required HO-1, as it could be reversed by genetic interference of HO-1; and by treatment with the HO inhibitor tin-protoporphyrin-IX (SnPP) in vitro and in vivo. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP)-IX, an HO-1 inducing agent, stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, which could be reversed by the CO scavenger hemoglobin. Application of CO, using the CO-releasing molecule-3 (CORM-3), stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, in a cGMP-dependent manner. Both CoPP and CORM-3-induced mitochondrial biogenesis required NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activation and phosphorylation of Akt. The natural antioxidant resveratrol induced mitochondrial biogenesis in HepG2 cells, in a manner dependent on NO biosynthesis, cGMP synthesis, Nrf2-dependent HO-1 activation, and endogenous CO production. Furthermore, resveratrol preserved mitochondrial biogenesis during lipopolysaccharides-induced hepatic inflammation in vivo. Innovation and Conclusions: The complex interplay between endogenous NO and CO production may underlie the mechanism by which natural antioxidants induce mitochondrial biogenesis. Strategies aimed at improving mitochondrial biogenesis may be used as therapeutics

  3. Biogenesis of light harvesting proteins.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Bressan, Mauro; Bassi, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The LHC family includes nuclear-encoded, integral thylakoid membrane proteins, most of which coordinate chlorophyll and xanthophyll chromophores. By assembling with the core complexes of both photosystems, LHCs form a flexible peripheral moiety for enhancing light-harvesting cross-section, regulating its efficiency and providing protection against photo-oxidative stress. Upon its first appearance, LHC proteins underwent evolutionary diversification into a large protein family with a complex genetic redundancy. Such differentiation appears as a crucial event in the adaptation of photosynthetic organisms to changing environmental conditions and land colonization. The structure of photosystems, including nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded subunits, presented the cell with a number of challenges for the control of the light harvesting function. Indeed, LHC-encoding messages are translated in the cytosol, and pre-proteins imported into the chloroplast, processed to their mature size and targeted to the thylakoids where are assembled with chromophores. Thus, a tight coordination between nuclear and plastid gene expression, in response to environmental stimuli, is required to adjust LHC composition during photoacclimation. In recent years, remarkable progress has been achieved in elucidating structure, function and regulatory pathways involving LHCs; however, a number of molecular details still await elucidation. In this review, we will provide an overview on the current knowledge on LHC biogenesis, ranging from organization of pigment-protein complexes to the modulation of gene expression, import and targeting to the photosynthetic membranes, and regulation of LHC assembly and turnover. Genes controlling these events are potential candidate for biotechnological applications aimed at optimizing light use efficiency of photosynthetic organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:25687893

  4. Effects of Bacillus subtilis endospore surface reactivity on the rate of forsterite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Z.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Primary mineral dissolution products, such as silica (Si), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), play an important role in numerous biologic and geochemical cycles including microbial metabolism, plant growth and secondary mineral precipitation. The flux of these and other dissolution products into the environment is largely controlled by the rate of primary silicate mineral dissolution. Bacteria, a ubiquitous component in water-rock systems, are known to facilitate mineral dissolution and may play a substantial role in determining the overall flux of dissolution products into the environment. Bacterial cell walls are complex and highly reactive organic surfaces that can affect mineral dissolution rates directly through microbe-mineral adsorption or indirectly by complexing dissolution products. The effect of bacterial surface adsorption on chemical weathering rates may even outweigh the influence of active processes in environments where a high proportion of cells are metabolically dormant or cell metabolism is slow. Complications associated with eliminating or accounting for ongoing metabolic processes in long-term dissolution studies have made it challenging to isolate the influence of cell wall interactions on mineral dissolution rates. We utilized Bacillus subtilis endospores, a robust and metabolically dormant cell type, to isolate and quantify the effects of bacterial surface reactivity on forsterite (Mg2SiO4) dissolution rates. We measured the influence of both direct and indirect microbe-mineral interactions on forsterite dissolution. Indirect pathways were isolated using dialysis tubing to prevent mineral-microbe contact while allowing free exchange of dissolved mineral products and endospore-ion adsorption. Homogenous experimental assays allowed both direct microbe-mineral and indirect microbe-ion interactions to affect forsterite dissolution rates. Dissolution rates were calculated based on silica concentrations and zero-order dissolution kinetics

  5. Effects of nisin and reutericyclin on resistance of endospores of Clostridium spp. to heat and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Simmon; Gebhardt, David; Ho, Linda; Gänzle, Michael; McMullen, Lynn M

    2013-05-01

    The effects of high pressure, temperature, and antimicrobial compounds on endospores of Clostridium spp. were examined. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of nisin and reutericyclin were determined for vegetative cells and endospores of Clostridium sporogenes ATCC 7955, Clostridium beijerinckii ATCC 8260, and Clostridium difficile 3195. Endospores of C. sporogenes ATCC 7955 and C. beijerinckii ATCC 8260 were exposed to 90 °C and 90 °C/600 MPa in the presence of 16 mg L(-1) nisin or 6.4 mg L(-1) reutericyclin for 0-60 min in a 0.9% saline solution. Dipicolinic acid (DPA) release was measured using a terbium-DPA fluorescence assay, and endospore permeability was assessed using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) fluorescence. Vegetative cells of C. sporogenes ATCC 7955 exhibited higher sensitivity to nisin relative to endospores, with MIC values 0.23 ± 0.084 mg L(-1) and 1.11 ± 0.48 mg L(-1), respectively. Nisin increased DPA release when endospores were treated at 90 °C; however, only C. sporogenes ATCC 7955 exhibited higher inactivation, suggesting strain or species specific effects. Reutericyclin did not enhance spore inactivation or DPA release. Use of nisin in combination with high pressure, thermal treatments enhanced inactivation of endospores of Clostridium spp. and may have application in foods. PMID:23498177

  6. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  7. Regulation of ribosome biogenesis in maize embryonic axes during germination.

    PubMed

    Villa-Hernández, J M; Dinkova, T D; Aguilar-Caballero, R; Rivera-Cabrera, F; Sánchez de Jiménez, E; Pérez-Flores, L J

    2013-10-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a pre-requisite for cell growth and proliferation; it is however, a highly regulated process that consumes a great quantity of energy. It requires the coordinated production of rRNA, ribosomal proteins and non-ribosomal factors which participate in the processing and mobilization of the new ribosomes. Ribosome biogenesis has been studied in yeast and animals; however, there is little information about this process in plants. The objective of the present work was to study ribosome biogenesis in maize seeds during germination, a stage characterized for its fast growth, and the effect of insulin in this process. Insulin has been reported to accelerate germination and to induce seedling growth. It was observed that among the first events reactivated just after 3 h of imbibition are the rDNA transcription and the pre-rRNA processing and that insulin stimulates both of them (40-230%). The transcript of nucleolin, a protein which regulates rDNA transcription and pre-rRNA processing, is among the messages stored in quiescent dry seeds and it is mobilized into the polysomal fraction during the first hours of imbibition (6 h). In contrast, de novo ribosomal protein synthesis was low during the first hours of imbibition (3 and 6 h) increasing by 60 times in later stages (24 h). Insulin increased this synthesis (75%) at 24 h of imbibition; however, not all ribosomal proteins were similarly regulated. In this regard, an increase in RPS6 and RPL7 protein levels was observed, whereas RPL3 protein levels did not change even though its transcription was induced. Results show that ribosome biogenesis in the first stages of imbibition is carried out with newly synthesized rRNA and ribosomal proteins translated from stored mRNA. PMID:23806421

  8. HDL biogenesis, remodeling, and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Zannis, Vassilis I; Fotakis, Panagiotis; Koukos, Georgios; Kardassis, Dimitris; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review how HDL is generated, remodeled, and catabolized in plasma. We describe key features of the proteins that participate in these processes, emphasizing how mutations in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and the other proteins affect HDL metabolism. The biogenesis of HDL initially requires functional interaction of apoA-I with the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and subsequently interactions of the lipidated apoA-I forms with lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Mutations in these proteins either prevent or impair the formation and possibly the functionality of HDL. Remodeling and catabolism of HDL is the result of interactions of HDL with cell receptors and other membrane and plasma proteins including hepatic lipase (HL), endothelial lipase (EL), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), apolipoprotein M (apoM), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), the F1 subunit of ATPase (Ecto F1-ATPase), and the cubulin/megalin receptor. Similarly to apoA-I, apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-IV were shown to form discrete HDL particles containing these apolipoproteins which may have important but still unexplored functions. Furthermore, several plasma proteins were found associated with HDL and may modulate its biological functions. The effect of these proteins on the functionality of HDL is the topic of ongoing research. PMID:25522986

  9. Echinochrome A Increases Mitochondrial Mass and Function by Modulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis Regulatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In-Sung; Noh, Su Jin; Marquez, Jubert; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoreyev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (Ech A) is a natural pigment from sea urchins that has been reported to have antioxidant properties and a cardio protective effect against ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, we ascertained whether Ech A enhances the mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat cardio myoblast H9c2 cells. To study the effects of Ech A on mitochondrial biogenesis, we measured mitochondrial mass, level of oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory gene expression. Ech A treatment did not induce cytotoxicity. However, Ech A treatment enhanced oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial ATP level. Likewise, Ech A treatment increased mitochondrial contents in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, Ech A treatment up-regulated biogenesis of regulatory transcription genes, including proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator (PGC)-1α, estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-α, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR)-γ, and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 and such mitochondrial transcription regulatory genes as mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM), mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M), mitochondrial DNA direct polymerase (POLMRT), single strand binding protein (SSBP) and Tu translation elongation factor (TUFM). In conclusion, these data suggest that Ech A is a potentiated marine drug which enhances mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25196935

  10. Ribosome biogenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Woolford, John L; Baserga, Susan J

    2013-11-01

    Ribosomes are highly conserved ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that translate information in the genome to create the proteome in all cells. In yeast these complex particles contain four RNAs (>5400 nucleotides) and 79 different proteins. During the past 25 years, studies in yeast have led the way to understanding how these molecules are assembled into ribosomes in vivo. Assembly begins with transcription of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus, where the RNA then undergoes complex pathways of folding, coupled with nucleotide modification, removal of spacer sequences, and binding to ribosomal proteins. More than 200 assembly factors and 76 small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with assembling ribosomes, to enable their accurate and efficient construction. Following export of preribosomes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, they undergo final stages of maturation before entering the pool of functioning ribosomes. Elaborate mechanisms exist to monitor the formation of correct structural and functional neighborhoods within ribosomes and to destroy preribosomes that fail to assemble properly. Studies of yeast ribosome biogenesis provide useful models for ribosomopathies, diseases in humans that result from failure to properly assemble ribosomes. PMID:24190922

  11. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a human adenovirus surrogate for evaluating the effectiveness of virus inactivation in low-pressure UV treatment systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential to use Bacillus pumilus endospores as a surrogate of human adenovirus (HAdV) in UV disinfection studies. The use of endospores has been limited by observations of batch-to-batch variation in UV sensitivity. This study reports on a pr...

  12. cAMP-induced Mitochondrial Compartment Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yoboue, Edgar D.; Augier, Eric; Galinier, Anne; Blancard, Corinne; Pinson, Benoît; Casteilla, Louis; Rigoulet, Michel; Devin, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Cell fate and proliferation are tightly linked to the regulation of the mitochondrial energy metabolism. Hence, mitochondrial biogenesis regulation, a complex process that requires a tight coordination in the expression of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, has a major impact on cell fate and is of high importance. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis through a nutrient-sensing pathway, the Ras-cAMP pathway. Activation of this pathway induces a decrease in the cellular phosphate potential that alleviates the redox pressure on the mitochondrial respiratory chain. One of the cellular consequences of this modulation of cellular phosphate potential is an increase in the cellular glutathione redox state. The redox state of the glutathione disulfide-glutathione couple is a well known important indicator of the cellular redox environment, which is itself tightly linked to mitochondrial activity, mitochondria being the main cellular producer of reactive oxygen species. The master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in yeast (i.e. the transcriptional co-activator Hap4p) is positively regulated by the cellular glutathione redox state. Using a strain that is unable to modulate its glutathione redox state (Δglr1), we pinpoint a positive feedback loop between this redox state and the control of mitochondrial biogenesis. This is the first time that control of mitochondrial biogenesis through glutathione redox state has been shown. PMID:22396541

  13. Insights into chloroplast biogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Barry J; Ganguly, Diep; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2015-09-01

    In recent years many advances have been made to obtain insight into chloroplast biogenesis and development. In plants several plastids types exist such as the proplastid (which is the progenitor of all plastids), leucoplasts (group of colourless plastids important for storage including elaioplasts (lipids), amyloplasts (starch) or proteinoplasts (proteins)), chromoplasts (yellow to orange-coloured due to carotenoids, in flowers or in old leaves as gerontoplasts), and the green chloroplasts. Chloroplasts are indispensable for plant development; not only by performing photosynthesis and thus rendering the plant photoautotrophic, but also for biochemical processes (which in some instances can also take place in other plastids types), such as the synthesis of pigments, lipids, and plant hormones and sensing environmental stimuli. Although we understand many aspects of these processes there are gaps in our understanding of the establishment of functional chloroplasts and their regulation. Why is that so? Even though chloroplast function is comparable in all plants and most of the algae, ferns and moss, detailed analyses have revealed many differences, specifically with respect to its biogenesis. As an update to our prior review on the genetic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis and development [1] herein we will focus on recent advances in Angiosperms (monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants) that provide novel insights and highlight the challenges and prospects for unravelling the regulation of chloroplast biogenesis specifically during the establishment of the young plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. PMID:25667967

  14. High pressure inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores in model emulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Juliane; Lenz, Christian A.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type E is a cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore-forming organism, primarily associated with aquatic environments. High pressure thermal (HPT) processing presents a promising tool to enhance food safety and stability. The effect of fat on HPT inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores was investigated using an emulsion model system. The distribution of spores in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions and their HPT (300-750 MPa, 45-75 °C, 10 min) inactivation was determined as a function of emulsion fat content (30-70% (v/v) soybean oil in buffer). Approximately 26% and 74% of the spores were located at the oil-buffer interface and the continuous phase, respectively. Spore inactivation in emulsion systems decreased with increasing oil contents, which suggests that the fat content of food plays an important role in the protection of C. botulinum type E endospores against HPT treatments. These results can be helpful for future safety considerations. This paper was presented at the 8th International Conference on High Pressure Bioscience & Biotechnology (HPBB 2014), in Nantes (France), 15-18 July 2014.

  15. PMA-Linked Fluorescence for Rapid Detection of Viable Bacterial Endospores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaDuc, Myron T.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Mohapatra, Bidyut

    2012-01-01

    The most common approach for assessing the abundance of viable bacterial endospores is the culture-based plating method. However, culture-based approaches are heavily biased and oftentimes incompatible with upstream sample processing strategies, which make viable cells/spores uncultivable. This shortcoming highlights the need for rapid molecular diagnostic tools to assess more accurately the abundance of viable spacecraft-associated microbiota, perhaps most importantly bacterial endospores. Propidium monoazide (PMA) has received a great deal of attention due to its ability to differentiate live, viable bacterial cells from dead ones. PMA gains access to the DNA of dead cells through compromised membranes. Once inside the cell, it intercalates and eventually covalently bonds with the double-helix structures upon photoactivation with visible light. The covalently bound DNA is significantly altered, and unavailable to downstream molecular-based manipulations and analyses. Microbiological samples can be treated with appropriate concentrations of PMA and exposed to visible light prior to undergoing total genomic DNA extraction, resulting in an extract comprised solely of DNA arising from viable cells. This ability to extract DNA selectively from living cells is extremely powerful, and bears great relevance to many microbiological arenas.

  16. Efficacy of using harmless Bacillus endospores to estimate the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mary; Clifford, Eoghan; O'Reilly, Edmond; Rowan, Neil J

    2013-06-01

    The need to use complex in vitro cell culture, expensive equipment, and highly-trained technicians that are available only to specialist laboratories has significantly limited studies assessing the potential of pulsed UV light (PUV) to inactivate the waterborne parasite Cryptosporidium parvum in drinking water. This constitutes the first study to report on the use of different non-pathogenic Bacillus endospores as potential surrogate organisms to indicate the PUV inactivation performance of a C. parvum oocyst suspended in water. Findings showed that PUV effectively inactivated approximately 5 log10 CFU/ml Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus pumilus endospores suspended in water at a UV dose of 9.72 μJ/cm(2) that also inactivated statistically similar levels of C. parvum oocysts (P < 0.05), as determined by combined in vitro HCT-8 cell culture and quantitative PCR. Specifically, this study demonstrated that B. megaterium exhibited greater or similar PUV-inactivation kinetic data compared to that of similarly treated C. parvum over the UV dose range 6.4 to 12.9 μJ/cm(2). Therefore, the former may be used as an indicator organism for safely investigating the PUV-inactivation performance of this chlorine-resistant, waterborne parasite at the waste-water treatment plant level. Findings presented will impact positively on future water quality studies and on public health. PMID:23145570

  17. N-acetylcysteine inhibits the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in livers from rats fed ethanol chronically

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Andres A.; Bell, Matthew; Ejiofor, Shannon; Zurcher, Grant; Petersen, Dennis R.; Ronis, Martin J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic ethanol administration to experimental animals induces hepatic oxidative stress and upregulates mitochondrial biogenesis. The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol upregulates mitochondrial biogenesis have not been fully explored. In this work, we hypothesized that oxidative stress is a factor that triggers mitochondrial biogenesis after chronic ethanol feeding. If our hypothesis is correct, co-administration of antioxidants should prevent upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes. Methods Rats were fed an ethanol-containing diet intragastrically by total enteral nutrition for 150 days, in the absence or presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 1.7 g/kg/day; control rats were administered isocaloric diets where carbohydrates substituted for ethanol calories. Results Ethanol administration significantly increased hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced as decreased liver total glutathione and GSH/GSSG ratio. These effects were inhibited by co-administration of ethanol and NAC. Chronic ethanol increased the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes including peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1 alpha and mitochondrial transcription factor A, and mitochondrial DNA; co-administration of ethanol and NAC prevented these effects. Chronic ethanol administration was associated with decreased mitochondrial mass, inactivation and depletion of mitochondrial complex I and complex IV, and increased hepatic mitochondrial oxidative damage, effects that were not prevented by NAC. Conclusions These results suggest that oxidative stress caused by chronic ethanol triggered the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in rat liver, because an antioxidant such as NAC prevented both effects. Because NAC did not prevent liver mitochondrial oxidative damage, extra-mitochondrial effects of reactive oxygen species may regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. In spite of the induction of hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis genes by

  18. [About the ribosomal biogenesis in human].

    PubMed

    Tafforeau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular ribonucleoprotein particles required for a fundamental mechanism, translation of the genetic information into proteins. Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex pathway involving many maturation steps: ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, rRNA processing, pre-rRNA modifications, its assembly with ribosomal proteins in the nuceolus, export of the subunit precursors to the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. Ribosome biogenesis has mainly being investigated in yeast during these last 25 years. However, recent works have shown that, despite many similarities between yeast and human ribosome structure and biogenesis, human pre-rRNA processing is far more complex than in yeast. In order to better understand diseases related to a malfunction in ribosome synthesis, the ribosomopathies, research should be conducted directly in human cells and animal models. PMID:26152166

  19. Autophagy plays a role in skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in an endurance exercise-trained condition.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jeong-Sun; Jeon, Sei-Il; Park, Je-Young; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Seong-Cheol; Cho, Ki-Jung; Jeong, Jong-Moon

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial homeostasis is tightly regulated by two major processes: mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial degradation by autophagy (mitophagy). Research in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercise training has been well established, while the mechanisms regulating mitophagy and the interplay between mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation following endurance exercise training are not yet well defined. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term inhibition of autophagy in response to acute endurance exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in an exercise-trained condition. Male wild-type C57BL/6 mice performed five daily bouts of 1-h swimming per week for 8 weeks. In order to measure autophagy flux in mouse skeletal muscle, mice were treated with or without 2 days of 0.4 mg/kg/day intraperitoneal colchicine (blocking the degradation of autophagosomes) following swimming exercise training. The autophagic flux assay demonstrated that swimming training resulted in an increase in the autophagic flux (~100 % increase in LC3-II) in mouse skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial fusion proteins, Opa1 and MFN2, were significantly elevated, and mitochondrial fission protein, Drp1, was also increased in trained mouse skeletal muscle, suggesting that endurance exercise training promotes both mitochondrial fusion and fission processes. A mitochondrial receptor, Bnip3, was further increased in exercised muscle when treated with colchicine while Pink/Parkin protein levels were unchanged. The endurance exercise training induced increases in mitochondrial biogenesis marker proteins, SDH, COX IV, and a mitochondrial biogenesis promoting factor, PGC-1α but this effect was abolished in colchicine-treated mouse skeletal muscle. This suggests that autophagy plays an important role in mitochondrial biogenesis and this coordination between these opposing processes is involved in the cellular

  20. Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain GS3372, an Endospore-Forming Bacterium Isolated in a Deep Geothermal Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Regenspurg, Simona; Li, Po-E; Lo, Chien-Chi; Johnson, Shannon; McMurry, Kim; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick S; Junier, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The genome of strain GS3372 is the first publicly available strain of Aeribacillus pallidus. This endospore-forming thermophilic strain was isolated from a deep geothermal reservoir. The availability of this genome can contribute to the clarification of the taxonomy of the closely related Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, and Aeribacillus genera. PMID:26316637

  1. In Situ Determination of Clostridium Endospore Membrane Fluidity during Pressure-Assisted Thermal Processing in Combination with Nisin or Reutericyclin

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, S.; Winter, R.; McMullen, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    This study determined the membrane fluidity of clostridial endospores during treatment with heat and pressure with nisin or reutericyclin. Heating (90°C) reduced laurdan (6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) general polarization, corresponding to membrane fluidization. Pressure (200 MPa) stabilized membrane order. Reutericyclin and nisin exhibit divergent effects on heat- and pressure-induced spore inactivation and membrane fluidity. PMID:23335780

  2. In situ determination of Clostridium endospore membrane fluidity during pressure-assisted thermal processing in combination with nisin or reutericyclin.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, S; Winter, R; McMullen, L M; Gänzle, M G

    2013-03-01

    This study determined the membrane fluidity of clostridial endospores during treatment with heat and pressure with nisin or reutericyclin. Heating (90°C) reduced laurdan (6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) general polarization, corresponding to membrane fluidization. Pressure (200 MPa) stabilized membrane order. Reutericyclin and nisin exhibit divergent effects on heat- and pressure-induced spore inactivation and membrane fluidity. PMID:23335780

  3. Genome Sequence of Aeribacillus pallidus Strain GS3372, an Endospore-Forming Bacterium Isolated in a Deep Geothermal Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Regenspurg, Simona; Li, Po-E; Lo, Chien-Chi; Johnson, Shannon; McMurry, Kim; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    The genome of strain GS3372 is the first publicly available strain of Aeribacillus pallidus. This endospore-forming thermophilic strain was isolated from a deep geothermal reservoir. The availability of this genome can contribute to the clarification of the taxonomy of the closely related Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, and Aeribacillus genera. PMID:26316637

  4. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a human adenovirus surrogate for evaluating the effectiveness of virus inactivation in low-pressure UV treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Boczek, Laura A; Rhodes, Eric R; Cashdollar, Jennifer L; Ryu, Jongseong; Popovici, Jonathan; Hoelle, Jill M; Sivaganesan, Mano; Hayes, Samuel L; Rodgers, Mark R; Ryu, Hodon

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the potential to use Bacillus pumilus endospores as a surrogate for human adenovirus (HAdV) in UV disinfection studies. The use of endospores has been limited by observations of batch-to-batch variation in UV sensitivity. This study reports on a propagation method that utilizes a commercially available medium to produce UV tolerant B. pumilus endospores with a consistent UV sensitivity. It is further demonstrated that the endospores of B. pumilus strain (ATCC 27142), produced using this protocol (half strength Columbia broth, 5 days incubation, with 0.1mM MnSO4), display a UV dose-response that is similar to that of HAdV. Endospore stocks could be stored in ethanol for up to two months at 4 °C without a significant change in UV sensitivity. Synergistic endospore damage was observed by pre-heat treatment of water samples followed by UV irradiation. UV tolerant B. pumilus endospores are a potential surrogate of HAdV for UV treatment performance tests in water utilities which do not have in-house research virology laboratories. PMID:26825005

  5. Survival of Bacillus subtilis endospores on ultraviolet-irradiated rover wheels and Mars regolith under simulated Martian conditions.

    PubMed

    Kerney, Krystal R; Schuerger, Andrew C

    2011-06-01

    Endospores of Bacillus subtilis HA101 were applied to a simulated Mars Exploration Rover (MER) wheel and exposed to Mars-normal UV irradiation for 1, 3, or 6 h. The experiment was designed to simulate a contaminated rover wheel sitting on its landing platform before rolling off onto the martian terrain, as was encountered during the Spirit and Opportunity missions. When exposed to 1 h of Mars UV, a reduction of 81% of viable endospores was observed compared to the non-UV irradiated controls. When exposed for 3 or 6 h, reductions of 94.6% and 96.6%, respectively, were observed compared to controls. In a second experiment, the contaminated rover wheel was rolled over a bed of heat-sterilized Mars analog soil; then the analog soil was exposed to full martian conditions of UV irradiation, low pressure (6.9 mbar), low temperature (-10°C), and an anaerobic CO(2) martian atmosphere for 24 h to determine whether endospores of B. subtilis on the contaminated rover wheel could be transferred to the surface of the analog soil and survive martian conditions. The experiment simulated conditions in which a rover wheel might come into contact with martian regolith immediately after landing, such as is designed for the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. The contaminated rover wheel transferred viable endospores of B. subtilis to the Mars analog soil, as demonstrated by 31.7% of samples showing positive growth. However, when contaminated soil samples were exposed to full martian conditions for 24 h, only 16.7% of samples exhibited positive growth-a 50% reduction in the number of soil samples positive for the transferred viable endospores. PMID:21707388

  6. Survival of Bacillus subtilis Endospores on Ultraviolet-Irradiated Rover Wheels and Mars Regolith under Simulated Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerney, Krystal R.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2011-06-01

    Endospores of Bacillus subtilis HA101 were applied to a simulated Mars Exploration Rover (MER) wheel and exposed to Mars-normal UV irradiation for 1, 3, or 6 h. The experiment was designed to simulate a contaminated rover wheel sitting on its landing platform before rolling off onto the martian terrain, as was encountered during the Spirit and Opportunity missions. When exposed to 1 h of Mars UV, a reduction of 81% of viable endospores was observed compared to the non-UV irradiated controls. When exposed for 3 or 6 h, reductions of 94.6% and 96.6%, respectively, were observed compared to controls. In a second experiment, the contaminated rover wheel was rolled over a bed of heat-sterilized Mars analog soil; then the analog soil was exposed to full martian conditions of UV irradiation, low pressure (6.9 mbar), low temperature (-10 °C), and an anaerobic CO2 martian atmosphere for 24 h to determine whether endospores of B. subtilis on the contaminated rover wheel could be transferred to the surface of the analog soil and survive martian conditions. The experiment simulated conditions in which a rover wheel might come into contact with martian regolith immediately after landing, such as is designed for the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. The contaminated rover wheel transferred viable endospores of B. subtilis to the Mars analog soil, as demonstrated by 31.7% of samples showing positive growth. However, when contaminated soil samples were exposed to full martian conditions for 24 h, only 16.7% of samples exhibited positive growth - a 50% reduction in the number of soil samples positive for the transferred viable endospores.

  7. Resistance of bacterial endospores to outer space for planetary protection purposes--experiment PROTECT of the EXPOSE-E mission.

    PubMed

    Horneck, Gerda; Moeller, Ralf; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mancinelli, Rocco L; Nicholson, Wayne L; Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Spry, Andrew; Stackebrandt, Erko; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J

    2012-05-01

    Spore-forming bacteria are of particular concern in the context of planetary protection because their tough endospores may withstand certain sterilization procedures as well as the harsh environments of outer space or planetary surfaces. To test their hardiness on a hypothetical mission to Mars, spores of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 were exposed for 1.5 years to selected parameters of space in the experiment PROTECT during the EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station. Mounted as dry layers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons, the "trip to Mars" spores experienced space vacuum, cosmic and extraterrestrial solar radiation, and temperature fluctuations, whereas the "stay on Mars" spores were subjected to a simulated martian environment that included atmospheric pressure and composition, and UV and cosmic radiation. The survival of spores from both assays was determined after retrieval. It was clearly shown that solar extraterrestrial UV radiation (λ≥110 nm) as well as the martian UV spectrum (λ≥200 nm) was the most deleterious factor applied; in some samples only a few survivors were recovered from spores exposed in monolayers. Spores in multilayers survived better by several orders of magnitude. All other environmental parameters encountered by the "trip to Mars" or "stay on Mars" spores did little harm to the spores, which showed about 50% survival or more. The data demonstrate the high chance of survival of spores on a Mars mission, if protected against solar irradiation. These results will have implications for planetary protection considerations. PMID:22680691

  8. Resistance of Bacterial Endospores to Outer Space for Planetary Protection Purposes—Experiment PROTECT of the EXPOSE-E Mission

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Ralf; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Nicholson, Wayne L.; Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Spry, Andrew; Stackebrandt, Erko; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Spore-forming bacteria are of particular concern in the context of planetary protection because their tough endospores may withstand certain sterilization procedures as well as the harsh environments of outer space or planetary surfaces. To test their hardiness on a hypothetical mission to Mars, spores of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 were exposed for 1.5 years to selected parameters of space in the experiment PROTECT during the EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station. Mounted as dry layers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons, the “trip to Mars” spores experienced space vacuum, cosmic and extraterrestrial solar radiation, and temperature fluctuations, whereas the “stay on Mars” spores were subjected to a simulated martian environment that included atmospheric pressure and composition, and UV and cosmic radiation. The survival of spores from both assays was determined after retrieval. It was clearly shown that solar extraterrestrial UV radiation (λ≥110 nm) as well as the martian UV spectrum (λ≥200 nm) was the most deleterious factor applied; in some samples only a few survivors were recovered from spores exposed in monolayers. Spores in multilayers survived better by several orders of magnitude. All other environmental parameters encountered by the “trip to Mars” or “stay on Mars” spores did little harm to the spores, which showed about 50% survival or more. The data demonstrate the high chance of survival of spores on a Mars mission, if protected against solar irradiation. These results will have implications for planetary protection considerations. Key Words: Planetary protection—Bacterial spores—Space experiment—Simulated Mars mission. Astrobiology 12, 445–456. PMID:22680691

  9. Functional characterization of the ribosome biogenesis factors PES, BOP1, and WDR12 (PeBoW), and mechanisms of defective cell growth and proliferation caused by PeBoW deficiency in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Cho, Hui Kyung; Lee, Du-Hwa; Sim, Hee-Jung; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolar protein pescadillo (PES) controls biogenesis of the 60S ribosomal subunit through functional interactions with Block of Proliferation 1 (BOP1) and WD Repeat Domain 12 (WDR12) in plants. In this study, we determined protein characteristics and in planta functions of BOP1 and WDR12, and characterized defects in plant cell growth and proliferation caused by a deficiency of PeBoW (PES-BOP1-WDR12) proteins. Dexamethasone-inducible RNAi of BOP1 and WDR12 caused developmental arrest and premature senescence in Arabidopsis, similar to the phenotype of PES RNAi. Both the N-terminal domain and WD40 repeats of BOP1 and WDR12 were critical for specific associations with 60S/80S ribosomes. In response to nucleolar stress or DNA damage, PeBoW proteins moved from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Kinematic analyses of leaf growth revealed that depletion of PeBoW proteins led to dramatically suppressed cell proliferation, cell expansion, and epidermal pavement cell differentiation. A deficiency in PeBoW proteins resulted in reduced cyclin-dependent kinase Type A activity, causing reduced phosphorylation of histone H1 and retinoblastoma-related (RBR) protein. PeBoW silencing caused rapid transcriptional modulation of cell-cycle genes, including reduction of E2Fa and Cyclin D family genes, and induction of several KRP genes, accompanied by down-regulation of auxin-related genes and up-regulation of jasmonic acid-related genes. Taken together, these results suggest that the PeBoW proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis play a critical role in plant cell growth and survival, and their depletion leads to inhibition of cell-cycle progression, possibly modulated by phytohormone signaling. PMID:27440937

  10. Functional characterization of the ribosome biogenesis factors PES, BOP1, and WDR12 (PeBoW), and mechanisms of defective cell growth and proliferation caused by PeBoW deficiency in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Cho, Hui Kyung; Lee, Du-Hwa; Sim, Hee-Jung; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2016-09-01

    The nucleolar protein pescadillo (PES) controls biogenesis of the 60S ribosomal subunit through functional interactions with Block of Proliferation 1 (BOP1) and WD Repeat Domain 12 (WDR12) in plants. In this study, we determined protein characteristics and in planta functions of BOP1 and WDR12, and characterized defects in plant cell growth and proliferation caused by a deficiency of PeBoW (PES-BOP1-WDR12) proteins. Dexamethasone-inducible RNAi of BOP1 and WDR12 caused developmental arrest and premature senescence in Arabidopsis, similar to the phenotype of PES RNAi. Both the N-terminal domain and WD40 repeats of BOP1 and WDR12 were critical for specific associations with 60S/80S ribosomes. In response to nucleolar stress or DNA damage, PeBoW proteins moved from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Kinematic analyses of leaf growth revealed that depletion of PeBoW proteins led to dramatically suppressed cell proliferation, cell expansion, and epidermal pavement cell differentiation. A deficiency in PeBoW proteins resulted in reduced cyclin-dependent kinase Type A activity, causing reduced phosphorylation of histone H1 and retinoblastoma-related (RBR) protein. PeBoW silencing caused rapid transcriptional modulation of cell-cycle genes, including reduction of E2Fa and Cyclin D family genes, and induction of several KRP genes, accompanied by down-regulation of auxin-related genes and up-regulation of jasmonic acid-related genes. Taken together, these results suggest that the PeBoW proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis play a critical role in plant cell growth and survival, and their depletion leads to inhibition of cell-cycle progression, possibly modulated by phytohormone signaling. PMID:27440937

  11. Analysis of Individual Cells and Endospores by Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Anthony; Huser, Thomas; Talley, Chad; Hollars, Christopher; Balhorn, Rod; Lane, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    We have collected Raman spectra of individual sperm cells by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. The high spatial resolution of this technique allows for compositional analysis of different sections of the sperm cells. The relative intensities of protein and DNA Raman transitions allow one to define a protein-DNA ratio. We have also collected the Raman spectra of individual bacterial endospores from four species in the genus Bacillus. The spectra were generally dominated by scattering from calcium dipicolinate, although scattering assignable to protein bands was also observed. A small fraction of the spores did not exhibit Raman scattering from CaDPA, possibly due to incomplete sporulation. These examples demonstrate the applicability of micro-Raman spectroscopy as a non-invasive method for addressing variability in the composition of cells.* *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-Eng-48.

  12. Validation of a Rapid Bacteria Endospore Enumeration System for Planetary Protection Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Kern, Roger; Kazarians, Gayane; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    NASA monitors spacecraft surfaces to assure that the presence of bacterial endospores meets strict criteria at launch, to minimize the risk of inadvertent contamination of the surface of Mars. Currently, the only approved method for enumerating the spores is a culture based assay that requires three days to produce results. In order to meet the demanding schedules of spacecraft assembly, a more rapid spore detection assay is being considered as an alternate method to the NASA standard culture-based assay. The Millipore Rapid Microbiology Detection System (RMDS) has been used successfully for rapid bioburden enumeration in the pharmaceutical and food industries. The RMDS is rapid and simple, shows high sensitivity (to 1 colony forming unit [CFU]/sample), and correlates well with traditional culture-based methods. It combines membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and image analysis based on photon detection with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera. In this study, we have optimized the assay conditions and evaluated the use of the RMDS as a rapid spore detection tool for NASA applications. In order to select for spores, the samples were subjected to a heat shock step before proceeding with the RMDS incubation protocol. Seven species of Bacillus (nine strains) that have been repeatedly isolated from clean room environments were assayed. All strains were detected by the RMDS in 5 hours and these assay times were repeatedly demonstrated along with low image background noise. Validation experiments to compare the Rapid Sore Assay (RSA) and NASA standard assay (NSA) were also performed. The evaluation criteria were modeled after the FDA Guideline of Process Validation, and Analytical Test Methods. This body of research demonstrates that the Rapid Spore Assay (RSA) is quick, and of equivalent sensitivity to the NASA standard assay, potentially reducing the assay time for bacterial endospores from over 72 hours to less than 8 hours

  13. The Enzyme-Mediated Direct Reversal of a Dithymine Photoproduct in Germinating Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer, 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct, or SP, in germinating endospores. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damaging product found in endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores’ extremely high UV resistance. Early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair SP in the absence of light. Recently, it has been established that SPL belongs to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily. The enzymes in this superfamily utilize a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to bind a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to reductively cleave its C5′-S bond, generating a reactive 5′-deoxyadenosyl (5′-dA) radical. This 5′-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. The H atom donor is suggested to be a conserved cysteine141 in B. subtilis SPL; the resulting thiyl radical likely interacts with a neighboring tyrosine99 before oxidizing the 5′-dA to 5′-dA radical and, subsequently, regenerating SAM. These findings suggest SPL to be the first enzyme in the large radical SAM superfamily (>44,000 members) to utilize a radical transfer pathway for catalysis; its study should shed light on the mechanistic understanding of the SAM regeneration process in other members of the superfamily. PMID:23799365

  14. A channel connecting the mother cell and forespore during bacterial endospore formation

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Jeffrey; Wang, Xin; Serrano, Monica; Henriques, Adriano O.; Moran, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    At an early stage during Bacillus subtilis endospore development the bacterium divides asymmetrically to produce two daughter cells. The smaller cell (forespore) differentiates into the endospore, while the larger cell (mother cell) becomes a terminally differentiated cell that nurtures the developing forespore. During development the mother cell engulfs the forespore to produce a protoplast, surrounded by two bilayer membranes, which separate it from the cytoplasm of the mother cell. The activation of σG, which drives late gene expression in the forespore, follows forespore engulfment and requires expression of the spoIIIA locus in the mother cell. One of the spoIIIA-encoded proteins SpoIIIAH is targeted specifically to the membrane surrounding the forespore, through an interaction of its C-terminal extracellular domain with the C-terminal extracellular domain of the forespore membrane protein SpoIIQ. We identified a homologous relationship between the C-terminal domain of SpoIIIAH and the YscJ/FliF protein family, members of which form multimeric rings involved in type III secretion systems and flagella. If SpoIIIAH forms a similar ring structure, it may also form a channel between the mother cell and forespore membranes. To test this hypothesis we developed a compartmentalized biotinylation assay, which we used to show that the C-terminal extracellular domain of SpoIIIAH is accessible to enzymatic modification from the forespore cytoplasm. These and other results lead us to suggest that SpoIIIAH forms part of a channel between the forespore and mother cell that is required for the activation of σG. PMID:18812514

  15. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores – kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Christian A.; Reineke, Kai; Knorr, Dietrich; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2015-01-01

    Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C.) botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT) processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores. We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near) isothermal HPT treatments at 300–1200 MPa at 30–75°C for 1 s to 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone), large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated) or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer) spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed first order kinetics. Dipicolinic acid release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective) physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced) germination at ≤450 MPa/≤45°C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60–70°C. Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores compared with the resistance of spores from other C. botulinum types could allow for the implementation of

  16. High-Pressure-Mediated Survival of Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Endospores at High Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Margosch, Dirk; Ehrmann, Matthias A.; Buckow, Roman; Heinz, Volker; Vogel, Rudi F.; Gänzle, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    Endospores of proteolytic type B Clostridium botulinum TMW 2.357 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TMW 2.479 are currently described as the most high-pressure-resistant bacterial spores relevant to food intoxication and spoilage in combined pressure-temperature applications. The effects of combined pressure (0.1 to 1,400 MPa) and temperature (70 to 120°C) treatments were determined for these spores. A process employing isothermal holding times was established to distinguish pressure from temperature effects. An increase in pressure (600 to 1,400 MPa) and an increase in temperature (90 to 110°C) accelerated the inactivation of C. botulinum spores. However, incubation at 100°C, 110°C, or 120°C with ambient pressure resulted in faster spore reduction than treatment with 600 or 800 MPa at the same temperature. This pressure-mediated spore protection was also observed at 120°C and 800, 1,000, or 1,200 MPa with the more heat-tolerant B. amyloliquefaciens TMW 2.479 spores. Inactivation curves for both strains showed a pronounced pressure-dependent tailing, which indicates that a small fraction of the spore populations survives conditions of up to 120°C and 1.4 GPa in isothermal treatments. Because of this tailing and the fact that pressure-temperature combinations stabilizing bacterial endospores vary from strain to strain, food safety must be ensured in case-by-case studies demonstrating inactivation or nongrowth of C. botulinum with realistic contamination rates in the respective pressurized food and equipment. PMID:16672493

  17. The Virus-Host Interplay: Biogenesis of +RNA Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Colleen R.; Airo, Adriana M.; Hobman, Tom C.

    2015-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA (+RNA) viruses are an important group of human and animal pathogens that have significant global health and economic impacts. Notable members include West Nile virus, Dengue virus, Chikungunya, Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus and enteroviruses of the Picornaviridae family.Unfortunately, prophylactic and therapeutic treatments against these pathogens are limited. +RNA viruses have limited coding capacity and thus rely extensively on host factors for successful infection and propagation. A common feature among these viruses is their ability to dramatically modify cellular membranes to serve as platforms for genome replication and assembly of new virions. These viral replication complexes (VRCs) serve two main functions: To increase replication efficiency by concentrating critical factors and to protect the viral genome from host anti-viral systems. This review summarizes current knowledge of critical host factors recruited to or demonstrated to be involved in the biogenesis and stabilization of +RNA virus VRCs. PMID:26287230

  18. Flexibility in targeting and insertion during bacterial membrane protein biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bloois, Edwin van; Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M. ten; Luirink, Joen

    2007-10-26

    The biogenesis of Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins (IMPs) is assisted by targeting and insertion factors such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the Sec-translocon and YidC with translocation of (large) periplasmic domains energized by SecA and the proton motive force (pmf). The use of these factors and forces is probably primarily determined by specific structural features of an IMP. To analyze these features we have engineered a set of model IMPs based on endogenous E. coli IMPs known to follow distinct targeting and insertion pathways. The modified model IMPs were analyzed for altered routing using an in vivo protease mapping approach. The data suggest a facultative use of different combinations of factors.

  19. Reactive oxygen species mediates homocysteine-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in human endothelial cells: Modulation by antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-de-Arce, Karen; Foncea, Rocio . E-mail: rfoncea@med.puc.cl; Leighton, Federico

    2005-12-16

    It has been proposed that homocysteine (Hcy)-induces endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A previous report has shown that Hcy promotes mitochondrial damage. Considering that oxidative stress can affect mitochondrial biogenesis, we hypothesized that Hcy-induced ROS in endothelial cells may lead to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. We found that Hcy-induced ROS (1.85-fold), leading to a NF-{kappa}B activation and increase the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, nuclear respiratory factor-1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, was significantly elevated in Hcy-treated cells. These changes were accompanied by increase in mitochondrial mass and higher mRNA and protein expression of the subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase. These effects were significantly prevented by pretreatment with the antioxidants, catechin and trolox. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by Hcy, and that modulation of oxidative stress by antioxidants may protect against the adverse vascular effects of Hcy.

  20. Vulnerability of microRNA biogenesis in FTD-ALS.

    PubMed

    Eitan, Chen; Hornstein, Eran

    2016-09-15

    The genetics of the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) turn our attention to RNA metabolism, primarily because many of the identified diseases-associated genes encode for RNA-binding proteins. microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous noncoding RNAs that play critical roles in maintaining brain integrity. The current review sheds light on miRNA dysregulation in neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on FTD-ALS. We propose that miRNAs are susceptible to fail when protein factors that are critical for miRNA biogenesis malfunction. Accordingly, potential insufficiencies of the 'microprocessor' complex, the nucleo-cytoplasmic export of miRNA precursors or their processing by Dicer were recently reported. Furthermore, specific miRNAs are involved in the regulation of pathways that are essential for neuronal survival or function. Any change in the expression of these specific miRNAs or in their ability to recognize their target sequences will have negative consequences. Taken together, recent reports strengthens the hypothesis that dysregulation of miRNAs might play an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and highlights the miRNA biogenesis machinery as an interesting target for therapeutic interventions for ALS as well as FTD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:RNA Metabolism in Disease. PMID:26778173

  1. Centriole biogenesis and function in multiciliated cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Siwei; Mitchell, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    The use of Xenopus embryonic skin as a model system for the development of ciliated epithelia is well established. This tissue is comprised of numerous cell types, most notably the multiciliated cells (MCCs) that each contain approximately 150 motile cilia. At the base of each cilium lies the centriole-based structure called the basal body. Centriole biogenesis is typically restricted to two new centrioles per cell cycle, each templating from an existing “mother” centriole. In contrast, MCCs are post-mitotic cells in which the majority of centrioles arise “de novo” without templating from a mother centriole, instead, these centrioles nucleate from an electron-dense structure termed the deuterostome. How centriole number is regulated in these cells and the mechanism by which the deuterosome templates nascent centrioles is still poorly understood. Here, we describe methods for regulating MCC cell fate as well as for visualizing and manipulating centriole biogenesis. PMID:26175436

  2. Oil body biogenesis during Brassica napus embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Qing; Wu, Yan

    2009-08-01

    Although the oil body is known to be an important membrane enclosed compartment for oil storage in seeds, we have little understanding about its biogenesis during embryogenesis. In the present study we investigated the oil body emergence and variations in Brassica napus cv. Topas. The results demonstrate that the oil bodies could be detected already at the heart stage, at the same time as the embryos began to turn green, and the starch grains accumulated in the chloroplast stroma. In comparison, we have studied the development of oil bodies between Arabidopsis thaliana wild type (Col) and the low-seed-oil mutant wrinkled1-3. We observed that the oil body development in the embryos of Col is similar to that of B. napus cv. Topas, and that the size of the oil bodies was obviously smaller in the embryos of wrinkled1-3. Our results suggest that the oil body biogenesis might be coupled with the embryo chloroplast. PMID:19686376

  3. PPARα in lysosomal biogenesis: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound vesicles containing hydrolytic enzymes, ubiquitously present in all eukaryotic cells. Classically considered to be central to the cellular waste management machinery, recent studies revealed the role of lysosomes in a wide array of cellular processes like, degradation, cellular development, programmed cell death, secretion, plasma membrane repair, nutritional responses, and lipid metabolism. We recently studied the regulation of TFEB, considered to be the master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, by activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα), one of the key regulators of lipid metabolism. In this article, we discuss how the recent finding could be put in to perspective with the previous findings that relate lysosomal biogenesis to lipid metabolism, and comment on the possibility of a bi-directional interplay between these two distinct cellular processes upon activation of PPARα. PMID:26621249

  4. PBR1 selectively controls biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes by modulating translation of the large chloroplast gene Ycf1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Si-Ting; Li, Ji-Kai; Shen, Hong-Tao; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The biogenesis of photosystem I (PSI), cytochrome b6f (Cytb6f) and NADH dehydrogenase (NDH) complexes relies on the spatially and temporally coordinated expression and translation of both nuclear and chloroplast genes. Here we report the identification of photosystem biogenesis regulator 1 (PBR1), a nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA-binding protein that regulates the concerted biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb6f complexes. We identified Ycf1, one of the two largest chloroplast genome-encoded open reading frames as the direct downstream target protein of PBR1. Biochemical and molecular analyses reveal that PBR1 regulates Ycf1 translation by directly binding to its mRNA. Surprisingly, we further demonstrate that relocation of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 fused with a plastid-transit sequence to the nucleus bypasses the requirement of PBR1 for Ycf1 translation, which sufficiently complements the defects in biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb6f complexes in PBR1-deficient plants. Remarkably, the nuclear-encoded PBR1 tightly controls the expression of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 at the translational level, which is sufficient to sustain the coordinated biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb6f complexes as a whole. Our findings provide deep insights into better understanding of how a predominant nuclear-encoded factor can act as a migratory mediator and undergoes selective translational regulation of the target plastid gene in controlling biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes. PMID:27462450

  5. PBR1 selectively controls biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes by modulating translation of the large chloroplast gene Ycf1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Si-Ting; Li, Ji-Kai; Shen, Hong-Tao; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The biogenesis of photosystem I (PSI), cytochrome b 6 f (Cytb 6 f) and NADH dehydrogenase (NDH) complexes relies on the spatially and temporally coordinated expression and translation of both nuclear and chloroplast genes. Here we report the identification of photosystem biogenesis regulator 1 (PBR1), a nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA-binding protein that regulates the concerted biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes. We identified Ycf1, one of the two largest chloroplast genome-encoded open reading frames as the direct downstream target protein of PBR1. Biochemical and molecular analyses reveal that PBR1 regulates Ycf1 translation by directly binding to its mRNA. Surprisingly, we further demonstrate that relocation of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 fused with a plastid-transit sequence to the nucleus bypasses the requirement of PBR1 for Ycf1 translation, which sufficiently complements the defects in biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes in PBR1-deficient plants. Remarkably, the nuclear-encoded PBR1 tightly controls the expression of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 at the translational level, which is sufficient to sustain the coordinated biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes as a whole. Our findings provide deep insights into better understanding of how a predominant nuclear-encoded factor can act as a migratory mediator and undergoes selective translational regulation of the target plastid gene in controlling biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes. PMID:27462450

  6. Enantiomeric Natural Products: Occurrence and Biogenesis**

    PubMed Central

    Finefield, Jennifer M.; Sherman, David H.; Kreitman, Martin; Williams, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    In Nature, chiral natural products are usually produced in optically pure form; however, on occasion Nature is known to produce enantiomerically opposite metabolites. These enantiomeric natural products can arise in Nature from a single species, or from different genera and/or species. Extensive research has been carried out over the years in an attempt to understand the biogenesis of naturally occurring enantiomers, however, many fascinating puzzles and stereochemical anomalies still remain. PMID:22555867

  7. Bacillus anthracis endospores regulate ornithine decarboxylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase through ERK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Porasuphatana, Supatra; Cao, Guan-Liang; Tsai, Pei; Tavakkoli, Fatemeh; Huwar, Theresa; Baillie, Les; Cross, Alan S; Shapiro, Paul; Rosen, Gerald M

    2010-12-01

    Interactions between Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis) and host cells are of particular interest given the implications of anthrax as a biological weapon. Inhaled B. anthracis endospores encounter alveolar macrophages as the first line of defense in the innate immune response. Yet, the consequences of this interaction remain unclear. We have demonstrated that B. anthracis uses arginase, inherent in the endospores, to reduce the ability of macrophages to produce nitric oxide ((•)NO) from inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) by competing for L-arginine, producing L-ornithine at the expense of (•)NO. In the current study, we used genetically engineered B. anthracis endospores to evaluate the contribution of germination and the lethal toxin (LT) in mediating signaling pathways responsible for the induction of NOS2 and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of L-ornithine into polyamines. We found that induction of NOS2 and ODC expression in macrophages exposed to B. anthracis occurs through the activation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAP kinases, respectively. Optimal induction of NOS2 was observed following exposure to germination-competent endospores, whereas ODC induction occurred irrespective of the endospores' germination capabilities and was more prominent in macrophages exposed to endospores lacking LT. Our findings suggest that activation of kinase signaling cascades that determine macrophage defense responses against B. anthracis infection occurs through distinct mechanisms. PMID:20440620

