Science.gov

Sample records for endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated

  1. Endothelium dependent hyperpolarization-type relaxation compensates for attenuated nitric oxide-mediated responses in subcutaneous arteries of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Siti Safiah; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan Wai Sum; Yusof, Mohd Imran; Wan Sulaiman, Wan Azman; Mat Saad, Arman Zaharil; Suppian, Rapeah; Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam

    2016-02-29

    Diabetes impairs endothelium-dependent relaxations. The present study evaluated the contribution of different endothelium-dependent relaxing mechanisms to the regulation of vascular tone in subcutaneous blood vessels of humans with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Subcutaneous arteries were isolated from tissues of healthy controls and diabetics. Vascular function was determined using wire myography. Expressions of proteins were measured by Western blotting and immunostaining. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine were impaired in arteries from diabetics compared to controls (P = 0.009). Acetylcholine-induced nitric oxide (NO)-mediated relaxations [in the presence of an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COX; indomethacin) and small and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blockers (UCL1684 and TRAM 34, respectively)] were attenuated in arteries from diabetics compared to controls (P < 0.001). However, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)-type relaxations [in the presence of indomethacin and the NO synthase blocker, l-NAME] were augmented in arteries from diabetics compared to controls (P = 0.003). Endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (NO donor) and salbutamol (β-adrenoceptor agonist) were preserved, but those to prostacyclin were attenuated in diabetics compared to controls (P = 0.017). In arteries of diabetics, protein expressions of endothelial NO synthase, prostacyclin synthase and prostacyclin receptors were decreased, but those of COX-2 were increased. These findings suggest that in human diabetes, the impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations is caused by a diminished NO bioavailability; however, EDH appears to compensate, at least in part, for this dysfunction. PMID:26768833

  2. The Endothelium-Dependent Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mónica, F Z; Bian, K; Murad, F

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic 3'-5' guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling plays a critical role on smooth muscle tone, platelet activity, cardiac contractility, renal function and fluid balance, and cell growth. Studies of the 1990s established endothelium dysfunction as one of the major causes of cardiovascular diseases. Therapeutic strategies that benefit NO bioavailability have been applied in clinical medicine extensively. Basic and clinical studies of cGMP regulation through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) or inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) have resulted in effective therapies for pulmonary hypertension, erectile dysfunction, and more recently benign prostatic hyperplasia. This section reviews (1) how endothelial dysfunction and NO deficiency lead to cardiovascular diseases, (2) how soluble cGMP regulation leads to beneficial effects on disorders of the circulation system, and (3) the epigenetic regulation of NO-sGC pathway components in the cardiovascular system. In conclusion, the discovery of the NO-cGMP pathway revolutionized the comprehension of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in cardiovascular and other diseases. However, considering the expression "from bench to bedside" the therapeutic alternatives targeting NO-cGMP did not immediately follow the marked biochemical and pathophysiological revolution. Some therapeutic options have been effective and released on the market for pulmonary hypertension and erectile dysfunction such as inhaled NO, PDE5 inhibitors, and recently sGC stimulators. The therapeutic armamentarium for many other disorders is expected in the near future. There are currently numerous active basic and clinical research programs in universities and industries attempting to develop novel therapies for many diseases and medical applications. PMID:27451093

  3. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction after ionized radiation: selective impairment of the nitric oxide component of endothelium-dependent vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Soloviev, Anatoly I; Tishkin, Sergey M; Parshikov, Alexander V; Ivanova, Irina V; Goncharov, Eugene V; Gurney, Alison M

    2003-01-01

    Gamma radiation impairs vascular function, leading to the depression of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Loss of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway has been implicated, but little is known about radiation effects on other endothelial mediators. This study investigated the mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in rabbits subjected to whole-body irradiation from a cobalt60 source. The endothelium-dependent relaxation of rabbit aorta evoked by acetylcholine (ACh) or A23187 was impaired in a dose-dependent manner by irradiation at 2 Gy or above. Inhibition was evident 9 days post-irradiation and persisted over the 30 day experimental period. Endothelium-independent responses to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) were suppressed over a similar dose range at 7–9 days post-irradiation, but recovered fully by 30 days post-irradiation. In healthy vessels, ACh-induced relaxation was inhibited by L-Nω-nitroarginine (L-NA; 3×10−4 M) and charybdotoxin (10−8 M) plus apamin (10−6 M) but resistant to indomethacin, indicating the involvement of NO and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Supporting this, ACh caused smooth muscle hyperpolarization that was reduced by L-NA and charybdotoxin plus apamin. In irradiated vessels, responses to ACh were insensitive to L-NA but abolished by charybdotoxin plus apamin, indicating selective loss of NO-mediated relaxation. In animals treated shortly after irradiation with the antioxidant, α-tocopherol acetate, the NO-dependent relaxation was restored without effect on the EDHF-dependent component. The results imply that radiation selectively impairs the NO pathway as a consequence of oxidative stress, while EDHF is able to maintain endothelium-dependent relaxation at a reduced level. PMID:12642385

  4. Reduced agonist-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in uremia is attributable to an impairment of vascular nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Passauer, Jens; Pistrosch, Frank; Büssemaker, Eckhart; Lässig, Grit; Herbrig, Kay; Gross, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Current concepts for the explanation of endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in uremia propose a reduced vascular bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO). The aim of the present study was to test the contributions of NO and NO/prostacyclin (PGI(2))-independent mechanisms to both baseline vascular tone and agonist-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients on hemodialysis (HD). In 10 HD patients and eight matched healthy control subjects, forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured at rest and during intrabrachial infusions of norepinephrine (NE; endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor, 60, 120, and 240 pmol/min) and N-monomethyl-L-arginine (blocker of NO synthases, 16 micromol/min). After inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase by ibuprofen (1200 mg orally), endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was assessed by infusion of acetylcholine (ACh; 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 300 nmol/min) and sodium-nitroprusside (2.5, 5, and 10 microg/min). NO/PGI(2)-independent vasodilation was tested by equal infusions of ACh during NO clamp. N-monomethyl-L-arginine reduced resting FBF to a comparable degree in both groups. Vascular responses to ACh were reduced in HD (P = 0.003 versus control by ANOVA), whereas those to sodium nitroprusside were mainly at control level. Infusion of ACh during NO clamp caused a similar increment of FBF in both groups. NO-mediated vasodilation as calculated by the difference between ACh-induced responses without and with NO clamp was substantially impaired in HD (P < 0.001) compared with control. In HD patients, baseline NO-mediated arteriolar tone is at control level. This study provides first evidence that endothelial dysfunction of uremic patients as shown by reduced agonist-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation is attributable to reduced stimulation of NO, whereas the NO/PGI(2)-resistant portion of ACh-mediated vasodilation is unaffected. PMID:15728785

  5. Stimulation of calcium-sensing receptors induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations via nitric oxide production and activation of IKCa channels

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Harry Z.E.; Shi, Jian; Jahan, Kazi S.; Martinucci, Matthew C.; Gilbert, Steven J.; Vanessa Ho, W.-S.; Albert, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of vascular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) is reported to induce both constrictions and relaxations. However, cellular mechanisms involved in these responses remain unclear. The present study investigates the effect of stimulating CaSRs on vascular contractility and focuses on the role of the endothelium, nitric oxide (NO) and K+ channels in these responses. In wire myography studies, increasing [Ca2 +]o from 1 mM to 6 mM induced concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine pre-contracted rabbit mesenteric arteries. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were dependent on a functional endothelium, and were inhibited by the negative allosteric CaSR modulator Calhex-231. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were reduced by inhibitors of endothelial NO synthase, guanylate cyclase, and protein kinase G. CaSR activation also induced NO production in freshly isolated endothelial cells (ECs) in experiments using the fluorescent NO indicator DAF-FM. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of large (BKCa) and intermediate (IKCa) Ca2 +-activated K+ channels (iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin), and Kv7 channels (linopirdine) also reduced [Ca2 +]o-induced vasorelaxations. Increasing [Ca2 +]o also activated IKCa currents in perforated-patch recordings of isolated mesenteric artery ECs. These findings indicate that stimulation of CaSRs induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations which are mediated by two separate pathways involving production of NO and activation of IKCa channels. NO stimulates PKG leading to BKCa activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas IKCa activity contributes to endothelium-derived hyperpolarisations. PMID:26772767

  6. Stimulation of calcium-sensing receptors induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations via nitric oxide production and activation of IKCa channels.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Harry Z E; Shi, Jian; Jahan, Kazi S; Martinucci, Matthew C; Gilbert, Steven J; Vanessa Ho, W-S; Albert, Anthony P

    2016-05-01

    Stimulation of vascular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) is reported to induce both constrictions and relaxations. However, cellular mechanisms involved in these responses remain unclear. The present study investigates the effect of stimulating CaSRs on vascular contractility and focuses on the role of the endothelium, nitric oxide (NO) and K(+) channels in these responses. In wire myography studies, increasing [Ca(2+)]o from 1mM to 6mM induced concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine pre-contracted rabbit mesenteric arteries. [Ca(2+)]o-induced relaxations were dependent on a functional endothelium, and were inhibited by the negative allosteric CaSR modulator Calhex-231. [Ca(2+)]o-induced relaxations were reduced by inhibitors of endothelial NO synthase, guanylate cyclase, and protein kinase G. CaSR activation also induced NO production in freshly isolated endothelial cells (ECs) in experiments using the fluorescent NO indicator DAF-FM. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of large (BKCa) and intermediate (IKCa) Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin), and Kv7 channels (linopirdine) also reduced [Ca(2+)]o-induced vasorelaxations. Increasing [Ca(2+)]o also activated IKCa currents in perforated-patch recordings of isolated mesenteric artery ECs. These findings indicate that stimulation of CaSRs induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations which are mediated by two separate pathways involving production of NO and activation of IKCa channels. NO stimulates PKG leading to BKCa activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas IKCa activity contributes to endothelium-derived hyperpolarisations. PMID:26772767

  7. 17β-estradiol potentiates endothelium-dependent nitric oxide- and hyperpolarization-mediated relaxations in blood vessels of male but not female apolipoprotein-E deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kong, Billy W C; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Man, Ricky Y K; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated the influence of gender on the changes underlying endothelial dysfunction in hyperlipidemia during aging. Isometric tension in rings (with endothelium) of the aortae and superior mesenteric arteries from apolipoprotein-E deficient mice was determined in wire myographs. Nitric oxide (NO)- and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)-mediated relaxations were smaller in the aortae and mesenteric arteries of 32weeks old males than eight weeks old males. In females, NO- and EDH-mediated relaxations were impaired only at 84weeks of age. The levels of reactive oxygen species were elevated in the blood vessels of 32weeks old males, but not females. Acute in vitro treatment with 17β-estradiol and apocynin improved NO- and EDH-mediated relaxations in 32weeks old males but not in 84weeks old males. Relaxations to SKA-31, activator of intermediate (IKCa) and small (SKCa) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, were attenuated in the mesenteric arteries of 32weeks old males. Such impairment was restored by acute treatment with apocynin. These findings suggest that male hyperlipidemic mice develop endothelial dysfunction at an earlier age than females. This endothelial dysfunction is associated with impaired NO bioavailability and reduced IKCa and SKCa activity. Apocynin and 17β-estradiol restore the endothelial function only in younger male animals but not in older male or female animals. PMID:25869512

  8. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine in bovine oviductal arteries: mediation by nitric oxide and changes in apamin-sensitive K+ conductance.

    PubMed Central

    García-Pascual, A.; Labadía, A.; Jimenez, E.; Costa, G.

    1995-01-01

    1. Mechanisms underlying the relaxant response to acetylcholine (ACh) were examined in bovine oviductal arteries (o.d. 300-500 microns and i.d. 150-300 microns) in vitro. Vascular rings were treated with indomethacin (10 microM) to prevent the effects of prostaglandins. 2. ACh elicited a concentration-related relaxation in ring segments precontracted with noradrenaline (NA), which was abolished by endothelium denudation. 3. The ACh-induced relaxation was attenuated but not abolished by NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 1 microM-1 mM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) formation. The inhibition caused by L-NOARG (10 microM) was reversed by addition of excess of L-arginine but not D-arginine (1 mM). 4. In high K+ (40-60 mM)-contracted rings, ACh was a much less effective vasodilator and its relaxant response was completely abolished by L-NOARG (100 microM). 5. In NA (10 microM)-contracted rings, ACh induced sustained and concentration-dependent increases in cyclic GMP, which were reduced below basal values by L-NOARG (100 microM), while potent relaxation persisted. Similar increases in cyclic GMP were evoked by ACh in high K+ (50 mM)-treated arteries and under these conditions, both cyclic GMP accumulation and relaxation were L-NOARG-sensitive. 6. S-nitroso-L-cysteine (NC), a proposed endogenous precursor of endothelial NO, also induced cyclic GMP accumulation in NA-contracted oviductal arteries. 7. Methylene blue (MB, 10 microM), a proposed inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase, inhibited both endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh and endothelium-independent response to exogenous NO, whereas relaxation to NC remained unaffected. 8. The L-NOARG-resistant response to ACh was not affected by either ouabain (0.5 mM), glibenclamide (3 microM), tetraethylammonium (TEA, 1 mM) or charybdotoxin (50 nM), but was selectively blocked by apamin (0.1-1 microM). However, apamin did not inhibit either relaxation to ACh in high K(+)-contracted rings or endothelium

  9. Aronia melanocarpa juice, a rich source of polyphenols, induces endothelium-dependent relaxations in porcine coronary arteries via the redox-sensitive activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hun; Auger, Cyril; Kurita, Ikuko; Anselm, Eric; Rivoarilala, Lalainasoa Odile; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2013-11-30

    This study examined the ability of Aronia melanocarpa (chokeberry) juice, a rich source of polyphenols, to cause NO-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated coronary arteries and, if so, to determine the underlying mechanism and the active polyphenols. A. melanocarpa juice caused potent endothelium-dependent relaxations in porcine coronary artery rings. Relaxations to A. melanocarpa juice were minimally affected by inhibition of the formation of vasoactive prostanoids and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated responses, and markedly reduced by N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine (endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) inhibitor), membrane permeant analogs of superoxide dismutase and catalase, PP2 (Src kinase inhibitor), and wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor). In cultured endothelial cells, A. melanocarpa juice increased the formation of NO as assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using the spin trap iron(II)diethyldithiocarbamate, and reactive oxygen species using dihydroethidium. These responses were associated with the redox-sensitive phosphorylation of Src, Akt and eNOS. A. melanocarpa juice-derived fractions containing conjugated cyanidins and chlorogenic acids induced the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. The present findings indicate that A. melanocarpa juice is a potent stimulator of the endothelial formation of NO in coronary arteries; this effect involves the phosphorylation of eNOS via the redox-sensitive activation of the Src/PI3-kinase/Akt pathway mostly by conjugated cyanidins and chlorogenic acids. PMID:23973200

  10. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  11. Concepts of neural nitric oxide-mediated transmission

    PubMed Central

    Garthwaite, John

    2008-01-01

    As a chemical transmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, nitric oxide (NO) is still thought a bit of an oddity, yet this role extends back to the beginnings of the evolution of the nervous system, predating many of the more familiar neurotransmitters. During the 20 years since it became known, evidence has accumulated for NO subserving an increasing number of functions in the mammalian central nervous system, as anticipated from the wide distribution of its synthetic and signal transduction machinery within it. This review attempts to probe beneath those functions and consider the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which NO evokes short- and long-term modifications in neural performance. With any transmitter, understanding its receptors is vital for decoding the language of communication. The receptor proteins specialised to detect NO are coupled to cGMP formation and provide an astonishing degree of amplification of even brief, low amplitude NO signals. Emphasis is given to the diverse ways in which NO receptor activation initiates changes in neuronal excitability and synaptic strength by acting at pre- and/or postsynaptic locations. Signalling to non-neuronal cells and an unexpected line of communication between endothelial cells and brain cells are also covered. Viewed from a mechanistic perspective, NO conforms to many of the rules governing more conventional neurotransmission, particularly of the metabotropic type, but stands out as being more economical and versatile, attributes that presumably account for its spectacular evolutionary success. PMID:18588525

  12. Porins facilitate nitric oxide-mediated killing of mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fabrino, Daniela Leite; Bleck, Christopher K E; Anes, Elsa; Hasilik, Andrej; Melo, Rossana C N; Niederweis, Michael; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2009-09-01

    Non-pathogenic mycobacteria such us Mycobacterium smegmatis reside in macrophages within phagosomes that fuse with late endocytic/lysosomal compartments. This sequential fusion process is required for the killing of non-pathogenic mycobacteria by macrophages. Porins are proteins that allow the influx of hydrophilic molecules across the mycobacterial outer membrane. Deletion of the porins MspA, MspC and MspD significantly increased survival of M. smegmatis in J774 macrophages. However, the mechanism underlying this observation is unknown. Internalization of wild-type M. smegmatis (SMR5) and the porin triple mutant (ML16) by macrophages was identical indicating that the viability of the porin mutant in vivo was enhanced. This was not due to effects on phagosome trafficking since fusion of phagosomes containing the mutant with late endocytic compartments was unaffected. Moreover, in ML16-infected macrophages, the generation of nitric oxide (NO) was similar to the wild type-infected cells. However, ML16 was significantly more resistant to the effects of NO in vitro compared to SMR5. Our data provide evidence that porins render mycobacteria vulnerable to killing by reactive nitrogen intermediates within phagosomes probably by facilitating uptake of NO across the mycobacterial outer membrane. PMID:19460455

  13. Nitric oxide mediates glutamate-linked enhancement of cGMP levels in the cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. The authors show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine-citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. N{sup {omega}}-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of N{sup {omega}}-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  14. Nitric Oxide Mediates Glutamate-Linked Enhancement of cGMP Levels in the Cerebellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredt, David S.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. We show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine-citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. Nω-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of Nω-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  15. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Stress Response Induced by Diatom Aldehydes in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Maria; Buttino, Isabella; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms. PMID:22022485

  16. Studies of the role of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide release in the sustained vasodilator effects of corticotrophin releasing factor and sauvagine.

    PubMed

    Barker, D M; Corder, R

    1999-01-01

    1. The mechanisms of the sustained vasodilator actions of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and sauvagine (SVG) were studied using rings of endothelium de-nuded rat thoracic aorta (RTA) and the isolated perfused rat superior mesenteric arterial vasculature (SMA). 2. SVG was approximately 50 fold more potent than CRF on RTA (EC40: 0.9 +/- 0.2 and 44 +/- 9 nM respectively, P < 0.05), and approximately 10 fold more active in the perfused SMA (ED40: 0.05 +/- 0.02 and 0.6 +/- 0.1 nmol respectively, P < 0.05). Single bolus injections of CRF (100 pmol) or SVG (15 pmol) in the perfused SMA caused reductions in perfusion pressure of 23 +/- 1 and 24 +/- 2% that lasted more than 20 min. 3. Removal of the endothelium in the perfused SMA with deoxycholic acid attenuated the vasodilatation and revealed two phases to the response; a short lasting direct action, and a sustained phase which was fully inhibited. 4. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with L-NAME (100 microM) L-NMMA (100 microM) or 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea (ETPU, 100 microM) had similar effects on the vasodilator responses to CRF as removal of the endothelium, suggesting a pivotal role for nitric oxide. However the selective guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[l,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 microM) did not affect the response to CRF. 5. High potassium (60 mM) completely inhibited the vasodilator response to CRF in the perfused SMA, indicating a role for K channels in this response. 6. Compared to other vasodilator agents acting via the release of NO, the actions of CRF and SVG are strikingly long-lasting, suggesting a novel mechanism of prolonged activation of nitric oxide synthase. PMID:10051151

  17. Studies of the role of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide release in the sustained vasodilator effects of corticotrophin releasing factor and sauvagine

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Diana M; Corder, Roger

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms of the sustained vasodilator actions of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and sauvagine (SVG) were studied using rings of endothelium de-nuded rat thoracic aorta (RTA) and the isolated perfused rat superior mesenteric arterial vasculature (SMA).SVG was ≈amp;50 fold more potent than CRF on RTA (EC40: 0.9±0.2 and 44±9 nM respectively, P<0.05), and ≈amp;10 fold more active in the perfused SMA (ED40: 0.05±0.02 and 0.6±0.1 nmol respectively, P<0.05). Single bolus injections of CRF (100 pmol) or SVG (15 pmol) in the perfused SMA caused reductions in perfusion pressure of 23±1 and 24±2% that lasted more than 20 min.Removal of the endothelium in the perfused SMA with deoxycholic acid attenuated the vasodilatation and revealed two phases to the response; a short lasting direct action, and a sustained phase which was fully inhibited.Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with L-NAME (100 μM) L-NMMA (100 μM) or 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea (ETPU, 100 μM) had similar effects on the vasodilator responses to CRF as removal of the endothelium, suggesting a pivotal role for nitric oxide. However the selective guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 μM) did not affect the response to CRF.High potassium (60 mM) completely inhibited the vasodilator response to CRF in the perfused SMA, indicating a role for K+ channels in this response.Compared to other vasodilator agents acting via the release of NO, the actions of CRF and SVG are strikingly long-lasting, suggesting a novel mechanism of prolonged activation of nitric oxide synthase. PMID:10051151

  18. Nitric oxide scavengers as a therapeutic approach to nitric oxide mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Fricker, S P

    1999-08-01

    The essential role of nitric oxide (NO) in normal physiology and its involvement in the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases render the compound an attractive therapeutic target. NO donor drugs are used in the treatment of hypotension and angina where abnormalities in the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway have been implicated. Overproduction of NO has been associated with a number of disease states including septic shock, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, adult respiratory distress syndrome, neurodegenerative diseases and allograft rejection. NO is produced by a group of enzymes, the nitric oxide synthases. Selective inhibition of the inducible isoform is one approach to the treatment of diseases where there is an overproduction of NO; an alternative approach is to scavenge or remove excess NO. A number of NO scavenger molecules have demonstrated pharmacological activity in disease models, particularly models of septic shock. These include organic molecules such as PTIO (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide), haemoglobin derivatives such as the pyridoxalated haemoglobin polyoxyethylene conjugate (PHP), low molecular weight iron compounds of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and diethyldithiocarbamate and ruthenium polyaminocarboxylate complexes. The data suggest a potential role for NO scavengers in the treatment of NO mediated disease. PMID:15992146

  19. Nitric oxide mediates the inhibitory action of platelet-activating factor on angiotensin II-induced renal vasoconstriction, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Handa, R K; Strandhoy, J W

    1996-06-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism(s) involved in the inhibitory effect of platelet-activating factor on renal vascular reactivity, in vivo. Bolus injections of vasoconstrictor agonists were administered into the renal circulation of pentobarbital anesthetized male Wistar rats at a dose to cause a transient 45 to 50% decrease in renal blood flow. Intrarenal infusion of platelet-activating factor (PAF) at 2.5 ng/min/kg attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II by 66%, a significantly smaller reduction of 35% for norepinephrine-mediated vasoconstriction, 22% for vasopressin-mediated vasoconstriction and no alteration of KCl-mediated vasoconstriction. The preferential inhibitory effect of platelet-activating factor on angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction was mimicked by the intrarenal infusion of either 0.2 to 5 micrograms/min/kg methacholine (endothelium-dependent vasodilator) or 2 micrograms/min/kg sodium nitroprusside (nitric oxide donor). After inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, intrarenal infusion of PAF or methacholine reduced angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction significantly less than that observed in the absence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Therefore, this study provides evidence that the shared ability of platelet-activating factor and methacholine to selectively reduce angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction involves endothelium-derived nitric oxide. PMID:8667214

  20. Reduced nitric oxide-mediated relaxation and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the tail arteries of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Siti Safiah; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan Wai Sum; Suppian, Rapeah; Yusof, Mohd Imran; Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam

    2016-02-15

    Diabetes is associated with endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations. The present study aimed to examine the role of nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH), in the relaxation of ventral tail arteries of rats under diabetic conditions. Relaxations of tail arteries of control and diabetic rats were studied in wire myograph. Western blotting and immunostaining were used to determine the presence of proteins. Acetylcholine-induced relaxations were significantly smaller in arteries of diabetic compared to control rats (Rmax; 70.81 ± 2.48% versus 85.05 ± 3.15%). Incubation with the combination of non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin and potassium channel blockers, TRAM 34 and UCL 1684, demonstrated that NO-mediated relaxation was attenuated significantly in diabetic compared to control rats (Rmax; 48.47 ± 5.84% versus 68.39 ± 6.34%). EDH-type (in the presence of indomethacin and NO synthase inhibitor, LNAME) and prostacyclin-mediated (in the presence of LNAME plus TRAM 34 and UCL 1684) relaxations were not significantly reduced in arteries of diabetic compared to control rats [Rmax: (EDH; 17.81 ± 6.74% versus 34.16 ± 4.59%) (prostacyclin; 15.85 ± 3.27% versus 17.23 ± 3.75%)]. Endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside, salbutamol and prostacyclin were comparable in the two types of preparations. Western blotting and immunostaining indicated that diabetes diminished the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), while increasing those of COX-1 and COX-2. Thus, since acetylcholine-induced NO-mediated relaxation was impaired in diabetes because of reduced eNOS protein expression, pharmacological intervention improving NO bioavailability could be useful in the management of diabetic endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26825543

  1. Nanoparticle inhalation impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilation in subepicardial arterioles

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, AJ; Cumpston, JL; Chen, BT; Frazer, D; Castranova, V; Nurkiewicz, TR

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM, mean aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) has been shown to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality and may contribute to acute coronary events such as myocardial infarction (MI). There is sufficient reason to believe that smaller particles, such as nanoparticles, might be even more detrimental than larger-sized particles due to their increased surface area and higher pulmonary deposition. Our lab showed that nanoparticle inhalation impairs endothelium-dependent arteriolar vasodilation in skeletal muscle. However, it is not known if coronary microvascular endothelial function is affected in a similar manner. Rats were exposed to filtered air (control) or TiO2 nanoparticles (primary particle diameter, ~21 nm) via inhalation at concentrations that produced measured depositions (10 μg) relevant to ambient air pollution. Subepicardial arterioles (~150 μm in diameter) were isolated and responses to transmural pressure, flow-induced dilation (FID), acetylcholine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) assessed. Myogenic responsiveness was preserved between groups. In addition, there was no difference in the vasodilation to SNP, signifying that smooth muscle sensitivity to nitric oxide (NO) is unaffected by nano-TiO2 exposure. However, inhalation of nano-TiO2 produced an increase in spontaneous tone in coronary arterioles and also impaired endothelium-dependent FID. In addition, ACh- and A23187-induced vasodilation was also blunted in arterioles after inhalation of nano-TiO2. Data showed that nanoparticle exposure significantly impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilation in subepicardial arterioles. Such disturbances in coronary microvascular function are consistent with the cardiac events associated with particle pollution exposure. PMID:20077232

  2. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Dilation of blood vessels in response to a large number of agents has been shown to be dependent on an intact vascular endothelium. The present studies examine some aspects of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in blood vessels of the rabbit and rat. Using the rabbit ear artery and the subtype-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine, muscarinic receptors of the endothelium and smooth muscle cells were shown to be of the low affinity M/sub 2/ subtype. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to determine affinity for the smooth muscle receptors while antagonism of methacholine induced vasodilation yielded the endothelial cell receptor affinity. The effect of increasing age (1-27 months) on endothelium-dependent relaxation was studied in aortic rings, perfused tail artery and perfused mesenteric bed of the Fisher 344 rat. The influence of endothelium on contractile responses was examined using the perfused caudal artery.

  3. SALICYLIC ACID- AND NITRIC OXIDE-MEDIATED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION IN DISEASE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current advances in plant defense signaling is discussed, with emphasis on the role of nitric oxide and salicylic acid in the development of disease resistance. Nitric Oxide has recently been shown to have an important role in plant disease resistance. We show an increase in NOS-like activity in TMV...

  4. Nitric oxide-mediated blood flow regulation as affected by smoking and nicotine.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Toda, Hiroshi

    2010-12-15

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, cerebral and coronary vascular diseases, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Chronic smoking impairs endothelial function by decreasing the formation of nitric oxide and increasing the degradation of nitric oxide via generation of oxygen free radicals. Nitric oxide liberated from efferent nitrergic nerves is also involved in vasodilatation, increased regional blood flow, and hypotension that are impaired through nitric oxide sequestering by smoking-induced factors. Influence of smoking on nitric oxide-induced blood flow regulation is not necessarily the same in all organs and tissues. However, human studies are limited mainly to the forearm blood flow measurement that assesses endothelial function under basal and stimulated conditions and also determination of penile tumescence and erection in response to endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide. Therefore, information about blood flow regulation in other organs, such as the brain and placenta, has been provided mainly from studies on experimental animals. Nicotine, a major constituent of cigarette smoke, acutely dilates cerebral arteries and arterioles through nitric oxide liberated from nitrergic neurons, but chronically interferes with endothelial function in various vasculatures, both being noted in studies on experimental animals. Cigarette smoke constituents other than nicotine also have some vascular actions. Not only active but also passive smoking is undoubtedly harmful for both the smokers themselves and their neighbors, who should bear in mind that they can face serious diseases in the future, which may result in lengthy hospitalization, and a shortened lifespan. PMID:20868673

  5. Role of Endothelium-Dependent Hyperpolarisation and Prostacyclin in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    MOKHTAR, Siti Safiah; RASOOL, Aida Hanum Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium plays a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by producing several vasodilating factors, including nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin (PGI2), and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarisation (EDH); however, the balance between endothelial relaxing and contracting factors is disrupted in disease states such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Most reported studies of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes focused on the actions of NO; however, there is accumulating evidence demonstrating that in addition to NO, PGI2 and EDH are likely to contribute to the vasodilatation of blood vessels. EDH plays an important role as a regulator of vascular tone and reactivity in resistance and conduit arteries of animal models and humans. PGI2 only plays a minimal role in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation but may serve as an important compensatory mechanism in conditions in which NO and EDH activities are decreased. Further studies are needed to determine the exact roles of EDH and PGI2 in the development of endothelial dysfunction and clinical vasculopathy in humans with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26023290

  6. Infrared Imaging of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Blood Flow in Human Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Alexander M.; Ackerman, Hans C.; Liu, Wei-Min; Meyer, Joseph M.; Littel, Patricia L.; Seamon, Catherine; Footman, Eleni; Chi, Amy; Zorca, Suzana; Krajewski, Megan L.; Cuttica, Michael J.; Machado, Roberto F.; Cannon, Richard O.; Kato, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important pathophysiologic manifestation of sickle cell disease (SCD), a condition that increases risk of pulmonary hypertension and stroke. We hypothesized that infrared (IR) imaging would detect changes in cutaneous blood flow reflective of vascular function. We performed IR imaging and conventional strain gauge plethysmography in twenty-five adults with SCD at baseline and during intra-arterial infusions of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and a NOS inhibitor L-NMMA. Skin temperature measured by IR imaging increased in a dose-dependent manner to graded infusions of ACh (+1.1° C, p < 0.0001) and SNP (+0.9° C, p < 0.0001), and correlated with dose-dependent increases in forearm blood flow (ACh: +19.9 mL/min/100mL, p < 0.0001; rs = 0.57, p = 0.003; SNP: +8.6 mL/min/100mL, p < 0.0001; r = 0.70, p = 0.0002). Although IR measurement of skin temperature accurately reflected agonist-induced increases in blood flow, it was less sensitive to decreases in blood flow caused by NOS inhibition. Baseline forearm skin temperature measured by IR imaging correlated significantly with baseline forearm blood flow (31.8±0.2° C, 6.0±0.4 mL/min/100mL; r = 0.58, p = 0.003), and appeared to represent a novel biomarker of vascular function. It predicted a blunted blood flow response to SNP (r = −0.61, p = 0.002), and was independently associated with a marker of pulmonary artery pressure, as well as hemoglobin level, diastolic blood pressure, homocysteine, and cholesterol (R2 = 0.84, p < 0.0001 for the model). IR imaging of agonist-stimulated cutaneous blood flow represents a less cumbersome alternative to plethysmography methodology. Measurement of baseline skin temperature by IR imaging may be a useful new marker of vascular risk in adults with SCD. PMID:22784510

  7. Evidence for nitric oxide-mediated sympathetic forearm vasodiolatation in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, N M; Engelke, K A; Samuel, T T; Fix, R T; Joyner, M J

    1997-01-01

    1. Our aim was to determine if sympathetic vasodilatation occurs in the human forearm, and if the vasodilating substance nitric oxide contributes to this dilatation. We also sought to determine if the nitric oxide might be released as a result of cholinergic stimulation of the vascular endothelium. 2. Blood flow was measured in the resting non-dominant forearm with venous occlusion plethysmography. To increase sympathetic traffic to the resting forearm, rhythmic handgrip exercise to fatigue followed by post-exercise ischaemia was performed by the dominant forearm. A brachial artery catheter in the non-dominant arm was used to selectively infuse drugs. 3. During control conditions, there was mild vasodilatation in the resting forearm during exercise followed by constriction during post-exercise ischaemia. When exercise was performed after brachial artery administration of bretylium (to block noradrenaline release) and phentolamine (an alpha-adrenergic antagonist), profound vasodilatation was seen in the resting forearm during both exercise and post-exercise ischaemia. 4. When the nitric oxide synthase blocker NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) was administered in the presence of bretylium and phentolamine prior to another bout of handgripping, little or no vasodilatation was seen either during exercise or post-exercise ischaemia. Atropine also blunted the vasodilator responses to exercise and post-exercise ischaemia after bretylium and phentolamine. 5. These results support the existence of active sympathetic vasodilatation in the human forearm and the involvement of nitric oxide in this phenomenon. They also suggest nitric oxide might be released as a result of cholinergic stimulation of the vascular endothelium. PMID:9032700

  8. Nitric oxide mediates anti-inflammatory action of extracorporeal shock waves.

    PubMed

    Ciampa, Anna R; de Prati, Alessandra Carcereri; Amelio, Ernesto; Cavalieri, Elisabetta; Persichini, Tiziana; Colasanti, Marco; Musci, Giovanni; Marlinghaus, Ernst; Suzuki, Hisanori; Mariotto, Sofia

    2005-12-19

    Here, we show that extracorporeal shock waves (ESW), at a low energy density value, quickly increase neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity and basal nitric oxide (NO) production in the rat glioma cell line C6. In addition, the treatment of C6 cells with ESW reverts the decrease of nNOS activity and NO production induced by a mixture of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) plus tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Finally, ESW treatment efficiently downregulates NF-kappaB activation and NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression, including inducible NOS and TNF-alpha. The present report suggests a possible molecular mechanism of the anti-inflammatory action of ESW treatment. PMID:16325181

  9. Reductive disproportionation of nitric oxide mediated by low-valent uranium.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Christopher J; La Pierre, Henry S; Maron, Laurent; Scheurer, Andreas; Heinemann, Frank W; Meyer, Karsten

    2016-09-18

    The reductive disproportionation of nitric oxide (1 atm) is mediated by the bulky U(III) aryloxide [U(III)(OAr(Ad,Ad,Me))3] ((Ad,Ad,Me)ArO = O-C6H2-2,6-Ad-4-Me) (1) to form the U(V) terminal oxo species [((Ad,Ad,Me)ArO)3U(V)(O)] (2) and N2O, as confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction and GC-MS measurements. The reaction is quantitative in the solid state. Mechanistic and theoretical studies of the reaction suggest that the N-N bond is formed by the coupling of an η(1)-O bound nitric oxide ligand with gaseous NO to give an η(1)-(N2O2)(1-) intermediate prior to the spontaneous extrusion of N2O to yield the U(V) terminal oxo species 2. PMID:27523718

  10. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Intracellular Growth Restriction of Pathogenic Rhodococcus equi Can Be Prevented by Iron▿

    PubMed Central

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050

  11. Different Sources of Nitric Oxide Mediate Neurovascular Coupling in the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus of the Cat

    PubMed Central

    de Labra, Carmen; Rivadulla, Casto; Espinosa, Nelson; Dasilva, Miguel; Cao, Ricardo; Cudeiro, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the link between neuronal responses (NRs) and metabolic signals is fundamental to our knowledge of brain function and it is a milestone in our efforts to interpret data from modern non invasive optical techniques such as fMRI, which are based on the close coupling between metabolic demand of active neurons and local changes in blood flow. The challenge is to unravel the link. Here we show, using spectrophotometry to record oxyhaemoglobin and methemoglobin (surrogate markers of cerebral flow and nitric oxide levels respectively) together with extracellular neuronal recordings in vivo and applying a multiple polynomial regression model, that the markers are able to predict up about 80% of variability in NR. Furthermore, we show that the coupling between blood flow and neuronal activity is heavily influenced by nitric oxide (NO). While NRs show the typical saturating response, blood flow shows a linear behaviour during contrast-response curves, with nitric oxide from different sources acting differently for low and high intensity. PMID:19826613

  12. Nitric oxide-mediated intracellular growth restriction of pathogenic Rhodococcus equi can be prevented by iron.

    PubMed

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050

  13. Nitric Oxide Mediates Biofilm Formation and Symbiosis in Silicibacter sp. Strain TrichCH4B

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Minxi; Smith, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important signaling role in all domains of life. Many bacteria contain a heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) protein that selectively binds NO. These H-NOX proteins often act as sensors that regulate histidine kinase (HK) activity, forming part of a bacterial two-component signaling system that also involves one or more response regulators. In several organisms, NO binding to the H-NOX protein governs bacterial biofilm formation; however, the source of NO exposure for these bacteria is unknown. In mammals, NO is generated by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and signals through binding the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. Recently, several bacterial NOS proteins have also been reported, but the corresponding bacteria do not also encode an H-NOX protein. Here, we report the first characterization of a bacterium that encodes both a NOS and H-NOX, thus resembling the mammalian system capable of both synthesizing and sensing NO. We characterized the NO signaling pathway of the marine alphaproteobacterium Silicibacter sp. strain TrichCH4B, determining that the NOS is activated by an algal symbiont, Trichodesmium erythraeum. NO signaling through a histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signaling pathway results in increased concentrations of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, a key bacterial second messenger molecule that controls cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. Silicibacter sp. TrichCH4B biofilm formation, activated by T. erythraeum, may be an important mechanism for symbiosis between the two organisms, revealing that NO plays a previously unknown key role in bacterial communication and symbiosis. PMID:25944856

  14. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide mediate plasticity of neuronal calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2000-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are important participants in signal transduction that could provide the cellular basis for activity-dependent regulation of neuronal excitability. In young rat cortical brain slices and undifferentiated PC12 cells, paired application of depolarization/agonist stimulation and oxidation induces long-lasting potentiation of subsequent Ca2+ signaling that is reversed by hypoxia. This potentiation critically depends on NO production and involves cellular ROS utilization. The ability to develop the Ca2+ signal potentiation is regulated by the developmental stage of nerve tissue, decreasing markedly in adult rat cortical neurons and differentiated PC12 cells. PMID:10618438

  15. Nitric Oxide Mediates Tightening of the Endothelial Barrier by Ascorbic Acid

    PubMed Central

    May, James M.; Qu, Zhi-chao

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, decreases paracellular endothelial permeability in a process that requires rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. To define the proximal mechanism of this effect, we tested whether it might involve enhanced generation and/or sparing of nitric oxide (NO) by the vitamin. EA.hy926 endothelial cells cultured on semi-porous filter supports showed decreased endothelial barrier permeability to radiolabeled inulin in response to exogenous NO provided by the NO donor spermine NONOATE, as well as to activation of the downstream NO pathway by 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, a cell-penetrant cyclic GMP analog. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester increased endothelial permeability, indicating a role constitutive NO generation by eNOS in maintaining the permeability barrier. Inhibition of guanylate cyclase by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one also increased endothelial permeability and blocked barrier tightening by spermine NONOATE. Loading cells with what are likely physiologic concentrations of ascorbate decreased endothelial permeability. This effect was blocked by inhibition of either eNOS or guanylate cyclase, suggesting that it involved generation of NO by eNOS and subsequent NO-dependent activation of guanylate cyclase. These results show that endothelial permeability barrier function depends on constitutive generation of NO and that ascorbate-dependent tightening of this barrier involves maintaining NO through the eNOS/guanylate cyclase pathway. PMID:21156160

  16. Nitric oxide: Mediator of nonadrenergic noncholinergic hyperpolarization of opossum esophageal circular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.; Murray, J.; Conklin, J.L.; Bates, J.N. )

    1991-03-15

    The electromyogram recorded from circular smooth muscle (SM) of opossum esophagus, either during peristalsis or when the intrinsic esophageal nerves are stimulated by an electrical field (EFS), consists of a hyperpolarization followed by a depolarization. This membrane response results from the interaction of a nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) neurotransmitter with its receptors on SM membrane. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, and nitric oxide (NO) were used to test the hypothesis that NO is a mediator of this NANC nerve-induced response. The transmembrane potential difference of circular SM cells of opossum esophagus was recorded with glass microelectrode. The nerve-mediated membrane response was evoked by EFS. L-NNA (50uM) abolished the initial hyperpolarization and reduced the amplitude of and the time to maximal depolarization. L-arginine (1mM), the substrate for NO synthase, antagonized the effect of L-NNA. Neither L-NNA nor L-arginine altered the resting membrane potential. Exogenous NO produced hyperpolarization of SM membrane potential and attenuated the amplitude of EFS-induced hyperpolarization and depolarization. Nitrosocysteine, a NO-containing compound, also hyperpolarized the membrane potential. Effect of NO was neither blocked by L-NNA nor by TTX. The data support the hypothesis that NO or an NO-containing compound mediates NANC nerve-induced responses of the esophageal SM membrane.