  8. Impact of surface structure and feed gas composition on Bacillus subtilis endospore inactivation during direct plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Christian; Steins, Veronika; Reineke, Kai; Rademacher, Antje; Klocke, Michael; Rauh, Cornelia; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the inactivation efficiency of cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on Bacillus subtilis endospores dependent on the used feed gas composition and on the surface, the endospores were attached on. Glass petri-dishes, glass beads, and peppercorns were inoculated with the same endospore density and treated with a radio frequency plasma jet. Generated reactive species were detected using optical emission spectroscopy. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based ratio detection system was established to monitor the DNA damage during the plasma treatment. Argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen as feed gas emitted the highest amounts of UV-C photons and considerable amount of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Plasma generated with argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen was characterized by the highest emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas the UV-C emission was negligible. The use of pure argon showed a negligible emission of UV photons and atomic oxygen, however, the emission of vacuum (V)UV photons was assumed. Similar maximum inactivation results were achieved for the three feed gas compositions. The surface structure had a significant impact on the inactivation efficiency of the plasma treatment. The maximum inactivation achieved was between 2.4 and 2.8 log10 on glass petri-dishes and 3.9 to 4.6 log10 on glass beads. The treatment of peppercorns resulted in an inactivation lower than 1.0 log10. qPCR results showed a significant DNA damage for all gas compositions. Pure argon showed the highest results for the DNA damage ratio values, followed by argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen. In case of argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen the inactivation seems to be dominated by the action of ROS. These findings indicate the significant role of VUV and UV photons in the inactivation process of B. subtilis endospores. PMID:26300855

  9. Impact of surface structure and feed gas composition on Bacillus subtilis endospore inactivation during direct plasma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hertwig, Christian; Steins, Veronika; Reineke, Kai; Rademacher, Antje; Klocke, Michael; Rauh, Cornelia; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the inactivation efficiency of cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on Bacillus subtilis endospores dependent on the used feed gas composition and on the surface, the endospores were attached on. Glass petri-dishes, glass beads, and peppercorns were inoculated with the same endospore density and treated with a radio frequency plasma jet. Generated reactive species were detected using optical emission spectroscopy. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based ratio detection system was established to monitor the DNA damage during the plasma treatment. Argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen as feed gas emitted the highest amounts of UV-C photons and considerable amount of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Plasma generated with argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen was characterized by the highest emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas the UV-C emission was negligible. The use of pure argon showed a negligible emission of UV photons and atomic oxygen, however, the emission of vacuum (V)UV photons was assumed. Similar maximum inactivation results were achieved for the three feed gas compositions. The surface structure had a significant impact on the inactivation efficiency of the plasma treatment. The maximum inactivation achieved was between 2.4 and 2.8 log10 on glass petri-dishes and 3.9 to 4.6 log10 on glass beads. The treatment of peppercorns resulted in an inactivation lower than 1.0 log10. qPCR results showed a significant DNA damage for all gas compositions. Pure argon showed the highest results for the DNA damage ratio values, followed by argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen + 0.2% vol. nitrogen. In case of argon + 0.135% vol. oxygen the inactivation seems to be dominated by the action of ROS. These findings indicate the significant role of VUV and UV photons in the inactivation process of B. subtilis endospores. PMID:26300855

  10. Performance evaluation of selected n95 respirators and surgical masks when challenged with aerosolized endospores and inert particles.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Craig S; Green, Christopher F; Gibbs, Shawn G; Schmid, Kendra K; Panlilio, Adelisa L; Jensen, Paul A; Scarpino, Pasquale V

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess how the relative efficiency of N95 respirators and surgical masks might vary with different challenge aerosols, utilizing a standardized manikin head form as a surrogate to human participation. A Collision nebulizer aerosolized B. anthracis Sterne strain endospores and polystyrene latex (PSL) particles to evaluate 11 models of N95 respirators and surgical masks. An automated breathing simulator, calibrated to normal tidal volume and active breathing rate, mimicked human respiration. A manikin head form with N95 respirators or surgical masks, and manikin head form without N95 respirators or surgical masks were placed in the bioaerosol chamber. An AGI-30 sampler filled with phosphate buffered water was fitted behind the mouth of each manikin head form to collect endospore bioaerosol samples. PSL aerosols concentrations were quantified by an ARTI Hand Held Particle Counter. Geometric Mean (GM) relative efficiency of N95 respirators and surgical masks challenged with endospore bioaerosol ranged from 34-65%. In PSL aerosol experiments, GM relative efficiency ranged from 35-64% for 1.3 μm particles. GM filtration efficiency of all N95 and surgical N95 respirators filter media evaluated was ≥99% when challenged with particles ≥0.1 μm. GM filtration efficiency of surgical mask filter media ranged from 70-83% with particles ≥0.1 μm and 74-92% with 1.3 μm PSL particles. Relative efficiencies of N95 respirators and surgical masks challenged with aerosolized B. anthracis endospores and PSL were similar. Relative efficiency was similar between N95 respirators and surgical masks on a manikin head form despite clear differences in filtration efficiency. This study further highlights the importance of face seal leakage in the respiratory protection provided by N95 respirators, and demonstrates it on a human surrogate. PMID:23915331

  11. An automated front-end monitor for anthrax surveillance systems based on the rapid detection of airborne endospores.

    PubMed

    Yung, Pun To; Lester, Elizabeth D; Bearman, Greg; Ponce, Adrian

    2007-11-01

    A fully automated anthrax smoke detector (ASD) has been developed and tested. The ASD is intended to serve as a cost effective front-end monitor for anthrax surveillance systems. The principle of operation is based on measuring airborne endospore concentrations, where a sharp concentration increase signals an anthrax attack. The ASD features an air sampler, a thermal lysis unit, a syringe pump, a time-gated spectrometer, and endospore detection chemistry comprised of dipicolinic acid (DPA)-triggered terbium ion (Tb(3+)) luminescence. Anthrax attacks were simulated using aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus spores in fumed silica, and corresponding Tb-DPA intensities were monitored as a function of time and correlated to the number of airborne endospores collected. A concentration dependence of 10(2)-10(6) spores/mg of fumed silica yielded a dynamic range of 4 orders of magnitude and a limit of detection of 16 spores/L when 250 L of air were sampled. Simulated attacks were detected in less than 15 min. PMID:17514759

  12. Isolation and structure elucidation of avocado seed (Persea americana) lipid derivatives that inhibit Clostridium sporogenes endospore germination.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Dariana Graciela; Pacheco, Adriana; García-Cruz, María Isabel; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet Alejandra; Benavides-Lozano, Jorge Alejandro; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen

    2013-07-31

    Avocado fruit extracts are known to exhibit antimicrobial properties. However, the effects on bacterial endospores and the identity of antimicrobial compounds have not been fully elucidated. In this study, avocado seed extracts were tested against Clostridium sporogenes vegetative cells and active endospores. Bioassay-guided purification of a crude extract based on inhibitory properties linked antimicrobial action to six lipid derivatives from the family of acetogenin compounds. Two new structures and four compounds known to exist in nature were identified as responsible for the activity. Structurally, most potent molecules shared features of an acetyl moiety and a trans-enone group. All extracts produced inhibition zones on vegetative cells and active endospores. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of isolated molecules ranged from 7.8 to 15.6 μg/mL, and bactericidal effects were observed for an enriched fraction at 19.5 μg/mL. Identified molecules showed potential as natural alternatives to additives and antibiotics used by the food and pharmaceutical industries to inhibit Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria. PMID:23829335

  13. Development and Application of Flow-Cytometric Techniques for Analyzing and Sorting Endospore-Forming Clostridia▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Bryan P.; Gaida, Stefan M.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2008-01-01

    The study of microbial heterogeneity at the single-cell level is a rapidly growing area of research in microbiology and biotechnology due to its significance in pathogenesis, environmental biology, and industrial biotechnologies. However, the tools available for efficiently and precisely probing such heterogeneity are limited for most bacteria. Here we describe the development and application of flow-cytometric (FC) and fluorescence-assisted cell-sorting techniques for the study of endospore-forming bacteria. We show that by combining FC light scattering (LS) with nucleic acid staining, we can discriminate, quantify, and enrich all sporulation-associated morphologies exhibited by the endospore-forming anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum. Using FC LS analysis, we quantitatively show that clostridial cultures commonly perform multiple rounds of sporulation and that sporulation is induced earlier by the overexpression of Spo0A, the master regulator of endospore formers. To further demonstrate the power of our approach, we employed FC LS analysis to generate compelling evidence to challenge the long-accepted view in the field that the clostridial cell form is the solvent-forming phenotype. PMID:18931289

  14. Proteome distribution between nucleoplasm and nucleolus and its relation to ribosome biogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Palm, Denise; Simm, Stefan; Darm, Katrin; Weis, Benjamin L; Ruprecht, Maike; Schleiff, Enrico; Scharf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is an essential process initiated in the nucleolus. In eukaryotes, multiple ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs) can be found in the nucleolus, the nucleus and in the cytoplasm. They act in processing, folding and modification of the pre-ribosomal (r)RNAs, incorporation of ribosomal proteins (RPs), export of pre-ribosomal particles to the cytoplasm, and quality control mechanisms. Ribosome biogenesis is best established for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Plant ortholog assignment to yeast RBFs revealed the absence of about 30% of the yeast RBFs in plants. In turn, few plant specific proteins have been identified by biochemical experiments to act in plant ribosome biogenesis. Nevertheless, a complete inventory of plant RBFs has not been established yet. We analyzed the proteome of the nucleus and nucleolus of Arabidopsis thaliana and the post-translational modifications of these proteins. We identified 1602 proteins in the nucleolar and 2544 proteins in the nuclear fraction with an overlap of 1429 proteins. For a randomly selected set of proteins identified by the proteomic approach we confirmed the localization inferred from the proteomics data by the localization of GFP fusion proteins. We assigned the identified proteins to various complexes and functions and found about 519 plant proteins that have a potential to act as a RBFs, but which have not been experimentally characterized yet. Last, we compared the distribution of RBFs and RPs in the various fractions with the distribution established for yeast. PMID:26980300

  15. Validation of a rapid bacteria endospore enumeration system for use with spacecraft assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Kuhlman, G.; Kirschner, L.; Kazarians, G.; Matsuyama, A.; Pickett, M.; Venkateswaran, K.; Kastner, J.; Kern, R.

    NASA planetary protection policy sets forth strict limits on the number of bacterial endospores that can be present on a spacecraft at launch Currently the only approved method for counting the spores is a culture based assay that requires three days to produce results a timeframe that can be at odds with the rapid pace and rigorous deadlines of spacecraft assembly A possible alternative to the traditional culture based approach is the Millipore Rapid Microbiology Detection System RMDS which has previously been used for process and contamination control in the pharmaceutical and food industries The RMDS is rapid and simple shows high sensitivity 1 colony forming unit CFU sample and correlates well with traditional culture-based methods It combines membrane filtration adenosine triphosphate ATP bioluminescence chemistry and image analysis based on photon detection with a Charge Coupled Device CCD camera In this study we have optimized the assay condition and evaluated the use of the RMDS as a rapid spore detection tool for NASA applications Seven species of Bacillus nine strains that have been repeatedly isolated from clean room environments were assayed In order to select for spores the samples were subjected to a heat shock step before proceeding with the RMDS incubation protocol All strains were detected by the RMDS in sim 5 hours and these assay times were repeatedly demonstrated along with low image background noise The RMDS-based spore detection method is undergoing the final stages of validation and is

  16. Towards Single-Shot Detection of Bacterial Endospores via Coherent Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestov, Dmitry; Wang, Xi; Ariunbold, Gombojav; Murawski, Robert; Sautenkov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Alexei; Scully, Marlan

    2007-10-01

    Recent advances in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy hold exciting promise to make the most out of now readily available ultrafast laser sources. Techniques have been devised to mitigate the nonresonant four-wave-mixing in favor of informative Raman-resonant signal. In particular, a hybrid technique for CARS (see Science 316, 265 (2007)) brings together the advantages of coherent broadband pump-Stokes excitation of molecular vibrations and their time-delayed but frequency-resolved probing via a spectrally narrowed and shaped laser pulse. We apply this technique to the problem of real-time detection of warfare bioagents and report single-shot acquisition of a distinct CARS spectrum from a small volume of B. subtilis endospores (˜10^4 spores), a harmless surrogate for B. anthracis. We study the dependence of the CARS signal on the energy of the ultrashort preparation pulses and find the limit on the pulse energy fluence (˜0.2 J/cm^2), imposed by the laser-induced damage of the spores.

  17. Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel filamentous, endospore-forming, thermophilic and halophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Addou, Nariman Ammara; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Fauque, Guy; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-04-01

    A novel filamentous, endospore-forming, thermophilic and moderately halophilic bacterium designated strain Nari2A(T) was isolated from soil collected from an Algerian salt lake, Chott Melghir. The novel isolate was Gram-staining-positive, aerobic, catalase-negative and oxidase-positive. Optimum growth occurred at 50-55 °C, 7-10% (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. The strain exhibited 95.4, 95.4 and 95.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Thalassobacillus devorans G19.1(T), Sediminibacillus halophilus EN8d(T) and Virgibacillus kekensis YIM-kkny16(T), respectively. The major menaquinone was MK-7. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, three unknown phosphoglycolipids and two unknown phospholipids. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(17 : 0). The DNA G+C content was 41.9 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain Nari2A(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Bacillaceae , order Bacillales , for which the name Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Melghiribacillus thermohalophilus is Nari2A(T) ( = DSM 25894(T) = CCUG 62543(T)). PMID:25604343

  18. SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN MELANOSOME BIOGENESIS AND PATHOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria

    2010-01-01

    Melanosomes are the specialized intracellular organelles of pigment cells devoted to the synthesis, storage and transport of melanin pigments, which are responsible for most visible pigmentation in mammals and other vertebrates. As a direct consequence, any genetic mutation resulting in alteration of melanosomal function, either because affecting pigment cell survival, migration and differentiation, or because interfering with melanosome biogenesis, transport and transfer to keratinocytes, is immediately translated into color variations of skin, fur, hair or eyes. Thus, over one hundred genes and proteins have been identified as pigmentary determinants in mammals, providing us with a deep understanding of this biological system, which functions by using mechanisms and processes that have parallels in other tissues and organs. In particular, many genes implicated in melanosome biogenesis have been characterized, so that melanosomes represent an incredible source of information and a model for organelles belonging to the secretory pathway. Furthermore, the function of melanosomes can be associated with common physiological phenotypes, such as variation of pigmentation among individuals, and with rare pathological conditions, such as albinism, characterized by severe visual defects. Among the most relevant mechanisms operating in melanosome biogenesis are the signal transduction pathways mediated by two peculiar G protein-coupled receptors: the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R), involved in the fair skin/red hair phenotype and skin cancer; and OA1 (GPR143), whose loss-of-function results in X-linked ocular albinism. This review will focus on the most recent novelties regarding the functioning of these two receptors, by highlighting emerging signaling mechanisms and general implications for cell biology and pathology. PMID:20381640

  19. Human disorders of peroxisome metabolism and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Waterham, Hans R; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes are dynamic organelles that play an essential role in a variety of cellular catabolic and anabolic metabolic pathways, including fatty acid alpha- and beta-oxidation, and plasmalogen and bile acid synthesis. Defects in genes encoding peroxisomal proteins can result in a large variety of peroxisomal disorders either affecting specific metabolic pathways, i.e., the single peroxisomal enzyme deficiencies, or causing a generalized defect in function and assembly of peroxisomes, i.e., peroxisome biogenesis disorders. In this review, we discuss the clinical, biochemical, and genetic aspects of all human peroxisomal disorders currently known. PMID:26611709

  20. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA.

    PubMed

    Patton, James G; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Weaver, Alissa M; Vickers, Kasey; Zhang, Bing; Coffey, Robert J; Ansel, K Mark; Blelloch, Robert; Goga, Andrei; Huang, Bo; L'Etoille, Noelle; Raffai, Robert L; Lai, Charles P; Krichevsky, Anna M; Mateescu, Bogdan; Greiner, Vanille J; Hunter, Craig; Voinnet, Olivier; McManus, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s) by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA. PMID:26320939

  1. Cilostazol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through activating the expression of PGC-1α

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Luning; Li, Qiang; Sun, Bei; Xu, Zhiying; Ge, Zhiming

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► First time to show that cilostazol promotes the expressions of PGC-1α. ► First time to show that cilostazol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in HUVECs. ► PKA/CREB pathway mediates the effect of cilostazol on PGC-1α expression. ► Suggesting the roles of cilostazol in mitochondrial dysfunction related disease. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is frequently observed in vascular diseases. Cilostazol is a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Cilostazol increases intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels through inhibition of type III phosphodiesterase. The effects of cilostazol in mitochondrial biogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated in this study. Cilostazol treated HUVECs displayed increased levels of ATP, mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA ratio, expressions of cytochrome B, and mitochondrial mass, suggesting an enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis induced by cilostazol. The promoted mitochondrial biogenesis could be abolished by Protein kinase A (PKA) specific inhibitor H-89, implying that PKA pathway played a critical role in increased mitochondrial biogenesis after cilostazol treatment. Indeed, expression levels of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), NRF 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) were significantly increased in HUVECs after incubation with cilostazol at both mRNA levels and protein levels. Importantly, knockdown of PGC-1α could abolish cilostazol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Enhanced expression of p-CREB and PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by H-89. Moreover, the increased expression of PGC-1α induced by cilostazol could be inhibited by downregulation of CREB using CREB siRNA at both mRNA and protein levels. All the results indicated that cilostazol promoted mitochondrial biogenesis through activating the expression of PGC-1α in

  2. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Geun; Park, Jung-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Shon, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action. PMID:26068191

  3. Integrator mediates the biogenesis of enhancer RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Fan; Gardini, Alessandro; Zhang, Anda; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Integrator is a multi-subunit complex stably associated with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) 1. Integrator is endowed with a core catalytic RNA endonuclease activity, which is required for the 3′-end processing of non-polyadenylated RNAPII-dependent uridylate-rich small nuclear RNA genes (UsnRNAs) 1. Here, we examined the requirement of Integrator in the biogenesis of transcripts derived from distal regulatory elements (enhancers) involved in tissue- and temporal-specific regulation of gene expression 2–5. Integrator is recruited to enhancers and super-enhancers in a stimulus-dependent manner. Functional depletion of Integrator subunits diminishes the signal-dependent induction of eRNAs and abrogates the stimulus-induced enhancer-promoter chromatin looping. Global nuclear run-on and RNAPII profiling reveals a role for Integrator in 3′-end cleavage of eRNAs primary transcripts leading to transcriptional termination. In the absence of Integrator, eRNAs remain bound to RNAPII and their primary transcripts accumulates. Importantly, the induction of eRNAs and gene expression responsiveness requires the catalytic activity of Integrator complex. We propose a role for Integrator in biogenesis of eRNAs and enhancer function in metazoans. PMID:26308897

  4. Keeping FIT, storing fat: Lipid droplet biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Vineet; Golden, Andy; Prinz, William A

    2016-01-01

    All eukaryotes store excess lipids in organelles known as lipid droplets (LDs), which play central roles in lipid metabolism. Understanding LD biogenesis and metabolism is critical for understanding the pathophysiology of lipid metabolic disorders like obesity and atherosclerosis. LDs are composed of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids that often contains coat proteins. Nascent LDs bud from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but the mechanism is not known. In this commentary we discuss our recent finding that a conserved family of proteins called fat storage-inducing transmembrane (FIT) proteins is necessary for LDs budding from the ER. In cells lacking FIT proteins, LDs remain in the ER membrane. C. elegans has a single FIT protein (FITM-2), which we found is essential; almost all homozygous fitm-2 animals die as larvae and those that survive to adulthood give rise to embryos that die as L1 and L2 larvae. Homozygous fitm-2 animals have a number of abnormalities including a significant decrease in intestinal LDs and dramatic defects in muscle development. Understanding how FIT proteins mediate LD biogenesis and what roles they play in lipid metabolism and development are fascinating challenges for the future. PMID:27383728

  5. Exosome Biogenesis, Regulation, and Function in Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alenquer, Marta; Amorim, Maria João

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) with the cellular plasma membrane. They originate as intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) during the process of MVB formation. Exosomes were shown to contain selectively sorted functional proteins, lipids, and RNAs, mediating cell-to-cell communications and hence playing a role in the physiology of the healthy and diseased organism. Challenges in the field include the identification of mechanisms sustaining packaging of membrane-bound and soluble material to these vesicles and the understanding of the underlying processes directing MVBs for degradation or fusion with the plasma membrane. The investigation into the formation and roles of exosomes in viral infection is in its early years. Although still controversial, exosomes can, in principle, incorporate any functional factor, provided they have an appropriate sorting signal, and thus are prone to viral exploitation. This review initially focuses on the composition and biogenesis of exosomes. It then explores the regulatory mechanisms underlying their biogenesis. Exosomes are part of the endocytic system, which is tightly regulated and able to respond to several stimuli that lead to alterations in the composition of its sub-compartments. We discuss the current knowledge of how these changes affect exosomal release. We then summarize how different viruses exploit specific proteins of endocytic sub-compartments and speculate that it could interfere with exosome function, although no direct link between viral usage of the endocytic system and exosome release has yet been reported. Many recent reports have ascribed functions to exosomes released from cells infected with a variety of animal viruses, including viral spread, host immunity, and manipulation of the microenvironment, which are discussed. Given the ever-growing roles and importance of exosomes in viral infections, understanding what regulates their composition and levels, and

  6. Coccidioides Endospores and Spherules Draw Strong Chemotactic, Adhesive, and Phagocytic Responses by Individual Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Thompson III, George R.; Hastey, Christine J.; Hodge, Gregory C.; Lunetta, Jennine M.; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Heinrich, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioides spp. are dimorphic pathogenic fungi whose parasitic forms cause coccidioidomycosis (Valley fever) in mammalian hosts. We use an innovative interdisciplinary approach to analyze one-on-one encounters between human neutrophils and two forms of Coccidioides posadasii. To examine the mechanisms by which the innate immune system coordinates different stages of the host response to fungal pathogens, we dissect the immune-cell response into chemotaxis, adhesion, and phagocytosis. Our single-cell technique reveals a surprisingly strong response by initially quiescent neutrophils to close encounters with C. posadasii, both from a distance (by complement-mediated chemotaxis) as well as upon contact (by serum-dependent adhesion and phagocytosis). This response closely resembles neutrophil interactions with Candida albicans and zymosan particles, and is significantly stronger than the neutrophil responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Rhizopus oryzae under identical conditions. The vigorous in vitro neutrophil response suggests that C. posadasii evades in vivo recognition by neutrophils through suppression of long-range mobilization and recruitment of the immune cells. This observation elucidates an important paradigm of the recognition of microbes, i.e., that intact immunotaxis comprises an intricate spatiotemporal hierarchy of distinct chemotactic processes. Moreover, in contrast to earlier reports, human neutrophils exhibit vigorous chemotaxis toward, and frustrated phagocytosis of, the large spherules of C. posadasii under physiological-like conditions. Finally, neutrophils from healthy donors and patients with chronic coccidioidomycosis display subtle differences in their responses to antibody-coated beads, even though the patient cells appear to interact normally with C. posadasii endospores. PMID:26070210

  7. Effects of Thermoradiation Treatments on the DNA of Bacillus Subtilis Endospores

    SciTech Connect

    JACOBS, JENNIFER A.; TURMAN, BOBBY N.; FAGUY, D.M.

    2002-06-01

    Endospores of the bacterium, Bacillus subfilis, have been shown to exhibit a synergistic rate of cell death when treated with particular levels of heat and ionizing radiation in combination. This synergism has been documented for a number of different organisms at various temperatures and radiation doses (Sivinski, H.D., D.M. Garst, M.C. Reynolds, C.A. Trauth, Jr., R.E. Trujillo, and W.J. Whitfield, ''The Synergistic Inactivation of Biological Systems by Thermoradiation,'' Industrial Sterilization, International Symposium, Amsterdam, 1972, Duke University Press, Durham, NC, pp. 305-335). However, the mechanism of the synergistic action is unknown. This study attempted to determine whether the mechanism of synergism was specifically connected to the DNA strand breakage--either single strand breakage or double strand breakage. Some work was also done to examine the effect of free radicals and ions created in the spore body by the radiation treatments, as well as to determine the functionality of repair enzymes following heat, radiation, and thermoradiation treatments. Bacillus subtilis spores were treated at combinations of 33 kr/hr, 15 kr/hr, 105 C, 85 C, 63 C, and 50 C. Some synergistic correlation was found with the number of double strand breaks, and a strong correlation was found with the number of single strand breaks. In cases displaying synergism of spore killing, single strand breakage while the DNA was in a denatured state is suspected as a likely mechanism. DNA was damaged more by irradiation in the naked state than when encased within the spore, indicating that the spore encasement provides an overall protective effect from radiation damage in spite of free radicals and ions which may be created from molecules other than the DNA molecule within the spore body. Repair enzymes were found to be functional following treatments by radiation only, heat only, and thermoradiation.

  8. Effects of thermoradiation treatments on the DNA of Bacillus subtilis endospores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Jennifer A.

    2001-12-01

    Endospores of the bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, have been shown to exhibit a synergistic rate of cell death when treated with particular levels of heat and ionizing radiation in combination. This synergism has been documented for a number of different organisms at various temperatures and radiation doses (Sivinski, H. D., D. M. Garst, M. C. Reynolds, C. A. Trauth, Jr., R. E. Trujillo, and W. J. Whitfield, ``The Synergistic Inactivation of Biological Systems by Thermoradiation,'' Industrial Sterilization, International Symposium, Amsterdam, 1972, Duke University Press, Durham, NC, pp. 305-335). However, the mechanism of the synergistic action is unknown. This study attempted to determine whether the mechanism of synergism was specifically connected to the DNA strand breakage-either single strand breakage or double strand breakage. Some work was also done to examine the effect of free radicals and ions created in the spore body by the radiation treatments, as well as to determine the functionality of repair enzymes following heat, radiation, and thermoradiation treatments. Bacillus subtilis spores were treated at combinations of 33 kr/hr, 15 kr/hr, 105°C, 85°C, 63°C, and room temperature. Some synergistic correlation was found with the number of double strand breaks, and a strong correlation was found with the number of single strand breaks. DNA was damaged more by irradiation in the naked state than when encased within the spore, indicating that the spore encasement provides an overall protective effect from radiation damage in spite of free radicals and ions which may be created from molecules other than the DNA molecule within the spore body. Repair enzymes appeared to be functional in their ability to repair single and double strand breaks following treatments by radiation only, heat only, and thermoradiation.

  9. eIF1A augments Ago2-mediated Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis and RNA interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tingfang; Arthanari, Haribabu; Akabayov, Barak; Song, Huaidong; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Qi, Hank H.; Jedrychowski, Mark; Güttler, Thomas; Guo, Cuicui; Luna, Rafael E.; Gygi, Steven P.; Huang, Stephen A.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and miRNA-guided RNA interference (RNAi) are essential for gene expression in eukaryotes. Here we report that translation initiation factor eIF1A directly interacts with Ago2 and promotes Ago2 activities in RNAi and miR-451 biogenesis. Biochemical and NMR analyses demonstrate that eIF1A binds to the MID domain of Ago2 and this interaction does not impair translation initiation. Alanine mutation of the Ago2-facing Lys56 in eIF1A impairs RNAi activities in human cells and zebrafish. The eIF1A-Ago2 assembly facilitates Dicer-independent biogenesis of miR-451, which mediates erythrocyte maturation. Human eIF1A (heIF1A), but not heIF1A(K56A), rescues the erythrocyte maturation delay in eif1axb knockdown zebrafish. Consistently, miR-451 partly compensates erythrocyte maturation defects in zebrafish with eif1axb knockdown and eIF1A(K56A) expression, supporting a role of eIF1A in miRNA-451 biogenesis in this model. Our results suggest that eIF1A is a novel component of the Ago2-centred RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) and augments Ago2-dependent RNAi and miRNA biogenesis.

  10. eIF1A augments Ago2-mediated Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis and RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tingfang; Arthanari, Haribabu; Akabayov, Barak; Song, Huaidong; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Qi, Hank H.; Jedrychowski, Mark; Güttler, Thomas; Guo, Cuicui; Luna, Rafael E.; Gygi, Steven P.; Huang, Stephen A.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and miRNA-guided RNA interference (RNAi) are essential for gene expression in eukaryotes. Here we report that translation initiation factor eIF1A directly interacts with Ago2 and promotes Ago2 activities in RNAi and miR-451 biogenesis. Biochemical and NMR analyses demonstrate that eIF1A binds to the MID-domain of Ago2 and this interaction does not impair translation initiation. Alanine mutation of the Ago2-facing Lys56 in eIF1A impairs RNAi activities in human cells and zebrafish. The eIF1A-Ago2 assembly facilitates Dicer-independent biogenesis of miR-451, which mediates erythrocyte maturation. Human eIF1A (heIF1A), but not heIF1A(K56A), rescues the erythrocyte maturation delay in eif1axb knockdown zebrafish. Consistently, miR-451 partly compensates erythrocyte maturation defects in zebrafish with eif1axb knockdown and eIF1A(K56A) expression, supporting a role of eIF1A in miRNA-451 biogenesis in this model. Our results suggest that eIF1A is a novel component of the Ago2-centered RNA induced silencing complexes (RISCs) and augments Ago2-dependent RNAi and miRNA biogenesis. PMID:26018492

  11. Evaluation of Sampling Tools for Environmental Sampling of Bacterial Endospores from Porous and Non-porous Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Nancy B.; Butcher, Mark G.; Su, Yin-Fong; Jarman, Kristin H.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Seiders, Barbara AB; Wahl, Karen L.

    2008-03-08

    Aims: Having and executing a well-defined and validated sampling protocol is critical following a purposeful release of a biological agent for response and recovery activities, for clinical and epidemiological analysis and for forensic purposes. The objective of this study was to address the need for validated sampling and analysis methods called out by the General Accounting Office and others to systematically compare the collection efficiency of various swabs and wipes for collection of bacterial endospores from five different surfaces, both porous and non-porous. This study was also designed to test the collection and extraction solutions used for endospore recovery from swabs and wipes. Methods and Results: Eight collection tools were used, five swabs and three wipes. Three collection/preservation solutions were evaluated: sterile E-pure® water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and phosphate buffered saline with 0.3% Tween (PBST). An Ink Jet Aerosol Generator (IJAG) was used to apply Bacillus subtilis endospores to five porous and non-porous surfaces. The collection efficiencies of the swabs and wipes were compared using a statistical multiple comparison analysis. Results indicated that wipes tend to have higher collection efficiency than swabs. Of the swabs tested, the recovery from most of the surfaces was highest with the polyurethane foam swab. Conclusions: The ScottPure® wipe had the highest collection efficiency and PBST was the best collection solution of those tested. Significance and Impact of Study: Validated sampling for potential biological warfare is of significant importance and this study answered some relevant questions.

  12. The Distribution of Thermophilic Sulfate-reducing Bacteria Along an Estuarine Gradient Reveals Multiple Origins of Endospores in Estuarine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cold marine sediments harbour inactive spores of thermophilic bacteria. These misplaced thermophiles are genetically similar to microorganisms detected in deep biosphere environments, leading to the hypothesis that seabed fluid flow transports thermophiles out of warm subsurface environments and into the ocean. Estuaries form the transition between the marine and the terrestrial biosphere and are influenced by tidal currents, surface run-off and groundwater seepage. Endospores from thermophilic bacteria present in estuarine sediments could therefore originate from a number of sources that may influence the estuary differently. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that this will lead to a gradient in the composition of thermophilic endospore populations in estuarine sediments. The distribution of thermophilic spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria along an estuarine gradient from freshwater (River Tyne, UK) to marine (North Sea) was investigated. Microbial community analysis by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed changes in the thermophilic population enriched at different locations within the estuary. Certain species were only detected at the marine end, highlighting possible links to deep marine biosphere habitats such as oil reservoirs that harbour closely related Desulfotomaculum spp. Conversely, other taxa were predominantly observed in the freshwater reaches of the estuary indicating dispersal from an upstream or terrestrial source. Different endospore populations were enriched dependent on incubation temperature and spore heat-resistance. Microcosms incubated at 50, 60 or 70°C showed a shift in the dominant species of Desulfotomaculum enriched as the temperature increased. Microcosms triple-autoclaved at 121°C prior to incubation still showed rapid and reproducible sulfate-reduction and some Desulfotomaculum spp. remained active after autoclaving at 130°C. These results show that temperature physiology and biogeographic patterns can be used to

  13. Insulin Granule Biogenesis, Trafficking and Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, June Chunqiu; Min, Le; Pessin, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that beta cell dysfunction resulting in abnormal insulin secretion is the essential element in the progression of patients from a state of impaired glucose tolerance to frank type 2 diabetes (Del Prato, 2003; Del Prato and Tiengo, 2001). Although extensive studies have examined the molecular, cellular and physiologic mechanisms of insulin granule biogenesis, sorting, and exocytosis the precise mechanisms controlling these processes and their dysregulation in the developed of diabetes remains an area of important investigation. We now know that insulin biogenesis initiates with the synthesis of preproinsulin in rough endoplastic reticulum and conversion of preproinsulin to proinsulin. Proinsulin begins to be packaged in the Trans-Golgi Network and is sorting into immature secretory granules. These immature granules become acidic via ATP-dependent proton pump and proinsulin undergoes proteolytic cleavage resulting the formation of insulin and C-peptide. During the granule maturation process, insulin is crystallized with zinc and calcium in the form of dense-core granules and unwanted cargo and membrane proteins undergo selective retrograde trafficking to either the constitutive trafficking pathway for secretion or to degradative pathways. The newly formed mature dense-core insulin granules populate two different intracellular pools, the readily releasable pools (RRP) and the reserved pool. These two distinct populations are thought to be responsible for the biphasic nature of insulin release in which the RRP granules are associated with the plasma membrane and undergo an acute calcium-dependent release accounting for first phase insulin secretion. In contrast, second phase insulin secretion requires the trafficking of the reserved granule pool to the plasma membrane. The initial trigger for insulin granule fusion with the plasma membrane is a rise in intracellular calcium and in the case of glucose stimulation results from

  14. Chronic Arsenic Exposure-Induced Oxidative Stress is Mediated by Decreased Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    The present study was executed to study the effect of chronic arsenic exposure on generation of mitochondrial oxidative stress and biogenesis in rat liver. Chronic sodium arsenite treatment (25 ppm for 12 weeks) decreased mitochondrial complexes activity in rat liver. There was a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity in arsenic-treated rats that might be responsible for increased protein and lipid oxidation as observed in our study. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complexes I (ND1 and ND2) and IV (COX I and COX IV) was downregulated in arsenic-treated rats only. The protein and mRNA expression of MnSOD was reduced suggesting increased mitochondrial oxidative damage after arsenic treatment. There was activation of Bax and caspase-3 followed by release of cytochrome c from mitochondria suggesting induction of apoptotic pathway under oxidative stress. The entire phenomenon was associated with decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis as evident by decreased protein and mRNA expression of nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in arsenic-treated rat liver. The results of the present study indicate that arsenic-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis in rat liver that may present one of the mechanisms for arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26767369

  15. Biogenesis of an Antitumor Antibiotic Protein, Neocarzonostatin

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Kozo; Kikuchi, Mikio; Ishida, Nakao

    1972-01-01

    A study of the biogenesis of the antitumor protein antibiotic neocarzinostatin (NCS) was undertaken. The production of NCS, as well as the growth of Streptomyces carzinostaticus in a production medium, was sensitive to puromycin, chloramphenicol, and actinomycin D. However, when a 12-hr culture in production medium was transferred to a nongrowth medium consisting of a phosphate buffer with Mg2+ and Ca2+, rapid NCS synthesis and liberation occurred. NCS production in this medium was no longer sensitive to actinomycin D, but was sensitive to puromycin and chloramphenicol. The conversion of a precursor NCS to an active form was shown to occur in this medium. Subcellular analysis suggested that NCS synthesis occurred by a mechanism similar to that of protein synthesis by membrane polysomes. PMID:4670693

  16. ABCA1 and nascent HDL biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhui; Smith, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    ABCA1 mediates the secretion of cellular free cholesterol and phospholipids to an extracellular acceptor, apolipoprotein AI, to form nascent high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Thus, ABCA1 is a key molecule in cholesterol homeostasis. Functional studies of certain Tangier disease mutations demonstrate that ABCA1 has multiple activities, including plasma membrane remodeling and apoAI binding to cell surface, which participate in nascent HDL biogenesis. Recent advances in our understanding of ABCA1 have demonstrated that ABCA1also mediates unfolding the N terminus of apoAI on the cell surface, followed by lipidation of apoAI and release of nascent HDL. Although ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to apoAI can occur on the plasma membrane, the role of apoAI retroendocytosis during cholesterol efflux may play a role in macrophage foam cells that store cholesterol esters in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. PMID:25359426

  17. Cytochrome c biogenesis: the Ccm system.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Carsten; Turkarslan, Serdar; Lee, Dong-Woo; Daldal, Fevzi

    2010-06-01

    Cytochromes of c-type contain covalently attached hemes that are formed via thioether bonds between the vinyls of heme b and cysteines within C(1)XXC(2)H motifs of apocytochromes. In diverse organisms this post-translational modification relies on membrane-associated specific biogenesis proteins, referred to as cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) systems. A highly complex version of these systems, Ccm or System I, is found in Gram-negative bacteria, archaea and plant mitochondria. We describe emerging functional interactions between the Ccm components categorized into three conserved modules, and present a mechanistic view of the molecular basis of ubiquitous vinyl-2 approximately Cys(1) and vinyl-4 approximately Cys(2) heme b-apocytochrome thioether bonds in c-type cytochromes. PMID:20382024

  18. Biogenesis of Plant Prevacuolar Multivesicular Bodies.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Shen, Jinbo; Gao, Caiji; Zhuang, Xiaohong; Wang, Junqi; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-06-01

    Plant prevacuolar compartments (PVCs), or multivesicular bodies (MVBs), are single membrane-bound organelles that play important roles in mediating protein trafficking to vacuoles in the secretory pathway. PVC/MVB also serves as a late endosome in the endocytic pathway in plants. Since the plant PVC was identified as an MVB more than 10 years ago, great progress has been made toward the understanding of PVC/MVB function and biogenesis in plants. In this review, we first summarize previous research into the identification and characterization of plant PVCs/MVBs, and then highlight recent advances on the mechanisms underlying intraluminal vesicle formation and maturation of plant PVCs/MVBs. In addition, we discuss the possible crosstalk that appears to occur between PVCs/MVBs and autophagosomes during autophagy in plants. Finally, we list some open questions and present future perspectives in this field. PMID:26836198

  19. Impaired Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Myogenesis in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ripolone, Michela; Ronchi, Dario; Violano, Raffaella; Vallejo, Dionis; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Barca, Emanuele; Lucchini, Valeria; Colombo, Irene; Villa, Luisa; Berardinelli, Angela; Balottin, Umberto; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina; Bordoni, Andreina; Fortunato, Francesco; Corti, Stefania; Parisi, Daniela; Toscano, Antonio; Sciacco, Monica; DiMauro, Salvatore; Comi, Giacomo P.; Moggio, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    , implying depression of the entire mitochondrial biogenesis. Results of Western blot analysis confirmed the reduced levels of the respiratory chain subunits that included mitochondrially encoded COX1 (47.5%; P = .004), COX2 (32.4%; P < .001), COX4 (26.6%; P < .001), and succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (65.8%; P = .03) as well as the structural outer membrane mitochondrial porin (33.1%; P < .001). Conversely, the levels of expression of 3 myogenic regulatory factors—muscle-specificmyogenic factor 5, myoblast determination 1, and myogenin—were higher in muscles from patients with SMA compared with muscles from age-matched controls (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our results strongly support the conclusion that an altered regulation of myogenesis and a downregulated mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to pathologic change in the muscle of patients with SMA. Therapeutic strategies should aim at counteracting these changes. PMID:25844556

  20. Divergent Mitochondrial Biogenesis Responses in Human Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Preeti; Wanagat, Jonathan; Wang, Zhihua; Wang, Yibin; Liem, David A.; Ping, Peipei; Antoshechkin, Igor A.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; MacLellan, W. Robb

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondria are key players in the development and progression of heart failure (HF). Mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction leads to diminished energy production and increased cell death contributing to the progression of left ventricular (LV) failure. The fundamental mechanisms that underlie mt dysfunction in HF have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Results To characterize mt morphology, biogenesis and genomic integrity in human HF, we investigated LV tissue from non-failing (NF) hearts and end-stage ischemic (ICM) or dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathic hearts. Although mt dysfunction was present in both types of cardiomyopathy, mt were smaller and increased in number in DCM compared to ICM or NF hearts. Mt volume density and mtDNA copy number was increased by ~2-fold (P<0.001) in DCM hearts in comparison to ICM hearts. These changes were accompanied by an increase in the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes in DCM versus no change in ICM. mtDNA repair and antioxidant genes were reduced in failing hearts suggestive of a defective repair and protection system, which may account for the 4.1-fold increase in mtDNA deletion mutations in DCM (P<0.05 vs NF hearts, P<0.05 vs ICM). Conclusions In DCM, mt dysfunction is associated with mtDNA damage and deletions, which could be a consequence of mutating stress coupled with a PGC-1α-dependent stimulus for mt biogenesis. However, this maladaptive compensatory response contributes to additional oxidative damage. Thus, our findings support further investigations into novel mechanisms and therapeutic strategies for mt dysfunction in DCM. PMID:23589024

  1. Biogenesis of respiratory cytochromes in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Thöny-Meyer, L

    1997-01-01

    Biogenesis of respiratory cytochromes is defined as consisting of the posttranslational processes that are necessary to assemble apoprotein, heme, and sometimes additional cofactors into mature enzyme complexes with electron transfer functions. Different biochemical reactions take place during maturation: (i) targeting of the apoprotein to or through the cytoplasmic membrane to its subcellular destination; (ii) proteolytic processing of precursor forms; (iii) assembly of subunits in the membrane and oligomerization; (iv) translocation and/or modification of heme and covalent or noncovalent binding to the protein moiety; (v) transport, processing, and incorporation of other cofactors; and (vi) folding and stabilization of the protein. These steps are discussed for the maturation of different oxidoreductase complexes, and they are arranged in a linear pathway to best account for experimental findings from studies concerning cytochrome biogenesis. The example of the best-studied case, i.e., maturation of cytochrome c, appears to consist of a pathway that requires at least nine specific genes and more general cellular functions such as protein secretion or the control of the redox state in the periplasm. Covalent attachment of heme appears to be enzyme catalyzed and takes place in the periplasm after translocation of the precursor through the membrane. The genetic characterization and the putative biochemical functions of cytochrome c-specific maturation proteins suggest that they may be organized in a membrane-bound maturase complex. Formation of the multisubunit cytochrome bc, complex and several terminal oxidases of the bo3, bd, aa3, and cbb3 types is discussed in detail, and models for linear maturation pathways are proposed wherever possible. PMID:9293186

  2. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  3. IHG-1 Promotes Mitochondrial Biogenesis by Stabilizing PGC-1α

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Fionnuala B.; Corcoran, James B.; Docherty, Neil G.; Griffin, Brenda; Bhreathnach, Una; Furlong, Fiona; Martin, Finian; Murphy, Madeline

    2011-01-01

    Increased expression of Induced-by-High-Glucose 1 (IHG-1) associates with tubulointerstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy. IHG-1 amplifies TGF-β1 signaling, but the functions of this highly-conserved protein are not well understood. IHG-1 contains a putative mitochondrial-localization domain, and here we report that IHG-1 is specifically localized to mitochondria. IHG-1 overexpression increased mitochondrial mass and stabilized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). Conversely, inhibition of IHG-1 expression decreased mitochondrial mass, downregulated mitochondrial proteins, and PGC-1α-regulated transcription factors, including nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and reduced activity of the TFAM promoter. In the unilateral ureteral obstruction model, we observed higher PGC-1α protein expression and IHG-1 levels with fibrosis. In a gene-expression database, we noted that renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy demonstrated higher expression of genes encoding key mitochondrial proteins, including cytochrome c and manganese superoxide dismutase, compared with control biopsies. In summary, these data suggest that IHG-1 increases mitochondrial biogenesis by promoting PGC-1α-dependent processes, potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis. PMID:21784897

  4. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice. PMID:25582749

  5. Regulatory Multidimensionality of Gas Vesicle Biogenesis in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Andrew I.; Facciotti, Marc T.

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that the regulation of gas vesicle biogenesis in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 is multifaceted and appears to integrate environmental and metabolic cues at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The mechanistic details underlying this process, however, remain unclear. In this manuscript, we quantify the contribution of light scattering made by both intracellular and released gas vesicles isolated from Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, demonstrating that each form can lead to distinct features in growth curves determined by optical density measured at 600 nm (OD600). In the course of the study, we also demonstrate the sensitivity of gas vesicle accumulation in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 on small differences in growth conditions and reevaluate published works in the context of our results to present a hypothesis regarding the roles of the general transcription factor tbpD and the TCA cycle enzyme aconitase on the regulation of gas vesicle biogenesis. PMID:22110395

  6. Tetramethylpyrazine ameliorates high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Xia, Pu; Li, Xi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Zhenqi; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is an active compound isolated from a Chinese herbal prescription that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that TMP acts as a potent antioxidant protecting endothelial cells against high glucose-induced damages. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for the antioxidant effect of TMP remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that TMP increases nitric oxide production in endothelial cells and promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation in rate aortic rings. The antioxidant effect of TMP appears attributable to its ability to activate the mitochondrial biogenesis, as reflected in an up-regulation of complex III and amelioration of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, TMP is able to reverse high glucose-induced suppression of SIRT1 and the biogenesis-related factors, including PGC-1α, NRF1 and TFAM, suggesting a new molecular mechanism underlying the protective effect of TMP on the endothelium. PMID:24505445

  7. Tetramethylpyrazine Ameliorates High Glucose-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction by Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Xia, Pu; Li, Xi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Zhenqi; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is an active compound isolated from a Chinese herbal prescription that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that TMP acts as a potent antioxidant protecting endothelial cells against high glucose-induced damages. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for the antioxidant effect of TMP remains to be elucidated. In this study, we show that TMP increases nitric oxide production in endothelial cells and promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation in rate aortic rings. The antioxidant effect of TMP appears attributable to its ability to activate the mitochondrial biogenesis, as reflected in an up-regulation of complex III and amelioration of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, TMP is able to reverse high glucose-induced suppression of SIRT1 and the biogenesis-related factors, including PGC-1α, NRF1 and TFAM, suggesting a new molecular mechanism underlying the protective effect of TMP on the endothelium. PMID:24505445

  8. The structure of Rpf2-Rrs1 explains its role in ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kharde, Satyavati; Calviño, Fabiola R; Gumiero, Andrea; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-08-18

    The assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes is a hierarchical process involving about 200 biogenesis factors and a series of remodeling steps. The 5S RNP consisting of the 5S rRNA, RpL5 and RpL11 is recruited at an early stage, but has to rearrange during maturation of the pre-60S ribosomal subunit. Rpf2 and Rrs1 have been implicated in 5S RNP biogenesis, but their precise role was unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex from Aspergillus nidulans at 1.5 Å resolution and describe it as Brix domain of Rpf2 completed by Rrs1 to form two anticodon-binding domains with functionally important tails. Fitting the X-ray structure into the cryo-EM density of a previously described pre-60S particle correlates with biochemical data. The heterodimer forms specific contacts with the 5S rRNA, RpL5 and the biogenesis factor Rsa4. The flexible protein tails of Rpf2-Rrs1 localize to the central protuberance. Two helices in the Rrs1 C-terminal tail occupy a strategic position to block the rotation of 25S rRNA and the 5S RNP. Our data provide a structural model for 5S RNP recruitment to the pre-60S particle and explain why removal of Rpf2-Rrs1 is necessary for rearrangements to drive 60S maturation. PMID:26117542

  9. Apolipoprotein a1 increases mitochondrial biogenesis through AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Song, Parkyong; Kwon, Yonghoon; Yea, Kyungmoo; Moon, Hyo-Youl; Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Ghim, Jaewang; Hyun, Hyunjung; Kim, Dayea; Koh, Ara; Berggren, Per-Olof; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-09-01

    Apolipoprotein a1, which is a major lipoprotein component of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), was reported to decrease plasma glucose in type 2 diabetes. Although recent studies also have shown that apolipoprotein a1 is involved in triglyceride (TG) metabolism, the mechanisms by which apolipoprotein a1 modulates TG levels remain largely unexplored. Here we demonstrated that apolipoprotein a1 increased mitochondrial DNA and mitochondria contents through sustained AMPK activation in myotubes. This resulted in enhanced fatty acid oxidation and attenuation of free fatty acid-induced insulin resistance features in skeletal muscle. The increment of mitochondria was mediated through induction of transcription factors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear transcription factor 1 (NRF-1). The inhibition of AMPK by a pharmacological agent inhibited the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Increase of AMPK phosphorylation by apolipoprotein a1 occurs through activation of upstream kinase LKB1. Finally, we confirmed that scavenger receptor Class B, type 1 (SR-B1) is an important receptor for apolipoprotein a1 in stimulating AMPK pathway and mitochondrial biogenesis. Our study suggests that apolipoprotein a1 can alleviate obesity related metabolic disease by inducing AMPK dependent mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25982508

  10. Structural analysis of Bacillus subtilis 168 endospore peptidoglycan and its role during differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Atrih, A; Zöllner, P; Allmaier, G; Foster, S J

    1996-01-01

    The structure of the endospore cell wall peptidoglycan of Bacillus subtilis has been examined. Spore peptidoglycan was produced by the development of a method based on chemical permeabilization of the spore coats and enzymatic hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan. The resulting muropeptides which were >97% pure were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, amino acid analysis, and mass spectrometry. This revealed that 49% of the muramic acid residues in the glycan backbone were present in the delta-lactam form which occurred predominantly every second muramic acid. The glycosidic bonds adjacent to the muramic acid delta-lactam residues were resistant to the action of muramidases. Of the muramic acid residues, 25.7 and 23.3% were substituted with a tetrapeptide and a single L-alanine, respectively. Only 2% of the muramic acids had tripeptide side chains and may constitute the primordial cell wall, the remainder of the peptidoglycan being spore cortex. The spore peptidoglycan is very loosely cross-linked at only 2.9% of the muramic acid residues, a figure approximately 11-fold less than that of the vegetative cell wall. The peptidoglycan from strain AA110 (dacB) had fivefold-greater cross-linking (14.4%) than the wild type and an altered ratio of muramic acid substituents having 37.0, 46.3, and 12.3% delta-lactam, tetrapeptide, and single L-alanine, respectively. This suggests a role for the DacB protein (penicillin-binding protein 5*) in cortex biosynthesis. The sporulation-specific putative peptidoglycan hydrolase CwlD plays a pivotal role in the establishment of the mature spore cortex structure since strain AA107 (cwlD) has spore peptidoglycan which is completely devoid of muramic acid delta-lactam residues. Despite this drastic change in peptidoglycan structure, the spores are still stable but are unable to germinate. The role of delta-lactam and other spore peptidoglycan structural features in the maintenance of dormancy, heat resistance

  11. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl{sub 2} for 15 days along with training. ► Co

  12. The effect of ethidium bromide and chloramphenicol on mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Li-Pin; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Wolvetang, Ernst

    2012-05-15

    The expression of mitochondrial components is controlled by an intricate interplay between nuclear transcription factors and retrograde signaling from mitochondria. The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mtDNA-encoded proteins in mitochondrial biogenesis is, however, poorly understood and thus far has mainly been studied in transformed cell lines. We treated primary human fibroblasts with ethidium bromide (EtBr) or chloramphenicol for six weeks to inhibit mtDNA replication or mitochondrial protein synthesis, respectively, and investigated how the cells recovered from these insults two weeks after removal of the drugs. Although cellular growth and mitochondrial gene expression were severely impaired after both inhibitor treatments we observed marked differences in mitochondrial structure, membrane potential, glycolysis, gene expression, and redox status between fibroblasts treated with EtBr and chloramphenicol. Following removal of the drugs we further detected clear differences in expression of both mtDNA-encoded genes and nuclear transcription factors that control mitochondrial biogenesis, suggesting that the cells possess different compensatory mechanisms to recover from drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Our data reveal new aspects of the interplay between mitochondrial retrograde signaling and the expression of nuclear regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process with direct relevance to mitochondrial diseases and chloramphenicol toxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► Cells respond to certain environmental toxins by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis. ► We investigated the effect of Chloramphenicol and EtBr in primary human fibroblasts. ► Inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis or DNA replication elicit different effects. ► We provide novel insights into the cellular responses toxins and antibiotics.

  13. Two orthogonal cleavages separate subunit RNAs in mouse ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Anikin, Leonid; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a dynamic multistep process, many features of which are still incompletely documented. Here, we show that changes in this pathway can be captured and annotated by means of a graphic set of pre-rRNA ratios, a technique we call Ratio Analysis of Multiple Precursors (RAMP). We find that knocking down a ribosome synthesis factor produces a characteristic RAMP profile that exhibits consistency across a range of depletion levels. This facilitates the inference of affected steps and simplifies comparative analysis. We applied RAMP to examine how endonucleolytic cleavages of the mouse pre-rRNA transcript in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) are affected by depletion of factors required for maturation of the small ribosomal subunit (Rcl1, Fcf1/Utp24, Utp23) and the large subunit (Pes1, Nog1). The data suggest that completion of early maturation in a subunit triggers its release from the common pre-rRNA transcript by stimulating cleavage at the proximal site in ITS1. We also find that splitting of pre-rRNA in the 3′ region of ITS1 is prevalent in adult mouse tissues and quiescent cells, as it is in human cells. We propose a model for subunit separation during mammalian ribosome synthesis and discuss its implications for understanding pre-rRNA processing pathways. PMID:25190460

  14. Synergistic Effects of Cilostazol and Probucol on ER Stress-Induced Hepatic Steatosis via Heme Oxygenase-1-Dependent Activation of Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingqing; Pandiri, Indira; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Seul-Ki; Park, Jeongmin; Ryu, Jinhyun; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Park, Jeong Woo; Ryter, Stefan W.; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2016-01-01

    The selective type-3 phosphodiesterase inhibitor cilostazol and the antihyperlipidemic agent probucol have antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties. Moreover, cilostazol and probucol can regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the combinatorial effect of cilostazol and probucol on mitochondrial biogenesis remains unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a well-known causative factor of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which can impair mitochondrial function in hepatocytes. Here, we investigated the synergistic effects of cilostazol and probucol on mitochondrial biogenesis and ER stress-induced hepatic steatosis. A synergistic effect of cilostazol and probucol on HO-1 and mitochondrial biogenesis gene expression was found in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) and murine primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, in an animal model of ER stress involving tunicamycin, combinatorial treatment with cilostazol and probucol significantly increased the expression of HO-1 and mitochondrial biogenesis-related genes and proteins, whereas it downregulated serum ALT, eIF2 phosphorylation, and CHOP expression, as well as the lipogenesis-related genes SREBP-1c and FAS. Based on these results, we conclude that cilostazol and probucol exhibit a synergistic effect on the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis via upregulation of HO-1, which confers protection against ER stress-induced hepatic steatosis. PMID:27057275

  15. Diabetes regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and fission in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J.L.; Quattrini, A.; Lentz, S.I.; Figueroa-Romero, C.; Cerri, F.; Backus, C.; Hong, Y.; Feldman, E.L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Normal mitochondrial (Mt) activity is a critical component of neuronal metabolism and function. Disruption of Mt activity by altered Mt fission and fusion is the root cause of both neurodegenerative disorders and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 2A inherited neuropathy. The current study addressed the role of Mt fission in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy (DN). Methods Mt biogenesis and fission were assayed in both in vivo and in vitro models of DN. Gene, protein, mitochondrial DNA and ultrastructural analyses were used to assess Mt biogenesis and fission. Results Our data reveal increased Mt biogenesis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from diabetic compared to non-diabetic mice. An essential step in Mt biogenesis is Mt fission, regulated by the Mt fission protein Drp1. Evaluation of in vivo diabetic neurons indicated small, fragmented Mt, suggesting increased fission. In vitro studies reveal short-term hyperglycemic exposure increased expression of Drp1. The influence of hyperglycemia-mediated Mt fission on cellular viability was evaluated by knockdown of Drp1. Knockdown of Drp1 resulted in decreased susceptibility to hyperglycemic damage. Conclusions We propose that: 1) Mt undergo biogenesis in response to hyperglycemia, but the increased biogenesis is insufficient to accommodate the metabolic load; 2) hyperglycemia causes an excess of Mt fission, creating small, damaged mitochondria; and 3) reduction of aberrant Mt fission increases neuronal survival and indicates an important role for the fission-fusion equilibrium in the pathogenesis of DN. PMID:19847394

  16. Targeted cancer therapy with ribosome biogenesis inhibitors: a real possibility?

    PubMed Central

    Brighenti, Elisa; Treré, Davide; Derenzini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The effects of many chemotherapeutic drugs on ribosome biogenesis have been underestimated for a long time. Indeed, many drugs currently used for cancer treatment – and which are known to either damage DNA or hinder DNA synthesis – have been shown to exert their toxic action mainly by inhibiting rRNA synthesis or maturation. Moreover, there are new drugs that have been proposed recently for cancer chemotherapy, which only hinder ribosome biogenesis without any genotoxic activity. Even though ribosome biogenesis occurs in both normal and cancer cells, whether resting or proliferating, there is evidence that the selective inhibition of ribosome biogenesis may, in some instances, result in a selective damage to neoplastic cells. The higher sensitivity of cancer cells to inhibitors of rRNA synthesis appears to be the consequence of either the loss of the mechanisms controlling the cell cycle progression or the acquisition of activating oncogene and inactivating tumor suppressor gene mutations that up-regulate the ribosome biogenesis rate. This article reviews those cancer cell characteristics on which the selective cancer cell cytotoxicity induced by the inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis is based. PMID:26415219

  17. Pasteuria endospores from Heterodera cajani (Nematoda: Heteroderidae) exhibit inverted attachment and altered germination in cross-infection studies with Globodera pallida (Nematoda: Heteroderidae).

    PubMed

    Mohan, Sharad; Mauchline, Tim H; Rowe, Janet; Hirsch, Penny R; Davies, Keith G

    2012-03-01

    The Pasteuria group of Gram-positive, endospore-forming bacteria are parasites of invertebrates and exhibit differences in host specificity. We describe a cross-infection study between an isolate of Pasteuria from pigeon pea cyst nematode, Heterodera cajani, which also infects the potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida, from the United Kingdom. A proportion of the attached endospores, 13% on H. cajani and 22% on G. pallida adhere to the cuticle in an inverted orientation. Inverted and conventionally attached endospores germinated and produced bacillus-like rods that completed their life cycle in < 15 weeks within females of G. pallida. This is the first example in which the life cycle of a Pasteuria population was systematically followed in two different nematode genera. A 1430-base pair fragment of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the Pasteuria isolate from H. cajani revealed 98.6% similarity to the orthologous gene in Pasteuria nishizawae. Additionally, their respective endospore sizes were not significantly different, in contrast their host ranges are. Potential reasons for this remain unclear and are discussed. PMID:22092805

  18. Peroxisome biogenesis in mammalian cells: The impact of genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Farr, Rebecca L; Lismont, Celien; Terlecky, Stanley R; Fransen, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The initiation and progression of many human diseases are mediated by a complex interplay of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. As all diseases begin with an imbalance at the cellular level, it is essential to understand how various types of molecular aberrations, metabolic changes, and environmental stressors function as switching points in essential communication networks. In recent years, peroxisomes have emerged as important intracellular hubs for redox-, lipid-, inflammatory-, and nucleic acid-mediated signaling pathways. In this review, we focus on how nature and nurture modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function in mammalian cells. First, we review emerging evidence that changes in peroxisome activity can be linked to the epigenetic regulation of cell function. Next, we outline how defects in peroxisome biogenesis may directly impact cellular pathways involved in the development of disease. In addition, we discuss how changes in the cellular microenvironment can modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function. Finally, given the importance of peroxisome function in multiple aspects of health, disease, and aging, we highlight the need for more research in this still understudied field. PMID:26305119

  19. Emerging roles of mitochondria in the evolution, biogenesis, and function of peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Abhishek; McBride, Heidi M.

    2013-01-01

    In the last century peroxisomes were thought to have an endosymbiotic origin. Along with mitochondria and chloroplasts, peroxisomes primarily regulate their numbers through the growth and division of pre-existing organelles, and they house specific machinery for protein import. These features were considered unique to endosymbiotic organelles, prompting the idea that peroxisomes were key cellular elements that helped facilitate the evolution of multicellular organisms. The functional similarities to mitochondria within mammalian systems expanded these ideas, as both organelles scavenge peroxide and reactive oxygen species, both organelles oxidize fatty acids, and at least in higher eukaryotes, the biogenesis of both organelles is controlled by common nuclear transcription factors of the PPAR family. Over the last decade it has been demonstrated that the fission machinery of both organelles is also shared, and that both organelles act as critical signaling platforms for innate immunity and other pathways. Taken together it is clear that the mitochondria and peroxisomes are functionally coupled, regulating cellular metabolism and signaling through a number of common mechanisms. However, recent work has focused primarily on the role of the ER in the biogenesis of peroxisomes, potentially overshadowing the critical importance of the mitochondria as a functional partner. In this review, we explore the mechanisms of functional coupling of the peroxisomes to the mitochondria/ER networks, providing some new perspectives on the potential contribution of the mitochondria to peroxisomal biogenesis. PMID:24133452

  20. The methyltransferase adaptor protein Trm112 is involved in biogenesis of both ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Richa; Johnson, Arlen W.

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified Bud23 as the methyltransferase that methylates G1575 of rRNA in the P-site of the small (40S) ribosomal subunit. In this paper, we show that Bud23 requires the methyltransferase adaptor protein Trm112 for stability in vivo. Deletion of Trm112 results in a bud23Δ-like mutant phenotype. Thus Trm112 is required for efficient small-subunit biogenesis. Genetic analysis suggests the slow growth of a trm112Δ mutant is due primarily to the loss of Bud23. Surprisingly, suppression of the bud23Δ-dependent 40S defect revealed a large (60S) biogenesis defect in a trm112Δ mutant. Using sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis and coimmunoprecipitation, we show that Trm112 is also involved in 60S subunit biogenesis. The 60S defect may be dependent on Nop2 and Rcm1, two additional Trm112 interactors that we identify. Our work extends the known range of Trm112 function from modification of tRNAs and translation factors to both ribosomal subunits, showing that its effects span all aspects of the translation machinery. Although Trm112 is required for Bud23 stability, our results suggest that Trm112 is not maintained in a stable complex with Bud23. We suggest that Trm112 stabilizes its free methyltransferase partners not engaged with substrate and/or helps to deliver its methyltransferase partners to their substrates. PMID:22956767

  1. Enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis contributes to Wnt induced osteoblastic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells.

    PubMed

    An, Jee Hyun; Yang, Jae-Yeon; Ahn, Byung Yong; Cho, Sun Wook; Jung, Ju Yeon; Cho, Hwa Young; Cho, Young Min; Kim, Sang Wan; Park, Kyong Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon; Lee, Hong Kyu; Shin, Chan Soo

    2010-07-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in cell physiology including cell differentiation and proliferation. We investigated the changes of mitochondrial biogenesis during Wnt-induced osteoblastic differentiation of murine mesenchymal C3H10T1/2 cells. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that activation of Wnt signaling by Wnt-3A conditioned medicum (CM) resulted in significant increase in the number of mitochondria in C3H10T1/2 cells. In addition, the induction of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities by Wnt-3A CM was accompanied by significant increase in mitochondrial mass (p<0.05), mitochondrial membrane potential (p<0.05), intracellular reactive oxygen species production (p<0.05), resting oxygen consumption rate (p<0.05), cellular ATP content (p< or =0.05) and mtDNA copy number (p<0.05) compared to the cells with control CM (L292-CM) treatment. Moreover, co-treatment with Dkk-1 or WIF-1, both of which are Wnt inhibitors, abrogated the Wnt-3A-induced ALP activities as well as mitochondrial biogenesis markers. Upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis by overexpression of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) significantly enhanced Wnt-induced osteogenesis as measured by ALP activities. In contrast, inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis by treatment with Zidovudine (AZT) resulted in significant inhibition of ALP activities. Finally, ALP activities in human osteosarcoma cell line devoid of mitochondrial DNA (rho(0) cells) was significantly suppressed both in basal and Wnt-3A stimulated state compared to those from mitochondria-intact cells (rho+ cells). As a mechanism for Wnt-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis, we found that Wnt increased the expression of PGC-1alpha, a critical molecules in mitochondrial biogenesis, through Erk and p38 MAPK pathway independent of beta-catenin signaling. We also found that increased mitochondrial biogenesis is in turn positively regulating TOPflash reporter activity as well as beta-catenin levels. To summarize, mitochodrial

  2. Repetitive elements regulate circular RNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilusz, Jeremy E

    2015-01-01

    It was long assumed that eukaryotic precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs) are almost always spliced to generate a linear mRNA that is subsequently translated to produce a protein. However, it is now clear that thousands of protein-coding genes can be non-canonically spliced to produce circular noncoding RNAs, some of which are expressed at much higher levels than their associated linear mRNAs. How then does the splicing machinery decide whether to generate a linear mRNA or a circular RNA? Recent work has revealed that intronic repetitive elements, including sequences derived from transposons, are critical regulators of this decision. In most cases, circular RNA biogenesis appears to be initiated when complementary sequences from 2 different introns base pair to one another. This brings the splice sites from the intervening exon(s) into close proximity and facilitates the backsplicing event that generates the circular RNA. As many pre-mRNAs contain multiple intronic repeats, distinct circular transcripts can be produced depending on which repeats base pair to one another. Intronic repeats are thus critical regulatory sequences that control the functional output of their host genes, and potentially cause the functions of protein-coding genes to be highly divergent across species. PMID:26442181

  3. Biogenesis of pipecolic acid in Rhizoctonia leguminicola

    SciTech Connect

    Wickwire, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    This laboratory has long been interested in the biogenesis and biological properties of two indolizidine alkaloids, slaframine and swainsonine that are produced by the fungal parasite Rhizoctonia Leguminicola. Slaframine, (1S,6S,8aS-1 acetoxy-6-aminooctahydroindolizine) is a parasympathetic secretagogue, and swainsonine (1S,2R,8R,8aR-1,2,8-trihydroxyoctahydroindolizine) is a potent {alpha}-mannosidase inhibitor. This thesis concerns the initial steps of the biosynthesis of these alkaloids from lysine, via the common intermediate pipecolic acid, in whole cells and cell free enzyme systems of R. leguminicola. In confirmation of earlier work performed in this laboratory, L-lysine was used preferentially for pipecolate biosynthesis in R. Leguminicola. This pathway was supported by the finding that cell free extracts of R. leguminicola consistently converted L-(U-{sup 14}C)-lysine to three labelled metabolites: saccharopine, peak II, and pipecolic acid. Peak II was subsequently identified by appropriate proton NMR studies to be {delta}{sup 1}-piperideine-6-carboxylate, and the following pathway of pipecolic acid formation was postulated: L-lysine {yields} saccharopine {yields} {delta}{sup 1}-piperideine-6-carboxylate {yields} pipecolate. This pathway was confirmed by demonstration of each enzymatic step in vitro from purified radiolabeled substrates.

  4. Survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft surfaces under simulated martian environments: . implications for the forward contamination of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Kern, Roger G.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2003-10-01

    Experiments were conducted in a Mars simulation chamber (MSC) to characterize the survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis under high UV irradiation and simulated martian conditions. The MSC was used to create Mars surface environments in which pressure (8.5 mb), temperature (-80, -40, -10, or +23 °C), gas composition (Earth-normal N 2/O 2 mix, pure N 2, pure CO 2, or a Mars gas mix), and UV-VIS-NIR fluence rates (200-1200 nm) were maintained within tight limits. The Mars gas mix was composed of CO 2 (95.3%), N 2 (2.7%), Ar (1.7%), O 2 (0.2%), and water vapor (0.03%). Experiments were conducted to measure the effects of pressure, gas composition, and temperature alone or in combination with Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR light environments. Endospores of B. subtilis, were deposited on aluminum coupons as monolayers in which the average density applied to coupons was 2.47×10 6 bacteria per sample. Populations of B. subtilis placed on aluminum coupons and subjected to an Earth-normal temperature (23 °C), pressure (1013 mb), and gas mix (normal N 2/O 2 ratio) but illuminated with a Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR spectrum were reduced by over 99.9% after 30 sec exposure to Mars-normal UV fluence rates. However, it required at least 15 min of Mars-normal UV exposure to reduce bacterial populations on aluminum coupons to non-recoverable levels. These results were duplicated when bacteria were exposed to Mars-normal environments of temperature (-10 °C), pressure (8.5 mb), gas composition (pure CO 2), and UV fluence rates. In other experiments, results indicated that the gas composition of the atmosphere and the temperature of the bacterial monolayers at the time of Mars UV exposure had no effects on the survival of bacterial endospores. But Mars-normal pressures (8.5 mb) were found to reduce survival by approximately 20-35% compared to Earth-normal pressures (1013 mb). The primary implications of these results are (a) that greater than 99.9% of bacterial populations on sun

  5. Impaired Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Adipose Tissue in Acquired Obesity.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Sini; Buzkova, Jana; Muniandy, Maheswary; Kaksonen, Risto; Ollikainen, Miina; Ismail, Khadeeja; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Jesse; Lundbom, Nina; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Moilanen, Eeva; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Suomalainen, Anu; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H

    2015-09-01

    Low mitochondrial number and activity have been suggested as underlying factors in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. However, the stage at which mitochondrial dysfunction manifests in adipose tissue after the onset of obesity remains unknown. Here we examined subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) samples from healthy monozygotic twin pairs, 22.8-36.2 years of age, who were discordant (ΔBMI >3 kg/m(2), mean length of discordance 6.3 ± 0.3 years, n = 26) and concordant (ΔBMI <3 kg/m(2), n = 14) for body weight, and assessed their detailed mitochondrial metabolic characteristics: mitochondrial-related transcriptomes with dysregulated pathways, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) amount, mtDNA-encoded transcripts, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) protein levels. We report global expressional downregulation of mitochondrial oxidative pathways with concomitant downregulation of mtDNA amount, mtDNA-dependent translation system, and protein levels of the OXPHOS machinery in the obese compared with the lean co-twins. Pathway analysis indicated downshifting of fatty acid oxidation, ketone body production and breakdown, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which inversely correlated with adiposity, insulin resistance, and inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative metabolic pathways, and OXPHOS proteins in SAT are downregulated in acquired obesity, and are associated with metabolic disturbances already at the preclinical stage. PMID:25972572

  6. Biogenesis, assembly and turnover of photosystem II units.

    PubMed Central

    Baena-González, Elena; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2002-01-01

    Assembly of photosystem II, a multiprotein complex embedded in the thylakoid membrane, requires stoichiometric production of over 20 protein subunits. Since part of the protein subunits are encoded in the chloroplast genome and part in the nucleus, a signalling network operates between the two genetic compartments in order to prevent wasteful production of proteins. Coordinated synthesis of proteins also takes place among the chloroplast-encoded subunits, thus establishing a hierarchy in the protein components that allows a stepwise building of the complex. In addition to this dependence on assembly partners, other factors such as the developmental stage of the plastid and various photosynthesis-related parameters exert a strict control on the accumulation, membrane targeting and assembly of the PSII subunits. Here, we briefly review recent results on this field obtained with three major approaches: biogenesis of photosystem II during the development of chloroplasts from etioplasts, use of photosystem II-specific mutants and photosystem II turnover during its repair cycle. PMID:12437884

  7. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  8. Biogenesis and architecture of arterivirus replication organelles.

    PubMed

    van der Hoeven, Barbara; Oudshoorn, Diede; Koster, Abraham J; Snijder, Eric J; Kikkert, Marjolein; Bárcena, Montserrat

    2016-07-15

    All eukaryotic positive-stranded RNA (+RNA) viruses appropriate host cell membranes and transform them into replication organelles, specialized micro-environments that are thought to support viral RNA synthesis. Arteriviruses (order Nidovirales) belong to the subset of +RNA viruses that induce double-membrane vesicles (DMVs), similar to the structures induced by e.g. coronaviruses, picornaviruses and hepatitis C virus. In the last years, electron tomography has revealed substantial differences between the structures induced by these different virus groups. Arterivirus-induced DMVs appear to be closed compartments that are continuous with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, thus forming an extensive reticulovesicular network (RVN) of intriguing complexity. This RVN is remarkably similar to that described for the distantly related coronaviruses (also order Nidovirales) and sets them apart from other DMV-inducing viruses analysed to date. We review here the current knowledge and open questions on arterivirus replication organelles and discuss them in the light of the latest studies on other DMV-inducing viruses, particularly coronaviruses. Using the equine arteritis virus (EAV) model system and electron tomography, we present new data regarding the biogenesis of arterivirus-induced DMVs and uncover numerous putative intermediates in DMV formation. We generated cell lines that can be induced to express specific EAV replicase proteins and showed that DMVs induced by the transmembrane proteins nsp2 and nsp3 form an RVN and are comparable in topology and architecture to those formed during viral infection. Co-expression of the third EAV transmembrane protein (nsp5), expressed as part of a self-cleaving polypeptide that mimics viral polyprotein processing in infected cells, led to the formation of DMVs whose size was more homogenous and closer to what is observed upon EAV infection, suggesting a regulatory role for nsp5 in modulating membrane curvature and DMV formation. PMID

  9. Isolation and characterisation of aerobic endospore forming Bacilli from sugarcane rhizosphere for the selection of strains with agriculture potentialities.

    PubMed

    de Los Milagros Orberá Ratón, Teresa; Yano, Ricardo; Rodríguez Gámez, Odalys; Floh, Eny Iochevet Segal; de Jesús Serrat Díaz, Manuel; Barbosa, Heloíza Ramos

    2012-04-01

    Eighteen aerobic endospore forming strains were isolated from sugarcane rhizosphere in N-free medium. A phenotypic description and analysis of the 5' end hypervariable region sequences of 16S rRNA revealed a high diversity of Bacillus and related genera. Isolates were identified, and four genera were obtained: seven strains belonged to Bacillus (Bacillaceae family), four belonged to Paenibacillus, six belonged to Brevibacillus and one strain was identified as Cohnella (Paenibacillaceae family). Four Brevibacillus strains showed in vitro inhibitory activity against plant pathogens fungi Curvularia and Fusarium. Seventy-four percent of the isolated bacteria grew on pectin as the only carbon source, showing polygalacturonase activity. Pectate lyase activity was detected for the first time in a Brevibacillus genus strain. All isolates showed endoglucanase activity. Calcium phosphate solubilisation was positive in 83.3% of the isolates, with higher values than those reported for Bacillus inorganic phosphate solubilising strains. High ethylene plant hormone secretion in the culture medium was detected in 22% of the bacteria. This is the first report of ethylene secretion in Paenibacillaceae isolates. Indole-3-acetic acid production was found in a Brevibacillus genus isolate. It was reported for the first time the presence of Cohnella genus strain on sugarcane rhizosphere bearing plant growth promoting traits. The sugarcane isolate Brevibacillus B65 was identified as a plant growth inoculant because it showed wider spectra of plant stimulation capabilities, including an antifungal effect, extracellular hydrolases secretion, inorganic phosphate solubilisation and plant hormone liberation. In this work, sugarcane was shown to be a suitable niche for finding aerobic endospore forming 'Bacilli' with agriculture biotechnological purposes. PMID:22805941

  10. Chemical modulators of ribosome biogenesis as biological probes.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; Brown, Eric D

    2015-12-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of protein biosynthesis have been instrumental in the dissection of the complexities of ribosome structure and function. Ribosome biogenesis, on the other hand, is a complex and largely enigmatic process for which there is a paucity of chemical probes. Indeed, ribosome biogenesis has been studied almost exclusively using genetic and biochemical approaches without the benefit of small-molecule inhibitors of this process. Here, we provide a perspective on the promise of chemical inhibitors of ribosome assembly for future research. We explore key obstacles that complicate the interpretation of studies aimed at perturbing ribosome biogenesis in vivo using genetic methods, and we argue that chemical inhibitors are especially powerful because they can be used to induce perturbations in a manner that obviates these difficulties. Thus, in combination with leading-edge biochemical and structural methods, chemical probes offer unique advantages toward elucidating the molecular events that define the assembly of ribosomes. PMID:26575239

  11. Role of AAA(+)-proteins in peroxisome biogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Immanuel; Erdmann, Ralf; Girzalsky, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the PEX1 gene, which encodes a protein required for peroxisome biogenesis, are the most common cause of the Zellweger spectrum diseases. The recognition that Pex1p shares a conserved ATP-binding domain with p97 and NSF led to the discovery of the extended family of AAA+-type ATPases. So far, four AAA+-type ATPases are related to peroxisome function. Pex6p functions together with Pex1p in peroxisome biogenesis, ATAD1/Msp1p plays a role in membrane protein targeting and a member of the Lon-family of proteases is associated with peroxisomal quality control. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the AAA+-proteins involved in peroxisome biogenesis and function. PMID:26453804

  12. Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chenglin; Chen, Dongrui; Xie, Qihai; Yang, Ying; Shen, Weili

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Nebivolol may act as a partial agonist of β3-adrenergic receptor (AR). •Nebivolol stimulates mitochondrial DNA replication and protein expression. •Nebivolol promotes mitochondrial synthesis via activation of eNOS by β3-AR. -- Abstract: Nebivolol is a third-generation β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) blocker with additional beneficial effects, including the improvement of lipid and glucose metabolism in obese individuals. However, the underlying mechanism of nebivolol’s role in regulating the lipid profile remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nebivolol in mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to nebivolol for 24 h increased mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial protein levels and the expression of transcription factors involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, including PPAR-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3), mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1 (Nrf1). These changes were accompanied by an increase in oxygen consumption and in the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and antioxidant enzymes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, including nebivolol-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as an increase in the formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) attenuated nebivolol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis, as did the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ. Treatment with nebivolol and β3-AR blocker SR59230A markedly attenuated PGC-1α, Sirt3 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein levels in comparison to treatment with nebivolol alone. These data indicate that the mitochondrial synthesis and metabolism in adipocytes that is promoted by nebivolol is primarily mediated through the eNOS/cGMP-dependent pathway and is initiated by the activation of β3-AR receptors.

  13. Melatonin enhances mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Hong, Jeong-Min; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-05-01

    Liver fibrosis leads to liver cirrhosis and failure, and no effective treatment is currently available. Growing evidence supports a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and liver fibrogenesis and mitochondrial quality control-based therapy has emerged as a new therapeutic target. We investigated the protective mechanisms of melatonin against mitochondrial dysfunction-involved liver fibrosis, focusing on mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis. Rats were treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 ) dissolved in olive oil (0.5 mL/kg, twice a week, i.p.) for 8 wk. Melatonin was administered orally at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg once a day. Chronic CCl4 exposure induced collagen deposition, hepatocellular damage, and oxidative stress, and melatonin attenuated these increases. Increases in mRNA and protein expression levels of transforming growth factor β1 and α-smooth muscle actin in response to CCl4 were attenuated by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as mitochondrial swelling and glutamate dehydrogenase release. Chronic CCl4 exposure impaired mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and melatonin attenuated this impairment, as indicated by increases in mitochondrial DNA and in protein levels of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1); Parkin; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α); nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1); and transcription factor A, mitochondrial (TFAM). CCl4 -mediated decreases in mitochondrial fission- and fusion-related proteins, such as dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) and mitofusin 2, were also attenuated by melatonin. Moreover, melatonin induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. These results suggest that melatonin protects against liver fibrosis via upregulation of mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and may be useful as an anti-fibrotic treatment. PMID:26882442

  14. Regulation of PGC-1α, a nodal regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis1234

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J; Auwerx, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for energy management in the cell and in the whole organism require a complex network of transcription factors and cofactors. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) has emerged as a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, thus becoming a crucial metabolic node. We present an overview of the mechanisms by which PGC-1α is regulated, including the transcriptional regulation of PGC-1α expression and the fine-tuning of its final activity via posttranslational modifications. PMID:21289221

  15. Stimulatory effect of CSE-generated H2S on hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis and the underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Untereiner, Ashley A; Fu, Ming; Módis, Katalin; Wang, Rui; Ju, YoungJun; Wu, Lingyun

    2016-08-31

    We previously showed that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) upregulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α in primary hepatocytes. PGC-1α is a crucial regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, a process required to maintain cellular energy homeostasis. We investigated the regulation of hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE)-generated H2S under physiological conditions. Primary hepatocytes isolated from CSE knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were used in all experiments. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mRNA levels were measured via real-time PCR. Protein S-sulfhydration was determined via a modified biotin switch assay. MitoTracker Green was used to quantify mitochondrial content and distribution. CSE-KO hepatocytes produced less mtDNA compared to WT hepatocytes. Mitochondrial content was reduced in CSE-KO hepatocytes compared to WT hepatocytes, which was restored with NaHS (an H2S donor) treatment. CSE-KO hepatocytes exhibited lower levels of mitochondrial transcription factors and the mitochondrial transcription coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-related protein (PPRC) compared to WT hepatocytes. NaHS administration upregulated PPRC, yet downregulated PGC-1β protein level in mouse hepatocytes. Exogenous H2S induced the S-sulfhydration of PPRC, which was lower in untreated CSE-KO hepatocytes, but not that of PGC-1β. Finally, knockdown of either PGC-1α or PPRC significantly decreased NaHS-stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in hepatocytes, where knockdown of both genes were required to abolish NaHS-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Endogenous H2S-induced liver mitochondrial biogenesis is dependent upon PGC-1α and PPRC signaling in primary hepatocytes. This study may offer clues to the regulation of energy homeostasis under physiological conditions as well as mitochondrial dysregulation. PMID:27364855

  16. Mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in the developing and diseased heart

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W.; Vega, Rick B.; Kelly, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrion is a complex organelle that serves essential roles in energy transduction, ATP production, and a myriad of cellular signaling events. A finely tuned regulatory network orchestrates the biogenesis, maintenance, and turnover of mitochondria. The high-capacity mitochondrial system in the heart is regulated in a dynamic way to generate and consume enormous amounts of ATP in order to support the constant pumping function in the context of changing energy demands. This review describes the regulatory circuitry and downstream events involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and its coordination with mitochondrial dynamics in developing and diseased hearts. PMID:26443844

  17. The structure of Rpf2–Rrs1 explains its role in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kharde, Satyavati; Calviño, Fabiola R.; Gumiero, Andrea; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes is a hierarchical process involving about 200 biogenesis factors and a series of remodeling steps. The 5S RNP consisting of the 5S rRNA, RpL5 and RpL11 is recruited at an early stage, but has to rearrange during maturation of the pre-60S ribosomal subunit. Rpf2 and Rrs1 have been implicated in 5S RNP biogenesis, but their precise role was unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Rpf2–Rrs1 complex from Aspergillus nidulans at 1.5 Å resolution and describe it as Brix domain of Rpf2 completed by Rrs1 to form two anticodon-binding domains with functionally important tails. Fitting the X-ray structure into the cryo-EM density of a previously described pre-60S particle correlates with biochemical data. The heterodimer forms specific contacts with the 5S rRNA, RpL5 and the biogenesis factor Rsa4. The flexible protein tails of Rpf2–Rrs1 localize to the central protuberance. Two helices in the Rrs1 C-terminal tail occupy a strategic position to block the rotation of 25S rRNA and the 5S RNP. Our data provide a structural model for 5S RNP recruitment to the pre-60S particle and explain why removal of Rpf2–Rrs1 is necessary for rearrangements to drive 60S maturation. PMID:26117542

  18. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  19. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Yuan-shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-dong; Chang, Rui-ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-gen; Fang, Xiang-shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-yuan; Huang, Zi-tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  20. Salidroside Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Protects against H2O2-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Shasha; Yang, Xiaoyan; Li, Wenjing; Bian, Fang; Wu, Dan; Chi, Jiangyang; Xu, Gao; Zhang, Yonghui; Jin, Si

    2014-01-01

    Salidroside (SAL) is an active component of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study is to explore the mechanism of the protective effect of SAL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced endothelial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with SAL significantly reduced the cytotoxicity brought by H2O2. Functional studies on the rat aortas found that SAL rescued the endothelium-dependent relaxation and reduced superoxide anion (O2∙−) production induced by H2O2. Meanwhile, SAL pretreatment inhibited H2O2-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. The underlying mechanisms involve the inhibition of H2O2-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and Akt, as well as the redox sensitive transcription factor, NF-kappa B (NF-κB). SAL also increased mitochondrial mass and upregulated the mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in the endothelial cells. H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as demonstrated by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and ATP production, was rescued by SAL pretreatment. Taken together, these findings implicate that SAL could protect endothelium against H2O2-induced injury via promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function, thus preventing the overactivation of oxidative stress-related downstream signaling pathways. PMID:24868319

  1. Standardized Boesenbergia pandurata Extract Stimulates Exercise Endurance Through Increasing Mitochondrial Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoon; Kim, Mi-Bo; Kim, Changhee; Jung, Hoe-Yune; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the effect of standardized Boesenbergia pandurata (Roxb.) Schltr. (fingerroot) ethanol extract on exercise endurance was investigated in L6 rat skeletal muscle cells and C57BL/6J mice. Standardized B. pandurata ethanol extract (BPE) increased mitochondrial mass and stimulated the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) in vitro. BPE also elevated the mRNA expression of key factors of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, which are activated by PGC-1α, such as estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). In animal models, both normal and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice treated with BPE ran much longer than their respective controls. In addition, BPE increased the protein expressions of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), PGC-1α, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ), which are stimulated by exercise. These results indicate that B. pandurata could be a potential nutraceutical candidate for enhancing exercise endurance based on its mitochondrial biogenesis and exercise-mimicking effects. PMID:27331877

  2. Lysosome biogenesis/scattering increases host cell susceptibility to invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic forms and resistance to tissue culture trypomastigotes.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Cristian; Real, Fernando; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental question to be clarified concerning the host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi is whether the insect-borne and mammalian-stage parasites use similar mechanisms for invasion. To address that question, we analysed the cell invasion capacity of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT) and tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCT) under diverse conditions. Incubation of parasites for 1 h with HeLa cells in nutrient-deprived medium, a condition that triggered lysosome biogenesis and scattering, increased MT invasion and reduced TCT entry into cells. Sucrose-induced lysosome biogenesis increased HeLa cell susceptibility to MT and resistance to TCT. Treatment of cells with rapamycin, which inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), induced perinuclear lysosome accumulation and reduced MT invasion while augmenting TCT invasion. Metacylic trypomastigotes, but not TCT, induced mTOR dephosphorylation and the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a mTOR-associated lysosome biogenesis regulator. Lysosome biogenesis/scattering was stimulated upon HeLa cell interaction with MT but not with TCT. Recently, internalized MT, but not TCT, were surrounded by colocalized lysosome marker LAMP2 and mTOR. The recombinant gp82 protein, the MT-specific surface molecule that mediates invasion, induced mTOR dephosphorylation, nuclear TFEB translocation and lysosome biogenesis/scattering. Taken together, our data clearly indicate that MT invasion is mainly lysosome-dependent, whereas TCT entry is predominantly lysosome-independent. PMID:26572924

  3. Survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft surfaces under simulated martian environments: implications for the forward contamination of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Kern, Roger G.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a Mars simulation chamber (MSC) to characterize the survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis under high UV irradiation and simulated martian conditions. The MSC was used to create Mars surface environments in which pressure (8.5 mb), temperature (-80, -40, -10, or +23 degrees C), gas composition (Earth-normal N2/O2 mix, pure N2, pure CO2, or a Mars gas mix), and UV-VIS-NIR fluence rates (200-1200 nm) were maintained within tight limits. The Mars gas mix was composed of CO2 (95.3%), N2 (2.7%), Ar (1.7%), O2 (0.2%), and water vapor (0.03%). Experiments were conducted to measure the effects of pressure, gas composition, and temperature alone or in combination with Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR light environments. Endospores of B. subtilis, were deposited on aluminum coupons as monolayers in which the average density applied to coupons was 2.47 x 10(6) bacteria per sample. Populations of B. subtilis placed on aluminum coupons and subjected to an Earth-normal temperature (23 degrees C), pressure (1013 mb), and gas mix (normal N2/O2 ratio) but illuminated with a Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR spectrum were reduced by over 99.9% after 30 sec exposure to Mars-normal UV fluence rates. However, it required at least 15 min of Mars-normal UV exposure to reduce bacterial populations on aluminum coupons to non-recoverable levels. These results were duplicated when bacteria were exposed to Mars-normal environments of temperature (-10 degrees C), pressure (8.5 mb), gas composition (pure CO2), and UV fluence rates. In other experiments, results indicated that the gas composition of the atmosphere and the temperature of the bacterial monolayers at the time of Mars UV exposure had no effects on the survival of bacterial endospores. But Mars-normal pressures (8.5 mb) were found to reduce survival by approximately 20-35% compared to Earth-normal pressures (1013 mb). The primary implications of these results are (a) that greater than 99.9% of bacterial populations on

  4. Fe/S protein biogenesis in trypanosomes - A review.

    PubMed

    Lukeš, Julius; Basu, Somsuvro

    2015-06-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of the African sleeping sickness of humans, and other kinetoplastid flagellates belong to the eukarytotic supergroup Excavata. This early-branching model protist is known for a broad range of unique features. As it is amenable to most techniques of forward and reverse genetics, T. brucei was subject to several studies of its iron-sulfur (Fe/S) protein biogenesis and thus represents the best studied excavate eukaryote. Here we review what is known about the Fe/S protein biogenesis of T. brucei, and focus especially on the comparative and evolutionary interesting aspects. We also explore the connections between the well-known and quite conserved ISC and CIA machineries and the tRNA thiolation pathway. Moreover, the Fe/S cluster protein biogenesis is dissected in the procyclic stage of T. brucei which has an active mitochondrion, as well as in its pathogenic bloodstream stage with a metabolically repressed organelle. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25196712

  5. Germ plasm biogenesis –an Oskar-centric perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Germ granules are the hallmark of all germ cells. These membrane-less, electron-dense structures were first observed over 100 years ago. Today, their role in regulating and processing transcripts critical for the establishment, maintenance and protection of germ cells is well-established and pathways outlining the biochemical mechanisms and physical properties associated with their biogenesis are emerging. PMID:26970648

  6. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T.; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Avadhani, Narayan G.; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Altieri, Dario C.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  7. Folding and Biogenesis of Mitochondrial Small Tim Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ceh-Pavia, Efrain; Spiller, Michael P.; Lu, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Correct and timely folding is critical to the function of all proteins. The importance of this is illustrated in the biogenesis of the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) “small Tim” proteins. Biogenesis of the small Tim proteins is regulated by dedicated systems or pathways, beginning with synthesis in the cytosol and ending with assembly of individually folded proteins into functional complexes in the mitochondrial IMS. The process is mostly centered on regulating the redox states of the conserved cysteine residues: oxidative folding is crucial for protein function in the IMS, but oxidized (disulfide bonded) proteins cannot be imported into mitochondria. How the redox-sensitive small Tim precursor proteins are maintained in a reduced, import-competent form in the cytosol is not well understood. Recent studies suggest that zinc and the cytosolic thioredoxin system play a role in the biogenesis of these proteins. In the IMS, the mitochondrial import and assembly (MIA) pathway catalyzes both import into the IMS and oxidative folding of the small Tim proteins. Finally, assembly of the small Tim complexes is a multistep process driven by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions; however, the chaperone function of the complex might require destabilization of these interactions to accommodate the substrate. Here, we review how folding of the small Tim proteins is regulated during their biogenesis, from maintenance of the unfolded precursors in the cytosol, to their import, oxidative folding, complex assembly and function in the IMS. PMID:23945562

  8. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Ope, Omotayo; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Schuchter, Lynn M; Gangadhar, Tara C; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Liu, Qin; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A; Wargo, Jennifer A; Avadhani, Narayan G; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Altieri, Dario C; Flaherty, Keith T; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2016-05-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  9. Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorders: Biological, Clinical and Pathophysiological Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Nancy E.; D'Agostino, Maria Daniela; MacLean, Gillian E.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders in which peroxisome assembly is impaired, leading to multiple peroxisome enzyme deficiencies, complex developmental sequelae and progressive disabilities. Mammalian peroxisome assembly involves the protein products of 16 "PEX" genes;…

  10. Regulation of actin polymerization by tropomodulin-3 controls megakaryocyte actin organization and platelet biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sui, Zhenhua; Nowak, Roberta B; Sanada, Chad; Halene, Stephanie; Krause, Diane S; Fowler, Velia M

    2015-07-23

    The actin cytoskeleton is important for platelet biogenesis. Tropomodulin-3 (Tmod3), the only Tmod isoform detected in platelets and megakaryocytes (MKs), caps actin filament (F-actin) pointed ends and binds tropomyosins (TMs), regulating actin polymerization and stability. To determine the function of Tmod3 in platelet biogenesis, we studied Tmod3(-/-) embryos, which are embryonic lethal by E18.5. Tmod3(-/-) embryos often show hemorrhaging at E14.5 with fewer and larger platelets, indicating impaired platelet biogenesis. MK numbers are moderately increased in Tmod3(-/-) fetal livers, with only a slight increase in the 8N population, suggesting that MK differentiation is not significantly affected. However, Tmod3(-/-) MKs fail to develop a normal demarcation membrane system (DMS), and cytoplasmic organelle distribution is abnormal. Moreover, cultured Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit impaired proplatelet formation with a wide range of proplatelet bud sizes, including abnormally large proplatelet buds containing incorrect numbers of von Willebrand factor-positive granules. Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit F-actin disturbances, and Tmod3(-/-) MKs spreading on collagen fail to polymerize F-actin into actomyosin contractile bundles. Tmod3 associates with TM4 and the F-actin cytoskeleton in wild-type MKs, and confocal microscopy reveals that Tmod3, TM4, and F-actin partially colocalize near the membrane of proplatelet buds. In contrast, the abnormally large proplatelets from Tmod3(-/-) MKs show increased F-actin and redistribution of F-actin and TM4 from the cortex to the cytoplasm, but normal microtubule coil organization. We conclude that F-actin capping by Tmod3 regulates F-actin organization in mouse fetal liver-derived MKs, thereby controlling MK cytoplasmic morphogenesis, including DMS formation and organelle distribution, as well as proplatelet formation and sizing. PMID:25964668

  11. MicroRNA-761 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse skeletal muscle in response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanli; Zhao, Chaoxian; Sun, Xuewen; Liu, Zhijun; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play critical roles in skeletal muscle in response to exercise. Previous study has shown that miR-761 was involved in a novel model regulating the mitochondrial network. However, its role in mitochondrial biogenesis remains poorly understood. Therefore, the current study was aimed to examine the effect of miR-761 on mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that aberrantly expressed miR-761 is involved in exercise activity and miR-761 is decreased by exercise training compared with the sedentary control mice. miR-761 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis of C2C12 myocytes by targeting the 3'-UTR of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) coactivator-1 (PGC-1α). Overexpression of miR-761 was capable of inhibiting the protein expression levels of PGC-1α. Moreover, miR-761 overexpression suppressed the p38 MAPK signaling pathway and down-regulated the expression of phosphorylated MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 (P-MK2), a downstream kinase of p38 MAPK. The phosphorylation of activating transcription factors 2 (ATF2) that plays a functional role in linking the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway to enhanced transcription of the PGC-1α was also inhibited by the overexpression of miR-761. These findings revealed a novel regulation mechanism for miR-761 in skeletal myocytes, and contributed to a better understanding of the modulation of skeletal muscle in response to exercise. PMID:26408907

  12. Improving recombinant Rubisco biogenesis, plant photosynthesis and growth by coexpressing its ancillary RAF1 chaperone.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Spencer M; Birch, Rosemary; Kelso, Celine; Beck, Jennifer L; Kapralov, Maxim V

    2015-03-17

    Enabling improvements to crop yield and resource use by enhancing the catalysis of the photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco has been a longstanding challenge. Efforts toward realization of this goal have been greatly assisted by advances in understanding the complexities of Rubisco's biogenesis in plastids and the development of tailored chloroplast transformation tools. Here we generate transplastomic tobacco genotypes expressing Arabidopsis Rubisco large subunits (AtL), both on their own (producing tob(AtL) plants) and with a cognate Rubisco accumulation factor 1 (AtRAF1) chaperone (producing tob(AtL-R1) plants) that has undergone parallel functional coevolution with AtL. We show AtRAF1 assembles as a dimer and is produced in tob(AtL-R1) and Arabidopsis leaves at 10-15 nmol AtRAF1 monomers per square meter. Consistent with a postchaperonin large (L)-subunit assembly role, the AtRAF1 facilitated two to threefold improvements in the amount and biogenesis rate of hybrid L8(A)S8(t) Rubisco [comprising AtL and tobacco small (S) subunits] in tob(AtL-R1) leaves compared with tob(AtL), despite >threefold lower steady-state Rubisco mRNA levels in tob(AtL-R1). Accompanying twofold increases in photosynthetic CO2-assimilation rate and plant growth were measured for tob(AtL-R1) lines. These findings highlight the importance of ancillary protein complementarity during Rubisco biogenesis in plastids, the possible constraints this has imposed on Rubisco adaptive evolution, and the likely need for such interaction specificity to be considered when optimizing recombinant Rubisco bioengineering in plants. PMID:25733857

  13. Eriocitrin ameliorates diet-induced hepatic steatosis with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hiramitsu, Masanori; Shimada, Yasuhito; Kuroyanagi, Junya; Inoue, Takashi; Katagiri, Takao; Zang, Liqing; Nishimura, Yuhei; Nishimura, Norihiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Lemon (Citrus limon) contains various bioactive flavonoids, and prevents obesity and obesity-associated metabolic diseases. We focused on eriocitrin (eriodictyol 7-rutinoside), a powerful antioxidative flavonoid in lemon with lipid-lowering effects in a rat model of high-fat diet. To investigate the mechanism of action of eriocitrin, we conducted feeding experiments on zebrafish with diet-induced obesity. Oral administration of eriocitrin (32 mg/kg/day for 28 days) improved dyslipidaemia and decreased lipid droplets in the liver. DNA microarray analysis revealed that eriocitrin increased mRNA of mitochondrial biogenesis genes, such as mitochondria transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor 1, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4, and ATP synthase. In HepG2 cells, eriocitrin also induced the corresponding orthologues, and reduced lipid accumulation under conditions of lipid loading. Eriocitrin increased mitochondrial size and mtDNA content, which resulted in ATP production in HepG2 cells and zebrafish. In summary, dietary eriocitrin ameliorates diet-induced hepatic steatosis with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:24424211

  14. Endospores of halophilic bacteria of the family Bacillaceae isolated from non-saline Japanese soil may be transported by Kosa event (Asian dust storm)

    PubMed Central

    Echigo, Akinobu; Hino, Miki; Fukushima, Tadamasa; Mizuki, Toru; Kamekura, Masahiro; Usami, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Background Generally, extremophiles have been deemed to survive in the extreme environments to which they had adapted to grow. Recently many extremophiles have been isolated from places where they are not expected to grow. Alkaliphilic microorganisms have been isolated from acidic soil samples with pH 4.0, and thermophiles have been isolated from samples of low temperature. Numerous moderately halophilic microorganisms, defined as those that grow optimally in media containing 0.5–2.5 Molar (3–15%) NaCl, and halotolerant microorganisms that are able to grow in media without added NaCl and in the presence of high NaCl have been isolated from saline environments such as salterns, salt lakes and sea sands. It has tacitly been believed that habitats of halophiles able to grow in media containing more than 20% (3.4 M) are restricted to saline environments, and no reports have been published on the isolation of halophiles from ordinary garden soil samples. Results We demonstrated that many halophilic bacteria that are able to grow in the presence of 20% NaCl are inhabiting in non-saline environments such as ordinary garden soils, yards, fields and roadways in an area surrounding Tokyo, Japan. Analyses of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of 176 isolates suggested that they were halophiles belonging to genera of the family Bacillaceae, Bacillus (11 isolates), Filobacillus (19 isolates), Gracilibacillus (6 isolates), Halobacillus (102 isolates), Lentibacillus (1 isolate), Paraliobacillus (5 isolates) and Virgibacillus (17 isolates). Sequences of 15 isolates showed similarities less than 92%, suggesting that they may represent novel taxa within the family Bacillaceae. Conclusion The numbers of total bacteria of inland soil samples were in a range from 1.4 × 107/g to 1.1 × 106/g. One tenth of the total bacteria was occupied by endospore-forming bacteria. Only very few of the endospore-forming bacteria, roughly 1 out of 20,000, are halophilic bacteria. Most of the

  15. Production of autoinducer-2 by aerobic endospore-forming bacteria isolated from the West African fermented foods.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yang; Kando, Christine Kere; Thorsen, Line; Larsen, Nadja; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-11-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a quorum-sensing (QS) molecule which mediates interspecies signaling and affects various bacterial behaviors in food fermentation. Biosynthesis of AI-2 is controlled by S-ribosylhomocysteine lyase encoded by the luxS gene. The objective of this study was to investigate production of AI-2 by aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (AEB) isolated from the West African alkaline fermented seed products Mantchoua and Maari. The study included 13 AEB strains of Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, B. altitudinis, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. licheniformis, B. aryabhattai, B. safensis, Lysinibacillus macroides and Paenibacillus polymyxa. All the tested strains harbored the luxS gene and all strains except for P. polymyxa B314 were able to produce AI-2 during incubation in laboratory medium. Production of AI-2 by AEB was growth phase dependent, showing maximum activity at the late exponential phase. AI-2 was depleted from the culture medium at the beginning of the stationary growth phase, indicating that the tested AEB possess a functional AI-2 receptor that internalizes AI-2. This study provides the evidences of QS system in Bacillus spp. and L. macroides and new knowledge of AI-2 production by AEB. This knowledge contributes to the development of QS-based strategies for better control of alkaline fermentation. PMID:26449556

  16. Effect of Several Environmental Conditions on the “Thermal Death Rate” of Endospores of Aerobic, Thermophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yokoya, Fumio; York, George K.