  17. Nitric oxide: Mediator of nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerve-induced responses of opossum esophageal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.; Du, C.; Conklin, J.L.; Ledlow, A.; Bates, J.N. )

    1991-03-15

    Nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) nerves of the opossum esophagus mediate relaxation of circular muscle from the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and the off contraction of circular esophageal muscle. The latencies between the end of the stimulus and the off contraction describe a gradient such that the latency is longest in muscle from the caudad esophagus. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, and nitric oxide were used to test the hypothesis that NO is a mediator of these nerve-induced responses. Both electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic esophageal nerves and exogenous NO relaxed LES muscle. Only EFS-induced relaxation was inhibited by L-NNA. L-arginine, the substrate for NO synthase, antagonized the inhibitory effect of L-NNA. Exogenous NO neither relaxed nor contracted circular esophageal muscle. Both the amplitude and the latency of the off contraction were diminished by L-NNA. L-arginine antagonized the action of L-NNA. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine also attenuated the gradient in the latency of the off response by shortening latencies in muscle form the caudad esophagus. It had no effect on cholinergic nerve-induced contraction of longitudinal esophageal muscle. These data support the hypothesis that NO or an NO-containing compound mediates NANC nerve-induced responses of the esophagus and LES.

  18. The Endogenous Nitric Oxide Mediates Selenium-Induced Phytotoxicity by Promoting ROS Generation in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang-Bin; Li, You-Qin; Chen, Jian; Yang, Li-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is suggested as an emerging pollutant in agricultural environment because of the increasing anthropogenic release of Se, which in turn results in phytotoxicity. The most common consequence of Se-induced toxicity in plants is oxidative injury, but how Se induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst remains unclear. In this work, histofluorescent staining was applied to monitor the dynamics of ROS and nitric oxide (NO) in the root of Brassica rapa under Se(IV) stress. Se(IV)-induced faster accumulation of NO than ROS. Both NO and ROS accumulation were positively correlated with Se(IV)-induced inhibition of root growth. The NO accumulation was nitrate reductase (NR)- and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent while ROS accumulation was NADPH oxidase-dependent. The removal of NO by NR inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, and NO scavenger could alleviate Se(IV)-induced expression of Br_Rbohs coding for NADPH oxidase and the following ROS accumulation in roots, which further resulted in the amelioration of Se(IV)-induced oxidative injury and growth inhibition. Thus, we proposed that the endogenous NO played a toxic role in B. rapa under Se(IV) stress by triggering ROS burst. Such findings can be used to evaluate the toxic effects of Se contamination on crop plants. PMID:25333984

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide- and Nitric Oxide-mediated Disease Control of Bacterial Wilt in Tomato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Kang, Su Ran; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Yoon, Dong June; Kim, Do Hoon; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Sung, Chang Hyun; Kang, Han Sol; Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Seong Hwan; Kim, Young Shik

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in tomato plants by Ralstonia solanacearum infection and the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide in tomato bacterial wilt control were demonstrated. During disease development of tomato bacterial wilt, accumulation of superoxide anion (O2−) and H2O2 was observed and lipid peroxidation also occurred in the tomato leaf tissues. High doses of H2O2and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) nitric oxide donor showed phytotoxicity to detached tomato leaves 1 day after petiole feeding showing reduced fresh weight. Both H2O2and SNP have in vitro antibacterial activities against R. solanacearum in a dose-dependent manner, as well as plant protection in detached tomato leaves against bacterial wilt by 106 and 107 cfu/ml of R. solanacearum. H2O2- and SNP-mediated protection was also evaluated in pots using soil-drench treatment with the bacterial inoculation, and relative ‘area under the disease progressive curve (AUDPC)’ was calculated to compare disease protection by H2O2 and/or SNP with untreated control. Neither H2O2 nor SNP protect the tomato seedlings from the bacterial wilt, but H2O2+ SNP mixture significantly decreased disease severity with reduced relative AUDPC. These results suggest that H2O2 and SNP could be used together to control bacterial wilt in tomato plants as bactericidal agents. PMID:25288967

  20. Expression of the nos gene and firefly flashing: a test of the nitric-oxide-mediated flash control model.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-01-01

    Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) emit various types of light that differ among species and populations of the same species. Their lights are assumed to be biological properties that play important ecological and evolutionary roles. Some species in the Lampyridae emit periodic luminescence, the patterns of which are characterized by species-specific intervals. In previous work, it was predicted that the nitric oxide (NO) regulates the oxygen supply required for the bioluminescence reaction of fireflies. Here, the expression of the NO synthase (NOS) mRNA in some fireflies was examined to verify the predictive model of nitric-oxide-mediated flash control in these insects. The expression of the nos gene in the lantern organ was observed not only in nocturnal flashing species but also in diurnal non-flashing species. It was shown that the expression levels of nos were higher in the lantern of Luciola cruciata (Motschulsky) larvae, which that emits continuous light, than in other body parts, although expression in the lantern of the adults, who flash periodically, was not high. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression levels among adults of Luciola cruciata characterized by different flashing intervals. The data do not support the model of an NO-mediated flash control mechanism, during which oxygen becomes available for the luciferin-luciferase reaction through NO-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. It is also indicated that flash patterns do not co-vary with NOS production. However, high nos expression in the larval lantern suggests that NO may play a role in producing continuous light by functioning as a neurotransmitter signal for bioluminescence. PMID:25373203

  1. Evidence nitric oxide mediates the vasodepressor response to hypoxia in sino-denervated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Miaokun; Reis, D.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Systemic hypoxia, produced in deeply anesthetized, paralyzed rats in which arterial chemoreceptors were denervated, elicited a decrease in arterial pressure (AP) averaging {minus}47 mmHg. Systemic administration of N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NO{sub 2}Arg), inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, attenuated the hypoxic depressor response by 79% and elevated AP by 21 mmHg. The effects of L-NO{sub 2}Arg on the hypoxic depressor response and arterial pressure were reversed by systemic administration of L- but not D-arginine. Elevation of AP with arginine-vasopressin or reduction of AP with nitroprusside to the pre-L-NO{sub 2}Arg levels did not modify the fall of AP to hypoxia. Endogenous NO synthesized in vivo from L-arginine, mediates most of the hypoxia depressor response.

  2. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  3. Nitric oxide-mediated central sympathetic excitation promotes CNS and pulmonary O₂ toxicity.

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Ivan T; Moskvin, Alexander N; Krivchenko, Alexander I; Piantadosi, Claude A; Allen, Barry W

    2012-06-01

    In hyperbaric oxygen (HBO(2)) at or above 3 atmospheres absolute (ATA), autonomic pathways link central nervous system (CNS) oxygen toxicity to pulmonary damage, possibly through a paradoxical and poorly characterized relationship between central nitric oxide production and sympathetic outflow. To investigate this possibility, we assessed sympathetic discharges, catecholamine release, cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, and lung damage in rats exposed to oxygen at 5 or 6 ATA. Before HBO(2) exposure, either a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) or a nonselective NOS inhibitor was injected directly into the cerebral ventricles to minimize effects on the lung, heart, and peripheral circulation. Experiments were performed on both anesthetized and conscious rats to differentiate responses to HBO(2) from the effects of anesthesia. EEG spikes, markers of CNS toxicity in anesthetized animals, were approximately four times as likely to develop in control rats than in animals with central NOS inhibition. In inhibitor-treated animals, autonomic discharges, cardiovascular pressures, catecholamine release, and cerebral blood flow all remained below baseline throughout exposure to HBO(2). In control animals, however, initial declines in these parameters were followed by significant increases above their baselines. In awake animals, central NOS inhibition significantly decreased the incidence of clonic-tonic convulsions or delayed their onset, compared with controls. The novel findings of this study are that NO produced by nNOS in the periventricular regions of the brain plays a critical role in the events leading to both CNS toxicity in HBO(2) and to the associated sympathetic hyperactivation involved in pulmonary injury. PMID:22442027

  4. Elevated level of nitric oxide mediates the anti-depressant effect of rubidium chloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amiri, Shayan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Kordjazy, Mehdi; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-09-01

    Rubidium has been used to treat psychiatric conditions including depression. We examined the antidepressant activity of rubidium chloride (RbCl) in male mice and the possible interference of nitric oxide (NO) in this effect. Mouse forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) were used to evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of RbCl. These drugs were used in this study: N(G)-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-Nitroindazole and aminoguanidine, selective neuronal and inducible NOS inhibitors, respectively, and l-arginine, an NO precursor. We studied the changes of serum and hippocampus nitrite level after different treatments. RbCl (30mg/kg), when administered 60min before the tests, significantly reduced the immobility time. Non-effective doses of l-NAME (10mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (50mg/kg), co-administered with the effective dose of RbCl (30mg/kg), reversed the anti-immobility effect of RbCl, while 7-NI (25mg/kg) could not prevent the diminishing effect of RbCl on immobility time. Moreover, co-administration of non-effective doses of l-arginine (750mg/kg) and RbCl (10mg/kg) decreased the immobility time. None of the mentioned treatments altered the locomotor activity of mice in open-field test. Nitrite level was significantly increased in serum and hippocampus of animals after RbCl (30mg/kg) administration and this nitrite level elevation was reversed by non-effective dose of l-NAME and aminoguanidine, but not 7-NI. Our data for the first time reveal the role of NO pathway in the antidepressant-like activity of RbCl, concluding that this effect results from elevation of NO through involvement of iNOS in mice. PMID:26101064

  5. Central release of nitric oxide mediates antinociception induced by aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Galdino, G S; Duarte, I D; Perez, A C

    2015-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a soluble gas that participates in important functions of the central nervous system, such as cognitive function, maintenance of synaptic plasticity for the control of sleep, appetite, body temperature, neurosecretion, and antinociception. Furthermore, during exercise large amounts of NO are released that contribute to maintaining body homeostasis. Besides NO production, physical exercise has been shown to induce antinociception. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception. In both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests, central [intrathecal (it) and intracerebroventricular (icv)] pretreatment with inhibitors of the NO/cGMP/KATP pathway (L-NOArg, ODQ, and glybenclamide) prevented the antinociceptive effect induced by aerobic exercise (AE). Furthermore, pretreatment (it, icv) with specific NO synthase inhibitors (L-NIO, aminoguanidine, and L-NPA) also prevented this effect. Supporting the hypothesis of the central involvement of NO in exercise-induced antinociception, nitrite levels in the cerebrospinal fluid increased immediately after AE. Therefore, the present study suggests that, during exercise, the NO released centrally induced antinociception. PMID:25517916

  6. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Coronary Flow Regulation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Noboru; Tanabe, Shinichi; Nakanishi, Sadanobu

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) formed via endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays crucial roles in the regulation of coronary blood flow through vasodilatation and decreased vascular resistance, and in inhibition of platelet aggregation and adhesion, leading to the prevention of coronary circulatory failure, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. Endothelial function is impaired by several pathogenic factors including smoking, chronic alcohol intake, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. The mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction include reduced NO synthase (NOS) expression and activity, decreased NO bioavailability, and increased production of oxygen radicals and endogenous NOS inhibitors. Atrial fibrillation appears to be a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is an important predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD) in humans. Penile erectile dysfunction, associated with impaired bioavailability of NO produced by eNOS and neuronal NOS, is also considered to be highly predictive of ischemic heart disease. There is evidence suggesting an important role of nitrergic innervation in coronary blood flow regulation. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures to eliminate pathogenic factors inducing endothelial and nitrergic nerve dysfunction would be quite important in preventing the genesis and development of CAD. PMID:22942627

  7. Guard cell hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide mediate elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kai; Li, Xin; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Guanqun; Liu, Yaru; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Chen, Zhixiang; Yu, Jingquan

    2015-10-01

    Climate change as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 influences plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Although the involvement of stomata in plant responses to elevated CO2 has been well established, the underlying mechanism of elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement remains largely unknown. We used diverse techniques, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, biochemical methodologies and gene silencing to investigate the signaling pathway for elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Elevated CO2 -induced stomatal closure was dependent on the production of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE 1 (RBOH1)-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and NITRATE REDUCTASE (NR)-mediated nitric oxide (NO) in guard cells in an abscisic acid (ABA)-independent manner. Silencing of OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) compromised the elevated CO2 -induced accumulation of H2 O2 and NO, upregulation of SLOW ANION CHANNEL ASSOCIATED 1 (SLAC1) gene expression and reduction of stomatal aperture, whereas silencing of RBOH1 or NR had no effects on the expression of OST1. Our results demonstrate that as critical signaling molecules, RBOH1-dependent H2 O2 and NR-dependent NO act downstream of OST1 that regulate SLAC1 expression and elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement. This information is crucial to deepen the understanding of CO2 signaling pathway in guard cells. PMID:26308648

  8. Antioxidant Systems are Regulated by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-translational Modifications (NO-PTMs)

    PubMed Central

    Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Valderrama, Raquel; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Padilla, María N.; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biological messenger that orchestrates a plethora of plant functions, mainly through post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as S-nitrosylation or tyrosine nitration. In plants, hundreds of proteins have been identified as potential targets of these NO-PTMs under physiological and stress conditions indicating the relevance of NO in plant-signaling mechanisms. Among these NO protein targets, there are different antioxidant enzymes involved in the control of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as H2O2, which is also a signal molecule. This highlights the close relationship between ROS/NO signaling pathways. The major plant antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutases (SODs) peroxiredoxins (Prx) and all the enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione (Asa-GSH) cycle, have been shown to be modulated to different degrees by NO-PTMs. This mini-review will update the recent knowledge concerning the interaction of NO with these antioxidant enzymes, with a special focus on the components of the Asa-GSH cycle and their physiological relevance. PMID:26909095

  9. Thyroid Hormone Enhances Nitric Oxide-Mediated Bacterial Clearance and Promotes Survival after Meningococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Altenbacher, Georg; Hagner, Matthias; Berglund, Pernilla; Gao, Yumin; Lu, Ting; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sjölinder, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Euthyroid sick syndrome characterized by reduced levels of thyroid hormones (THs) is observed in patients with meningococcal shock. It has been found that the level of THs reflects disease severity and is predictive for mortality. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of THs on host defense during meningococcal infection. We found that supplementation of thyroxine to mice infected with Neisseria meningitidis enhanced bacterial clearance, attenuated the inflammatory responses and promoted survival. In vitro studies with macrophages revealed that THs enhanced bacteria-cell interaction and intracellular killing of meningococci by stimulating inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNos)-mediated NO production. TH treatment did not activate expression of TH receptors in macrophages. Instead, the observed TH-directed actions were mediated through nongenomic pathways involving the protein kinases PI3K and ERK1/2 and initiated at the membrane receptor integrin αvβ3. Inhibition of nongenomic TH signaling prevented iNos induction, NO production and subsequent intracellular bacterial killing by macrophages. These data demonstrate a beneficial role of THs in macrophage-mediated N. meningitidis clearance. TH replacement might be a novel option to control meningococcal septicemia. PMID:22844479

  10. Nitric oxide mediates bleomycin-induced angiogenesis and pulmonary fibrosis via regulation of VEGF.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M; Wright, Clayton A; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogenic mediator VEGF using anti-VEGF antibody CBO-P11 significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Bleomycin-induced nitric oxide (NO) was observed to be the key upstream regulator of VEGF via the PI3k/Akt pathway. VEGF regulated other important angiogenic proteins including PAI-1 and IL-8 in response to bleomycin exposure. Inhibition of NO and VEGF activity significantly mitigated bleomycin-induced angiogenic and fibrogenic responses. NO and VEGF are key mediators of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and could serve as important targets against this debilitating disease. Overall, our data suggests an important role for angiogenic mediators in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25919965

  11. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ oscillation in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji; Zhai, Kui; Chen, Yingxiao; Zhang, Xu; Miao, Lin; Wei, Bin; Ji, Guangju

    2016-06-15

    The stretching of smooth muscle tissue modulates contraction through augmentation of Ca(2+) transients, but the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca(2+) transients is still unknown. We found that mechanical stretching and maintenance of mouse urinary bladder smooth muscle strips and single myocytes at 30% and 18% beyond the initial length, respectively, resulted in Ca(2+) oscillations. Experiments indicated that mechanical stretching remarkably increased the production of nitric oxide (NO) as well as the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and contractility increases were completely abolished by the NO inhibitor L-NAME or eNOS (also known as NOS3) gene inactivation. Moreover, exposure of eNOS-knockout myocytes to exogenous NO donor induced Ca(2+) oscillations. The stretch-induced Ca(2+) oscillations were greatly inhibited by the selective inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) inhibitor xestospongin C and partially inhibited by ryanodine. Moreover, the stretch-induced Ca(2+) oscillations were also suppressed by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, but not by the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ. These results suggest that stretching myocyte and maintenance at a certain length results in Ca(2+) oscillations that are NO dependent , and sGC and cGMP independent, and results from the activation of PI3K in smooth muscle. PMID:27189081

  12. Inhibition of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase by nitric oxide-mediated S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Kim, Bong-Jo; Song, Byoung J.

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is responsible for the metabolism of acetaldehyde and other toxic lipid aldehydes. Despite many reports about the inhibition of ALDH2 by toxic chemicals, it is unknown whether nitric oxide (NO) can alter the ALDH2 activity in intact cells or in vivo animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of NO on ALDH2 activity in H4IIE-C3 rat hepatoma cells. NO donors such as S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, and 3-morpholinosydnonimine significantly increased the nitrite concentration while they inhibited the ALDH2 activity. Addition of GSH-ethylester (GSH-EE) completely blocked the GSNO-mediated ALDH2 inhibition and increased nitrite concentration. To directly demonstrate the NO-mediated S-nitrosylation and inactivation, ALDH2 was immunopurified from control or GSNO-treated cells and subjected to immunoblot analysis. The anti-nitrosocysteine antibody recognized the immunopurified ALDH2 only from the GSNO-treated samples. All these results indicate that S-nitrosylation of ALDH2 in intact cells leads to reversible inhibition of ALDH2 activity. PMID:16242127

  13. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  14. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M.; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A.; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  15. Redox and Nitric Oxide-Mediated Regulation of Sensory Neuron Ion Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) can intimately control neuronal excitability and synaptic strength by regulating the function of many ion channels. In peripheral sensory neurons, such regulation contributes towards the control of somatosensory processing; therefore, understanding the mechanisms of such regulation is necessary for the development of new therapeutic strategies and for the treatment of sensory dysfunctions, such as chronic pain. Recent Advances: Tremendous progress in deciphering nitric oxide (NO) and ROS signaling in the nervous system has been made in recent decades. This includes the recognition of these molecules as important second messengers and the elucidation of their metabolic pathways and cellular targets. Mounting evidence suggests that these targets include many ion channels which can be directly or indirectly modulated by ROS and NO. However, the mechanisms specific to sensory neurons are still poorly understood. This review will therefore summarize recent findings that highlight the complex nature of the signaling pathways involved in redox/NO regulation of sensory neuron ion channels and excitability; references to redox mechanisms described in other neuron types will be made where necessary. Critical Issues: The complexity and interplay within the redox, NO, and other gasotransmitter modulation of protein function are still largely unresolved. Issues of specificity and intracellular localization of these signaling cascades will also be addressed. Future Directions: Since our understanding of ROS and RNS signaling in sensory neurons is limited, there is a multitude of future directions; one of the most important issues for further study is the establishment of the exact roles that these signaling pathways play in pain processing and the translation of this understanding into new therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 486–504. PMID:24735331

  16. Nitric oxide mediates lung injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shang Jyh; Peng, Tai-Chu; Lee, Ru Ping; Hsu, Kang; Chen, Chao-Fuh; Hung, Yu-Kuen; Wang, David; Chen, Hsing I

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to play a role in lung injury (LI) induced by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). However, controversy exists as to the potential beneficial or detrimental effect of NO. In the present study, an in situ, perfused rat lung model was used to study the possible role of NO in the LI induced by I/R. The filtration coefficient (Kfc), lung weight gain (LWG), protein concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage (PCBAL), and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) were measured to evaluate the degree of pulmonary hypertension and LI. I/R resulted in increased Kfc, LWG, and PCBAL. These changes were exacerbated by inhalation of NO (20-30 ppm) or 4 mM L-arginine, an NO precursor. The permeability increase and LI caused by I/R could be blocked by exposure to 5 mM N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; a nonspecific NO synthase inhibitor), and this protective effect of L-NAME was reversed with NO inhalation. Inhaled NO prevented the increase in PAP caused by I/R, while L-arginine had no such effect. L-NAME tended to diminish the I/R-induced elevation in PAP, but the suppression was not statistically significant when compared to the values in the I/R group. These results indicate that I/R increases Kfc and promotes alveolar edema by stimulating endogenous NO synthesis. Exogenous NO, either generated from L-arginine or delivered into the airway, is apparently also injurious to the lung following I/R. PMID:12566987

  17. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Alessandro; Trevisan, Sara; Voigt, Boris; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3- fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ) of root apex has been suggested as a signaling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3- resupply effects on primary root (PR) growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO) as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced PR elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs) immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger). Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signaling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs) biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108) restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs. PMID:26834770

  18. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones.

    PubMed

    Manoli, Alessandro; Trevisan, Sara; Voigt, Boris; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3 (-)) is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3 (-) fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ) of root apex has been suggested as a signaling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3 (-) resupply effects on primary root (PR) growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO) as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced PR elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs) immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger). Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signaling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs) biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108) restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs. PMID:26834770

  19. Downstream mechanisms of nitric oxide-mediated skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Lynch, Gordon S; McConell, Glenn K

    2010-12-01

    There is evidence that nitric oxide (NO) is required for the normal increases in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction, but the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. We examined whether NO regulates glucose uptake during skeletal muscle contractions via cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent pathways. Isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from mice were stimulated to contract ex vivo, and potential NO signaling pathways were blocked by the addition of inhibitors to the incubation medium. Contraction increased (P < 0.05) NO synthase (NOS) activity (∼40%) and dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence (a marker of oxidant levels; ∼95%), which was prevented with a NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), and antioxidants [nonspecific antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC); thiol-reducing agent, DTT], respectively. L-NMMA and NAC both attenuated glucose uptake during contraction by ∼50% (P < 0.05), and their effects were not additive. Neither the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, which prevents the formation of cGMP, the cGMP-dependent protein (PKG) inhibitor Rp-8-bromo-β-phenyl-1,N2-ethenoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate sodium salt nor white light, which breaks S-nitrosylated bonds, affects glucose uptake during contraction; however, DTT attenuated (P < 0.05) contraction-stimulated glucose uptake (by 70%). NOS inhibition and antioxidant treatment reduced contraction-stimulated increases in protein S-glutathionylation and tyrosine nitration (P < 0.05), without affecting AMPK or p38 MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, we provide evidence to suggest that NOS-derived oxidants regulate skeletal muscle glucose uptake during ex vivo contractions via a cGMP/PKG-, AMPK-, and p38 MAPK-independent pathway. In addition, it appears that NO and ROS may regulate skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction through a similar pathway. PMID:20943856

  20. Nitric oxide mediates gonadotropin-releasing hormone effects on frog pituitary.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, A; Zerani, M

    1998-06-01

    We studied the possible role of nitric oxide (NO) in GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion in the female water frog, Rana esculenta. During pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation, ovulation, post-ovulation, refractory, recovery and hibernation, pituitaries were incubated with medium-alone, GnRH, NO donor (NOd), NO synthase inhibitor (NOSi), cyclic GMP analogue (cGMPa), soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (sGCi), GnRH plus NOSi, GnRH plus sGCi, and NOd plus sGCi. Because antisera raised against gonadotropins are not available for this species, we measured these hormones indirectly through their effects on ovarian progesterone secretion. The ovaries were superfused with the pituitaries pre-incubated as reported above. In addition, NOS activity and cGMP levels were determined in the pre-incubated pituitaries. Those pre-incubated with medium-alone and with GnRH increased progesterone secretion during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation, ovulation and recovery; the increase induced by GnRH was higher than that induced by medium-alone during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery. NOd and cGMPa increased progesterone in all considered reproductive phases except ovulation; the increase induced by NOd and cGMP was higher than that induced by medium-alone during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery. NOS activity was highest during ovulation and lowest during post-ovulation, refractory and hibernation. GnRH increased NOS activity during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery. Cyclic GMP levels were highest during ovulation and lowest during post-ovulation, refractory and hibernation. GnRH increased cGMP levels during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery, NOd during all considered reproductive phases. These results suggest that NO mediates basal and GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion in female Rana esculenta. PMID:9688343

  1. Nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation increases blood flow during the early stages of stress fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Ryan E; Shoghi, Kooresh I; Silva, Matthew J

    2014-02-15

    Despite the strong connection between angiogenesis and osteogenesis in skeletal repair conditions such as fracture and distraction osteogenesis, little is known about the vascular requirements for bone formation after repetitive mechanical loading. Here, established protocols of damaging (stress fracture) and nondamaging (physiological) forelimb loading in the adult rat were used to stimulate either woven or lamellar bone formation, respectively. Positron emission tomography was used to evaluate blood flow and fluoride kinetics at the site of bone formation. In the group that received damaging mechanical loading leading to woven bone formation (WBF), (15)O water (blood) flow rate was significantly increased on day 0 and remained elevated 14 days after loading, whereas (18)F fluoride uptake peaked 7 days after loading. In the group that received nondamaging mechanical loading leading to lamellar bone formation (LBF), (15)O water and (18)F fluoride flow rates in loaded limbs were not significantly different from nonloaded limbs at any time point. The early increase in blood flow rate after WBF loading was associated with local vasodilation. In addition, Nos2 expression in mast cells was increased in WBF-, but not LBF-, loaded limbs. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester was used to suppress NO generation, resulting in significant decreases in early blood flow rate and bone formation after WBF loading. These results demonstrate that NO-mediated vasodilation is a key feature of the normal response to stress fracture and precedes woven bone formation. Therefore, patients with impaired vascular function may heal stress fractures more slowly than expected. PMID:24356518

  2. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Modulation of Central Network Dynamics during Olfactory Perception.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Takanashi, Fumihito; Ishida, Kohei; Kobayashi, Suguru; Kitamura, Yoshiichiro; Hamasaki, Yuuta; Saito, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) modulates the dynamics of central olfactory networks and has been implicated in olfactory processing including learning. Land mollusks have a specialized olfactory lobe in the brain called the procerebral (PC) lobe. The PC lobe produces ongoing local field potential (LFP) oscillation, which is modulated by olfactory stimulation. We hypothesized that NO should be released in the PC lobe in response to olfactory stimulation, and to prove this, we applied an NO electrode to the PC lobe of the land slug Limax in an isolated tentacle-brain preparation. Olfactory stimulation applied to the olfactory epithelium transiently increased the NO concentration in the PC lobe, and this was blocked by the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME at 3.7 mM. L-NAME at this concentration did not block the ongoing LFP oscillation, but did block the frequency increase during olfactory stimulation. Olfactory stimulation also enhanced spatial synchronicity of activity, and this response was also blocked by L-NAME. Single electrical stimulation of the superior tentacle nerve (STN) mimicked the effects of olfactory stimulation on LFP frequency and synchronicity, and both of these effects were blocked by L-NAME. L-NAME did not block synaptic transmission from the STN to the nonbursting (NB)-type PC lobe neurons, which presumably produce NO in an activity-dependent manner. Previous behavioral experiments have revealed impairment of olfactory discrimination after L-NAME injection. The recording conditions in the present work likely reproduce the in vivo brain state in those behavioral experiments. We speculate that the dynamical effects of NO released during olfactory perception underlie precise odor representation and memory formation in the brain, presumably through regulation of NB neuron activity. PMID:26360020

  3. Nitric Oxide Mediates Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Retinal Bipolar Cell Output via S-Nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Tooker, Ryan E.; Lipin, Mikhail Y.; Leuranguer, Valerie; Rozsa, Eva; Bramley, Jayne R.; Harding, Jacqueline L.; Reynolds, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Coding a wide range of light intensities in natural scenes poses a challenge for the retina: adaptation to bright light should not compromise sensitivity to dim light. Here we report a novel form of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, specifically, a “weighted potentiation” that selectively increases output of Mb-type bipolar cells in the goldfish retina in response to weak inputs but leaves the input–output ratio for strong stimuli unaffected. In retinal slice preparation, strong depolarization of bipolar terminals significantly lowered the threshold for calcium spike initiation, which originated from a shift in activation of voltage-gated calcium currents (ICa) to more negative potentials. The process depended upon glutamate-evoked retrograde nitric oxide (NO) signaling as it was eliminated by pretreatment with an NO synthase blocker, TRIM. The NO-dependent ICa modulation was cGMP independent but could be blocked by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), indicating that NO acted via an S-nitrosylation mechanism. Importantly, the NO action resulted in a weighted potentiation of Mb output in response to small (≤−30 mV) depolarizations. Coincidentally, light flashes with intensity ≥2.4 × 108 photons/cm2/s lowered the latency of scotopic (≤2.4 × 108 photons/cm2/s) light-evoked calcium spikes in Mb axon terminals in an NEM-sensitive manner, but light responses above cone threshold (≥3.5 × 109 photons/cm2/s) were unaltered. Under bright scotopic/mesopic conditions, this novel form of Mb output potentiation selectively amplifies dim retinal inputs at Mb → ganglion cell synapses. We propose that this process might counteract decreases in retinal sensitivity during light adaptation by preventing the loss of visual information carried by dim scotopic signals. PMID:24305814

  4. Nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis of neutrophils through caspase-8 and caspase-3-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Megha; Nagarkoti, Sheela; Awasthi, Deepika; Singh, Abhishek K; Chandra, Tulika; Kumaravelu, J; Barthwal, Manoj K; Dikshit, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play an indispensable role in killing of invading pathogens by enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO generation, and subsequently undergoing apoptosis. Unlike ROS/NOX2, role of NO/NOS still remains undefined in the apoptosis of neutrophils (PMNs) and the present study attempts to decipher the importance of NO/NOS in the neutrophil apoptosis. Prolonged treatment of human PMNs or mice bone marrow derived neutrophils (BMDN) with NO led to enhanced ROS generation, caspase-8/caspase-3 cleavage, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and finally cellular apoptosis. NO-induced ROS generation led to caspase-8 deglutathionylation and activation, which subsequently activated mitochondrial death pathway via BID (Bcl-2 family protein) cleavage. NO-mediated augmentation of caspase-8 and BID cleavage was significantly prevented in BMDN from neutrophil cytosolic factor-1 (NCF-1) knockout (KO) mice, implying the involvement of NOX2 in NO-induced apoptosis of PMNs. Furthermore, ROS, NO generation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were enhanced in a time-dependent manner in human PMNs and mice BMDN undergoing spontaneous apoptosis. Pharmacological and genetic ablation of iNOS in human PMNs and mice BMDN significantly reduced the levels of apoptosis. Impaired apoptosis of BMDN from iNOS KO mice was due to reduced caspase-8 activity which subsequently prevented caspase-3 and -9 activation. Altogether, our results suggest a crucial role of NO/iNOS in neutrophil apoptosis via enhanced ROS generation and caspase-8 mediated activation of mitochondrial death pathway. PMID:27584786

  5. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Modulation of Central Network Dynamics during Olfactory Perception

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Suguru; Kitamura, Yoshiichiro; Hamasaki, Yuuta; Saito, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) modulates the dynamics of central olfactory networks and has been implicated in olfactory processing including learning. Land mollusks have a specialized olfactory lobe in the brain called the procerebral (PC) lobe. The PC lobe produces ongoing local field potential (LFP) oscillation, which is modulated by olfactory stimulation. We hypothesized that NO should be released in the PC lobe in response to olfactory stimulation, and to prove this, we applied an NO electrode to the PC lobe of the land slug Limax in an isolated tentacle-brain preparation. Olfactory stimulation applied to the olfactory epithelium transiently increased the NO concentration in the PC lobe, and this was blocked by the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME at 3.7 mM. L-NAME at this concentration did not block the ongoing LFP oscillation, but did block the frequency increase during olfactory stimulation. Olfactory stimulation also enhanced spatial synchronicity of activity, and this response was also blocked by L-NAME. Single electrical stimulation of the superior tentacle nerve (STN) mimicked the effects of olfactory stimulation on LFP frequency and synchronicity, and both of these effects were blocked by L-NAME. L-NAME did not block synaptic transmission from the STN to the nonbursting (NB)-type PC lobe neurons, which presumably produce NO in an activity-dependent manner. Previous behavioral experiments have revealed impairment of olfactory discrimination after L-NAME injection. The recording conditions in the present work likely reproduce the in vivo brain state in those behavioral experiments. We speculate that the dynamical effects of NO released during olfactory perception underlie precise odor representation and memory formation in the brain, presumably through regulation of NB neuron activity. PMID:26360020

  6. Vitamin C improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ting, H H; Timimi, F K; Boles, K S; Creager, S J; Ganz, P; Creager, M A

    1996-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired in humans with diabetes mellitus. Inactivation of endothelium-derived nitric oxide by oxygen-derived free radicals contributes to abnormal vascular reactivity in experimental models of diabetes. To determine whether this observation is relevant to humans, we tested the hypothesis that the antioxidant, vitamin C, could improve endothelium-dependent vasodilation in forearm resistance vessels of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. We studied 10 diabetic subjects and 10 age-matched, nondiabetic control subjects. Forearm blood flow was determined by venous occlusion plethysmography. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by intraarterial infusion of methacholine (0.3-10 micrograms/min). Endothelium-independent vasodilation was measured by intraarterial infusion of nitroprusside (0.3-10 micrograms/min) and verapamil (10-300 micrograms/min). Forearm blood flow dose-response curves were determined for each drug before and during concomitant intraarterial administration of vitamin C (24 mg/min). In diabetic subjects, endothelium-dependent vasodilation to methacholine was augmented by simultaneous infusion of vitamin C (P = 0.002); in contrast, endothelium-independent vasodilation to nitroprusside and to verapamil were not affected by concomitant infusion of vitamin C (P = 0.9 and P = 0.4, respectively). In nondiabetic subjects, vitamin C administration did not alter endothelium-dependent vasodilation (P = 0.8). We conclude that endothelial dysfunction in forearm resistance vessels of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus can be improved by administration of the antioxidant, vitamin C. These findings support the hypothesis that nitric oxide inactivation by oxygen-derived free radicals contributes to abnormal vascular reactivity in diabetes. PMID:8550838

  7. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  8. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  9. Hindlimb unweighting does not alter vasoconstrictor responsiveness and nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Just, Timothy P; Jendzjowsky, Nicholas G; DeLorey, Darren S

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We tested the hypothesis that physical inactivity would increase sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness and diminish NO-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Sprague–Dawley rats (n = 33) were randomly assigned to sedentary time control (S) or hindlimb unweighted (HU) groups for 21 days. Following the intervention, rats were anaesthetized and instrumented for measurement of arterial blood pressure and femoral artery blood flow and stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain. The percentage change of femoral vascular conductance (%FVC) in response to sympathetic chain stimulation delivered at 2 and 5 Hz was determined at rest and during triceps surae muscle contraction before (control) and after NO synthase blockade with l-NAME (5 mg kg i.v.). Sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness was not different (P > 0.05) in S and HU rats at rest (S, 2 Hz, −26 ± 8% and 5 Hz, −46 ± 12%; and HU, 2 Hz, −29 ± 9% and 5 Hz, −51 ± 10%) and during contraction (S, 2 Hz, −10 ± 7% and 5 Hz, −23 ± 11%; and HU, 2 Hz, −9 ± 5% and 5 Hz, −22 ± 7%). Nitric oxide synthase blockade caused a similar increase (P > 0.05) in sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness in HU and S rats at rest (S, 2 Hz, −41 ± 7% and 5 Hz, −58 ± 8%; and HU, 2 Hz, −43 ± 6% and 5 Hz, −63 ± 8%) and during muscle contraction (S, 2 Hz, −15 ± 6% and 5 Hz, −31 ± 11%; and HU, 2 Hz, −12 ± 5% and 5 Hz, −29 ± 8%). Skeletal muscle NO synthase expression and ACh-mediated vasodilatation were also not different between HU and S rats. These data suggest that HU does not alter sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness and NO-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Key points Physical inactivity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and may alter sympathetic nervous system control of vascular

  10. Endothelium-Dependent Hyperpolarization and Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Félétou, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The endothelium controls vascular tone not only by releasing various vasoactive substances but also by another pathway associated with the hyperpolarization of both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells and is termed endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH). These responses involve an increase in the endothelial intracellular Ca concentration by the activation of transient receptor potential channels (predominantly TRPV4) followed by the opening of Ca-activated K channels of small and intermediate conductance (SKCa and IKCa). These channels show a distinct subcellular distribution. SKCa are widely distributed over the plasma membrane but segregates at sites of homocellular endothelial junctions, whereas IKCa are preferentially expressed in the myoendothelial projections. Following KCa activation, smooth muscle hyperpolarization is evoked by electrical coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions and/or by the potassium efflux that subsequently activates smooth muscle Kir2.1 and/or Na/K-ATPase. Alteration of the EDH contributes to the endothelial dysfunctions observed in various pathologies or conversely compensates for the loss in NO bioavailability. A better characterization of EDH should allow determining whether new druggable targets can be identified for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26657714

  11. Nitric oxide-mediated hyporeactivity to noradrenaline precedes the induction of nitric oxide synthase in endotoxin shock.

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C.; Mitchell, J. A.; Thiemermann, C.; Vane, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. The role of an enhanced formation of nitric oxide (NO) and the relative importance of the constitutive and inducible NO synthase (NOS) for the development of immediate (within 60 min) and delayed (at 180 min) vascular hyporeactivity to noradrenaline was investigated in a model of circulatory shock induced by endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) in the rat. 2. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetized and instrumented for the measurement of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate. In addition, the calcium-dependent and calcium-independent NOS activity was measured ex vivo by the conversion of [3H]-arginine to [3H]-citrulline in homogenates from several organs obtained from vehicle- and LPS-treated rats. 3. E. coli LPS (10 mg kg-1, i.v. bolus) caused a rapid (within 5 min) and sustained fall in MAP. At 30 and 60 min after LPS, pressor responses to noradrenaline (0.3, 1 or 3 micrograms kg-1, i.v.) were significantly reduced. The pressor responses were restored by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 1 mg kg-1, i.v. at 60 min), a potent inhibitor of NO synthesis. In contrast, L-NAME did not potentiate the noradrenaline-induced pressor responses in control animals. 4. Dexamethasone (3 mg kg-1, i.v., 60 min prior to LPS), a potent inhibitor of the induction of NOS, did not alter initial MAP or pressor responses to noradrenaline in control rats, but significantly attenuated the LPS-induced fall in MAP at 15 to 60 min after LPS. Dexamethasone did not influence the development of the LPS-induced immediate (within 60 min) hyporeactivity to noradrenaline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682137

  12. Developmental changes in endothelium-dependent pulmonary vasodilatation in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S. F.; Hislop, A. A.; Haworth, S. G.; Barnes, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. We compared in vitro endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and the endothelium-independent vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha)-precontracted muscular pulmonary arteries (PA) from pigs aged 5 min to 2 h (neonatal), 3-10 days, 3-8 weeks and adults. 2. In the pulmonary artery (PA) rings from neonatal animals, the vasodilator response to ACh was negligible. However, responses to ACh were present in all PA rings from older animals, being greatest at 3-10 days and then decreasing with age (P less than 0.001, ANOVA). ACh (30 microM) induced a 1 +/- 1%, 92 +/- 9%, 62 +/- 5% and 51 +/- 6% reduction of the PGF2 alpha-generated tension in neonatal, 3-10 days, 3-8 weeks and adult groups, respectively. 3. The relaxant response to SNP was present in the PA rings from all age groups and increased with age (P less than 0.001, ANOVA). SNP (1 microM)-induced relaxation was 55 +/- 9%, 73 +/- 7%, 97 +/- 5% and 93 +/- 6% in neonatal, 3-10 days, 3-8 week and adult groups, respectively. 4. Removal of the vascular endothelium abolished the relaxant response to ACh but had no effect on the response to SNP in any groups. 5. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (30 microM), a nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor, inhibited the response to ACh but not to SNP. The lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, had no significant effect on responses to ACh or SNP in any group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 PMID:1393265

  13. Nafamostat mesilate promotes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation via the Akt-eNOS dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sujeong; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Song, Hee-Jung; Choi, Si Wan; Nagar, Harsha; Piao, Shuyu; Jung, Saet-Byel; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Cuk-Seong

    2016-09-01

    Nafamostat mesilate (NM), a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, has anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. The intracellular mediator and external anti-inflammatory external signal in the vascular wall have been reported to protect endothelial cells, in part due to nitric oxide (NO) production. This study was designed to examine whether NM exhibit endothelium dependent vascular relaxation through Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and generation of NO. NM enhanced Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and aorta tissues obtained from rats treated with various concentrations of NM. NM concomitantly decreased arginase activity, which could increase the available arginine substrate for NO production. Moreover, we investigated whether NM increased NO bioavailability and decreased aortic relaxation response to an eNOS inhibitor in the aorta. These results suggest that NM increases NO generation via the Akt/eNOS signaling pathway, leading to endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation. Therefore, the vasorelaxing action of NM may contribute to the regulation of cardiovascular function. PMID:27610041

  14. Nafamostat mesilate promotes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation via the Akt-eNOS dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sujeong; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Song, Hee-Jung; Choi, Si Wan; Nagar, Harsha; Piao, Shuyu; Jung, Saet-byel; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Nafamostat mesilate (NM), a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, has anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. The intracellular mediator and external anti-inflammatory external signal in the vascular wall have been reported to protect endothelial cells, in part due to nitric oxide (NO) production. This study was designed to examine whether NM exhibit endothelium dependent vascular relaxation through Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and generation of NO. NM enhanced Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and aorta tissues obtained from rats treated with various concentrations of NM. NM concomitantly decreased arginase activity, which could increase the available arginine substrate for NO production. Moreover, we investigated whether NM increased NO bioavailability and decreased aortic relaxation response to an eNOS inhibitor in the aorta. These results suggest that NM increases NO generation via the Akt/eNOS signaling pathway, leading to endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation. Therefore, the vasorelaxing action of NM may contribute to the regulation of cardiovascular function. PMID:27610041

  15. Pycnogenol, French maritime pine bark extract, augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Kenji; Hidaka, Takayuki; Nakamura, Shuji; Umemura, Takashi; Jitsuiki, Daisuke; Soga, Junko; Goto, Chikara; Chayama, Kazuaki; Yoshizumi, Masao; Higashi, Yukihito

    2007-09-01

    Pycnogenol, an extract of bark from the French maritime pine, Pinus pinaster Ait., consists of a concentrate of water-soluble polyphenols. Pycnogenol contains the bioflavonoids catechin and taxifolin as well as phenolcarbonic acids. Antioxidants, such as bioflavonoids, enhance endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression and subsequent NO release from endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine Pycnogenol's effects on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo and active drug study. We evaluated forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and to sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an endothelium-independent vasodilator, in healthy young men before and after 2 weeks of daily oral administration of Pycnogenol (180 mg/day) (n=8) or placebo (n=8). FBF was measured by using strain-gauge plethysmography. Neither the placebo nor Pycnogenol altered forearm or systemic hemodynamics. Pycnogenol, but not placebo, augmented FBF response to ACh, from 13.1 +/- 7.0 to 18.5 +/- 4.0 mL/min per 100 mL tissue (p<0.05). SNP-stimulated vasodilation was similar before and after 2 weeks of treatment in the control and Pycnogenol groups. The administration of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor, completely abolished Pycnogenol-induced augmentation of the FBF response to ACh. These findings suggest that Pycnogenol augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation by increasing in NO production. Pycnogenol would be useful for treating various diseases whose pathogeneses involve endothelial dysfunction. PMID:18037769

  16. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibition and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in younger vs. older healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Eisenach, John H; Gullixson, Leah R; Allen, Alexander R; Kost, Susan L; Nicholson, Wayne T

    2014-01-01

    Aim A major feature of endothelial dysfunction is reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which in ageing may be due to decreased production of endothelial prostacyclin, or nitric oxide (NO), or both. Method We tested this hypothesis in 12 younger (age 18–38 years, six women) and 12 older healthy adults (age 55–73 years, six post-menopausal women). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by the forearm vascular conductance (FVC) response to intra-arterial acetylcholine (ACh) (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 μg dl−1 forearm tissue min−1) before and 90 min after inhibition of the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) with oral celecoxib (400 mg), followed by the addition of endothelial NO synthase inhibition with intra-arterial NG-monomethyl-l arginine acetate (L-NMMA). Results Ageing was associated with a significantly reduced FVC response to ACh (P = 0.009, age-by-dose interaction; highest dose FVC ± SEM in ageing: 11.2 ± 1.4 vs. younger: 17.7 ± 2.4 units, P = 0.02). Celecoxib did not reduce resting FVC or the responses to ACh in any group. L-NMMA significantly reduced resting FVC and the responses to ACh in all groups, and absolute FVC values following L-NMMA were similar between groups. Conclusion In healthy normotensive younger and older adults, there is minimal contribution of prostacyclin to ACh-mediated vasodilation, yet the NO component of vasodilation is reduced with ageing. In the clinical context, these findings suggest that acute administration of medications that inhibit prostacyclin (i.e. COX-2 inhibitors) evoke modest vascular consequences in healthy persons. Additional studies are necessary to test whether chronic use of COX-2 medications reduces endothelium dependent vasodilation in older persons with or without cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:24698105

  17. Activation of toll-like receptor signaling pathways leading to nitric oxide-mediated antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Cader, Mohamed Sarjoon; Amarasinghe, Aruna; Abdul-Careem, Mohamed Faizal

    2016-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), well-characterized pattern-recognizing receptors of the innate arm of the immune system, are vital in detecting pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The TLR-PAMP interaction initiates an intracellular signaling cascade, predominantly culminating in upregulation of antiviral components, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). After activation, various TLR pathways can promote iNOS production via the myeloid differentiation primary response-88 (MyD-88) adapter protein. Subsequently, iNOS facilitates production of nitric oxide (NO), a highly reactive and potent antiviral molecule that can inhibit replication of RNA and DNA viruses. Furthermore, NO can diffuse freely across cell membranes and elicit antiviral mechanisms in various ways, including direct and indirect damage to viral genomes. This review emphasizes current knowledge of NO-mediated antiviral responses elicited after activation of TLR signaling pathways. PMID:27233799

  18. α2A-adrenoceptors, but not nitric oxide, mediate the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition of moxonidine.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Puc, Luis E; Aguayo-Morales, Hilda; Silva-Belmares, Yesenia; González-Zavala, Maria A; Centurión, David

    2016-07-01

    Moxonidine centrally inhibits the sympathetic activity through the I1-imidazoline receptor and nitric oxide. In addition, inhibits the peripheral cardiac sympathetic outflow by α2-adrenoceptors/I1-imidazoline receptors, although the role of α2-adrenoceptor subtypes or nitric oxide in the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine are unknown. Therefore, the cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine (10μg/kgmin) was evaluated before and after of the treatment with the following antagonists/inhibitor: (1) BRL 44408, (300μg/kg, α2A), imiloxan, (3000μg/kg, α2B), and JP-1302, (300μg/kg, α2C), in animals pretreated with AGN 192403 (3000μg/kg, I1 antagonist); (2) N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 34, 100, and 340μg/kgmin); and (3) the combinations of the highest dose of l-NAME plus AGN 192403 or BRL 44408. Additionally, the expression of the neuronal (nNOS) and inducible (iNOS) nitric oxide synthase in the stellate ganglion was determined after treatment with moxonidine (i.p. 0.56mg/kg daily, during one week). The cardiac sympatho-inhibition of 10μg/kgmin moxonidine was: (1) unaffected by imiloxan and JP-1302, under pretreatment with AGN 192403, or l-NAME (34, 100 and 340μg/kgmin) given alone; (2) partially antagonized by the combination of 340 μg/kgmin l-NAME plus BRL 44408; and (3) abolished by BRL 44408 under treatment with AGN 192403. Furthermore, moxonidine did not modify the nNOS or iNOS protein expression in the stellate ganglion, the main source of postganglionic sympathetic neurons innervating the heart. In conclusion, our results suggest that the peripheral cardiac sympatho-inhibition induced by moxonidine is mediated by α2A-adrenoceptor subtype but not by nitric oxide. PMID:27112661

  19. Nitric oxide mediated amelioration of arsenic toxicity which alters the alternative oxidase (Aox1) gene expression in Hordeum vulgare L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, Shalini; Dubey, Pragyan; Singh, Aradhana; Singh, A K

    2015-10-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) as a key molecule in the signal transduction pathway of a biotic stress response has already been described. Recent studies indicate that it also participate in the signaling of abiotic stresses. In the present study, we showed the altered expression of stress responsive gene alternative oxidase (Aox1) in seedlings of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in response to arsenic toxicity. Arsenic toxicity decreased the germination percentage, biomass, chlorophyll and carotenoid content whereas, arsenic toxicity enhanced the MDA content and proline content in a dose dependent manner. Other enzyme activities like catalase and superoxide dismutase increased with the increase in concentrations but it fell down at higher concentration of arsenic. Pretreatment of nitric oxide results in the enhanced expression of alternative oxidase which showed the adaptation of alternative pathway during the arsenic stress and it also enhances the growth ability and adaptability towards the arsenic stress. The results support the conclusion that nitric oxide ameliorates the arsenic toxicity not only at the level of antioxidant defense but also by affecting other mechanism of detoxification. PMID:26036416

  20. Nitric oxide mediates cardiac protection of tissue kallikrein by reducing inflammation and ventricular remodeling after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the role of nitric oxide (NO) and the kinin B2 receptor in mediating tissue kallikrein’s actions in intramyocardial inflammation and cardiac remodeling after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adenovirus carrying the human tissue kallikrein gene was delivered locally into rat hearts 4 days prior to 30-minute ischemia followed by 24- hour or 7-day reperfusion with or without administration of icatibant, a kinin B2 receptor antagonist, or N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Kallikrein gene delivery improved cardiac contractility and diastolic function, reduced infarct size at 1 day after I/R without affecting mean arterial pressure. Kallikrein treatment reduced macrophage/monocyte and neutrophil accumulation in the infarcted myocardium in association with reduced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels. Kallikrein increased cardiac endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation and NO levels and decreased superoxide formation, TGF-β1 levels and Smad2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, kallikrein reduced I/R-induced JNK, p38MAPK, IκB-α phosphorylation and nuclear NF-κB activation. In addition, kallikrein improved cardiac performance, reduced infarct size and prevented ventricular wall thinning at 7 days after I/R. The effects of kallikrein on cardiac function, inflammation and signaling mediators were all blocked by icatibant and L-NAME. These results indicate that tissue kallikrein through kinin B2 receptor and NO formation improves cardiac function, prevents inflammation and limits left ventricular remodeling after myocardial I/R by suppression of oxidative stress, TGF-β1/Smad2 and JNK/p38MAPK signaling pathways and NF-κB activation. PMID:18068196

  1. Bilateral common carotid artery stenosis in normotensive rats impairs endothelium-dependent dilation of parenchymal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Matin, Nusrat; Fisher, Courtney; Jackson, William F; Dorrance, Anne M

    2016-05-15

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion is a risk factor for cognitive impairment. Reduced blood flow through the common carotid arteries induced by bilateral carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) is a physiologically relevant model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. We hypothesized that BCAS in 20-wk-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats would impair cognitive function and lead to reduced endothelium-dependent dilation and outward remodeling in the parenchymal arterioles (PAs). After 8 wk of BCAS, both short-term memory and spatial discrimination abilities were impaired. In vivo assessment of cerebrovascular reserve capacity showed a severe impairment after BCAS. PA endothelial function and structure were assessed by pressure myography. BCAS impaired endothelial function in PAs, as evidenced by reduced dilation to carbachol. Addition of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase inhibitors did not change carbachol-mediated dilation in either group. Inhibiting CYP epoxygenase, the enzyme that produces epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EETs), a key determinant of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-mediated dilation, abolished dilation in PAs from Sham rats, but had no effect in PAs from BCAS rats. Expression of TRPV4 channels, a target for EETs, was decreased and maximal dilation to a TRPV4 agonist was attenuated after BCAS. Together these data suggest that EET-mediated dilation is impaired in PAs after BCAS. Thus impaired endothelium-dependent dilation in the PAs may be one of the contributing factors to the cognitive impairment observed after BCAS. PMID:26968546

  2. Nitric oxide mediates the fungal-elicitor-enhanced biosynthesis of antioxidant polyphenols in submerged cultures of Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weifa; Miao, Kangjie; Zhang, Yanxia; Pan, Shenyuan; Zhang, Meimei; Jiang, Hong

    2009-10-01

    A fungal elicitor prepared from the cell debris of the plant-pathogenic ascomycete Alternaria alternata induces multiple responses by Inonotus obliquus cells, including an increase in generation of nitric oxide (NO), activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and accumulation of total mycelial phenolic compounds (TMP), but does not trigger production of oxylipins or jasmonic acid (JA). The role of NO in TMP production was investigated via the effects of the NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPITO) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG). TMP profiles were assayed using (1)H NMR spectroscopy combining multivariate pattern recognition strategies. Pretreatment of I. obliquus mycelia with cPITO or AG suppressed not only elicitor-enhanced NO generation and PAL activity, but also the elicitor-induced increase in TMP production. This TMP reduction by either a NO scavenger or a NOS inhibitor was reversed by exogenous addition of either a NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, or JA separately. NMR-based metabonomic analysis of TMP profiles showed that the induced TMP were hispidin analogues including inoscavins, phelligridins, davallialactone and methyldavallialactone, which possess high antioxidant activities. Thus, NO mediates an elicitor-induced increase in production of antioxidant polyphenols in I. obliquus via a signalling pathway independent of oxylipins or JA, a mechanism which differs from those in some higher plants. PMID:19556296

  3. The mechanism of the nitric oxide-mediated enhancement of tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced DNA single strand breakage

    PubMed Central

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Clementi, Emilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cantoni, Orazio

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine (Cf) enhances the DNA cleavage induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (tB-OOH) in U937 cells via a mechanism involving Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial formation of DNA-damaging species (Guidarelli et al., 1997b). Nitric oxide (NO) is not involved in this process since U937 cells do not express the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS).Treatment with the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 10 μM), or S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, 300 μM), however, potentiated the DNA strand scission induced by 200 μM tB-OOH. The DNA lesions generated by tB-OOH alone, or combined with SNAP, were repaired with superimposable kinetics and were insensitive to anti-oxidants and peroxynitrite scavengers but suppressed by iron chelators.SNAP or GSNO did not cause mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation but their enhancing effects on the tB-OOH-induced DNA strand scission were prevented by ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the calcium uniporter of mitochondria. Furthermore, the enhancing effects of both SNAP and GSNO were identical to and not additive with those promoted by the Ca2+-mobilizing agents Cf or ATP.The SNAP- or GSNO-mediated enhancement of the tB-OOH-induced DNA cleavage was abolished by the respiratory chain inhibitors rotenone and myxothiazol and was not apparent in respiration-deficient cells.It is concluded that, in cells which do not express the enzyme cNOS, exogenous NO enhances the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks induced by tB-OOH via a mechanism involving inhibition of complex III. PMID:9846647

  4. Nitric Oxide Mediates 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Leaves of Elymus nutans Griseb. Exposed to Chilling Stress

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Juanjuan; Chu, Xitong; Sun, Yongfang; Miao, Yanjun; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) are both extremely important signalling molecules employed by plants to control many aspects of physiology. In the present study, the role of NO in ALA-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of two sources of Elymus nutans Griseb. (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD) was investigated. Chilling stress enhanced electrolyte leakage, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide radical in two E. nutans, which were substantially alleviated by exogenous ALA and NO application. Pretreatment with NO scavenger PTIO or NOS inhibitor L-NNA alone and in combination with ALA induced enhancements in electrolyte leakage and the accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and superoxide radical in leaves of DX and ZD exposed to chilling stress, indicating that the inhibition of NO biosynthesis reduced the chilling resistance of E. nutans and the ALA-enhanced chilling resistance. Further analyses showed that ALA and NO enhanced antioxidant defense and activated plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and decreased the accumulation of ROS induced by chilling stress. A pronounced increase in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and NO release by exogenous ALA treatment was found in chilling-resistant DX plants exposed to chilling stress, while only a little increase was observed in chilling-sensitive ZD. Furthermore, inhibition of NO accumulation by PTIO or L-NNA blocked the protective effect of exogenous ALA, while both exogenous NO treatment and inhibition of endogenous NO accumulation did not induce ALA production. These results suggested that NO might be a downstream signal mediating ALA-induced chilling resistance in E. nutans. PMID:26151364

  5. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore regulates nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis of neurons induced by target deprivation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lee J; Adams, Neal A; Pan, Yan; Price, Ann; Wong, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of mouse occipital cortex induces precisely timed and uniform p53-modulated and Bax-dependent apoptosis of thalamocortical projection neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) by 7 d after lesion. We tested the hypothesis that this neuronal apoptosis is initiated by oxidative stress and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Preapoptotic LGN neurons accumulate mitochondria, Zn(2+) and Ca(2+), and generate higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, nitric oxide (NO), and peroxynitrite, than LGN neurons with an intact cortical target. Preapoptosis of LGN neurons is associated with increased formation of protein carbonyls, protein nitration, and protein S-nitrosylation. Genetic deletion of nitric oxide synthase 1 (nos1) and inhibition of NOS1 with nitroindazole protected LGN neurons from apoptosis, revealing NO as a mediator. Putative components of the mPTP are expressed in mouse LGN, including the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), and cyclophilin D (CyPD). Nitration of CyPD and ANT in LGN mitochondria occurs by 2 d after cortical injury. Chemical cross-linking showed that LGN neuron preapoptosis is associated with formation of CyPD and VDAC oligomers, consistent with mPTP formation. Mice without CyPD are rescued from neuron apoptosis as are mice treated with the mPTP inhibitors TRO-19622 (cholest-4-en-3-one oxime) and TAT-Bcl-X(L)-BH4. Manipulation of the mPTP markedly attenuated the early preapoptotic production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in target-deprived neurons. Our results demonstrate in adult mouse brain neurons that the mPTP functions to enhance ROS production and the mPTP and NO trigger apoptosis; thus, the mPTP is a target for neuroprotection in vivo. PMID:21209222

  6. Nitric oxide-mediated cutaneous microvascular function is impaired in polycystic ovary sydrome but can be improved by exercise training.

    PubMed

    Sprung, V S; Cuthbertson, D J; Pugh, C J A; Daousi, C; Atkinson, G; Aziz, N F; Kemp, G J; Green, D J; Cable, N T; Jones, H

    2013-03-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with cardiovascular disease. The contribution of the nitric oxide (NO) dilator system to cutaneous endothelial dysfunction is currently unknown in PCOS. Our aim was to examine whether women with PCOS demonstrate impaired cutaneous microvascular NO function and whether exercise training can ameliorate any impairment. Eleven women with PCOS (age, 29 ± 7 years; body mass index, 34 ± 6 kg m(-2)) were compared with six healthy obese control women (age, 29 ± 7 years; body mass index, 34 ± 5 kg m(-2)). Six women with PCOS (30 ± 7 years; 31 ± 6 kg m(-2)) then completed 16 weeks of exercise training. Laser Doppler flowmetry, combined with intradermal microdialysis of l-N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine, a nitric oxide antagonist, in response to incremental local heating of the forearm was assessed in women with PCOS and control women, and again in women with PCOS following exercise training. Cardiorespiratory fitness, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, hormone and lipid profiles were also assessed. Differences between women with PCOS and control women and changes with exercise were analysed using Student's unpaired t tests. Differences in the contribution of NO to cutaneous blood flow [expressed as a percentage of maximal cutaneous vasodilatation (CVCmax)] were analysed using general linear models. At 42°C heating, cutaneous NO-mediated vasodilatation was attenuated by 17.5%CVCmax (95% confidence interval, 33.3, 1.7; P = 0.03) in women with PCOS vs. control women. Exercise training improved cardiorespiratory fitness by 5.0 ml kg(-1) min(-1) (95% confidence interval, 0.9, 9.2; P = 0.03) and NO-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation at 42°C heating by 19.6% CVCmax (95% confidence interval, 4.3, 34.9; P = 0.02). Cutaneous microvascular NO function is impaired in women with PCOS compared with obese matched control women but can be improved with exercise training. PMID:23318877

  7. Oleic acid-dependent modulation of Nitric oxide associated 1 protein levels regulates nitric oxide-mediated defense signaling in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The conserved cellular metabolites nitric oxide (NO) and oleic acid (18:1) are well-known regulators of disease physiologies in diverse organism. We show that NO production in plants is regulated via 18:1. Reduction in 18:1 levels, via a genetic mutation in the 18:1-synthesizing gene SUPPRESSOR OF S...

  8. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system. PMID:27192939

  9. Nitric oxide-mediated neuronal apoptosis in rats with recurrent febrile seizures through endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Qin, Jiong; Liu, Xiaoyan; Han, Ying; Yang, Zhixian; Chang, Xingzhi; Ji, Xinna

    2008-10-10

    Nitric oxide (NO), as a neurotransmitter, exerts various physiological and pathological effects on the brain. Excess NO is toxic to neurons and may cause neuronal apoptosis. However, the cascade of NO-mediated apoptosis is not fully understood. We utilized a recurrent febrile seizures (FS) rat model and found that plasma NO was increased, neuronal apoptosis was evident, the expression of glucose-regulated protein78 (GRP78, a well-established marker of ER stress) was elevated, and caspase-12 (an ER stress-specific proapoptosis molecule) was activated in the hippocampus in a time-dependent manner after recurrent FS. Administration of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) enhanced neuronal apoptosis, down-regulated the expression of GRP78, and increased that of caspase-12 in FS+SNP groups compared with FS groups. In contrast, treatment with N(G)-nitrol-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, a competitive NO synthase inhibitor) inhibited neuronal apoptosis, up-regulated the expression of GRP78, and decreased that of caspase-12 in FS+l-NAME groups compared with FS groups. These results suggest that NO mediates neuronal apoptosis caused by recurrent FS, and that the ER stress pathway is involved in NO-mediated neuronal apoptosis. PMID:18675883

  10. Impact of nitric-oxide-mediated vasodilation and oxidative stress on renal medullary oxygenation: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Fry, Brendan C; Edwards, Aurélie; Layton, Anita T

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation in preventing medullary hypoxia, as well as the likely pathways by which superoxide (O2(-)) conversely enhances medullary hypoxia. To do so, we expanded a previously developed mathematical model of solute transport in the renal medulla that accounts for the reciprocal interactions among oxygen (O2), NO, and O2(-) to include the vasoactive effects of NO on medullary descending vasa recta. The model represents the radial organization of the vessels and tubules, centered around vascular bundles in the outer medulla and collecting ducts in the inner medulla. Model simulations suggest that NO helps to prevent medullary hypoxia both by inducing vasodilation of the descending vasa recta (thus increasing O2 supply) and by reducing the active sodium transport rate (thus reducing O2 consumption). That is, the vasodilative properties of NO significantly contribute to maintaining sufficient medullary oxygenation. The model further predicts that a reduction in tubular transport efficiency (i.e., the ratio of active sodium transport per O2 consumption) is the main factor by which increased O2(-) levels lead to hypoxia, whereas hyperfiltration is not a likely pathway to medullary hypoxia due to oxidative stress. Finally, our results suggest that further increasing the radial separation between vessels and tubules would reduce the diffusion of NO towards descending vasa recta in the inner medulla, thereby diminishing its vasoactive effects therein and reducing O2 delivery to the papillary tip. PMID:26831340

  11. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system.

  12. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system. PMID:27192939

  13. Endogenous nitric oxide mediates He-Ne laser-induced adaptive responses in salt stressed-tall fescue leaves.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Gao, Limei; Han, Rong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of endogenous nitric oxide in protective effects of He-Ne laser on salt stressed-tall fescue leaves. Salt stress resulted in significant increases of membrane injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, polyamine accumulation, and activities of SOD, POD, and APX, while pronounced decreases of antioxidant contents, CAT activity and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in seedlings leaves. He-Ne laser illumination caused a distinct alleviation of cellular injury that was reflected by the lower MDA amounts, polyamine accumulation and ROS levels at the stress period. In contrast, the laser treatment displayed a higher Ca(2+) concentration, antioxidant amounts, NO release, antioxidant enzyme, and NOS activities. These responses could be blocked due to the inhibition of NO biosynthesis by PTIO (NO scavenger) or LNNA (NOS inhibitor). The presented results demonstrated that endogenous NO might be involved in the progress of He-Ne laser-induced plant antioxidant system activation and ROS degradation in order to enhance adaptive responses of tall fescue to prolonged saline conditions. PMID:27309569

  14. Vascular microRNA-204 is remotely governed by the microbiome and impairs endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by downregulating Sirtuin1.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Ajit; Kim, Young-Rae; Kumar, Santosh; Li, Qiuxia; Kassan, Modar; Jacobs, Julia S; Irani, Kaikobad

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota promotes atherosclerosis, and vascular endothelial dysfunction, signalled by impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, is an early marker of atherosclerosis. Here we show that vascular microRNA-204 (miR-204) expression is remotely regulated by the microbiome, and impairs endothelial function by targeting the Sirtuin1 lysine deacetylase (Sirt1). MiR-204 is downregulated, while Sirt1 is upregulated, in aortas of germ-free mice. Suppression of gut microbiome with broad-spectrum antibiotics decreases miR-204, increases Sirt1 and bioavailable vascular nitric oxide, and improves endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in mouse aortas. Antibiotics curtail aortic miR-204 upregulation, and rescue decline of aortic Sirt1 and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, triggered by high-fat diet feeding. Improvement of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by antibiotics is lost in mice lacking endothelial Sirt1. Systemic antagonism of miR-204 rescues impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and vascular Sirt1, and decreases vascular inflammation induced by high-fat diet. These findings reveal a gut microbe-vascular microRNA-Sirtuin1 nexus that leads to endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27586459

  15. Role of metabolic environment on nitric oxide mediated inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Monica P; Emond, Zachary M; Wang, Zheng; Martinez, Janet; Jiang, Qun; Kibbe, Melina R

    2014-01-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is well known to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Previously, we reported that NO was more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in a type 2 diabetic environment than control. We also found that NO was ineffective in an uncontrolled type 1 diabetic environment; however, insulin restored the efficacy of NO. Thus, the goal of this study was to more closely evaluate the effect of insulin and glucose on the efficacy of NO at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments using different doses of insulin as well as pioglitazone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in male lean Zucker (LZ) rats with streptozotocin (60 mg/kg IP). Groups included control, moderate glucose control, and tight glucose control. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats fed Purina 5008 chow were used as a type 2 diabetic model. Groups included no therapy, insulin therapy, or pioglitazone therapy. After 4 weeks of maintaining group assignments, the carotid artery injury model was performed. Treatment groups included: control, injury and injury plus NO. 2 weeks following arterial injury, in the type 1 diabetic rats, NO most effectively reduced the neointimal area in the moderate and tightly controlled groups (81% and 88% vs. 33%, respectively, p=0.01). In type 2 diabetic rats, the metabolic environment had no impact on the efficacy of NO (81-82% reduction for all groups). Thus, in this study, we show NO is effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic environments. A greater understanding of how the metabolic environment may impact the efficacy of NO may lead to the development of more effective NO-based therapies for patients with diabetes. PMID:24333562

  16. Glial nitric oxide-mediated long-term presynaptic facilitation revealed by optical imaging in rat spinal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2004-11-01

    We investigated a presynaptic form of long-term potentiation (LTP) in horizontal slices of the rat spinal cord by visualizing presynaptic and postsynaptic excitation with a voltage-sensitive dye. To record presynaptic excitation, we stained primary afferent fibers anterogradely from the dorsal root. A single-pulse test stimulation of C fiber-activating strength to the dorsal root elicited action potential (AP)-like or compound AP-like optical signals throughout the superficial dorsal horn. After conditioning (240 pulses at 2 Hz for 2 min), the presynaptic excitation was augmented. Furthermore, new excitation was elicited in the areas that were silent before conditioning. For postsynaptic recording, projection neurons in spinal lamina I were stained retrogradely from the periaqueductal gray in the brain stem. The test stimulation elicited AP-like or EPSP-like optical signals in the stained neurons. After conditioning, the EPSP-like responses were augmented, and previously silent neurons were converted to active ones. Results obtained with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, NO synthase inhibitors, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist and mGluR1 antagonist, and a glial metabolism inhibitor suggest that after conditioning, presynaptic excitation is facilitated by NO released from glial cells via the activation of mGluR1. The results also indicate the possible presence of additional presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanism(s) for the LTP induction. Activity-dependent LTP of nociceptive afferent synaptic transmission in the spinal cord is believed to underlie central sensitization after inflammation or nerve injury. This glial NO-mediated control of presynaptic excitation may contribute to the induction at least in part. PMID:15525773

  17. Impaired Nitric Oxide Mediated Vasodilation In The Peripheral Circulation In The R6/2 Mouse Model Of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kane, Andrew D; Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A; Morton, A Jennifer; Giussani, Dino A

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the Huntington's disease (HD) extends beyond the nervous system to other sites, including the cardiovascular system. Further, the cardiovascular pathology pre-dates neurological decline, however the mechanisms involved remain unclear. We investigated in the R6/2 mouse model of HD nitric oxide (NO) dependent and independent endothelial mechanisms. Femoral artery reactivity was determined by wire myography in wild type (WT) and R6/2 mice at 12 and 16 weeks of adulthood. WT mice showed increased endothelial relaxation between 12 and 16 weeks (Rmax: 72 ± 7% vs. 97 ± 13%, P < 0.05). In contrast, R6/2 mice showed enhanced endothelial relaxation already by 12 weeks (Rmax at 12w: 72 ± 7% vs. 94 ± 5%, WT vs. R6/2, P < 0.05) that declined by 16 weeks compared with WT mice (Rmax at 16w: 97 ± 13% vs. 68 ± 7%, WT vs. R6/2, P < 0.05). In WT mice, the increase in femoral relaxation between 12 and 16 weeks was due to enhanced NO dependent mechanisms. By 16 weeks of adult age, the R6/2 mouse developed overt endothelial dysfunction due to an inability to increase NO dependent vasodilation. The data add to the growing literature of non-neural manifestations of HD and implicate NO depletion as a key mechanism underlying the HD pathophysiology in the peripheral vasculature. PMID:27181166

  18. Enhanced nitric oxide-mediated autophagy contributes to the hepatoprotective effects of ischemic preconditioning during ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jun-Kyu; Kang, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-08-31

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protects against liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Autophagy is an essential cytoprotective system that is rapidly activated by multiple stressors. Nitric oxide (NO) acts as an inducer of IPC. We examined the impact of autophagy in liver IPC and its regulation by NO. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 60 min of hepatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion. IPC was achieved for 10 min of ischemia followed by 10 min of reperfusion prior to sustained ischemia. N(ω)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 15 mg/kg, i.v., all NOS inhibitor) and aminoguanidine (AG, 10 mg/kg, i.v., iNOS inhibitor) were injected 10 min before IPC. SB203580 (10 mg/kg, i.p., p38 inhibitor) was injected 30 min before IPC. I/R increased serum alanine aminotransferase activity. IPC attenuated this increase, which was abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. Microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II levels increased and p62 protein levels decreased after I/R; these changes were augmented by IPC and abolished by L-NAME. I/R increased liver protein expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)12-Atg5 complex and lysosome-associated membrane protein-2. IPC augmented the expression of these proteins, which were abolished by L-NAME, but not AG. IPC also augmented the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK induced by I/R and this phosphorylation was abolished by L-NAME. Our findings suggest that IPC-mediated NO protects against I/R-induced liver injury by enhancing autophagic flux. PMID:27246638

  19. Hydrogen sulfide enhances salt tolerance through nitric oxide-mediated maintenance of ion homeostasis in barley seedling roots

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Fei-Hua; He, En-Ming; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are emerging as messenger molecules involved in the modulation of plant physiological processes. Here, we investigated a signalling network involving H2S and NO in salt tolerance pathway of barley. NaHS, a donor of H2S, at a low concentration of either 50 or 100 μM, had significant rescue effects on the 150 mM NaCl-induced inhibition of plant growth and modulated the K+/Na+ balance by decreasing the net K+ efflux and increasing the gene expression of an inward-rectifying potassium channel (HvAKT1) and a high-affinity K+ uptake system (HvHAK4). H2S and NO maintained the lower Na+ content in the cytoplast by increasing the amount of PM H+-ATPase, the transcriptional levels of PM H+-ATPase (HvHA1) and Na+/H+ antiporter (HvSOS1). H2S and NO modulated Na+ compartmentation into the vacuoles with up-regulation of the transcriptional levels of vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter (HvVNHX2) and H+-ATPase subunit β (HvVHA-β) and increased in the protein expression of vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter (NHE1). H2S mimicked the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) by increasing NO production, whereas the function was quenched with the addition of NO scavenger. These results indicated that H2S increased salt tolerance by maintaining ion homeostasis, which were mediated by the NO signal. PMID:26213372

  20. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Hormonal Control of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Expression in Young Pineapple Plants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Purgatto, Eduardo; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Magalhaes, Jose Ronaldo; Kaiser, Werner M.; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-01-01

    Genotypic, developmental, and environmental factors converge to determine the degree of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) expression. To characterize the signaling events controlling CAM expression in young pineapple (Ananas comosus) plants, this photosynthetic pathway was modulated through manipulations in water availability. Rapid, intense, and completely reversible up-regulation in CAM expression was triggered by water deficit, as indicated by the rise in nocturnal malate accumulation and in the expression and activity of important CAM enzymes. During both up- and down-regulation of CAM, the degree of CAM expression was positively and negatively correlated with the endogenous levels of abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinins, respectively. When exogenously applied, ABA stimulated and cytokinins repressed the expression of CAM. However, inhibition of water deficit-induced ABA accumulation did not block the up-regulation of CAM, suggesting that a parallel, non-ABA-dependent signaling route was also operating. Moreover, strong evidence revealed that nitric oxide (NO) may fulfill an important role during CAM signaling. Up-regulation of CAM was clearly observed in NO-treated plants, and a conspicuous temporal and spatial correlation was also evident between NO production and CAM expression. Removal of NO from the tissues either by adding NO scavenger or by inhibiting NO production significantly impaired ABA-induced up-regulation of CAM, indicating that NO likely acts as a key downstream component in the ABA-dependent signaling pathway. Finally, tungstate or glutamine inhibition of the NO-generating enzyme nitrate reductase completely blocked NO production during ABA-induced up-regulation of CAM, characterizing this enzyme as responsible for NO synthesis during CAM signaling in pineapple plants. PMID:20147491

  1. Nitric oxide mediates strigolactone signaling in auxin and ethylene-sensitive lateral root formation in sunflower seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Niharika; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) play significant role in shaping root architecture whereby auxin-SL crosstalk has been observed in SL-mediated responses of primary root elongation, lateral root formation and adventitious root (AR) initiation. Whereas GR24 (a synthetic strigolactone) inhibits LR and AR formation, the effect of SL biosynthesis inhibitor (fluridone) is just the opposite (root proliferation). Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) leads to LR proliferation but completely inhibits AR development. The diffusive distribution of PIN1 in the provascular cells in the differentiating zone of the roots in response to GR24, fluridone or NPA treatments further indicates the involvement of localized auxin accumulation in LR development responses. Inhibition of LR formation by GR24 treatment coincides with inhibition of ACC synthase activity. Profuse LR development by fluridone and NPA treatments correlates with enhanced [Ca2+]cyt in the apical region and differentiating zones of LR, indicating a critical role of [Ca2+] in LR development in response to the coordinated action of auxins, ethylene and SLs. Significant enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) activity (enzyme responsible for SL biosynthesis) in tissue homogenates in presence of cPTIO (NO scavenger) indicates the role of endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCD activity. Differences in the spatial distribution of NO in the primary and lateral roots further highlight the involvement of NO in SL-modulated root morphogenesis in sunflower seedlings. Present work provides new report on the negative modulation of SL biosynthesis through modulation of CCD activity by endogenous nitric oxide during SL-modulated LR development. PMID:26076049

  2. Impairment of Coronary Arteriolar Endothelium-Dependent Dilation after Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Inhalation: A Time-Course Study

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; Cumpston, Amy M.; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T.; Sager, Tina M.; Frazer, David G.; Mercer, Robert R.; Scabilloni, James; Andrew, Michael E.; Castranova, Vincent; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials have been developed for widespread applications due to many highly unique and desirable characteristics. The purpose of this study was to assess pulmonary inflammation and subepicardial arteriolar reactivity in response to multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) inhalation and evaluate the time course of vascular alterations. Rats were exposed to MWCNT aerosols producing pulmonary deposition. Pulmonary inflammation via bronchoalveolar lavage and MWCNT translocation from the lungs to systemic organs was evident 24 h post-inhalation. Coronary arterioles were evaluated 24–168 h post-exposure to determine microvascular response to changes in transmural pressure, endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity. Myogenic responsiveness, vascular smooth muscle reactivity to nitric oxide, and α-adrenergic responses all remained intact. However, a severe impact on endothelium-dependent dilation was observed within 24 h after MWCNT inhalation, a condition which improved, but did not fully return to control after 168 h. In conclusion, results indicate that MWCNT inhalation not only leads to pulmonary inflammation and cytotoxicity at low lung burdens, but also a low level of particle translocation to systemic organs. MWCNT inhalation also leads to impairments of endothelium-dependent dilation in the coronary microcirculation within 24 h, a condition which does not fully dissipate within 168 h. The innovations within the field of nanotechnology, while exciting and novel, can only reach their full potential if toxicity is first properly assessed. PMID:23203034

  3. Chronic in vivo or acute in vitro resveratrol attenuates endothelium-dependent cyclooxygenase-mediated contractile signaling in hypertensive rat carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Denniss, Steven G; Ford, Rebecca J; Smith, Christopher S; Jeffery, Andrew J; Rush, James W E

    2016-05-15

    Exaggerated cyclooxygenase (COX) and thromboxane-prostanoid (TP) receptor-mediated endothelium-dependent contraction can contribute to endothelial dysfunction. This study examined the effect of resveratrol (RSV) on endothelium-dependent contraction and cell signaling in the common carotid artery (CCA) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). Acetylcholine (Ach)-stimulated endothelium-dependent nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-mediated relaxation in precontracted SHR CCA was impaired (maximum 73 ± 6% vs. 87 ± 5% in WKY) (P < 0.05) by competitive COX-mediated contraction. Chronic (28-day) treatment in vivo (drinking water) with a ∼0.075 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) RSV dose affected neither endothelium-dependent relaxation nor endothelium-dependent contraction and associated prostaglandin (PG) production evaluated in non-precontracted NOS-blocked CCA. In contrast, a chronic ∼7.5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) RSV dose improved endothelium-dependent relaxation (94 ± 6%) and attenuated endothelium-dependent contraction (58 ± 4% vs. 73 ± 5% in No-RSV) and PG production (183 ± 43 vs. 519 ± 93 pg/ml) in SHR CCA, while U46619-stimulated TP receptor-mediated contraction was unaffected. In separate acute in vitro experiments, 20-μM RSV preincubation attenuated endothelium-dependent contraction (6 ± 4% vs. 62 ± 2% in No Drug) and PG production (121 ± 15 vs. 491 ± 93 pg/ml) and attenuated U46619-stimulated contraction (134 ± 5% vs. 171 ± 4%) in non-precontracted NOS-blocked SHR CCA. Compound C, a known AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, did not prevent the RSV attenuating effect on Ach- and U46619-stimulated contraction but did prevent the RSV attenuating effect on PG production (414 ± 58 pg/ml). These data demonstrate that RSV can attenuate endothelium-dependent contraction both by suppressing arterial wall PG production, which may be partially mediated by AMPK, and by TP receptor hyporesponsiveness, which does not appear to be mediated by

  4. Hindlimb unweighting decreases endothelium-dependent dilation and eNOS expression in soleus not gastrocnemius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, C. R.; Schrage, W. G.; Rush, J. W.; Ray, C. A.; Price, E. M.; Hasser, E. M.; Laughlin, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting (HLU) decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) in arteries of skeletal muscle with reduced blood flow during HLU. Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were exposed to HLU (n = 15) or control (n = 15) conditions for 14 days. ACh-induced dilation was assessed in muscle with reduced [soleus (Sol)] or unchanged [gastrocnemius (Gast)] blood flow during HLU. eNOS and SOD-1 expression were measured in feed arteries (FA) and in first-order (1A), second-order (2A), and third-order (3A) arterioles. Dilation to infusion of ACh in vivo was blunted in Sol but not Gast. In arteries of Sol muscle, HLU decreased eNOS mRNA and protein content. eNOS mRNA content was significantly less in Sol FA (35%), 1A arterioles (25%) and 2A arterioles (18%). eNOS protein content was less in Sol FA (64%) and 1A arterioles (65%) from HLU rats. In arteries of Gast, HLU did not decrease eNOS mRNA or protein. SOD-1 mRNA expression was less in Sol 2A arterioles (31%) and 3A arterioles (29%) of HLU rats. SOD-1 protein content was less in Sol FA (67%) but not arterioles. SOD-1 mRNA and protein content were not decreased in arteries from Gast. These data indicate that HLU decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation, eNOS expression, and SOD-1 expression primarily in arteries of Sol muscle where blood flow is reduced during HLU.