    1965-01-01

    The composition of the recovery medium affected the apparent heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus when the pH of the medium was 7.0 but not when the pH was 6.5. The rate of thermal death at 110 C was exponential. Deviations from exponential rates of thermal death during the initial phases of heating at 96 C were observed with endospores of B. coagulans under different conditions of sporulation. Additionally, the apparent heat resistance was influenced by the composition of the media used for sporulation and recovery and by the composition of the suspending menstruum. The presence of 0.001 m sorbic acid in the suspending menstruum at pH 7.0 and the temperature of incubation of the cultures after heating did not affect the apparent heat resistance of B. coagulans. Several explanations are discussed for the observed deviations from exponential thermal death rates and the effect of the environment on the apparent heat resistance of B. coagulans. PMID:5866047

  17. Deacetylation of TFEB promotes fibrillar Aβ degradation by upregulating lysosomal biogenesis in microglia.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jintao; Zheng, Liangjun; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xinya; Zhang, Xuefei; Li, Zeyang; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Zhong; Huo, Wei; Zhao, Xuyang; Shang, Shujiang; Wang, Qingsong; Zhang, Chen; Ji, Jianguo

    2016-06-01

    Microglia play a pivotal role in clearance of Aβ by degrading them in lysosomes, countering amyloid plaque pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that lysosomal dysfunction leads to insufficient elimination of toxic protein aggregates. We tested whether enhancing lysosomal function with transcription factor EB (TFEB), an essential regulator modulating lysosomal pathways, would promote Aβ clearance in microglia. Here we show that microglial expression of TFEB facilitates fibrillar Aβ (fAβ) degradation and reduces deposited amyloid plaques, which are further enhanced by deacetylation of TFEB. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we firstly confirmed acetylation as a previously unreported modification of TFEB and found that SIRT1 directly interacted with and deacetylated TFEB at lysine residue 116. Subsequently, SIRT1 overexpression enhanced lysosomal function and fAβ degradation by upregulating transcriptional levels of TFEB downstream targets, which could be inhibited when TFEB was knocked down. Furthermore, overexpression of deacetylated TFEB at K116R mutant in microglia accelerated intracellular fAβ degradation by stimulating lysosomal biogenesis and greatly reduced the deposited amyloid plaques in the brain slices of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Our findings reveal that deacetylation of TFEB could regulate lysosomal biogenesis and fAβ degradation, making microglial activation of TFEB a possible strategy for attenuating amyloid plaque deposition in AD. PMID:27209302

  18. BUD22 Affects Ty1 Retrotransposition and Ribosome Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dakshinamurthy, Arun; Nyswaner, Katherine M.; Farabaugh, Philip J.; Garfinkel, David J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of cellular factors affect the movement of the retrovirus-like transposon Ty1. To identify genes involved in Ty1 virus-like particle (VLP) function, the level of the major capsid protein (Gag-p45) and its proteolytic precursor (Gag-p49p) was monitored in a subset of Ty1 cofactor mutants. Twenty-nine of 87 mutants contained alterations in the level of Gag; however, only bud22Δ showed a striking defect in Gag processing. BUD22 affected the +1 translational frameshifting event required to express the Pol proteins protease, integrase, and reverse transcriptase. Therefore, it is possible that the bud22Δ mutant may not produce enough functional Ty1 protease to completely process Gag-p49 to p45. Furthermore, BUD22 is required for 18S rRNA processing and 40S subunit biogenesis and influences polysome density. Together our results suggest that BUD22 is involved in a step in ribosome biogenesis that not only affects general translation, but also may alter the frameshifting efficiency of ribosomes, an event central to Ty1 retrotransposition. PMID:20498295

  19. Temperature and Carbon Assimilation Regulate the Chlorosome Biogenesis in Green Sulfur Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang; Saikin, Semion K.; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Enriquez, Miriam M.; Huh, Joonsuk; Frank, Harry A.; Urban, Volker S.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria adjust the structure and functionality of the chlorosome—the light-absorbing antenna complex—in response to environmental stress factors. The chlorosome is a natural self-assembled aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. In this study, we report the regulation of the biogenesis of the Chlorobaculum tepidum chlorosome by carbon assimilation in conjunction with temperature changes. Our studies indicate that the carbon source and thermal stress culture of C. tepidum grows slower and incorporates fewer BChl c in the chlorosome. Compared with the chlorosome from other cultural conditions we investigated, the chlorosome from the carbon source and thermal stress culture displays (a) smaller cross-sectional radius and overall size, (b) simplified BChl c homologs with smaller side chains, (c) blue-shifted Qy absorption maxima, and (d) a sigmoid-shaped circular dichroism spectra. Using a theoretical model, we analyze how the observed spectral modifications can be associated with structural changes of BChl aggregates inside the chlorosome. Our report suggests a mechanism of metabolic regulation for chlorosome biogenesis. PMID:24047985

  20. Mechanism of the AAA+ ATPases pontin and reptin in the biogenesis of H/ACA RNPs

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Pinilla, Rosario; Liger, Dominique; Leulliot, Nicolas; Meier, U. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The AAA+ ATPases pontin and reptin function in a staggering array of cellular processes including chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage repair, and assembly of macromolecular complexes, such as RNA polymerase II and small nucleolar (sno) RNPs. However, the molecular mechanism for all of these AAA+ ATPase associated activities is unknown. Here we document that, during the biogenesis of H/ACA RNPs (including telomerase), the assembly factor SHQ1 holds the pseudouridine synthase NAP57/dyskerin in a viselike grip, and that pontin and reptin (as components of the R2TP complex) are required to pry NAP57 from SHQ1. Significantly, the NAP57 domain captured by SHQ1 harbors most mutations underlying X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (X-DC) implicating the interface between the two proteins as a target of this bone marrow failure syndrome. Homing in on the essential first steps of H/ACA RNP biogenesis, our findings provide the first insight into the mechanism of action of pontin and reptin in the assembly of macromolecular complexes. PMID:22923768

  1. Flavan-3-ol fraction from cocoa powder promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous clinical studies have reported that ingestion of chocolate has reduced risk of metabolic syndrome. In order to elucidate the mechanism, we evaluated the influence of flavan-3-ols derived from cocoa powder on energy metabolism in mice using an indirect calorimetric method. Method The mice were divided into two groups, and administered either distilled water or 50 mg/kg of flavan-3-ol fraction for 2 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, animals were sacrificed after blood pressure and the mean respiratory exchange ratio (RER) over 24 hours were measured. Results The mean respiratory exchange ratio (RER) over 24 hours was reduced significantly in the flavan-3-ols group. The mean blood pressure was significantly decreased in flavan-3-ols treatment group compared with control group. The protein level of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2) was increased significantly by flavan-3-ols in skeletal muscle, but not in liver. Uncoupling protein (UCP) 1 was increased significantly in brown adipose tissue by flavan-3-ols. The mitochondria copy number in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles and brown adipose tissue were increased significantly by administration of flavan-3-ol fraction. Conclusion These results suggest that flavan-3-ols enhances lipolysis and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis. We conclude that improvement of metabolic syndrome risk factors following ingestion of chocolate may be induced, in part, by the mitochondrial biogenesis-promoting effect of flavan-3-ols. PMID:24708519

  2. Cyclovirobuxine D Attenuates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Suppression of Oxidative Damage and Mitochondrial Biogenesis Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qian; Guo, Jiabin; Yang, Rong; Peng, Hui; Zhao, Jun; Li, Li; Peng, Shuangqing

    2015-01-01

    The clinical application of doxorubicin (DOX) is compromised by its cardiac toxic effect. Cyclovirobuxine D (CVB-D) is a steroid alkaloid extracted from a traditional Chinese medicine, Buxus microphylla. Our results showed that CVB-D pretreatment markedly attenuated DOX-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and histological alterations. By using TUNEL assay and western blot analysis, we found that CVB-D pretreatment reduced DOX-induced apoptosis of myocardial cells and mitochondrial cytochrome c release to cytosol. CVB-D pretreatment ameliorated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative damage including lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation and a decrease in the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG). Moreover, CVB-D was found to prevent DOX-induced mitochondrial biogenesis impairment as evidenced by preservation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1), as well as mitochondrial DNA copy number. These findings demonstrate that CVB-D protects against DOX-induced cardiomyopathy, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative damage and mitochondrial biogenesis impairment. PMID:26075032

  3. Mitochondrial cytochrome c biogenesis: no longer an enigma

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Shalon E.; Sutherland, Molly C.; Francisco, Brian San; Mendez, Deanna L.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochromes c and c1are heme proteins that are essential for aerobic respiration. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria is an important signal in apoptosis initiation. Biogenesis of c-type cytochromes involves covalent attachment of heme to two cysteines (at a conserved CXXCH sequence) in the apocytochrome. Heme attachment is catalyzed in most mitochondria by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS), which is also necessary for import of apocytochrome c. Thus, HCCS affects cellular levels of cytochrome c, impacting mitochondrial physiology and cell death. Here, we review the mechanisms of HCCS function and the roles played by heme and residues in the CXXCH motif. Additionally, we consider concepts emerging within the two prokaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathways. PMID:26073510

  4. Pex19p, a Farnesylated Protein Essential for Peroxisome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Götte, Klaudia; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Linkert, Michael; Baumgart, Evelyn; Kammerer, Stefan; Kunau, Wolf-Hubert; Erdmann, Ralf

    1998-01-01

    We report the identification and molecular characterization of Pex19p, an oleic acid-inducible, farnesylated protein of 39.7 kDa that is essential for peroxisome biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells lacking Pex19p are characterized by the absence of morphologically detectable peroxisomes and mislocalization of peroxisomal matrix proteins to the cytosol. The human HK33 gene product was identified as the putative human ortholog of Pex19p. Evidence is provided that farnesylation of Pex19p takes place at the cysteine of the C-terminal CKQQ amino acid sequence. Farnesylation of Pex19p was shown to be essential for the proper function of the protein in peroxisome biogenesis. Pex19p was shown to interact with Pex3p in vivo, and this interaction required farnesylation of Pex19p. PMID:9418908

  5. Abnormal Synaptic Vesicle Biogenesis in Drosophila Synaptogyrin Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Robin J.; Akbergenova, Yulia; Jorquera, Ramon A.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2012-01-01

    Sustained neuronal communication relies on the coordinated activity of multiple proteins that regulate synaptic vesicle biogenesis and cycling within the presynaptic terminal. Synaptogyrin and synaptophysin are conserved MARVEL domain-containing transmembrane proteins that are among the most abundant synaptic vesicle constituents, although their role in the synaptic vesicle cycle has remained elusive. To further investigate the function of these proteins, we generated and characterized a synaptogyrin (gyr) null mutant in Drosophila, whose genome encodes a single synaptogyrin isoform and lacks a synaptophysin homolog. We demonstrate that Drosophila synaptogyrin plays a modulatory role in synaptic vesicle biogenesis at larval neuromuscular junctions. Drosophila lacking synaptogyrin are viable and fertile and have no overt deficits in motor function. However, ultrastructural analysis of gyr larvae revealed increased synaptic vesicle diameter and enhanced variability in the size of synaptic vesicles. In addition, the resolution of endocytic cisternae into synaptic vesicles in response to strong stimulation is defective in gyr mutants. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated an increase in quantal size and a concomitant decrease in quantal content, suggesting functional consequences for transmission caused by the loss of synaptogyrin. Furthermore, high-frequency stimulation resulted in increased facilitation and a delay in recovery from synaptic depression, indicating that synaptic vesicle exo-endocytosis is abnormally regulated during intense stimulation conditions. These results suggest that synaptogyrin modulates the synaptic vesicle exo-endocytic cycle and is required for the proper biogenesis of synaptic vesicles at nerve terminals. PMID:23238721

  6. Bmi1 promotes erythroid development through regulating ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Yingchi; Wan, Yang; Young, Sara K.; Soltis, Anthony; Yu, Ming; Vemula, Sasidhar; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Xu, Yang; Yoder, Mervin C.; Wek, Ronald C.; Ellis, Steven R.; Kapur, Reuben; Zhu, Xiaofan; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    While Polycomb group protein Bmi1 is important for stem cell maintenance, its role in lineage commitment is largely unknown. We have identified Bmi1 as a novel regulator of erythroid development. Bmi1 is highly expressed in mouse erythroid progenitor cells and its deficiency impairs erythroid differentiation. BMI1 is also important for human erythroid development. Furthermore, we discovered that loss of Bmi1 in erythroid progenitor cells results in down-regulation of transcription of multiple ribosomal protein genes and impaired ribosome biogenesis. Bmi1 deficiency stabilizes p53 protein, leading to upregulation of p21 expression and subsequent G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Genetic inhibition of p53 activity rescues the erythroid defects seen in the Bmi1 null mice, demonstrating that a p53-dependent mechanism underlies the pathophysiology of the anemia. Mechanistically, Bmi1 is associated with multiple ribosomal protein genes and may positively regulate their expression in erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, Bmi1 promotes erythroid development, at least in part through regulating ribosome biogenesis. Ribosomopathies are human disorders of ribosome dysfunction, including diamond blackfan anemia (DBA) and 5q- syndrome, in which genetic abnormalities cause impaired ribosome biogenesis, resulting in specific clinical phenotypes. We observed that BMI1 expression in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from patients with DBA is correlated with the expression of some ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that BMI1 deficiency may play a pathological role in DBA and other ribosomopathies. PMID:25385494

  7. Bmi1 promotes erythroid development through regulating ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Yingchi; Wan, Yang; Young, Sara K; Soltis, Anthony; Yu, Ming; Vemula, Sasidhar; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Xu, Yang; Yoder, Mervin C; Wek, Ronald C; Ellis, Steven R; Kapur, Reuben; Zhu, Xiaofan; Liu, Yan

    2015-03-01

    While Polycomb group protein Bmi1 is important for stem cell maintenance, its role in lineage commitment is largely unknown. We have identified Bmi1 as a novel regulator of erythroid development. Bmi1 is highly expressed in mouse erythroid progenitor cells and its deficiency impairs erythroid differentiation. BMI1 is also important for human erythroid development. Furthermore, we discovered that loss of Bmi1 in erythroid progenitor cells results in decreased transcription of multiple ribosomal protein genes and impaired ribosome biogenesis. Bmi1 deficiency stabilizes p53 protein, leading to upregulation of p21 expression and subsequent G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Genetic inhibition of p53 activity rescues the erythroid defects seen in the Bmi1 null mice, demonstrating that a p53-dependent mechanism underlies the pathophysiology of the anemia. Mechanistically, Bmi1 is associated with multiple ribosomal protein genes and may positively regulate their expression in erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, Bmi1 promotes erythroid development, at least in part through regulating ribosome biogenesis. Ribosomopathies are human disorders of ribosome dysfunction, including Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) and 5q- syndrome, in which genetic abnormalities cause impaired ribosome biogenesis, resulting in specific clinical phenotypes. We observed that BMI1 expression in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from patients with DBA is correlated with the expression of some ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that BMI1 deficiency may play a pathological role in DBA and other ribosomopathies. PMID:25385494

  8. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Rosani, Umberto; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs) guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves. PMID:26989613

  9. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Rosani, Umberto; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs) guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves. PMID:26989613

  10. MicroRNA-27b Regulates Mitochondria Biogenesis in Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shunhua; Du, Jingjing; Bai, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Yanzhi; Li, Xuewei; Wang, Jinyong; Zhu, Li

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that affect the post-transcriptional regulation of various biological pathways. To date, it is not fully understood how miRNAs regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. This study aimed at the identification of the role of miRNA-27b in mitochondria biogenesis. The mitochondria content in C2C12 cells was significantly increased during myogenic differentiation and accompanied by a marked decrease of miRNA-27b expression. Furthermore, the expression of the predicted target gene of miRNA-27b, forkhead box j3 (Foxj3), was also increased during myogenic differentiation. Luciferase activity assays confirmed that miRNA-27b directly targets the 3’-untranslated region (3’-UTR) of Foxj3. Overexpression of miRNA-27b provoked a decrease of mitochondria content and diminished expression of related mitochondrial genes and Foxj3 both at mRNA and protein levels. The expression levels of downstream genes of Foxj3, such as Mef2c, PGC1α, NRF1 and mtTFA, were also decreased in C2C12 cells upon overexpression of miRNA-27b. These results suggested that miRNA-27b may affect mitochondria biogenesis by down-regulation of Foxj3 during myocyte differentiation. PMID:26849429

  11. Altered Endosome Biogenesis in Prostate Cancer has Biomarker Potential

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ian R D; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma J; Shandala, Tetyana; Weigert, Roberto; Butler, Lisa M; Brooks, Doug A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common form of cancer in males, affecting one in eight men by the time they reach the age of 70. Current diagnostic tests for prostate cancer have significant problems with both false negatives and false positives, necessitating the search for new molecular markers. A recent investigation of endosomal and lysosomal proteins revealed that the critical process of endosomal biogenesis might be altered in prostate cancer. Here, a panel of endosomal markers was evaluated in prostate cancer and non-malignant cells and a significant increase in gene and protein expression was found for early, but not late endosomal proteins. There was also a differential distribution of early endosomes, and altered endosomal traffic and signalling of the transferrin receptors (TFRC and TFR2) in prostate cancer cells. These findings support the concept that endosome biogenesis and function is altered in prostate cancer. Microarray analysis of a clinical cohort confirmed the altered endosomal gene expression observed in cultured prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, in prostate cancer patient tissue specimens, the early endosomal marker and adaptor protein APPL1 showed consistently altered basement membrane histology in the vicinity of tumours and concentrated staining within tumour masses. These novel observations on altered early endosome biogenesis provide a new avenue for prostate cancer biomarker investigation and suggest new methods for the early diagnosis and accurate prognosis of prostate cancer. PMID:25080433

  12. Nuclear Recruitment of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase by α-Syntrophin Is Crucial for the Induction of Mitochondrial Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Aquilano, Katia; Baldelli, Sara; Ciriolo, Maria R.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) has various splicing variants and different subcellular localizations. nNOS can be found also in the nucleus; however, its exact role in this compartment is still not completely defined. In this report, we demonstrate that the PDZ domain allows the recruitment of nNOS to nuclei, thus favoring local NO production, nuclear protein S-nitrosylation, and induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. In particular, overexpression of PDZ-containing nNOS (nNOSα) increases S-nitrosylated CREB with consequent augmented binding on cAMP response element consensus sequence on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator (PGC)-1α promoter. The resulting PGC-1α induction is accompanied by the expression of mitochondrial genes (e.g., TFAM, MtCO1) and increased mitochondrial mass. Importantly, full active nNOS lacking PDZ domain (nNOSβ) does not localize in nuclei and fails in inducing the expression of PGC-1α. Moreover, we substantiate that the mitochondrial biogenesis normally accompanying myogenesis is associated with nuclear translocation of nNOS. We demonstrate that α-Syntrophin, which resides in nuclei of myocytes, functions as the upstream mediator of nuclear nNOS translocation and nNOS-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis. Overall, our results indicate that altered nNOS splicing and nuclear localization could be contributing factors in human muscular diseases associated with mitochondrial impairment. PMID:24235139

  13. Genome-Wide Screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Highlight a Role for Cardiolipin in Biogenesis of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Multispan Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sauerwald, Julia; Jores, Tobias; Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Chuartzman, Silvia Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    A special group of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) proteins spans the membrane several times via multiple helical segments. Such multispan proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes before their targeting to mitochondria and insertion into the MOM. Previous work recognized the import receptor Tom70 and the mitochondrial import (MIM) complex, both residents of the MOM, as required for optimal biogenesis of these proteins. However, their involvement is not sufficient to explain either the entire import pathway or its regulation. To identify additional factors that are involved in the biogenesis of MOM multispan proteins, we performed complementary high-throughput visual and growth screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cardiolipin (CL) synthase (Crd1) appeared as a candidate in both screens. Our results indeed demonstrate lower steady-state levels of the multispan proteins Ugo1, Scm4, and Om14 in mitochondria from crd1Δ cells. Importantly, MOM single-span proteins were not affected by this mutation. Furthermore, organelles lacking Crd1 had a lower in vitro capacity to import newly synthesized Ugo1 and Scm4 molecules. Crd1, which is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane, condenses phosphatidylglycerol together with CDP-diacylglycerol to obtain de novo synthesized CL molecules. Hence, our findings suggest that CL is an important component in the biogenesis of MOM multispan proteins. PMID:26149385

  14. Field-scale evaluation of the co-transport impacts of Bacillus subtilis endospores on other pathogen surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimson, J. R.; Chik, A. H.; Mesquita, M. M.; McLellan, N. L.; Emelko, M.

    2009-12-01

    Bacillus subtilis spores are increasingly used as a surrogate in pathogen fate and transport studies, in particular as a conservative indicator of Cryptosporidium parvum transport in engineered and riverbank filtration systems. As part of the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2ESWTR), riverbank filtration systems can obtain additional log credits for pathogen removal through conducting a demonstration of performance study. Several studies have shown that the removal of total aerobic endospores (and often B. subtilis specifically) provide a conservative estimate of Crytosporidium oocyst removal during during conventional granular media and slow sand filtration processes used for drinking water treatment. Spores are persistent in groundwater settings, but readily attach to geological media due to high zeta potential and hydrophobic properties of the spore coat. “Demonstration” or “performance studies” are often conducted using more than one pathogen surrogate to provide regulators with greater confidence in projected pathogen removals during subsurface “treatment” of surface water. Column studies conducted at the University of Waterloo reproducibly indicated that the presence of Bacillus spores resulted in increased removal of other pathogen surrogates such as bacteria- and protozoan-sized carboxylated microspheres. A field study was subsequently conducted to determine if the same increase in removal occurs when B. subtilis spores are present during a field-scale injection experiment. Colloid suspensions were injected into a shallow well and extracted from another well at a distance of 0.4 m. These wells were installed in unconsolidated silty, sandy, gravel and boulder riverbank sediments along the Grand River in Kitchener, Ontario. Two initial injection experiments were conducted, one with 1.5 µm microspheres (a non-biological surrogate) alone and a second with B. subtilis spores and 1.5 µm fluorescent microspheres. Total aerobic

  15. Lipoamide Acts as an Indirect Antioxidant by Simultaneously Stimulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Phase II Antioxidant Enzyme Systems in ARPE-19 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Liu, Zhongbo; Jia, Haiqun; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang; Li, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that pretreatment with lipoamide (LM) more effectively than alpha-lipoic acid (LA) protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from the acrolein-induced damage. However, the reasons and mechanisms for the greater effect of LM than LA are unclear. We hypothesize that LM, rather than the more direct antioxidant LA, may act more as an indirect antioxidant. In the present study, we treated ARPE-19 cells with LA and LM and compared their effects on activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II enzyme systems. It is found that LM is more effective than LA on increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and inducing the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its translocation to the nucleus, leading to an increase in expression or activity of phase II antioxidant enzymes (NQO-1, GST, GCL, catalase and Cu/Zn SOD). Further study demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II enzyme induction are closely coupled via energy requirements. These results suggest that LM, compared with the direct antioxidant LA, plays its protective effect on oxidative damage more as an indirect antioxidant to simultaneously stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II antioxidant enzymes. PMID:26030919

  16. Lipoamide Acts as an Indirect Antioxidant by Simultaneously Stimulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Phase II Antioxidant Enzyme Systems in ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin; Liu, Zhongbo; Jia, Haiqun; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang; Li, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that pretreatment with lipoamide (LM) more effectively than alpha-lipoic acid (LA) protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from the acrolein-induced damage. However, the reasons and mechanisms for the greater effect of LM than LA are unclear. We hypothesize that LM, rather than the more direct antioxidant LA, may act more as an indirect antioxidant. In the present study, we treated ARPE-19 cells with LA and LM and compared their effects on activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II enzyme systems. It is found that LM is more effective than LA on increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and inducing the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its translocation to the nucleus, leading to an increase in expression or activity of phase II antioxidant enzymes (NQO-1, GST, GCL, catalase and Cu/Zn SOD). Further study demonstrated that mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II enzyme induction are closely coupled via energy requirements. These results suggest that LM, compared with the direct antioxidant LA, plays its protective effect on oxidative damage more as an indirect antioxidant to simultaneously stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and induction of phase II antioxidant enzymes. PMID:26030919

  17. Assessment of functional and genetic diversity of aerobic endospore forming Bacilli from rhizospheric soil of Phyllanthus amarus L.

    PubMed

    Kadyan, Sangeeta; Panghal, Manju; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Khushboo; Yadav, Jaya Parkash

    2013-09-01

    Fifty two aerobic and endospore forming Bacilli (AEFB) strains were recovered from rhizospheric soil of Phyllanthus amarus. Morphological, biochemical and molecular characterization by 16S rDNA gene sequencing has shown that these bacterial strains belong to six different genera of AEFB i.e. Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Terribacillus and Jeotgalibacillus. Analysis of their PGP activities has shown that 92.30 % strains produced indole acetic acid hormone, 86.53 % of the strains solubilized Phosphate and 44.23 % strains produced siderophore. Chitinase production activity was shown by 42.30 % of the strains and 21.15 % of the strains produced 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. 46.15 % of isolates have shown antagonistic activity against common fungal pathogen of the plant i.e. Corynespora cassiicola. Among all of the isolated strains B. Cereus JP44SK22 and JP44SK42 have shown all of the six plant growth promoting traits tested. B. megaterium strains (JP44SK18 and JP44SK35), Lysinibacillus sphaericus strains (JP44SK3 and JP44SK4) and Brevibacillus laterosporus strain JP44SK51 have also shown multiple PGP activities except ACC deaminase production activity. In the present study bacterial strain belonging to genera Jeotgalibacillus sp. JP44SK37 has been reported first time as a member of rhizospheric soil habitat and has also shown PGP activities. It can be concluded that Rhizosphere of P. amarus has harboured a good diversity of AEFB bacterial strains having a lot of biofertilizing and biocontrol abilities. PMID:23526192

  18. Bacillus rigiliprofundi sp. nov., an endospore-forming, Mn-oxidizing, moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from deep subseafloor basaltic crust.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, Jason B; Hoffman, Colleen L; Momper, Lily M; Toner, Brandy M; Amend, Jan P; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-06-01

    A facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated strain 1MBB1T, was isolated from basaltic breccia collected from 341 m below the seafloor by seafloor drilling of Rigil Guyot during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 330. The cells were straight rods, 0.5 μm wide and 1-3 μm long, that occurred singly and in chains. Strain 1MBB1T stained Gram-positive. Catalase and oxidase were produced. The isolate grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.5, and could grow with up to 12 % (w/v) NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 40.5 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were C16:1ω11c (26.5 %), anteiso-C15:0 (19.5 %), C16:0 (18.7 %) and iso-C15:0 (10.4 %), and the cell-wall diamino acid was meso-diaminopimelic acid. Endospores of strain 1MBB1T oxidized Mn(II) to Mn(IV), and siderophore production by vegetative cells was positive. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that strain 1MBB1T was a member of the family Bacillaceae, with Bacillus foraminis CV53T and Bacillus novalis LMG 21837T being the closest phylogenetic neighbours (96.5 and 96.2 % similarity, respectively). This is the first novel species described from deep subseafloor basaltic crust. On the basis of our polyphasic analysis, we conclude that strain 1MBB1T represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which we propose the name Bacillus rigiliprofundi sp. nov. The type strain is 1MBB1T ( = NCMA B78T = LMG 28275T). PMID:25813363

  19. Comparison of coherent and spontaneous Raman microspectroscopies for noninvasive detection of single bacterial endospores

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Georgi I.; Arora, Rajan; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Wang, Xi; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2007-01-01

    Single bacterial spores were analyzed by using nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The Raman spectra were retrieved from CARS spectra and found to be in excellent agreement with conventionally collected Raman spectra. The phase retrieval method based on maximum entropy model revealed significant robustness to external noise. The direct comparison of signal amplitudes exhibited a factor of 100 stronger CARS signal, as compared with the Raman signal. PMID:17483468

  20. Stage-specific assembly events of the 6-MDa small-subunit processome initiate eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chaker-Margot, Malik; Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Dill, Brian D; Klinge, Sebastian

    2015-11-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves a plethora of ribosome-assembly factors, and their temporal order of association with preribosomal RNA is largely unknown. By using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, we developed a system that recapitulates and arrests ribosome assembly at early stages, thus providing in vivo snapshots of nascent preribosomal particles. Here we report the stage-specific order in which 70 ribosome-assembly factors associate with preribosomal RNA domains, thereby forming the 6-MDa small-subunit processome. PMID:26479197

  1. Biogenesis of antibiotics-viewing its history and glimpses of the future.

    PubMed

    Spížek, J; Sigler, K; Řezanka, T; Demain, A

    2016-07-01

    This review aims at comparing some historical data with the current situation in the study of biogenesis of natural compounds, antibiotics in the first place. Biogenesis of tetracyclines and cycloheximide and related compounds serves as example. Examples of molecular biological and bioinformatics methods used in the study of antibiotic biogenesis are described both in terms of its historical aspects and the current knowledge. PMID:27188629

  2. Mitochondrial and lysosomal biogenesis are activated following PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Ivankovic, Davor; Chau, Kai-Yin; Schapira, Anthony H V; Gegg, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of the autophagy-lysosome pathway is implicated with the changes in α-synuclein and mitochondrial dysfunction observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). Damaged mitochondria accumulate PINK1, which then recruits parkin, resulting in ubiquitination of mitochondrial proteins. These can then be bound by the autophagic proteins p62/SQSTM1 and LC3, resulting in degradation of mitochondria by mitophagy. Mutations in PINK1 and parkin genes are a cause of familial PD. We found a significant increase in the expression of p62/SQSTM1 mRNA and protein following mitophagy induction in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. p62 protein not only accumulated on mitochondria, but was also greatly increased in the cytosol. Increased p62/SQSMT1 expression was prevented in PINK1 knock-down cells, suggesting increased p62 expression was a consequence of mitophagy induction. The transcription factors Nrf2 and TFEB, which play roles in mitochondrial and lysosomal biogenesis, respectively, can regulate p62/SQSMT1. We report that both Nrf2 and TFEB translocate to the nucleus following mitophagy induction and that the increase in p62 mRNA levels was significantly impaired in cells with Nrf2 or TFEB knockdown. TFEB translocation also increased expression of itself and lysosomal proteins such as glucocerebrosidase and cathepsin D following mitophagy induction. We also report that cells with increased TFEB protein have significantly higher PGC-1α mRNA levels, a regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in increased mitochondrial content. Our data suggests that TFEB is activated following mitophagy to maintain autophagy-lysosome pathway and mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, strategies to increase TFEB may improve both the clearance of α-synuclein and mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. Damaged mitochondria are degraded by the autophagy-lysosome pathway and is termed mitophagy. Following mitophagy induction, the transcription factors Nrf2 and TFEB translocate to the nucleus, inducing

  3. Inactivation of σE and σG in Clostridium acetobutylicum Illuminates Their Roles in Clostridial-Cell-Form Biogenesis, Granulose Synthesis, Solventogenesis, and Spore Morphogenesis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Bryan P.; Jones, Shawn W.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2011-01-01

    Central to all clostridia is the orchestration of endospore formation (i.e., sporulation) and, specifically, the roles of differentiation-associated sigma factors. Moreover, there is considerable applied interest in understanding the roles of these sigma factors in other stationary-phase phenomena, such as solvent production (i.e., solventogenesis). Here we separately inactivated by gene disruption the major sporulation-specific sigma factors, σE and σG, and performed an initial analysis to elucidate their roles in sporulation-related morphogenesis and solventogenesis in Clostridium acetobutylicum. The terminal differentiation phenotype for the sigE inactivation mutant stalled in sporulation prior to asymmetric septum formation, appeared vegetative-like often with an accumulation of DNA at both poles, frequently exhibited two longitudinal internal membranes, and did not synthesize granulose. The sigE inactivation mutant did produce the characteristic solvents (i.e., butanol and acetone), but the extent of solventogenesis was dependent on the physiological state of the inoculum. The sigG inactivation mutant stalled in sporulation during endospore maturation, exhibiting engulfment and partial cortex and spore coat formation. Lastly, the sigG inactivation mutant did produce granulose and exhibited wild-type-like solventogenesis. PMID:21217008

  4. Biogenesis and subcellular organization of the magnetosome organelles of magnetotactic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Shannon E.; Komeili, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial cells, like their eukaryotic counterparts, are capable of constructing lipid-based organelles that carry out essential biochemical functions. The magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria are one such compartment that is quickly becoming a model for exploring the process of organelle biogenesis in bacteria. Magnetosomes consist of a lipid-bilayer compartment that houses a magnetic crystal. By arranging magnetosomes into chains within the cell, magnetotactic bacteria create an internal compass that is used for navigation along magnetic fields. Over the past decade, a number of studies have elucidated the possible factors involved in the formation of the magnetosome membrane and biomineralization of magnetic minerals. Here, we highlight some of these recent advances with a particular focus on the cell biology of magnetosome formation. PMID:22726584

  5. Subcellular localization of the pyoverdine biogenesis machinery of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a membrane-associated "siderosome".

    PubMed

    Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    The peptidic siderophore pyoverdine is the primary iron uptake system of fluorescent pseudomonads, and a virulence factor in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pyoverdine biogenesis is a co-ordinate process requiring several precursor-generating enzymes and large nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in the cytoplasm, followed by extracytoplasmic maturation. By using cell fractionation, protein-protein interaction, and in vivo labeling assays we obtained evidence that, in P. aeruginosa, pyoverdine NRPSs assemble with precursor-generating enzymes into a membrane-bound multi-enzymatic complex, for which we propose the name "siderosome". The pyoverdine biogenetic complex represents a novel example of subcellular compartmentalization of a secondary metabolic pathway in prokaryotes. PMID:24042050

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is involved in regulation of ribosome biogenesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Yukari; Kodama, Yushi; Katayama, Masako; Sakamoto, Akiko; Kanemaru, Hirofumi; Wan, Kun; Mizuta, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    Secretory defects cause transcriptional repression of both ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNA genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rrs1, a trans-acting factor that participates in ribosome biogenesis, is involved in the signaling pathway induced by secretory defects. Here, we found that Rrs1 interacts with two homologs of the glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), Rim11, and Mrk1. Rrs1 possesses a repetitive consensus amino acid sequence for phosphorylation by GSK-3, and mutation of this sequence abolished the interaction of Rrs1 with Rim11 and Mrk1. Although this mutation did not affect vegetative cell growth or secretory response, disruption of all four genes encoding GSK-3 homologs, especially Mck1, diminished the transcriptional repression of ribosomal protein genes in response to secretory defects. Among the four GSK-3 kinases, Mck1 appears to be the primary mediator of this response, while the other GSK-3 kinases contribute redundantly. PMID:25035982

  7. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016. PMID:27294303

  8. MITF drives endolysosomal biogenesis and potentiates Wnt signaling in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ploper, Diego; Taelman, Vincent F.; Robert, Lidia; Perez, Brian S.; Titz, Björn; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Graeber, Thomas G.; von Euw, Erika; Ribas, Antoni; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in development and disease, regulating transcription of target genes and stabilizing many proteins phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). We observed that the MiT family of transcription factors, which includes the melanoma oncogene MITF (micropthalmia-associated transcription factor) and the lysosomal master regulator TFEB, had the highest phylogenetic conservation of three consecutive putative GSK3 phosphorylation sites in animal proteomes. This finding prompted us to examine the relationship between MITF, endolysosomal biogenesis, and Wnt signaling. Here we report that MITF expression levels correlated with the expression of a large subset of lysosomal genes in melanoma cell lines. MITF expression in the tetracycline-inducible C32 melanoma model caused a marked increase in vesicular structures, and increased expression of late endosomal proteins, such as Rab7, LAMP1, and CD63. These late endosomes were not functional lysosomes as they were less active in proteolysis, yet were able to concentrate Axin1, phospho-LRP6, phospho-β-catenin, and GSK3 in the presence of Wnt ligands. This relocalization significantly enhanced Wnt signaling by increasing the number of multivesicular bodies into which the Wnt signalosome/destruction complex becomes localized upon Wnt signaling. We also show that the MITF protein was stabilized by Wnt signaling, through the novel C-terminal GSK3 phosphorylations identified here. MITF stabilization caused an increase in multivesicular body biosynthesis, which in turn increased Wnt signaling, generating a positive-feedback loop that may function during the proliferative stages of melanoma. The results underscore the importance of misregulated endolysosomal biogenesis in Wnt signaling and cancer. PMID:25605940

  9. MITF drives endolysosomal biogenesis and potentiates Wnt signaling in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ploper, Diego; Taelman, Vincent F; Robert, Lidia; Perez, Brian S; Titz, Björn; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Graeber, Thomas G; von Euw, Erika; Ribas, Antoni; De Robertis, Edward M

    2015-02-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in development and disease, regulating transcription of target genes and stabilizing many proteins phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). We observed that the MiT family of transcription factors, which includes the melanoma oncogene MITF (micropthalmia-associated transcription factor) and the lysosomal master regulator TFEB, had the highest phylogenetic conservation of three consecutive putative GSK3 phosphorylation sites in animal proteomes. This finding prompted us to examine the relationship between MITF, endolysosomal biogenesis, and Wnt signaling. Here we report that MITF expression levels correlated with the expression of a large subset of lysosomal genes in melanoma cell lines. MITF expression in the tetracycline-inducible C32 melanoma model caused a marked increase in vesicular structures, and increased expression of late endosomal proteins, such as Rab7, LAMP1, and CD63. These late endosomes were not functional lysosomes as they were less active in proteolysis, yet were able to concentrate Axin1, phospho-LRP6, phospho-β-catenin, and GSK3 in the presence of Wnt ligands. This relocalization significantly enhanced Wnt signaling by increasing the number of multivesicular bodies into which the Wnt signalosome/destruction complex becomes localized upon Wnt signaling. We also show that the MITF protein was stabilized by Wnt signaling, through the novel C-terminal GSK3 phosphorylations identified here. MITF stabilization caused an increase in multivesicular body biosynthesis, which in turn increased Wnt signaling, generating a positive-feedback loop that may function during the proliferative stages of melanoma. The results underscore the importance of misregulated endolysosomal biogenesis in Wnt signaling and cancer. PMID:25605940

  10. Bacterial Growth, Necromass Turnover, And Endospore Abundance In The Deep Subseafloor Sediments Of The Greenland Shelf Using D:L Amino Acid Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhatre, S. S.; Braun, S.; Jaussi, M.; Røy, H.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The subsurface realm is colonized by a large number of microorganisms- about 3 × 1029. Microbial cells in these very stable and oligotrophic settings catabolize at a much slower rate than model organisms in nutrient rich cultures. The aim of this work was to use recently developed D:L-amino acid racemization model for studying the turnover times of microbial biomass and microbial necromass in a ~12,000 years old Greenland shelf marine sediment samples. Sediments were analyzed for total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA), the bacterial endospore marker dipicolinic acid (DPA), and amino acid enantiomers of aspartic acid. The percentage amino acid carbon content (%TAAC) and the percentage amino acid nitrogen content (%TAAN) were used for determining the degradation state of the organic matter. Endospores quantified using DPA quantification method were found to be as abundant as vegetative cells. The microbial necromass turnover times were thousand years, and biomass turnover times were in the range of tens to hundred years. Studies with deeper sediment cores will further improve our understanding of the energetic limits of life in the deep biosphere.

  11. Biogenesis and Functions of Exosomes and Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Florian; Baur, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Research on extracellular vesicles (EVs) is a new and emerging field that is rapidly growing. Many features of these structures still need to be described and discovered. This concerns their biogenesis, their release and cellular entrance mechanisms, as well as their functions, particularly in vivo. Hence our knowledge on EV is constantly evolving and sometimes changing. In our review we summarize the most important facts of our current knowledge about extracellular vesicles and described some of the assumed functions in the context of cancer and HIV infection. PMID:27317183

  12. Biogenesis of the multifunctional lipid droplet: Lipids, proteins, and sites

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous dynamic organelles that store and supply lipids in all eukaryotic and some prokaryotic cells for energy metabolism, membrane synthesis, and production of essential lipid-derived molecules. Interest in the organelle’s cell biology has exponentially increased over the last decade due to the link between LDs and prevalent human diseases and the discovery of new and unexpected functions of LDs. As a result, there has been significant recent progress toward understanding where and how LDs are formed, and the specific lipid pathways that coordinate LD biogenesis. PMID:24590170

  13. Mitochondrial biogenesis during differentiation of Artemia salina cysts.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, H; Grossfeld, H; Littauer, U Z

    1973-09-01

    Mitochondria isolated from cysts of Artemia salina (brine shrimp) were found to be devoid of cristae and to possess a low respiratory capability. Hydration of the cysts induces marked biochemical and morphological changes in the mitochondria. Their biogenesis proceeds in two stages. The first stage is completed within 1 h and is characterized by a rapid increase in the respiratory capability of the mitochondria, their cytochrome oxidase, cytochrome b, cytochrome c and perhaps some morphological changes. In the second stage there is an increase in the protein-synthesizing capacity of the mitochondria as well as striking changes in mitochondrial morphology leading to the formation of cristae. PMID:4355924

  14. Serine protease autotransporters of enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs): biogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Dautin, Nathalie

    2010-06-01

    Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins. PMID:22069633

  15. The Biogenesis of Lysosomes and Lysosome-Related Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Luzio, J. Paul; Hackmann, Yvonne; Dieckmann, Nele M.G.; Griffiths, Gillian M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes were once considered the end point of endocytosis, simply used for macromolecule degradation. They are now recognized to be dynamic organelles, able to fuse with a variety of targets and to be re-formed after fusion events. They are also now known to be the site of nutrient sensing and signaling to the cell nucleus. In addition, lysosomes are secretory organelles, with specialized machinery for regulated secretion of proteins in some cell types. The biogenesis of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles is discussed, taking into account their dynamic nature and multiple roles. PMID:25183830

  16. The biogenesis and emerging roles of circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are produced from precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) back-splicing of thousands of genes in eukaryotes. Although circRNAs are generally expressed at low levels, recent findings have shed new light on their cell type-specific and tissue-specific expression and on the regulation of their biogenesis. Furthermore, the data indicate that circRNAs shape gene expression by titrating microRNAs, regulating transcription and interfering with splicing, thus effectively expanding the diversity and complexity of eukaryotic transcriptomes. PMID:26908011

  17. Impaired Nrf2 regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in rostral ventrolateral medulla on hypertension induced by systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kay L H; Wu, Chih-Wei; Chao, Yung-Mei; Hung, Chun-Ying; Chan, Julie Y H

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), where sympathetic premotor neurons reside, is involved in the development of hypertension under systemic inflammation. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to tissue oxidative stress. In this study, we sought to investigate whether hypertension developed under systemic inflammation is attributable to impaired mitochondrial biogenesis in RVLM. In normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats, intraperitoneal infusion of a low dose Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 7 days promoted a pressor response, alongside a decrease in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, reductions in protein expression of nuclear DNA-encoded transcription factors for mitochondrial biogenesis, including mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2), and suppression of nuclear translocation of the phosphorylated Nrf2 (p-Nrf2) in RVLM neurons; all of which were abrogated by treatment with intracisternal infusion of an interleukin-1β (IL-1β) blocker, IL-1Ra, or a mobile mitochondrial electron carrier, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Microinjection into RVLM of IL-1β suppressed the expressions of p-Nrf2 and TFAM, and evoked a pressor response; conversely, the Nrf2 inducer, tert-butylhydroquinone, lessened the LPS-induced suppression of TFAM expression and pressor response. At cellular level, exposure of neuronal N2a cells to IL-1β decreased mtDNA copy number, increased protein interaction of Nrf2 to its negative regulator, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), and reduced DNA binding activity of p-Nrf2 to Tfam gene. Together these results indicate that defect mitochondrial biogenesis in RVLM neurons entailing redox-sensitive and IL-1β-dependent suppression of TFAM because of the increase in the formation of Keap1/Nrf2 complex, reductions in nuclear translocation of the activated Nrf2 and its binding to the Tfam gene promoter may underlie hypertension developed under the LPS

  18. Mitochondrial biogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature during inhalation lung injury and fibrosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell survival and injury repair is facilitated by mitochondrial biogenesis; however, the role of this process in lung repair is unknown. We evaluated mitochondrial biogenesis in the mouse lung in two injuries that cause acute inflammation and in two that cause chronic inflammatio...

  19. Mitochondrial DNA copy number and biogenesis in different tissues of early- and late-lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Laubenthal, L; Hoelker, M; Frahm, J; Dänicke, S; Gerlach, K; Südekum, K-H; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2016-02-01

    Energy balance in dairy cows changes during the course of lactation due to alterations in voluntary feed intake and energy required for milk synthesis. To adapt to the demands of lactation, energy metabolism needs to be regulated and coordinated in key organs such as adipose tissue (AT), liver, and mammary gland. Mitochondria are the main sites of energy production in mammalian cells and their number varies depending on age, organ, and physiological condition. The copy number of the mitochondrial genome, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), reflects the abundance of mitochondria within a cell and is regulated by transcriptional and translational factors. Environmental, physiological, and energetic conditions change during lactation and we thus hypothesized that these changes may influence the mtDNA copy number and the abundance of genes regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to provide an overview of mitochondrial biogenesis in liver, subcutaneous (sc)AT, mammary gland, and peripheral blood cells during early and late lactation in dairy cows. German Holstein cows (n=21) were fed according to their requirements, and biopsies from scAT, liver, mammary gland, and blood were collected in early and late lactation and assayed for relative mtDNA copy numbers and the mRNA abundance of genes regulating mitochondrial biogenesis, such as nuclear-respiratory factor 1 and 2 (NRF-1, NRF-2), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α). The number of mtDNA copies increased from early to late lactation in all tissues, whereas that in peripheral blood cells was greater in early compared with late lactation. Moreover, mitochondrial activity enzymes (i.e., citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase) increased from early to late lactation in scAT. Comparing the number of mtDNA copies between tissues and blood in dairy cows, the highest mtDNA content was observed in liver. The mRNA abundance of

  20. Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis through cAMP Response Element-binding Protein Phosphorylation and Increased PGC-1α Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Bauerly, Kathryn A.; Tchaparian, Eskouhie; Wong, Alice; Cortopassi, Gino A.; Rucker, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive compounds reported to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis are linked to many health benefits such increased longevity, improved energy utilization, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Previously studies have shown that mice and rats fed diets lacking in pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) have reduced mitochondrial content. Therefore, we hypothesized that PQQ can induce mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse hepatocytes. Exposure of mouse Hepa1–6 cells to 10–30 μm PQQ for 24–48 h resulted in increased citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activity, Mitotracker staining, mitochondrial DNA content, and cellular oxygen respiration. The induction of this process occurred through the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a pathway known to regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. PQQ exposure stimulated phosphorylation of CREB at serine 133, activated the promoter of PGC-1α, and increased PGC-1α mRNA and protein expression. PQQ did not stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis after small interfering RNA-mediated reduction in either PGC-1α or CREB expression. Consistent with activation of the PGC-1α pathway, PQQ increased nuclear respiratory factor activation (NRF-1 and NRF-2) and Tfam, TFB1M, and TFB2M mRNA expression. Moreover, PQQ protected cells from mitochondrial inhibition by rotenone, 3-nitropropionic acid, antimycin A, and sodium azide. The ability of PQQ to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis accounts in part for action of this compound and suggests that PQQ may be beneficial in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:19861415

  1. Biogenesis and Function of T Cell-Derived Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ventimiglia, Leandro N.; Alonso, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are a particular type of extracellular vesicle, characterized by their endosomal origin as intraluminal vesicles present in large endosomes with a multivesicular structure. After these endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, exosomes are secreted into the extracellular space. The ability of exosomes to carry and selectively deliver bioactive molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) confers on them the capacity to modulate the activity of receptor cells, even if these cells are located in distant tissues or organs. Since exosomal cargo depends on cell type, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the biochemical composition of exosomes is fundamental to a comprehensive view of exosome function. Here, we review the latest advances concerning exosome function and biogenesis in T cells, with particular focus on the mechanism of protein sorting at multivesicular endosomes. Exosomes secreted by specific T-cell subsets can modulate the activity of immune cells, including other T-cell subsets. Ceramide, tetraspanins and MAL have been revealed to be important in exosome biogenesis by T cells. These molecules, therefore, constitute potential molecular targets for artificially modulating exosome production and, hence, the immune response for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27583248

  2. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. PMID:26370942

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Monophosphate Is Involved in Toxoplasma Apicoplast Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tawk, Lina; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Montcourrier, Philippe; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Merezegue, Fabrice; Richard, Véronique; Payrastre, Bernard; Meissner, Markus; Vial, Henri J.; Roy, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause devastating diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. They harbour a plastid-like, non-photosynthetic organelle of algal origin, the apicoplast, which fulfils critical functions for parasite survival. Because of its essential and original metabolic pathways, the apicoplast has become a target for the development of new anti-apicomplexan drugs. Here we show that the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI3P) is involved in apicoplast biogenesis in Toxoplasma gondii. In yeast and mammalian cells, PI3P is concentrated on early endosomes and regulates trafficking of endosomal compartments. Imaging of PI3P in T. gondii showed that the lipid was associated with the apicoplast and apicoplast protein-shuttling vesicles. Interference with regular PI3P function by over-expression of a PI3P specific binding module in the parasite led to the accumulation of vesicles containing apicoplast peripheral membrane proteins around the apicoplast and, ultimately, to the loss of the organelle. Accordingly, inhibition of the PI3P-synthesising kinase interfered with apicoplast biogenesis. These findings point to an unexpected implication for this ubiquitous lipid and open new perspectives on how nuclear encoded proteins traffic to the apicoplast. This study also highlights the possibility of developing specific pharmacological inhibitors of the parasite PI3-kinase as novel anti-apicomplexan drugs. PMID:21379336

  4. The toxin GraT inhibits ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ainelo, Andres; Tamman, Hedvig; Leppik, Margus; Remme, Jaanus; Hõrak, Rita

    2016-05-01

    Most bacteria encode numerous chromosomal toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems that are proposed to contribute to stress tolerance, as they are able to shift the cells to a dormant state. Toxins act on a variety of targets with the majority attacking the translational apparatus. Intriguingly, the toxicity mechanisms of even closely related toxins may differ essentially. Here, we report on a new type of TA toxin that inhibits ribosome biogenesis. GraT of the GraTA system has previously been described in Pseudomonas putida as an unusually moderate toxin at optimal growth temperatures. However, GraT causes a severe growth defect at lower temperatures. Here, we demonstrate that GraT causes the accumulation of free ribosomal subunits. Mapping the rRNA 5' ends reveals incomplete processing of the free subunits and quantification of modified nucleosides shows an underrepresentation of late subunit assembly specific modifications. This indicates that GraT inhibits ribosome subunit assembly. Interestingly, GraT effects can be alleviated by modification of the chaperone DnaK, a known facilitator of late stages in ribosome biogenesis. We show that GraT directly interacts with DnaK and suggest two possible models for the role of this interaction in GraT toxicity. PMID:26833678

  5. Dynamic evolution and biogenesis of small RNAs during sex reversal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Luo, Majing; Sheng, Yue; Hong, Qiang; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2015-01-01

    Understanding origin, evolution and functions of small RNA (sRNA) genes has been a great challenge in the past decade. Molecular mechanisms underlying sexual reversal in vertebrates, particularly sRNAs involved in this process, are largely unknown. By deep-sequencing of small RNA transcriptomes in combination with genomic analysis, we identified a large amount of piRNAs and miRNAs including over 1,000 novel miRNAs, which were differentially expressed during gonad reversal from ovary to testis via ovotesis. Biogenesis and expressions of miRNAs were dynamically changed during the reversal. Notably, phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic expansions of miRNAs in vertebrates and an evolutionary trajectory of conserved miR-17-92 cluster in the Eukarya. We showed that the miR-17-92 cluster in vertebrates was generated through multiple duplications from ancestor miR-92 in invertebrates Tetranychus urticae and Daphnia pulex from the Chelicerata around 580 Mya. Moreover, we identified the sexual regulator Dmrt1 as a direct target of the members miR-19a and -19b in the cluster. These data suggested dynamic biogenesis and expressions of small RNAs during sex reversal and revealed multiple expansions and evolutionary trajectory of miRNAs from invertebrates to vertebrates, which implicate small RNAs in sexual reversal and provide new insight into evolutionary and molecular mechanisms underlying sexual reversal. PMID:25944477

  6. Biogenesis and Function of T Cell-Derived Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Ventimiglia, Leandro N; Alonso, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are a particular type of extracellular vesicle, characterized by their endosomal origin as intraluminal vesicles present in large endosomes with a multivesicular structure. After these endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, exosomes are secreted into the extracellular space. The ability of exosomes to carry and selectively deliver bioactive molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) confers on them the capacity to modulate the activity of receptor cells, even if these cells are located in distant tissues or organs. Since exosomal cargo depends on cell type, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the biochemical composition of exosomes is fundamental to a comprehensive view of exosome function. Here, we review the latest advances concerning exosome function and biogenesis in T cells, with particular focus on the mechanism of protein sorting at multivesicular endosomes. Exosomes secreted by specific T-cell subsets can modulate the activity of immune cells, including other T-cell subsets. Ceramide, tetraspanins and MAL have been revealed to be important in exosome biogenesis by T cells. These molecules, therefore, constitute potential molecular targets for artificially modulating exosome production and, hence, the immune response for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27583248

  7. Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis: New levels of Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fontanesi, Flavia; Soto, Ileana C.; Barrientos, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is a multimeric enzyme of dual genetic origin, whose assembly is a complicated and highly regulated process. COX displays a concerted accumulation of its constitutive subunits. Data obtained from studies performed with yeast mutants indicate that most catalytic core unassembled subunits are post-translationally degraded. Recent data obtained in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have revealed another contribution to the stoichiometric accumulation of subunits during COX biogenesis targeting subunit 1 or Cox1p. Cox1p is a mitochondrially encoded catalytic subunit of COX which acts as a seed around which the full complex is assembled. A regulatory mechanism exists by which Cox1p synthesis is controlled by the availability of its assembly partners. The unique properties of this regulatory mechanism offer a means to catalyze multiple-subunit assembly. New levels of COX biogenesis regulation have been recently proposed. For example, COX assembly and stability of the fully assembled enzyme depend on the presence in the mitochondrial compartments of two partners of the oxidative phosphorylation system, the mobile electron carrier cytochrome c and the mitochondrial ATPase. The different mechanisms of regulation of COX assembly are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18465791

  8. Microalgal lipid droplets: composition, diversity, biogenesis and functions.

    PubMed

    Goold, Hugh; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2015-04-01

    Lipid droplet is the major site of neutral lipid storage in eukaryotic cells, and increasing evidence show its involvement in numerous cellular processes such as lipid homeostasis, signaling, trafficking and inter-organelle communications. Although the biogenesis, structure, and functions of lipid droplets have been well documented for seeds of vascular plants, mammalian adipose tissues, insects and yeasts, relative little is known about lipid droplets in microalgae. Over the past 5 years, the growing interest of microalgae as a platform for biofuel, green chemicals or value-added polyunsaturated fatty acid production has brought algal lipid droplets into spotlight. Studies conducted on the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and other model microalgae such as Haematococcus and Nannochloropsis species have led to the identification of proteins associated with lipid droplets, which include putative structural proteins different from plant oleosins and animal perilipins, as well as candidate proteins for lipid biosynthesis, mobilization, trafficking and homeostasis. Biochemical and microscopy studies have also started to shed light on the role of chloroplasts in the biogenesis of lipid droplets in Chlamydomonas. PMID:25433857

  9. Biogenesis, maintenance and dynamics of glycosomes in trypanosomatid parasites.

    PubMed

    Haanstra, Jurgen R; González-Marcano, Eglys B; Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Michels, Paul A M

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes of organisms belonging to the protist group Kinetoplastea, which include trypanosomatid parasites of the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, are unique in playing a crucial role in glycolysis and other parts of intermediary metabolism. They sequester the majority of the glycolytic enzymes and hence are called glycosomes. Their glycosomal enzyme content can vary strongly, particularly quantitatively, between different trypanosomatid species, and within each species during its life cycle. Turnover of glycosomes by autophagy of redundant ones and biogenesis of a new population of organelles play a pivotal role in the efficient adaptation of the glycosomal metabolic repertoire to the sudden, major nutritional changes encountered during the transitions in their life cycle. The overall mechanism of glycosome biogenesis is similar to that of peroxisomes in other organisms, but the homologous peroxins involved display low sequence conservation as well as variations in motifs mediating crucial protein-protein interactions in the process. The correct compartmentalisation of enzymes is essential for the regulation of the trypanosomatids' metabolism and consequently for their viability. For Trypanosoma brucei it was shown that glycosomes also play a crucial role in its life-cycle regulation: a crucial developmental control switch involves the translocation of a protein phosphatase from the cytosol into the organelles. Many glycosomal proteins are differentially phosphorylated in different life-cycle stages, possibly indicative of regulation of enzyme activities as an additional means to adapt the metabolic network to the different environmental conditions encountered. PMID:26384872

  10. Phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate is involved in toxoplasma apicoplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Lina; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Montcourrier, Philippe; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Merezegue, Fabrice; Richard, Véronique; Payrastre, Bernard; Meissner, Markus; Vial, Henri J; Roy, Christian; Wengelnik, Kai; Lebrun, Maryse

    2011-02-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause devastating diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. They harbour a plastid-like, non-photosynthetic organelle of algal origin, the apicoplast, which fulfils critical functions for parasite survival. Because of its essential and original metabolic pathways, the apicoplast has become a target for the development of new anti-apicomplexan drugs. Here we show that the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI3P) is involved in apicoplast biogenesis in Toxoplasma gondii. In yeast and mammalian cells, PI3P is concentrated on early endosomes and regulates trafficking of endosomal compartments. Imaging of PI3P in T. gondii showed that the lipid was associated with the apicoplast and apicoplast protein-shuttling vesicles. Interference with regular PI3P function by over-expression of a PI3P specific binding module in the parasite led to the accumulation of vesicles containing apicoplast peripheral membrane proteins around the apicoplast and, ultimately, to the loss of the organelle. Accordingly, inhibition of the PI3P-synthesising kinase interfered with apicoplast biogenesis. These findings point to an unexpected implication for this ubiquitous lipid and open new perspectives on how nuclear encoded proteins traffic to the apicoplast. This study also highlights the possibility of developing specific pharmacological inhibitors of the parasite PI3-kinase as novel anti-apicomplexan drugs. PMID:21379336

  11. Enhancing Astrocytic Lysosome Biogenesis Facilitates Aβ Clearance and Attenuates Amyloid Plaque Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingli; Yan, Ping; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Perez, Ronaldo; Zhu, Alec; Gonzales, Ernesto; Burchett, Jack M.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Cirrito, John R.

    2014-01-01

    In sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), impaired Aβ removal contributes to elevated extracellular Aβ levels that drive amyloid plaque pathogenesis. Extracellular proteolysis, export across the blood–brain barrier, and cellular uptake facilitate physiologic Aβ clearance. Astrocytes can take up and degrade Aβ, but it remains unclear whether this function is insufficient in AD or can be enhanced to accelerate Aβ removal. Additionally, age-related dysfunction of lysosomes, the major degradative organelles wherein Aβ localizes after uptake, has been implicated in amyloid plaque pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing lysosomal function in astrocytes with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosome biogenesis, would promote Aβ uptake and catabolism and attenuate plaque pathogenesis. Exogenous TFEB localized to the nucleus with transcriptional induction of lysosomal biogenesis and function in vitro. This resulted in significantly accelerated uptake of exogenously applied Aβ42, with increased localization to and degradation within lysosomes in C17.2 cells and primary astrocytes, indicating that TFEB is sufficient to coordinately enhance uptake, trafficking, and degradation of Aβ. Stereotactic injection of adeno-associated viral particles carrying TFEB driven by a glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter was used to achieve astrocyte-specific expression in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Exogenous TFEB localized to astrocyte nuclei and enhanced lysosome function, resulting in reduced Aβ levels and shortened half-life in the brain interstitial fluid and reduced amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus compared with control virus-injected mice. Therefore, activation of TFEB in astrocytes is an effective strategy to restore adequate Aβ removal and counter amyloid plaque pathogenesis in AD. PMID:25031402

  12. The unique regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in a Gram-positive bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joana A.; Alonso-García, Noelia; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters function as cofactors of a wide range of proteins, with diverse molecular roles in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Dedicated machineries assemble the clusters and deliver them to the final acceptor molecules in a tightly regulated process. In the prototypical Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, the two existing iron-sulfur cluster assembly systems, iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) and sulfur assimilation (SUF) pathways, are closely interconnected. The ISC pathway regulator, IscR, is a transcription factor of the helix-turn-helix type that can coordinate a [2Fe-2S] cluster. Redox conditions and iron or sulfur availability modulate the ligation status of the labile IscR cluster, which in turn determines a switch in DNA sequence specificity of the regulator: cluster-containing IscR can bind to a family of gene promoters (type-1) whereas the clusterless form recognizes only a second group of sequences (type-2). However, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria is not so well characterized, and most organisms of this group display only one of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly systems. A notable exception is the unique Gram-positive dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Thermincola potens, where genes from both systems could be identified, albeit with a diverging organization from that of Gram-negative bacteria. We demonstrated that one of these genes encodes a functional IscR homolog and is likely involved in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in T. potens. Structural and biochemical characterization of T. potens and E. coli IscR revealed a strikingly similar architecture and unveiled an unforeseen conservation of the unique mechanism of sequence discrimination characteristic of this distinctive group of transcription regulators. PMID:24847070

  13. The contractile vacuole complex of protists--new cues to function and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut

    2015-06-01

    The contractile vacuole complex (CVC) of freshwater protists sequesters the excess of water and ions (Ca(2+)) for exocytosis cycles at the pore. Sequestration is based on a chemiosmotic proton gradient produced by a V-type H(+)-ATPase. So far, many pieces of information available have not been combined to a comprehensive view on CVC biogenesis and function. One main function now appears as follows. Ca(2+)-release channels, type inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3R), may serve for fine-tuning of local cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and mediate numerous membrane-to-membrane interactions within the tubular spongiome meshwork. Such activity is suggested by the occurrence of organelle-specific soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) and Ras-related in brain (Rab) proteins, which may regulate functional requirements. For tubulation, F-Bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (F-BAR) proteins are available. In addition, there is indirect evidence for the occurrence of H(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers (to sequester Ca(2+)) and mechanosensitive Ca(2+)-channels (for signaling the filling sate). The periodic activity of the CVC may be regulated by the mechanosensitive Ca(2+)-channels. Such channels are known to colocalize with and to be functionally supported by stomatins, which were recently detected in the CVC. A Kif18-related kinesin motor protein might control the length of radial arms. Two additional InsP3-related channels and several SNAREs are associated with the pore. De novo organelle biogenesis occurs under epigenetic control during mitotic activity and may involve the assembly of γ-tubulin, centrin, calmodulin and a never in mitosis A-type (NIMA) kinase - components also engaged in mitotic processes. PMID:23919298

  14. Rice RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 acts in small RNA biogenesis and spikelet development.

    PubMed

    Song, Xianwei; Wang, Dekai; Ma, Lijia; Chen, Zhiyu; Li, Pingchuan; Cui, Xia; Liu, Chunyan; Cao, Shouyun; Chu, Chengcai; Tao, Yuezhi; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2012-08-01

    Higher plants have evolved multiple RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs), which work with Dicer-like (DCL) proteins to produce different classes of small RNAs with specialized molecular functions. Here we report that OsRDR6, the rice (Oryza sativa L.) homolog of Arabidopsis RDR6, acts in the biogenesis of various types and sizes of small RNAs. We isolated a rice osrdr6-1 mutant, which was temperature sensitive and showed spikelet defects. This mutant displays reduced accumulation of tasiR-ARFs, the conserved trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) derived from the TAS3 locus, and ectopic expression of tasiR-ARF target genes, the Auxin Response Factors (including ARF2 and ARF3/ETTIN). The loss of tasiR-mediated repression of ARFs in osrdr6-1 can explain its morphological defects, as expression of two non-targeted ARF3 gene constructs (ARF3muts) in a wild-type background mimics the osrdr6 and osdcl4-1 mutant phenotypes. Small RNA high-throughput sequencing also reveals that besides tasiRNAs, 21-nucleotide (nt) phased small RNAs are also largely dependent on OsRDR6. Unexpectedly, we found that osrdr6-1 has a strong impact on the accumulation of 24-nt phased small RNAs, but not on unphased ones. Our work uncovers the key roles of OsRDR6 in small RNA biogenesis and directly illustrates the crucial functions of tasiR-ARFs in rice development. PMID:22443269

  15. Estrogen-related receptor alpha and PGC-1-related coactivator constitute a novel complex mediating the biogenesis of functional mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Mirebeau-Prunier, Delphine; Le Pennec, Soazig; Jacques, Caroline; Gueguen, Naig; Poirier, Julie; Malthiery, Yves; Savagner, Frédérique

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis, which depends on nuclear as well as mitochondrial genes, occurs in response to increased cellular ATP demand. The nuclear transcriptional factors, estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) and nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2, are associated with the coordination of the transcriptional machinery governing mitochondrial biogenesis, whereas coactivators of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) family serve as mediators between the environment and this machinery. In the context of proliferating cells, PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC) is a member of the PGC-1 family, which is known to act in partnership with nuclear respiratory factors, but no functional interference between PRC and ERRalpha has been described so far. We explored three thyroid cell lines, FTC-133, XTC.UC1 and RO 82 W-1, each characterized by a different mitochondrial content, and studied their behavior towards PRC and ERRalpha in terms of respiratory efficiency. Overexpression of PRC and ERRalpha led to increased respiratory chain capacity and mitochondrial mass. The inhibition of ERRalpha decreased cell growth and respiratory chain capacity in all three cell lines. However, the inhibition of PRC and ERRalpha produced a greater effect in the oxidative cell model, decreasing the mitochondrial mass and the phosphorylating respiration, whereas the nonphosphorylating respiration remained unchanged. We therefore hypothesize that the ERRalpha-PRC complex plays a role in arresting the cell cycle through the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation in oxidative cells, and through some other pathway in glycolytic cells. PMID:20067526

  16. Inhibition of akt phosphorylation diminishes mitochondrial biogenesis regulators, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity and exacerbates recognition memory deficit in rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaerzadeh, Fatemeh; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Khodagholi, Fariba

    2014-11-01

    3-Methyladenine (3-MA), as a PI3K inhibitor, is widely used for inhibition of autophagy. Inhibition of PI3K class I leads to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation, a central molecule involved in diverse arrays of intracellular cascades in nervous system. Accordingly, in the present study, we aimed to determine the alterations of specific mitochondrial biogenesis markers and mitochondrial function in 3-MA-injected rats following amyloid beta (Aβ) insult. Our data revealed that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation downregulates master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α). Our data also showed that decrease in PGC-1α level presumably is due to decrease in the phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding and AMP-activated kinase, two upstream activators of PGC-1α. As a consequence, the level of some mitochondrial biogenesis factors including nuclear respiratory factor-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and Cytochrome c decreased significantly. Also, activities of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) enzymes such as Aconitase, a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase reduced in the presence of 3-MA with or without Aβ insult. Decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis factors and TCA enzyme activity in the rats receiving 3-MA and Aβ were more compared to the rats that received either alone; indicating the additive destructive effects of these two agents. In agreement with our molecular results, data obtained from behavioral test (using novel objective recognition test) indicated that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation with or without Aβ injection impaired novel recognition (non-spatial) memory. Our results suggest that 3-MA amplified deleterious effects of Aβ by targeting central molecule Akt. PMID:25135709

  17. The intriguing realm of protein biogenesis: Facing the green co-translational protein maturation networks.

    PubMed

    Breiman, Adina; Fieulaine, Sonia; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2016-05-01

    The ribosome is the cell's protein-making factory, a huge protein-RNA complex, that is essential to life. Determining the high-resolution structures of the stable "core" of this factory was among the major breakthroughs of the past decades, and was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2009. Now that the mysteries of the ribosome appear to be more traceable, detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate protein synthesis includes not only the well-known steps of initiation, elongation, and termination but also the less comprehended features of the co-translational events associated with the maturation of the nascent chains. The ribosome is a platform for co-translational events affecting the nascent polypeptide, including protein modifications, folding, targeting to various cellular compartments for integration into membrane or translocation, and proteolysis. These events are orchestrated by ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors (RPBs), a group of a dozen or more factors that act as the "welcoming committee" for the nascent chain as it emerges from the ribosome. In plants these factors have evolved to fit the specificity of different cellular compartments: cytoplasm, mitochondria and chloroplast. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge of these factors and their interaction around the exit tunnel of dedicated ribosomes. Particular attention has been accorded to the plant system, highlighting the similarities and differences with other organisms. PMID:26555180

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases promote mitochondrial biogenesis in part through inducing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1β expression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minghui; Wang, Junjian; Lu, Na; Fang, Fang; Liu, Jinsong; Wong, Chi-Wai

    2011-06-01

    Growth factor activates mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases to promote cell growth. Mitochondrial biogenesis is an integral part of cell growth. How growth factor regulates mitochondrial biogenesis is not fully understood. In this study, we found that mitochondrial mass was specifically reduced upon serum starvation and induced upon re-feeding with serum. Using mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases inhibitor U0126, we found that the mRNA expression levels of ATP synthase, cytochrome-C, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and mitofusin 2 were reduced. Since the transcriptional levels of these genes are under the control of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α and -1β (PGC-1α and PGC-1β), we examined and found that only the mRNA and protein levels of PGC-1β were suppressed. Importantly, over-expression of PGC-1β partially reversed the reduction of mitochondrial mass upon U0126 treatment. Thus, we conclude that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases direct mitochondrial biogenesis through selectively inducing PGC-1β expression. PMID:21458501

  19. Deciphering the roles of phosphoinositide lipids in phagolysosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Andreas; Haas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Professional phagocytes engulf microbial invaders into plasma membrane-derived phagosomes. These mature into microbicidal phagolysosomes, leading to killing of the ingested microbe. Phagosome maturation involves sequential fusion of the phagosome with early endosomes, late endosomes, and the main degradative compartments in cells, lysosomes. Some bacterial pathogens manipulate the phosphoinositide (PIP) composition of phagosome membranes and are not delivered to phagolysosomes, pointing at a role of PIPs in phagosome maturation. This hypothesis is supported by comprehensive microscopic studies. Recently, cell-free reconstitution of fusion between phagosomes and endo(lyso)somes identified phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] as key regulators of phagolysosome biogenesis. Here, we describe the emerging roles of PIPs in phagosome maturation and we present tools to study PIP involvement in phagosome trafficking using intact cells or purified compartments. PMID:27489580

  20. Cell wall structure and biogenesis in Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Akira; Miyazawa, Ken; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species are among the most important filamentous fungi from the viewpoints of industry, pathogenesis, and mycotoxin production. Fungal cells are exposed to a variety of environmental stimuli, including changes in osmolality, temperature, and pH, which create stresses that primarily act on fungal cell walls. In addition, fungal cell walls are the first interactions with host cells in either human or plants. Thus, understanding cell wall structure and the mechanism of their biogenesis is important for the industrial, medical, and agricultural fields. Here, we provide a systematic review of fungal cell wall structure and recent findings regarding the cell wall integrity signaling pathways in aspergilli. This accumulated knowledge will be useful for understanding and improving the use of industrial aspergilli fermentation processes as well as treatments for some fungal infections. PMID:27140698

  1. The emerging roles of ribosome biogenesis in craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Ross, Adam P; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a transient, migratory cell population, which originates during neurulation at the neural folds and contributes to the majority of tissues, including the mesenchymal structures of the craniofacial skeleton. The deregulation of the complex developmental processes that guide migration, proliferation, and differentiation of NCCs may result in a wide range of pathological conditions grouped together as neurocristopathies. Recently, due to their multipotent properties neural crest stem cells have received considerable attention as a possible source for stem cell based regenerative therapies. This exciting prospect underlines the need to further explore the developmental programs that guide NCC differentiation. This review explores the particular importance of ribosome biogenesis defects in this context since a specific interface between ribosomopathies and neurocristopathies exists as evidenced by disorders such as Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome (TCS) and Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA). PMID:24550838

  2. DExD/H-box RNA helicases in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Roman; Straub, Annika U.; Doebele, Carmen; Bohnsack, Markus T.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis requires a multitude of cofactors, among them DExD/H-box RNA helicases. Bacterial RNA helicases involved in ribosome assembly are not essential, while eukaryotes strictly require multiple DExD/H-box proteins that are involved in the much more complex ribosome biogenesis pathway. Here, RNA helicases are thought to act in structural remodeling of the RNPs including the modulation of protein binding, and they are required for allowing access or the release of specific snoRNPs from pre-ribosomes. Interestingly, helicase action is modulated by specific cofactors that can regulate recruitment and enzymatic activity. This review summarizes the current knowledge and focuses on recent findings and open questions on RNA helicase function and regulation in ribosome synthesis. PMID:22922795

  3. β2-adrenoceptor agonists in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Yuri K.; Cameron, Robert B.; Wills, Lauren P.; Trager, Richard E.; Lindsey, Chris C.; Beeson, Craig C.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2014-01-01

    The stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) via cell surface G-protein coupled receptors is a promising strategy for cell repair and regeneration. Here we report the specificity and chemical rationale of a panel of β2-adrenoceptor agonists with regards to MB. Using primary cultures of renal cells, a diverse panel of β2-adrenoceptor agonists elicited three distinct phenotypes: full MB, partial MB, and non-MB. Full MB compounds had efficacy in the low nanomolar range and represent two chemical scaffolds containing three distinct chemical clusters. Interestingly, the MB phenotype did not correlate with reported receptor affinity or chemical similarity. Chemical clusters were then subjected to pharmacophore modeling creating two models with unique and distinct features, consisting of five conserved amongst full MB compounds were identified. The two discrete pharmacophore models were coalesced into a consensus pharmacophore with four unique features elucidating the spatial and chemical characteristics required to stimulate MB. PMID:23954364

  4. TIP47 functions in the biogenesis of lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Bulankina, Anna V.; Deggerich, Anke; Wenzel, Dirk; Mutenda, Kudzai; Wittmann, Julia G.; Rudolph, Markus G.; Burger, Koert N.J.

    2009-01-01

    TIP47 (tail-interacting protein of 47 kD) was characterized as a cargo selection device for mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs), directing their transport from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network. In contrast, our current analysis shows that cytosolic TIP47 is not recruited to organelles of the biosynthetic and endocytic pathways. Knockdown of TIP47 expression had no effect on MPR distribution or trafficking and did not affect lysosomal enzyme sorting. Therefore, our data argue against a function of TIP47 as a sorting device. Instead, TIP47 is recruited to lipid droplets (LDs) by an amino-terminal sequence comprising 11-mer repeats. We show that TIP47 has apolipoprotein-like properties and reorganizes liposomes into small lipid discs. Suppression of TIP47 blocked LD maturation and decreased the incorporation of triacylglycerol into LDs. We conclude that TIP47 functions in the biogenesis of LDs. PMID:19451273

  5. Getting ready for building: signaling and autophagosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abada, Adi; Elazar, Zvulun

    2014-08-01

    Autophagy is the main cellular catabolic process responsible for degrading organelles and large protein aggregates. It is initiated by the formation of a unique membrane structure, the phagophore, which engulfs part of the cytoplasm and forms a double-membrane vesicle termed the autophagosome. Fusion of the outer autophagosomal membrane with the lysosome and degradation of the inner membrane contents complete the process. The extent of autophagy must be tightly regulated to avoid destruction of proteins and organelles essential for cell survival. Autophagic activity is thus regulated by external and internal cues, which initiate the formation of well-defined autophagy-related protein complexes that mediate autophagosome formation and selective cargo recruitment into these organelles. Autophagosome formation and the signaling pathways that regulate it have recently attracted substantial attention. In this review, we analyze the different signaling pathways that regulate autophagy and discuss recent progress in our understanding of autophagosome biogenesis. PMID:25027988

  6. Ribosome biogenesis: emerging evidence for a central role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass†

    PubMed Central

    Chaillou, Thomas; Kirby, Tyler J.; McCarthy, John J.

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is a supramolecular ribonucleoprotein complex that functions at the heart of the translation machinery to convert mRNA into protein. Ribosome biogenesis is the primary determinant of translational capacity of the cell and accordingly has an essential role in the control of cell growth in eukaryotes. Cumulative evidence supports the hypothesis that ribosome biogenesis has an important role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. The purpose of this review is to, first, summarize the main mechanisms known to regulate ribosome biogenesis and, second, put forth the hypothesis that ribosome biogenesis is a central mechanism used by skeletal muscle to regulate protein synthesis and control skeletal muscle mass in response to anabolic and catabolic stimuli. The mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin/c-myc signaling pathways are discussed as the major pathways that work in concert with each of the three RNA polymerases (RNA Pol I, II and III) in regulating ribosome biogenesis. Consistent with our hypothesis, activation of these two pathways has been shown to be associated with ribosome biogenesis during skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Although further study is required, the finding that ribosome biogenesis is altered under catabolic states, in particular during disuse atrophy, suggests that its activation represents a novel therapeutic target to reduce or prevent muscle atrophy. Lastly, the emerging field of ribosome specialization is discussed and its potential role in the regulation of gene expression during periods of skeletal muscle plasticity. PMID:24604615

  7. Re-evaluation of the roles of DROSHA, Exportin 5, and DICER in microRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Boseon; Kim, V. Narry

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of canonical microRNAs (miRNAs) involves multiple steps: nuclear processing of primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) by DROSHA, nuclear export of precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA) by Exportin 5 (XPO5), and cytoplasmic processing of pre-miRNA by DICER. To gain a deeper understanding of the contribution of each of these maturation steps, we deleted DROSHA, XPO5, and DICER in the same human cell line, and analyzed their effects on miRNA biogenesis. Canonical miRNA production was completely abolished in DROSHA-deleted cells, whereas we detected a few DROSHA-independent miRNAs including three previously unidentified noncanonical miRNAs (miR-7706, miR-3615, and miR-1254). In contrast to DROSHA knockout, many canonical miRNAs were still detected without DICER albeit at markedly reduced levels. In the absence of DICER, pre-miRNAs are loaded directly onto AGO and trimmed at the 3′ end, yielding miRNAs from the 5′ strand (5p miRNAs). Interestingly, in XPO5 knockout cells, most miRNAs are affected only modestly, suggesting that XPO5 is necessary but not critical for miRNA maturation. Our study demonstrates an essential role of DROSHA and an important contribution of DICER in the canonical miRNA pathway, and reveals that the function of XPO5 can be complemented by alternative mechanisms. Thus, this study allows us to understand differential contributions of key biogenesis factors, and provides with valuable resources for miRNA research. PMID:26976605

  8. Resistance exercise enhances the molecular signaling of mitochondrial biogenesis induced by endurance exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Mascher, Henrik; Psilander, Niklas; Blomstrand, Eva; Sahlin, Kent

    2011-11-01

    Combining endurance and strength training (concurrent training) may change the adaptation compared with single mode training. However, the site of interaction and the mechanisms are unclear. We have investigated the hypothesis that molecular signaling of mitochondrial biogenesis after endurance exercise is impaired by resistance exercise. Ten healthy subjects performed either only endurance exercise (E; 1-h cycling at ∼65% of maximal oxygen uptake), or endurance exercise followed by resistance exercise (ER; 1-h cycling + 6 sets of leg press at 70-80% of 1 repetition maximum) in a randomized cross-over design. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after exercise (1 and 3 h postcycling). The mRNA of genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis [(peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1)α, PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC)] related coactivator) and substrate regulation (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4) increased after both E and ER, but the mRNA levels were about twofold higher after ER (P < 0.01). Phosphorylation of proteins involved in the signaling cascade of protein synthesis [mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal S6 kinase 1, and eukaryotic elongation factor 2] was altered after ER but not after E. Moreover, ER induced a larger increase in mRNA of genes associated with positive mTOR signaling (cMyc and Rheb). Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and Akt increased similarly at 1 h postcycling (P < 0.01) after both types of exercise. Contrary to our hypothesis, the results demonstrate that ER, performed after E, amplifies the adaptive signaling response of mitochondrial biogenesis compared with single-mode endurance exercise. The mechanism may relate to a cross talk between signaling pathways mediated by mTOR. The results suggest that concurrent training may be beneficial for the adaptation of muscle oxidative capacity. PMID:21836044

  9. Vipp1 Is Essential for the Biogenesis of Photosystem I but Not Thylakoid Membranes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Shen, Gaozhong; Li, Zhongkui; Golbeck, John H.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    The biogenesis of thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria is presently not well understood, but the vipp1 gene product has been suggested to play an important role in this process. Previous studies in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 reported that vipp1 (sll0617) was essential. By constructing a fully segregated null mutant in vipp1 (SynPCC7002_A0294) in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, we show that Vipp1 is not essential. Spectroscopic studies revealed that Photosystem I (PS I) was below detection limits in the vipp1 mutant, but Photosystem II (PS II) was still assembled and was active. Thylakoid membranes were still observed in vipp1 mutant cells and resembled those in a psaAB mutant that completely lacks PS I. When the vipp1 mutation was complemented with the orthologous vipp1 gene from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that was expressed from the strong PcpcBA promoter, PS I content and activities were restored to normal levels, and cells again produced thylakoids that were indistinguishable from those of wild type. Transcription profiling showed that psaAB transcripts were lower in abundance in the vipp1 mutant. However, when the yfp gene was expressed from the PpsaAB promoter in the presence and the absence of Vipp1, no difference in YFP expression was observed, which shows that Vipp1 is not a transcription factor for the psaAB genes. This study shows that thylakoids are still produced in the absence of Vipp1 and that normal thylakoid biogenesis in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 requires expression and biogenesis of PS I, which in turn requires Vipp1. PMID:24764304

  10. Hsp70 and Hsp90 multichaperone complexes sequentially regulate thiazide-sensitive cotransporter endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Bridget F; Needham, Patrick G; Snyder, Avin C; Roy, Ankita; Khadem, Shaheen; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Subramanya, Arohan R

    2013-05-01

    The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) is the primary mediator of salt reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule and is a key determinant of the blood pressure set point. Given its complex topology, NCC is inefficiently processed and prone to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD), although the mechanisms governing this process remain obscure. Here, we identify factors that impact the ER quality control of NCC. Analyses of NCC immunoprecipitates revealed that the cotransporter formed complexes with the core chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp40. Disruption of Hsp90 function accelerated NCC degradation, suggesting that Hsp90 promotes NCC folding. In addition, two cochaperones, the C terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) and the Hsp70/Hsp90 organizer protein, were associated with NCC. Although CHIP, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, promoted NCC ubiquitination and ERAD, the Hsp70/Hsp90 organizer protein stabilized NCC turnover, indicating that these two proteins differentially remodel the core chaperone systems to favor cotransporter degradation and biogenesis, respectively. Adjusting the folding environment in mammalian cells via reduced temperature enhanced NCC biosynthetic trafficking, increased Hsp90-NCC interaction, and diminished binding to Hsp70. In contrast, cotransporters harboring disease-causing mutations that impair NCC biogenesis failed to escape ERAD as efficiently as the wild type protein when cells were incubated at a lower temperature. Instead, these mutants interacted more strongly with Hsp70, Hsp40, and CHIP, consistent with a role for the Hsp70/Hsp40 system in selecting misfolded NCC for ERAD. Collectively, these observations indicate that Hsp70 and Hsp90 comprise two functionally distinct ER quality control checkpoints that sequentially monitor NCC biogenesis. PMID:23482560

  11. Myristoylated CIL-7 regulates ciliary extracellular vesicle biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Julie E; Silva, Malan; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Hellen, Elizabeth; Kern, Andrew D; Hall, David H; Barr, Maureen M

    2015-08-01

    The cilium both releases and binds to extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs may be used by cells as a form of intercellular communication and mediate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. The mammalian polycystins (PCs) localize to cilia, as well as to urinary EVs released from renal epithelial cells. PC ciliary trafficking defects may be an underlying cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and ciliary-EV interactions have been proposed to play a central role in the biology of PKD. In Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals, PC1 and PC2 act in the same genetic pathway, act in a sensory capacity, localize to cilia, and are contained in secreted EVs, suggesting ancient conservation. However, the relationship between cilia and EVs and the mechanisms generating PC-containing EVs remain an enigma. In a forward genetic screen for regulators of C. elegans PKD-2 ciliary localization, we identified CIL-7, a myristoylated protein that regulates EV biogenesis. Loss of CIL-7 results in male mating behavioral defects, excessive accumulation of EVs in the lumen of the cephalic sensory organ, and failure to release PKD-2::GFP-containing EVs to the environment. Fatty acylation, such as myristoylation and palmitoylation, targets proteins to cilia and flagella. The CIL-7 myristoylation motif is essential for CIL-7 function and for targeting CIL-7 to EVs. C. elegans is a powerful model with which to study ciliary EV biogenesis in vivo and identify cis-targeting motifs such as myristoylation that are necessary for EV-cargo association and function. PMID:26041936

  12. Rutin Increases Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis with AMPK Activation in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sangjin; Lee, Mak-Soon; Chang, Eugene; Shin, Yoonjin; Oh, Soojung; Kim, In-Hwan; Kim, Yangha

    2015-01-01

    Decreased mitochondrial number and dysfunction in skeletal muscle are associated with obesity and the progression of obesity-associated metabolic disorders. The specific aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of rutin on mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle of high-fat diet-induced obese rats. Supplementation with rutin reduced body weight and adipose tissue mass, despite equivalent energy intake (p < 0.05). Rutin significantly increased mitochondrial size and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content as well as gene expression related to mitochondrial biogenesis, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), transcription factor A (Tfam), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent deacetylase, sirtulin1 (SIRT1) in skeletal muscle (p < 0.05). Moreover, rutin consumption increased muscle adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity by 40% (p < 0.05). Taken together, these results suggested at least partial involvement of muscle mitochondria and AMPK activation in the rutin-mediated beneficial effect on obesity. PMID:26402699

  13. Ribosomal Biogenesis and Translational Flux Inhibition by the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) XPO1 Antagonist KPT-185.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Yoko; Kojima, Kensuke; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Davis, Richard Eric; Wang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Wencai; Ishizawa, Jo; Kazuno, Saiko; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Ueno, Takashi; Miida, Takashi; Andreeff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma characterized by the aberrant expression of several growth-regulating, oncogenic effectors. Exportin 1 (XPO1) mediates the nucleocytoplasmic transport of numerous molecules including oncogenic growth-regulating factors, RNAs, and ribosomal subunits. In MCL cells, the small molecule KPT-185 blocks XPO1 function and exerts anti-proliferative effects. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of this putative anti-tumor effect on MCL cells using cell growth/viability assays, immunoblotting, gene expression analysis, and absolute quantification proteomics. KPT-185 exhibited a p53-independent anti-lymphoma effect on MCL cells, by suppression of oncogenic mediators (e.g., XPO1, cyclin D1, c-Myc, PIM1, and Bcl-2 family members), repression of ribosomal biogenesis, and downregulation of translation/chaperone proteins (e.g., PIM2, EEF1A1, EEF2, and HSP70) that are part of the translational/transcriptional network regulated by heat shock factor 1. These results elucidate a novel mechanism in which ribosomal biogenesis appears to be a key component through which XPO1 contributes to tumor cell survival. Thus, we propose that the blockade of XPO1 could be a promising, novel strategy for the treatment of MCL and other malignancies overexpressing XPO1. PMID:26340096

  14. Ribosomal Biogenesis and Translational Flux Inhibition by the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) XPO1 Antagonist KPT-185

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shinichi; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Davis, Richard Eric; Wang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Wencai; Ishizawa, Jo; Kazuno, Saiko; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Ueno, Takashi; Miida, Takashi; Andreeff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma characterized by the aberrant expression of several growth-regulating, oncogenic effectors. Exportin 1 (XPO1) mediates the nucleocytoplasmic transport of numerous molecules including oncogenic growth-regulating factors, RNAs, and ribosomal subunits. In MCL cells, the small molecule KPT-185 blocks XPO1 function and exerts anti-proliferative effects. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of this putative anti-tumor effect on MCL cells using cell growth/viability assays, immunoblotting, gene expression analysis, and absolute quantification proteomics. KPT-185 exhibited a p53-independent anti-lymphoma effect on MCL cells, by suppression of oncogenic mediators (e.g., XPO1, cyclin D1, c-Myc, PIM1, and Bcl-2 family members), repression of ribosomal biogenesis, and downregulation of translation/chaperone proteins (e.g., PIM2, EEF1A1, EEF2, and HSP70) that are part of the translational/transcriptional network regulated by heat shock factor 1. These results elucidate a novel mechanism in which ribosomal biogenesis appears to be a key component through which XPO1 contributes to tumor cell survival. Thus, we propose that the blockade of XPO1 could be a promising, novel strategy for the treatment of MCL and other malignancies overexpressing XPO1. PMID:26340096

  15. The NF45/NF90 Heterodimer Contributes to the Biogenesis of 60S Ribosomal Subunits and Influences Nucleolar Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wandrey, Franziska; Montellese, Christian; Koos, Krisztian; Badertscher, Lukas; Bammert, Lukas; Cook, Atlanta G.; Zemp, Ivo; Horvath, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The interleukin enhancer binding factors ILF2 (NF45) and ILF3 (NF90/NF110) have been implicated in various cellular pathways, such as transcription, microRNA (miRNA) processing, DNA repair, and translation, in mammalian cells. Using tandem affinity purification, we identified human NF45 and NF90 as components of precursors to 60S (pre-60S) ribosomal subunits. NF45 and NF90 are enriched in nucleoli and cosediment with pre-60S ribosomal particles in density gradient analysis. We show that association of the NF45/NF90 heterodimer with pre-60S ribosomal particles requires the double-stranded RNA binding domains of NF90, while depletion of NF45 and NF90 by RNA interference leads to a defect in 60S biogenesis. Nucleoli of cells depleted of NF45 and NF90 have altered morphology and display a characteristic spherical shape. These effects are not due to impaired rRNA transcription or processing of the precursors to 28S rRNA. Consistent with a role of the NF45/NF90 heterodimer in nucleolar steps of 60S subunit biogenesis, downregulation of NF45 and NF90 leads to a p53 response, accompanied by induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21/CIP1, which can be counteracted by depletion of RPL11. Together, these data indicate that NF45 and NF90 are novel higher-eukaryote-specific factors required for the maturation of 60S ribosomal subunits. PMID:26240280

  16. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Yeast Mitochondrial Biogenesis: Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional mRNA Oscillatory Modules

    PubMed Central

    Lelandais, Gaëlle; Saint-Georges, Yann; Geneix, Colette; Al-Shikhley, Liza; Dujardin, Geneviève; Jacq, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Examples of metabolic rhythms have recently emerged from studies of budding yeast. High density microarray analyses have produced a remarkably detailed picture of cycling gene expression that could be clustered according to metabolic functions. We developed a model-based approach for the decomposition of expression to analyze these data and to identify functional modules which, expressed sequentially and periodically, contribute to the complex and intricate mitochondrial architecture. This approach revealed that mitochondrial spatio-temporal modules are expressed during periodic spikes and specific cellular localizations, which cover the entire oscillatory period. For instance, assembly factors (32 genes) and translation regulators (47 genes) are expressed earlier than the components of the amino-acid synthesis pathways (31 genes). In addition, we could correlate the expression modules identified with particular post-transcriptional properties. Thus, mRNAs of modules expressed “early” are mostly translated in the vicinity of mitochondria under the control of the Puf3p mRNA-binding protein. This last spatio-temporal module concerns mostly mRNAs coding for basic elements of mitochondrial construction: assembly and regulatory factors. Prediction that unknown genes from this module code for important elements of mitochondrial biogenesis is supported by experimental evidence. More generally, these observations underscore the importance of post-transcriptional processes in mitochondrial biogenesis, highlighting close connections between nuclear transcription and cytoplasmic site-specific translation. PMID:19521515

  17. MRM2 and MRM3 are involved in biogenesis of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Rorbach, Joanna; Boesch, Pierre; Gammage, Payam A.; Nicholls, Thomas J. J.; Pearce, Sarah F.; Patel, Dipali; Hauser, Andreas; Perocchi, Fabiana; Minczuk, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Defects of the translation apparatus in human mitochondria are known to cause disease, yet details of how protein synthesis is regulated in this organelle remain to be unveiled. Ribosome production in all organisms studied thus far entails a complex, multistep pathway involving a number of auxiliary factors. This includes several RNA processing and modification steps required for correct rRNA maturation. Little is known about the maturation of human mitochondrial 16S rRNA and its role in biogenesis of the mitoribosome. Here we investigate two methyltransferases, MRM2 (also known as RRMJ2, encoded by FTSJ2) and MRM3 (also known as RMTL1, encoded by RNMTL1), that are responsible for modification of nucleotides of the 16S rRNA A-loop, an essential component of the peptidyl transferase center. Our studies show that inactivation of MRM2 or MRM3 in human cells by RNA interference results in respiratory incompetence as a consequence of diminished mitochondrial translation. Ineffective translation in MRM2- and MRM3-depleted cells results from aberrant assembly of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome (mt-LSU). Our findings show that MRM2 and MRM3 are human mitochondrial methyltransferases involved in the modification of 16S rRNA and are important factors for the biogenesis and function of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome. PMID:25009282

  18. Prevalence, Biogenesis, and Functionality of the Serine Protease Autotransporter EspP

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, André; Brockmeyer, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) causes severe diseases in humans worldwide. One of its virulence factors is EspP, which belongs to the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family. In this review we recapitulate the current data on prevalence, biogenesis, structural properties and functionality. EspP has been used to investigate mechanistic details of autotransport, and recent studies indicate that this transport mechanism is not autonomous but rather dependent on additional factors. Currently, five subtypes have been identified (EspPα-EspPε), with EspPα being associated with highly virulent EHEC serotypes and isolates from patients with severe disease. EspPα has been shown to degrade major proteins of the complement cascade, namely C3 and C5 and probably interferes with hemostasis by cleavage of coagulation factor V. Furthermore, EspPα is believed to contribute to biofilm formation perhaps by polymerization to rope-like structures. Together with the proteolytic activity, EspPα might ameliorate host colonization and interfere with host response. PMID:23274272

  19. A Time to Reap, a Time to Sow: Mitophagy and Biogenesis in Cardiac Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Allen M.; Stotland, Aleksandr; Queliconi, Bruno B.; Gottlieb, Roberta A.

    2014-01-01

    Balancing mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for maintaining a healthy population of mitochondria and cellular homeostasis. Coordinated interplay between these two forces that govern mitochondrial turnover plays an important role as an adaptive response against various cellular stresses that can compromise cell survival. Failure to maintain the critical balance between mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis or homeostatic turnover of mitochondria results in a population of dysfunctional mitochondria that contribute to various disease processes. In this review we outline the mechanics and relationships between mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and discuss the implications of a disrupted balance between these two forces, with an emphasis on cardiac physiology. PMID:25444712

  20. SUMO-specific Protease 1 Regulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis through PGC-1α*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Rong; Yu, Tingting; Huang, Chao; Xia, Xuefeng; Liu, Xiaobing; Gu, Jianmin; Xue, Song; Yeh, Edward T.H.; Cheng, Jinke

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in response to changes in the cellular environment, physiological or pathological status of mammals. PGC-1α is known to be modified by SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier). However, it is not known whether SUMOylation could affect the function of PGC-1α in mitochondrial biogenesis and that how PGC-1α SUMOylation is regulated. In this study, we have identified the role of Sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1) as a specific SUMO protease to regulate SUMOylation status of PGC-1α. More importantly, we have also found that SENP1 promotes PGC-1α transcription activity, which is essential for the expression of mitochondrial genes and subsequently mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, we reveal that the SUMOylation of PGC-1α controlled by SENP1 plays an important role in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. PMID:23152500

  1. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4’-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17828.001 PMID:27540631

  2. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. PMID:27540631

  3. Activator of G-Protein Signaling 3-Induced Lysosomal Biogenesis Limits Macrophage Intracellular Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Vural, Ali; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Shi, Chong-Shan; Srinivasan, Lalitha; McQuiston, Travis J; Hwang, Il-Young; Yeh, Anthony J; Blumer, Joe B; Briken, Volker; Williamson, Peter R; Otto, Michael; Fraser, Iain D C; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-15

    Many intracellular pathogens cause disease by subverting macrophage innate immune defense mechanisms. Intracellular pathogens actively avoid delivery to or directly target lysosomes, the major intracellular degradative organelle. In this article, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an LPS-inducible protein in macrophages, affects both lysosomal biogenesis and activity. AGS3 binds the Gi family of G proteins via its G-protein regulatory (GoLoco) motif, stabilizing the Gα subunit in its GDP-bound conformation. Elevated AGS3 levels in macrophages limited the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a sensor of cellular nutritional status. This triggered the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB, a known activator of lysosomal gene transcription. In contrast, AGS3-deficient macrophages had increased mammalian target of rapamycin activity, reduced transcription factor EB activity, and a lower lysosomal mass. High levels of AGS3 in macrophages enhanced their resistance to infection by Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, whereas AGS3-deficient macrophages were more susceptible. We conclude that LPS priming increases AGS3 levels, which enhances lysosomal function and increases the capacity of macrophages to eliminate intracellular pathogens. PMID:26667172

  4. S1 domain-containing STF modulates plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung; Park, Youn-Il; Lee, Soon Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2012-01-01

    • In this study, we examined the biochemical and physiological functions of Nicotiana benthamiana S1 domain-containing Transcription-Stimulating Factor (STF) using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), cosuppression, and overexpression strategies. • STF : green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein colocalized with sulfite reductase (SiR), a chloroplast nucleoid-associated protein also present in the stroma. Full-length STF and its S1 domain preferentially bound to RNA, probably in a sequence-nonspecific manner. • STF silencing by VIGS or cosuppression resulted in severe leaf yellowing caused by disrupted chloroplast development. STF deficiency significantly perturbed plastid-encoded multimeric RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent transcript accumulation. Chloroplast transcription run-on assays revealed that the transcription rate of PEP-dependent plastid genes was reduced in the STF-silenced leaves. Conversely, the exogenously added recombinant STF protein increased the transcription rate, suggesting a direct role of STF in plastid transcription. Etiolated seedlings of STF cosuppression lines showed defects in the light-triggered transition from etioplasts to chloroplasts, accompanied by reduced light-induced expression of plastid-encoded genes. • These results suggest that STF plays a critical role as an auxiliary factor of the PEP transcription complex in the regulation of plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in higher plants. PMID:22050604

  5. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α induces lysosomal biogenesis in brain cells: implications for lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arunava; Jana, Malabendu; Modi, Khushbu; Gonzalez, Frank J; Sims, Katherine B; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-04-17

    Lysosomes are ubiquitous membrane-enclosed organelles filled with an acidic interior and are central to the autophagic, endocytic, or phagocytic pathway. In contrast to its classical function as the waste management machinery, lysosomes are now considered to be an integral part of various cellular signaling processes. The diverse functionality of this single organelle requires a very complex and coordinated regulation of its activity with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, at its core. However, mechanisms by which TFEB is regulated are poorly understood. This study demonstrates that gemfibrozil, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, alone and in conjunction with all-trans-retinoic acid is capable of enhancing TFEB in brain cells. We also observed that PPARα, but not PPARβ and PPARγ, is involved in gemfibrozil-mediated up-regulation of TFEB. Reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the recruitment of retinoid X receptor α, PPARα, and PGC1α on the PPAR-binding site on the Tfeb promoter as well. Subsequently, the drug-mediated induction of TFEB caused an increase in lysosomal protein and the lysosomal abundance in cell. Collectively, this study reinforces the link between lysosomal biogenesis and lipid metabolism with TFEB at the crossroads. Furthermore, gemfibrozil may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders in which autophagy-lysosome pathway plays an important role. PMID:25750174

  6. Cell-Specific Transcriptional Profiling of Ciliated Sensory Neurons Reveals Regulators of Behavior and Extracellular Vesicle Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Kaletsky, Rachel; Silva, Malan; Williams, April; Haas, Leonard A; Androwski, Rebecca J; Landis, Jessica N; Patrick, Cory; Rashid, Alina; Santiago-Martinez, Dianaliz; Gravato-Nobre, Maria; Hodgkin, Jonathan; Hall, David H; Murphy, Coleen T; Barr, Maureen M

    2015-12-21

    Cilia and extracellular vesicles (EVs) are signaling organelles [1]. Cilia act as cellular sensory antennae, with defects resulting in human ciliopathies. Cilia both release and bind to EVs [1]. EVs are sub-micron-sized particles released by cells and function in both short- and long-range intercellular communication. In C. elegans and mammals, the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) gene products polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 localize to both cilia and EVs, act in the same genetic pathway, and function in a sensory capacity, suggesting ancient conservation [2]. A fundamental understanding of EV biology and the relationship between the polycystins, cilia, and EVs is lacking. To define properties of a ciliated EV-releasing cell, we performed RNA-seq on 27 GFP-labeled EV-releasing neurons (EVNs) isolated from adult C. elegans. We identified 335 significantly overrepresented genes, of which 61 were validated by GFP reporters. The EVN transcriptional profile uncovered new pathways controlling EV biogenesis and polycystin signaling and also identified EV cargo, which included an antimicrobial peptide and ASIC channel. Tumor-necrosis-associated factor (TRAF) homologs trf-1 and trf-2 and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pmk-1 acted in polycystin-signaling pathways controlling male mating behaviors. pmk-1 was also required for EV biogenesis, independent of the innate immunity MAPK signaling cascade. This first high-resolution transcriptome profile of a subtype of ciliated sensory neurons isolated from adult animals reveals the functional components of an EVN. PMID:26687621

  7. Activation of the tumor suppressor p53 upon impairment of ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bursac, Sladana; Brdovcak, Maja Cokaric; Donati, Giulio; Volarevic, Sinisa

    2014-06-01

    Errors in ribosome biogenesis can result in quantitative or qualitative defects in protein synthesis and consequently lead to improper execution of the genetic program and the development of specific diseases. Evidence has accumulated over the last decade suggesting that perturbation of ribosome biogenesis triggers a p53-activating checkpoint signaling pathway, often referred to as the ribosome biogenesis stress checkpoint pathway. Although it was originally suggested that p53 has a prominent role in preventing diseases by monitoring the fidelity of ribosome biogenesis, recent work has demonstrated that p53 activation upon impairment of ribosome biogenesis also mediates pathological manifestations in humans. Perturbations of ribosome biogenesis can trigger a p53-dependent checkpoint signaling pathway independent of DNA damage and the tumor suppressor ARF through inhibitory interactions of specific ribosomal components with the p53 negative regulator, Mdm2. Here we review the recent advances made toward understanding of this newly-recognized checkpoint signaling pathway, its role in health and disease, and discuss possible future directions in this exciting research field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24514102

  8. Repositioning of antibiotic levofloxacin as a mitochondrial biogenesis inhibitor to target breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Li, Ruishu; Zhang, Juan

    2016-03-18

    Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis has become a potential therapeutic strategy in cancer due to their unique metabolic dependencies. In this study, we show that levofloxacin, a FDA-approved antibiotic, is an attractive candidate for breast cancer treatment. This is achieved by the inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in a panel of breast cancer cell lines while sparing normal breast cells. It also acts synergistically with conventional chemo drug in two independent in vivo breast xenograft mouse models. Importantly, levofloxacin inhibits mitochondrial biogenesis as shown by the decreased level of mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential and ATP. In addition, the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of levofloxacin are reversed by acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR, a mitochondrial fuel), confirming that levofloxacin's action in breast cancer cells is through inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis. A consequence of mitochondrial biogenesis inhibition by levofloxacin in breast cancer cells is the deactivation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/ERK pathways. We further demonstrate that breast cancer cells have increased mitochondrial biogenesis than normal breast cells, and this explains their different sensitivity to levofloxacin. Our work suggest that levofloxacin is a useful addition to breast cancer treatment. Our work also establish the essential role of mitochondrial biogenesis on the activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/ERK pathways in breast cancer cells. PMID:26902121

  9. PIWI Slicing and EXD1 Drive Biogenesis of Nuclear piRNAs from Cytosolic Targets of the Mouse piRNA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaolin; Chen, Kuan-Ming; Pandey, Radha Raman; Homolka, David; Reuter, Michael; Janeiro, Bruno Kotska Rodino; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Fauvarque, Marie-Odile; McCarthy, Andrew A.; Pillai, Ramesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) guide PIWI proteins to suppress transposons in the cytoplasm and nucleus of animal germ cells, but how silencing in the two compartments is coordinated is not known. Here we demonstrate that endonucleolytic slicing of a transcript by the cytosolic mouse PIWI protein MILI acts as a trigger to initiate its further 5′→3′ processing into non-overlapping fragments. These fragments accumulate as new piRNAs within both cytosolic MILI and the nuclear MIWI2. We also identify Exonuclease domain-containing 1 (EXD1) as a partner of the MIWI2 piRNA biogenesis factor TDRD12. EXD1 homodimers are inactive as a nuclease but function as an RNA adaptor within a PET (PIWI-EXD1-Tdrd12) complex. Loss of Exd1 reduces sequences generated by MILI slicing, impacts biogenesis of MIWI2 piRNAs, and de-represses LINE1 retrotransposons. Thus, piRNA biogenesis triggered by PIWI slicing, and promoted by EXD1, ensures that the same guides instruct PIWI proteins in the nucleus and cytoplasm. PMID:26669262

  10. Biogenesis of γ-secretase early in the secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinoh; Kleizen, Bertrand; Choy, Regina; Thinakaran, Gopal; Sisodia, Sangram S.; Schekman, Randy W.