  5. The DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin and the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 improve endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat mesenteric arteries in the presence of high glucose.

    PubMed

    Salheen, S M; Panchapakesan, U; Pollock, C A; Woodman, O L

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of the DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1R agonist, exendin-4 on the mechanism(s) of endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat mesenteric arteries exposed to high glucose concentration (40 mM). Organ bath techniques were employed to investigate vascular endothelial function in rat mesenteric arteries in the presence of normal (11 mM) or high (40 mM) glucose concentrations. Pharmacological tools (1μM TRAM-34, 1μM apamin, 100 nM Ibtx, 100 μM l-NNA, 10 μM ODQ) were used to distinguish between NO and EDHF-mediated relaxation. Superoxide anion levels were assessed by L-012 and lucigenin enhanced-chemiluminescence techniques. Incubation of mesenteric rings with high glucose for 2 h caused a significant increase in superoxide anion generation and a significant impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation. Exendin-4 and DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin, but not sitagliptin or vildagliptin, significantly reduced vascular superoxide and improved endothelium-dependent relaxation in the presence of high glucose. The beneficial actions of exendin-4, but not linagliptin, were attenuated by the GLP-1R antagonist exendin fragment (9-39). Further experiments demonstrated that the presence of high glucose impaired the contribution of both nitric oxide and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarisation to relaxation and that linagliptin improved both mechanisms involved in endothelium-dependent relaxation. These findings demonstrate that high glucose impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation can be improved by exendin-4 and linagliptin, likely due to their antioxidant activity and independently of any glucose lowering effect. PMID:25697548

  6. Hormonal therapy with estradiol and drospirenone improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the coronary bed of ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Borgo, M.V.; Claudio, E.R.G.; Silva, F.B.; Romero, W.G.; Gouvea, S.A.; Moysés, M.R.; Santos, R.L.; Almeida, S.A.; Podratz, P.L.; Graceli, J.B.; Abreu, G.R.

    2015-01-01

    Drospirenone (DRSP) is a progestin with anti-aldosterone properties and it reduces blood pressure in hypertensive women. However, the effects of DRSP on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation have not been evaluated. This study investigated the effects of combined therapy with estrogen (E2) and DRSP on endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the coronary bed of ovariectomized (OVX) spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female spontaneously hypertensive rats (n=87) at 12 weeks of age were randomly divided into sham operated (Sham), OVX, OVX treated with E2 (E2), and OVX treated with E2 and DRSP (E2+DRSP) groups. Hemodynamic parameters were directly evaluated by catheter insertion into the femoral artery. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to bradykinin in the coronary arterial bed was assessed using isolated hearts according to a modified Langendorff method. Coronary protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) was assessed by Western blotting. Histological slices of coronary arteries were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and morphometric parameters were analyzed. Oxidative stress was assessed in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence. Ovariectomy increased systolic blood pressure, which was only prevented by E2+DRSP treatment. Estrogen deficiency caused endothelial dysfunction, which was prevented by both treatments. However, the vasodilator response in the E2+DRSP group was significantly higher at the three highest concentrations compared with the OVX group. Reduced ER-α expression in OVX rats was restored by both treatments. Morphometric parameters and oxidative stress were augmented by OVX and reduced by E2 and E2+DRSP treatments. Hormonal therapy with E2 and DRSP may be an important therapeutic option in the prevention of coronary heart disease in hypertensive post-menopausal women. PMID:26577845

  7. Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Effect of Apocynum venetum Leaf Extract via Src/PI3K/Akt Signalling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yeh Siang; Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani; Kwan, Chiu Yin; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2015-07-01

    Botanical herbs are consumed globally not only as an essential diet but also as medicines or as functional/recreational food supplements. The extract of the Apocynum venetum leaves (AVLE), also known as Luobuma, exerts its antihypertensive effect via dilating the blood vessels in an endothelium- and concentration-dependent manner with optimal effect seen at as low as 10 µg/mL. A commercial Luoboma "antihypertensive tea" is available commercially in the western province of China. The present study seeks to investigate the underlying cellular mechanisms of the nitric oxide (NO)-releasing property of AVLE in rat aortas and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by AVLE was assessed in organ chambers in the presence or absence of polyethyleneglycol catalase (PP2, 20 µM; inhibitor of Src kinase), wortmannin (30 nM) and LY294002 (20 µM; PI3 (phosphatidylinositol3)-Kinase inhibitor), N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NAME, 100 µM; endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (eNOS)) and ODQ (1 µM; soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor). Total nitrite and nitrate (NOx) level and protein expression of p-Akt and p-eNOS were measured. AVLE-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was reduced by PP2, wortmannin and LY294002 and abolished by L-NAME and ODQ. AVLE significantly increased total NOx level in rat aortas and in HUVECs compared to control. It also instigated phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS in cultured HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner and this was markedly suppressed by PP2, wortmannin and LY294002. AVLE also inhibited superoxide generated from both NADPH oxidase and xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. Taken together, AVLE causes endothelium-dependent NO mediated relaxations of rat aortas through Src/PI3K/Akt dependent NO signalling pathway and possesses superoxide scavenging activity. PMID:26133970

  8. Hormonal therapy with estradiol and drospirenone improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the coronary bed of ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Borgo, M V; Claudio, E R G; Silva, F B; Romero, W G; Gouvea, S A; Moysés, M R; Santos, R L; Almeida, S A; Podratz, P L; Graceli, J B; Abreu, G R

    2016-01-01

    Drospirenone (DRSP) is a progestin with anti-aldosterone properties and it reduces blood pressure in hypertensive women. However, the effects of DRSP on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation have not been evaluated. This study investigated the effects of combined therapy with estrogen (E2) and DRSP on endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the coronary bed of ovariectomized (OVX) spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female spontaneously hypertensive rats (n=87) at 12 weeks of age were randomly divided into sham operated (Sham), OVX, OVX treated with E2 (E2), and OVX treated with E2 and DRSP (E2+DRSP) groups. Hemodynamic parameters were directly evaluated by catheter insertion into the femoral artery. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to bradykinin in the coronary arterial bed was assessed using isolated hearts according to a modified Langendorff method. Coronary protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) was assessed by Western blotting. Histological slices of coronary arteries were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and morphometric parameters were analyzed. Oxidative stress was assessed in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence. Ovariectomy increased systolic blood pressure, which was only prevented by E2+DRSP treatment. Estrogen deficiency caused endothelial dysfunction, which was prevented by both treatments. However, the vasodilator response in the E2+DRSP group was significantly higher at the three highest concentrations compared with the OVX group. Reduced ER-α expression in OVX rats was restored by both treatments. Morphometric parameters and oxidative stress were augmented by OVX and reduced by E2 and E2+DRSP treatments. Hormonal therapy with E2 and DRSP may be an important therapeutic option in the prevention of coronary heart disease in hypertensive post-menopausal women. PMID:26577845

  9. IDH2 deficiency impairs mitochondrial function in endothelial cells and endothelium-dependent vasomotor function.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Bum; Nagar, Harsha; Choi, Sujeong; Jung, Saet-Byel; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Shin Kwang; Lee, Jun Wan; Lee, Jin Hyup; Park, Jeen-Woo; Irani, Kaikobad; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Song, Hee-Jung; Kim, Cuk-Seong

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2) plays an essential role protecting cells against oxidative stress-induced damage. A deficiency in IDH2 leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyocytes and cancer cells. However, the function of IDH2 in vascular endothelial cells is mostly unknown. In this study the effects of IDH2 deficiency on mitochondrial and vascular function were investigated in endothelial cells. IDH2 knockdown decreased the expression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes I, II and III, which lead to increased mitochondrial superoxide. In addition, the levels of fission and fusion proteins (Mfn-1, OPA-1, and Drp-1) were significantly altered and MnSOD expression also was decreased by IDH2 knockdown. Furthermore, knockdown of IDH2 decreased eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) concentration in endothelial cells. Interestingly, treatment with Mito-TEMPO, a mitochondrial-specific superoxide scavenger, recovered mitochondrial fission-fusion imbalance and blunted mitochondrial superoxide production, and reduced the IDH2 knockdown-induced decrease in MnSOD expression, eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in endothelial cells. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation was impaired, and the concentration of bioavailable NO decreased in the aortic ring in IDH2 knockout mice. These findings suggest that IDH2 deficiency induces endothelial dysfunction through the induction of dynamic mitochondrial changes and impairment in vascular function. PMID:26898144

  10. Age Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation is improved by resveratrol in rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gocmez, Semil S; Scarpace, Philip J; Whidden, Melissa A; Erdos, Benedek; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Sakarya, Yasemin; Utkan, Tijen; Tumer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether resveratrol improves the adverse effects age on vascular function in mesenteric arteries (MAs), and diminishes the hyperactivity in adrenal gland with age. [Methods] Male F344 x Brown Norway rats were assigned to 6-month control (YC), 6-month resveratrol (YR), 24-month control (OC) and 24-month resveratrol (OR). Resveratrol (15 mg/kg) was provided to resveratrol groups in drinking water for 14 days. [Results] Concentration response curves to phenylephrine (PE, 10-9-10-5M), acetylcholine (Ach, 10-9-10-5M) and resveratrol (10-8-10-4M) were evaluated in pressurized isolated MAs. The Ach concentration-response curve was right shifted with maximal response diminished in OC compared with YC rats. These effects were reversed by resveratrol treatment. The resveratrol-mediated relaxant responses were unchanged with age or resveratrol suggesting an endothelium-independent mechanism. Resveratrol tended to increase endothelial nitric oxide synthase; caused no effect on copper-zinc superoxide dismutase; and normalized the age-related elevatation in DβH and NPY levels in adrenal medulla, two indicators of sympathetic activity [Conclusion] These data indicate that resveratrol reverses age-related dysfunction in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in MAs and partially reverses hyperactivity of adrenomedullary function with age. This treatment may have a therapeuticpotential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or hypertension in the elderly. PMID:27298812

  11. Contribution of non-endothelium-dependent substances to exercise hyperaemia: are they O2 dependent?

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Janice M; Ray, Clare J

    2012-01-01

    This review considers the contributions to exercise hyperaemia of substances released into the interstitial fluid, with emphasis on whether they are endothelium dependent or O2 dependent. The early phase of exercise hyperaemia is attributable to K+ released from contracting muscle fibres and acting extraluminally on arterioles. Hyperpolarization of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells induced by K+ may also facilitate the maintained phase, for example by facilitating conduction of dilator signals upstream. ATP is released into the interstitium from muscle fibres, at least in part through cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-associated channels, following the fall in intracellular H+. ATP is metabolized by ectonucleotidases to adenosine, which dilates arterioles via A2A receptors, in a nitric oxide-independent manner. Evidence is presented that the rise in arterial achieved by breathing 40% O2 attenuates efflux of H+ and lactate, thereby decreasing the contribution that adenosine makes to exercise hyperaemia; efflux of inorganic phosphate and its contribution may likewise be attenuated. Prostaglandins (PGs), PGE2 and PGI2, also accumulate in the interstitium during exercise, and breathing 40% O2 abolished the contribution of PGs to exercise hyperaemia. This suggests that PGE2 released from muscle fibres and PGI2 released from capillaries and venular endothelium by a fall in their local act extraluminally to dilate arterioles. Although modest hyperoxia attenuates exercise hyperaemia by improving O2 supply, limiting the release of O2-dependent adenosine and PGs, higher O2 concentrations may have adverse effects. Evidence is presented that breathing 100% O2 limits exercise hyperaemia by generating O2−, which inactivates nitric oxide and decreases PG synthesis. PMID:23045341

  12. An ordinary mixed meal transiently impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sarabi, M; Fugmann, A; Karlström, B; Berne, C; Lithell, H; Lind, L

    2001-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of an ordinary mixed meal on endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Ten young healthy volunteers were given a mixed meal (minced meat sauce with rice, 900 kcal, 34% of the energy content was fat). In the fasting state, at 60 and 120 min after the start of the meal, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and endothelium-independent vasodilation were evaluated by local infusion of metacholine (4 microg min (-1)) and sodium nitroprusside (10 microg min (-1)) in the brachial artery. Blood flow in the forearm was measured using venous occlusion plethysmography. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation decreased from 15.4 +/- 3.3 (mean +/- SD) at fasting to 13.7 +/- 3.5 mL min (-1) (100 mL tissue)-1 (P < 0.01) 60 min after feeding, but had returned to the fasting level at 120 min. At 60 min, but not in the fasting state, the serum level of free fatty acids was inversely related to endothelium-dependent vasodilation (r=-0.74, P < 0.05), although no significant net changes in FFA levels were seen. Endothelium-independent vasodilation was not affected by the mixed meal. No similar attenuations in endothelium-dependent vasodilation were seen during control meals. In conclusion, an ordinary mixed meal transiently attenuated endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Free fatty acids may be involved in this effect on endothelial function. PMID:11442450

  13. Multiple pathways underlying endothelium-dependent relaxation in the rabbit isolated femoral artery.

    PubMed Central

    Plane, F.; Pearson, T.; Garland, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. In isolated segments of the rabbit femoral artery stimulated with noradrenaline, both acetylcholine (1 nM-10 microM) and the calcium ionophore A23187 (1 nM-100 microM) evoked endothelium-dependent smooth muscle relaxation and hyperpolarization while bradykinin (0.01-100 nM) had no effect. 2. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG; 100 microM; 20 min) or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 microM; 20 min) each abolished the hyperpolarization and the majority of the relaxation to acetylcholine (maximal response reduced from 96.8 +/- 2.3% to 2.0 +/- 1.4%). 3. The potassium channel blocker, glibenclamide (10 microM; 10 min) also abolished the change in membrane potential to acetylcholine but did not modify the smooth muscle relaxation. 4. In contrast, neither L-NAME nor glibenclamide modified the comparable responses of the femoral artery to A23187, which were also unaffected by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (10 microM). 5. In artery segments stimulated with potassium chloride (25 mM), the maximal change in tension and membrane potential evoked by A23187 (100 microM) was significantly reduced from 95.0 +/- 4.5% and 23.0 +/- 2.0 mV to 69.0 +/- 10.1% and 12.0 +/- 1.5 mV, respectively. Under these conditions L-NAME further reduced the relaxation but not the accompanying hyperpolarization to A23187. 6. Endothelium-denuded arterial segments sandwiched with endothelium-intact 'donor' segments gave qualitatively similar relaxant responses to those described above for acetylcholine and A23187.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7647981

  14. The impairment of endothelium-dependent arterial relaxation by7-ketocholesterol is associated with an early activation of protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Deckert, Valérie; Duverneuil, Linda; Poupon, Sandrine; Monier, Serge; Le Guern, Naig; Lizard, Gérard; Masson, David; Lagrost, Laurent

    2002-01-01

    Among components of oxidized low density lipoproteins, cholesterol derivatives oxidized in position 7 inhibit endothelium-dependent arterial relaxation by decreasing the release of the main endothelium-derived relaxing factor, nitric oxide (NO). The aim of the present study was to bring new insights into the molecular mechanism by which 7-ketocholesterol can block the endothelium-dependent arterial relaxation. Superoxide dismutase did not prevent the inhibitory effect of 7-ketocholesterol on endothelium-dependent relaxation, and consistent observations were made whether superoxide dismutase was conjugated or not to polyethylene glycol. In addition, neither glutathione supplementation, nor oxypurinol, i.e. a xanthine oxidase inhibitor could reverse the effect of 7-ketocholesterol, indicating that NO was not inactivated by superoxide anion. A direct alteration of the activity of the calcium-dependent NO synthase could also be ruled out, since identical relaxing effects of the calcium ionophore A23187 were observed whether arterial rings were treated or not with 7-ketocholesterol. Whereas the above observations come in support of an early, inhibitory action of 7-ketocholesterol, the specific blockade of one given subtype of membrane receptors could be discarded, and similar inhibitions were observed when either muscarinic or purinergic receptors were stimulated. Finally, the blockade of protein kinase C activity by chelerythrine arose as the sole relevant tool in preventing the effect of 7-ketocholesterol on the endothelium-dependent relaxation of rabbit aortic rings. In addition, complementary studies on cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells came in direct support of the ability of 7-ketocholesterol to activate PKC. In conclusion, 7-ketocholesterol that is present in human hypercholesterolaemic plasma, in atherosclerotic arteries, and in many processed foods can block the release of NO by vascular endothelial cells through its ability to activate PKC. PMID

  15. Characteristics of arterial wall shear stress which cause endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in the anaesthetized dog

    PubMed Central

    Snow, H M; Markos, F; O'Regan, D; Pollock, K

    2001-01-01

    The effects of changes in the mean and amplitude of arterial wall shear stress on endothelium-dependent arterial dilatation of the iliac artery of the anaesthetized dog were examined. Changes in the mean and amplitude of blood flow and wall shear stress were brought about by varying local peripheral resistance and stroke volume using a distal infusion of acetylcholine and the stimulation of the left ansa subclavia. Changes in the diameter of a segment of the iliac artery with the endothelium intact, relative to a segment with no endothelium, were used as an index of the release of nitric oxide. The increase in mean blood flow was from 84 ± 12 to 527 ± 53 ml min−1 and in amplitude was from 365 ± 18 to 695 ± 38 ml min−1 (means ±s.e.m.). The increase in mean wall shear stress was from 1.78 ± 0.30 to 7.66 ± 1.01 N m−2 and in amplitude was from 7.37 ± 0.46 to 13.9 ± 2.00 N m−2 (means ±s.e.m.). Increases in mean shear stress caused an increase in the diameter only of the section of artery with endothelium; the slope of the relationship was 0.064 ± 0.006 mm N−1 m2 (mean ±s.e.m., P < 0.001); changes in the amplitude of shear stress did not cause an increase in diameter. Changes in both the mean and amplitude of shear stress had no significant effect on the diameter of the section of artery with no endothelium. These findings coupled with the known anti-atheroma effects of nitric oxide and the effect of shear stress on cell adhesion and platelet aggregation offer a possible explanation for the disposition of atheroma in those parts of the arterial system which have low mean and high amplitude of wall shear stress. PMID:11251063

  16. Polyphenol-enriched extract of oil palm fronds (Elaeis guineensis) promotes vascular relaxation via endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Abeywardena, Mahinda; Runnie, Irine; Nizar, Mohd; Suhaila, Momamed; Head, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Plant-based polyphenolic compounds have been reported to possess cardiovascular health benefits. Several dietary sources, including herbs and spices, fruits and vegetables, and tea and wine, contain an array of biologically active compounds that have been shown to be effective in retarding oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and promoting vascular relaxation. In the present study four different plant sources, both edible and non-edible, were evaluated for potential activity. Organic extracts enriched in polyphenols were prepared from palm fronds (Elaesis guineensis); lemongrass (Cymbopogon citrates); papaya shoots (Carica papaya) and green chilli (Capsicum frutescenes) and tested for their ability to prevent in vitro oxidation of LDL, and for potential vascular relaxation actions. Rings of rat thoracic aorta and isolated perfused mesenteric vascular beds were mounted in organ baths, contracted using a half-maximal dose of noradrenaline and exposed to cumulative additions of test extracts. Palm frond extract resulted in considerable relaxation (>75%) in both preparations and was found to be endothelium-dependent as removal of endothelium or inhibition of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) led to a total loss in relaxant activity. Lemongrass extract caused a greater relaxation action in the mesenteric preparation compared to aortic rings, and appears to be mediated via NO-independent and non-prostanoid mechanisms. Of the extracts tested, palm fronds also demonstrated the highest antioxidant capacity, as determined by the ferric reducing activity/potential assay, and resulted in a significant delay (P < 0.05) in the oxidation of LDL. Collectively, these preliminary findings lend further support to the potential cardiovascular actions of plant polyphenols and also identify oil palm fronds as containing constituents that promote vascular relaxation via endothelium-dependent mechanisms. PMID:12492636

  17. Immune Complex-Induced, Nitric Oxide-Mediated Vascular Endothelial Cell Death by Phagocytes Is Prevented with Decoy FcγReceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mula, Ramanjaneya V. R.; Machiah, Deepa; Holland, Lauren; Wang, Xinyu; Parihar, Harish; Sharma, Avadhesh C.; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune vasculitis is an endothelial inflammatory disease that results from the deposition of immune-complexes (ICs) in blood vessels. The interaction between Fcgamma receptors (FcγRs) expressed on inflammatory cells with ICs is known to cause blood vessel damage. Hence, blocking the interaction of ICs and inflammatory cells is essential to prevent the IC-mediated blood vessel damage. Thus we tested if uncoupling the interaction of FcγRs and ICs prevents endothelium damage. Herein, we demonstrate that dimeric FcγR-Igs prevented nitric oxide (NO) mediated apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in an in vitro vasculitis model. Dimeric FcγR-Igs significantly inhibited the IC-induced upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) release by murine monocytic cell line. However, FcγR-Igs did not affect the exogenously added NO-induced upregulation of pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax (15 fold), Bak (35 fold), cytochrome-C (11 fold) and caspase-3 (30 fold) in HUVECs. In conclusion, these data suggest that IC-induced NO could be one of the major inflammatory mediator promoting blood vessel inflammation and endothelial cell death during IC-mediated vasculitis which can be effectively blocked by dimeric decoy FcγRs. PMID:27101012

  18. Impairment of endothelium-dependent responses of cerebral arterioles in chronic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mayhan, W G; Faraci, F M; Heistad, D D

    1987-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether endothelium-dependent responses are impaired in the cerebral microcirculation of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). We measured diameters of cerebral arterioles using intravital microscopy in normotensive rats (WKY) and SHRSP (6-8 mo old). Cerebral vasodilator responses to superfusion with adenosine, which is an endothelium-independent agonist, were similar in WKY and SHRSP. In contrast, cerebral vasodilator responses to superfusion with endothelium-dependent agonists were profoundly impaired in SHRSP. Acetylcholine (10(-4) M) increased pial arteriolar diameter 23 +/- 2% (means +/- SE) in WKY and did not change arteriolar diameter in SHRSP (-2 +/- 3%, P less than 0.05 vs. WKY). Serotonin (10(-5) M) increased pial arteriolar diameter 23 +/- 1% in WKY and, in contrast, reduced diameter 11 +/- 1% in SHRSP (P less than 0.05 vs. WKY). Nitroglycerin and acetylcholine produce vasodilatation by activation of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). Nitroglycerin was used to determine whether impaired responses of cerebral arterioles in SHRSP were related to altered cGMP activity. We found similar dilatation of cerebral arterioles in WKY and SHRSP in response to nitroglycerin. Thus impaired endothelium-dependent dilatation in SHRSP is not related to alteration of cGMP activity. We speculate that impairment of cerebral vasodilator responses to endothelium-dependent agonists, including vasoactive substances released by platelets, may predispose SHRSP to cerebral ischemia. PMID:3122590

  19. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Hafiz; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Yakob, Yusnita; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Ching, Siew Mooi; Ahmad, Zuraini; Abdul Kadir, Arifah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae) leaves (MECN) using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT), formalin-induced paw licking (FT), and hot plate tests (HPT). The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all nociceptive models with the recorded ED50 value of 279.3 mg/kg for the ACT, while, for the early and late phases of the FT, the value was >500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist) but was partially reversed by l-arginine (l-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor), Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor), or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) enhanced the extract's antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems. PMID:27190528

  20. Methanolic Extract of Clinacanthus nutans Exerts Antinociceptive Activity via the Opioid/Nitric Oxide-Mediated, but cGMP-Independent, Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rahim, Mohammad Hafiz; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Yakob, Yusnita; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Ching, Siew Mooi; Ahmad, Zuraini; Abdul Kadir, Arifah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the mechanisms of antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of Clinacanthus nutans (Acanthaceae) leaves (MECN) using various animal nociceptive models. The antinociceptive activity of orally administered 10% DMSO, 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), 5 mg/kg morphine, or MECN (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was determined using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction (ACT), formalin-induced paw licking (FT), and hot plate tests (HPT). The role of opioid and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems was also investigated. The results showed that MECN produced a significant (p < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all nociceptive models with the recorded ED50 value of 279.3 mg/kg for the ACT, while, for the early and late phases of the FT, the value was >500 mg/kg or 227.7 mg/kg, respectively. This antinociceptive activity was fully antagonized by naloxone (a nonselective opioid antagonist) but was partially reversed by l-arginine (l-arg; a nitric oxide [NO] precursor), Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; an NO synthase inhibitor), or their combinations thereof. In contrast, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) enhanced the extract's antinociception. UHPLC analysis revealed the presence of several flavonoid-based compounds with antinociceptive action. In conclusion, MECN exerted the peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of the opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent, systems. PMID:27190528

  1. Activated Macrophages as a Novel Determinant of Tumor Cell Radioresponse: The Role of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Inhibition of Cellular Respiration and Oxygen Sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Heng; De Ridder, Mark; Verovski, Valeri N.; Sonveaux, Pierre; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Law, Kalun; Monsaert, Christinne; Van den Berge, Dirk L.; Verellen, Dirk; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard; Storme, Guy A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is known to inhibit metabolic oxygen consumption because of interference with mitochondrial respiratory activity. This study examined whether activation of iNOS (a) directly in tumor cells or (b) in bystander macrophages may improve radioresponse through sparing of oxygen. Methods and Materials: EMT-6 tumor cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma, and examined for iNOS expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzymatic activity. Tumor cells alone, or combined with macrophages were subjected to metabolic hypoxia and analyzed for radiosensitivity by clonogenic assay, and for oxygen consumption by electron paramagnetic resonance and a Clark-type electrode. Results: Both tumor cells and macrophages displayed a coherent picture of iNOS induction at transcriptional/translational levels and NO/nitrite production, whereas macrophages showed also co-induction of the inducible heme oxygenase-1, which is associated with carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin production. Activation of iNOS in tumor cells resulted in a profound oxygen sparing and a 2.3-fold radiosensitization. Bystander NO-producing, but not CO-producing, macrophages were able to block oxygen consumption by 1.9-fold and to radiosensitize tumor cells by 2.2-fold. Both effects could be neutralized by aminoguanidine, a metabolic iNOS inhibitor. An improved radioresponse was clearly observed at macrophages to tumor cells ratios ranging between 1:16 to 1:1. Conclusions: Our study is the first, as far as we are aware, to provide evidence that iNOS may induce radiosensitization through oxygen sparing, and illuminates NO-producing macrophages as a novel determinant of tumor cell radioresponse within the hypoxic tumor microenvironment.

  2. Salt Stress Reduces Root Meristem Size by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Modulation of Auxin Accumulation and Signaling in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels. PMID:25818700

  3. Nitrate reductase mutation alters potassium nutrition as well as nitric oxide-mediated control of guard cell ion channels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Yizhou; Wang, Jian-Wen; Babla, Mohammad; Zhao, Chenchen; García-Mata, Carlos; Sani, Emanuela; Differ, Christopher; Mak, Michelle; Hills, Adrian; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining potassium (K(+) ) nutrition and a robust guard cell K(+) inward channel activity is considered critical for plants' adaptation to fluctuating and challenging growth environment. ABA induces stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) along with subsequent ion channel-mediated loss of K(+) and anions. However, the interactions of NO synthesis and signalling with K(+) nutrition and guard cell K(+) channel activities have not been fully explored in Arabidopsis. Physiological and molecular techniques were employed to dissect the interaction of nitrogen and potassium nutrition in regulating stomatal opening, CO2 assimilation and ion channel activity. These data, gene expression and ABA signalling transduction were compared in wild-type Columbia-0 (Col-0) and the nitrate reductase mutant nia1nia2. Growth and K(+) nutrition were impaired along with stomatal behaviour, membrane transport, and expression of genes associated with ABA signalling in the nia1nia2 mutant. ABA-inhibited K(+) in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for complete stomatal closure in nia1nia2. While NO is an important signalling component in ABA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis, our findings demonstrate a more complex interaction associating potassium nutrition and nitrogen metabolism in the nia1nia2 mutant that affects stomatal function. PMID:26508536

  4. Reactive oxygen species- and nitric oxide-mediated lung inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type and iNOS-deficient mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongwen; Ma, Joseph K; Barger, Mark W; Mercer, Robert R; Millecchia, Lyndell; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Castranova, Vince; Ma, Jane Y

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary responses to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) exposure are mediated through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) by alveolar macrophages (AM). The current study examined the differential roles of ROS and NO in DEP-induced lung injury using C57B/6J wild-type (WT) and inducible NO synthase knockout (iNOS KO) mice. Mice exposed by pharyngeal aspiration to DEP or carbon black particles (CB) (35 mg/kg) showed an inflammatory profile that included neutrophil infiltration, increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and elevated albumin content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) at 1, 3, and 7 d postexposure. The organic extract of DEP (DEPE) did not induce an inflammatory response. Comparing WT to iNOS KO mice, the results show that NO enhanced DEP-induced neutrophils infiltration and plasma albumin content in BALF and upregulated the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 12 (IL-12) by AM. DEP-exposed AM from iNOS KO mice displayed diminished production of IL-12 and, in response to ex vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, decreased production of IL-12 but increased production of IL-10 when compared to cells from WT mice. DEP, CB, but not DEPE, induced DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in AM, however, that is independent of cellular production of NO. These results demonstrate that DEP-induced immune/inflammatory responses in mice are regulated by both ROS- and NO-mediated pathways. NO did not affect ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage but upregulated IL-12 and provided a counterbalance to the ROS-mediated adaptive stress response that downregulates IL-12 and upregulates IL-10. PMID:19267316

  5. The anabolic action of intermittent parathyroid hormone on cortical bone depends partly on its ability to induce nitric oxide-mediated vasorelaxation in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Gohin, S; Carriero, A; Chenu, C; Pitsillides, A A; Arnett, T R; Marenzana, M

    2016-03-01

    There is strong evidence that vasodilatory nitric oxide (NO) donors have anabolic effects on bone in humans. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), the only osteoanabolic drug currently approved, is also a vasodilator. We investigated whether the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME might alter the effect of PTH on bone by blocking its vasodilatory effect. BALB/c mice received 28 daily injections of PTH[1-34] (80 µg/kg/day) or L-NAME (30 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination. Hindlimb blood perfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging. Bone architecture, turnover and mechanical properties in the femur were analysed respectively by micro-CT, histomorphometry and three-point bending. PTH increased hindlimb blood flow by >30% within 10 min of injection (P < 0.001). Co-treatment with L-NAME blocked the action of PTH on blood flow, whereas L-NAME alone had no effect. PTH treatment increased femoral cortical bone volume and formation rate by 20% and 110%, respectively (P < 0.001). PTH had no effect on trabecular bone volume in the femoral metaphysis although trabecular thickness and number were increased and decreased by 25%, respectively. Co-treatment with L-NAME restricted the PTH-stimulated increase in cortical bone formation but had no clear-cut effects in trabecular bone. Co-treatment with L-NAME did not affect the mechanical strength in femurs induced by iPTH. These results suggest that NO-mediated vasorelaxation plays partly a role in the anabolic action of PTH on cortical bone. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26834008

  6. High-fat diet-induced obesity alters nitric oxide-mediated neuromuscular transmission and smooth muscle excitability in the mouse distal colon.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Yogesh; Fried, David; Gulbransen, Brian; Kadrofske, Mark; Fernandes, Roxanne; Xu, Hui; Galligan, James

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that colonic enteric neurotransmission and smooth muscle cell (SMC) function are altered in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). We used wild-type (WT) mice and mice lacking the β1-subunit of the BK channel (BKβ1 (-/-)). WT mice fed a HFD had increased myenteric plexus oxidative stress, a 28% decrease in nitrergic neurons, and a 20% decrease in basal nitric oxide (NO) levels. Circular muscle inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs) were reduced in HFD WT mice. The NO synthase inhibitor nitro-l-arginine (NLA) was less effective at inhibiting relaxations in HFD compared with control diet (CD) WT mice (11 vs. 37%, P < 0.05). SMCs from HFD WT mice had depolarized membrane potentials (-47 ± 2 mV) and continuous action potential firing compared with CD WT mice (-53 ± 2 mV, P < 0.05), which showed rhythmic firing. SMCs from HFD or CD fed BKβ1 (-/-) mice fired action potentials continuously. NLA depolarized membrane potential and caused continuous firing only in SMCs from CD WT mice. Sodium nitroprusside (NO donor) hyperpolarized membrane potential and changed continuous to rhythmic action potential firing in SMCs from HFD WT and BKβ1 (-/-) mice. Migrating motor complexes were disrupted in colons from BKβ1 (-/-) mice and HFD WT mice. BK channel α-subunit protein and β1-subunit mRNA expression were similar in CD and HFD WT mice. We conclude that HFD-induced obesity disrupts inhibitory neuromuscular transmission, SMC excitability, and colonic motility by promoting oxidative stress, loss of nitrergic neurons, and SMC BK channel dysfunction. PMID:27288421

  7. Impaired Nitric Oxide Mediated Vasodilation In The Peripheral Circulation In The R6/2 Mouse Model Of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Andrew D.; Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A.; Morton, A. Jennifer; Giussani, Dino A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the Huntington’s disease (HD) extends beyond the nervous system to other sites, including the cardiovascular system. Further, the cardiovascular pathology pre-dates neurological decline, however the mechanisms involved remain unclear. We investigated in the R6/2 mouse model of HD nitric oxide (NO) dependent and independent endothelial mechanisms. Femoral artery reactivity was determined by wire myography in wild type (WT) and R6/2 mice at 12 and 16 weeks of adulthood. WT mice showed increased endothelial relaxation between 12 and 16 weeks (Rmax: 72 ± 7% vs. 97 ± 13%, P < 0.05). In contrast, R6/2 mice showed enhanced endothelial relaxation already by 12 weeks (Rmax at 12w: 72 ± 7% vs. 94 ± 5%, WT vs. R6/2, P < 0.05) that declined by 16 weeks compared with WT mice (Rmax at 16w: 97 ± 13% vs. 68 ± 7%, WT vs. R6/2, P < 0.05). In WT mice, the increase in femoral relaxation between 12 and 16 weeks was due to enhanced NO dependent mechanisms. By 16 weeks of adult age, the R6/2 mouse developed overt endothelial dysfunction due to an inability to increase NO dependent vasodilation. The data add to the growing literature of non-neural manifestations of HD and implicate NO depletion as a key mechanism underlying the HD pathophysiology in the peripheral vasculature. PMID:27181166

  8. Low-intensity voluntary running lowers blood pressure with simultaneous improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and insulin sensitivity in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng-Wei; Qian, Feng-Lei; Wang, Jian; Tao, Tao; Guo, Jing; Wang, Lie; Lu, Ai-Yun; Chen, Hong

    2008-03-01

    Our objective is to examine the effects of voluntary running at different intensity levels on blood pressure, endothelium-dependent vessel dysfunction and insulin resistance in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with severe hypertension. Ten-month-old male and female SHR with severe hypertension were assigned to voluntary running at either low intensity (30% of maximal aerobic velocity) or moderate intensity (60% of maximal aerobic velocity) on a motor-driven treadmill for 6 weeks, 20 min per day and 7 days per week. Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats and SHR were kept under sedentary conditions as controls. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured by the tail-cuff method. At the end of the exercise training, blood samples were collected for glucose, insulin and lipids assay, and aortae were isolated to examine their function in vitro. Low-intensity but not moderate-intensity running significantly lowered blood pressure in both male and female SHR (p<0.01). There was significant impairment in acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in SHR (p<0.01), which was improved by low-intensity training (p<0.05). Nitric oxide synthase blockade abrogated the improvement in endothelium-dependent relaxation. Hypertensive rats had elevated blood glucose and insulin levels with lowered insulin sensitivity that was ameliorated by low-intensity running. A significant increase in blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and a significant decrease in triglycerides were found in exercised SHR. In conclusion, low-intensity voluntary exercise lowers hypertension in aged SHR with severe hypertension. Exercise-induced simultaneous improvement in endothelium-dependent vessel relaxation and insulin sensitivity may act concomitantly in attenuating cardiovascular risk factors in aged hypertensive rats with significantly high blood pressure. PMID:18497475

  9. Effects of red and white wine on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of rat aorta and human coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Flesch, M; Schwarz, A; Böhm, M

    1998-10-01

    Beneficial effects of wine on myocardial infarction mortality may be because of its vasodilatory properties. This study investigated whether the vasodilatory activity involves the endothelium and is specific for certain wines. Effects of different red and white wines and phenolic grape ingredients on vascular tension and cGMP content were studied in human coronary arteries and rat aortic rings in vitro. Only French and Italian red wines produced "en barrique" (Bordeaux, Châteauneuf du Pape, Barolo) (1:1,000, vol/vol), quercetin (1-100 microM), and tannic acid (1-100 microgram/ml) decreased tension of precontracted vascular rings and increased vascular cGMP content (both P < 0.001). The effects were abolished after endothelial denudation and reversible by nitric oxide synthase inhibition. Red wines not produced en barrique (Valpolicella, Ahr Spätburgunder), white wines (en barrique-produced Rioja, Chardonnay, Mosel-Riesling), and ethanol did not affect vascular tension or cGMP content. Thus endothelium-dependent vasodilatory effects appear to be specific for red barrique wines, possibly because of their high content of phenolic substances. Divergent effects of wines indicate that a general view on the effects of wine and alcoholic beverages is not warranted. PMID:9746465

  10. Nitric oxide mediates the vagal protective effect on ventricular fibrillation via effects on action potential duration restitution in the rabbit heart

    PubMed Central

    Brack, Kieran E; Patel, Vanlata H; Coote, John H; Ng, G André

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that direct vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) reduces the slope of action potential duration (APD) restitution while simultaneously protecting the heart against induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the absence of any sympathetic activity or tone. In the current study we have examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the effect of VNS. Monophasic action potentials were recorded from a left ventricular epicardial site on innervated, isolated rabbit hearts (n = 7). Standard restitution, effective refractory period (ERP) and VF threshold (VFT) were measured at baseline and during VNS in the presence of the NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine (l-NA, 200 μm) and during reversing NO blockade with l-arginine (l-Arg, 1 mm). Data represent the mean ± s.e.m. The restitution curve was shifted upwards and became less steep with VNS when compared to baseline. l-NA blocked the effect of VNS whereas l-Arg restored the effect of VNS. The maximum slope of restitution was reduced from 1.17 ± 0.14 to 0.60 ± 0.09 (50 ± 5%, P < 0.0001) during control, from 0.98 ± 0.14 to 0.93 ± 0.12 (2 ± 10%, P = NS) in the presence of l-NA and from 1.16 ± 0.17 to 0.50 ± 0.10 (41 ± 9%, P = 0.003) with l-Arg plus l-NA. ERP was increased by VNS in control from 119 ± 6 ms to 130 ± 6 ms (10 ± 5%, P = 0.045) and this increase was not affected by l-NA (120 ± 4 to 133 ± 4 ms, 11 ± 3%, P = 0.0019) or l-Arg with l-NA (114 ± 4 to 123 ± 4 ms, 8 ± 2%, P = 0.006). VFT was increased from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 5.8 ± 0.5 mA (98 ± 12%, P = 0.0017) in control, 3.4 ± 0.4 to 3.8 ± 0.5 mA (13 ± 12%, P = 0.6) during perfusion with l-NA and 2.5 ± 0.4 to 6.0 ± 0.7 mA (175 ± 50%, P = 0.0017) during perfusion with l-Arg plus l-NA. Direct VNS increased VFT and flattened the slope of APD restitution curve in this isolated rabbit heart preparation with intact autonomic nerves. These effects were blocked using l-NA and reversed by replenishing the substrate for NO production

  11. Vascular Protective Effect of an Ethanol Extract of Camellia japonica Fruit: Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation of Coronary Artery and Reduction of Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sin-Hee; Shim, Bong-Sup; Yoon, Jun-Seong; Lee, Hyun-Ho; Lee, Hye-Won; Yoo, Seok-Bong; Wi, An-Jin; Park, Whoa-Shig; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Dong-Wok; Oak, Min-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Camellia japonica is a popular garden plant in Asia and widely used as cosmetic sources and traditional medicine. However, the possibility that C. japonica affects cardiovascular system remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate vascular effects of an extract of C. japonica. Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ baths using porcine coronary arteries and inhibition of proliferation and migration were assessed using human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). All four different parts, leaf, stem, flower, and fruits, caused concentration-dependent relaxations and C. japonica fruit (CJF) extract showed the strongest vasorelaxation and its effect was endothelium dependent. Relaxations to CJF were markedly reduced by inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibitor of PI3-kinase, but not affected by inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated response. CJF induced activated a time- and concentration-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS in endothelial cells. Altogether, these studies have demonstrated that CJF is a potent endothelium-dependent vasodilator and this effect was involved in, at least in part, PI3K-eNOS-NO pathway. Moreover, CJF attenuated TNF-α induced proliferation and PDGF-BB induced migration of VSMCs. The present findings indicate that CJF could be a valuable candidate of herbal medicine for cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. PMID:26697138

  12. Vascular Protective Effect of an Ethanol Extract of Camellia japonica Fruit: Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation of Coronary Artery and Reduction of Smooth Muscle Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hee; Shim, Bong-Sup; Yoon, Jun-Seong; Lee, Hyun-Ho; Lee, Hye-Won; Yoo, Seok-Bong; Wi, An-Jin; Park, Whoa-Shig; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Dong-Wok; Oak, Min-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Camellia japonica is a popular garden plant in Asia and widely used as cosmetic sources and traditional medicine. However, the possibility that C. japonica affects cardiovascular system remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate vascular effects of an extract of C. japonica. Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ baths using porcine coronary arteries and inhibition of proliferation and migration were assessed using human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). All four different parts, leaf, stem, flower, and fruits, caused concentration-dependent relaxations and C. japonica fruit (CJF) extract showed the strongest vasorelaxation and its effect was endothelium dependent. Relaxations to CJF were markedly reduced by inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibitor of PI3-kinase, but not affected by inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated response. CJF induced activated a time- and concentration-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS in endothelial cells. Altogether, these studies have demonstrated that CJF is a potent endothelium-dependent vasodilator and this effect was involved in, at least in part, PI3K-eNOS-NO pathway. Moreover, CJF attenuated TNF-α induced proliferation and PDGF-BB induced migration of VSMCs. The present findings indicate that CJF could be a valuable candidate of herbal medicine for cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. PMID:26697138

  13. Effects of reactive oxygen species and neutrophils on endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Viktor; Sotníková, Ružena; Drábiková, Katarína

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in different metabolic processes including the respiratory burst of neutrophils accompanying local inflammation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils, isolated from the guinea pig peritoneal cavity, on isolated rings of a large (conduit) artery, the rat thoracic aorta. FMLP-activated neutrophils enhanced the basal tension increased by α1-adrenergic stimulation. In phenylephrine-precontracted aortae, they elicited marked contraction, while in noradrenaline-precontracted rat aortal rings they caused a biphasic response (contraction-relaxation). To eliminate interaction of activated neutrophils with catecholamines, in the subsequent experiments the basal tension was increased by KCl-induced depolarization. Activated neutrophils evoked a low-amplitude biphasic response (relaxation-contraction) on the KCl-induced contraction. Not only the acetylcholine- and A23187-induced relaxations but also the catalase sensitive hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) elicited contractions were endothelium-dependent. Even though the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was changed by activated neutrophils and by the ROS studied, their effects differed significantly, yet none of them did eliminate fully the endothelium-dependent acetylcholine relaxation. The effect of activated neutrophils resembled the effect of superoxide anion radical (O2 •–) produced by xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XO) and differed from the inhibitory effects of Fe2SO4/H2O2-produced hydroxyl radical (•OH) and H2O2. Thus O2 •– produced either by activated neutrophils or X/XO affected much less the endothelium-dependent acetylcholine-activated relaxation mechanisms than did •OH and H2O2. In the large (conduit) artery, the effects of activated neutrophils and various ROS (O2 •–, •OH and H2O2) seem to be more dependent on muscle tension than on endothelial mechanisms. PMID:22319253

  14. Endothelium-dependent mechanisms of the vasodilatory effect of the endocannabinoid, anandamide, in the rat pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; MacLean, Margaret R; Kozłowska, Hanna; Malinowska, Barbara

    2012-09-01

    Endocannabinoids exhibit vasodilatory properties and reduce blood pressure in vivo. However, the influence and mechanism of action of the prominent endocannabinoid, anandamide (AEA), in pulmonary arteries are not known. The present study determined the vascular response to AEA in isolated rat pulmonary arteries. AEA relaxed rat pulmonary arteries that were pre-constricted with U-46619. This relaxation was reduced by the following conditions:removal of the endothelium; in KCl pre-constricted preparations; in the presence of the potassium channel (K(Ca)) blockers, tetraethylammonium and the combination of charybdotoxin and apamin, and the prostacyclin receptor antagonist, RO1138452. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (indomethacin), nitric oxide (NO) synthase (N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (URB597) alone or in combination diminished AEA-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact vessels. The remaining experiments were performed in the presence of URB597 to eliminate the influence of AEA metabolites. Antagonists of the endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CB(x)), O-1918 and cannabidiol, attenuated the AEA-induced response. Antagonists of CB(1), CB(2) and TRPV1 receptors, AM251, AM630 and capsazepine, respectively, did not modify the AEA-induced response. A reference activator of CB(x) receptors, abnormal cannabidiol, mimicked the receptor-mediated AEA effects. The present study demonstrated that AEA relaxed rat pulmonary arteries in an endothelium-dependent fashion via the activation of the O-1918-sensitive CB(x) receptor and/or prostacyclin-like vasoactive products of AEA. One or both of these mechanisms may involve K(Ca) or the NO pathway. PMID:22627170

  15. In vivo evidence for an endothelium-dependent mechanism in radiation-induced normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Emilie; François, Agnès; Toullec, Aurore; Guipaud, Olivier; Buard, Valérie; Tarlet, Georges; Mintet, Elodie; Jaillet, Cyprien; Iruela-Arispe, Maria Luisa; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism involved in side effects of radiation therapy, and especially the role of the endothelium remains unclear. Previous results showed that plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) contributes to radiation-induced intestinal injury and suggested that this role could be driven by an endothelium-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether endothelial-specific PAI-1 deletion could affect radiation-induced intestinal injury. We created a mouse model with a specific deletion of PAI-1 in the endothelium (PAI-1KOendo) by a Cre-LoxP system. In a model of radiation enteropathy, survival and intestinal radiation injury were followed as well as intestinal gene transcriptional profile and inflammatory cells intestinal infiltration. Irradiated PAI-1KOendo mice exhibited increased survival, reduced acute enteritis severity and attenuated late fibrosis compared with irradiated PAI-1flx/flx mice. Double E-cadherin/TUNEL labeling confirmed a reduced epithelial cell apoptosis in irradiated PAI-1KOendo. High-throughput gene expression combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed a putative involvement of macrophages. We observed a decrease in CD68+cells in irradiated intestinal tissues from PAI-1KOendo mice as well as modifications associated with M1/M2 polarization. This work shows that PAI-1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury by an endothelium-dependent mechanism and demonstrates in vivo that the endothelium is directly involved in the progression of radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:26510580

  16. Inhibition by quinine of endothelium-dependent relaxation of rabbit aortic strips.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, D; Hadházy, P; Magyar, K

    1987-12-01

    1 The effects of quinine sulphate, tetramethylammonium chloride (TMA) and tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) (all blockers of the Ca2+-activated K+ channels) on the relaxations induced by acetylcholine (ACh), calcium ionophore A23187 and sodium nitrite were studied in helical strips of rabbit aorta. 2 The strips were contracted to a moderate stable tone with phenylephrine (10(-7) M). ACh (4 X 10(-9) to 10(-6) M) as well as A23187 (10(-8) to 3 X 10(-7) M) reduced this tone in a concentration- and endothelium-dependent manner. 3 Pretreatment of the tissues with quinine (2.5 X 10(-5) to 10(-4) M) for 60 min produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the relaxation induced by ACh. Also 90 min incubation of the strips with TMA (3 X 10(-3) to 6.5 X 10(-2) M) or TEA (10(-3) to 3 X 10(-2) M) inhibited the ACh-evoked relaxation in a manner similar to quinine. 4 Quinine (10(-4) M, 60 min), TMA (6.5 X 10(-2) M, 90 min) or TEA (3 X 10(-2) M, 90 min) produced 5 to 10 fold reductions in the relaxant EC50 values of A23187 and ACh and depressed (by 40 to 95%) the maximal relaxations to the ionophore and ACh. 5. On a molar basis, quinine was more effective than the two tetraalkylammonium ions in reducing the endothelium-dependent relaxations of the aortic strips induced by ACh or A23187. The inhibitory actions were reversible after 60 to 90 min washout. 6. Exposure of the strips to either quinine (10-4M, 60 min), TMA (6.5 x 10-2 M, 90 min) or TEA (3 X 10-2 M, 90 min), however, did not influence significantly the relaxations evoked by sodium nitrite, a direct smooth muscle relaxant. 7. These results suggest that stimulation of the Ca2+-activated K' channels could be, at least partially, responsible for the endothelium-dependent relaxations induced by ACh or A23 187. Their activation might not be required for the endothelium-independent relaxant effects of sodium nitrite. PMID:2827827

  17. Endothelium-dependent relaxation and hyperpolarization evoked by bradykinin in canine coronary arteries: enhancement by exercise-training.

    PubMed Central

    Mombouli, J. V.; Nakashima, M.; Hamra, M.; Vanhoutte, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    bradykinin were also shifted to the left by perindoprilat. The shift induced by the ACE-inhibitor in either type of preparation was not significantly different. 8. These findings demonstrate that exercise-training augments the sensitivity of the coronary artery of the dog to the endothelium-dependent effects of bradykinin. This sensitization to bradykinin may reflect an increased role of both NO and EDHF, and is not the consequence of differences in ACE activity in the receptor compartment. PMID:8821528

  18. Singlet oxygen scavengers affect laser-dye impairment of endothelium-dependent responses of brain arterioles.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, W I; Nelson, G H

    1996-04-01

    This study investigates the possible role of singlet oxygen in accounting for the inhibitory effect of laser-dye injury on endothelium-dependent dilations. The combination of helium-neon (HeNe) laser (20-s exposure) and intravascular Evans blue impairs endothelium-dependent dilation of mouse pial arterioles by acetylcholine (ACh), bradykinin (BK), and calcium ionophore A23187. Each has a different endothelium-derived mediator (EDRFACh, EDRFBK, EDRFionophore, respectively). In this study, diameters at a craniotomy site were monitored in vivo with an image splitter-television microscope. The laser-dye injury, as usual, abolished the responses 10 and 30 min after injury, with recovery, complete or partial, at 60 min. Dilations by sodium nitroprusside, an endothelium-independent dilator, were not affected by laser-dye. When the singlet oxygen scavengers L-histidine (10(-3) M) and L-tryptophan (10(-2) M) were added to the suffusate over the site, the responses to ACh at 10 and 30 min were relatively intact, the response to BK was partly protected at 10 min only, and the response to ionophore was still totally impaired at 10 and 30 min. Lysine, a nonscavenging amino acid, had no protective effects with any dilator. We postulate that a heat-induced injury initiates a chain of events resulting in prolonged singlet oxygen generation by the endothelial cell (not by the dye). We postulate further that destruction of EDRFACh by singlet oxygen is responsible for laser-dye inhibition of ACh and that generation of the radical must continue for > or = 30 min. On the other hand, the heat injury itself is probably responsible for the elimination of the response to ionophore. Heat plus singlet oxygen generated by heat-damaged tissue may initially impair the response to BK, but by 30 min only the effects of some other factor, presumably heat injury, account for the impaired response to BK. PMID:8967364

  19. Laser-induced endothelial damage inhibits endothelium-dependent relaxation in the cerebral microcirculation of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblum, W.I.; Nelson, G.H.; Povlishock, J.T.

    1987-02-01

    This study demonstrates endothelium-dependent relaxation in the surface arterioles of the brain. A helium-neon laser was used to injure endothelium in situ following i.v. injection of Evans blue dye, which sensitizes the bed to the laser. Areas 18 or 36 micron in diameter were injured and no longer relaxed to either 1 ml of acetylcholine chloride or bradykinin triacetate, 80 micrograms/ml delivered for 60 seconds. Dilations to sodium nitroprusside (30 micrograms/ml) were unaffected. Normal responses to nitroprusside, plus electron microscopy, established that vascular smooth muscle was uninjured. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was impaired when only minor ultrastructural damage was present. Dilation was inhibited downstream and upstream as far as 80 micron from the center of the laser beam. This suggests a spread of endothelium injury around the site of laser impact. However, inhibition was somewhat more marked downstream than upstream, implying that a portion of the downstream response was dependent on a substance released from an upstream site. To date, very few studies have reported endothelium-dependent relaxation in vivo, especially in the microcirculation. The present study accomplishes this. Moreover, in contrast to in vitro observations of endothelium-dependent relaxation in large vessels, the in vivo elimination of endothelium-dependent relaxation in the microcirculation required neither removal of endothelium nor injury to large numbers of endothelium cells. Since endothelium-dependent relaxation in the microcirculation has now been demonstrated using three different techniques to injure endothelium, it is reasonable to conclude that the phenomenon is real.

  20. MACC-1 Promotes Endothelium-Dependent Angiogenesis in Gastric Cancer by Activating TWIST1/VEGF-A Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dong, Shaoting; Zhang, Jingwen; Luo, Yuhao; Huang, Na; Shi, Min; Bin, Jianping; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun

    2016-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent angiogenesis is thought to be a crucial step in cancer progression. We previously reported that metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) contributed to the vasculogenic mimicry in gastric cancer (GC), but it remains unknown whether MACC1 promotes endothelium-dependent angiogenesis of GC and whether TWIST1 is involved in this process. In the present study, we detected MACC1 expression and microvessel density (MVD) by immunohistochemistry in 159 patients with stage I-III GC, and investigated the role of TWIST1 and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) in MACC1-induced endothelium-dependent angiogenesis using nude mice with GC xenografts, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were co-cultured with conditioned media from overexpression and interference MACC1 GC cells. We found that MACC1 expression was positively correlated with an increased MVD and tumor recurrence in GC patients. In GC xenograft models, MACC1 elevated MVD and upregulated the expression of VEGF-A as well as accelerated tumor growth. In addition, MACC1 obviously increased the expression of TWIST1 and induced tube-like formation of HUVECs, whereas attenuation of TWIST1 suppressed the protein expression of VEGF-A and repealed the effect of MACC1 on tube formation. Our findings shed light on the function of MACC1 in endothelium-dependent angiogenesis of GC and suggest potential prognostic and therapeutic value. PMID:27280289

  1. Local 24-h hyperglycemia does not affect endothelium-dependent or -independent vasoreactivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Houben, A J; Schaper, N C; de Haan, C H; Huvers, F C; Slaaf, D W; de Leeuw, P W; Nieuwenhuijzen Kruseman, C

    1996-06-01

    Hyperglycemia induces regional hemodynamic changes, as suggested by animal studies. These hemodynamic changes may play an initiating role in the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute local hyperglycemia for 24 h on basal human forearm muscle and skin blood flow and endothelium-dependent and -independent vasoreactivity. Local hyperglycemia (approximately 15 mM) was induced by infusion of 5% glucose into the brachial artery of the nondominant arm. In control experiments, the same individual amount of glucose was infused intravenously in the dominant arm to correct for possible systemic effects of the infused glucose. Vasoreactivity of the forearm vasculature was evaluated by local infusion of acetylcholine (ACh), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), and norepinephrine (NE) into the brachial artery. Regional hemodynamic measurements were performed at baseline and after 6, 12, and 24 h of local hyperglycemia. Median (with interquartile range) basal forearm (muscle) blood flow (FBF) was not influenced by the 24-h local hyperglycemia [infused-to-contralateral arm FBF ratio for glucose 1.32 (1.16-1.64) vs. control 1.54 (1.34-1.69)]. Skin microcirculatory blood flow (laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) was not influenced by the 24-h local hyperglycemia [LDF ratio for glucose 1.00 (0.62-1.56) vs control 0.80 (0.58-1.14)]. In addition, the vasoreactivity of both muscle and skin (not shown) vasculature to ACh [percent change in FBF ratio for glucose 167% (81-263) vs. control 148% (94-211)], SNP [for glucose 486% (178-586) vs. control 293% (196-454)], L-NMMA [for glucose -36% (-56 to -22) vs. control -41% (-51 to -24)], and NE [for glucose -48% (-72 to -41) vs. control -66% (-79 to -33)] was also not affected by the local hyperglycemia. Thus, in contrast to animal studies, our results suggest that a moderate-to-severe hyperglycemia does not affect the regulation of basal blood flow or

  2. The vasorelaxant effect of gallic acid involves endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lais Moraes; de Oliveira, Thiago Sardinha; da Costa, Rafael Menezes; de Souza Gil, Eric; Costa, Elson Alves; Passaglia, Rita de Cassia Aleixo Tostes; Filgueira, Fernando Paranaíba; Ghedini, Paulo César

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms of action involved in the vasorelaxant effect of gallic acid (GA) were examined in the isolated rat thoracic aorta. GA exerted a relaxant effect in the highest concentrations (0.4-10mM) in both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings. Pre-incubation with L-NAME, ODQ, calmidazolium, TEA, 4-aminopyridine, and barium chloride significantly reduced the pEC50 values. Moreover, this effect was not modified by indomethacin, wortmannin, PP2, glibenclamide, or paxillin. Pre-incubation of GA (1, 3, and 10mM) in a Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution attenuated CaCl2-induced contractions and blocked BAY K8644-induced vascular contractions, but it did not inhibit a contraction induced by the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmatic reticulum stores. In addition, a Western blot analysis showed that GA induces phosphorylation of eNOS in rat thoracic aorta. These results suggest that GA induces relaxation in rat aortic rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, resulting in eNOS phosphorylation and opening potassium channels. Additionally, the relaxant effect by an endothelium-independent pathway involves the blockade of the Ca(2+) influx via L-type Ca(2+) channels. PMID:26643780

  3. Effects of raloxifene on carotid blood flow resistance and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ceresini, Graziano; Marchini, Lorenzo; Rebecchi, Isabella; Morganti, Simonetta; Bertone, Luca; Montanari, Ilaria; Bacchi-Modena, Alberto; Sgarabotto, Maria; Baldini, Monica; Denti, Licia; Ablondi, Fabrizio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Valenti, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Raloxifene is one of the most important selective estrogen receptor modulators currently employed for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, it has also been suggested that this compound affects the vascular system. We evaluated both carotid blood flow resistance and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in 50 healthy postmenopausal women randomly assigned to receive, in a double blind design, either raloxifene (60 mg per day; N=25 subjects) or placebo (N=25 subjects) for 4 months. Indices of carotid blood flow resistance, such as the pulsatility index (PI) and resistance index (RI), as well as the flow-mediated brachial artery dilation were measured both at baseline and at the end of treatment. Changes in PI were -1.86+/-2.24 and -2.15+/-2.22% after placebo and raloxifene treatment, respectively, with no significant differences between groups. Changes in RI were -0.77+/-1.72 and -1.81+/-1.54% after placebo and raloxifene treatment, respectively, with no significant differences between groups. At the end of the treatment period, the increments in artery diameter measured after the flow stimulus were 10.79+/-2.39 and 6.70+/-1.23% for placebo and raloxifene, respectively, with no significant differences between groups. These results demonstrate no significant effects of raloxifene on either carotid blood flow resistance or brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in postmenopausal women. PMID:12618276

  4. Serum alkaline phosphatase negatively affects endothelium-dependent vasodilation in naïve hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Perticone, Francesco; Perticone, Maria; Maio, Raffaele; Sciacqua, Angela; Andreucci, Michele; Tripepi, Giovanni; Corrao, Salvatore; Mallamaci, Francesca; Sesti, Giorgio; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-10-01

    Tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, promoting arterial calcification in experimental models, is a powerful predictor of total and cardiovascular mortality in general population and in patients with renal or cardiovascular diseases. For this study, to evaluate a possible correlation between serum alkaline phosphatase levels and endothelial function, assessed by strain gauge plethysmography, we enrolled 500 naïve hypertensives divided into increasing tertiles of alkaline phosphatase. The maximal response to acetylcholine was inversely related to alkaline phosphatase (r=−0.55; P<0.001), and this association was independent (r=−0.61; P<0.001) of demographic and classical risk factors, body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum phosphorus and calcium, C-reactive protein, and albuminuria. At multiple logistic regression analysis, the risk of endothelial dysfunction was ≈3-fold higher in patients in the third tertile than that of patients in the first tertile. We also tested the combined role of alkaline phosphatase and serum phosphorus on endothelial function. The steepness of the alkaline phosphatase/vasodilating response to acetylcholine relationship was substantially attenuated (P<0.001) in patients with serum phosphorus above the median value when compared with patients with serum phosphorus below the median (−5.0% versus −10.2% per alkaline phosphatase unit, respectively), and this interaction remained highly significant (P<0.001) after adjustment of all the previously mentioned risk factors. Our data support a strong and significant inverse relationship between alkaline phosphatase and endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which was attenuated by relatively higher serum phosphorus levels. PMID:26324506

  5. Excess L-arginine restores endothelium-dependent relaxation impaired by monocrotaline pyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Wei; Oike, Masahiro . E-mail: moike@pharmaco.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ohnaka, Keizo; Koyama, Tetsuya; Ito, Yushi

    2005-09-15

    The pyrrolizidine alkaloid plant toxin monocrotaline pyrrole (MCTP) causes pulmonary hypertension in experimental animals. The present study aimed to examine the effects of MCTP on the endothelium-dependent relaxation. We constructed an in vitro disease model of pulmonary hypertension by overlaying MCTP-treated bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (CPAEs) onto pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell-embedded collagen gel lattice. Acetylcholine (Ach) induced a relaxation of the control CPAEs-overlaid gels that were pre-contracted with noradrenaline, and the relaxation was inhibited by L-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). In contrast, when MCTP-treated CPAEs were overlaid, the pre-contracted gels did not show a relaxation in response to Ach in the presence of 0.5 mM L-arginine. Expression of endothelial NOS protein, Ach-induced Ca{sup 2+} transients and cellular uptake of L-[{sup 3}H]arginine were significantly smaller in MCTP-treated CPAEs than in control cells, indicating that these changes were responsible for the impaired NO production in MCTP-treated CPAEs. Since cellular uptake of L-[{sup 3}H]arginine linearly increased according to its extracellular concentration, we hypothesized that the excess concentration of extracellular L-arginine might restore NO production in MCTP-treated CPAEs. As expected, in the presence of 10 mM L-arginine, Ach showed a relaxation of the MCTP-treated CPAEs-overlaid gels. These results indicate that the impaired NO production in damaged endothelial cells can be reversed by supplying excess L-arginine.

  6. Obesity and risk of vascular disease: importance of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Matthias; Baretella, Oliver; Meyer, Matthias R

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious global health issue affecting both adults and children. Recent devolopments in world demographics and declining health status of the world's population indicate that the prevalence of obesity will continue to increase in the next decades. As a disease, obesity has deleterious effects on metabolic homeostasis, and affects numerous organ systems including heart, kidney and the vascular system. Thus, obesity is now regarded as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related diseases such as coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and stroke. In the arterial system, endothelial cells are both the source and target of factors contributing to atherosclerosis. Endothelial vasoactive factors regulate vascular homeostasis under physiological conditions and maintain basal vascular tone. Obesity results in an imbalance between endothelium-derived vasoactive factors favouring vasoconstriction, cell growth and inflammatory activation. Abnormal regulation of these factors due to endothelial cell dysfunction is both a consequence and a cause of vascular disease processes. Finally, because of the similarities of the vascular pathomechanisms activated, obesity can be considered to cause accelerated, ‘premature’ vascular aging. Here, we will review some of the pathomechanisms involved in obesity-related activation of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction, the clinical relevance of obesity-associated vascular risk, and therapeutic interventions using ‘endothelial therapy’ aiming at maintaining or restoring vascular endothelial health. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21557734

  7. Vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects of formononetin through endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Tao; LIU, Rui; CAO, Yong-xiao

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the vasorelaxant effect of formononetin, an O-methylated isoflavone, in isolated arteries, and its antihypertensive activity in vivo. Methods: Arterial rings of superior mesenteric arteries, renal arteries, cerebral basilar arteries, coronary arteries and abdominal aortas were prepared from SD rats. Isometric tension of the arterial rings was recorded using a myograph system. Arterial pressure was measured using tail-cuff method in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Results: Formononetin (1–300 μmol/L) elicited relaxation in arteries of the five regions that were pre-contracted by KCl (60 mmol/L), U46619 (1 μmol/L) or phenylephrine (10 μmol/L). The formononetin-induced relaxation was reduced by removal of endothelium or by pretreatment with L-NAME (100 μmol/L). Under conditions of endothelium denudation, formononetin (10, 30, and 100 μmol/L) inhibited the contraction induced by KCl and that induced by CaCl2 in Ca2+-free depolarized medium. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, formononetin (10, 30, and 100 μmol/L) depressed the constriction caused by phenylephrine (10 μmol/L), but did not inhibit the tonic contraction in response to the addition of CaCl2 (2 mmol/L). The contraction caused by caffeine (30 mmol/L) was not inhibited by formononetin (100 μmol/L). Formononetin (10 and 100 μmol/L) reduced the change rate of Ca2+-fluorescence intensity in response to KCl (50 mmol/L). In spontaneously hypertensive rats, formononetin (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) slowly lowered the systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure. Conclusion: Formononetin causes vasodilatation via two pathways: (1) endothelium-independent pathway, probably due to inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and intracellular Ca2+ release; and (2) endothelium-dependent pathway by releasing NO. Both the pathways may contribute to its antihypertensive effect. PMID:21818108

  8. A differential impact of lithium on endothelium-dependent but not on endothelium-independent vessel relaxation.

    PubMed

    Bosche, Bert; Molcanyi, Marek; Noll, Thomas; Rej, Soham; Zatschler, Birgit; Doeppner, Thorsten R; Hescheler, Jürgen; Müller, Daniel J; Macdonald, R Loch; Härtel, Frauke V

    2016-06-01

    Lithium is drug for bipolar disorders with a narrow therapeutic window. Lithium was recently reported to prevent stroke and protect vascular endothelium but tends to accumulate particularly in the brain and kidney. Here, adverse effects are common; however mechanisms are still vaguely understood. If lithium could also negatively influence the endothelium is unclear. We hypothesize that at higher lithium levels, the effects on endothelium reverses--that lithium also impairs endothelial-dependent relaxation of blood vessels. Vessel grafts from de-nerved murine aortas and porcine middle cerebral arteries were preconditioned using media supplemented with lithium chloride or acetate (0.4-100 mmol/L). Native or following phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction, the relaxation capacity of preconditioned vessels was assessed by isometric myography, using acetylcholine to test the endothelium-dependent or sodium nitroprusside to test the endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, respectively. At the 0.4 mmol/L lithium concentration, acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vessel relaxation was slightly increased, however, diminished in a concentration-dependent manner in vessel grafts preconditioned with lithium at higher therapeutic and supratherapeutic concentrations (0.8-100 mmol/L). In contrast, endothelium-independent vasorelaxation remained unaltered in preconditioned vessel grafts at any lithium concentration tested. Lithium elicits opposing effects on endothelial functions representing a differential impact on the endothelium within the narrow therapeutic window. Lithium accumulation or overdose reduces endothelium-dependent but not endothelium-independent vasorelaxation. The differentially modified endothelium-dependent vascular response represents an additional mechanism contributing to therapeutic or adverse effects of lithium. PMID:26875501

  9. The ent-15α-Acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic Acid Relaxes Rat Artery Mesenteric Superior via Endothelium-Dependent and Endothelium-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Êurica Adélia Nogueira; Herculano, Edla de Azevedo; da Costa, Cintia Danieli Ferreira; Furtado, Fabiola Fialho; da-Cunha, Emídio Vasconcelos Leitão; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Medeiros, Isac Almeida

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism of the relaxant activity of the ent-15α-acetoxykaur-16-en-19-oic acid (KA-acetoxy). In rat mesenteric artery rings, KA-acetoxy induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in vessels precontracted with phenylephrine. In the absence of endothelium, the vasorelaxation was significantly shifted to the right without reduction of the maximum effect. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with L-NAME, an inhibitor of the NO-synthase (NOS), indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase, L-NAME + indomethacin, atropine, a nonselective antagonist of the muscarinic receptors, ODQ, selective inhibitor of the guanylyl cyclase enzyme, or hydroxocobalamin, a nitric oxide scavenger. The relaxation was completely reversed in the presence of L-NAME + 1 mM L-arginine or L-arginine, an NO precursor. Diterpene-induced relaxation was not affected by TEA, a nonselective inhibitor of K+ channels. The KA-acetoxy antagonized CaCl2-induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner and also inhibited an 80 mM KCl-induced contraction. The KA-acetoxy did not interfere with Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The vasorelaxant induced by KA-acetoxy seems to involve the inhibition of the Ca2+ influx and also, at least in part, by endothelial muscarinic receptors activation, NO and PGI2 release. PMID:23346202

  10. Copper deficiency attenuates endothelial nitric oxide release

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The attenuation of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation is a consistent finding in both conduit and resistance vessels during dietary copper deficiency. While the effect is well established, evidence for the mechanism is still circumstantial. This study was designed to deter...

  11. Dietary obesity increases NO and inhibits BKCa-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation in rat cremaster muscle artery: association with caveolins and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Howitt, Lauren; Grayson, T Hilton; Morris, Margaret J; Sandow, Shaun L; Murphy, Timothy V

    2012-06-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for hypertension and other vascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity on endothelium-dependent dilation of rat cremaster muscle arterioles. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (213 ± 1 g) were fed a cafeteria-style high-fat or control diet for 16-20 wk. Control rats weighed 558 ± 7 g compared with obese rats 762 ± 12 g (n = 52-56; P < 0.05). Diet-induced obesity had no effect on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced dilation of isolated, pressurized (70 mmHg) arterioles, but sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced vasodilation was enhanced. ACh-induced dilation of arterioles from control rats was abolished by a combination of the K(Ca) blockers apamin, 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34), and iberiotoxin (IBTX; all 0.1 μmol/l), with no apparent role for nitric oxide (NO). In arterioles from obese rats, however, IBTX had no effect on responses to ACh while the NO synthase (NOS)/guanylate cyclase inhibitors N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 μmol/l)/1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 10 μmol/l) partially inhibited ACh-induced dilation. Furthermore, NOS activity (but not endothelial NOS expression) was increased in arteries from obese rats. L-NAME/ODQ alone or removal of the endothelium constricted arterioles from obese but not control rats. Expression of caveolin-1 and -2 oligomers (but not monomers or caveolin-3) was increased in arterioles from obese rats. The number of caveolae was reduced in the endothelium of arteries, and caveolae density was increased at the ends of smooth muscle cells from obese rats. Diet-induced obesity abolished the contribution of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel to ACh-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation of rat cremaster muscle arterioles, while increasing NOS activity and inducing an NO-dependent component. PMID:22492718

  12. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in the aorta of transgenic mice expressing human apolipoprotein(a) or lipoprotein(a).

    PubMed

    Rubanyi, G M; Freay, A D; Lawn, R M

    2000-01-01

    Elevated plasma level of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is a well established risk factor for premature atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. Recent studies showed impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in humans with elevated plasma Lp(a). However, these human studies could not determine whether (1) elevated Lp(a) levels alone are the cause of endothelial dysfunction (these patients had multiple risk factors), and (2) native or oxidatively modified Lp(a) contributes to endothelial dysfunction (no measurements of native/oxidized Lp(a) ratio was reported in humans). In order to test whether apo(a) (an essential component of Lp(a) which is required for binding to endothelial cells) and native Lp(a) cause endothelial dysfunction, in the present study we tested endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in aortic rings isolated from control and transgenic male mice either expressing the human apo(a) gene (TgA) or both the human apo(a) and human apo B100 genes (TgL). The TgA mice had plasma apo(a) levels of 8.8 +/- 1.2 mg/dl (n=6) and the double transgenic TgL mice had plasma Lp(a) levels of 15.3 +/- 1.4 mg/dl (n=8). Isolated aortic rings with and without endothelium were mounted in organ chambers and contracted with U46619 (10(-8) M) in the presence of ibuprofen (10(-5) M). Acetylcholine caused concentration-dependent (10(-9)-10(-5) M) relaxation, which could be prevented by endothelium removal and by NG-L-nitro-arginine (10(-4) M). Basal and acetylcholine-stimulated endothelium-dependent relaxation and endothelium-independent relaxation to nitroglycerin (10(-6) M) were not significantly different in aortic rings isolated from control and TgA or TgL mice. Twenty-four hour incubation of aortic rings isolated from control mice with recombinant human apo(a) or native Lp(a) (up to 300 microg/ml) caused no impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations. In contrast, incubation with oxidized Lp(a) (50 microg/ml) or oxidized LDL (250 microg/ml) caused significant suppression

  13. Involvement of histamine in endothelium-dependent relaxation of mesenteric lymphatic vessels

    PubMed Central

    Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Maejima, Daisuke; Nagai, Takashi; Bridenbaugh, Eric; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chatterjee, Victor; Meininger, Cynthia J.; Gashev, Anatoliy A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The knowledge of the basic principles of lymphatic function, still remains, to a large degree, rudimentary and will require significant research efforts. Recent studies of the physiology of the mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLVs) suggested the presence of an endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) other than nitric oxide. In this study we tested the hypothesis that lymphatic endothelium-derived histamine relaxes MLVs. Methods We measured and analyzed parameters of lymphatic contractility in isolated and pressurized rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels under control conditions and after pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, 100 μM) or/and histamine production by α-methyl-DL-histidine dihydrochloride (α-MHD, 10 μM). Effectiveness of α-MHD was confirmed immunohistochemically. We also used immunohistochemical labeling and western blot analysis of the histamine-producing enzyme, histidine decarboxylase (HDC). Additionally we blocked HDC protein expression in MLVs by transient transfection with vivo-morpholino oligos. Results We found that only combined pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide and histamine production completely eliminates flow-dependent relaxation of lymphatic vessels, thus confirming a role for histamine as an EDRF in MLVs. We also confirmed the presence of histidine decarboxylase and histamine inside lymphatic endothelial cells. Conclusions Our study supports a role for histamine as an EDRF in MLVs. PMID:24750494

  14. Paullinia pinnata extracts rich in polyphenols promote vascular relaxation via endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zamble, Alexis; Carpentier, Marie; Kandoussi, Abdelmejid; Sahpaz, Sevser; Petrault, Olivier; Ouk, Tawarak; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart; Bordet, Régis; Duriez, Patrick; Bailleul, François; Martin-Nizard, Françoise

    2006-04-01

    Paullinia pinnata L. (Sapindaceae) is an African tropical plant whose roots and leaves are used in traditional medicine for many purposes, especially for erectile dysfunction, but its action mechanism is unknown. P. pinnata root and leaf methanolic extracts are rich in phenolic compounds. This study shows that both extracts are highly antioxidative and induce a slight transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha. They also increased and decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase and endothelin-1 mRNA levels in bovine aortic endothelial cells, respectively. In this study P. pinnata methanolic extracts in cumulative doses elicited in a dose-dependent manner the relaxation of phenylephrine precontracted isolated rat aortic rings. N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester significantly attenuated the capacity of both extracts to induce arterial relaxation, indicating that this arterial relaxation was mediated by endothelial nitric oxide release. It could be suggested that the arterial relaxation induced by both extracts could be mainly linked to their capacities to inhibit nitric oxide oxidation through their antioxidant properties. PMID:16680075

  15. Apamin-sensitive K+ channels mediate an endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization in rabbit mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, M E; Brayden, J E

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular endothelial cells release a variety of substances which affect the membrane potential and tone of underlying vascular smooth muscle. In the presence of N omega-nitro-L-arginine to inhibit nitric oxide synthase and indomethacin to inhibit cyclo-oxygenase, acetylcholine (ACh; EC50 approximately 1 microM) elicited the release of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in rabbit mesenteric arteries. 2. The hyperpolarization due to EDHF was blocked by apamin (IC50 approximately 0.3 nM), and by other inhibitors of the apamin-sensitive K+ channel (10 nM scyllatoxin, 100 microM d-tubocurarine, 300 microM gallamine) in the presence of indomethacin and N omega-nitro-L-arginine. The hyperpolarization was not blocked by glibenclamide (5 microM), iberiotoxin (10 nM), tetraethylammonium (1 mM), barium (500 microM), 4-aminopyridine (500 microM), ouabain (10 microM), bumetanide (10 microM), or nimodipine (100 nM). 3. In the presence of apamin and N omega-nitro-L-arginine, but the absence of indomethacin, ACh triggered a hyperpolarization that was blocked by glibenclamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels. A similar glibenclamide-sensitive hyperpolarization was caused by Iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin. 4. In experiments which distinguished the effects of EDHF, prostanoids and nitric oxide, hyperpolarizations and/or relaxations triggered by ACh were antagonized by muscarinic antagonists, the relative potencies (atropine approximately 4-DAMP > pirenzepine) of which indicated that the release of all three endothelium-derived factors was mediated by M3 receptors. 5. Our results suggest that ACh stimulates M3 receptors on endothelial cells, triggering the release of nitric oxide and prostanoids, which hyperpolarize underlying smooth muscle by activation of KATP channels, and the release of an EDHF, which hyperpolarizes smooth muscle through the activation of apamin-sensitive K+ (KAS) channels. Images Figure 4 PMID:8788937

  16. Is the presence of hyperlipidemia associated with impairment of endothelium-dependent neointimal relaxation after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty?

    PubMed

    Sakai, A; Hirayama, A; Adachi, T; Nanto, S; Hori, M; Inoue, M; Kamada, T; Kodama, K

    1996-01-01

    To determine whether hyperlipidemia affects the endothelium-dependent vasomotor response along the dilated vessel after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), we evaluated 32 patients with one-vessel disease, 3-6 months after successful PTCA without restenosis. Fourteen patients had mild stenotic lesions not subjected to PTCA (non-PTCA sites) in addition to the PTCA sites. Vessel diameter changes at 32 PTCA and 36 non-PTCA sites were assessed by quantitative angiography, before and after intracoronary injection of acetylcholine (20 micrograms to the right and 50 micrograms to the left coronary artery) and of nitroglycerin (0.1-0.3 mg). The acetylcholine response ranged from 46% (dilation) to -100% (constriction). All coronary arteries were dilated in response to nitroglycerin, which suggested preservation of the function of vascular smooth muscle, and the presence of an abnormality in endothelial function in those patients with a constrictor response to acetylcholine. There was a negative correlation between the acetylcholine response and the serum total cholesterol level at PTCA sites (r = -0.37; P = 0.038) and at non-PTCA sites (r = -0.46; P = 0.005). These findings indicate that hyperlipidemia is associated with a loss of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, not only at non-PTCA but also at PTCA sites, at which restoration of endothelial function might have occurred. They also suggest that hyperlipidemia may be related to the functional state of the regenerated endothelium at sites where PTCA had been previously performed. PMID:9129246

  17. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Opening Releases Endogenous Acetylcholine, which Contributes to Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation Induced by Mild Hypothermia in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat but Not Wistar-Kyoto Rat Arteries.