    2007-01-01

    γ-Secretase is responsible for proteolytic maturation of signaling and cell surface proteins, including amyloid precursor protein (APP). Abnormal processing of APP by γ-secretase produces a fragment, Aβ42, that may be responsible for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The biogenesis and trafficking of this important enzyme in relation to aberrant Aβ processing is not well defined. Using a cell-free reaction to monitor the exit of cargo proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), we have isolated a transient intermediate of γ-secretase. Here, we provide direct evidence that the γ-secretase complex is formed in an inactive complex at or before the assembly of an ER transport vesicle dependent on the COPII sorting subunit, Sec24A. Maturation of the holoenzyme is achieved in a subsequent compartment. Two familial AD (FAD)–linked PS1 variants are inefficiently packaged into transport vesicles generated from the ER. Our results suggest that aberrant trafficking of PS1 may contribute to disease pathology. PMID:18056412

  11. Regulation of Mitoflash Biogenesis and Signaling by Mitochondrial Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwen; Sun, Tao; Liu, Beibei; Wu, Di; Qi, Wenfeng; Wang, Xianhua; Ma, Qi; Cheng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles undergoing constant network reorganization and exhibiting stochastic signaling events in the form of mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes). Here we investigate whether and how mitochondrial network dynamics regulate mitoflash biogenesis and signaling. We found that mitoflash frequency was largely invariant when network fragmentized or redistributed in the absence of mitofusin (Mfn) 1, Mfn2, or Kif5b. However, Opa1 deficiency decreased spontaneous mitoflash frequency due to superimposing changes in respiratory function, whereas mitoflash response to non-metabolic stimulation was unchanged despite network fragmentation. In Drp1- or Mff-deficient cells whose mitochondria hyperfused into a single whole-cell reticulum, the frequency of mitoflashes of regular amplitude and duration was again unaltered, although brief and low-amplitude "miniflashes" emerged because of improved detection ability. As the network reorganized, however, the signal mass of mitoflash signaling was dynamically regulated in accordance with the degree of network connectivity. These findings demonstrate a novel functional role of mitochondrial network dynamics and uncover a magnitude- rather than frequency-modulatory mechanism in the regulation of mitoflash signaling. In addition, our data support a stochastic trigger model for the ignition of mitoflashes. PMID:27623243

  12. Oligodendroglial membrane dynamics in relation to myelin biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ozgen, Hande; Baron, Wia; Hoekstra, Dick; Kahya, Nicoletta

    2016-09-01

    In the central nervous system, oligodendrocytes synthesize a specialized membrane, the myelin membrane, which enwraps the axons in a multilamellar fashion to provide fast action potential conduction and to ensure axonal integrity. When compared to other membranes, the composition of myelin membranes is unique with its relatively high lipid to protein ratio. Their biogenesis is quite complex and requires a tight regulation of sequential events, which are deregulated in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. To devise strategies for remedying such defects, it is crucial to understand molecular mechanisms that underlie myelin assembly and dynamics, including the ability of specific lipids to organize proteins and/or mediate protein-protein interactions in healthy versus diseased myelin membranes. The tight regulation of myelin membrane formation has been widely investigated with classical biochemical and cell biological techniques, both in vitro and in vivo. However, our knowledge about myelin membrane dynamics, such as membrane fluidity in conjunction with the movement/diffusion of proteins and lipids in the membrane and the specificity and role of distinct lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions, is limited. Here, we provide an overview of recent findings about the myelin structure in terms of myelin lipids, proteins and membrane microdomains. To give insight into myelin membrane dynamics, we will particularly highlight the application of model membranes and advanced biophysical techniques, i.e., approaches which clearly provide an added value to insight obtained by classical biochemical techniques. PMID:27141942

  13. Determinants of pore folding in potassium channel biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Erin; Khanna, Pooja; Tu, LiWei; Robinson, John M.; Deutsch, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Many ion channels, both selective and nonselective, have reentrant pore loops that contribute to the architecture of the permeation pathway. It is a fundamental feature of these diverse channels, regardless of whether they are gated by changes of membrane potential or by neurotransmitters, and is critical to function of the channel. Misfolding of the pore loop leads to loss of trafficking and expression of these channels on the cell surface. Mature tetrameric potassium channels contain an α-helix within the pore loop. We systematically mutated the “pore helix” residues of the channel Kv1.3 and assessed the ability of the monomer to fold into a tertiary reentrant loop. Our results show that pore loop residues form a canonical α-helix in the monomer early in biogenesis and that disruption of tertiary folding is caused by hydrophilic substitutions only along one face of this α-helix. These results provide insight into the determinants of the reentrant pore conformation, which is essential for ion channel function. PMID:24616516

  14. Lipid partitioning at the nuclear envelope controls membrane biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Antonio Daniel; Sembongi, Hiroshi; Su, Wen-Min; Abreu, Susana; Reggiori, Fulvio; Carman, George M.; Siniossoglou, Symeon

    2015-01-01

    Partitioning of lipid precursors between membranes and storage is crucial for cell growth, and its disruption underlies pathologies such as cancer, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms and signals that regulate this process are largely unknown. In yeast, lipid precursors are mainly used for phospholipid synthesis in nutrient-rich conditions in order to sustain rapid proliferation but are redirected to triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in lipid droplets during starvation. Here we investigate how cells reprogram lipid metabolism in the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that the conserved phosphatidate (PA) phosphatase Pah1, which generates diacylglycerol from PA, targets a nuclear membrane subdomain that is in contact with growing lipid droplets and mediates TAG synthesis. We find that cytosol acidification activates the master regulator of Pah1, the Nem1-Spo7 complex, thus linking Pah1 activity to cellular metabolic status. In the absence of TAG storage capacity, Pah1 still binds the nuclear membrane, but lipid precursors are redirected toward phospholipids, resulting in nuclear deformation and a proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We propose that, in response to growth signals, activation of Pah1 at the nuclear envelope acts as a switch to control the balance between membrane biogenesis and lipid storage. PMID:26269581

  15. Regulation of endomembrane biogenesis in arabidopsis by phospatidic acid hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Christian P; Adams, Nicolette; Bryant, Fiona M; Kurup, Smita; Eastmond, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of membrane lipid biosynthesis is important for cell function during plant growth and development. Here we summarize our recent work on PHOSPHATIDIC ACID PHOSPHOHYDROLASE (PAH) which suggests that this enzyme is a key regulator of phosphaticylcholine (PC) biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Disruption of PAH activity elevates phosphatidic acid (PA) levels and stimulates PC biosynthesis and biogenesis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Furthermore, the activity of PHOSPHOCHOLINE CYTIDYLYLTRANSFERASE (CCT), which is the key enzyme controlling the rate of PC biosynthesis, is directly stimulated by PA and expression of a constitutively active version of CCT replicates the effects of PAH disruption. Hence PAH activity can control the abundance of PA, which in turn can modulate CCT activity to govern the rate of PC biosynthesis. Crucially it is not yet clear how PAH activity is regulated in Arabidopsis but there is evidence that PAH1 and PAH2 are both phosphorylated and further work will be required to investigate whether this is functionally significant. PMID:26225871

  16. Activated Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells regulate Beige Fat Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Woo; Odegaard, Justin I.; Mukundan, Lata; Qiu, Yifu; Molofsky, Ari B.; Nussbaum, Jesse C.; Yun, Karen; Locksley, Richard M.; Chawla, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), an innate source of the type 2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-5 and -13, participate in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Although type 2 immunity is critically important for mediating metabolic adaptations to environmental cold, the functions of ILC2s in beige or brown fat development are poorly defined. We report here that activation of ILC2s by IL-33 is sufficient to promote the growth of functional beige fat in thermoneutral mice. Mechanistically, ILC2 activation results in the proliferation of bipotential adipocyte precursors (APs) and their subsequent commitment to the beige fat lineage. Loss- and gain-of-function studies reveal that ILC2-and eosinophil-derived type 2 cytokines stimulate signaling via the IL-4Rα in PDGFRα+ APs to promote beige fat biogenesis. Together, our results highlight a critical role for ILC2s and type 2 cytokines in the regulation of adipocyte precursor numbers and fate, and as a consequence, adipose tissue homeostasis. PMID:25543153

  17. Chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of Cinnamomum zeylanicum.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakasha, G K; Rao, L Jagan Mohan

    2011-07-01

    The genus Cinnamomum comprises of several hundreds of species, which are distributed in Asia and Australia. Cinnamomum zeylanicum, the source of cinnamon bark and leaf oils, is an indigenous tree of Sri Lanka, although most oil now comes from cultivated areas. C. zeylanicum is an important spice and aromatic crop having wide applications in flavoring, perfumery, beverages, and medicines. Volatile oils from different parts of cinnamon such as leaves, bark, fruits, root bark, flowers, and buds have been isolated by hydro distillation/steam distillation and supercritical fluid extraction. The chemical compositions of the volatile oils have been identified by GC and GC-MS. More than 80 compounds were identified from different parts of cinnamon. The leaf oil has a major component called eugenol. Cinnamaldehyde and camphor have been reported to be the major components of volatile oils from stem bark and root bark, respectively. Trans-cinnamyl acetate was found to be the major compound in fruits, flowers, and fruit stalks. These volatile oils were found to exhibit antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antidiabetic activities. C. zeylanicum bark and fruits were found to contain proanthocyandins with doubly linked bis-flavan-3-ol units in the molecule. The present review provides a coherent presentation of scattered literature on the chemistry, biogenesis, and biological activities of cinnamon. PMID:21929331

  18. Autophagy-mediated longevity is modulated by lipoprotein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seah, Nicole E.; de Magalhaes Filho, C. Daniel; Petrashen, Anna P.; Henderson, Hope R.; Laguer, Jade; Gonzalez, Julissa; Dillin, Andrew; Hansen, Malene; Lapierre, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy-dependent longevity models in C. elegans display altered lipid storage profiles, but the contribution of lipid distribution to life-span extension is not fully understood. Here we report that lipoprotein production, autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis are linked to modulate life span in a conserved fashion. We find that overexpression of the yolk lipoprotein VIT/vitellogenin reduces the life span of long-lived animals by impairing the induction of autophagy-related and lysosomal genes necessary for longevity. Accordingly, reducing vitellogenesis increases life span via induction of autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. Life-span extension due to reduced vitellogenesis or enhanced lysosomal lipolysis requires nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) NHR-49 and NHR-80, highlighting novel roles for these NHRs in lysosomal lipid signaling. In dietary-restricted worms and mice, expression of VIT and hepatic APOB (apolipoprotein B), respectively, are significantly reduced, suggesting a conserved longevity mechanism. Altogether, our study demonstrates that lipoprotein biogenesis is an important mechanism that modulates aging by impairing autophagy and lysosomal lipolysis. PMID:26671266

  19. RAL-1 controls multivesicular body biogenesis and exosome secretion

    PubMed Central

    Apaydin, Ahmet; Rodriguez, David; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Hoff-Yoessle, Sarah; Diem, Maxime; Tak, Saurabh; Lefebvre, Olivier; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are secreted vesicles arising from the fusion of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) with the plasma membrane. Despite their importance in various processes, the molecular mechanisms controlling their formation and release remain unclear. Using nematodes and mammary tumor cells, we show that Ral GTPases are involved in exosome biogenesis. In Caenorhabditis elegans, RAL-1 localizes at the surface of secretory MVBs. A quantitative electron microscopy analysis of RAL-1–deficient animals revealed that RAL-1 is involved in both MVB formation and their fusion with the plasma membrane. These functions do not involve the exocyst complex, a common Ral guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) effector. Furthermore, we show that the target membrane SNARE protein SYX-5 colocalizes with a constitutively active form of RAL-1 at the plasma membrane, and MVBs accumulate under the plasma membrane when SYX-5 is absent. In mammals, RalA and RalB are both required for the secretion of exosome-like vesicles in cultured cells. Therefore, Ral GTPases represent new regulators of MVB formation and exosome release. PMID:26459596

  20. Mitochondrial Rab GAPs govern autophagosome biogenesis during mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Koji; Fogel, Adam I; Wang, Chunxin; van der Bliek, Alexander M; Youle, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Damaged mitochondria can be selectively eliminated by mitophagy. Although two gene products mutated in Parkinson’s disease, PINK1, and Parkin have been found to play a central role in triggering mitophagy in mammals, how the pre-autophagosomal isolation membrane selectively and accurately engulfs damaged mitochondria remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that TBC1D15, a mitochondrial Rab GTPase-activating protein (Rab-GAP), governs autophagosome biogenesis and morphology downstream of Parkin activation. To constrain autophagosome morphogenesis to that of the cargo, TBC1D15 inhibits Rab7 activity and associates with both the mitochondria through binding Fis1 and the isolation membrane through the interactions with LC3/GABARAP family members. Another TBC family member TBC1D17, also participates in mitophagy and forms homodimers and heterodimers with TBC1D15. These results demonstrate that TBC1D15 and TBC1D17 mediate proper autophagic encapsulation of mitochondria by regulating Rab7 activity at the interface between mitochondria and isolation membranes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01612.001 PMID:24569479

  1. Heat shock proteins: molecular chaperones of protein biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, E A; Gambill, B D; Nelson, R J

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses such as an increase in temperature. Recently, several of the major Hsps have been shown to be intimately involved in protein biogenesis through a direct interaction with a wide variety of proteins. As a reflection of this role, these Hsps have been referred to as molecular chaperones. Hsp70s interact with incompletely folded proteins, such as nascent chains on ribosomes and proteins in the process of translocation from the cytosol into mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum. Hsp60 also binds to unfolded proteins, preventing aggregation and facilitating protein folding. Although less well defined, other Hsps such as Hsp90 also play important roles in modulating the activity of a number of proteins. The function of the proteolytic system is intertwined with that of molecular chaperones. Several components of this system, encoded by heat-inducible genes, are responsible for the degradation of abnormal or misfolded proteins. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven very useful in the analysis of the role of molecular chaperones in protein maturation, translocation, and degradation. In this review, results of experiments are discussed within the context of experiments with other organisms in an attempt to describe the current state of understanding of these ubiquitous and important proteins. PMID:8336673

  2. Extracellular Streptomyces lividans vesicles: composition, biogenesis and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Schrempf, Hildgund; Merling, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    We selected Streptomyces lividans to elucidate firstly the biogenesis and antimicrobial activities of extracellular vesicles that a filamentous and highly differentiated Gram-positive bacterium produces. Vesicle types range in diameter from 110 to 230 nm and 20 to 60 nm, respectively; they assemble to clusters, and contain lipids and phospholipids allowing their in situ imaging by specific fluorescent dyes. The presence of the identified secondary metabolite undecylprodigiosin provokes red fluorescence of a portion of the heterogeneous vesicle populations facilitating in vivo monitoring. Protuberances containing vesicles generate at tips, and alongside of substrate hyphae, and enumerate during late vegetative growth to droplet-like exudates. Owing to in situ imaging in the presence and absence of a green fluorescent vancomycin derivative, we conclude that protuberances comprising vesicles arise at sites with enhanced levels of peptidoglycan subunits [pentapeptide of lipid II (C55)-linked disaccharides], and reduced levels of polymerized and cross-linked peptidoglycan within hyphae. These sites correlate with enhanced levels of anionic phospholipids and lipids. Vesicles provoke pronounced damages of Aspergillus proliferans, Verticillium dahliae and induced clumping and distortion of Escherichia coli. These harmful effects are likely attributable to the action of the identified vesicular compounds including different enzyme types, components of signal transduction cascades and undecylprodigiosin. Based on our pioneering findings, we highlight novel clues with environmental implications and application potential. PMID:25851532

  3. Runx1 deficiency decreases ribosome biogenesis and confers stress resistance to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiongwei; Gao, Long; Teng, Li; Ge, Jingping; Oo, Zaw Min; Kumar, Ashish R.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Mason, Philip J.; Tan, Kai; Speck, Nancy A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor RUNX1 is frequently mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia. RUNX1 mutations can be early events, creating pre-leukemic stem cells that expand in the bone marrow. Here we show, counter-intuitively, that Runx1 deficient hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have a slow growth, low biosynthetic, small cell phenotype and markedly reduced ribosome biogenesis (Ribi). The reduced Ribi involved decreased levels of rRNA and many mRNAs encoding ribosome proteins. Runx1 appears to directly regulate Ribi; Runx1 is enriched on the promoters of genes encoding ribosome proteins, and binds the ribosomal DNA repeats. Runx1 deficient HSPCs have lower p53 levels, reduced apoptosis, an attenuated unfolded protein response, and accordingly are resistant to genotoxic and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The low biosynthetic activity and corresponding stress resistance provides a selective advantage to Runx1 deficient HSPCs, allowing them to expand in the bone marrow and outcompete normal HSPCs. PMID:26165925

  4. Outer membrane vesicles of Lysobacter sp. XL1: biogenesis, functions, and applied prospects.

    PubMed

    Kudryakova, Irina V; Shishkova, Nina A; Vasilyeva, Natalia V

    2016-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria have been intensively investigated in recent times. Vesicle formation models have been proposed, some factors affecting the process were established, and important roles vesicles play in vital activities of their producing cells were determined. Studies of pathogenic bacterial vesicles contribute to understanding the causes of acute infection and developing drugs on their basis. Despite intensive research, issues associated with the understanding of vesicle biogenesis, the mechanisms of bacterium-bacterium and pathogen-host interactions with participation of vesicles, still remain unresolved. This review discusses some results obtained in the research into OMVs of Lysobacter sp. XL1 VKM B-1576. This bacterium secretes into the environment a spectrum of bacteriolytic enzymes that hydrolyze peptidoglycan of competing bacteria, thus leading to their lysis. One of these enzymes, lytic endopeptidase L5, has been shown not only to be secreted by means of vesicles but also to be involved in their formation. As part of vesicles, the antimicrobial potential of L5 enzyme has been found to be considerably expanded. Vesicles have been shown to have a therapeutic effect in respect of anthrax infection and staphylococcal sepsis modelled in mice. The scientific basis for constructing liposomal antimicrobial preparations from vesicle phospholipids and recombinant bacteriolytic enzyme L5 has been formed. PMID:27098257

  5. Chromosome replication and segregation govern the biogenesis and inheritance of inorganic polyphosphate granules

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jonathan T.; Crosson, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotes and eukaryotes synthesize long chains of orthophosphate, known as polyphosphate (polyP), which form dense granules within the cell. PolyP regulates myriad cellular functions and is often localized to specific subcellular addresses through mechanisms that remain undefined. In this study, we present a molecular-level analysis of polyP subcellular localization in the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We demonstrate that biogenesis and localization of polyP is controlled as a function of the cell cycle, which ensures regular partitioning of granules between mother and daughter. The enzyme polyphosphate kinase 1 (Ppk1) is required for granule production, colocalizes with granules, and dynamically localizes to the sites of new granule synthesis in nascent daughter cells. Localization of Ppk1 within the cell requires an intact catalytic active site and a short, positively charged tail at the C-terminus of the protein. The processes of chromosome replication and segregation govern both the number and position of Ppk1/polyP complexes within the cell. We propose a multistep model in which the chromosome establishes sites of polyP coalescence, which recruit Ppk1 to promote the in situ synthesis of large granules. These findings underscore the importance of both chromosome dynamics and discrete protein localization as organizing factors in bacterial cell biology. PMID:23985321

  6. RNA Mimicry by the Fap7 Adenylate Kinase in Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Réty, Stéphane; Lebaron, Simon; Deschamps, Patrick; Bareille, Joseph; Jombart, Julie; Robert-Paganin, Julien; Delbos, Lila; Chardon, Florian; Zhang, Elodie; Charenton, Clément; Tollervey, David; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    During biogenesis of the 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits, the pre-40S particles are exported to the cytoplasm prior to final cleavage of the 20S pre-rRNA to mature 18S rRNA. Amongst the factors involved in this maturation step, Fap7 is unusual, as it both interacts with ribosomal protein Rps14 and harbors adenylate kinase activity, a function not usually associated with ribonucleoprotein assembly. Human hFap7 also regulates Cajal body assembly and cell cycle progression via the p53–MDM2 pathway. This work presents the functional and structural characterization of the Fap7–Rps14 complex. We report that Fap7 association blocks the RNA binding surface of Rps14 and, conversely, Rps14 binding inhibits adenylate kinase activity of Fap7. In addition, the affinity of Fap7 for Rps14 is higher with bound ADP, whereas ATP hydrolysis dissociates the complex. These results suggest that Fap7 chaperones Rps14 assembly into pre-40S particles via RNA mimicry in an ATP-dependent manner. Incorporation of Rps14 by Fap7 leads to a structural rearrangement of the platform domain necessary for the pre-rRNA to acquire a cleavage competent conformation. PMID:24823650

  7. The Arf family G protein Arl1 is required for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Isabel L.; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Munro, Sean

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small G protein Arf like 1 (Arl1) is found at the Golgi complex, and its GTP-bound form recruits several effectors to the Golgi including GRIP-domain-containing coiled-coil proteins, and the Arf1 exchange factors Big1 and Big2. To investigate the role of Arl1, we have characterised a loss-of-function mutant of the Drosophila Arl1 orthologue. The gene is essential, and examination of clones of cells lacking Arl1 shows that it is required for recruitment of three of the four GRIP domain golgins to the Golgi, with Drosophila GCC185 being less dependent on Arl1. At a functional level, Arl1 is essential for formation of secretory granules in the larval salivary gland. When Arl1 is missing, Golgi are still present but there is a dispersal of adaptor protein 1 (AP-1), a clathrin adaptor that requires Arf1 for its membrane recruitment and which is known to be required for secretory granule biogenesis. Arl1 does not appear to be required for AP-1 recruitment in all tissues, suggesting that it is crucially required to enhance Arf1 activation at the trans-Golgi in particular tissues. PMID:24610947

  8. Studies on the role of NonA in mRNA biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlova, Natalia; Braga, Jose; Lundgren, Josefin; Rino, Jose; Young, Patrick; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Visa, Neus . E-mail: Neus.Visa@molbio.su.se

    2006-08-01

    The NonA protein of Drosophila melanogaster is an abundant nuclear protein that belongs to the DBHS (Drosophila behavior, human splicing) protein family. The DBHS proteins bind both DNA and RNA in vitro and have been involved in different aspects of gene expression, including pre-mRNA splicing, transcription regulation and nuclear retention of mRNA. We have used double-stranded RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells to silence the expression of NonA and to investigate its role in mRNA biogenesis. We show that knockdown of NonA does not affect transcription nor splicing. We demonstrate that NonA forms a complex with the essential nuclear export factor NXF1 in an RNA-dependent manner. We have constructed stable S2 cell lines that express full-length and truncated NXF1 fused to GFP in order to perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. We show that knockdown of NonA reduces the intranuclear mobility of NXF1-GFP associated with poly(A){sup +} RNA in vivo, while the mobility of the truncated NXF1-GFP that does not bind RNA is not affected. Our data suggest that NonA facilitates the intranuclear mobility of mRNP particles.

  9. Biogenesis of yeast mitochondrial cytochrome c: a unique relationship to the TOM machinery.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Nils; Kozjak, Vera; Prinz, Thorsten; Ryan, Michael T; Meisinger, Chris; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Truscott, Kaye N

    2003-03-21

    The import of cytochrome c into the mitochondrial intermembrane space is not understood at a mechanistic level. While the precursor apocytochrome c can insert into protein-free lipid bilayers, the purified translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex supports the translocation of apocytochrome c into proteoliposomes. We report an in organello analysis of cytochrome c import into yeast mitochondria from wild-type cells and different mutants cells, each defective in one of the seven Tom proteins. The import of cytochrome c is not affected by removal of the receptor Tom20 or Tom70. Moreover, neither the transfer protein Tom5 nor the assembly factors Tom6 and Tom7 are needed for import of cytochrome c. When the general import pore (GIP)-protein Tom40 is blocked, the import of cytochrome c is moderately affected. Mitochondria lacking the central receptor and organizing protein Tom22 contain greatly reduced levels of cytochrome c. We conclude that up to two components of the TOM complex, Tom22 and possibly the GIP, are involved in the biogenesis of cytochrome c. PMID:12628251

  10. The release of dipicolinic acid--the rate-limiting step of Bacillus endospore inactivation during the high pressure thermal sterilization process.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Kai; Schlumbach, Karl; Baier, Daniel; Mathys, Alexander; Knorr, Dietrich

    2013-03-01

    High pressure combined with elevated temperatures can produce low acid, commercially sterile and shelf-stable foods. Depending on the temperature and pressure levels applied, bacterial endospores pass through different pathways, which can lead to a pressure-induced germination or inactivation. Regardless of the pathway, Bacillus endospores first release pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (DPA), which contributes to the low amount of free water in the spore core and is consequently responsible for the spore's high resistance against wet and dry heat. This is therefore the rate-limiting step in the high pressure sterilization process. To evaluate the impact of a broad pressure, temperature and time domain on the DPA release, Bacillus subtilis spores were pressure treated between 0.1 and 900 MPa at between 30 and 80 °C under isothermal isobaric conditions during dwell time. DPA quantification was assessed using HPLC, and samples were taken both immediately and 2 h after the pressure treatment. To obtain a release kinetic for some pressure-temperature conditions, samples were collected between 1s and 60 min after decompression. A multiresponse kinetic model was then used to derive a model covering all kinetic data. The isorate lines modeled for the DPA release in the chosen pressure-temperature landscape enabled the determination of three distinct zones. (I) For pressures <600 MPa and temperatures >50 °C, a 90% DPA release was achievable in less than 5 min and no difference in the amount of DPA was found immediately 2 h after pressurization. This may indicate irreversible damage to the inner spore membrane or membrane proteins. (II) Above 600 MPa the synergism between pressure and temperature diminished, and the treatment temperature alone dominated DPA release. (III) Pressures <600 MPa and temperatures <50 °C resulted in a retarded release of DPA, with strong increased differences in the amount of DPA released after 2 h, which implies a pressure-induced physiological

  11. Exercise Increases Mitochondrial PGC-1α Content and Promotes Nuclear-Mitochondrial Cross-talk to Coordinate Mitochondrial Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Adeel; Little, Jonathan P.; Stokl, Andrew J.; Hettinga, Bart P.; Akhtar, Mahmood; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Endurance exercise is known to induce metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle via activation of the transcriptional co-activator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α). PGC-1α regulates mitochondrial biogenesis via regulating transcription of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Recently, PGC-1α has been shown to reside in mitochondria; however, the physiological consequences of mitochondrial PGC-1α remain unknown. We sought to delineate if an acute bout of endurance exercise can mediate an increase in mitochondrial PGC-1α content where it may co-activate mitochondrial transcription factor A to promote mtDNA transcription. C57Bl/6J mice (n = 12/group; ♀ = ♂) were randomly assigned to sedentary (SED), forced-endurance (END) exercise (15 m/min for 90 min), or forced endurance +3 h of recovery (END+3h) group. The END group was sacrificed immediately after exercise, whereas the SED and END+3h groups were euthanized 3 h after acute exercise. Acute exercise coordinately increased the mRNA expression of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcripts. Nuclear and mitochondrial abundance of PGC-1α in END and END+3h groups was significantly higher versus SED mice. In mitochondria, PGC-1α is in a complex with mitochondrial transcription factor A at mtDNA D-loop, and this interaction was positively modulated by exercise, similar to the increased binding of PGC-1α at the NRF-1 promoter. We conclude that in response to acute altered energy demands, PGC-1α re-localizes into nuclear and mitochondrial compartments where it functions as a transcriptional co-activator for both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA transcription factors. These results suggest that PGC-1α may dynamically facilitate nuclear-mitochondrial DNA cross-talk to promote net mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:21245132

  12. Desorption/Ionization Fluence Thresholds and Improved Mass Spectral Consistency Measured Using a Flattop Laser Profile in the Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry of Single Bacillus Endospores

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T; Srivastava, A; Pitesky, M E; Fergenson, D P; Tobias, H J; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2004-11-30

    Bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) is being developed to analyze and identify biological aerosols in real-time. Mass spectra of individual Bacillus endospores were measured here with a bipolar aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer in which molecular desorption and ionization were produced using a single laser pulse from a Q-switched, frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser that was modified to have an approximately flattop profile. The flattened laser profile allowed the minimum fluence required to desorb and ionize significant numbers of ions from single aerosol particles to be determined. For Bacillus spores this threshold had a mean value of approximately 1 nJ/{micro}m{sup 2} (0.1 J/cm{sup 2}). Thresholds for individual spores, however, could apparently deviate by 20% or more from the mean. Threshold distributions for clumps of MS2 bacteriophage and bovine serum albumin were subsequently determined. Finally, the flattened profile was observed to increase the reproducibility of single spore mass spectra. This is consistent with the general conclusions of our earlier paper on the fluence dependence of single spore mass spectra and is particularly significant because it is expected to enable more robust differentiation and identification of single bioaerosol particles.

  13. Biodiversity of aerobic endospore-forming bacterial species occurring in Yanyanku and Ikpiru, fermented seeds of Hibiscus sabdariffa used to produce food condiments in Benin.

    PubMed

    Agbobatinkpo, Pélagie B; Thorsen, Line; Nielsen, Dennis S; Azokpota, Paulin; Akissoe, Noèl; Hounhouigan, Joseph D; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2013-05-15

    Yanyanku and Ikpiru made by the fermentation of Malcavene bean (Hibiscus sabdariffa) are used as functional additives for Parkia biglobosa seed fermentations in Benin. A total of 355 aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (AEFB) isolated from Yanyanku and Ikpiru produced in northern and southern Benin were identified using phenotypic and genotypic methods, including GTG5-PCR, M13-PCR, 16S rRNA, gyrA and gyrB gene sequencing. Generally, the same 5-6 species of the genus Bacillus predominated: Bacillus subtilis (17-41% of isolates), Bacillus cereus (8-39%), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (9-22%), Bacillus licheniformis (3-26%), Bacillus safensis (8-19%) and Bacillus altitudinis (0-19%). Bacillus aryabhattai, Bacillus flexus, and Bacillus circulans (0-2%), and species of the genera Lysinibacillus (0-14%), Paenibacillus (0-13%), Brevibacillus (0-4%), and Aneurinibacillus (0-3%) occurred sporadically. The diarrheal toxin encoding genes cytK-1, cytK-2, hblA, hblC, and hblD were present in 0%, 91% 15%, 34% and 35% of B. cereus isolates, respectively. 9% of them harbored the emetic toxin genetic determinant, cesB. This study is the first to identify the AEFB of Yanyanku and Ikpiru to species level and perform a safety evaluation based on toxin gene detections. We further suggest, that the gyrA gene can be used for differentiating the closely related species Bacillus pumilus and B. safensis. PMID:23571124

  14. Sam37 is crucial for formation of the mitochondrial TOM–SAM supercomplex, thereby promoting β-barrel biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Ellenrieder, Lars; Qiu, Jian; Bohnert, Maria; Zufall, Nicole; van der Laan, Martin; Becker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins requires two preprotein translocases, the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM and SAM form a supercomplex that promotes transfer of β-barrel precursors. The SAM core complex contains the channel protein Sam50, which cooperates with Sam35 in precursor recognition, and the peripheral membrane protein Sam37. The molecular function of Sam37 has been unknown. We report that Sam37 is crucial for formation of the TOM–SAM supercomplex. Sam37 interacts with the receptor domain of Tom22 on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane and links TOM and SAM complexes. Sam37 thus promotes efficient transfer of β-barrel precursors to the SAM complex. We conclude that Sam37 functions as a coupling factor of the translocase supercomplex of the mitochondrial outer membrane. PMID:26416958

  15. A liaison between mTOR signaling, ribosome biogenesis and cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Gentilella, Antonio; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George

    2016-01-01

    The ability to translate genetic information into functional proteins is considered a landmark in evolution. Ribosomes have evolved to take on this responsibility and, although there are some differences in their molecular make-up, both prokaryotes and eukaryotes share a common structural architecture and similar underlying mechanisms of protein synthesis. Understanding ribosome function and biogenesis has been the focus of extensive research since the early days of their discovery. In the last decade however, new and unexpected roles have emerged that place deregulated ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis at the crossroads of pathological settings, particularly cancer, revealing a set of novel cellular checkpoints. Moreover, it is also becoming evident that mTOR signaling, which regulates an array of anabolic processes, including ribosome biogenesis, is often exploited by cancer cells to sustain proliferation through the upregulation of global protein synthesis. The use of pharmacological agents that interfere with ribosome biogenesis and mTOR signaling has proven to be an effective strategy to control cancer development clinically. Here we discuss the most recent findings concerning the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR signaling controls ribosome production and the potential impact of ribosome bio-genesis in tumor development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translation and Cancer. PMID:25735853

  16. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  17. Eukaryote-specific rRNA expansion segments function in ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Madhumitha; Woolford, John L

    2016-08-01

    The secondary structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is largely conserved across all kingdoms of life. However, eukaryotes have evolved extra blocks of rRNA sequences, relative to those of prokaryotes, called expansion segments (ES). A thorough characterization of the potential roles of ES remains to be done, possibly because of limitations in the availability of robust systems to study rRNA mutants. We sought to systematically investigate the potential functions, if any, of the ES in 25S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by deletion mutagenesis. We deleted 14 of the 16 different eukaryote-specific ES in yeast 25S rRNA individually and assayed their phenotypes. Our results show that all but two of the ES tested are necessary for optimal growth and are required for production of 25S rRNA, suggesting that ES play roles in ribosome biogenesis. Further, we classified expansion segments into groups that participate in early nucleolar, middle, and late nucleoplasmic steps of ribosome biogenesis, by assaying their pre-rRNA processing phenotypes. This study is the first of its kind to systematically identify the functions of eukaryote-specific expansion segments by showing that they play roles in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. The catalog of phenotypes we identified, combined with previous investigations of the roles ribosomal proteins in large subunit biogenesis, leads us to infer that assembling ribosomes are composed of distinct RNA and protein structural neighborhood clusters that participate in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27317789

  18. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  19. Ribosome biogenesis in skeletal development and the pathogenesis of skeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Trainor, Paul A; Merrill, Amy E

    2014-06-01

    The skeleton affords a framework and structural support for vertebrates, while also facilitating movement, protecting vital organs, and providing a reservoir of minerals and cells for immune system and vascular homeostasis. The mechanical and biological functions of the skeleton are inextricably linked to the size and shape of individual bones, the diversity of which is dependent in part upon differential growth and proliferation. Perturbation of bone development, growth and proliferation, can result in congenital skeletal anomalies, which affect approximately 1 in 3000 live births [1]. Ribosome biogenesis is integral to all cell growth and proliferation through its roles in translating mRNAs and building proteins. Disruption of any steps in the process of ribosome biogenesis can lead to congenital disorders termed ribosomopathies. In this review, we discuss the role of ribosome biogenesis in skeletal development and in the pathogenesis of congenital skeletal anomalies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24252615

  20. Pharmacological induction of mitochondrial biogenesis as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Mònica; Pardo, Rosario; Villena, Josep A

    2015-11-01

    Defects in mitochondrial oxidative function have been associated with the onset of type 2 diabetes. Although the causal relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and diabetes has not been fully established, numerous studies indicate that improved glucose homeostasis achieved via lifestyle interventions, such as exercise or calorie restriction, is tightly associated with increased mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function. Therefore, it is conceivable that potentiating mitochondrial biogenesis by pharmacological means could constitute an efficacious therapeutic strategy that would particularly benefit those diabetic patients who cannot adhere to comprehensive programs based on changes in lifestyle or that require a relatively rapid improvement in their diabetic status. In this review, we discuss several pharmacological targets and drugs that modulate mitochondrial biogenesis as well as their potential use as treatments for insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:26212547

  1. Basal body structure and cell cycle-dependent biogenesis in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sue; Gull, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Basal bodies are microtubule-based organelles that assemble cilia and flagella, which are critical for motility and sensory functions in all major eukaryotic lineages. The core structure of the basal body is highly conserved, but there is variability in biogenesis and additional functions that are organism and cell type specific. Work carried out in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei has arguably produced one of the most detailed dissections of basal body structure and biogenesis within the context of the flagellar pocket and associated organelles. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the basic basal body structure in T. brucei along with the accessory structures and show how basal body movements during the basal body duplication cycle orchestrate cell and organelle morphogenesis. With this in-depth three-dimensional knowledge, identification of many basal body genes coupled with excellent genetic tools makes it an attractive model organism to study basal body biogenesis and maintenance. PMID:26862392

  2. T-tubule biogenesis and triad formation in skeletal muscle and implication in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the excitation-contraction (EC) coupling machinery mediates the translation of the action potential transmitted by the nerve into intracellular calcium release and muscle contraction. EC coupling requires a highly specialized membranous structure, the triad, composed of a central T-tubule surrounded by two terminal cisternae from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. While several proteins located on these structures have been identified, mechanisms governing T-tubule biogenesis and triad formation remain largely unknown. Here, we provide a description of triad structure and plasticity and review the role of proteins that have been linked to T-tubule biogenesis and triad formation and/or maintenance specifically in skeletal muscle: caveolin 3, amphiphysin 2, dysferlin, mitsugumins, junctophilins, myotubularin, ryanodine receptor, and dihydhropyridine Receptor. The importance of these proteins in triad biogenesis and subsequently in muscle contraction is sustained by studies on animal models and by the direct implication of most of these proteins in human myopathies. PMID:21797990

  3. Artemisinin mimics calorie restriction to trigger mitochondrial biogenesis and compromise telomere shortening in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming; Li, Si-Ming; Gao, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction is known to extend lifespan among organisms by a debating mechanism underlying nitric oxide-driven mitochondrial biogenesis. We report here that nitric oxide generators including artemisinin, sodium nitroprusside, and L-arginine mimics calorie restriction and resembles hydrogen peroxide to initiate the nitric oxide signaling cascades and elicit the global antioxidative responses in mice. The large quantities of antioxidant enzymes are correlated with the low levels of reactive oxygen species, which allow the down-regulation of tumor suppressors and accessory DNA repair partners, eventually leading to the compromise of telomere shortening. Accompanying with the up-regulation of signal transducers and respiratory chain signatures, mitochondrial biogenesis occurs with the elevation of adenosine triphosphate levels upon exposure of mouse skeletal muscles to the mimetics of calorie restriction. In conclusion, calorie restriction-triggered nitric oxide provides antioxidative protection and alleviates telomere attrition via mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby maintaining chromosomal stability and integrity, which are the hallmarks of longevity. PMID:25780774

  4. Global effects of the small RNA biogenesis machinery on the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Laubinger, Sascha; Zeller, Georg; Henz, Stefan R; Buechel, Sabine; Sachsenberg, Timo; Wang, Jia-Wei; Rätsch, Gunnar; Weigel, Detlef

    2010-10-12

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, four different dicer-like (DCL) proteins have distinct but partially overlapping functions in the biogenesis of microRNAs (miRNAs) and siRNAs from longer, noncoding precursor RNAs. To analyze the impact of different components of the small RNA biogenesis machinery on the transcriptome, we subjected dcl and other mutants impaired in small RNA biogenesis to whole-genome tiling array analysis. We compared both protein-coding genes and noncoding transcripts, including most pri-miRNAs, in two tissues and several stress conditions. Our analysis revealed a surprising number of common targets in dcl1 and dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 triple mutants. Furthermore, our results suggest that the DCL1 is not only involved in miRNA action but also contributes to silencing of a subset of transposons, apparently through an effect on DNA methylation. PMID:20870966

  5. Secretion of TcpF by the Vibrio cholerae Toxin-Coregulated Pilus Biogenesis Apparatus Requires an N-Terminal Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Megli, Christina J.

    2013-01-01

    Type IV pili are important for microcolony formation, biofilm formation, twitching motility, and attachment. We and others have shown that type IV pili are important for protein secretion across the outer membrane, similar to type II secretion systems. This study explored the relationship between protein secretion and pilus formation in Vibrio cholerae. The toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), a type IV pilus required for V. cholerae pathogenesis, is necessary for the secretion of the colonization factor TcpF (T. J. Kirn, N. Bose, and R. K. Taylor, Mol. Microbiol. 49:81–92, 2003). This phenomenon is not unique to V. cholerae; secreted virulence factors that are dependent on the presence of components of the type IV pilus biogenesis apparatus for secretion have been reported with Dichelobacter nodosus (R. M. Kennan, O. P. Dhungyel, R. J. Whittington, J. R. Egerton, and J. I. Rood, J. Bacteriol. 183:4451–4458, 2001) and Francisella tularensis (A. J. Hager et al., Mol. Microbiol. 62:227–237, 2006). Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the secretion of TcpF is dependent on the presence of selected amino acid R groups at position five. We were unable to find other secretion determinants, suggesting that Y5 is the major secretion determinant within TcpF. We also report that proteins secreted in a type IV pilus biogenesis apparatus-dependent manner have a YXS motif within the first 15 amino acids following the Sec cleavage site. The YXS motif is not present in proteins secreted by type II secretion systems, indicating that this is unique to type IV pilus-mediated secretion. Moreover, we show that TcpF interacts with the pilin TcpA, suggesting that these proteins are secreted by the type IV pilus biogenesis system. These data provide a starting point for understanding how type IV pili can mediate secretion of virulence factors important for bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:23564177

  6. Small RNA Deep Sequencing Reveals Role for Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases in Viral siRNA Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaopeng; Bao, Forrest Sheng; Xie, Zhixin

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing functions as an important antiviral defense mechanism in a broad range of eukaryotes. In plants, biogenesis of several classes of endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) requires RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR) activities. Members of the RDR family proteins, including RDR1and RDR6, have also been implicated in antiviral defense, although a direct role for RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis has yet to be demonstrated. Using a crucifer-infecting strain of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV-Cg) and Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, we analyzed the viral small RNA profile in wild-type plants as well as rdr mutants by applying small RNA deep sequencing technology. Over 100,000 TMV-Cg-specific small RNA reads, mostly of 21- (78.4%) and 22-nucleotide (12.9%) in size and originating predominately (79.9%) from the genomic sense RNA strand, were captured at an early infection stage, yielding the first high-resolution small RNA map for a plant virus. The TMV-Cg genome harbored multiple, highly reproducible small RNA-generating hot spots that corresponded to regions with no apparent local hairpin-forming capacity. Significantly, both the rdr1 and rdr6 mutants exhibited globally reduced levels of viral small RNA production as well as reduced strand bias in viral small RNA population, revealing an important role for these host RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis. In addition, an informatics analysis showed that a large set of host genes could be potentially targeted by TMV-Cg-derived siRNAs for posttranscriptional silencing. Two of such predicted host targets, which encode a cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30) and an unknown protein similar to translocon-associated protein alpha (TRAP α), respectively, yielded a positive result in cleavage validation by 5′RACE assays. Our data raised the interesting possibility for viral siRNA-mediated virus-host interactions that may contribute to viral pathogenicity and host specificity. PMID:19308254

  7. Biogenesis of the Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Holotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Yoko; Ohara, Masaru; Kawamoto, Toru; Fujiwara, Tamaki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi; Oswald, Eric; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2006-01-01

    The cell cycle G2/M specific inhibitor cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is composed of CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC coded on the cdtA, cdtB, and cdtC genes that are tandem on the chromosomal cdt locus. A. actinomycetemcomitans CdtA has the lipid binding consensus domain, the so-called “lipobox”, at the N-terminal signal sequence. Using Escherichia coli carrying plasmid pTK3022, we show that the 16th residue, cysteine, of CdtA bound [3H]palmitate or [3H]glycerol. Further, posttranslational processing of the signal peptide, CdtA, was inhibited using globomycin, an inhibitor of lipoprotein-specific signal peptidase II. Fractionation and immunoblotting show the lipid-modified CdtA is present in the outer membrane. Immunoprecipitation and the pull-down assay of the CDT complex from E. coli carrying a plasmid containing cdtABC demonstrated that the CDT complex in the periplasm is composed of CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC and that the CDT complex in culture supernatant is an N-terminally truncated (36 to 43 amino acids) form of CdtA (CdtA′), CdtB, and CdtC. This suggests that CDT is present as a complex both in the periplasm and the supernatant where CdtA undergoes posttranslation processing to CdtA′ in the process of biogenesis and secretion of CDT holotoxin into the culture supernatant. Site-directed mutagenesis of the 16th cysteine residue to glycine in CdtA altered localization of CdtA in the cell and reduced the amount of CDT activity in the culture supernatant. This suggests that CDT forms a complex inside the periplasm for lipid modification where posttranslational processing of CdtA plays an important role for the efficient production of CDT holotoxin into the culture supernatant. PMID:16714579

  8. N-acetylcysteine inhibits the up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in livers from rats fed ethanol chronically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Chronic ethanol (EtOH) administration to experimental animals induces hepatic oxidative stress and up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis. The mechanisms by which chronic EtOH up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis have not been fully explored. In this work, we hypothesized that oxidative ...

  9. Disorders of Lysosome-related Organelle Biogenesis: Clinical and Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Huizing, Marjan; Helip-Wooley, Amanda; Westbroek, Wendy; Gunay-Aygun, Meral; Gahl, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Lysosome-related organelles (LROs) are a heterogeneous group of vesicles that share various features with lysosomes, but are distinct in function, morphology, and composition. The biogenesis of LROs employs a common machinery, and genetic defects in this machinery can affect all LROs or only an individual LRO, resulting in a variety of clinical features. In this review, we discuss the main components in LRO biogenesis. We also address the function, composition and resident cell type of the major LROs. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of the major human LRO disorders. PMID:18544035

  10. Developmental changes and organelle biogenesis in the reproductive organs of thermogenic skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus renifolius)

    PubMed Central

    Ito-Inaba, Yasuko; Sato, Mayuko; Masuko, Hiromi; Hida, Yamato; Toyooka, Kiminori; Watanabe, Masao; Inaba, Takehito

    2009-01-01

    Sex-dependent thermogenesis during reproductive organ development in the inflorescence is a characteristic feature of some of the protogynous arum species. One such plant, skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus renifolius), can produce massive heat during the female stage but not during the subsequent male stage in which the stamen completes development, the anthers dehisce, and pollen is released. Unlike other thermogenic species, skunk cabbage belongs to the bisexual flower group. Although recent studies have identified the spadix as the thermogenic organ, it remains unclear how individual tissues or intracellular structures are involved in thermogenesis. In this study, reproductive organ development and organelle biogenesis were examined during the transition from the female to the male stage. During the female stage, the stamens exhibit extensive structural changes including changes in organelle structure and density. They accumulate high levels of mitochondrial proteins, including possible thermogenic factors, alternative oxidase, and uncoupling protein. By contrast, the petals and pistils do not undergo extensive changes during the female stage. However, they contain a larger number of mitochondria than during the male stage in which they develop large cytoplasmic vacuoles. Comparison between female and male spadices suggests that mitochondrial number rather than their level of activity correlates with thermogenesis. Their spadices, even in the male, contain a larger amount of mitochondria that had greater oxygen consumption, compared with non-thermogenic plants. Taken together, our data suggest that the extensive maturation process in stamens produces massive heat through increased metabolic activities. The possible mechanisms by which petal and pistil metabolism may affect thermogenesis are also discussed. PMID:19640927

  11. Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis hormones stimulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis in human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Vidali, Silvia; Knuever, Jana; Lerchner, Johannes; Giesen, Melanie; Bíró, Tamás; Klinger, Matthias; Kofler, Barbara; Funk, Wolfgang; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Paus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate mitochondrial function. As other hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis hormones, i.e., thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), are expressed in human hair follicles (HFs) and regulate mitochondrial function in human epidermis, we investigated in organ-cultured human scalp HFs whether TRH (30 nM), TSH (10 mU ml(-1)), thyroxine (T4) (100 nM), and triiodothyronine (T3) (100 pM) alter intrafollicular mitochondrial energy metabolism. All HPT-axis members increased gene and protein expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase (MTCO1), a subunit of respiratory chain complex IV, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and Porin. All hormones also stimulated intrafollicular complex I/IV activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The TSH effects on MTCO1, TFAM, and porin could be abolished by K1-70, a TSH-receptor antagonist, suggesting a TSH receptor-mediated action. Notably, as measured by calorimetry, T3 and TSH increased follicular heat production, whereas T3/T4 and TRH stimulated ATP production in cultured HF keratinocytes. HPT-axis hormones did not increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rather, T3 and T4 reduced ROS formation, and all tested HPT-axis hormones increased the transcription of ROS scavengers (catalase, superoxide dismutase 2) in HF keratinocytes. Thus, mitochondrial biology, energy metabolism, and redox state of human HFs are subject to profound (neuro-)endocrine regulation by HPT-axis hormones. The neuroendocrine control of mitochondrial biology in a complex human mini-organ revealed here may be therapeutically exploitable. PMID:23949722

  12. Pilin and Sortase Residues Critical for Endocarditis- and Biofilm-Associated Pilus Biogenesis in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Flores-Mireles, Ana L.; Kau, Andrew L.; Kline, Kimberly A.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Neiers, Fabrice; Normark, Staffan; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Enterococci commonly cause hospital-acquired infections, such as infective endocarditis and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. In animal models of these infections, a long hairlike extracellular protein fiber known as the endocarditis- and biofilm-associated (Ebp) pilus is an important virulence factor for Enterococcus faecalis. For Ebp and other sortase-assembled pili, the pilus-associated sortases are essential for fiber formation as they create covalent isopeptide bonds between the sortase recognition motif and the pilin-like motif of the pilus subunits. However, the molecular requirements governing the incorporation of the three pilus subunits (EbpA, EbpB, and EbpC) have not been investigated in E. faecalis. Here, we show that a Lys residue within the pilin-like motif of the EbpC subunit was necessary for EbpC polymerization. However, incorporation of EbpA into the pilus fiber only required its sortase recognition motif (LPXTG), while incorporation of EbpB only required its pilin-like motif. Only the sortase recognition motif would be required for incorporation of the pilus tip subunit, while incorporation of the base subunit would only require the pilin recognition motif. Thus, these data support a model with EbpA at the tip and EbpB at the base of an EbpC polymer. In addition, the housekeeping sortase, SrtA, was found to process EbpB and its predicted catalytic Cys residue was required for efficient cell wall anchoring of mature Ebp pili. Thus, we have defined molecular interactions involved in fiber polymerization, minor subunit organization, and pilus subcellular compartmentalization in the E. faecalis Ebp pilus system. These studies advance our understanding of unique molecular mechanisms of sortase-assembled pilus biogenesis. PMID:23913319

  13. Comparison of quantitative PCR and culture-based methods for evaluating dispersal of Bacillus thuringiensis endospores at a bioterrorism hoax crime scene.