    PubMed

    Zou, Q; Leung, S W S; Vanhoutte, P M

    2015-08-01

    Mild hypothermia causes endothelium-dependent relaxations, which are reduced by the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine. The present study investigated whether endothelial endogenous acetylcholine contributes to these relaxations. Aortic rings of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were contracted with prostaglandin F2 α and exposed to progressive mild hypothermia (from 37 to 31°C). Hypothermia induced endothelium-dependent, Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-sensitive relaxations, which were reduced by atropine, but not by mecamylamine, in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. The responses in SHR aortae were also reduced by acetylcholinesterase (the enzyme responsible for acetylcholine degradation), bromoacetylcholine (inhibitor of acetylcholine synthesis), hemicholinium-3 (inhibitor of choline uptake), and vesamicol (inhibitor of acetylcholine release). The mild hypothermia-induced relaxations in both SHR and WKY rat aortae were inhibited by AMTB [N-(3-aminopropyl)-2-[(3-methylphenyl)methoxy]-N-(2-thienylmethyl)-benzamide; the transient receptor potential (TRP) M8 inhibitor]; only those in SHR aortae were inhibited by HC-067047 [2-methyl-1-[3-(4-morpholinyl)propyl]-5-phenyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamide; TRPV4 antagonist] while those in WKY rat aortae were reduced by HC-030031 [2-(1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-7H-purin-7-yl)-N-(4-isopropylphenyl)acetamide; TRPA1 antagonist]. The endothelial uptake of extracellular choline and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate was enhanced by mild hypothermia and inhibited by HC-067047 in SHR but not in WKY rat aortae. Compared with WKY rats, the SHR preparations expressed similar levels of acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase, but a lesser amount of vesicular acetylcholine transporter, located mainly in the endothelium. Thus, mild hypothermia causes nitric oxide-dependent relaxations by opening TRPA1 channels in WKY rat aortae

  18. Nitric Oxide Mediates Root K+/Na+ Balance in a Mangrove Plant, Kandelia obovata, by Enhancing the Expression of AKT1-Type K+ Channel and Na+/H+ Antiporter under High Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Xiao, Qiang; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that nitric oxide (NO) enhances salt tolerance of glycophytes. However, the effect of NO on modulating ionic balance in halophytes is not very clear. This study focuses on the role of NO in mediating K+/Na+ balance in a mangrove species, Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu and Yong. We first analyzed the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, on ion content and ion flux in the roots of K. obovata under high salinity. The results showed that 100 μM SNP significantly increased K+ content and Na+ efflux, but decreased Na+ content and K+ efflux. These effects of NO were reversed by specific NO synthesis inhibitor and scavenger, which confirmed the role of NO in retaining K+ and reducing Na+ in K. obovata roots. Using western-blot analysis, we found that NO increased the protein expression of plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter, which were crucial proteins for ionic balance. To further clarify the molecular mechanism of NO-modulated K+/Na+ balance, partial cDNA fragments of inward-rectifying K+ channel, PM Na+/H+ antiporter, PM H+-ATPase, vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter and vacuolar H+-ATPase subunit c were isolated. Results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that NO increased the relative expression levels of these genes, while this increase was blocked by NO synthesis inhibitors and scavenger. Above results indicate that NO greatly contribute to K+/Na+ balance in high salinity-treated K. obovata roots, by activating AKT1-type K+ channel and Na+/H+ antiporter, which are the critical components in K+/Na+ transport system. PMID:23977070

  19. Impaired endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation of aorta from diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yakubu, M A; Sofola, O A; Igbo, I; Oyekan, A O

    2012-01-01

    Vascular complication in diabetes has been reported to be due to the effects of chronic high blood glucose on the vascular system. Different relaxation mechanisms exist in the vasculature and effect of chronic high glucose on vascular relaxation mechanisms is not clearly understood. We assessed the effect of streptozotocin (STZ, 70 mg/kg, for 12 wks)-induced diabetes on vascular reactivity to isoproterenol (Isop, 10-9-10-5 M), a cAMP-dependent agent, acetylcholine (ACh, 10-9-10-5 M), a stimulant of NO (nitric oxide) synthase, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 10-10-10-5 M), NO donor, or bradykinin (BK, 10-9-10-5 M) in the rat isolated aortic ring. Isop, ACh, SNP, or BK dose-dependently relaxed phenylephrine (PE, 10-7 M) pre-constricted ring producing a maximum relaxation of 82 % for Isop (10-5 M), 85 % for ACh (10-5 M), 100 % for SNP (10-6 M), and 30 % for BK (10-5 M) respectively. STZ attenuated Isop, ACh, and BK-induced relaxation by 45 % (n=7, pn (Fig. 5, Ref. 24). PMID:22394031

  20. The Gatekeepers in the Mouse Ophthalmic Artery: Endothelium-Dependent Mechanisms of Cholinergic Vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Manicam, Caroline; Staubitz, Julia; Brochhausen, Christoph; Grus, Franz H.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Gericke, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic regulation of arterial luminal diameter involves intricate network of intercellular communication between the endothelial and smooth muscle cells that is highly dependent on the molecular mediators released by the endothelium. Albeit the well-recognized contribution of nitric oxide (NO) towards vasodilation, the identity of compensatory mechanisms that maintain vasomotor tone when NO synthesis is deranged remain largely unknown in the ophthalmic artery. This is the first study to identify the vasodilatory signalling mechanisms of the ophthalmic artery employing wild type mice. Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasodilation was only partially attenuated when NO synthesis was inhibited. Intriguingly, the combined blocking of cytochrome P450 oxygenase (CYP450) and lipoxygenase (LOX), as well as CYP450 and gap junctions, abolished vasodilation; demonstrating that the key compensatory mechanisms comprise arachidonic acid metabolites which, work in concert with gap junctions for downstream signal transmission. Furthermore, the voltage-gated potassium ion channel, Kv1.6, was functionally relevant in mediating vasodilation. Its localization was found exclusively in the smooth muscle. In conclusion, ACh-induced vasodilation of mouse ophthalmic artery is mediated in part by NO and predominantly via arachidonic acid metabolites, with active involvement of gap junctions. Particularly, the Kv1.6 channel represents an attractive therapeutic target in ophthalmopathologies when NO synthesis is compromised. PMID:26831940

  1. Chicago sky blue and a helium neon laser abolish endothelium dependent relaxation in vivo in the microcirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, H.; Nelson, G.H.; Rosenblum, W.I. )

    1989-12-01

    Chicago sky blue, also known as Niagara sky blue, is a vital dye that can successfully be used as an intravascular energy absorbing target for the light from a helium-neon (HeNe) laser. The result of this light/dye interaction is endothelium damage which can be controlled by adjusting the duration of the laser exposure and the amount of dye injected intravenously. The endothelial damage probably is the result of the heat generated by the dyes absorption of energy at the interface between plasma and endothelium. The most minimal damage resulted in selective loss of the dilation normally produced by acetylcholine and bradykinin, two endothelium dependent dilators. The dilation produced by sodium nitroprusside, a dilator acting directly on vascular smooth muscle, was preserved. More severe injury (i.e. more prolonged exposure to light and/or more dye), resulted in local platelet aggregation at the site of laser impact.

  2. Cannabidiol causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via CB1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher P.; Hind, William H.; Tufarelli, Cristina; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The protective effects of cannabidiol (CBD) have been widely shown in preclinical models and have translated into medicines for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. However, the direct vascular effects of CBD in humans are unknown. Methods and results Using wire myography, the vascular effects of CBD were assessed in human mesenteric arteries, and the mechanisms of action probed pharmacologically. CBD-induced intracellular signalling was characterized using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). CBD caused acute, non-recoverable vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries with an Rmax of ∼40%. This was inhibited by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists, desensitization of transient receptor potential channels using capsaicin, removal of the endothelium, and inhibition of potassium efflux. There was no role for cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ, the novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CBe), or cyclooxygenase. CBD-induced vasorelaxation was blunted in males, and in patients with type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia. In HAECs, CBD significantly reduced phosphorylated JNK, NFκB, p70s6 K and STAT5, and significantly increased phosphorylated CREB, ERK1/2, and Akt levels. CBD also increased phosphorylated eNOS (ser1177), which was correlated with increased levels of ERK1/2 and Akt levels. CB1 receptor antagonism prevented the increase in eNOS phosphorylation. Conclusion This study shows, for the first time, that CBD causes vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via activation of CB1 and TRP channels, and is endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent. PMID:26092099

  3. Fruit juice-induced endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated porcine coronary arteries: evaluation of different fruit juices and purees and optimization of a red fruit juice blend.

    PubMed

    Auger, Cyril; Kim, Jong-Hun; Trinh, Sandrine; Chataigneau, Thierry; Popken, Anne M; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2011-05-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that several polyphenol-rich sources such as red wine and green tea are potent inducers of endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated arteries. As various fruits and berries are known to contain high levels of polyphenols, the aim of the present study was to assess the ability of selected pure fruit juices and purees as well as blends to cause endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated arteries. Vascular reactivity was assessed using porcine coronary artery rings, and fruit juices, purees and blends were characterized for their content in vitamin C, total phenolic, sugar and antioxidant activity. Fruit juices and purees caused variable concentration-dependent relaxations, with blackcurrant, aronia, cranberry, blueberry, lingonberry, and grape being the most effective fruits. Several blends of red fruits caused endothelium-dependent relaxations. Relaxations to blend D involved both a NO- and an EDHF-mediated components. The present findings indicate that some berries and blends of red fruit juices are potent inducers of endothelium-dependent relaxations in the porcine coronary artery. This effect involves both endothelium-derived NO and EDHF, and appears to be dependent on their polyphenolic composition rather than on the polyphenolic content. PMID:21779562

  4. Retrospectively gated MRI for in vivo assessment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and endothelial permeability in murine models of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bar, Anna; Skórka, Tomasz; Jasiński, Krzysztof; Sternak, Magdalena; Bartel, Żaneta; Tyrankiewicz, Urszula; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is linked to impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and permeability changes. Here, we quantify both of these phenomena associated with endothelial dysfunction by MRI in vivo in mice. Endothelial function was evaluated in the brachiocephalic artery (BCA) and left carotid artery (LCA) in ApoE/LDLR(-/-) and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice as compared with control mice (C57BL/6J). The 3D IntraGate® FLASH sequence was used for evaluation of changes in vessels' cross-sectional area (CSA) and volume following acetylcholine (Ach) administration. Evaluation of endothelial permeability after administration of contrast agent (Galbumin, BioPAL) was based on the variable flip angle method for the assessment of parameters based on the relaxation time (T1 ) value. In order to confirm the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in response to Ach, L-NAME-treated mice were also analyzed. To confirm that endothelial permeability changes accompany the impairment of Ach-dependent vasodilatation, permeability changes were analyzed in isolated, perfused carotid artery. In C57BL/6J mice, Ach-induced vasodilatation led to an approximately 25% increase in CSA in both vessels, which was temporarily dissociated from the effect of Ach on heart rate. In ApoE/LDLR(-/-) or HFD-fed mice Ach induced a paradoxical vasoconstriction that amounted to approximately 30% and 50% decreases in CSA of BCA and LCA respectively. In ApoE/LDLR(-/-) and HFD-fed mice endothelial permeability in BCA was also increased (fall in T1 by about 25%). In L-NAME-treated mice Ach-induced vasodilatation in BCA was lost. In isolated, perfused artery from ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice endothelial permeability was increased. MRI-based assessment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation induced by Ach and endothelial permeability using a retrospectively self-gated 3D gradient-echo sequence (IntraGate® FLASH) enables the reliable detection of systemic endothelial dysfunction in mice and provides an important tool

  5. Unitary TRPV3 channel Ca2+ influx events elicit endothelium-dependent dilation of cerebral parenchymal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Pires, Paulo W; Sullivan, Michelle N; Pritchard, Harry A T; Robinson, Jennifer J; Earley, Scott

    2015-12-15

    Cerebral parenchymal arterioles (PA) regulate blood flow between pial arteries on the surface of the brain and the deeper microcirculation. Regulation of PA contractility differs from that of pial arteries and is not completely understood. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that the Ca(2+) permeable vanilloid transient receptor potential (TRPV) channel TRPV3 can mediate endothelium-dependent dilation of cerebral PA. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), we found that carvacrol, a monoterpenoid compound derived from oregano, increased the frequency of unitary Ca(2+) influx events through TRPV3 channels (TRPV3 sparklets) in endothelial cells from pial arteries and PAs. Carvacrol-induced TRPV3 sparklets were inhibited by the selective TRPV3 blocker isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP). TRPV3 sparklets have a greater unitary amplitude (ΔF/F0 = 0.20) than previously characterized TRPV4 (ΔF/F0 = 0.06) or TRPA1 (ΔF/F0 = 0.13) sparklets, suggesting that TRPV3-mediated Ca(2+) influx could have a robust influence on cerebrovascular tone. In pressure myography experiments, carvacrol caused dilation of cerebral PA that was blocked by IPP. Carvacrol-induced dilation was nearly abolished by removal of the endothelium and block of intermediate (IK) and small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels. Together, these data suggest that TRPV3 sparklets cause dilation of cerebral parenchymal arterioles by activating IK and SK channels in the endothelium. PMID:26453324

  6. Endothelial Small- and Intermediate-Conductance K Channels and Endothelium-Dependent Hyperpolarization as Drug Targets in Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Köhler, R; Oliván-Viguera, A; Wulff, H

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial calcium/calmodulin-gated K channels of small (KCa2.3) and intermediate conductance (KCa3.1) produce membrane hyperpolarization and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)-mediated vasodilation. Dysfunctions of the two channels and ensuing EDH impairments are found in several cardiovascular pathologies such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, postangioplastic neointima formation, but also inflammatory disease, cancer, and organ fibrosis. Moreover, KCa3.1 plays an important role in endothelial barrier dysfunction, edema formation in cardiac and pulmonary disease, and in ischemic stroke. Concerning KCa2.3, genome-wide association studies revealed an association of KCa2.3 channels with atrial fibrillation in humans. Accordingly, both channels are considered potential drug targets for cardio- and cerebrovascular disease states. In this chapter, we briefly review the function of the two channels in EDH-type vasodilation and systemic circulatory regulation and then highlight their pathophysiological roles in ischemic stroke as well as in pulmonary and brain edema. Finally, the authors summarize recent advances in the pharmacology of the channels and explore potential therapeutic utilities of novel channel modulators. PMID:27451095

  7. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L.; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B.

    2015-01-01

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction. PMID:26608817

  8. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-01-01

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction. PMID:26608817

  9. Diabetes and the Mediterranean diet: a beneficial effect of oleic acid on insulin sensitivity, adipocyte glucose transport and endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M; McInerney, D; Owens, D; Collins, P; Johnson, A; Tomkin, G H

    2000-02-01

    Abnormalities in endothelial function may be associated with increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. We examined the effect of an oleic-acid-rich diet on insulin resistance and endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity in type 2 diabetes. Eleven type 2 diabetic patients were changed from their usual linoleic-acid-rich diet and treated for 2 months with an oleic-acid-rich diet. Insulin-mediated glucose transport was measured in isolated adipocytes. Fatty acid composition of the adipocyte membranes was determined by gas-liquid chromatography and flow-mediated endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilatation were measured in the superficial femoral artery at the end of each dietary period. There was a significant increase in oleic acid and a decrease in linoleic acid on the oleic-acid-rich diet (p<0.0001). Diabetic control was not different between the diets, but there was a small but significant decrease in fasting glucose/insulin on the oleic-acid-rich diet. Insulin-stimulated (1 ng/ml) glucose transport was significantly greater on the oleic- acid-rich diet (0.56+/-0.17 vs. 0.29+/-0.14 nmol/10(5) cells/3 min, p<0.0001). Endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) was significantly greater on the oleic-acid-rich diet (3.90+/-0.97% vs. 6.12+/-1.36% p<0.0001). There was a significant correlation between adipocyte membrane oleic/linoleic acid and insulin-mediated glucose transport (p<0.001) but no relationship between insulin-stimulated glucose transport and change in endothelium-dependent FMD. There was a significant positive correlation between adipocyte membrane oleic/linoleic acid and endothelium-dependent FMD (r=0.61, p<0.001). Change from polyunsaturated to monounsaturated diet in type 2 diabetes reduced insulin resistance and restored endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, suggesting an explanation for the anti-atherogenic benefits of a Mediterranean-type diet. PMID:10700478

  10. Brazilin isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan L induces endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation of rat aortic rings

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yu; Chen, Yu-cai; Lin, Yi-huang; Guo, Jing; Niu, Zi-ran; Li, Li; Wang, Shou-bao; Fang, Lian-hua; Du, Guan-hua

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Brazilin is one of the major constituents of Caesalpinia sappan L with various biological activities. This study sought to investigate the vasorelaxant effect of brazilin on isolated rat thoracic aorta and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Endothelium-intact and -denuded aortic rings were prepared from rats. The tension of the preparations was recorded isometrically with a force displacement transducer connected to a polygraph. The phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and myosin light chain (MLC) were analyzed using Western blotting assay. Results: Application of brazilin (10–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently relaxed the NE- or high K+-induced sustained contraction of endothelium-intact aortic rings (the EC50 was 83.51±5.6 and 79.79±4.57 μmol/L, respectively). The vasorelaxant effect of brazilin was significantly attenuated by endothelium removal or by pre-incubation with L-NAME, methylene blue or indomethacin. In addition, pre-incubation with brazilin dose-dependently attenuated the vasoconstriction induced by KCl, NE or Ang II. Pre-incubation with brazilin also markedly suppressed the high K+-induced extracellular Ca2+ influx and NE-induced intracellular Ca2+ release in endothelium-denuded aortic rings. Pre-incubation with brazilin dose-dependently inhibited the NE-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and MLC in both endothelium-intact and -denuded aortic rings. Conclusion: Brazilin induces relaxation in rat aortic rings via both endothelium-dependent and -independent ways as well as inhibiting NE-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and MLC. Brazilin also attenuates vasoconstriction via blocking voltage- and receptor-operated Ca2+ channels. PMID:26564314

  11. Long-lasting endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated arteries caused by an extract from the bark of Combretum leprosum

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Francisco das Chagas; Cavalcanti, Paulo Marques da Silva; Passaglia, Rita de Cassia Aleixo Tostes; Ballejo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe and to characterize the relaxing effect of an extract of the bark of Combretum leprosum on isolated arterial rings from different animals. Methods Rings (3 to 4mm) from rabbit, rat, or porcine arteries rings were suspended in an organ bath (Krebs, 37°C, 95%O2/5%CO2) to record isometric contractions. After the stabilization period (2 to 3 hours) contractions were induced by the addition of phenylephrine (0.1 to 0.3µM) or U46619 (10 to 100nM), and Combretum leprosum extract was added on the plateau of the contractions. Experiments were performed to determine the potency, duration, reversibility, and to get insights on the potential mechanism involved in extract-induced relaxations. Results In all rings tested, Combretumleprosum extract (1.5μg/mL) was able to cause relaxations, which were strictly endothelium-dependent. In rabbit or rat thoracic aorta rings, the relaxations were reversed by vitamin B12a or L-NG-nitroarginine. In porcine right coronary arteries and rabbit abdominal aorta, extract caused both L-NG-nitroarginine-sensitive and L-NG-nitroarginine-resistant relaxations. In rabbit thoracic aorta, the extract was relatively potent (EC50=0.20µg/mL) and caused relaxations; intriguingly the endothelium continued to produce relaxing factors for a long period after removing the extract. The magnitude of extract-induced relaxations was significantly reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca2+; in addition, the TRPs channels blocker ruthenium red (10µM) was able to revert extract-induced relaxations. Phytochemical analyses indicated that the extract was rich in polyphenol-like reacting substances. Conclusions Combretum leprosum extract contains bioactive compounds capable of promoting Ca2+-dependent stimulation of endothelial cells which results in a prolonged production of relaxing factors. PMID:26466063

  12. Endothelial Cell-Derived Nitric Oxide Mobilization is Attenuated in Copper-Deficient Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The attenuation of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation is a consistent finding in both conduit and resistance vessels during dietary Cu deficiency. While the effect is well established, evidence for the mechanism is still circumstantial. This study was designed to determine...

  13. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen . Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  14. Muscarinic Receptor Activation Affects Pulmonary Artery Contractility in Sheep: The Impact of Maturation and Chronic Hypoxia on Endothelium-Dependent and Endothelium-Independent Function.

    PubMed

    Giang, Michael; Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G; Nguyen, Dan; Paez, Ricardo; Blum Johnston, Carla; Kim, Joon; Brunnell, Alexander; Blood, Quintin; Goyal, Ravi; Longo, Lawrence D; Wilson, Sean M

    2016-06-01

    Giang, Michael, Demosthenes G. Papamatheakis, Dan Nguyen, Ricardo Paez, Carla Blum Johnston, Joon Kim, Alexander Brunnell, Quintin Blood, Ravi Goyal, Lawrence D. Longo, and Sean M. Wilson. Muscarinic receptor activation affects pulmonary artery contractility in sheep: the impact of maturation and chronic hypoxia on endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function. High Alt Med Biol. 17:122-132, 2015.-Muscarinic receptor activation in the pulmonary vasculature can cause endothelium-dependent vasodilation and smooth muscle-dependent vasoconstriction. Chronic hypoxia (CH) can modify both of these responses. This study aimed to assess the combined influence of CH and maturation on endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent muscarinic-induced vasoreactivity. This was accomplished by performing wire myography on endothelium-intact or endothelium-disrupted pulmonary arterial rings isolated from normoxic or CH fetal and adult sheep. In endothelium-intact arteries, vasodilation was evaluated using cumulative bradykinin doses in phenylephrine and carbachol precontracted pulmonary arterial segments; and vasoconstriction was examined using cumulative doses of carbachol following bradykinin predilation. Effects of nonselective (atropine) and selective M1 (pirenzepine), M2 (AFDX116), and M3 (4-DAMP and Dau5884) muscarinic receptor antagonists were assessed in disrupted arteries. In normoxic arteries, bradykinin relaxation was twofold greater in the adult compared to fetus, while carbachol contraction was fourfold greater. In adult arteries, CH increased bradykinin relaxation and carbachol contraction. In vessels with intact endothelium, maturation and CH augmented maximal response and efficacy for carbachol constriction and bradykinin relaxation. Approximately 50%-80% of adult normoxic and CH endothelium-disrupted arteries contracted to acetylcholine, while ∼50% of fetal normoxic and ∼10% of CH arteries responded. Atropine reduced carbachol

  15. Polydatin Restores Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in Rat Aorta Rings Impaired by High Glucose: A Novel Insight into the PPARβ-NO Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Xue, Lai; Du, Weimin; Huang, Bo; Tang, Cuiping; Liu, Changqing; Qiu, Hongmei; Jiang, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    Polydatin, a natural component from Polygonum Cuspidatum, has important therapeutic effects on metabolic syndrome. A novel therapeutic strategy using polydatin to improve vascular function has recently been proposed to treat diabetes-related cardiovascular complications. However, the biological role and molecular basis of polydatin's action on vascular endothelial cells (VECs)-mediated vasodilatation under diabetes-related hyperglycemia condition remain elusive. The present study aimed to assess the contribution of polydatin in restoring endothelium-dependent relaxation and to determine the details of its underlying mechanism. By measuring endothelium-dependent relaxation, we found that acetylcholine-induced vasodilation was impaired by elevated glucose (55 mmol/L); however, polydatin (1, 3, 10 μmol/L) could restore the relaxation in a dose-dependent manner. Polydatin could also improve the histological damage to endothelial cells in the thoracic aorta. Polydatin's effects were mediated via promoting the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), enhancing eNOS activity and decreasing the inducible NOS (iNOS) level, finally resulting in a beneficial increase in NO release, which probably, at least in part, through activation of the PPARβ signaling pathway. The results provided a novel insight into polydatin action, via PPARβ-NO signaling pathways, in restoring endothelial function in high glucose conditions. The results also indicated the potential utility of polydatin to treat diabetes related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25941823

  16. Renal hypoperfusion and impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation in an animal model of VILI: the role of the peroxynitrite-PARP pathway

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation (MV) can injure the lungs and contribute to an overwhelming inflammatory response, leading to acute renal failure (ARF). We previously showed that poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is involved in the development of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) and the related ARF, but the mechanisms underneath remain unclear. In the current study we therefore tested the hypothesis that renal blood flow and endothelial, functional and tissue changes in the kidney of rats with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury aggravated by MV, is caused, in part, by activation of PARP by peroxynitrite. Methods Anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats (n = 31), were subjected to intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide at 10 mg/kg followed by 210 min of mechanical ventilation at either low tidal volume (6 mL/kg) with 5 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure or high tidal volume (19 mL/kg) with zero positive end-expiratory pressure in the presence or absence of a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, WW85 or a PARP inhibitor, PJ-34. During the experiment, hemodynamics and blood gas variables were monitored. At time (t) t = 0 and t = 180 min, renal blood flow was measured. Blood and urine were collected for creatinine clearance measurement. Arcuate renal arteries were isolated for vasoreactivity experiment and kidneys snap frozen for staining. Results High tidal volume ventilation resulted in lung injury, hypotension, renal hypoperfusion and impaired renal endothelium-dependent vasodilation, associated with renal dysfunction and tissue changes (leukocyte accumulation and increased expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin). Both WW85 and PJ-34 treatments attenuated lung injury, preserved blood pressure, attenuated renal endothelial dysfunction and maintained renal blood flow. In multivariable analysis, renal blood flow improvement was, independently from each other, associated with both maintained blood pressure

  17. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  18. Endothelium-dependent vasodilator effects of the extract from Salviae Miltiorrhizae radix. A study on the identification of lithospermic acid B in the extracts.

    PubMed

    Kamata, K; Iizuka, T; Nagai, M; Kasuya, Y

    1993-07-01

    1. The aqueous extract of Salviae Miltiorrhizae radix (Chinese crude drug named "dan-shen") relaxed the noradrenaline-precontracted aorta with endothelium. 2. Vasodilation by the extract disappeared in aorta without endothelium, and was inhibited by pretreatment with 10(-4) M NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) or 10(-5) M methylene blue. 3. The inhibition of the extract-induced vasodilation by L-NMMA was reversed by L-arginine (3 x 10(-4) M). 4. The component of the extract was analyzed by chromatography, fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy (FAB-MS) and 1H-NMR. 5. An active component of the extract, which showed endothelium-dependent vasodilation, was found to be identical with lithospermic acid B. PMID:8224751

  19. Vascular Endothelium-Dependent and Independent Actions of Oleanolic Acid and Its Synthetic Oleanane Derivatives as Possible Mechanisms for Hypotensive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Madlala, Hlengiwe P.; Metzinger, Thomas; van Heerden, Fanie R.; Mubagwa, Kanigula; Dessy, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Plant-derived oleanolic acid (OA) and its related synthetic derivatives (Br-OA and Me-OA) possess antihypertensive effects in experimental animals. The present study investigated possible underlying mechanisms in rat isolated single ventricular myocytes and in vascular smooth muscles superfused at 37°C. Methods Cell shortening was assessed at 1 Hz using a video-based edge-detection system and the L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL) was measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in single ventricular myocytes. Isometric tension was measured using force transducer in isolated aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries. Vascular effects were measured in endothelium-intact and denuded vessels in the presence of various enzyme or channel inhibitors. Results OA and its derivatives increased cell shortening in cardiomyocytes isolated from normotensive rats but had no effect in those isolated from hypertensive animals. These triterpenes also caused relaxation in aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries pre-contracted with either phenylephrine or KCl-enriched solution. The relaxation was only partially inhibited by endothelium denudation, and also partly inhibited by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin, with no additional inhibitory effect of the NO synthase inhibitor, N-ω-Nitro-L-arginine. A combination of both ATP-dependent channel inhibition by glibenclaminde and voltage-dependent K+ channel inhibition by 4-aminopyridine was necessary to fully inhibit the relaxation. Conclusion These data indicate that the effects of OA and its derivatives are mediated via both endothelium-dependent and independent mechanisms suggesting the involvement of COX in the endothelium-dependent effects and of vascular muscle K+ channels in the endothelium-independent effects. Finally, our results support the view that the antihypertensive action of OA and its derivatives is due to a decrease of vascular resistance with no negative inotropic effect on the heart. PMID:26799746

  20. Increased Superoxide Anions Level may be Related with Impaired Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation of Cerebral and Carotid Arteries in Simulated Microgravity Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin; Zhang, Ran; Ren, Xin-Ling

    2008-06-01

    Our previous works showed that there is a significant increase in nitrite and nitrate content of cerebral and carotid arteries of hindlimb unweighting rats, and this result suggests that NOS activity or NO production may be increased by HU in the cerebral and carotid arteries ,and this may result in a enhanced endothelium-dependent dilatory responses in these artery of hindlimb unweighting rats. The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of hindlimb unweighting on endothelium mediated relaxation and find the possible mechanisms which may result in the alteration. Twenty male healthy SD rats, which body weight ranged from 250g to 280g, were divided into control and hindlimb unweighting simulated microgravity groups randomly. After three weeks, the basilar artery and carotid artery were isolated and arterial dilatory responsiveness were examined in vitro using isolated arterial rings from rats. And the Superoxide Anions Levels were detected by oxidation-sensitive dye dihydroethidium and laser scanning confocal microscope. The data showed: Dilatory responses of both basilar and carotid arterial rings to Acetylcholine(10-10~10-4 mol/L ) was decreased in simulated microgravity rats as compared with that of controls, but dilatory responses of isolated arterial rings to Sodium Nitroprussid (10-10~10-4 mol/L ) was similar in both simulated Microgravity rats and control rats, and stronger superoxide anions signals were detected in basilar and carotid arteries from HU rats, while compared with that of control rats. These results indicate that endothelium-dependent relaxation of both basilar artery and carotid artery have been diminished by 3-week hindlimb unweighting, and increased superoxide anions levels may contribute to this alteration.

  1. Blood pressure lowering effect of the extract of aerial parts of Capparis aphylla is mediated through endothelium-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shah, Abdul Jabbar; Gilani, Anwarul Hassan

    2011-01-01

    This investigation was aimed to provide pharmacological evidences for the medicinal use of Capparis aphylla in hypertension. In normotensive anesthetized rats, intravenous administration of the crude extract of Capparis aphylla (Ca.Cr; 3-100 mg/kg) caused a fall in mean arterial pressure (MAP), which was partially blocked in the presence of atropine (2 mg/kg). In isolated rabbit aortic rings, Ca.Cr inhibited phenylephrine (1 μM) and high K(+) (80 mM) precontractions with respective EC(50) values of 0.10 (0.07-0.15) and 1.22 mg/mL (1.00-1.50), suggesting calcium channel blocking (CCB) activity with a predominant inhibitory effect on receptor operated Ca(2+) channels. Pretreatment of the arotic rings with Ca.Cr (0.1-1 mg/mL) caused a rightward shift in the Ca(2+) concentration response curves, similar to verapamil. In isolated rat aorta preparations, Ca.Cr caused a partial endothelium-dependent L-NAME/atropine-sensitive vasodilator effect. In guinea-pig atria, Ca.Cr suppressed both rate and force of spontaneous atrial contractions with respective EC(50) values of 1.35 (1.01-1.79) and 1.60 mg/mL (1.18-2.17), which remained unchanged in the presence of atropine (1 μM). These data indicate that the blood pressure (BP) lowering effect of the crude extract of Capparis aphylla is mediated through a vasodilator and cardiac depressant effect. The vasodilator effect is partly mediated by an endothelium-dependent, atropine-sensitive NO pathway, while the CCB effect is partly responsible for endothelium-independent vasodilatation and also for the cardiac depressant effect; thus, this study provides pharmacologic evidence with respect to the medicinal use of the plant in hypertension. PMID:21978026

  2. Tirofiban induces vasorelaxation of the coronary artery via an endothelium-dependent NO-cGMP signaling by activating the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tianyang; Guan, Weiwei; Fu, Jinjuan; Zou, Xue; Han, Yu; Chen, Caiyu; Zhou, Lin; Zeng, Chunyu; Wang, Wei Eric

    2016-06-01

    Tirofiban, a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor, is an antiplatelet drug extensively used in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and exerts an therapeutic effect on no-reflow phenomenon during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Previous studies elucidated the vasodilation caused by tirofiban in the peripheral artery. However, whether tirofiban exerts a vasodilator effect on the coronary artery is unclear. Our present study found that tirofiban induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in the isolated rat coronary artery pre-constricted by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Further study showed that incubation of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) with tirofiban increased NO production, which was ascribed to the increased eNOS phosphorylation. This was confirmed by the loss of the vasorelaxant effect of tirofiban in the presence of l-NAME (eNOS inhibitor) and L-NMMA (NOS inhibitor) but not SMT (iNOS inhibitor) on isolated rat coronary arteries. The vasorelaxation was also blocked by the PI3K inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002, as well as the Akt inhibitor SH-5, indicating the role of PI3K and Akt in tirofiban-mediated vasodilation. Moreover, further study showed that soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ, or blockers of potassium channel (big-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel) blocked tirofiban-induced vasodilation of the coronary artery. These findings suggest that tirofiban induces vasorelaxation via an endothelium-dependent NO-cGMP signaling through the activation of the Akt/eNOS/sGC pathway. PMID:27018249

  3. Role of membrane potential in endothelium-dependent relaxation of guinea-pig coronary arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Parkington, H C; Tonta, M A; Coleman, H A; Tare, M

    1995-04-15

    1. Membrane potential and tension were measured simultaneously in ring segments of main coronary artery of guinea-pigs. The synthetic thromboxane A2 analogue U46619 depolarized the tissues from -58 +/- 2 to -40 +/- 1 mV and increased tension by 12 +/- 1 mN mm-1. Nitric oxide (NO) and Iloprost, the stable analogue of prostacyclin, evoked hyperpolarization and relaxation. 2. The concentration of NO required to evoke half-maximal hyperpolarization (EC50 of 2 x 10(-5) M) was 40-fold higher than that which was required to induce relaxation (EC50 of 5 x 10(-7) M). The EC50 for Iloprost-induced hyperpolarization (3 x 10(-8) M) was similar to that for relaxation (4 x 10(-8) M). 3. Glibenclamide (10(-6) M) abolished the hyperpolarization in response to both NO and Iloprost but was without effect on the amplitudes of the relaxations over the complete concentration-response curves. 4. Acetylcholine evoked concentration-dependent hyperpolarization and relaxation in the presence of N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (NAME; 10(-5) M) and indomethacin (10(-6) M), and these responses were attributed to endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). The hyperpolarization produced by EDHF always preceded relaxation, and relaxation never occurred at concentrations of acetylcholine that were insufficient to evoke hyperpolarization. 5. The concentration-hyperpolarization and concentration-relaxation curves in response to acetylcholine were not affected by glibenclamide or barium (1-3 mM) but were shifted to the right 4- and 5-fold, respectively, by 1 mM tetraethylammonium. The hyperpolarization and relaxation evoked by acetylcholine were also reduced in a parallel manner when the potassium concentration in the superfusate was increased. 6. Hyperpolarizing current steps, applied to spiral strips of coronary artery denuded of endothelium and depolarized and constricted with U46619, caused relaxation. The relationship between hyperpolarization and relaxation evoked electronically

  4. The expression of p66shc in peripheral blood monocytes is increased in patients with coronary heart disease and correlated with endothelium-dependent vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qin; Wang, Qiong; Dong, Lini; Wang, Yanjiao; Tan, Yi; Zhang, Xiangyu

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study is to detect the p66shc mRNA and protein expression of the peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs) in coronary heart disease patients (CHD) and controls, to evaluate the correlation between the expression of p66shc mRNA in the PBMs and endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. This study included 78 coronary angiography-documented CHD patients (CHD group) and 38 non-CHD controls (control group). The p66shc mRNA and protein levels were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. The flow-mediated dilatation (FMD, endothelium-dependent), nitroglycerine-induced dilatation (NID, endothelium-independent) and carotid intimal medial thickness (CIMT) were detected using high-resolution ultrasound. The p66shc mRNA and the protein expression levels in the PBMs were significantly higher in the CHD group compared with the control group (p = 0.007 and 0.001). The FMD (p < 0.001) and NID (p = 0.013) were significantly lower and the CIMT (p = 0.007) was significantly thicker in the CHD patients than in the controls. In the univariate analysis, the expression of the p66shc mRNA in the PBMs was significantly positively correlated with the serum LDL-C and homocysteine levels and the CIMT and was inversely correlated with the FMD and the NID (all p < 0.001). In the multiple linear regression analysis, the FMD (p < 0.001), LDL-C (p = 0.002) and homocysteine levels (p = 0.002) remained independently correlated with the p66shc mRNA expression. These findings highlight a pivotal role for the expression of p66shc in CHD and endothelial dysfunction, which might represent a molecular target to prevent endothelial dysfunction-related disease. PMID:24676406

  5. Tocotrienol Rich Palm Oil Extract Is More Effective Than Pure Tocotrienols at Improving Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in the Presence of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Saher F.; Woodman, Owen L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative endothelial dysfunction is a critical initiator of vascular disease. Vitamin E is an effective antioxidant but attempts to use it to treat vascular disorders have been disappointing. This study investigated whether tocotrienols, the less abundant components of vitamin E compared to tocopherols, might be more effective at preserving endothelial function. Superoxide generated by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase or rat aorta was measured using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. The effect of α-tocopherol, α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols and a tocotrienol rich palm oil extract (tocomin) on levels of superoxide was assessed. Endothelial function in rat aorta was assessed in the presence of the auto-oxidant pyrogallol. Whilst all of the compounds displayed antioxidant activity, the tocotrienols were more effective when superoxide was produced by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase whereas tocomin and α-tocopherol were more effective in the isolated aorta. Tocomin and α-tocopherol restored endothelial function in the presence of oxidant stress but α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols were ineffective. The protective effect of tocomin was replicated when the tocotrienols were present with, but not without, α-tocopherol. Tocotrienol rich tocomin is more effective than α-tocopherol at reducing oxidative stress and restoring endothelium-dependent relaxation in rat aortae and although α-, δ-, and γ-tocotrienols effectively scavenged superoxide, they did not improve endothelial function. PMID:26075031

  6. Cilostazol Enhances Mobilization of Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improves Endothelium-Dependent Function in Patients at High Risk of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ting-Hsing; Chen, I-Chih; Lee, Cheng-Han; Chen, Ju-Yi; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Li, Yi-Heng; Tseng, Shih-Ya; Tsai, Liang-Miin; Tseng, Wei-Kung

    2016-08-01

    This is the first study to investigate the vasculoangiogenic effects of cilostazol on endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This double-blind, placebo-controlled study included 71 patients (37 received 200 mg/d cilostazol and 34 received placebo for 12 weeks). Use of cilostazol, but not placebo, significantly increased circulating EPC (kinase insert domain receptor(+)CD34(+)) counts (percentage changes: 149.0% [67.9%-497.8%] vs 71.9% [-31.8% to 236.5%], P = .024) and improved triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P = .002 and P = .003, respectively). Plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A165 and FMD significantly increased (72.5% [32.9%-120.4%] vs -5.8% [-46.0% to 57.6%], P = .001; 232.8% ± 83.1% vs -46.9% ± 21.5%, P = .003, respectively) in cilostazol-treated patients. Changes in the plasma triglyceride levels significantly inversely correlated with the changes in the VEGF-A165 levels and FMD. Cilostazol significantly enhanced the mobilization of EPCs and improved endothelium-dependent function by modifying some metabolic and angiogenic markers in patients at high risk of CVD. PMID:27401788

  7. Nitric oxide function in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthys, K. E.

    1997-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process in the intima of conduit arteries, which disturbs the endothelium-dependent regulation of the vascular tone by the labile liposoluble radical nitric oxide (NO) formed by the constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). This defect predisposes to coronary vasospasm and cardiac ischaemia, with anginal pain as the typical clinical manifestation. It is now appreciated that endothelial dysfunction is an early event in atherogenesis and that it may also involve the microcirculation, in which atherosclerotic lesions do not develop. On the other hand, the inflammatory environment in atherosclerotic plaques may result in the expression of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) isozyme. Whether the dysfunction in endothelial NO production is causal to, or the result of, atherosclerotic lesion formation is still highly debated. Most evidence supports the hypothesis that constitutive endothelial NO release protects against atherogenesis e.g. by preventing smooth muscle cell proliferation and leukocyte adhesion. Nitric oxide generated by the inducible isozyme may be beneficial by replacing the failing endothelial production but excessive release may damage the vascular wall cells, especially in combination with reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:18472828