    PubMed

    Crighton, Taryn; Hoile, Rebecca; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2012-06-10

    Since the anthrax mail attacks of 2001, law enforcement agencies have processed thousands of suspicious mail incidents globally, many of which are hoax bioterrorism threats. Bio-insecticide preparations containing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) spores have been involved in several such threats in Australia, leading to the requirement for rapid and sensitive detection techniques for this organism, a close relative of Bacillus anthracis. Here we describe the development of a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for the detection of Bt crystal toxin gene cry1, and evaluation of the method's effectiveness during a hoax bioterrorism event in 2009. When combined with moist wipe sampling, the cry1 qPCR was a rapid, reliable, and sensitive diagnostic tool for detecting and quantifying Bt contamination, and mapping endospore dispersal within a mail sorting facility. Results from the cry1 qPCR were validated by viable counts of the same samples on Bacillus-selective agar (PEMBA), which revealed a similar pattern of contamination. Extensive and persistent contamination of the facility was detected, both within the affected mailroom, and extending into office areas up to 30m distant from the source event, emphasising the need for improved containment procedures for suspicious mail items, both during and post-event. The cry1 qPCR enables detection of both viable and non-viable Bt spores and cells, which is important for historical crime scenes or scenes subjected to decontamination. This work provides a new rapid method to add to the forensics toolbox for crime scenes suspected to be contaminated with biological agents. PMID:22227150

  14. Low-molecular-weight polyphenols protect kidney damage through suppressing NF-κB and modulating mitochondrial biogenesis in diabetic db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hung-Wen; Wei, Chu-Chun; Chang, Sue-Joan

    2016-04-20

    Hyperglycemia, increased inflammatory responses, and dysregulation of mitochondrial function accompanied by type 2 diabetes may eventually lead to kidney damage. We examined the protective effects of oligonol, a low-molecular-weight polyphenol derived from lychee fruit and green tea, on kidney damage in diabetic db/db mice. Dietary oligonol supplementation lowered glucose and insulin levels and improved oral glucose tolerance. Oligonol attenuated serum resistin and IL-6 levels and reduced glomerular hypertrophy and mesangial matrix expansion caused by diabetes. Oligonol reduced activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Suppressed renal oxidative stress by oligonol was associated with stimulated sirtuin1 expression and restored AMP-activated kinase protein α activity, mitochondrial DNA copy number, and mitochondrial biogenesis associated genes including nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. In conclusion, oligonol reduced fasting glucose level, improved insulin sensitivity, suppressed inflammatory responses, and upregulated metabolic regulators involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby leading to protection against diabetes-induced kidney damage. PMID:26960417

  15. Effects of Resveratrol and SIRT1 on PGC-1α Activity and Mitochondrial Biogenesis: A Reevaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su Ryun; Asaka, Meiko; Holloszy, John O.; Han, Dong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that feeding mice resveratrol activates AMPK and SIRT1 in skeletal muscle leading to deacetylation and activation of PGC-1α, increased mitochondrial biogenesis, and improved running endurance. This study was done to further evaluate the effects of resveratrol, SIRT1, and PGC-1α deacetylation on mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle. Feeding rats or mice a diet containing 4 g resveratrol/kg diet had no effect on mitochondrial protein levels in muscle. High concentrations of resveratrol lowered ATP concentration and activated AMPK in C2C12 myotubes, resulting in an increase in mitochondrial proteins. Knockdown of SIRT1, or suppression of SIRT1 activity with a dominant-negative (DN) SIRT1 construct, increased PGC-1α acetylation, PGC-1α coactivator activity, and mitochondrial proteins in C2C12 cells. Expression of a DN SIRT1 in rat triceps muscle also induced an increase in mitochondrial proteins. Overexpression of SIRT1 decreased PGC-1α acetylation, PGC-1α coactivator activity, and mitochondrial proteins in C2C12 myotubes. Overexpression of SIRT1 also resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial proteins in rat triceps muscle. We conclude that, contrary to some previous reports, the mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis is by inhibiting PGC-1α coactivator activity, resulting in a decrease in mitochondria. We also conclude that feeding rodents resveratrol has no effect on mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle. PMID:23874150

  16. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  17. Role of mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system in protein biogenesis of the mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bohnert, Maria; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Zerbes, Ralf M.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Stroud, David A.; von der Malsburg, Karina; Müller, Judith M.; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Perschil, Inge; Warscheid, Bettina; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.; Daum, Günther; Wiedemann, Nils; Becker, Thomas; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria contain two membranes, the outer membrane and the inner membrane with folded cristae. The mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS) is a large protein complex required for maintaining inner membrane architecture. MINOS interacts with both preprotein transport machineries of the outer membrane, the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). It is unknown, however, whether MINOS plays a role in the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins. We have dissected the interaction of MINOS with TOM and SAM and report that MINOS binds to both translocases independently. MINOS binds to the SAM complex via the conserved polypeptide transport–associated domain of Sam50. Mitochondria lacking mitofilin, the large core subunit of MINOS, are impaired in the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins of the outer membrane, whereas mutant mitochondria lacking any of the other five MINOS subunits import β-barrel proteins in a manner similar to wild-type mitochondria. We show that mitofilin is required at an early stage of β-barrel biogenesis that includes the initial translocation through the TOM complex. We conclude that MINOS interacts with TOM and SAM independently and that the core subunit mitofilin is involved in biogenesis of outer membrane β-barrel proteins. PMID:22918945

  18. Canonical and alternate functions of the microRNA biogenesis machinery

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Mark M.W.; Zhang, Guoan; Cheloufi, Sihem; Neubert, Thomas A.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Littman, Dan R.

    2010-01-01

    The canonical microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis pathway requires two RNaseIII enzymes: Drosha and Dicer. To understand their functions in mammals in vivo, we engineered mice with germline or tissue-specific inactivation of the genes encoding these two proteins. Changes in proteomic and transcriptional profiles that were shared in Dicer- and Drosha-deficient mice confirmed the requirement for both enzymes in canonical miRNA biogenesis. However, deficiency in Drosha or Dicer did not always result in identical phenotypes, suggesting additional functions. We found that, in early-stage thymocytes, Drosha recognizes and directly cleaves many protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNAs) with secondary stem–loop structures. In addition, we identified a subset of miRNAs generated by a Dicer-dependent but Drosha-independent mechanism. These were distinct from previously described mirtrons. Thus, in mammalian cells, Dicer is required for the biogenesis of multiple classes of miRNAs. Together, these findings extend the range of function of RNaseIII enzymes beyond canonical miRNA biogenesis, and help explain the nonoverlapping phenotypes caused by Drosha and Dicer deficiency. PMID:20713509

  19. Canonical and alternate functions of the microRNA biogenesis machinery.

    PubMed

    Chong, Mark M W; Zhang, Guoan; Cheloufi, Sihem; Neubert, Thomas A; Hannon, Gregory J; Littman, Dan R

    2010-09-01

    The canonical microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis pathway requires two RNaseIII enzymes: Drosha and Dicer. To understand their functions in mammals in vivo, we engineered mice with germline or tissue-specific inactivation of the genes encoding these two proteins. Changes in proteomic and transcriptional profiles that were shared in Dicer- and Drosha-deficient mice confirmed the requirement for both enzymes in canonical miRNA biogenesis. However, deficiency in Drosha or Dicer did not always result in identical phenotypes, suggesting additional functions. We found that, in early-stage thymocytes, Drosha recognizes and directly cleaves many protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNAs) with secondary stem-loop structures. In addition, we identified a subset of miRNAs generated by a Dicer-dependent but Drosha-independent mechanism. These were distinct from previously described mirtrons. Thus, in mammalian cells, Dicer is required for the biogenesis of multiple classes of miRNAs. Together, these findings extend the range of function of RNaseIII enzymes beyond canonical miRNA biogenesis, and help explain the nonoverlapping phenotypes caused by Drosha and Dicer deficiency. PMID:20713509

  20. Utilizing small nutrient compounds as enhancers of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Daniel M.; Ashcroft, Stephen P.; Belew, Micah Y.; Stocks, Ben; Currell, Kevin; Baar, Keith; Philp, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Endurance exercise, when performed regularly as part of a training program, leads to increases in whole-body and skeletal muscle-specific oxidative capacity. At the cellular level, this adaptive response is manifested by an increased number of oxidative fibers (Type I and IIA myosin heavy chain), an increase in capillarity and an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. The increase in mitochondrial biogenesis (increased volume and functional capacity) is fundamentally important as it leads to greater rates of oxidative phosphorylation and an improved capacity to utilize fatty acids during sub-maximal exercise. Given the importance of mitochondrial biogenesis for skeletal muscle performance, considerable attention has been given to understanding the molecular cues stimulated by endurance exercise that culminate in this adaptive response. In turn, this research has led to the identification of pharmaceutical compounds and small nutritional bioactive ingredients that appear able to amplify exercise-responsive signaling pathways in skeletal muscle. The aim of this review is to discuss these purported exercise mimetics and bioactive ingredients in the context of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. We will examine proposed modes of action, discuss evidence of application in skeletal muscle in vivo and finally comment on the feasibility of such approaches to support endurance-training applications in humans. PMID:26578969

  1. Expression of Flotilin-2 and Acrosome Biogenesis Are Regulated by MiR-124 during Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Haoyu; Jiang, Min; Xia, Zhengrong; Yu, Jinjin; Chen, Ling; Huang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short non-coding RNA molecules, which diversely regulate gene expression in organisms. Although the regulatory role of these small RNA molecules has been recently explored in animal spermatogenesis, the role of miR-124 in male germ cells is poorly defined. In our previous study, flotillin-2 was investigated as a novel Golgi-related protein involved in sperm acrosome biogenesis. The current study was designed to analyze the contribution of miR-124 in the regulation of flotillin-2 expression during mouse acrosome biogenesis. Luciferase assays revealed the target effects of miR-124 on flotillin-2 expression. Following intratesticular injection of miR-124 in 3-week-old male mice, quantitative real-time RT-PCR and western blot analysis were employed to confirm the function of miR-124 in regulating flotillin-2 after 48 hours. Sperm abnormalities were assessed 3 weeks later by ordinary optical microscopy, the acrosome abnormalities were also assessed by PNA staining and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed the proportion of sperm acrosome abnormalities was significantly higher than that of the control group. The expression of flotillin-2 and caveolin-1 was significantly downregulated during acrosome biogenesis. These results indicated that miR-124 could potentially play a role in caveolin-independent vesicle trafficking and modulation of flotillin-2 expression in mouse acrosome biogenesis. PMID:26313572

  2. Peroxynitrite induced mitochondrial biogenesis following MnSOD knockdown in normal rat kidney (NRK) cells.

    PubMed

    Marine, Akira; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Macmillan-Crow, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    Superoxide is widely regarded as the primary reactive oxygen species (ROS) which initiates downstream oxidative stress. Increased oxidative stress contributes, in part, to many disease conditions such as cancer, atherosclerosis, ischemia/reperfusion, diabetes, aging, and neurodegeneration. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide into hydrogen peroxide which can then be further detoxified by other antioxidant enzymes. MnSOD is critical in maintaining the normal function of mitochondria, thus its inactivation is thought to lead to compromised mitochondria. Previously, our laboratory observed increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a novel kidney-specific MnSOD knockout mouse. The current study used transient siRNA mediated MnSOD knockdown of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells as the in vitro model, and confirmed functional mitochondrial biogenesis evidenced by increased PGC1α expression, mitochondrial DNA copy numbers and integrity, electron transport chain protein CORE II, mitochondrial mass, oxygen consumption rate, and overall ATP production. Further mechanistic studies using mitoquinone (MitoQ), a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant and L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor demonstrated that peroxynitrite (at low micromolar levels) induced mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings provide the first evidence that low levels of peroxynitrite can initiate a protective signaling cascade involving mitochondrial biogenesis which may help to restore mitochondrial function following transient MnSOD inactivation. PMID:24563852

  3. Syringaresinol induces mitochondrial biogenesis through activation of PPARβ pathway in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Thach, Trung Thanh; Lee, Chan-Kyu; Park, Hyun Woo; Lee, Sang-Jun; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2016-08-15

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) plays a crucial role in cellular energy metabolism that directly impacts mitochondrial biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate that syringaresinol, a pharmacological lignan extracted from Panax ginseng berry, moderately binds to and activates PPARβ with KD and EC50 values of 27.62±15.76μM and 18.11±4.77μM, respectively. Subsequently, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α together with PPARβ transcriptional targets, mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 and uncoupling protein 2, was also enhanced in terms of both mRNA and protein levels. The activation of these proteins induced mitochondrial biogenesis by enrichment of mitochondrial replication and density within C2C12 myotubes. Importantly, knockdown of PPARβ reduced the syringaresinol-induced protein expression followed by the significant reduction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that syringaresinol induces mitochondrial biogenesis by activating PPARβ pathway. PMID:27450788

  4. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  5. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation. PMID:26801560

  6. Nuclear-localized CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α regulates phosphatidylcholine synthesis required for lipid droplet biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aitchison, Adam J.; Arsenault, Daniel J.; Ridgway, Neale D.

    2015-01-01

    The reversible association of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα) with membranes regulates the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) by the CDP-choline (Kennedy) pathway. Based on results with insect CCT homologues, translocation of nuclear CCTα onto cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) is proposed to stimulate the synthesis of PC that is required for LD biogenesis and triacylglycerol (TAG) storage. We examined whether this regulatory mechanism applied to LD biogenesis in mammalian cells. During 3T3-L1 and human preadipocyte differentiation, CCTα expression and PC synthesis was induced. In 3T3-L1 cells, CCTα translocated from the nucleoplasm to the nuclear envelope and cytosol but did not associate with LDs. The enzyme also remained in the nucleus during human adipocyte differentiation. RNAi silencing in 3T3-L1 cells showed that CCTα regulated LD size but did not affect TAG storage or adipogenesis. LD biogenesis in nonadipocyte cell lines treated with oleate also promoted CCTα translocation to the nuclear envelope and/or cytoplasm but not LDs. In rat intestinal epithelial cells, CCTα silencing increased LD size, but LD number and TAG deposition were decreased due to oleate-induced cytotoxicity. We conclude that CCTα increases PC synthesis for LD biogenesis by translocation to the nuclear envelope and not cytoplasmic LDs. PMID:26108622

  7. Atg7 is required for acrosome biogenesis during spermatogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongna; Wan, Haifeng; Li, Xixia; Liu, Weixiao; Chen, Qi; Wang, Yaqing; Yang, Lin; Tang, Hongmei; Zhang, Xiujun; Duan, Enkui; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Gao, Fei; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The acrosome is a specialized organelle that covers the anterior part of the sperm nucleus and plays an essential role in the process of fertilization. The molecular mechanism underlying the biogenesis of this lysosome-related organelle (LRO) is still largely unknown. Here, we show that germ cell-specific Atg7-knockout mice were infertile due to a defect in acrosome biogenesis and displayed a phenotype similar to human globozoospermia; this reproductive defect was successfully rescued by intracytoplasmic sperm injections. Furthermore, the depletion of Atg7 in germ cells did not affect the early stages of development of germ cells, but at later stages of spermatogenesis, the proacrosomal vesicles failed to fuse into a single acrosomal vesicle during the Golgi phase, which finally resulted in irregular or nearly round-headed spermatozoa. Autophagic flux was disrupted in Atg7-depleted germ cells, finally leading to the failure of LC3 conjugation to Golgi apparatus-derived vesicles. In addition, Atg7 partially regulated another globozoospermia-related protein, Golgi-associated PDZ- and coiled-coil motif-containing protein (GOPC), during acrosome biogenesis. Finally, the injection of either autophagy or lysosome inhibitors into testis resulted in a similar phenotype to that of germ cell-specific Atg7-knockout mice. Altogether, our results uncover a new role for Atg7 in the biogenesis of the acrosome, and we provide evidence to support the autolysosome origination hypothesis for the acrosome. PMID:24853953

  8. Karrikins delay soybean seed germination by mediating abscisic acid and gibberellin biogenesis under shaded conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yongjie; Chen, Feng; Shuai, Haiwei; Luo, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jun; Tang, Shengwen; Xu, Shuanshuan; Liu, Jianwei; Liu, Weiguo; Du, Junbo; Liu, Jiang; Yang, Feng; Sun, Xin; Yong, Taiwen; Wang, Xiaochun; Feng, Yuqi; Shu, Kai; Yang, Wenyu

    2016-01-01

    Karrikins (KAR) are a class of signal compounds, discovered in wildfire smoke, which affect seed germination. Currently, numerous studies have focused on the model plant Arabidopsis in the KAR research field, rather than on crops. Thus the regulatory mechanisms underlying KAR regulation of crop seed germination are largely unknown. Here, we report that KAR delayed soybean seed germination through enhancing abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, while impairing gibberellin (GA) biogenesis. Interestingly, KAR only retarded soybean seed germination under shaded conditions, rather than under dark and white light conditions, which differs from in Arabidopsis. Phytohormone quantification showed that KAR enhanced ABA biogenesis while impairing GA biosynthesis during the seed imbibition process, and subsequently, the ratio of active GA4 to ABA was significantly reduced. Further qRT-PCR analysis showed that the transcription pattern of genes involved in ABA and GA metabolic pathways are consistent with the hormonal measurements. Finally, fluridone, an ABA biogenesis inhibitor, remarkably rescued the delayed-germination phenotype of KAR-treatment; and paclobutrazol, a GA biosynthesis inhibitor, inhibited soybean seed germination. Taken together, these evidences suggest that KAR inhibit soybean seed germination by mediating the ratio between GA and ABA biogenesis. PMID:26902640

  9. GPAT2, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, in piRNA biogenesis in germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shiromoto, Yusuke; Kuramochi-Miyagawa, Satomi; Daiba, Akito; Chuma, Shinichiro; Katanaya, Ami; Katsumata, Akiko; Nishimura, Ken; Ohtaka, Manami; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Yoshinaga, Koichi; Asada, Noriko; Nakamura, Shota; Yasunaga, Teruo; Kojima-Kita, Kanako; Itou, Daisuke; Kimura, Tohru; Nakano, Toru

    2013-06-01

    piRNA (PIWI-interacting RNA) is a germ cell-specific small RNA in which biogenesis PIWI (P-element wimpy testis) family proteins play crucial roles. MILI (mouse Piwi-like), one of the three mouse PIWI family members, is indispensable for piRNA production, DNA methylation of retrotransposons presumably through the piRNA, and spermatogenesis. The biogenesis of piRNA has been divided into primary and secondary processing pathways; in both of these MILI is involved in mice. To analyze the molecular function of MILI in piRNA biogenesis, we utilized germline stem (GS) cells, which are derived from testicular stem cells and possess a spermatogonial phenotype. We established MILI-null GS cell lines and their revertant, MILI-rescued GS cells, by introducing the Mili gene with Sendai virus vector. Comparison of wild-type, MILI-null, and MILI-rescued GS cells revealed that GS cells were quite useful for analyzing the molecular mechanisms of piRNA production, especially the primary processing pathway. We found that glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 2 (GPAT2), a mitochondrial outer membrane protein for lysophosphatidic acid, bound to MILI using the cells and that gene knockdown of GPAT2 brought about impaired piRNA production in GS cells. GPAT2 is not only one of the MILI bound proteins but also a protein essential for primary piRNA biogenesis. PMID:23611983

  10. Selenite Stimulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis Signaling and Enhances Mitochondrial Functional Performance in Murine Hippocampal Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Haza; Kumari, Santosh; Li, P. Andy

    2012-01-01

    Supplementation of selenium has been shown to protect cells against free radical mediated cell damage. The objectives of this study are to examine whether supplementation of selenium stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis signaling pathways and whether selenium enhances mitochondrial functional performance. Murine hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells were treated with sodium selenite for 24 hours. Mitochondrial biogenesis markers, mitochondrial respiratory rate and activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes were measured and compared to non-treated cells. The results revealed that treatment of selenium to the HT22 cells elevated the levels of nuclear mitochondrial biogenesis regulators PGC-1α and NRF1, as well as mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase IV (COX IV). These effects are associated with phosphorylation of Akt and cAMP response element-binding (CREB). Supplementation of selenium significantly increased mitochondrial respiration and improved the activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes. We conclude that selenium activates mitochondrial biogenesis signaling pathway and improves mitochondrial function. These effects may be associated with modulation of AKT-CREB pathway. PMID:23110128

  11. Rational Extension of the Ribosome Biogenesis Pathway Using Network-Guided Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhihua; Lee, Insuk; Moradi, Emily; Hung, Nai-Jung; Johnson, Arlen W.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    Biogenesis of ribosomes is an essential cellular process conserved across all eukaryotes and is known to require >170 genes for the assembly, modification, and trafficking of ribosome components through multiple cellular compartments. Despite intensive study, this pathway likely involves many additional genes. Here, we employ network-guided genetics—an approach for associating candidate genes with biological processes that capitalizes on recent advances in functional genomic and proteomic studies—to computationally identify additional ribosomal biogenesis genes. We experimentally evaluated >100 candidate yeast genes in a battery of assays, confirming involvement of at least 15 new genes, including previously uncharacterized genes (YDL063C, YIL091C, YOR287C, YOR006C/TSR3, YOL022C/TSR4). We associate the new genes with specific aspects of ribosomal subunit maturation, ribosomal particle association, and ribosomal subunit nuclear export, and we identify genes specifically required for the processing of 5S, 7S, 20S, 27S, and 35S rRNAs. These results reveal new connections between ribosome biogenesis and mRNA splicing and add >10% new genes—most with human orthologs—to the biogenesis pathway, significantly extending our understanding of a universally conserved eukaryotic process. PMID:19806183

  12. Concerted removal of the Erb1-Ytm1 complex in ribosome biogenesis relies on an elaborate interface.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Matthias; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Maddi, Karthik; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-01-29

    The complicated process of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves about 200 assembly factors that transiently associate with the nascent pre-ribosome in a spatiotemporally ordered way. During the early steps of 60S subunit formation, several proteins, collectively called A3 cluster factors, participate in the removal of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) from 27SA3 pre-rRNA. Among these factors is the conserved hetero-trimeric Nop7-Erb1-Ytm1 complex (or human Pes1-Bop1-Wdr12), which is removed from the evolving pre-60S particle by the AAA ATPase Rea1 to allow progression in the pathway. Here, we clarify how Ytm1 and Erb1 interact, which has implications for the release mechanism of both factors from the pre-ribosome. Biochemical studies show that Ytm1 and Erb1 bind each other via their ß-propeller domains. The crystal structure of the Erb1-Ytm1 heterodimer determined at 2.67Å resolution reveals an extended interaction surface between the propellers in a rarely observed binding mode. Structure-based mutations in the interface that impair the Erb1-Ytm1 interaction do not support growth, with specific defects in 60S subunit synthesis. Under these mutant conditions, it becomes clear that an intact Erb1-Ytm1 complex is required for 60S maturation and that loss of this stable interaction prevents ribosome production. PMID:26657628

  13. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Kandimalla, Ramesh J.L.; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10 mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits–NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases. - Highlights: • Aluminium decreases the mRNA levels of mitochondrial and nuclear encoded

  14. Transgenerationally inherited piRNAs trigger piRNA biogenesis by changing the chromatin of piRNA clusters and inducing precursor processing

    PubMed Central

    Le Thomas, Adrien; Stuwe, Evelyn; Li, Sisi; Marinov, Georgi; Rozhkov, Nikolay; Chen, Yung-Chia Ariel; Luo, Yicheng; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Toth, Katalin Fejes; Patel, Dinshaw; Aravin, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs that associate with Piwi proteins, called piRNAs, serve as guides for repression of diverse transposable elements in germ cells of metazoa. In Drosophila, the genomic regions that give rise to piRNAs, the so-called piRNA clusters, are transcribed to generate long precursor molecules that are processed into mature piRNAs. How genomic regions that give rise to piRNA precursor transcripts are differentiated from the rest of the genome and how these transcripts are specifically channeled into the piRNA biogenesis pathway are not known. We found that transgenerationally inherited piRNAs provide the critical trigger for piRNA production from homologous genomic regions in the next generation by two different mechanisms. First, inherited piRNAs enhance processing of homologous transcripts into mature piRNAs by initiating the ping-pong cycle in the cytoplasm. Second, inherited piRNAs induce installment of the histone 3 Lys9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) mark on genomic piRNA cluster sequences. The heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) homolog Rhino binds to the H3K9me3 mark through its chromodomain and is enriched over piRNA clusters. Rhino recruits the piRNA biogenesis factor Cutoff to piRNA clusters and is required for efficient transcription of piRNA precursors. We propose that transgenerationally inherited piRNAs act as an epigenetic memory for identification of substrates for piRNA biogenesis on two levels: by inducing a permissive chromatin environment for piRNA precursor synthesis and by enhancing processing of these precursors. PMID:25085419

  15. Decreased ovarian reserve, dysregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased lipid peroxidation in female mouse offspring exposed to an obesogenic maternal diet

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Catherine E.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Penfold, Naomi C.; Dearden, Laura; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal diet during pregnancy influences the later life reproductive potential of female offspring. We investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the depletion of ovarian follicular reserve in young adult females following exposure to obesogenic diet in early life. Furthermore, we explore the interaction between adverse maternal diet and postweaning diet in generating reduced ovarian reserve. Female mice were exposed to either maternal obesogenic (high fat/high sugar) or maternal control diet in utero and during lactation, then weaned onto either obesogenic or control diet. At 12 wk of age, the offspring ovarian reserve was depleted following exposure to maternal obesogenic diet (P < 0.05), but not postweaning obesogenic diet. Maternal obesogenic diet was associated with increased mitochondrial DNA biogenesis (copy number P < 0.05; transcription factor A, mitochondrial expression P < 0.05), increased mitochondrial antioxidant defenses [manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) P < 0.05; copper/zinc superoxide dismutase P < 0.05; glutathione peroxidase 4 P < 0.01] and increased lipoxygenase expression (arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase P < 0.05; arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase P < 0.05) in the ovary. There was also significantly increased expression of the transcriptional regulator NF-κB (P < 0.05). There was no effect of postweaning diet on any measured ovarian parameters. Maternal diet thus plays a central role in determining follicular reserve in adult female offspring. Our observations suggest that lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis are the key intracellular pathways involved in programming of ovarian reserve.—Aiken, C. E., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Penfold, N. C., Dearden, L., Ozanne, S. E. Decreased ovarian reserve, dysregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased lipid peroxidation in female mouse offspring exposed to an obesogenic maternal diet. PMID:26700734

  16. Decreased ovarian reserve, dysregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased lipid peroxidation in female mouse offspring exposed to an obesogenic maternal diet.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Catherine E; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Penfold, Naomi C; Dearden, Laura; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-04-01

    Maternal diet during pregnancy influences the later life reproductive potential of female offspring. We investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the depletion of ovarian follicular reserve in young adult females following exposure to obesogenic diet in early life. Furthermore, we explore the interaction between adverse maternal diet and postweaning diet in generating reduced ovarian reserve. Female mice were exposed to either maternal obesogenic (high fat/high sugar) or maternal control dietin uteroand during lactation, then weaned onto either obesogenic or control diet. At 12 wk of age, the offspring ovarian reserve was depleted following exposure to maternal obesogenic diet (P< 0.05), but not postweaning obesogenic diet. Maternal obesogenic diet was associated with increased mitochondrial DNA biogenesis (copy numberP< 0.05; transcription factor A, mitochondrial expressionP< 0.05), increased mitochondrial antioxidant defenses [manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)P< 0.05; copper/zinc superoxide dismutaseP< 0.05; glutathione peroxidase 4P< 0.01] and increased lipoxygenase expression (arachidonate 12-lipoxygenaseP< 0.05; arachidonate 15-lipoxygenaseP< 0.05) in the ovary. There was also significantly increased expression of the transcriptional regulator NF-κB (P< 0.05). There was no effect of postweaning diet on any measured ovarian parameters. Maternal diet thus plays a central role in determining follicular reserve in adult female offspring. Our observations suggest that lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis are the key intracellular pathways involved in programming of ovarian reserve.-Aiken, C. E., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Penfold, N. C., Dearden, L., Ozanne, S. E. Decreased ovarian reserve, dysregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased lipid peroxidation in female mouse offspring exposed to an obesogenic maternal diet. PMID:26700734

  17. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hagland, Hanne R.; Nilsson, Linn I.H.; Burri, Lena; Nikolaisen, Julie; Berge, Rolf K.; Tronstad, Karl J.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPAR{alpha}-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  18. A methods review on use of nonsense suppression to study 3′ end formation and other aspects of tRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.; Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G.

    2014-01-01

    Suppressor tRNAs bear anticodon mutations that allow them to decode premature stop codons in metabolic marker gene mRNAs, that can be used as in vivo reporters of functional tRNA biogenesis. Here, we review key components of a suppressor tRNA system specific to S. pombe and its adaptations for use to study specific steps in tRNA biogenesis. Eukaryotic tRNA biogenesis begins with transcription initiation by RNA polymerase (pol) III. The nascent pre-tRNAs must undergo folding, 5′ and 3′ processing to remove the leader and trailer, nuclear export, and splicing if applicable, while multiple complex chemical modifications occur throughout the process. We review evidence that precursor-tRNA processing begins with transcription termination at the oligo(T) terminator element, which forms a 3′ oligo(U) tract on the nascent RNA, a sequence-specific binding site for the RNA chaperone, La protein. The processing pathway bifurcates depending on a poorly understood property of pol III termination that determines the 3′ oligo(U) length and therefore the affinity for La. We thus review the pol III termination process and the factors involved including advances using gene-specific random mutagenesis by dNTP analogs that identify key residues important for transcription termination in certain pol III subunits. The review ends with a ‘technical approaches’ section that includes a parts lists of suppressor-tRNA alleles, strains and plasmids, and graphic examples of its diverse uses. PMID:25447915

  19. Protection of scaffold protein Isu from degradation by the Lon protease Pim1 as a component of Fe–S cluster biogenesis regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Schilke, Brenda; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters, essential protein cofactors, are assembled on the mitochondrial scaffold protein Isu and then transferred to recipient proteins via a multistep process in which Isu interacts sequentially with multiple protein factors. This pathway is in part regulated posttranslationally by modulation of the degradation of Isu, whose abundance increases >10-fold upon perturbation of the biogenesis process. We tested a model in which direct interaction with protein partners protects Isu from degradation by the mitochondrial Lon-type protease. Using purified components, we demonstrated that Isu is indeed a substrate of the Lon-type protease and that it is protected from degradation by Nfs1, the sulfur donor for Fe–S cluster assembly, as well as by Jac1, the J-protein Hsp70 cochaperone that functions in cluster transfer from Isu. Nfs1 and Jac1 variants known to be defective in interaction with Isu were also defective in protecting Isu from degradation. Furthermore, overproduction of Jac1 protected Isu from degradation in vivo, as did Nfs1. Taken together, our results lead to a model of dynamic interplay between a protease and protein factors throughout the Fe–S cluster assembly and transfer process, leading to up-regulation of Isu levels under conditions when Fe–S cluster biogenesis does not meet cellular demands. PMID:26842892

  20. Protection of scaffold protein Isu from degradation by the Lon protease Pim1 as a component of Fe-S cluster biogenesis regulation.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Szymon J; Schilke, Brenda; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2016-04-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters, essential protein cofactors, are assembled on the mitochondrial scaffold protein Isu and then transferred to recipient proteins via a multistep process in which Isu interacts sequentially with multiple protein factors. This pathway is in part regulated posttranslationally by modulation of the degradation of Isu, whose abundance increases >10-fold upon perturbation of the biogenesis process. We tested a model in which direct interaction with protein partners protects Isu from degradation by the mitochondrial Lon-type protease. Using purified components, we demonstrated that Isu is indeed a substrate of the Lon-type protease and that it is protected from degradation by Nfs1, the sulfur donor for Fe-S cluster assembly, as well as by Jac1, the J-protein Hsp70 cochaperone that functions in cluster transfer from Isu. Nfs1 and Jac1 variants known to be defective in interaction with Isu were also defective in protecting Isu from degradation. Furthermore, overproduction of Jac1 protected Isu from degradation in vivo, as did Nfs1. Taken together, our results lead to a model of dynamic interplay between a protease and protein factors throughout the Fe-S cluster assembly and transfer process, leading to up-regulation of Isu levels under conditions when Fe-S cluster biogenesis does not meet cellular demands. PMID:26842892

  1. Role of calcium and AMP kinase in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and GLUT4 levels in muscle.

    PubMed

    Ojuka, Edward O

    2004-05-01

    Contractile activity induces mitochondrial biogenesis and increases glucose transport capacity in muscle. There has been much research on the mechanisms responsible for these adaptations. The present paper reviews the evidence, which indicates that the decrease in the levels of high-energy phosphates, leading to activation of AMP kinase (AMPK), and the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), which activates Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAMK), are signals that initiate these adaptative responses. Although the events downstream of AMPK and CAMK have not been well characterized, these events lead to activation of various transcription factors, including: nuclear respiratory factors (NRF) 1 and 2, which cause increased expression of proteins of the respiratory chain; PPAR-alpha, which up regulates the levels of enzymes of beta oxidation; mitochondrial transcription factor A, which activates expression of the mitochondrial genome; myocyte-enhancing factor 2A, the transcription factor that regulates GLUT4 expression. The well-orchestrated expression of the multitude of proteins involved in these adaptations is mediated by the rapid activation of PPAR gamma co-activator (PGC) 1, a protein that binds to various transcription factors to maximize transcriptional activity. Activating AMPK using 5-aminoimidizole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-riboside (AICAR) and increasing cytoplasmic Ca(2+) using caffeine, W7 or ionomycin in L6 myotubes increases the concentration of mitochondrial enzymes and GLUT4 and enhances the binding of NRF-1 and NRF-2 to DNA. AICAR and Ca-releasing agents also increase the levels of PGC-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A and myocyte-enhancing factors 2A and 2D. These results are similar to the responses seen in muscle during the adaptation to endurance exercise and show that L6 myotubes are a suitable model for studying the mechanisms by which exercise causes the adaptive responses in muscle mitochondria and glucose transport. PMID:15294043

  2. A protein with an inactive pterin-4a-carbinolamine dehydratase domain is required for Rubisco biogenesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Feiz, Leila; Williams-Carrier, Rosalind; Belcher, Susan; Montano, Monica; Barkan, Alice; Stern, David B

    2014-12-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) plays a critical role in sustaining life by catalysis of carbon fixation in the Calvin-Benson pathway. Incomplete knowledge of the assembly pathway of chloroplast Rubisco has hampered efforts to fully delineate the enzyme's properties, or seek improved catalytic characteristics via directed evolution. Here we report that a Mu transposon insertion in the Zea mays (maize) gene encoding a chloroplast dimerization co-factor of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (DCoH)/pterin-4α-carbinolamine dehydratases (PCD)-like protein is the causative mutation in a seedling-lethal, Rubisco-deficient mutant named Rubisco accumulation factor 2 (raf2-1). In raf2 mutants newly synthesized Rubisco large subunit accumulates in a high-molecular weight complex, the formation of which requires a specific chaperonin 60-kDa isoform. Analogous observations had been made previously with maize mutants lacking the Rubisco biogenesis proteins RAF1 and BSD2. Chemical cross-linking of maize leaves followed by immunoprecipitation with antibodies to RAF2, RAF1 or BSD2 demonstrated co-immunoprecipitation of each with Rubisco small subunit, and to a lesser extent, co-immunoprecipitation with Rubisco large subunit. We propose that RAF2, RAF1 and BSD2 form transient complexes with the Rubisco small subunit, which in turn assembles with the large subunit as it is released from chaperonins. PMID:25279696

  3. Outer membrane biogenesis in Escherichia coli, Neisseria meningitidis, and Helicobacter pylori: paradigm deviations in H. pylori.

    PubMed

    Liechti, George; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is capable of colonizing the gastric mucosa of the human stomach using a variety of factors associated with or secreted from its outer membrane (OM). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and numerous OM proteins have been shown to be involved in adhesion and immune stimulation/evasion. Many of these factors are essential for colonization and/or pathogenesis in a variety of animal models. Despite this wide array of potential targets present on the bacterial surface, the ability of H. pylori to vary its OM profile limits the effectiveness of vaccines or therapeutics that target any single one of these components. However, it has become evident that the proteins comprising the complexes that transport the majority of these molecules to the OM are highly conserved and often essential. The field of membrane biogenesis has progressed remarkably in the last few years, and the possibility now exists for targeting the mechanisms by which β-barrel proteins, lipoproteins, and LPS are transported to the OM, resulting in loss of bacterial fitness and significant altering of membrane permeability. In this review, the OM transport machinery for LPS, lipoproteins, and outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are discussed. While the principal investigations of these transport mechanisms have been conducted in Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, here these systems will be presented in the genetic context of ε proteobacteria. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that minimalist genomes, such as that of Helicobacter pylori, offer insight into the smallest number of components required for these essential pathways to function. Interestingly, in the majority of ε proteobacteria, while the inner and OM associated apparatus of LPS, lipoprotein, and OMP transport pathways appear to all be intact, most of the components associated with the periplasmic compartment are either missing or are almost unrecognizable when compared to their E. coli counterparts. Eventual

  4. Methionine restriction decreases endogenous oxidative molecular damage and increases mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling protein 4 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Naudí, Alba; Caro, Pilar; Jové, Mariona; Gómez, José; Boada, Jordi; Ayala, Victoria; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Barja, Gustavo; Pamplona, Reinald

    2007-12-01

    Aging plays a central role in the occurrence of neurodegenerative diseases. Caloric restriction (CR) mitigates oxidative stress by decreasing the rate of generation of endogenous damage, a mechanism that can contribute to the slowing of the aging rate induced by this intervention. Various reports have recently linked methionine to aging, and methionine restriction (MetR) without energy restriction also increases life span. We have thus hypothesized that MetR can be responsible, at least in part, for the decrease in endogenous oxidative damage in CR. In this investigation we subjected male rats to exactly the same dietary protocol of MetR that is known to increase their life span. We have found that MetR: (1) decreases the mitochondrial complex I content and activity, as well as complex III content, while the complex II and IV, the mitochondrial flavoprotein apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and ATP content are unchanged; (2) increases the mitochondrial biogenesis factor PGC-1alpha; (3) increases the resistance of brain to metabolic and oxidative stress by increasing mitochondrial uncoupling protein 4 uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4); and (4) decreases mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage and all five different markers of protein oxidation measured and lowers membrane unsaturation in rat brain. No changes were detected for protein amino acid composition. These beneficial MetR-induced changes likely derived from metabolic reprogramming at the cellular and tissue level can play a key role in the protection against aging-associated neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17716000

  5. The Arabidopsis thylakoid protein PAM68 is required for efficient D1 biogenesis and photosystem II assembly.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Ute; Zühlke, Jessica; Rengstl, Birgit; Kreller, Renate; Makarenko, Elina; Rühle, Thilo; Schünemann, Danja; Jahns, Peter; Weisshaar, Bernd; Nickelsen, Jörg; Leister, Dario

    2010-10-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a multiprotein complex that functions as a light-driven water:plastoquinone oxidoreductase in photosynthesis. Assembly of PSII proceeds through a number of distinct intermediate states and requires auxiliary proteins. The photosynthesis affected mutant 68 (pam68) of Arabidopsis thaliana displays drastically altered chlorophyll fluorescence and abnormally low levels of the PSII core subunits D1, D2, CP43, and CP47. We show that these phenotypes result from a specific decrease in the stability and maturation of D1. This is associated with a marked increase in the synthesis of RC (the PSII reaction center-like assembly complex) at the expense of PSII dimers and supercomplexes. PAM68 is a conserved integral membrane protein found in cyanobacterial and eukaryotic thylakoids and interacts in split-ubiquitin assays with several PSII core proteins and known PSII assembly factors. Biochemical analyses of thylakoids from Arabidopsis and Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 suggest that, during PSII assembly, PAM68 proteins associate with an early intermediate complex that might contain D1 and the assembly factor LPA1. Inactivation of cyanobacterial PAM68 destabilizes RC but does not affect larger PSII assembly complexes. Our data imply that PAM68 proteins promote early steps in PSII biogenesis in cyanobacteria and plants, but their inactivation is differently compensated for in the two classes of organisms. PMID:20923938

  6. High fat diet-induced liver steatosis promotes an increase in liver mitochondrial biogenesis in response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Carabelli, Julieta; Burgueño, Adriana L; Rosselli, Maria Soledad; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Lago, Nestor R; Pirola, Carlos J; Sookoian, Silvia

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number plays a key role in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes, but its role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not well understood. We evaluated the molecular mechanisms that may be involved in the regulation of liver mtDNA content in a high-fat-induced rat model of NAFLD. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that liver mtDNA copy number is associated with liver expression of HIF-1α. Rats were given either standard chow diet (SCD, n = 10) or high-fat diet (HFD, n = 15) for 20 weeks. Subsequently, mtDNA quantification using nuclear DNA (nDNA) as a reference was carried out using real time quantitative PCR. HFD induced a significant increase in liver mtDNA/nDNA ratio, which significantly correlated with the liver triglyceride content (R: 0.29, P < 0.05). The liver mtDNA/nDNA ratio significantly correlated with the hepatic expression of HIF-1α mRNA (R: 0.37, P < 0.001); liver HIF-1α mRNA was significantly higher in the HFD group. In addition, liver cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1 (COX4I1) mRNA expression was also positively correlated with liver mtDNA content. The hepatic expression of mRNA of transcriptional factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and PGC-1β, nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ and Tfam, was not associated with the liver mtDNA content. Neither hepatocyte apoptosis nor oxidative stress was involved in the HIF-1α-mediated increase in mtDNA copy number. In conclusion, we found that HFD promotes an increase in liver mitochondrial biogenesis in response to hypoxia via HIF-1α, probably to enhance the mitochondrial function as well as to accommodate the metabolic load. PMID:20629985

  7. High fat diet-induced liver steatosis promotes an increase in liver mitochondrial biogenesis in response to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Carabelli, Julieta; Burgueño, Adriana L; Rosselli, Maria Soledad; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Lago, Nestor R; Pirola, Carlos J; Sookoian, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number plays a key role in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes, but its role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not well understood. We evaluated the molecular mechanisms that may be involved in the regulation of liver mtDNA content in a high-fat-induced rat model of NAFLD. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that liver mtDNA copy number is associated with liver expression of HIF-1α. Rats were given either standard chow diet (SCD, n= 10) or high-fat diet (HFD, n= 15) for 20 weeks. Subsequently, mtDNA quantification using nuclear DNA (nDNA) as a reference was carried out using real time quantitative PCR. HFD induced a significant increase in liver mtDNA/nDNA ratio, which significantly correlated with the liver triglyceride content (R: 0.29, P < 0.05). The liver mtDNA/nDNA ratio significantly correlated with the hepatic expression of HIF-1α mRNA (R: 0.37, P < 0.001); liver HIF-1α mRNA was significantly higher in the HFD group. In addition, liver cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1 (COX4I1) mRNA expression was also positively correlated with liver mtDNA content. The hepatic expression of mRNA of transcriptional factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and PGC-1β, nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ and Tfam, was not associated with the liver mtDNA content. Neither hepatocyte apoptosis nor oxidative stress was involved in the HIF-1α-mediated increase in mtDNA copy number. In conclusion, we found that HFD promotes an increase in liver mitochondrial biogenesis in response to hypoxia via HIF-1α, probably to enhance the mitochondrial function as well as to accommodate the metabolic load. PMID:20629985

  8. Differential Expression of PGC-1α and Metabolic Sensors Suggest Age-Dependent Induction of Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Friedreich Ataxia Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    García-Giménez, José Luis; Gimeno, Amparo; Gonzalez-Cabo, Pilar; Dasí, Francisco; Bolinches-Amorós, Arantxa; Mollá, Belén; Palau, Francesc; Pallardó, Federico V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a mitochondrial rare disease, which molecular origin is associated with defect in the expression of frataxin. The pathological consequences are degeneration of nervous system structures and cardiomyopathy with necrosis and fibrosis, among others. Principal Findings Using FRDA fibroblasts we have characterized the oxidative stress status and mitochondrial biogenesis. We observed deficiency of MnSOD, increased ROS levels and low levels of ATP. Expression of PGC-1α and mtTFA was increased and the active form of the upstream signals p38 MAPK and AMPK in fibroblasts from two patients. Interestingly, the expression of energetic factors correlated with the natural history of disease of the patients, the age when skin biopsy was performed and the size of the GAA expanded alleles. Furthermore, idebenone inhibit mitochondriogenic responses in FRDA cells. Conclusions The induction of mitochondrial biogenesis in FRDA may be a consequence of the mitochondrial impairment associated with disease evolution. The increase of ROS and the involvement of the oxidative phosphorylation may be an early event in the cell pathophysiology of frataxin deficiency, whereas increase of mitochondriogenic response might be a later phenomenon associated to the individual age and natural history of the disease, being more evident as the patient age increases and disease evolves. This is a possible explanation of heart disease in FRDA. PMID:21687738

  9. Deficiency of the ribosome biogenesis gene Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells causes neutropenia in mice by attenuating lineage progression in myelocytes.

    PubMed

    Zambetti, Noemi A; Bindels, Eric M J; Van Strien, Paulina M H; Valkhof, Marijke G; Adisty, Maria N; Hoogenboezem, Remco M; Sanders, Mathijs A; Rommens, Johanna M; Touw, Ivo P; Raaijmakers, Marc H G P

    2015-10-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder characterized by debilitating neutropenia. The disease is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the SBDS gene, implicated in ribosome biogenesis, but the cellular and molecular events driving cell specific phenotypes in ribosomopathies remain poorly defined. Here, we established what is to our knowledge the first mammalian model of neutropenia in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome through targeted downregulation of Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells expressing the myeloid transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (Cebpa). Sbds deficiency in the myeloid lineage specifically affected myelocytes and their downstream progeny while, unexpectedly, it was well tolerated by rapidly cycling hematopoietic progenitor cells. Molecular insights provided by massive parallel sequencing supported cellular observations of impaired cell cycle exit and formation of secondary granules associated with the defect of myeloid lineage progression in myelocytes. Mechanistically, Sbds deficiency activated the p53 tumor suppressor pathway and induced apoptosis in these cells. Collectively, the data reveal a previously unanticipated, selective dependency of myelocytes and downstream progeny, but not rapidly cycling progenitors, on this ubiquitous ribosome biogenesis protein, thus providing a cellular basis for the understanding of myeloid lineage biased defects in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. PMID:26185170

  10. Deficiency of the ribosome biogenesis gene Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells causes neutropenia in mice by attenuating lineage progression in myelocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zambetti, Noemi A.; Bindels, Eric M. J.; Van Strien, Paulina M. H.; Valkhof, Marijke G.; Adisty, Maria N.; Hoogenboezem, Remco M.; Sanders, Mathijs A.; Rommens, Johanna M.; Touw, Ivo P.; Raaijmakers, Marc H. G. P.

    2015-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder characterized by debilitating neutropenia. The disease is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the SBDS gene, implicated in ribosome biogenesis, but the cellular and molecular events driving cell specific phenotypes in ribosomopathies remain poorly defined. Here, we established what is to our knowledge the first mammalian model of neutropenia in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome through targeted downregulation of Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells expressing the myeloid transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (Cebpa). Sbds deficiency in the myeloid lineage specifically affected myelocytes and their downstream progeny while, unexpectedly, it was well tolerated by rapidly cycling hematopoietic progenitor cells. Molecular insights provided by massive parallel sequencing supported cellular observations of impaired cell cycle exit and formation of secondary granules associated with the defect of myeloid lineage progression in myelocytes. Mechanistically, Sbds deficiency activated the p53 tumor suppressor pathway and induced apoptosis in these cells. Collectively, the data reveal a previously unanticipated, selective dependency of myelocytes and downstream progeny, but not rapidly cycling progenitors, on this ubiquitous ribosome biogenesis protein, thus providing a cellular basis for the understanding of myeloid lineage biased defects in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. PMID:26185170

  11. The Pichia pastoris PER6 gene product is a peroxisomal integral membrane protein essential for peroxisome biogenesis and has sequence similarity to the Zellweger syndrome protein PAF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Waterham, H R; de Vries, Y; Russel, K A; Xie, W; Veenhuis, M; Cregg, J M

    1996-01-01

    We report the cloning of PER6, a gene essential for peroxisome biogenesis in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The PER6 sequence predicts that its product Per6p is a 52-kDa polypeptide with the cysteine-rich C3HC4 motif. Per6p has significant overall sequence similarity with the human peroxisome assembly factor PAF-1, a protein that is defective in certain patients suffering from the peroxisomal disorder Zellweger syndrome, and with car1, a protein required for peroxisome biogenesis and caryogamy in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. In addition, the C3HC4 motif and two of the three membrane-spanning segments predicted for Per6p align with the C3HC4 motifs and the two membrane-spanning segments predicted for PAF-1 and car1. Like PAF-1, Per6p is a peroxisomal integral membrane protein. In methanol- or oleic acid-induced cells of per6 mutants, morphologically recognizable peroxisomes are absent. Instead, peroxisomal remnants are observed. In addition, peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized but located in the cytosol. The similarities between Per6p and PAF-1 in amino acid sequence and biochemical properties, and between mutants defective in their respective genes, suggest that Per6p is the putative yeast homolog of PAF-1. PMID:8628321

  12. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: A ceRNA Analysis Pointed to a Crosstalk between SOX2, TP53, and microRNA Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carina, Valeria; Tomasello, Laura; Pitrone, Maria; Baiamonte, Concetta; Amato, Marco Calogero

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that cancer stem cells (CSC) may play a central role in oncogenesis, especially in undifferentiated tumours. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) has characteristics suggestive of a tumour enriched in CSC. Previous studies suggested that the stem cell factor SOX2 has a preeminent hierarchical role in determining the characteristics of stem cells in SW1736 ATC cell line. In detail, silencing SOX2 in SW1736 is able to suppress the expression of the stem markers analysed, strongly sensitizing the line to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, in order to further investigate the role of SOX2 in ATC, a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) analysis was conducted in order to isolate new functional partners of SOX2. Among the interactors, of particular interest are genes involved in the biogenesis of miRNAs (DICER1, RNASEN, and EIF2C2), in the control cell cycle (TP53, CCND1), and in mitochondrial activity (COX8A). The data suggest that stemness, microRNA biogenesis and functions, p53 regulatory network, cyclin D1, and cell cycle control, together with mitochondrial activity, might be coregulated. PMID:25705224

  13. Mechanistic studies of the biogenesis and folding of outer membrane proteins in vitro and in vivo: What have we learned to date?

    PubMed Central

    McMorran, Lindsay M.; Brockwell, David J.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Research into the mechanisms by which proteins fold into their native structures has been on-going since the work of Anfinsen in the 1960s. Since that time, the folding mechanisms of small, water-soluble proteins have been well characterised. By contrast, progress in understanding the biogenesis and folding mechanisms of integral membrane proteins has lagged significantly because of the need to create a membrane mimetic environment for folding studies in vitro and the difficulties in finding suitable conditions in which reversible folding can be achieved. Improved knowledge of the factors that promote membrane protein folding and disfavour aggregation now allows studies of folding into lipid bilayers in vitro to be performed. Consequently, mechanistic details and structural information about membrane protein folding are now emerging at an ever increasing pace. Using the panoply of methods developed for studies of the folding of water-soluble proteins. This review summarises current knowledge of the mechanisms of outer membrane protein biogenesis and folding into lipid bilayers in vivo and in vitro and discusses the experimental techniques utilised to gain this information. The emerging knowledge is beginning to allow comparisons to be made between the folding of membrane proteins with current understanding of the mechanisms of folding of water-soluble proteins. PMID:24613287

  14. Transcriptional Analysis of the sfa Determinant Revealing Multiple mRNA Processing Events in the Biogenesis of S Fimbriae in Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Balsalobre, Carlos; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Jass, Jana; Hacker, Jörg; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2003-01-01

    Among the virulence factors present in pathogenic extraintestinal Escherichia coli strains, expression of fimbrial adhesins is necessary for attachment to the host tissues and subsequent colonization. Occurrence of the sfa determinant coding for the S fimbriae is widespread among the uropathogens and meningitis isolates. The sfa operon consists of nine genes. In the biogenesis of S fimbriae, the proteins encoded by the sfa genes are presumably required in a specific stoichiometry. In the present work we studied how differential expression of the sfa operon genes occurs. Our findings indicate that a number of endoribonucleolytic cleavages occur in the mRNA from the sfa operon, and we detected the presence of different distinct transcriptional products, including sfaBA, sfaA, sfaADE, and sfaGSH. The sfaGSH transcript represents the three distal genes of the sfa operon, which code for the minor subunits of the S fimbriae. Analysis of the proteins in S fimbriae suggested that expression of the sfaGSH transcript provides equimolar amounts of the minor subunits. Furthermore, we showed that in the generation of the major sfaA transcript, the processing included RNase E endoribonuceolytic cleavage of the precursor sfaBA transcript. We suggest that posttranscriptional mRNA processing events result in differential gene expression important to achieve the stoichiometry necessary for fimbrial adhesin biogenesis. PMID:12511509

  15. miRNA biogenesis: biological impact in the development of cancer.

    PubMed

    Romero-Cordoba, Sandra L; Salido-Guadarrama, Ivan; Rodriguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are non coding RNAs with different biological functions and pathological implications. Given their role as post-transcriptional gene expression regulators, they are involved in several important physiological processes like development, cell differentiation and cell signaling. miRNAs act as modulators of gene expression programs in different diseases, particularly in cancer, where they act through the repression of genes which are critical for carcinogenesis. The expression level of mature miRNAs is the result of a fine mechanism of biogenesis, carried out by different enzymatic complexes that exert their function at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In this review, we will focus our discussion on the alterations in the miRNA biogenesis machinery, and its impact on the establishment and development of cancer programs. PMID:25482951

  16. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K; Osvath, Sarah R; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H; Charles, Ian G; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  17. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L.; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K.; Osvath, Sarah R.; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S.; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G.; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H.; Charles, Ian G.; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  18. Organelle biogenesis and interorganellar connections: Better in contact than in isolation.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Tiziana; Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    Membrane contact sites (MCSs) allow the exchange of molecules and information between organelles, even when their membranes cannot fuse directly. In recent years, a number of functions have been attributed to these contacts, highlighting their critical role in cell homeostasis. Although inter-organellar connections typically involve the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), we recently reported the presence of a novel MCSs between melanosomes and mitochondria. Melanosome-mitochondrion contacts appear mediated by fibrillar bridges resembling the protein tethers linking mitochondria and the ER, both for their ultrastructural features and the involvement of Mitofusin 2. The frequency of these connections correlates spatially and timely with melanosome biogenesis, suggesting a functional link between the 2 processes and in general that organelle biogenesis in the secretory pathway requires interorganellar crosstalks at multiple steps. Here, we summarize the different functions attributed to MCSs, and discuss their possible relevance for the newly identified melanosome-mitochondrion liaison. PMID:25346798

  19. Rhabdomere biogenesis in Drosophila photoreceptors is acutely sensitive to phosphatidic acid levels

    PubMed Central

    Coessens, Elise; Manifava, Maria; Georgiev, Plamen; Pettitt, Trevor; Wood, Eleanor; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Okkenhaug, Hanneke; Trivedi, Deepti; Zhang, Qifeng; Razzaq, Azam; Zaid, Ola; Wakelam, Michael; O'Kane, Cahir J; Ktistakis, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is postulated to have both structural and signaling functions during membrane dynamics in animal cells. In this study, we show that before a critical time period during rhabdomere biogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptors, elevated levels of PA disrupt membrane transport to the apical domain. Lipidomic analysis shows that this effect is associated with an increase in the abundance of a single, relatively minor molecular species of PA. These transport defects are dependent on the activation state of Arf1. Transport defects via PA generated by phospholipase D require the activity of type I phosphatidylinositol (PI) 4 phosphate 5 kinase, are phenocopied by knockdown of PI 4 kinase, and are associated with normal endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. We propose that PA levels are critical for apical membrane transport events required for rhabdomere biogenesis. PMID:19349583

  20. piRNA-guided slicing specifies transcripts for Zucchini dependent, phased piRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brennecke, Julius

    2016-01-01

    In animal gonads PIWI-clade Argonaute proteins repress transposons sequence-specifically via bound piRNAs. These are processed from single-stranded precursor RNAs by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we show that primary piRNA biogenesis is a 3′ directed and phased process that, in the Drosophila germline, is initiated by secondary piRNA-guided transcript cleavage. Phasing results from consecutive endo-nucleolytic cleavages catalyzed by Zucchini, implying coupled formation of 3′ and 5′ ends of flanking piRNAs. Unexpectedly, Zucchini also participates in 3′ end formation of secondary piRNAs. Its function can, however, be bypassed by downstream piRNA-guided precursor cleavages coupled to exonucleolytic trimming. Our data uncover an evolutionarily conserved piRNA biogenesis mechanism where Zucchini plays a central role in defining piRNA 5′ and 3′ ends. PMID:25977553

  1. Stomatin-Like Protein 2 Binds Cardiolipin and Regulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Darah A.; Lemke, Caitlin D.; Elias, Isaac M.; Chau, Luan A.; Kirchhof, Mark G.; Li, Bo; Ball, Eric H.; Dunn, Stanley D.; Hatch, Grant M.; Madrenas, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2) is a widely expressed mitochondrial inner membrane protein of unknown function. Here we show that human SLP-2 interacts with prohibitin-1 and -2 and binds to the mitochondrial membrane phospholipid cardiolipin. Upregulation of SLP-2 expression increases cardiolipin content and the formation of metabolically active mitochondrial membranes and induces mitochondrial biogenesis. In human T lymphocytes, these events correlate with increased complex I and II activities, increased intracellular ATP stores, and increased resistance to apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway, ultimately enhancing cellular responses. We propose that the function of SLP-2 is to recruit prohibitins to cardiolipin to form cardiolipin-enriched microdomains in which electron transport complexes are optimally assembled. Likely through the prohibitin functional interactome, SLP-2 then regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function. PMID:21746876

  2. Two distinct arginine methyltransferases are required for biogenesis of Sm-class ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalvez, Graydon B.; Tian, Liping; Ospina, Jason K.; Boisvert, François-Michel; Lamond, Angus I.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) are core components of the spliceosome. The U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNPs each contain a common set of seven Sm proteins. Three of these Sm proteins are posttranslationally modified to contain symmetric dimethylarginine (sDMA) residues within their C-terminal tails. However, the precise function of this modification in the snRNP biogenesis pathway is unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that the methyltransferase protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is responsible for sDMA modification of Sm proteins. We found that in human cells, PRMT5 and a newly discovered type II methyltransferase, PRMT7, are each required for Sm protein sDMA modification. Furthermore, we show that the two enzymes function nonredundantly in Sm protein methylation. Lastly, we provide in vivo evidence demonstrating that Sm protein sDMA modification is required for snRNP biogenesis in human cells. PMID:17709427

  3. RNase III-independent microRNA biogenesis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, Thomas; Cazalla, Demián; Yang, Jr-Shiuan; Bortolamiol-Becet, Diane; Lai, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    RNase III enzymes are fundamental to the biogenesis of microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in all species studied. Although alternative miRNA pathways independent of Drosha or Dicer exist, each still requires one RNase III-type enzyme. Here, we describe two strategies that marry either RNase Z or the Integrator complex with the slicing activity of Argonaute2 to generate highly functional mature miRNAs. We provide stringent validation of their RNase III independence by demonstrating efficient miRNA biogenesis and activity in Drosha and Dicer knockout cells. These data provide proof-of-principle evidence for additional mechanistic possibilities for efficient generation of small regulatory RNAs, and represent novel silencing triggers that may be exploited for technical purposes. PMID:23097423

  4. Order within a mosaic distribution of mitochondrial c-type cytochrome biogenesis systems?

    PubMed

    Allen, James W A; Jackson, Andrew P; Rigden, Daniel J; Willis, Antony C; Ferguson, Stuart J; Ginger, Michael L

    2008-05-01

    Mitochondrial cytochromes c and c(1) are present in all eukaryotes that use oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor in the respiratory chain. Maturation of c-type cytochromes requires covalent attachment of the heme cofactor to the protein, and there are at least five distinct biogenesis systems that catalyze this post-translational modification in different organisms and organelles. In this study, we use biochemical data, comparative genomic and structural bioinformatics investigations to provide a holistic view of mitochondrial c-type cytochrome biogenesis and its evolution. There are three pathways for mitochondrial c-type cytochrome maturation, only one of which is present in prokaryotes. We analyze the evolutionary distribution of these biogenesis systems, which include the Ccm system (System I) and the enzyme heme lyase (System III). We conclude that heme lyase evolved once and, in many lineages, replaced the multicomponent Ccm system (present in the proto-mitochondrial endosymbiont), probably as a consequence of lateral gene transfer. We find no evidence of a System III precursor in prokaryotes, and argue that System III is incompatible with multi-heme cytochromes common to bacteria, but absent from eukaryotes. The evolution of the eukaryotic-specific protein heme lyase is strikingly unusual, given that this protein provides a function (thioether bond formation) that is also ubiquitous in prokaryotes. The absence of any known c-type cytochrome biogenesis system from the sequenced genomes of various trypanosome species indicates the presence of a third distinct mitochondrial pathway. Interestingly, this system attaches heme to mitochondrial cytochromes c that contain only one cysteine residue, rather than the usual two, within the heme-binding motif. The isolation of single-cysteine-containing mitochondrial cytochromes c from free-living kinetoplastids, Euglena and the marine flagellate Diplonema papillatum suggests that this unique form of heme attachment

  5. The tails of ubiquitin precursors are ribosomal proteins whose fusion to ubiquitin facilitates ribosome biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, Daniel; Bartel, Bonnie; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1989-03-01

    Three of the four yeast ubiquitin genes encode hybrid proteins which are cleaved to yield ubiquitin and previously unidentified ribosomal proteins. The transient association between ubiquitin and these proteins promotes their incorporation into nascent ribosomes and is required for efficient ribosome biogenesis. These results suggest a novel 'chaperone' function for ubiquitin, in which its covalent association with other proteins promotes the formation of specific cellular structures.

  6. Yeast Mitochondria as a Model System to Study the Biogenesis of Bacterial β-Barrel Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Thomas; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Rapaport, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Beta-barrel proteins are found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. The evolutionary conservation in the biogenesis of these proteins allows mitochondria to assemble bacterial β-barrel proteins in their functional form. In this chapter, we describe exemplarily how the capacity of yeast mitochondria to process the trimeric autotransporter YadA can be used to study the role of bacterial periplasmic chaperones in this process. PMID:26427673

  7. Nom1 Mediates Pancreas Development by Regulating Ribosome Biogenesis in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wei; Chen, Zelin; Zhang, Yihan; Yan, Ruibin; Yan, Guanrong; Li, Song; Zhong, Hanbing; Lin, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is an important biological process for proper cellular function and development. Defects leading to improper ribosome biogenesis can cause diseases such as Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome. Nucleolar proteins are a large family of proteins and are involved in many cellular processes, including the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. Through a forward genetic screen and positional cloning, we identified and characterized a zebrafish line carrying mutation in nucleolar protein with MIF4G domain 1 (nom1), which encodes a conserved nulceolar protein with a role in pre-rRNA processing. Zebrafish nom1 mutants exhibit major defects in endoderm development, especially in exocrine pancreas. Further studies revealed that impaired proliferation of ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitor cells mainly contributed to the phenotype. RNA-seq and molecular analysis showed that ribosome biogenesis and pre-mRNA splicing were both affected in the mutant embryos. Several defects of ribosome assembly have been shown to have a p53-dependent mechanism. In the nom1 mutant, loss of p53 did not rescue the pancreatic defect, suggesting a p53-independent role. Further studies indicate that protein phosphatase 1 alpha, an interacting protein to Nom1, could partially rescue the pancreatic defect in nom1 morphants if a human nucleolar localization signal sequence was artificially added. This suggests that targeting Pp1α into the nucleolus by Nom1 is important for pancreatic proliferation. Altogether, our studies revealed a new mechanism involving Nom1 in controlling vertebrate exocrine pancreas formation. PMID:24967912

  8. Protein biogenesis machinery is a driver of replicative aging in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Georges E; Meinema, Anne C; González, Javier; Wolters, Justina C; Schmidt, Alexander; Guryev, Victor; Bischoff, Rainer; Wit, Ernst C; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M; Heinemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    An integrated account of the molecular changes occurring during the process of cellular aging is crucial towards understanding the underlying mechanisms. Here, using novel culturing and computational methods as well as latest analytical techniques, we mapped the proteome and transcriptome during the replicative lifespan of budding yeast. With age, we found primarily proteins involved in protein biogenesis to increase relative to their transcript levels. Exploiting the dynamic nature of our data, we reconstructed high-level directional networks, where we found the same protein biogenesis-related genes to have the strongest ability to predict the behavior of other genes in the system. We identified metabolic shifts and the loss of stoichiometry in protein complexes as being consequences of aging. We propose a model whereby the uncoupling of protein levels of biogenesis-related genes from their transcript levels is causal for the changes occurring in aging yeast. Our model explains why targeting protein synthesis, or repairing the downstream consequences, can serve as interventions in aging. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08527.001 PMID:26422514

  9. Protein biogenesis machinery is a driver of replicative aging in yeast.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Georges E; Meinema, Anne C; González, Javier; Wolters, Justina C; Schmidt, Alexander; Guryev, Victor; Bischoff, Rainer; Wit, Ernst C; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M; Heinemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    An integrated account of the molecular changes occurring during the process of cellular aging is crucial towards understanding the underlying mechanisms. Here, using novel culturing and computational methods as well as latest analytical techniques, we mapped the proteome and transcriptome during the replicative lifespan of budding yeast. With age, we found primarily proteins involved in protein biogenesis to increase relative to their transcript levels. Exploiting the dynamic nature of our data, we reconstructed high-level directional networks, where we found the same protein biogenesis-related genes to have the strongest ability to predict the behavior of other genes in the system. We identified metabolic shifts and the loss of stoichiometry in protein complexes as being consequences of aging. We propose a model whereby the uncoupling of protein levels of biogenesis-related genes from their transcript levels is causal for the changes occurring in aging yeast. Our model explains why targeting protein synthesis, or repairing the downstream consequences, can serve as interventions in aging. PMID:26422514

  10. Human PEX1 is mutated in complementation group 1 of the peroxisome biogenesis disorders.

    PubMed

    Portsteffen, H; Beyer, A; Becker, E; Epplen, C; Pawlak, A; Kunau, W H; Dodt, G

    1997-12-01

    Human peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBDs) are a group of genetically heterogeneous autosomal-recessive disease caused by mutations in PEX genes that encode peroxins, proteins required for peroxisome biogenesis. These lethal diseases include Zellweger syndrome (ZS), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum's disease (IRD), three phenotypes now thought to represent a continuum of clinical features that are most severe in ZS, milder in NALD and least severe in IRD2. At least eleven PBD complementation groups have been identified by somatic-cell hybridization analysis compared to the eighteen PEX complementation groups that have been found in yeast. We have cloned the human PEX1 gene encoding a 147-kD member of the AAA protein family (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities), which is the putative orthologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pex1p (ScPex1p). Human PEX1 has been identified by computer-based 'homology probing' using the ScPex1p sequence to screen databases of expressed sequence tags (dbEST) for human cDNA clones. Expression of PEX1 rescued the cells from the biogenesis defect in human fibroblasts of complementation group 1 (CG1), the largest PBD complementation group. We show that PEX1 is mutated in CG1 patients. PMID:9398848

  11. Redox and Reactive Oxygen Species Regulation of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bourens, Myriam; Fontanesi, Flavia; Soto, Iliana C.; Liu, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is the major oxygen consumer enzyme in the cell. COX biogenesis involves several redox-regulated steps. The process is highly regulated to prevent the formation of pro-oxidant intermediates. Recent Advances: Regulation of COX assembly involves several reactive oxygen species and redox-regulated steps. These include: (i) Intricate redox-controlled machineries coordinate the expression of COX isoenzymes depending on the environmental oxygen concentration. (ii) COX is a heme A-copper metalloenzyme. COX copper metallation involves the copper chaperone Cox17 and several other recently described cysteine-rich proteins, which are oxidatively folded in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Copper transfer to COX subunits 1 and 2 requires concomitant transfer of redox power. (iii) To avoid the accumulation of reactive assembly intermediates, COX is regulated at the translational level to minimize synthesis of the heme A-containing Cox1 subunit when assembly is impaired. Critical Issues: An increasing number of regulatory pathways converge to facilitate efficient COX assembly, thus preventing oxidative stress. Future Directions: Here we will review on the redox-regulated COX biogenesis steps and will discuss their physiological relevance. Forthcoming insights into the precise regulation of mitochondrial COX biogenesis in normal and stress conditions will likely open future perspectives for understanding mitochondrial redox regulation and prevention of oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1940–1952. PMID:22937827

  12. Promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis by necdin protects neurons against mitochondrial insults

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Koichi; Yasuda, Toru; Shiraishi, Chinatsu; Fujiwara, Kazushiro; Przedborski, Serge; Mochizuki, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Neurons rely heavily on mitochondria for their function and survival. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. PGC-1α is a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Here we identify necdin as a potent PGC-1α stabilizer that promotes mitochondrial biogenesis via PGC-1α in mammalian neurons. Expression of genes encoding mitochondria-specific proteins decreases significantly in necdin-null cortical neurons, where mitochondrial function and expression of the PGC-1α protein are reduced. Necdin strongly stabilizes PGC-1α by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Forced expression of necdin enhances mitochondrial function in primary cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to prevent mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitor-induced degeneration. Moreover, overexpression of necdin in the substantia nigra in vivo of adult mice protects dopaminergic neurons against degeneration in experimental Parkinson's disease. These data reveal that necdin promotes mitochondrial biogenesis through stabilization of endogenous PGC-1α to exert neuroprotection against mitochondrial insults. PMID:26971449

  13. shutdown is a component of the Drosophila piRNA biogenesis machinery

    PubMed Central

    Preall, Jonathan B.; Czech, Benjamin; Guzzardo, Paloma M.; Muerdter, Felix; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    In animals, the piRNA pathway preserves the integrity of gametic genomes, guarding them against the activity of mobile genetic elements. This innate immune mechanism relies on distinct genomic loci, termed piRNA clusters, to provide a molecular definition of transposons, enabling their discrimination from genes. piRNA clusters give rise to long, single-stranded precursors, which are processed into primary piRNAs through an unknown mechanism. These can engage in an adaptive amplification loop, the ping-pong cycle, to optimize the content of small RNA populations via the generation of secondary piRNAs. Many proteins have been ascribed functions in either primary biogenesis or the ping-pong cycle, though for the most part the molecular functions of proteins implicated in these pathways remain obscure. Here, we link shutdown (shu), a gene previously shown to be required for fertility in Drosophila, to the piRNA pathway. Analysis of knockdown phenotypes in both the germline and somatic compartments of the ovary demonstrate important roles for shutdown in both primary biogenesis and the ping-pong cycle. shutdown is a member of the FKBP family of immunophilins. Shu contains domains implicated in peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity and in the binding of HSP90-family chaperones, though the relevance of these domains to piRNA biogenesis is unknown. PMID:22753781

  14. AP-1 and clathrin are essential for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Jason; Jauregui, Miluska; Tan, Julie; Rollins, Janet; Lallet, Sylvie; Leventis, Peter A.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Chang, Henry C.; Le Borgne, Roland; Krämer, Helmut; Brill, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

     Regulated secretion of hormones, digestive enzymes, and other biologically active molecules requires the formation of secretory granules. Clathrin and the clathrin adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) are necessary for maturation of exocrine, endocrine, and neuroendocrine secretory granules. However, the initial steps of secretory granule biogenesis are only minimally understood. Powerful genetic approaches available in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were used to investigate the molecular pathway for biogenesis of the mucin-containing “glue granules” that form within epithelial cells of the third-instar larval salivary gland. Clathrin and AP-1 colocalize at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and clathrin recruitment requires AP-1. Furthermore, clathrin and AP-1 colocalize with secretory cargo at the TGN and on immature granules. Finally, loss of clathrin or AP-1 leads to a profound block in secretory granule formation. These findings establish a novel role for AP-1– and clathrin-dependent trafficking in the biogenesis of mucin-containing secretory granules. PMID:21490149

  15. Components and dynamics of fiber formation define a ubiquitous biogenesis pathway for bacterial pili

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Matthew; van Putten, Jos P.M.; Hayes, Stanley F.; Dorward, David; Koomey, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) are a unique class of multifunctional surface organelles in Gram-negative bacteria, which play important roles in prokaryotic cell biology. Although components of the Tfp biogenesis machinery have been characterized, it is not clear how they function or interact. Using Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a model system, we report here that organelle biogenesis can be resolved into two discrete steps: fiber formation and translocation of the fiber to the cell surface. This conclusion is based on the capturing of an intermediate state in which the organelle is retained within the cell owing to the simultaneous absence of the secretin family member and biogenesis component PilQ and the twitching motility/pilus retraction protein PilT. This finding is the first demonstration of a specific translocation defect associated with loss of secretin function, and additionally confirms the role of PilT as a conditional antagonist of stable pilus fiber formation. These findings have important implications for Tfp structure and function and are pertinent to other membrane translocation systems that utilize a highly related set of components. PMID:11101514

  16. The Role of the 3-Hydroxy 3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Cytosolic Domain in Karmellae Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Profant, Deborah A.; Roberts, Christopher J.; Koning, Ann J.; Wright, Robin L.

    1999-01-01

    In all cells examined, specific endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane arrays are induced in response to increased levels of the ER membrane protein 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. In yeast, expression of Hmg1p, one of two yeast HMG-CoA reductase isozymes, induces assembly of nuclear-associated ER stacks called karmellae. Understanding the features of HMG-CoA reductase that signal karmellae biogenesis would provide useful insights into the regulation of membrane biogenesis. The HMG-CoA reductase protein consists of two domains, a multitopic membrane domain and a cytosolic catalytic domain. Previous studies had indicated that the HMG-CoA reductase membrane domain was exclusively responsible for generation of ER membrane proliferations. Surprisingly, we discovered that this conclusion was incorrect: sequences at the carboxyl terminus of HMG-CoA reductase can profoundly affect karmellae biogenesis. Specifically, truncations of Hmg1p that removed or shortened the carboxyl terminus were unable to induce karmellae assembly. This result indicated that the membrane domain of Hmg1p was not sufficient to signal for karmellae assembly. Using β-galactosidase fusions, we demonstrated that the carboxyl terminus was unlikely to simply serve as an oligomerization domain. Our working hypothesis is that a truncated or misfolded cytosolic domain prevents proper signaling for karmellae by interfering with the required tertiary structure of the membrane domain. PMID:10512876

  17. Rab11A Controls the Biogenesis of Birbeck Granules by Regulating Langerin Recycling and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Uzan-Gafsou, Stéphanie; Bausinger, Huguette; Proamer, Fabienne; Monier, Solange; Lipsker, Dan; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Goud, Bruno; de la Salle, Henri

    2007-01-01

    The extent to which Rab GTPases, Rab-interacting proteins, and cargo molecules cooperate in the dynamic organization of membrane architecture remains to be clarified. Langerin, a recycling protein accumulating in the Rab11-positive compartments of Langerhans cells, induces the formation of Birbeck granules (BGs), which are membrane subdomains of the endosomal recycling network. We investigated the role of Rab11A and two members of the Rab11 family of interacting proteins, Rip11 and RCP, in Langerin traffic and the biogenesis of BGs. The overexpression of a dominant-negative Rab11A mutant or Rab11A depletion strongly influenced Langerin traffic and stability and the formation of BGs, whereas modulation of other Rab proteins involved in dynamic regulation of the endocytic-recycling pathway had no effect. Impairment of Rab11A function led to a missorting of Langerin to lysosomal compartments, but inhibition of Langerin degradation by chloroquine did not restore the formation of BGs. Loss of RCP, but not of Rip11, also had a modest, but reproducible effect on Langerin stability and BG biogenesis, pointing to a role for Rab11A–RCP complexes in these events. Our results show that Rab11A and Langerin are required for BG biogenesis, and they illustrate the role played by a Rab GTPase in the formation of a specialized subcompartment within the endocytic-recycling system. PMID:17538027

  18. Rab11A controls the biogenesis of Birbeck granules by regulating Langerin recycling and stability.

    PubMed

    Uzan-Gafsou, Stéphanie; Bausinger, Huguette; Proamer, Fabienne; Monier, Solange; Lipsker, Dan; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Goud, Bruno; de la Salle, Henri; Hanau, Daniel; Salamero, Jean

    2007-08-01

    The extent to which Rab GTPases, Rab-interacting proteins, and cargo molecules cooperate in the dynamic organization of membrane architecture remains to be clarified. Langerin, a recycling protein accumulating in the Rab11-positive compartments of Langerhans cells, induces the formation of Birbeck granules (BGs), which are membrane subdomains of the endosomal recycling network. We investigated the role of Rab11A and two members of the Rab11 family of interacting proteins, Rip11 and RCP, in Langerin traffic and the biogenesis of BGs. The overexpression of a dominant-negative Rab11A mutant or Rab11A depletion strongly influenced Langerin traffic and stability and the formation of BGs, whereas modulation of other Rab proteins involved in dynamic regulation of the endocytic-recycling pathway had no effect. Impairment of Rab11A function led to a missorting of Langerin to lysosomal compartments, but inhibition of Langerin degradation by chloroquine did not restore the formation of BGs. Loss of RCP, but not of Rip11, also had a modest, but reproducible effect on Langerin stability and BG biogenesis, pointing to a role for Rab11A-RCP complexes in these events. Our results show that Rab11A and Langerin are required for BG biogenesis, and they illustrate the role played by a Rab GTPase in the formation of a specialized subcompartment within the endocytic-recycling system. PMID:17538027

  19. All-trans retinoic acid induces oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondria biogenesis in adipocytes[S

    PubMed Central

    Tourniaire, Franck; Musinovic, Hana; Gouranton, Erwan; Astier, Julien; Marcotorchino, Julie; Arreguin, Andrea; Bernot, Denis; Palou, Andreu; Bonet, M. Luisa; Ribot, Joan; Landrier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    A positive effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on white adipose tissue (WAT) oxidative and thermogenic capacity has been described and linked to an in vivo fat-lowering effect of ATRA in mice. However, little is known about the effects of ATRA on mitochondria in white fat. Our objective has been to characterize the effect of ATRA on mitochondria biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity in mature white adipocytes. Transcriptome analysis, oxygraphy, analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and flow cytometry-based analysis of mitochondria density were performed in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes after 24 h incubation with ATRA (2 µM) or vehicle. Selected genes linked to mitochondria biogenesis and function and mitochondria immunostaining were analyzed in WAT tissues of ATRA-treated as compared with vehicle-treated mice. ATRA upregulated the expression of a large set of genes linked to mtDNA replication and transcription, mitochondrial biogenesis, and OXPHOS in adipocytes, as indicated by transcriptome analysis. Oxygen consumption rate, mtDNA content, and staining of mitochondria were increased in the ATRA-treated adipocytes. Similar results were obtained in WAT depots of ATRA-treated mice. We conclude that ATRA impacts mitochondria in adipocytes, leading to increased OXPHOS capacity and mitochondrial content in these cells. PMID:25914170

  20. Purification of Human Telomerase Complexes Identifies Factors Involved in Telomerase Biogenesis and Telomere Length Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Dragony; Collins, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The identities and roles of proteins associated with human telomerase remain poorly defined. To gain insight, we undertook an affinity purification of endogenously assembled human telomerase complexes. We show that specific subsets of H/ACA, Sm, and hnRNP proteins associate with active and inactive telomerase RNPs, while two NTPase proteins associate preferentially with active enzyme. All three core H/ACA-motif binding proteins are telomerase holoenzyme components essential for RNP accumulation. On the other hand, telomerase RNPs lacking interaction with Sm proteins or hnRNP C remain fully functional for telomere elongation. Curiously, overexpression of either associated hnRNP protein (hnRNP C and hnRNP U) or either NTPase protein (NAT10 and GNL3L) induced telomere shortening. Our findings suggest that endogenous human telomerase complexes are more heterogeneous than those of single-celled eukaryotes, have predominantly shared rather than telomerase-specific proteins, and make numerous regulatory interactions. PMID:18082603

  1. SuhB Associates with Nus Factors To Facilitate 30S Ribosome Biogenesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Navjot; Bubunenko, Mikhail; Smith, Carol; Abbott, David M.; Stringer, Anne M.; Shi, Ronald; Court, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complex of highly conserved proteins consisting of NusB, NusE, NusA, and NusG is required for robust expression of rRNA in Escherichia coli. This complex is proposed to prevent Rho-dependent transcription termination by a process known as “antitermination.” The mechanism of this antitermination in rRNA is poorly understood but requires association of NusB and NusE with a specific RNA sequence in rRNA known as BoxA. Here, we identify a novel member of the rRNA antitermination machinery: the inositol monophosphatase SuhB. We show that SuhB associates with elongating RNA polymerase (RNAP) at rRNA in a NusB-dependent manner. Although we show that SuhB is required for BoxA-mediated antitermination in a reporter system, our data indicate that the major function of the NusB/E/A/G/SuhB complex is not to prevent Rho-dependent termination of rRNA but rather to promote correct rRNA maturation. This occurs through formation of a SuhB-mediated loop between NusB/E/BoxA and RNAP/NusA/G. Thus, we have reassigned the function of these proteins at rRNA and identified another key player in this complex. PMID:26980831

  2. Concerted removal of the Erb1–Ytm1 complex in ribosome biogenesis relies on an elaborate interface

    PubMed Central

    Thoms, Matthias; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Maddi, Karthik; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    The complicated process of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves about 200 assembly factors that transiently associate with the nascent pre-ribosome in a spatiotemporally ordered way. During the early steps of 60S subunit formation, several proteins, collectively called A3 cluster factors, participate in the removal of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) from 27SA3 pre-rRNA. Among these factors is the conserved hetero-trimeric Nop7–Erb1–Ytm1 complex (or human Pes1–Bop1–Wdr12), which is removed from the evolving pre-60S particle by the AAA ATPase Rea1 to allow progression in the pathway. Here, we clarify how Ytm1 and Erb1 interact, which has implications for the release mechanism of both factors from the pre-ribosome. Biochemical studies show that Ytm1 and Erb1 bind each other via their ß-propeller domains. The crystal structure of the Erb1–Ytm1 heterodimer determined at 2.67Å resolution reveals an extended interaction surface between the propellers in a rarely observed binding mode. Structure-based mutations in the interface that impair the Erb1–Ytm1 interaction do not support growth, with specific defects in 60S subunit synthesis. Under these mutant conditions, it becomes clear that an intact Erb1–Ytm1 complex is required for 60S maturation and that loss of this stable interaction prevents ribosome production. PMID:26657628

  3. Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein A is required for diversion of phagosome biogenesis but not for cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    von Bargen, Kristine; Polidori, Marco; Becken, Ulrike; Huth, Gitta; Prescott, John F; Haas, Albert

    2009-12-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause severe bronchopneumonia in foals and AIDS patients. Virulence is plasmid regulated and is accompanied by phagosome maturation arrest and host cell necrosis. A replacement mutant in the gene for VapA (virulence-associated protein A), a major virulence factor of R. equi, was tested for its activities during macrophage infection. Early in infection, phagosomes containing the vapA mutant did not fuse with lysosomes and did not stain with the acidotropic fluor LysoTracker similar to those containing virulent wild-type R. equi. However, vapA mutant phagosomes had a lower average pH. Late in infection, phagosomes containing the vapA mutant were as frequently positive for LysoTracker as phagosomes containing plasmid-cured, avirulent bacteria, whereas those with virulent wild-type R. equi were still negative for the fluor. Macrophage necrosis after prolonged infection with virulent bacteria was accompanied by a loss of organelle staining with LysoTracker, suggesting that lysosome proton gradients had collapsed. The vapA mutant still killed the macrophages and yet did not affect the pH of host cell lysosomes. Hence, VapA is not required for host cell necrosis but is required for neutralization of phagosomes and lysosomes or their disruption. This is the first report of an R. equi mutant with altered phagosome biogenesis. PMID:19797071

  4. Novel structural co-expression analysis linking the NPM1-associated ribosomal biogenesis network to chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lawrence WC; Lin, Xihong; Yung, Godwin; Lui, Thomas; Chiu, Ya Ming; Wang, Fengfeng; Tsui, Nancy BY; Cho, William CS; Yip, SP; Siu, Parco M.; Wong, SC Cesar; Yung, Benjamin YM

    2015-01-01

    Co-expression analysis reveals useful dysregulation patterns of gene cooperativeness for understanding cancer biology and identifying new targets for treatment. We developed a structural strategy to identify co-expressed gene networks that are important for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). This strategy compared the distributions of expressional correlations between CML and normal states, and it identified a data-driven threshold to classify strongly co-expressed networks that had the best coherence with CML. Using this strategy, we found a transcriptome-wide reduction of co-expression connectivity in CML, reflecting potentially loosened molecular regulation. Conversely, when we focused on nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) associated networks, NPM1 established more co-expression linkages with BCR-ABL pathways and ribosomal protein networks in CML than normal. This finding implicates a new role of NPM1 in conveying tumorigenic signals from the BCR-ABL oncoprotein to ribosome biogenesis, affecting cellular growth. Transcription factors may be regulators of the differential co-expression patterns between CML and normal. PMID:26205693

  5. Biogenesis and nuclear export of ribosomal subunits in higher eukaryotes depend on the CRM1 export pathway.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Franziska; Kutay, Ulrike

    2003-06-15

    The production of ribosomes constitutes a major biosynthetic task for cells. Eukaryotic small and large ribosomal subunits are assembled in the nucleolus and independently exported to the cytoplasm. Most nuclear export pathways require RanGTP-binding export receptors. We analyzed the role of CRM1, the export receptor for leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NES), in the biogenesis of ribosomal subunits in vertebrate cells. Inhibition of the CRM1 export pathway led to a defect in nuclear export of both 40S and 60S subunits in HeLa cells. Moreover, the export of newly made ribosomal subunits in Xenopus oocytes was efficiently and specifically competed by BSA-NES conjugates. The CRM1 dependence of 60S subunit export suggested a conserved function for NMD3, a factor proposed to be a 60S subunit export adaptor in yeast. Indeed, we observed that nuclear export of human NMD3 (hNMD3) is sensitive to leptomycin B (LMB), which inactivates CRM1. It had, however, not yet been demonstrated that Nmd3 can interact with CRM1. Using purified recombinant proteins we have shown here that hNMD3 binds to CRM1 directly, in a RanGTP-dependent manner, by way of a C-terminal NES sequence. Our results suggest that the functions of CRM1 and NMD3 in ribosomal subunit export are conserved from yeast to higher eukaryotes. PMID:12724356

  6. HIV and Cocaine Impact Glial Metabolism: Energy Sensor AMP-activated protein kinase Role in Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Epigenetic Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata S R; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF. Results showed that cocaine exposure during HIV infection significantly increased the level of p24, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP-utilization and upregulated energy sensor AMPKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau and Wee1 protein expression. Increased ROS production subsequently inhibits OCR/ECAR ratio and OXPHOS, and eventually upregulate epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF in CHME-5 cells. These results suggest that HIV infection induced energy deficit and metabolic dysfunction is accelerated by cocaine inducing energy sensor AMPKs, mitochondrial biogenesis and chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF activation, which may lead to neuroAIDS disease progression. PMID:27535703

  7. CARTS biogenesis requires VAP–lipid transfer protein complexes functioning at the endoplasmic reticulum–Golgi interface

    PubMed Central

    Wakana, Yuichi; Kotake, Richika; Oyama, Nanako; Murate, Motohide; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Arasaki, Kohei; Inoue, Hiroki; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Vesicle-associated membrane protein–associated protein (VAP) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident integral membrane protein that controls a nonvesicular mode of ceramide and cholesterol transfer from the ER to the Golgi complex by interacting with ceramide transfer protein and oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), respectively. We report that VAP and its interacting proteins are required for the processing and secretion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor, whose transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the cell surface is mediated by transport carriers called “carriers of the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface” (CARTS). In VAP-depleted cells, diacylglycerol level at the TGN was decreased and CARTS formation was impaired. We found that VAP forms a complex with not only OSBP but also Sac1 phosphoinositide phosphatase at specialized ER subdomains that are closely apposed to the trans-Golgi/TGN, most likely reflecting membrane contact sites. Immobilization of ER–Golgi contacts dramatically reduced CARTS production, indicating that association–dissociation dynamics of the two membranes are important. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the ER–Golgi contacts play a pivotal role in lipid metabolism to control the biogenesis of transport carriers from the TGN. PMID:26490117

  8. HIV and Cocaine Impact Glial Metabolism: Energy Sensor AMP-activated protein kinase Role in Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Epigenetic Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata S. R.; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF. Results showed that cocaine exposure during HIV infection significantly increased the level of p24, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP-utilization and upregulated energy sensor AMPKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau and Wee1 protein expression. Increased ROS production subsequently inhibits OCR/ECAR ratio and OXPHOS, and eventually upregulate epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF in CHME-5 cells. These results suggest that HIV infection induced energy deficit and metabolic dysfunction is accelerated by cocaine inducing energy sensor AMPKs, mitochondrial biogenesis and chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF activation, which may lead to neuroAIDS disease progression. PMID:27535703

  9. MitoGenesisDB: an expression data mining tool to explore spatio-temporal dynamics of mitochondrial biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Orgeur, Mickael; Jacq, Claude; Lelandais, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria constitute complex and flexible cellular entities, which play crucial roles in normal and pathological cell conditions. The database MitoGenesisDB focuses on the dynamic of mitochondrial protein formation through global mRNA analyses. Three main parameters confer a global view of mitochondrial biogenesis: (i) time-course of mRNA production in highly synchronized yeast cell cultures, (ii) microarray analyses of mRNA localization that define translation sites and (iii) mRNA transcription rate and stability which characterize genes that are more dependent on post-transcriptional regulation processes. MitoGenesisDB integrates and establishes cross-comparisons between these data. Several model organisms can be analyzed via orthologous relationships between interspecies genes. More generally this database supports the ‘post-transcriptional operon’ model, which postulates that eukaryotes co-regulate related mRNAs based on their functional organization in ribonucleoprotein complexes. MitoGenesisDB allows identifying such groups of post-trancriptionally regulated genes and is thus a useful tool to analyze the complex relationships between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation processes. The case of respiratory chain assembly factors illustrates this point. The MitoGenesisDB interface is available at http://www.dsimb.inserm.fr/dsimb_tools/mitgene/. PMID:20833631

  10. Cystatin F Ensures Eosinophil Survival by Regulating Granule Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Stephen P.; McMillan, Sarah J.; Colbert, Jeff D.; Lawrence, Rachel A.; Watts, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eosinophils are now recognized as multifunctional leukocytes that provide critical homeostatic signals to maintain other immune cells and aid tissue repair. Paradoxically, eosinophils also express an armory of granule-localized toxins and hydrolases believed to contribute to pathology in inflammatory disease. How eosinophils deliver their supporting functions while avoiding self-inflicted injury is poorly understood. We have demonstrated that cystatin F (CF) is a critical survival factor for eosinophils. Eosinophils from CF null mice had reduced lifespan, reduced granularity, and disturbed granule morphology. In vitro, cysteine protease inhibitors restored granularity, demonstrating that control of cysteine protease activity by CF is critical for normal eosinophil development. CF null mice showed reduced pulmonary pathology in a model of allergic lung inflammation but also reduced ability to combat infection by the nematode Brugia malayi. These data identify CF as a “cytoprotectant” that promotes eosinophil survival and function by ensuring granule integrity. Video Abstract PMID:27067058

  11. Biogenesis of outer membranes in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-03-23

    The outer membrane, an essential organelle of Gram-negative bacteria, is composed of four major components: lipopolysaccharide, phospholipids, beta-barrel proteins, and lipoproteins. The mechanisms underlying the transport of these components to outer membranes are currently under extensive examination. Among them, the sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli has been clarified in detail. The Lol system, composed of five proteins, catalyzes outer membrane sorting of lipoproteins. Various Lpt proteins have recently been identified as factors involved in the transport of lipopolysaccharide to the outer membrane, although the mechanism remains largely unknown. Proteins with alpha-helical membrane spanning segments are found in the inner membrane, whereas amphipathic beta-barrel proteins span the outer membrane. These beta-barrel proteins are inserted into the outer membranes through a central core protein BamA (YaeT) with the help of four outer membrane lipoproteins. In contrast, little is known about how phospholipids are transported to the outer membrane. PMID:19270402

  12. Nucleolin protein interacts with microprocessor complex to affect biogenesis of microRNAs 15a and 16.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Brian F; Yu, Dihua; Van Dyke, Michael W

    2011-12-23

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are endogenous, short, non-coding RNA that undergo a multistep biogenesis before generating the functional, mature sequence. The core components of the microprocessor complex, consisting of Drosha and DGCR8, are both necessary and sufficient for this process, although accessory proteins have been found that modulate the biogenesis of a subset of miRNA. Curiously, many of the proteins involved in miRNA biogenesis are also needed for ribosomal RNA processing. Here we show that nucleolin, another protein critical for rRNA processing, is involved in the biogenesis of microRNA 15a/16 (miR-15a/16), specifically at the primary to precursor stage of processing. Through overexpression and knockdown studies, we show that miR-15a/16 levels are directly correlated to nucleolin expression. Furthermore, we found that cellular localization is critical for the proper functioning of nucleolin in this pathway and that nucleolin directly interacts with DGCR8 and Drosha in the nucleus. Nucleolin can bind to the primary miRNA both directly and specifically. Finally, we show that in the absence of nucleolin, cell extracts are unable to process miR-15a/16 in vitro and that this can be rescued by the addition of nucleolin. Our findings offer a new protein component in the microRNA biogenesis pathway and lend insight into miRNA dysregulation in certain cancers. PMID:22049078

  13. The nucleolar GTPase nucleostemin-like 1 plays a role in plant growth and senescence by modulating ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young; Park, Yong-Joon; Cho, Hui Kyung; Jung, Hyun Ju; Ahn, Tae-Kyu; Kang, Hunseung; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Nucleostemin is a nucleolar GTP-binding protein that is involved in stem cell proliferation, embryonic development, and ribosome biogenesis in mammals. Plant nucleostemin-like 1 (NSN1) plays a role in embryogenesis, and apical and floral meristem development. In this study, a nucleolar function of NSN1 in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis was identified. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused NSN1 localized to the nucleolus, which was primarily determined by its N-terminal domain. Recombinant NSN1 and its N-terminal domain (NSN1-N) bound to RNA in vitro. Recombinant NSN1 expressed GTPase activity in vitro. NSN1 silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana led to growth retardation and premature senescence. NSN1 interacted with Pescadillo and EBNA1 binding protein 2 (EBP2), which are nucleolar proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis, and with several ribosomal proteins. NSN1, NSN1-N, and EBP2 co-fractionated primarily with the 60S ribosomal large subunit in vivo. Depletion of NSN1 delayed 25S rRNA maturation and biogenesis of the 60S ribosome subunit, and repressed global translation. NSN1-deficient plants exhibited premature leaf senescence, excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and senescence-related gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest that NSN1 plays a crucial role in plant growth and senescence by modulating ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26163696

  14. Physical Exercise Regulates p53 Activity Targeting SCO2 and Increases Mitochondrial COX Biogenesis in Cardiac Muscle with Age

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhengtang; He, Jie; Su, Yuhui; He, Qiang; Liu, Jingxia; Yu, Lu; Al-Attas, Omar; Hussain, Tajamul; Ding, Shuzhe; Ji, Liu; Qian, Min

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to outline the timelines of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cytochrome c oxidase complex (COX) biogenesis in cardiac muscle with age, and to evaluate whether and how these age-related changes were attenuated by exercise. ICR/CD-1 mice were treated with pifithrin-μ (PFTμ), sacrificed and studied at different ages; ICR/CD-1 mice at younger or older ages were randomized to endurance treadmill running and sedentary conditions. The results showed that mRNA expression of p53 and its protein levels in mitochondria increased with age in cardiac muscle, accompanied by increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, reduced expression of COX subunits and assembly proteins, and decreased expression of most markers in mitochondrial biogenesis. Most of these age-related changes including p53 activity targeting cytochrome oxidase deficient homolog 2 (SCO2), p53 translocation to mitochondria and COX biogenesis were attenuated by exercise in older mice. PFTμ, an inhibitor blocking p53 translocation to mitochondria, increased COX biogenesis in older mice, but not in young mice. Our data suggest that physical exercise attenuates age-related changes in mitochondrial COX biogenesis and p53 activity targeting SCO2 and mitochondria, and thereby induces antisenescent and protective effects in cardiac muscle. PMID:21750704

  15. Physical exercise regulates p53 activity targeting SCO2 and increases mitochondrial COX biogenesis in cardiac muscle with age.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhengtang; He, Jie; Su, Yuhui; He, Qiang; Liu, Jingxia; Yu, Lu; Al-Attas, Omar; Hussain, Tajamul; Ding, Shuzhe; Ji, Liu; Qian, Min

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to outline the timelines of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cytochrome c oxidase complex (COX) biogenesis in cardiac muscle with age, and to evaluate whether and how these age-related changes were attenuated by exercise. ICR/CD-1 mice were treated with pifithrin-μ (PFTμ), sacrificed and studied at different ages; ICR/CD-1 mice at younger or older ages were randomized to endurance treadmill running and sedentary conditions. The results showed that mRNA expression of p53 and its protein levels in mitochondria increased with age in cardiac muscle, accompanied by increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, reduced expression of COX subunits and assembly proteins, and decreased expression of most markers in mitochondrial biogenesis. Most of these age-related changes including p53 activity targeting cytochrome oxidase deficient homolog 2 (SCO2), p53 translocation to mitochondria and COX biogenesis were attenuated by exercise in older mice. PFTμ, an inhibitor blocking p53 translocation to mitochondria, increased COX biogenesis in older mice, but not in young mice. Our data suggest that physical exercise attenuates age-related changes in mitochondrial COX biogenesis and p53 activity targeting SCO2 and mitochondria, and thereby induces antisenescent and protective effects in cardiac muscle. PMID:21750704

  16. Nanoparticle analysis sheds budding insights into genetic drivers of extracellular vesicle biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Stephanie N.; Conlon, Meghan M.; Rider, Mark A.; Brownstein, Naomi C.; Meckes, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of cell-to-cell communication in healthy and pathological environments. Because EVs are present in a variety of biological fluids and contain molecular signatures of their cell or tissue of origin, they have great diagnostic and prognostic value. The ability of EVs to deliver biologically active proteins, RNAs and lipids to cells has generated interest in developing novel therapeutics. Despite their potential medical use, many of the mechanisms underlying EV biogenesis and secretion remain unknown. Methods Here, we characterized vesicle secretion across the NCI-60 panel of human cancer cells by nanoparticle tracking analysis. Using CellMiner, the quantity of EVs secreted by each cell line was compared to reference transcriptomics data to identify gene products associated with vesicle secretion. Results Gene products positively associated with the quantity of exosomal-sized vesicles included vesicular trafficking classes of proteins with Rab GTPase function and sphingolipid metabolism. Positive correlates of larger microvesicle-sized vesicle secretion included gene products involved in cytoskeletal dynamics and exocytosis, as well as Rab GTPase activation. One of the identified targets, CD63, was further evaluated for its role in vesicle secretion. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 knockout of the CD63 gene in HEK293 cells resulted in a decrease in small vesicle secretion, suggesting the importance of CD63 in exosome biogenesis. Conclusion These observations reveal new insights into genes involved in exosome and microvesicle formation, and may provide a means to distinguish EV sub-populations. This study offers a foundation for further exploration of targets involved in EV biogenesis and secretion. PMID:27421995

  17. Thyroid Hormone Stimulation of Autophagy Is Essential for Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Activity in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesmana, Ronny; Sinha, Rohit A; Singh, Brijesh K; Zhou, Jin; Ohba, Kenji; Wu, Yajun; Yau, Winifred W Y; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yen, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) and autophagy share similar functions in regulating skeletal muscle growth, regeneration, and differentiation. Although TH recently has been shown to increase autophagy in liver, the regulation and role of autophagy by this hormone in skeletal muscle is not known. Here, using both in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrated that TH induces autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in skeletal muscle. TH induction of autophagy involved reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulation of 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-Unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1) signaling. TH also increased mRNA and protein expression of key autophagy genes, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), Sequestosome 1 (p62), and Ulk1, as well as genes that modulated autophagy and Forkhead box O (FOXO) 1/3a. TH increased mitochondrial protein synthesis and number as well as basal mitochondrial O2 consumption, ATP turnover, and maximal respiratory capacity. Surprisingly, mitochondrial activity and biogenesis were blunted when autophagy was blocked in muscle cells by Autophagy-related gene (Atg)5 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Induction of ROS and 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by TH played a significant role in the up-regulation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PPARGC1A), the key regulator of mitochondrial synthesis. In summary, our findings showed that TH-mediated autophagy was essential for stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in skeletal muscle. Moreover, autophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis were coupled in skeletal muscle via TH induction of mitochondrial activity and ROS generation. PMID:26562261

  18. The Ribosome Biogenesis Protein Nol9 Is Essential for Definitive Hematopoiesis and Pancreas Morphogenesis in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Bielczyk-Maczyńska, Ewa; Lam Hung, Laure; Ferreira, Lauren; Fleischmann, Tobias; Weis, Félix; Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Harvey, Steven A; Wali, Neha; Warren, Alan J; Barroso, Inês; Stemple, Derek L; Cvejic, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a ubiquitous and essential process in cells. Defects in ribosome biogenesis and function result in a group of human disorders, collectively known as ribosomopathies. In this study, we describe a zebrafish mutant with a loss-of-function mutation in nol9, a gene that encodes a non-ribosomal protein involved in rRNA processing. nol9sa1022/sa1022 mutants have a defect in 28S rRNA processing. The nol9sa1022/sa1022 larvae display hypoplastic pancreas, liver and intestine and have decreased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), as well as definitive erythrocytes and lymphocytes. In addition, ultrastructural analysis revealed signs of pathological processes occurring in endothelial cells of the caudal vein, emphasizing the complexity of the phenotype observed in nol9sa1022/sa1022 larvae. We further show that both the pancreatic and hematopoietic deficiencies in nol9sa1022/sa1022 embryos were due to impaired cell proliferation of respective progenitor cells. Interestingly, genetic loss of Tp53 rescued the HSPCs but not the pancreatic defects. In contrast, activation of mRNA translation via the mTOR pathway by L-Leucine treatment did not revert the erythroid or pancreatic defects. Together, we present the nol9sa1022/sa1022 mutant, a novel zebrafish ribosomopathy model, which recapitulates key human disease characteristics. The use of this genetically tractable model will enhance our understanding of the tissue-specific mechanisms following impaired ribosome biogenesis in the context of an intact vertebrate. PMID:26624285

  19. The Ribosome Biogenesis Protein Nol9 Is Essential for Definitive Hematopoiesis and Pancreas Morphogenesis in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Lauren; Fleischmann, Tobias; Weis, Félix; Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Harvey, Steven A.; Wali, Neha; Warren, Alan J.; Barroso, Inês; Stemple, Derek L.; Cvejic, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a ubiquitous and essential process in cells. Defects in ribosome biogenesis and function result in a group of human disorders, collectively known as ribosomopathies. In this study, we describe a zebrafish mutant with a loss-of-function mutation in nol9, a gene that encodes a non-ribosomal protein involved in rRNA processing. nol9 sa1022/sa1022 mutants have a defect in 28S rRNA processing. The nol9 sa1022/sa1022 larvae display hypoplastic pancreas, liver and intestine and have decreased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), as well as definitive erythrocytes and lymphocytes. In addition, ultrastructural analysis revealed signs of pathological processes occurring in endothelial cells of the caudal vein, emphasizing the complexity of the phenotype observed in nol9 sa1022/sa1022 larvae. We further show that both the pancreatic and hematopoietic deficiencies in nol9 sa1022/sa1022 embryos were due to impaired cell proliferation of respective progenitor cells. Interestingly, genetic loss of Tp53 rescued the HSPCs but not the pancreatic defects. In contrast, activation of mRNA translation via the mTOR pathway by L-Leucine treatment did not revert the erythroid or pancreatic defects. Together, we present the nol9 sa1022/sa1022 mutant, a novel zebrafish ribosomopathy model, which recapitulates key human disease characteristics. The use of this genetically tractable model will enhance our understanding of the tissue-specific mechanisms following impaired ribosome biogenesis in the context of an intact vertebrate. PMID:26624285

  20. Interplay between oxygen and Fe-S cluster biogenesis: insights from the Suf pathway.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Thomas, Khaleh M; Dai, Yuyuan; Boyd, Jeff M; Outten, F Wayne

    2014-09-23

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster metalloproteins conduct essential functions in nearly all contemporary forms of life. The nearly ubiquitous presence of Fe-S clusters and the fundamental requirement for Fe-S clusters in both aerobic and anaerobic Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya suggest that these clusters were likely integrated into central metabolic pathways early in the evolution of life prior to the widespread oxidation of Earth's atmosphere. Intriguingly, Fe-S cluster-dependent metabolism is sensitive to disruption by oxygen because of the decreased bioavailability of ferric iron as well as direct oxidation of sulfur trafficking intermediates and Fe-S clusters by reactive oxygen species. This fact, coupled with the ubiquity of Fe-S clusters in aerobic organisms, suggests that organisms evolved with mechanisms that facilitate the biogenesis and use of these essential cofactors in the presence of oxygen, which gradually began to accumulate around 2.5 billion years ago as oxygenic photosynthesis proliferated and reduced minerals that buffered against oxidation were depleted. This review highlights the most ancient of the Fe-S cluster biogenesis pathways, the Suf system, which likely was present in early anaerobic forms of life. Herein, we use the evolution of the Suf pathway to assess the relationships between the biochemical functions and physiological roles of Suf proteins, with an emphasis on the selective pressure of oxygen toxicity. Our analysis suggests that diversification into oxygen-containing environments disrupted iron and sulfur metabolism and was a main driving force in the acquisition of accessory Suf proteins (such as SufD, SufE, and SufS) by the core SufB-SufC scaffold complex. This analysis provides a new framework for the study of Fe-S cluster biogenesis pathways and Fe-S cluster-containing metalloenzymes and their complicated patterns of diver