  8. Sex differences in the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in porcine isolated coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pui San; Roberts, Richard E; Randall, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial and smooth muscle Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels contribute to regulation of vascular tone. We have previously reported sex differences in the endothelial function in porcine isolated coronary arteries (PCAs). The present study examined the role of TRP channels in endothelium-dependent and H2O2-induced vasorelaxations in male and female PCAs. Distal PCAs were mounted in a wire myograph and precontracted with U46619. Concentration-response curves to bradykinin, H2O2 and A23187 were constructed in the presence of TRP channel antagonists with or without L-NAME and indomethacin to inhibit NO synthase and cyclooxygenase respectively. 2-APB (TRPC & TRPM antagonist) inhibited the maximum relaxation (Rmax) of the bradykinin-induced vasorelaxation and abolished the EDH-type response in PCAs from both sexes. SKF96365 (TRPC antagonist) inhibited the Rmax of bradykinin-induced vasorelaxation in males, and inhibited Rmax of the EDH-type response in both sexes. Pyr3 (TRPC3 antagonist) inhibited both the NO and EDH components of the bradykinin-induced vasorelaxation in males, but not females. RN1734 (TRPV4 antagonist) reduced the potency of the NO component of the bradykinin-induced vasorelaxation in females only, but inhibited the Rmax of the EDH-type component in both sexes. 2-APB, SKF96365 and RN1734 all reduced the H2O2-induced vasorelaxation, whereas Pyr3 had no effect. No differences in expression level of TRPC3 and TRPV4 between sexes were detected using Western blot. Present study demonstrated a clear sex differences in the role TRP channels where TRPC3 play a role in the NO- and EDH-type response in males and TRPV4 play a role in the NO-mediated response in females. PMID:25620134

  9. A factorial randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of micronutrients supplementation and regular aerobic exercise on maternal endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and oxidative stress of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies have suggested a relationship between metabolic abnormalities and impaired fetal growth with the development of non-transmissible chronic diseases in the adulthood. Moreover, it has been proposed that maternal factors such as endothelial function and oxidative stress are key mechanisms of both fetal metabolic alterations and subsequent development of non-transmissible chronic diseases. The objective of this project is to evaluate the effect of micronutrient supplementation and regular aerobic exercise on endothelium-dependent vasodilation maternal and stress oxidative of the newborn. Methods and design 320 pregnant women attending to usual prenatal care in Cali, Colombia will be included in a factorial randomized controlled trial. Women will be assigned to the following intervention groups: 1. Control group: usual prenatal care (PC) and placebo (maltodextrine). 2. Exercise group: PC, placebo and aerobic physical exercise. 3. Micronutrients group: PC and a micronutrients capsule consisting of zinc (30 mg), selenium (70 μg), vitamin A (400 μg), alphatocopherol (30 mg), vitamin C (200 mg), and niacin (100 mg). 4. Combined interventions Group: PC, supplementation of micronutrients, and aerobic physical exercise. Anthropometric measures will be taken at the start and at the end of the interventions. Discussion Since in previous studies has been showed that the maternal endothelial function and oxidative stress are related to oxidative stress of the newborn, this study proposes that complementation with micronutrients during pregnancy and/or regular physical exercise can be an early and innovative alternative to strengthen the prevention of chronic diseases in the population. Trial registration NCT00872365. PMID:21356082

  10. Increment of body mass index is positively correlated with worsening of endothelium-dependent and independent changes in forearm blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz G; de Miranda, Marcos L; Bottino, Daniel A; Lima, Ronald de A; de Souza, Maria das Graças C; Balarini, Michelle de Moura; Villela, Nivaldo R; Bouskela, Eliete

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with the impairment of endothelial function leading to the initiation of the atherosclerotic process. As obesity is a multiple grade disease, we have hypothesized that an increasing impairment of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell functions occurs from lean subjects to severe obese ones, creating a window of opportunities for preventive measures. Thus, the present study was carried out to investigate the grade of obesity in which endothelial dysfunction can be detected and if there is an increasing impairment of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell functions as body mass index increases. According to body mass index, subjects were allocated into five groups: Lean controls (n = 9); Overweight (n = 11); Obese class I (n = 26); Obese class II (n = 15); Obese class III (n = 19). Endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell functions were evaluated measuring forearm blood flow responses to increasing intra-arterial infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside using venous occlusion plethysmography. We observed that forearm blood flow was progressively impaired from lean controls to severe obese and found no significant differences between Lean controls and Overweight groups. Known determinants of endothelial dysfunction, such as inflammatory response, insulin resistance, and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, did not correlate with forearm blood flow response to vasodilators. Moreover, several risk factors for atherosclerosis were excluded as independent predictors after confounder-adjusted analysis. Our data suggests that obesity per se could be sufficient to promote impairment of vascular reactivity, that obesity class I is the first grade of obesity in which endothelial dysfunction can be detected, and that body mass index positively correlates with the worsening of endothelium-dependent and independent changes in forearm blood flow. PMID:26913005

  11. NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to age-related impairments of endothelium-dependent dilation in rat soleus feed arteries

    PubMed Central

    Trott, Daniel W.; Seawright, John W.; Luttrell, Meredith J.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that age-related endothelial dysfunction in rat soleus muscle feed arteries (SFA) is mediated in part by NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). SFA from young (4 mo) and old (24 mo) Fischer 344 rats were isolated and cannulated for examination of vasodilator responses to flow and acetylcholine (ACh) in the absence or presence of a superoxide anion (O2−) scavenger (Tempol; 100 μM) or an NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor (apocynin; 100 μM). In the absence of inhibitors, flow- and ACh-induced dilations were attenuated in SFA from old rats compared with young rats. Tempol and apocynin improved flow- and ACh-induced dilation in SFA from old rats. In SFA from young rats, Tempol and apocynin had no effect on flow-induced dilation, and apocynin attenuated ACh-induced dilation. To determine the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), dilator responses were assessed in the absence and presence of catalase (100 U/ml) or PEG-catalase (200 U/ml). Neither H2O2 scavenger altered flow-induced dilation, whereas both H2O2 scavengers blunted ACh-induced dilation in SFA from young rats. In old SFA, catalase improved flow-induced dilation whereas PEG-catalase improved ACh-induced dilation. Compared with young SFA, in response to exogenous H2O2 and NADPH, old rats exhibited blunted dilation and constriction, respectively. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the NAD(P)H oxidase subunit gp91phox protein content was greater in old SFA compared with young. These results suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to impaired endothelium-dependent dilation in old SFA. PMID:21233343

  12. NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to age-related impairments of endothelium-dependent dilation in rat soleus feed arteries.

    PubMed

    Trott, Daniel W; Seawright, John W; Luttrell, Meredith J; Woodman, Christopher R

    2011-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that age-related endothelial dysfunction in rat soleus muscle feed arteries (SFA) is mediated in part by NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). SFA from young (4 mo) and old (24 mo) Fischer 344 rats were isolated and cannulated for examination of vasodilator responses to flow and acetylcholine (ACh) in the absence or presence of a superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) scavenger (Tempol; 100 μM) or an NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor (apocynin; 100 μM). In the absence of inhibitors, flow- and ACh-induced dilations were attenuated in SFA from old rats compared with young rats. Tempol and apocynin improved flow- and ACh-induced dilation in SFA from old rats. In SFA from young rats, Tempol and apocynin had no effect on flow-induced dilation, and apocynin attenuated ACh-induced dilation. To determine the role of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), dilator responses were assessed in the absence and presence of catalase (100 U/ml) or PEG-catalase (200 U/ml). Neither H(2)O(2) scavenger altered flow-induced dilation, whereas both H(2)O(2) scavengers blunted ACh-induced dilation in SFA from young rats. In old SFA, catalase improved flow-induced dilation whereas PEG-catalase improved ACh-induced dilation. Compared with young SFA, in response to exogenous H(2)O(2) and NADPH, old rats exhibited blunted dilation and constriction, respectively. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the NAD(P)H oxidase subunit gp91phox protein content was greater in old SFA compared with young. These results suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to impaired endothelium-dependent dilation in old SFA. PMID:21233343

  13. Beneficial effects of calcitriol on hypertension, glucose intolerance, impairment of endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation, and visceral adiposity in fructose-fed hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chu-Lin; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Lee, Tony J F; Fang, Te-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Besides regulating calcium homeostasis, the effects of vitamin D on vascular tone and metabolic disturbances remain scarce in the literature despite an increase intake with high-fructose corn syrup worldwide. We investigated the effects of calcitriol, an active form of vitamin D, on vascular relaxation, glucose tolerance, and visceral fat pads in fructose-fed rats. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 6 per group). Group Con: standard chow diet for 8 weeks; Group Fru: high-fructose diet (60% fructose) for 8 weeks; Group Fru-HVD: high-fructose diet as Group Fru, high-dose calcitriol treatment (20 ng / 100 g body weight per day) 4 weeks after the beginning of fructose feeding; and Group Fru-LVD: high-fructose diet as Group Fru, low-dose calcitriol treatment (10 ng / 100 g body weight per day) 4 weeks after the beginning of fructose feeding. Systolic blood pressure was measured twice a week by the tail-cuff method. Blood was examined for serum ionized calcium, phosphate, creatinine, glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Intra-peritoneal glucose intolerance test, aortic vascular reactivity, the weight of visceral fat pads, adipose size, and adipose angiotensin II levels were analyzed at the end of the study. The results showed that the fructose-fed rats significantly developed hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, heavier weight and larger adipose size of visceral fat pads, and raised adipose angiotensin II expressions compared with the control rats. High- and low-dose calcitriol reduced modestly systolic blood pressure, increased endothelium-dependent aortic relaxation, ameliorated glucose intolerance, reduced the weight and adipose size of visceral fat pads, and lowered adipose angiotensin II expressions in the fructose-fed rats. However, high-dose calcitriol treatment mildly increased serum ionized calcium levels (1.44 ± 0.05 mmol/L). These results suggest a protective role of calcitriol treatment on endothelial function, glucose

  14. Perturbation of chemical coupling by an endothelial Cx40 mutant attenuates endothelium-dependent vasodilation by KCa channels and elevates blood pressure in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaston, Daniel J; Haddock, Rebecca E; Howitt, Lauren; Morton, Susan K; Brown, Russell D; Matthaei, Klaus I; Hill, Caryl E

    2015-09-01

    Mutant forms of connexin40 (Cx40) exist in the human population and predispose carriers to atrial fibrillation. Since endothelial expression of Cx40 is important for electrical and chemical communication within the arterial wall, carriers of mutant Cx40 proteins may be predisposed to peripheral arterial dysfunction and dysregulation of blood pressure. We have therefore studied mice expressing either a chemically dysfunctional mutant, Cx40T202S, or wild-type Cx40, with native Cx40, specifically in the endothelium. Blood pressure was measured by telemetry under normal conditions and during cardiovascular stress induced by locomotor activity, phenylephrine or nitric oxide blockade (N(ɷ)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydroxide, L-NAME). Blood pressure of Cx40T202STg mice was significantly elevated at night when compared with wild-type or Cx40Tg mice, without change in mean heart rate, pulse pressure or locomotor activity. Analysis over 24 h showed that blood pressure of Cx40T202STg mice was significantly elevated at rest and additionally during locomotor activity. In contrast, neither plasma renin concentration nor pressor responses to phenylephrine or L-NAME were altered, the latter indicating that nitric oxide bioavailability was normal. In isolated, pressurised mesenteric arteries, hyperpolarisation and vasodilation evoked by SKA-31, the selective modulator of SKCa and IKCa channels, was significantly reduced in Cx40T202STg mice, due to attenuation of the SKCa component. Acetylcholine-induced ascending vasodilation in vivo was also significantly attenuated in cremaster muscle arterioles of Cx40T202STg mice, compared to wild-type and Cx40Tg mice. We conclude that endothelial expression of the chemically dysfunctional Cx40T202S reduces peripheral vasodilator capacity mediated by SKCa-dependent hyperpolarisation and also increases blood pressure. PMID:25369777

  15. Nitric oxide mediates isoflavone accumulation and the antioxidant system enhancement in soybean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Caifeng; Yang, Runqiang; Zhou, Yulin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationships between endogenous NO signal transduction pathways, the antioxidant system and isoflavone accumulation induced by UV-B radiation in soybean sprouts. Results showed that UV-B-triggered NO generation induced isoflavone accumulation by up-regulating the activity and gene expression of key enzymes (phenylalanine ammonia lyase, PAL; chalcone isomerase, CHI; chalcone synthase, CHS; isoflavone synthase, IFS) that participate in isoflavone biosynthesis and enhanced the antioxidant system by regulating levels of antioxidants (glutathione reductase, GR; glutathione S-transferase, GST; ascorbate peroxidase, APX; glutathione GSH; ascorbic acid, ASC), antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; peroxidase, POD; catalase, CAT) and their gene expression. These effects were inhibited by the addition of a specific NO-scavenger, carboxy-PTIO (cPTIO). The inhibition was reversed through application of the exogenous NO donor, SNP. Overall, NO is an essential signaling molecule, mediating UV-B-induced isoflavone accumulation and the antioxidant system enhancement in soybean sprouts. PMID:26988515

  16. Nitric Oxide-mediated Relaxation by High K in Human Gastric Longitudinal Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Chul; Choi, Woong; Yun, Hyo-Young; Sung, Rohyun; Yoo, Ra Young; Park, Seon-Mee; Yun, Sei Jin; Kim, Mi-Jung; Song, Young-Jin; Xu, Wen-Xie; Lee, Sang Jin

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to elucidate high-K(+)induced response of circular and longitudinal smooth muscle from human gastric corpus using isometric contraction. Contraction from circular and longitudinal muscle stripes of gastric corpus greater curvature and lesser curvature were compared. Circular smooth muscle from corpus greater curvature showed high K(+) (50 mM)-induced tonic contraction. On the contrary, however, longitudinal smooth muscle strips showed high K(+) (50 mM)-induced sustained relaxation. To find out the reason for the discrepancy we tested several relaxation mechanisms. Protein kinase blockers like KT5720, PKA inhibitor, and KT5823, PKG inhibitor, did not affect high K(+)-induced relaxation. K(+) channel blockers like tetraethylammonium (TEA), apamin (APA), glibenclamide (Glib) and barium (Ba(2+)) also had no effect. However, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) and 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazolo (4,3-A) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and 4-AP (4-aminopyridine), voltage-dependent K(+) channel (K(V)) blocker, inhibited high K(+)-induced relaxation, hence reversing to tonic contraction. High K(+)-induced relaxation was observed in gastric corpus of human stomach, but only in the longitudinal muscles from greater curvature not lesser curvature. L-NNA, ODQ and K(V) channel blocker sensitive high K(+)-induced relaxation in longitudinal muscle of higher portion of corpus was also observed. These results suggest that longitudinal smooth muscle from greater curvature of gastric corpus produced high K(+)-induced relaxation which was activated by NO/sGC pathway and by K(V) channel dependent mechanism. PMID:22359479

  17. Determination of nitric oxide mediating intracellular Ca2+ release on neurons based on confocal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; He, Yipeng; Zeng, Yixiu; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    The gas NO is a ubiquitous intercellular messenger that modulates a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological functions. But few studies were made to study the role of NO in the Ca2+ release in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by confocal microscopy. Thus the objective of this study was to assess if NO has a role in Ca2+ signaling in DRG neurons using confocal microscopy combined with special fluorescence probe Fluo-3/AM. A 100 μM concentration of the NO donors (Sodium Nitroprusside, Dihydrate, SNP) and NO synthase inhibitor (NG-Monomethyl-L-arginine, Monoacetate salt, L-NMMA) was used in the study. Results showed that the fluorescence intensity increased rapidly after injecting SNP, which indicated that SNP could enhance intracellular Ca2+ release. And the fluorescence intensity shrank gradually with time and kept at a low level for quite a long period after loading with L-NMMA which indicated that L-NMMA could block intracellular Ca2+ release. All these results demonstrated that NO was involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ release in the DRG neurons.

  18. Nitric oxide mediates intestinal pathology but not immune expulsion during Trichinella spiralis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, C E; Paterson, J C; Wei, X Q; Liew, F Y; Garside, P; Kennedy, M W

    2000-04-15

    The relationship between intestinal pathology and immune expulsion of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes remains controversial. Although immune expulsion of GI helminth parasites is usually associated with Th2 responses, the effector mechanisms directly responsible for parasite loss have not been identified. We have previously shown that while the intestinal pathology accompanying the expulsion of the GI parasite Trichinella spiralis may be dependent on IL-4 and mediated by TNF, parasite loss is independent of TNF. In contrast, intestinal pathology in other disease models has been attributed to Th1 cytokines, although it closely resembles that seen in helminth infections. Whereas production of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the gut is important for both homeostasis of the epithelial layer and in protection against pathogenic microorganisms, overproduction of NO has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory conditions. We therefore investigated the role of NO in T. spiralis infection using iNOS-deficient mice. iNOS-/- and iNOS-/+ mice were infected with T. spiralis, and parasite expulsion and intestinal pathology were followed. Parasite expulsion proceeded similarly in both groups of animals, but significant intestinal pathology was only observed in the heterozygous mice. Thus it appears that, although the protective effects of Th2 responses in GI helminth infection do not require NO, this mediator contributes substantially to the associated enteropathy. NO may therefore be an important mediator of enteropathy in both Th1- and Th2-inducing conditions. PMID:10754319

  19. Oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction. Possible role in airway disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, W.J.; Martin, W.J. 2d.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of reactive species of oxygen on the airway are not well known. This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the structure and function of the airway epithelium. Tracheal rings were prepared from 200 g male rats. Damage to the airway epithelium was assayed by monitoring the ciliary beat frequency, the release of 51Cr, and histology. H2O2 at concentrations of 1.0 mM and above caused a very rapid decrease in ciliary beat frequency. After ten minutes' exposure to 1.0 mM, the ciliary beat frequency was 72 +/- 20 percent of control. Release of 51Cr was a less sensitive measure with significant release occurring after four hours of exposure to ciliotoxic concentrations of H2O2. Histologic changes were not evident within the experimental time period. All toxic effects of H2O2 were completely blocked by catalase. This study shows that H2O2 causes a rapid decline in ciliary activity and suggests that oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction could play a role in the pathogenesis of airway disease. The ciliary beat frequency provides a sensitive, physiologically relevant parameter for the in vitro study of these diseases.

  20. Whole blood viscosity and erythrocyte deformability are related to endothelium-dependent vasodilation and coronary risk in the elderly. The prospective investigation of the vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS) study.

    PubMed

    Sandhagen, Bo; Lind, Lars

    2012-01-01

    It has previously been shown that a high hemoglobin value, a major determinant of whole blood viscosity (WBV), predicts cardiovascular events. One putative mechanism might be an impaired endothelial function. Erythrocyte deformability is another rheologic feature of the erythrocyte being of importance for the flow properties of the blood, especially in the capillaries. The present study evaluates the relationships between blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability assessed as erythrocyte fluidity (EF), coronary risk and endothelial vasodilatory function. In the population-based PIVUS study (1016 subjects aged 70); endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV) was evaluated by the invasive forearm technique with acetylcholine given in the brachial artery and the brachial artery ultrasound technique with measurement of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). WBV, plasma viscosity (PV) and EF were measured in a random sample of 573 subjects. WBV and PV were positively and EF negatively related to Framingham risk score. EDV was inversely related to both whole blood and plasma viscosity. FMD was not related to any rheologic variable. In multiple regression analyses WBV and EF were significantly related to EDV independently of gender, hypertension, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, obesity and diabetes. Acetylcholine-induced vasodilation in the forearm, but not FMD, was negatively related to whole blood viscosity and positively related to EF independently of traditional risk factors in elderly subjects, indicating a pathophysiological link between impaired hemorheology and coronary risk. PMID:22240364

  1. [The role of preventing nitric oxide deficiency in the antihypertensive effect of adaptation to hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Mashina, S Iu; Smirin, B V; Pokidyshev, D A; Malyshev, I Iu; Liamina, N P; Senchikin, V N; Markov, Kh M; Manukhin, E B

    2001-01-01

    Shortage of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) manifested as decreased daily urinary excretion of nitrate and nitrite as well as attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxation of conduit and resistance vessels progresses with age-related increase of blood pressure (BP) in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Simultaneous NO-dependent suppression of vascular contractions is, apparently, due to the inducible NO synthase activity in vascular smooth muscle specific for spontaneously hypertensive rat. Adaptation of rats to hypobaric hypoxia initiated at early hypertensive stage (at the age of 5-6 weeks) decelerates hypertension progress. The antihypertensive effect of the adaptation was accompanied by stimulation of endothelial NO synthesis and prevention of impaired NO-dependent response in isolated blood vessels. Nitric oxide stores were formed in the vascular wall of SHRSP and WKY rats at the same time. The obtained data indicate a significant role of correction of endothelial NO deficiency in the antihypertensive effect of adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:15926321

  2. Nitric oxide in atherosclerosis: vascular protector or villain?

    PubMed

    Dusting, G J; Fennessy, P; Yin, Z L; Gurevich, V

    1998-11-01

    1. Nitric oxide (NO) has important roles in physiological vasodilatation, cytotoxicity and vascular disease. Nitric oxide and prostacyclin (PGI2), both released from the endothelium, act synergistically to inhibit platelet aggregation and adhesion. These autacoids also inhibit the adhesion and migration of leucocytes and, in some arteries, they synergize in terms of vasodilation. 2. The development of atherosclerosis and hyperlipaemia per se is accompanied by impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation. 3. Atherosclerosis is associated with marked changes in the activity of isoforms of NO synthase (NOS) in the artery wall, including increased expression of the NOS2 (inducible) isoform in complex human lesions as well as in the neointima of experimental animal models. 4. Failure of NO release from the endothelium with normal physiological stimuli, which has been attributed to a defect in the operation of the endothelial NOS (NOS3), provides conditions propitious for leucocyte adhesion, vasospasm, thrombosis and, in addition, may promote increased proliferation of intimal cells. 5. Nitric oxide and superoxide anions generated by inflammatory cells in atherosclerosis react to form cytodestructive peroxynitrite radicals, potentially causing injury to the endothelium and myocytes, and this may be a factor in apoptosis of cells leading to plaque rupture. 6. We have been able to reverse these NO defects with therapeutic agents, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, antagonists of platelet-activating factor and NO donor compounds, all offering promise in protecting against some manifestations of vascular disease. PMID:9809190

  3. Restoration of nitric oxide availability after calcium antagonist treatment in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Taddei, S; Virdis, A; Ghiadoni, L; Magagna, A; Favilla, S; Pompella, A; Salvetti, A

    2001-03-01

    Essential hypertension is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation caused by oxygen free radical-induced nitric oxide (NO) breakdown. Because calcium antagonists can improve endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension, in this study we tested the hypothesis that this beneficial effect could be related to restoration of NO availability by antioxidant properties. In 15 healthy subjects and 15 hypertensive patients, we studied forearm blood flow (strain-gauge plethysmography) modifications induced by intrabrachial acetylcholine (ACh; 0.15, 0.45, 1.5, 4.5, and 15 microg/100 mL per minute), an endothelium-dependent vasodilator in basal conditions, during infusion of N:(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 100 microg/100 mL forearm tissue per minute), an NO-synthase inhibitor, vitamin C (8 mg/100 mL forearm tissue per minute), and finally, simultaneous infusion of L-NMMA and vitamin C. The response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 1, 2, and 4 microg/100 mL forearm tissue per minute) was also evaluated. In control subjects, vasodilation to ACh was inhibited by L-NMMA and not changed by vitamin C. In hypertensive patients, vasodilation to ACh was blunted as compared with control subjects and resistant to L-NMMA. Vitamin C, which decreased plasma isoprostanes and increased plasma antioxidant capacity, increased the response to ACh and restored the inhibiting effect of L-NMMA. In hypertensive patients, the study was repeated after 3-month treatment with nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (30 to 60 mg/daily). Nifedipine treatment decreased circulating plasma lipoperoxides and isoprostanes and increased plasma antioxidant capacity. Moreover, nifedipine increased the vasodilation to ACh but not to SNP and restored the inhibiting effect of L-NMMA on ACh-induced vasodilation, whereas vitamin C no longer exerted its facilitating activity. These results indicate that nifedipine increases endothelium-dependent vasodilation by restoring NO

  4. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  5. The Effect of Quercus salicina Leaf Extracts on Vascular Endothelial Function: Role of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Yoon, Jun-Seong; Lee, Hye-Won; Park, Gye-Choon; Yi, Eunyoung; Yoon, Goo; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Oak, Min-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium is reported as a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases. Many evidences suggest that polyphenols are associated with a decreased global mortality and might be involved in protection against cardiovascular risk. This beneficial effect of polyphenol may be due to many actions as antioxidant that increases bioavailability of nitric oxide, vasodilation or anti-hypertensive properties. To identify new natural medicine candidate for cardiovascular protection, plant extracts used in traditional medicine were evaluated by vascular reactivity system. Porcine coronary artery rings were suspended in organ chambers for the measurement of changes in isometric tension. Screening results indicated that the ethanolic extract of leaf from Quercus salicina (QSE) has been found to exhibit potent vasorelaxant activity. QSE dose-dependently induced endothelium-dependent relaxations, which were abolished by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (Nomega-nitro-L-arginine). In addition, QSE strongly and dose-dependently activate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in porcine coronary artery endothelial cell. Taken together, the present study has demonstrated that QSE is a powerful endothelium-dependentvasodilator and that this effect involves increased nitric oxide bioavailability. In conclusion, QSE could be a cardiovascular protective herbal medicine candidate associated with cardiovascular diseases and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27433730

  6. Nitric oxide, S-nitrosylation and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Chung, K K K; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L

    2005-09-01

    Nitric oxide is a critically important signaling molecule, controlling a wide range of pathways and biological processes. Highly reactive nitric oxide mediates its function through reaction with different molecules directly or indirectly. One of these modifications is the S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues in proteins. S-nitrosylation is emerging as an important redox signaling mechanism and has been found to regulate a broad range of biologic, physiologic and cellular functions. One of the major findings in this area recently is the linkage of nitrosative stress to various neurodegenerative disorders. Oxidative stress has long been regarded as a prime mediator in the development of neurodegeneration as various indices of oxidative stress are readily observed in postmortem studies. A causative role for nitrosative stress in neurodegeneration is just now being appreciated. The direct connection of S-nitrosylation to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease in recent studies further provide insights into how imbalance in nitric oxide metabolism can contribute to the development of selective injury and disease. PMID:16191392

  7. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  8. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  9. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26739766

  10. Sexual dimorphism in rat aortic endothelial function of streptozotocin-induced diabetes: possible involvement of superoxide and nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Rui; Anderson, Leigh; Rahimian, Roshanak

    2013-01-01

    Little is known of the interactions between diabetes and sex on vascular function. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether there were sex differences in rat aortic endothelial function one week after the induction of streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetes, and to examine the potential roles of superoxide and nitric oxide (NO) in this sex-specific effect. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to acetylcholine (ACh) was measured in rat aortic rings before and after treatment with MnTMPyP (25 μM), a superoxide dismutase. Contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) were generated before and after treatment with L-NAME (200 μM), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. The mRNA expression of NADPH oxidase (Nox) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were also determined. We demonstrated that 1) STZ-diabetes impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to ACh to a greater extent in female than male aortae, 2) inhibition of superoxide enhanced sensitivity to ACh only in diabetic females, and 3) Nox1 and Nox4 mRNA expression was significantly elevated only in aortic tissue of diabetic females. Furthermore, incubation of aortic rings with L-NAME potentiated PE responses in all groups, but aortae from control females showed a greater potentiation of the PE response after NOS inhibition compared with others. STZ-diabetes reduced the extent of PE potentiation after L-NAME and the aortic eNOS mRNA expression in females to the same levels as seen in males. These data suggest that a decrease in NO, resulting from either decreased eNOS or elevated superoxide, may partially contribute to the predisposition of the female aorta to injury early in diabetes. PMID:24211329

  11. Nitric oxide inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian (Wai Chong); Lerner, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is involved in many physiologic processes. There are efforts, described elsewhere in this volume, to deliver nitric oxide to tissues as a therapy. Nitric oxide also contributes to pathophysiologic processes. Inhibiting nitric oxide or its production can thus also be of therapeutic benefit. This article addresses such inhibitory strategies. PMID:26634146

  12. Endothelial dysfunction in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice: role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Silva, Grazielle C; Silva, Josiane F; Diniz, Thiago F; Lemos, Virginia S; Cortes, Steyner F

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common problem associated with hypertension and is considered a precursor to the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications. The present study investigated the involvement of nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) and H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) in the impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the mesenteric arteries of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt-hypertensive mice. Myograph studies were used to investigate the endothelium-dependent vasodilator effect of ACh (acetylcholine). The expression and phosphorylation of nNOS and eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) were studied by Western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence was used to examine the localization of nNOS and eNOS in the endothelial layer of the mesenteric artery. The vasodilator effect of ACh is strongly impaired in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Non-selective inhibition of NOS sharply reduced the effect of ACh in both DOCA-salt-hypertensive and sham mice. Selective inhibition of nNOS and catalase led to a higher reduction in the effect of ACh in sham than in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Production of H2O2 induced by ACh was significantly reduced in vessels from DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, and it was blunted after nNOS inhibition. The expression of both eNOS and nNOS was considerably lower in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, whereas phosphorylation of their inhibitory sites was increased. The presence of nNOS was confirmed in the endothelial layer of mesenteric arteries from both sham and DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. These results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice is associated with reduced expression and functioning of nNOS and impaired production of nNOS-derived H2O2 Such findings offer a new perspective for the understanding of endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. PMID:26976926

  13. Vasorelaxant effects of mercury on rat thoracic aorta: the nitric oxide signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Omanwar, S; Saidullah, B; Ravi, K; Fahim, M

    2014-09-01

    Mercury, a heavy metal, is widespread and persistent in the environment and has been elucidated as a possible risk factor in cardiovascular diseases. Mercury has been reported to selectively impair the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the vascular endothelium as a consequence of oxidative stress. Conversely, mercury per se causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation at lower concentration via the NO pathway. Little is known about the effects of mercury per se on other endothelial mediators. To elucidate possible mechanisms involved in this action, isometric tension was measured in aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine (10 µM) from Wistar rats. Responses to increasing concentrations of inorganic mercuric chloride (10(-12)-10(-5) M) were obtained in the presence and absence of endothelium. Inorganic mercury produced a biphasic response in endothelium-intact aortic rings and produced only vasoconstriction in endothelium-denuded aortic rings. To study the possible underlying mechanisms for the biphasic response of mercury, increasing concentrations of mercuric chloride (10(-12)-10(-5) M) were used before and after N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (10(-4) M)), glybenclamide (10(-5) M), superoxide dismutase (10 U/ml) + catalase (100 U/ml), and nifedipine (10(-4) M) treatment. Results suggest that mercury produces endothelium-dependent relaxation at low concentration mediated by endothelial-generated NO and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor and endothelium-independent contraction resulting from the blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channels by generation of free radicals. PMID:24347300

  14. In vivo stimulatory effect of erythropoietin on endothelial nitric oxide synthase in cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R; Smith, Leslie A; Nath, Karl A; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-08-01

    The discovery of tissue protective effects of erythropoietin has stimulated significant interest in erythropoietin (Epo) as a novel therapeutic approach to vascular protection. The present study was designed to determine the cerebral vascular effects of recombinant Epo in vivo. Recombinant adenoviral vectors (10(9) plaque-forming units/animal) encoding genes for human erythropoietin (AdEpo) and beta-galactosidase (AdLacZ) were injected into the cisterna magna of rabbits. After 48 h, basilar arteries were harvested for analysis of vasomotor function, Western blotting, and measurement of cGMP levels. Gene transfer of AdEpo increased the expressions of recombinant Epo and its receptor in the basilar arteries. Arteries exposed to recombinant Epo demonstrated attenuation of contractile responses to histamine (10(-9) to 10(-5) mol/l) (P < 0.05, n = 5). Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (10(-9) to 10(-5) mol/l) were significantly augmented (P < 0.05, n = 5), whereas endothelium-independent relaxations to a nitric oxide (NO) donor 2-(N,N-diethylamino)diazenolate-2-oxide sodium salt remained unchanged in AdEpo-transduced basilar arteries. Transduction with AdEpo increased the protein expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated the S1177 form of the enzyme. Basal levels of cGMP were significantly elevated in arteries transduced with AdEpo consistent with increased NO production. Our studies suggest that in cerebral circulation, Epo enhances endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. This effect could play an important role in the vascular protective effect of Epo. PMID:16565320

  15. Extracellular but not cytosolic superoxide dismutase protects against oxidant-mediated endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Foresman, Erin L; Miller, Francis J

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide (O2 (•-)) contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease. Generation of O2 (•-) occurs in both the intracellular and extracellular compartments. We hypothesized that the gene transfer of cytosolic superoxide dismutase (SOD1) or extracellular SOD (SOD3) to blood vessels would differentially protect against O2 (•-)-mediated endothelial-dependent dysfunction. Aortic ring segments from New Zealand rabbits were incubated with adenovirus (Ad) containing the gene for Escherichia coli β-galactosidase, SOD1, or SOD3. Activity assays confirmed functional overexpression of both SOD3 and SOD1 isoforms in aorta 24 h following gene transfer. Histochemical staining for β-galactosidase showed gene transfer occurred in the endothelium and adventitia. Next, vessels were prepared for measurement of isometric tension in Kreb's buffer containing xanthine. After precontraction with phenylephrine, xanthine oxidase impaired relaxation to the endothelium-dependent dilator acetylcholine (ACh, max relaxation 33±4% with XO vs. 64±3% without XO, p<0.05), whereas relaxation to the endothelium-independent dilator sodium nitroprusside was unaffected. In the presence of XO, maximal relaxation to ACh was improved in vessels incubated with AdSOD3 (55±2%, p<0.05 vs. control) but not AdSOD1 (34±4%). We conclude that adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of SOD3, but not SOD1, protects the aorta from xanthine/XO-mediated endothelial dysfunction. These data provide important insight into the location and enzymatic source of O2 (•-) production in vascular disease. PMID:24024163

  16. Oleoyl-Lysophosphatidylcholine Limits Endothelial Nitric Oxide Bioavailability by Induction of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kozina, Andrijana; Opresnik, Stefan; Wong, Michael Sze Ka; Hallström, Seth; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Malli, Roland; Schröder, Katrin; Schmidt, Kurt; Frank, Saša

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported modulation of endothelial prostacyclin and interleukin-8 production, cyclooxygenase-2 expression and vasorelaxation by oleoyl- lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC 18:1). In the present study, we examined the impact of this LPC on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in vascular endothelial EA.hy926 cells. Basal NO formation in these cells was decreased by LPC 18:1. This was accompanied with a partial disruption of the active endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)- dimer, leading to eNOS uncoupling and increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The LPC 18:1-induced ROS formation was attenuated by the superoxide scavenger Tiron, as well as by the pharmacological inhibitors of eNOS, NADPH oxidases, flavin-containing enzymes and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Intracellular ROS-formation was most prominent in mitochondria, less pronounced in cytosol and undetectable in endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, Tiron completely prevented the LPC 18:1-induced decrease in NO bioavailability in EA.hy926 cells. The importance of the discovered findings for more in vivo like situations was analyzed by organ bath experiments in mouse aortic rings. LPC 18:1 attenuated the acetylcholine-induced, endothelium dependent vasorelaxation and massively decreased NO bioavailability. We conclude that LPC 18:1 induces eNOS uncoupling and unspecific superoxide production. This results in NO scavenging by ROS, a limited endothelial NO bioavailability and impaired vascular function. PMID:25419657

  17. Hemolysis in sickle cell mice causes pulmonary hypertension due to global impairment in nitric oxide bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Hunter C.; Campbell-Lee, Sally A.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Manci, Elizabeth A.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Schimel, Daniel M.; Cochard, Audrey E.; Wang, Xunde; Schechter, Alan N.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a highly prevalent complication of sickle cell disease and is a strong risk factor for early mortality. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to pulmonary vasculopathy remain unclear. Transgenic mice provide opportunities for mechanistic studies of vascular pathophysiology in an animal model. By microcardiac catheterization, all mice expressing exclusively human sickle hemoglobin had pulmonary hypertension, profound pulmonary and systemic endothelial dysfunction, and vascular instability characterized by diminished responses to authentic nitric oxide (NO), NO donors, and endothelium-dependent vasodilators and enhanced responses to vasoconstrictors. However, endothelium-independent vasodilation in sickle mice was normal. Mechanisms of vasculopathy in sickle mice involve global dysregulation of the NO axis: impaired constitutive nitric oxide synthase activity (NOS) with loss of endothelial NOS (eNOS) dimerization, increased NO scavenging by plasma hemoglobin and superoxide, increased arginase activity, and depleted intravascular nitrite reserves. Light microscopy and computed tomography revealed no plexogenic arterial remodeling or thrombi/emboli. Transplanting sickle marrow into wild-type mice conferred the same phenotype, and similar pathobiology was observed in a nonsickle mouse model of acute alloimmune hemolysis. Although the time course is shorter than typical pulmonary hypertension in human sickle cell disease, these results demonstrate that hemolytic anemia is sufficient to produce endothelial dysfunction and global dysregulation of NO. PMID:17158223

  18. Involvement of nitric oxide pathway in the PAF-induced relaxation of rat thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Moritoki, H.; Hisayama, T.; Takeuchi, S.; Miyano, H.; Kondoh, W.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanism of the vasorelaxant effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on rat thoracic aorta and the effect of aging on the PAF-induced relaxation were investigated. 2. PAF at concentrations causing relaxation induced marked increases in guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) production, but did not induce an increase in adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP). 3. Removal of the endothelium by mechanical rubbing, and treatment with the PAF antagonists CV-3988, CV-6209 and FR-900452, the nitric oxide biosynthesis inhibitor, NG-nitro L-arginine, the radical scavenger, haemoglobin, and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, methylene blue, inhibited PAF-induced relaxation and abolished or attenuated PAF-stimulated cyclic GMP production. 4. The relaxation was greatest in arteries from rats aged 4 weeks. With an increase in age, the response of the arteries to PAF was attenuated. 5. Endothelium-dependent cyclic GMP production also decreased with increase in age of the rats. 6. These results suggest that PAF stimulates production of nitric oxide from L-arginine by acting on the PAF receptors in the endothelium, which in turn stimulates soluble guanylate cyclase in the smooth muscle cells, and so increases production of cyclic GMP, thus relaxing the arteries. Age-associated decrease in PAF-induced relaxation may result from a reduction of cyclic GMP formation. PMID:1358382

  19. Endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3' untranslated region of endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA: regulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, J; Sánchez de Miguel, L; Montón, M; Casado, S; López-Farré, A

    1997-01-01

    Changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression may be involved in the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation dysfunction associated with several vascular diseases. In the present work, we demonstrate that eNOS mRNA contains a previously undescribed cis element in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). A U+C-rich segment in the 3' UTR is critical in complex formation with bovine aortic endothelial cell cytosolic proteins. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), which destabilizes eNOS mRNA, increased the binding activity of the cytosolic proteins in a time-dependent manner. These data suggest that endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3' UTR of eNOS mRNA. These proteins may play a role in TNF-alpha-induced eNOS mRNA destabilization. PMID:9315630

  20. Vascular oxidative stress and nitric oxide depletion in HIV-1 transgenic rats are reversed by glutathione restoration

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Erik R.; Kleinhenz, Dean J.; Liang, Bill; Dikalov, Sergey; Guidot, David M.; Hart, C. Michael; Jones, Dean P.; Sutliff, Roy L.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have a higher incidence of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and cardiovascular disease than uninfected individuals. Recent reports have demonstrated that viral proteins upregulate reactive oxygen species, which may contribute to elevated cardiovascular risk in HIV-1 patients. In this study we employed an HIV-1 transgenic rat model to investigate the physiological effects of viral protein expression on the vasculature. Markers of oxidative stress in wild-type and HIV-1 transgenic rats were measured using electron spin resonance, fluorescence microscopy, and various molecular techniques. Relaxation studies were completed on isolated aortic rings, and mRNA and protein were collected to measure changes in expression of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide sources. HIV-1 transgenic rats displayed significantly less NO-hemoglobin, serum nitrite, serum S-nitrosothiols, aortic tissue NO, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation than wild-type rats. NO reduction was not attributed to differences in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) protein expression, eNOS-Ser1177 phosphorylation, or tetrahydrobiopterin availability. Aortas from HIV-1 transgenic rats had higher levels of superoxide and 3-nitrotyrosine but did not differ in expression of superoxide-generating sources NADPH oxidase or xanthine oxidase. However, transgenic aortas displayed decreased superoxide dismutase and glutathione. Administering the glutathione precursor procysteine decreased superoxide, restored aortic NO levels and NO-hemoglobin, and improved endothelium-dependent relaxation in HIV-1 transgenic rats. These results show that HIV-1 protein expression decreases NO and causes endothelial dysfunction. Diminished antioxidant capacity increases vascular superoxide levels, which reduce NO bioavailability and promote peroxynitrite generation. Restoring glutathione levels reverses HIV-1 protein-mediated effects on superoxide, NO, and vasorelaxation

  1. Cinnamaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde-containing micelles induce relaxation of isolated porcine coronary arteries: role of nitric oxide and calcium

    PubMed Central

    Raffai, Gábor; Kim, Byungkuk; Park, Sanga; Khang, Gilson; Lee, Dongwon; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Cinnamaldehyde, a major component of cinnamon, induces the generation of reactive oxygen species and exerts vasodilator and anticancer effects, but its short half-life limits its clinical use. The present experiments were designed to compare the acute relaxing properties of cinnamaldehyde with those of self-assembling polymer micelles either loaded with cinnamaldehyde or consisting of a polymeric prodrug [poly(cinnamaldehyde)] that incorporates the compound in its backbone. Methods Rings of porcine coronary arteries were contracted with the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U46619 or 40 mM KCl, and changes in isometric tension were recorded. Results Cinnamaldehyde induced concentration-dependent but endothelium-independent, nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-independent, cyclooxygenase-independent, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)-independent, calcium-activated potassium-independent, and TRPA1 channel-independent relaxations. Cinnamaldehyde also inhibited the contractions induced by 40 mM KCl Ca2+ reintroduction in 40 mM KCl Ca2+-free solution or by the Ca2+ channel opener Bay K8644. Cinnamaldehyde-loaded control micelles induced complete, partly endothelium-dependent relaxations sensitive to catalase and inhibitors of NOS or sGC, but not cyclooxygenase or TRPA1, channels. Cinnamaldehyde-loaded micelles also inhibited contractions induced by 40 mM KCl Ca2+ reintroduction or Bay K8644. Poly(cinnamaldehyde) micelles induced only partial, endothelium-dependent relaxations that were reduced by inhibitors of NOS or sGC and by catalase and the antioxidant tiron, but not by indomethacin or TRPA1 channel blockers. Conclusion The present findings demonstrate that cinnamaldehyde-loaded and poly(cinnamaldehyde) micelles possess vasodilator properties, but that the mechanism underlying the relaxation that they cause differs from that of cinnamaldehyde, and thus could be used both to relieve coronary vasospasm and for therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:24904214

  2. Nitric Oxide Nanoparticle Technology

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections account for the majority of skin and soft tissue infections in the United States. Staphylococcus aureus is rapidly evolving resistance to contemporary topical as well as systemic antibiotics. Alternatives to current treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections are needed for more effective treatment now and in the future. Nitric oxide's proven roles in both wound repair and as an antimicrobial agent make it an excellent candidate for the treatment of skin infections. Recent attempts at novel nitric oxide therapies, in the form of nitric oxide donors, have shown limited potential in treating cutaneous infection. However, more recent developments in nitric oxide delivery, using nitric oxide nanoparticle technology, demonstrate substantial promise in the promotion of wound repair and eradication of skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:20725551

  3. Contribution of nitric oxide to coronary vasodilation during hypercapnic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Gurevicius, J; Salem, M R; Metwally, A A; Silver, J M; Crystal, G J

    1995-01-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in coronary vasodilation during hypercapnic acidosis (HC). The left anterior descending coronary arteries of 17 anesthetized, open-chest dogs were perfused with normal arterial blood or with arterial blood equilibrated in an extracorporeal circuit with 90% O2-10% CO2 [arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) 72 +/- 3 mmHg, arterial pH 7.16 +/- 0.02]. Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was initially set at 100 mmHg. Coronary blood flow (CBF) was measured with a Doppler transducer. Studies were conducted under constant-pressure (variable CBF; n = 13) and constant-flow (variable CPP) conditions (n = 4). Steady-state changes in CBF (or CPP) during HC and during intracoronary infusions of acetylcholine (ACh, 20 micrograms/min), an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 80 micrograms/min), an endothelium-independent vasodilator, were compared before and after intracoronary infusion of a NO synthase inhibitor, either NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 4.5 mg) or NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 30 mg). Under constant pressure, L-NAME blunted increases in CBF by HC (274 +/- 32 vs. 113 +/- 24%) and ACh (400 +/- 43 vs. 68 +/- 17%), whereas increases in CBF by SNP were not significantly affected (207 +/- 34 vs. 186 +/- 18%). Results with L-NMMA were similar. Under constant flow, L-NAME attenuated decreases in CPP by HC and ACh, whereas it had no significant effect on decreases in CPP by SNP. In conclusion, HC elicits release of NO from coronary vascular endothelium via a direct effect rather than secondary to an increased flow rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7530920

  4. Effects of FeS on Chromium Oxidation Mediated by Manganese Oxidizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Youxian; Deng, Baolin

    2004-03-31

    Reductive immobilization of Cr(VI) has been widely explored as a cost-effective approach for Cr-contaminated site remediation. The long-term stability of the immobilized Cr(III), however, is a concern. Cr(III) is known to be oxidized by Mn oxides chemically and Mn-oxides could be produced through microbially mediated Mn(II) oxidation. This study examined the effect of FeS on Cr(III) oxidation mediated by Pseudomonas putida. The results showed that commercial granular FeS did not affect Cr(III) oxidation in the culture of P. putida with Mn(II), but freshly precipitated FeS slurry inhibited Cr(III) oxidation. A 10 mg/l of FeS did not inhibit the microbial growth, but delayed the production of Mn oxides, thus postponing potential Cr(III) oxidation. In the presence of excessive FeS slurry, both Cr(VI) and Mn oxides were reduced rapidly. The reduced Cr(III) could not be re-oxidized as long as freshly formed FeS was present, even in the presence of the manganese oxidizers.

  5. Mechanism of Alcohol Oxidation Mediated by Copper(II) and Nitroxyl Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Ryland, Bradford L.; McCann, Scott D.; Brunold, Thomas C.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2015-01-01

    2,2′-Bipyridine-ligated copper complexes, in combination with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl), are highly effective catalysts for aerobic alcohol oxidation. Considerable uncertainty and debate exist over the mechanism of alcohol oxidation mediated by CuII and TEMPO. Here, we report experimental and density functional theory (DFT) computational studies that distinguish among numerous previously proposed mechanistic pathways. Oxidation of various classes of radical-probe substrates shows that long-lived radicals are not formed in the reaction. DFT computational studies support this conclusion. A bimolecular pathway involving hydrogen-atom-transfer from a CuII–alkoxide to a nitroxyl radical is higher in energy than hydrogen transfer from a CuII–alkoxide to a coordinated nitroxyl species. The data presented here reconcile a collection of diverse and seemingly contradictory experimental and computational data reported previously in the literature. The resulting Oppenauer-like reaction pathway further explains experimental trends in the relative reactivity of different classes of alcohols (benzylic versus aliphatic and primary versus secondary), as well as the different reactivity observed between TEMPO and bicyclic nitroxyls, such as ABNO (ABNO = 9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane N-oxyl). PMID:25090238

  6. Syringaresinol causes vasorelaxation by elevating nitric oxide production through the phosphorylation and dimerization of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Byung-Hee; Kim, Sookon; Kim, Jong-Dai; Lee, Jung Joon; Baek, Yi-Yong; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Choe, Jongseon; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Won, Moo-Ho; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in vascular functions, including vasorelaxation. We here investigated the pharmacological effect of the natural product syringaresinol on vascular relaxation and eNOS-mediated NO production as well as its underlying biochemical mechanism in endothelial cells. Treatment of aortic rings from wild type, but not eNOS-/- mice, with syringaresinol induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was abolished by addition of the NOS inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Treatment of human endothelial cells and mouse aortic rings with syringaresinol increased NO production, which was correlated with eNOS phosphorylation via the activation of Akt and AMP kinase (AMPK) as well as elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels. A phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor blocked the increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels, AMPK-dependent eNOS phosphorylation, and NO production, but not Akt activation, in syringaresinol-treated endothelial cells. Syringaresinol-induced AMPK activation was inhibited by co-treatment with PLC inhibitor, Ca2+ chelator, calmodulin antagonist, and CaMKKβ siRNA. This compound also increased eNOS dimerization, which was inhibited by a PLC inhibitor and a Ca2+-chelator. The chemicals that inhibit eNOS phosphorylation and dimerization attenuated vasorelaxation and cGMP production. These results suggest that syringaresinol induces vasorelaxation by enhancing NO production in endothelial cells via two distinct mechanisms, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt- and PLC/Ca2+/CaMKKβ-dependent eNOS phosphorylation and Ca2+-dependent eNOS dimerization. PMID:22170035

  7. Homocysteine provokes leukocyte-endothelium interaction by downregulation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Pruefer, D; Scalia, R; Lefer, A M

    1999-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that chronic hyperhomocysteinemia, which is found in from 9 to 15% of the general population, is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. We sought to elucidate the mechanism by which exposure of the vascular wall to high levels of homocysteine initiates this inflammatory reaction. We examined the acute effect of homocysteine on endothelial dysfunction in isolated rat arteries and on microcirculatory leukocyte-endothelium interaction in vivo. Intravital microscopy of rat mesenteric venules was performed by superfusing the mesentery with increasing concentrations of homocysteine (1-5 mmol/l). There was a significant concentration- and time-dependent increase in leukocyte rolling, adherence, and extravasation compared with control rats superfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution (p < 0.01). Moreover, immunohistochemical staining demonstrated significantly increased P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression on intestinal venules after homocysteine superfusion. In contrast, mesenteric superfusion with the nitric oxide donor 4-hydroxymethyl-furazan-3-carboxylic acid oxide (CAS1609, 1 micromol/l) significantly attenuated homocysteine-induced leukocyte rolling, adherence, and transmigration to control levels (p < 0.01). CAS1609 also attenuated both P-selectin and ICAM-1 expression on mesenteric venules and decreased CD18 expression on isolated leukocytes. Superior mesenteric arteries incubated with 5 mmol/l homocysteine developed significant (p < 0.01) endothelial dysfunction (i.e., impaired relaxation to endothelium-dependent dilators). Acute hyperhomocysteinemia induces endothelial dysfunction, characterized by a loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, leading to an inflammatory state. This state results in increased leukocyte rolling, adherence, and transmigration by upregulation of cell adhesion molecules. Our data suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia inhibits the important homeostatic role of

  8. Influences of prostanoids and nitric oxide on post-suspension hypotension in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eatman, D.; Listhrop, R. A.; Beasley, A. S.; Socci, R. R.; Abukhalaf, I.; Bayorh, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    Impairment in cardiovascular functions sometimes manifested in astronauts during standing postflight, may be related to the diminished autonomic function and/or excessive production of endothelium-dependent relaxing factors. In the present study, using the 30 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) model, we compared the cardiovascular and biochemical effects of 7 days of suspension and a subsequent 6-h post-suspension period between suspended and non-suspended conscious female Sprague-Dawley rats. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were measured prior to suspension (basal), daily thereafter, and every 2h post-suspension. Following 7 days of suspension, MAP was not different from their basal values, however, upon release from suspension, MAP was significantly reduced compared to the non-suspended rats. Nitric oxide levels were elevated while thromboxane A(2) levels declined significantly in both plasma and tissue samples following post-suspension. The levels of prostacyclin following post-suspension remained unaltered in plasma and aortic rings but was significantly elevated in carotid arterial rings. Therefore, the post-suspension reduction in mean arterial pressure is due mostly to overproduction of nitric oxide and to a lesser extent prostacyclin.

  9. Mechanistic Variants in Gas-Phase Metal-Oxide Mediated Activation of Methane at Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The C-H bond activation of methane mediated by a prototypical heteronuclear metal-oxide cluster, [Al2Mg2O5](•+), was investigated by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. Experimentally, hydrogen-atom abstraction from methane by the cluster ion [Al2Mg2O5](•+) takes place at ambient conditions. As to the mechanism, according to our computational findings, both the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) are feasible and compete with each other. This is in distinct contrast to the [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Mg, Al, Si) cluster oxide ions which activate methane exclusively via the PCET route (Li, J.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, J.; Schlangen, M.; Weiske, T.; Usharani, D.; Shaik, S.; Schwarz, H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 7973-7981). The electronic origins of the mechanistically rather complex reactivity scenarios of the [Al2Mg2O5](•+)/CH4 couple were elucidated. For the PCET mechanism, in which the Lewis acid-base pair [Al(+)-O(-)] of the cluster acts as the active site, a clear correlation has been established between the nature of the transition state, the corresponding barrier height, the Lewis acidity-basicity of the [M(+)-O(-)] unit, as well as the bond order of the M(+)-O(-) bond. Also addressed is the role of the spin and charge distributions of a terminal oxygen radical site in the direct HAT route. The knowledge of the factors that control the reactivity of PCET and HAT pathways not only deepens our mechanistic understanding of metal-oxide mediated C-H bond activation but may also provide guidance for the rational design of catalysts. PMID:27518766

  10. Ferric Oxide Mediated Formation of PCDD/Fs from 2-Monochlorophenol

    PubMed Central

    Nganai, Shadrack; Lomnicki, Slawo; Dellinger, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The copper oxide, surface-mediated formation of polychlorinated dibenzop-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) from precursors such as chlorinated phenols is considered to be a major source of PCDD/F emissions from combustion sources. In spite of being present at 2–50x higher concentrations than copper oxide, virtually no studies of the iron oxide-mediated formation of PCDD/F have been reported in the literature. We have performed packed bed, flow reactor studies of the reaction of 50 ppm gas phase 2-monochlorophenol (2-MCP) over a surface of 5% iron oxide on silica over a temperature range of 200–500 °C. Dibenzo-p-dioxin (DD), 1-monochlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1-MCDD), 4,6-dichlorodibenzofuran (4,6-DCDF), and dibenzofuran (DF) were formed in maximum yields of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 %, respectively. The yield of PCDD/F over iron oxide peaked at temperatures 50–100 °C higher in temperature than over copper oxide. The maximum yields of DD, 1-MCDD and 4,6-DCDF were 2x and 5x higher over iron oxide, respectively, than over copper oxide, while DF was not observed at all for copper oxide. The resulting PCDD/PCDF ratio was 0.39 versus 1.2 observed for iron oxide and copper oxide, respectively, which is in agreement with PCDD to PCDF ratios in full-scale combustors that are typically ≪1. The combination of 2–50x higher concentrations of iron oxide than copper oxide in most full-scale combustors and 2.5x higher yields of PCDD/F observed in the laboratory, suggest that iron oxide may contribute as much as 5–125x more than copper oxide to the emissions of PCDD/F from full-scale combustors. PMID:19238966

  11. Tetrahydrobiopterin Deficiency and Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling Contribute to Atherosclerosis Induced by Disturbed Flow

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chen, Wei; Rezvan, Amir; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a critical cofactor for Nitric Oxide (NO) synthesis by NO synthase (NOS). Recently, we demonstrated that disturbed flow produced by partial carotid ligation decreases BH4 levels in vivo. We therefore aimed to determine whether atherosclerosis induced by disturbed flow is due to BH4 deficiency and NOS uncoupling and whether increasing BH4 would prevent endothelial dysfunction, plaque inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We produced a region of disturbed flow in ApoE−/− mice using partial carotid ligation and fed these animals a high-fat diet. This caused eNOS uncoupling as characterized by increased vascular superoxide production, altered vascular reactivity and a change in eNOS migration on low-temperature gel. These perturbations were accompanied by severe atherosclerosis, infiltration of T cells and macrophages, and an increase in cytokine production. Treatment with BH4 recoupled NOS, decreased superoxide production, imporoved endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and virtually eliminated atherosclerosis. BH4 treatment also markedly reduced vascular inflammation and improved the cytokine milieu induced by disturbed flow. Conclusions Our results highlight a key role of BH4 deficiency and NOS uncoupling in atherosclerosis induced by disturbed flow, and provide insight into the effect of modulating vascular BH4 levels on atherosclerosis and inflammation at these sites of the circulation. PMID:21512164

  12. Nitric Oxide Contributes to Vasomotor Tone in Hypertensive African Americans Treated With Nebivolol and Metoprolol.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Robert B; Hayek, Salim S; Poole, Joseph C; Rahman, Ayaz; Menon, Vivek; Kavtaradze, Nino; Polhemus, David; Veledar, Emir; Lefer, David J; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2016-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is more prevalent in African Americans (AAs) compared with whites. The authors hypothesized that nebivolol, a selective β1 -antagonist that stimulates nitric oxide (NO), will improve endothelial function in AAs with hypertension when compared with metoprolol. In a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, 19 AA hypertensive patients were randomized to a 12-week treatment period with either nebivolol 10 mg or metoprolol succinate 100 mg daily. Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured using plethysmography at rest and after intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside to estimate endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilation, respectively. Physiologic vasodilation was assessed during hand-grip exercise. Measurements were repeated after NO blockade with L-N(G) -monomethylarginine (L-NMMA) and after inhibition of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) with tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA). NO blockade with L-NMMA produced a trend toward greater vasoconstriction during nebivolol compared with metoprolol treatment (21% vs 12% reduction in FBF, P=.06, respectively). This difference was more significant after combined administration of L-NMMA and TEA (P<.001). Similarly, there was a contribution of NO to exercise-induced vasodilation during nebivolol but not during metoprolol treatment. There were significantly greater contributions of NO and EDHF to resting vasodilator tone and of NO to exercise-induced vasodilation with nebivolol compared with metoprolol in AAs with hypertension. PMID:26285691

  13. Endothelium-derived relaxing factor produced and released from artery and vein is nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Buga, G.M.; Wood, K.S.; Byrns, R.E.; Chaudhuri, G.

    1987-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) is responsible for the vascular smooth muscle relaxation elicited by endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). EDRF is an unstable humoral substance released from artery and vein that mediates the action of endothelium-dependent vasodilators. NO is and unstable endothelium-independent vasodilator that is released from vasodilator drugs such as nitroprusside and glyceryl trinitrate. The authors have repeatedly observed that the actions of NO on vascular smooth muscle closely resemble those of EDRF. In the present study the vascular effects of EDRF released from perfused bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein were compared with the effects of NO delivered by superfusion over endothelium-denuded arterial and venous strips arranged in a cascade. EDRF was indistinguishable from NO in that both were labile inactivated by pyrogallol or superoxide anion, stabilized by superoxide dismutase, and inhibited by oxyhemoglobin or potassium. Both EDRF and NO produced comparable increases in cyclic GMP accumulation in artery and vein, and this cyclic GMP accumulation was inhibited by pyrogallol, oxyhemoglobin, potassium, and methylene blue. EDRF was identified chemically as NO, or a labile nitroso species, by two procedures. Thus, EDRF released from artery and vein possesses identical and biological and chemical properties as NO.

  14. Effects of chronic noradrenaline on the nitric oxide pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bachetti, T; Comini, L; Agnoletti, L; Pedersini, P; Gaia, G; Cargnoni, A; Bellet, M; Curello, S; Ferrari, R

    1998-08-01

    Altered endothelium-dependent vasodilation has been observed in congestive heart failure (CHF), a disease characterized by a sustained adrenergic activation. The purpose of our study was to test the hypothesis that chronically elevated catecholamines influence the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the human endothelium. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were exposed for 7 days to a concentration of noradrenaline (NA, 1 ng/mL) similar to that found in the blood of patients with CHF. Kinetics of endothelial constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) activity, measured by [3H]L-arginine to [3H]L-citrulline conversion, and protein expression of ecNOS and iNOS, assessed by Western blot analysis, were unaffected by chronic NA treatment. Furthermore, no changes in subcellular fraction-associated ecNOS were found; this indirectly shows that chronic NA did not cause phosphorylation of the enzyme. Moreover, [3H]L-arginine transport through the plasma membrane was conserved in chronically NA-treated cells. The data demonstrate that prolonged in vitro exposure to pathologic CHF-like NA does not affect the L-arginine: NO pathway in human endothelial cells. PMID:9782366

  15. Dispersal of human and plant pathogens biofilms via nitric oxide donors at 4 °C.

    PubMed

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Durie, Ian A; Henríquez, Tania; Satkute, Aiste; Matuszewska, Marta; Prado, Raphael Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide donors capable of manipulating nitric oxide-mediated signaling in bacteria could induce dispersal of biofilms. Encased in extracellular polymeric substances, human and plant pathogens within biofilms are significantly more resistant to sanitizers. This is particularly a problem in refrigerated environments where food is processed. In an exercise aimed to study the potential of nitric oxide donors as biofilm dispersal in refrigerated conditions, we compared the ability of different nitric oxide donors (SNAP, NO-aspirin and Noc-5) to dislodge biofilms formed by foodborne, human and plant pathogens treated at 4 °C. The donors SNAP and Noc-5 were efficient in dispersing biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica, pathogenic Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua. The biomasses were decreased up to 30 % when compared with the untreated controls. When the plant pathogens Pectobacterium sp. and Xanthomonas sp. were tested the dispersion was mainly limited to Pectobacterium carotovorum biofilms, decreasing up to 15 % after exposure to molsidomine. Finally, the association of selected nitric oxide donors with sanitizers (DiQuat, H2O2, peracetic acid and PhenoTek II) was effective in dispersing biofilms. The best dispersal was achieved by pre-treating P. carotovorum with molsidomine and then peracetic acid. The synergistic effect was estimated up to ~35 % in dispersal when compared with peracetic acid alone. The association of nitric oxide donors with sanitizers could provide a foundation for an improved sanitization procedure for cleaning refrigerate environments. PMID:27457245

  16. Postischemic vasodilation in human forearm is dependent on endothelium-derived nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Meredith, I T; Currie, K E; Anderson, T J; Roddy, M A; Ganz, P; Creager, M A

    1996-04-01

    Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide contributes to basal vascular tone, little is known about its role in regulating blood flow during changes in metabolic supply and demand. We examined the contribution of endothelium-derived nitric oxide to reactive hyperemia in the forearm of 20 normal subjects (12 women, 8 men) aged 27 +/- 4 yr (means +/- SD), using the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Forearm ischemia was induced by suprasystolic blood pressure cuff inflation for 5 min, and the subsequent hyperemic flow was recorded for 5 min using venous occlusion strain-gauge plethysmography. The efficacy of nitric oxide blockade was tested by comparing the dose-response relationship to the endothelium-dependent agonist, acetylcholine (3, 10, and 30 mg/min), before and after intra-arterial infusion of up to 2,000 mg/min of L-NMMA. L-NMMA produced a significant downward and rightward shift in the dose-response relationship to acetylcholine and a 39% reduction in response to the maximum dose (P < 0.001). In the presence of L-NMMA, peak hyperemic flow was reduced 16% (26.5 +/- 2.1 to 22.3 +/- 1.5 ml.min-1.100 ml of forearm-1, P < 0.03), and the minimum forearm vascular resistance was increased 22.8% (3.5 +/- 0.3 to 4.3 +/- 0.4 mmHg.ml-1.min.100 ml, P < 0.02). Total hyperemia, calculated from the area under the flow vs. time curve, at 1 and 5 min after cuff release was 17 and 23% less, respectively (13.6 +/- 1.2 vs. 11.3 +/- 1.1 and 31.8 +/- 2.7 vs. 24.6 +/- 1.8 ml/100 ml, P < 0.002), following L-NMMA. These data suggest that endothelium-derived nitric oxide plays a role in both reactive hyperemia and in the maintenance of the hyperemic response following ischemia in the forearm. PMID:8967386

  17. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, M.; Dominiczak, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide is an important regulatory molecule in cardiovascular function. Reduced availability of nitric oxide has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:9497971

  18. Preserved Microvascular Endothelial Function in Young, Obese Adults with Functional Loss of Nitric Oxide Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, John W.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Evans, Trent D.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Schrage, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Data indicate endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) may be preserved in the skeletal muscle microcirculation of young, obese adults. Preserved EDD might be mediated by compensatory mechanisms, impeding insight into preclinical vascular dysfunction. We aimed to determine the functional roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) toward EDD in younger obese adults. We first hypothesized EDD would be preserved in young, obese adults. Further, we hypothesized a reduced contribution of NOS in young, obese adults would be replaced by increased COX signaling. Microvascular EDD was assessed with Doppler ultrasound and brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) in younger (27 ± 1 year) obese (n = 29) and lean (n = 46) humans. Individual and combined contributions of NOS and COX were examined with intra-arterial infusions of l-NMMA and ketorolac, respectively. Vasodilation was quantified as an increase in forearm vascular conductance (ΔFVC). Arterial endothelial cell biopsies were analyzed for protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). ΔFVC to ACh was similar between groups. After l-NMMA, ΔFVC to ACh was greater in obese adults (p < 0.05). There were no group differences in ΔFVC to ACh with ketorolac. With combined NOS-COX inhibition, ΔFVC was greater in obese adults at the intermediate dose of ACh. Surprisingly, arterial endothelial cell eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS were similar between groups. Younger obese adults exhibit preserved EDD and eNOS expression despite functional dissociation of NOS-mediated vasodilation and similar COX signaling. Compensatory NOS- and COX-independent vasodilatory mechanisms conceal reduced NOS contributions in otherwise healthy obese adults early in life, which may contribute to vascular dysfunction. PMID:26733880

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Dancs, Péter; Kerék, Margit; Németh, Tamás; Faragó, Bernadett; Balogh, Andrea; Patil, Renukadevi; Jennings, Brett L.; Liliom, Károly; Malik, Kafait U.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Tigyi, Gabor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as a mediator of several cardiovascular functions, but its potential involvement in the control of vascular tone is obscure. Here, we show that both LPA (18:1) and VPC31143 (a synthetic agonist of LPA1–3 receptors) relax intact mouse thoracic aorta with similar Emax values (53.9 and 51.9% of phenylephrine-induced precontraction), although the EC50 of LPA- and VPC31143-induced vasorelaxations were different (400 vs. 15 nM, respectively). Mechanical removal of the endothelium or genetic deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) not only diminished vasorelaxation by LPA or VPC31143 but converted it to vasoconstriction. Freshly isolated mouse aortic endothelial cells expressed LPA1, LPA2, LPA4 and LPA5 transcripts. The LPA1,3 antagonist Ki16425, the LPA1 antagonist AM095, and the genetic deletion of LPA1, but not that of LPA2, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3 kinase–protein kinase B/Akt pathway by wortmannin or MK-2206 failed to influence the effect of LPA. However, pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73122 or edelfosine, but not genetic deletion of PLCε, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation and indicated that a PLC enzyme, other than PLCε, mediates the response. In summary, the present study identifies LPA as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator substance acting via LPA1, PLC, and eNOS.—Ruisanchez, É., Dancs, P., Kerék, M., Németh, T., Faragó, B., Balogh, A., Patil, R., Jennings, B. L., Liliom, K., Malik, K. U., Smrcka, A. V., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. PMID:24249637

  20. Low Level Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Decrease Connexin36 Gap Junction Coupling in Mouse and Human Islets through Nitric Oxide-mediated Protein Kinase Cδ.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, Nikki L; Walter, Rachelle L; Hemmati, Alireza; Westacott, Matthew J; Benninger, Richard K P

    2016-02-12

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the decline in islet function during the development of diabetes. Cytokines can disrupt insulin secretion and calcium dynamics; however, the mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood. Connexin36 gap junctions coordinate glucose-induced calcium oscillations and pulsatile insulin secretion across the islet. Loss of gap junction coupling disrupts these dynamics, similar to that observed during the development of diabetes. This study investigates the mechanisms by which pro-inflammatory cytokines mediate gap junction coupling. Specifically, as cytokine-induced NO can activate PKCδ, we aimed to understand the role of PKCδ in modulating cytokine-induced changes in gap junction coupling. Isolated mouse and human islets were treated with varying levels of a cytokine mixture containing TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ. Islet dysfunction was measured by insulin secretion, calcium dynamics, and gap junction coupling. Modulators of PKCδ and NO were applied to determine their respective roles in modulating gap junction coupling. High levels of cytokines caused cell death and decreased insulin secretion. Low levels of cytokine treatment disrupted calcium dynamics and decreased gap junction coupling, in the absence of disruptions to insulin secretion. Decreases in gap junction coupling were dependent on NO-regulated PKCδ, and altered membrane organization of connexin36. This study defines several mechanisms underlying the disruption to gap junction coupling under conditions associated with the development of diabetes. These mechanisms will allow for greater understanding of islet dysfunction and suggest ways to ameliorate this dysfunction during the development of diabetes. PMID:26668311

  1. Evidence that nitric oxide mediates the blood pressure lowering effect of a polyphenol-rich cocoa powder in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, M; Muguerza, B; Miguel, M; Aleixandre, A

    2011-11-01

    The involvement of endothelial-relaxing factors on the antihypertensive effect of a polyphenol-rich cocoa powder named CocoanOX (CCX) was studied. Thirty 17-20-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), weighing 314 ± 3g were used. They were divided into two groups of 15 animals, that were respectively administered by gastric intubation distilled water or 300 mg/kg CCX dissolved in distilled water, between 9 am and 10 am. 2h after the oral administration, 5 of the animals in each group were intraperitoneally administered 1 ml saline. The remaining rats in both groups were divided into another two groups of 5 animals that were respectively administered 30 mg/kg Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) dissolved in 1 ml of saline or 5 mg/kg indomethacin also dissolved in 1 ml of saline by the same procedure. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was recorded in the rats by the tail cuff method before the initial oral administration and also 4h after this administration. CCX caused a significant decrease in SBP (-49.5 ± 4.9 mmHg; p<0.05). L-NAME caused a clear increase in SBP in the rats (+16.2 ± 4.3 mmHg; p<0.05), and the effect of CCX was not observed in the SHR that were treated with L-NAME (+4.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; p<0.05). Nevertheless, indomethacin treatment did not modify SBP in the SHR and this compound failed to modify the antihypertensive effect of CCX in these animals. In conclusion, this study proves the participation of NO in the antihypertensive effect of CCX in the SHR strain. When CCX is administered, the synthesis, or the bioavailability, of this endothelial factor could increase, but other mechanisms may also participate in the antihypertensive effect of this cocoa powder. In any case, further investigation should be carried out to characterize the signalling pathways involved in the antihypertensive effect of CCX. PMID:21699979

  2. N-Substituted analogues of S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine: chemical stability and prolonged nitric oxide mediated vasodilatation in isolated rat femoral arteries.

    PubMed

    Megson, I L; Morton, S; Greig, I R; Mazzei, F A; Field, R A; Butler, A R; Caron, G; Gasco, A; Fruttero, R; Webb, D J

    1999-02-01

    Previous studies show that linking acetylated glucosamine to S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) stabilizes the molecule and causes it to elicit unusually prolonged vasodilator effects in endothelium-denuded, isolated rat femoral arteries. Here we studied the propanoyl (SNPP; 3 carbon side-chain), valeryl (SNVP; 5C) and heptanoyl (SNHP; 7C) N-substituted analogues of SNAP (2C), to further investigate other molecular characteristics that might influence chemical stability and duration of vascular action of S-nitrosothiols. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that SNVP was the most stable analogue in solution. Decomposition of all four compounds was accelerated by Cu(II) and cysteine, and neocuproine, a specific Cu(I) chelator, slowed decomposition of SNHP. Generation of NO from the compounds was confirmed by electrochemical detection at 37 degrees C. Bolus injections of SNAP (10 microl; 10(-8)-10(-3) M) into the perfusate of precontracted, isolated rat femoral arteries taken from adult male Wistar rats (400-500 g), caused concentration-dependent, transient vasodilatations irrespective of endothelial integrity. Equivalent vasodilatations induced by SNVP and SNHP were transient in endothelium-intact vessels but failed to recover to pre-injection pressures at moderate and high concentrations (10(-6)-10(-3) M) in those denuded of endothelium. This sustained effect (> 1 h) was most prevalent with SNHP and was largely reversed by the NO scavenger, haemoglobin. We suggest that increased lipophilicity of SNAP analogues with longer sidechains facilitates their retention by endothelium-denuded vessels; subsequent slow decomposition within the tissue generates sufficient NO to cause prolonged vasodilatation. This is a potentially useful characteristic for targeting NO delivery to areas of endothelial damage. PMID:10188974

  3. N-substituted analogues of S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine: chemical stability and prolonged nitric oxide mediated vasodilatation in isolated rat femoral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Megson, I L; Morton, S; Greig, I R; Mazzei, F A; Field, R A; Butler, A R; Caron, G; Gasco, A; Fruttero, R; Webb, D J

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies show that linking acetylated glucosamine to S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) stabilizes the molecule and causes it to elicit unusually prolonged vasodilator effects in endothelium-denuded, isolated rat femoral arteries. Here we studied the propanoyl (SNPP; 3 carbon side-chain), valeryl (SNVP; 5C) and heptanoyl (SNHP; 7C) N-substituted analogues of SNAP (2C), to further investigate other molecular characteristics that might influence chemical stability and duration of vascular action of S-nitrosothiols. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that SNVP was the most stable analogue in solution. Decomposition of all four compounds was accelerated by Cu(II) and cysteine, and neocuproine, a specific Cu(I) chelator, slowed decomposition of SNHP. Generation of NO from the compounds was confirmed by electrochemical detection at 37°C. Bolus injections of SNAP (10 μl; 10−8–10−3 M) into the perfusate of precontracted, isolated rat femoral arteries taken from adult male Wistar rats (400–500 g), caused concentration-dependent, transient vasodilatations irrespective of endothelial integrity. Equivalent vasodilatations induced by SNVP and SNHP were transient in endothelium-intact vessels but failed to recover to pre-injection pressures at moderate and high concentrations (10−6–10−3 M) in those denuded of endothelium. This sustained effect (>1 h) was most prevalent with SNHP and was largely reversed by the NO scavenger, haemoglobin. We suggest that increased lipophilicity of SNAP analogues with longer sidechains facilitates their retention by endothelium-denuded vessels; subsequent slow decomposition within the tissue generates sufficient NO to cause prolonged vasodilatation. This is a potentially useful characteristic for targeting NO delivery to areas of endothelial damage. PMID:10188974

  4. Comparison of effects of chronic and acute administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester to the rat on inhibition of nitric oxide-mediated responses.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, C E; Allcock, G H; Warner, T D

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside in vivo and in vitro, in the isolated perfused kidney and in rings of rat thoracic aorta, were measured in rats treated chronically with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; approx, 70 mg kg-1) and compared to responses in age-matched control animals, and age-matched animals after the acute administration of L-NAME (3-100 mumol kg-1). Parallel experiments examined alterations in responsiveness in rings of trachea and anococcygeus muscles taken from the same animals. 2. Chronic oral administration of L-NAME elevated the blood pressure in anaesthetized animals from 114 +/- 5 mmHg to 153 +/- 11 mmHg (n = 5). The hypotensive responses to both acetylcholine (1 nmol kg-1) and sodium nitroprusside (10 nmol kg-1) were enhanced by chronic L-NAME treatment (n = 5-7) whereas acute L-NAME administration enhanced only the response to sodium nitroprusside (n = 5). 3. After chronic treatment with L-NAME, the basal perfusion pressure in the isolated perfused kidney was elevated. However, vasodilator responses to either acetylcholine (1 nmol) or sodium nitroprusside (3 nmol) were unaltered (n = 5-7). The vasodilatation induced by acetylcholine was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the administration of acute L-NAME (0.1 - 100 microM; n = 5), such that significant inhibition was seen at 10 microM L-NAME. The response to sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by L-NAME.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7541283

  5. A Novel Soluble Immune-Type Receptor (SITR) in Teleost Fish: Carp SITR Is Involved in the Nitric Oxide-Mediated Response to a Protozoan Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Carla M. S.; Bird, Steve; Raes, Geert; Ghassabeh, Gholamreza H.; Schijns, Virgil E. J. C.; Pontes, Maria J. S. L.; Savelkoul, Huub F. J.; Wiegertjes, Geert F.

    2011-01-01

    Background The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of the IgSF are type I transmembrane proteins containing one or more extracellular Ig-like domains and their regulation of effector functions is mediated intracellularly by distinct stimulatory or inhibitory pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings Carp SITR was found in a substracted cDNA repertoire from carp macrophages, enriched for genes up-regulated in response to the protozoan parasite Trypanoplasma borreli. Carp SITR is a type I protein with two extracellular Ig domains in a unique organisation of a N-proximal V/C2 (or I-) type and a C-proximal V-type Ig domain, devoid of a transmembrane domain or any intracytoplasmic signalling motif. The carp SITR C-proximal V-type Ig domain, in particular, has a close sequence similarity and conserved structural characteristics to the mammalian CD300 molecules. By generating an anti-SITR antibody we could show that SITR protein expression was restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage. Carp SITR is abundantly expressed in macrophages and is secreted upon in vitro stimulation with the protozoan parasite T. borreli. Secretion of SITR protein during in vivo T. borreli infection suggests a role for this IgSF receptor in the host response to this protozoan parasite. Overexpression of carp SITR in mouse macrophages and knock-down of SITR protein expression in carp macrophages, using morpholino antisense technology, provided evidence for the involvement of carp SITR in the parasite-induced NO production. Conclusion/Significance We report the structural and functional characterization of a novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR) in a teleost fish and propose a role for carp SITR in the NO-mediated response to a protozoan parasite. PMID:21305002

  6. Pharmacological characterization of guanidinoethyldisulphide (GED), a novel inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase with selectivity towards the inducible isoform.

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C.; Bryk, R.; Zingarelli, B.; Southan, G. J.; Gahman, T. C.; Bhat, V.; Salzman, A. L.; Wolff, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. Guanidines, amidines, S-alkylisothioureas, and recently, mercaptoalkylguanidines have been described as inhibitors of the generation of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine by NO synthases (NOS). We have recently demonstrated that guanidinoethyldisulphide (GED), formed from the dimerisation of mercaptoethylguanidine (MEG), is a novel inhibitor of nitric oxide synthases. Here we describe the pharmacological properties of GED on purified NOS isoforms, various cultured cell types, vascular ring preparations, and in endotoxin shock. 2. GED potently inhibited NOS activity of purified inducible NOS (iNOS), endothelial NOS (ecNOS), and brain NOS (bNOS) enzymes with Ki values of 4.3, 18 and 25 microM, respectively. Thus, GED has a 4 fold selectivity for iNOS over ecNOS at the enzyme level. The inhibitory effect of GED on ecNOS and iNOS was competitive vs. L-arginine and non-competitive vs. tetrahydrobiopterin. 3. Murine J774 macrophages, rat aortic smooth muscle cells, murine lung epithelial cells, and human intestinal DLD-1 cells were stimulated with appropriate mixtures of pro-inflammatory cytokines or bacterial lipopolysaccharide to express iNOS. In these cells, GED potently inhibited nitrite formation (EC50 values: 11, 9, 1 and 30 microM, respectively). This suggests that uptake of GED may be cell type and species-dependent. The inhibitory effect of GED on nitrite production was independent of whether GED was given together with immunostimulation or 6 h afterwards, indicating that GED does not interfere with the process of iNOS induction. 4. GED caused relaxations in the precontracted vascular ring preparations (EC50: 20 microM). Part of this relaxation was endothelium-dependent, but was not blocked by methylene blue (100 microM), an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase. In precontracted rings, GED enhanced the acetylcholine-induced, endothelium-dependent relaxations at 10 microM and caused a slight inhibition of the relaxations at 100 microM. The vascular studies

  7. Growth of oxide-mediated ternary silicide controlled by a Si cap layer by rapid thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Vantomme, A.; Vanormelingen, K.; Yao, S. D.

    2008-01-01

    We reported a simple method to grow good-quality CoSi 2 film by using Si cap technology and introducing moderate Ni. First, a cobalt layer of ∼15 nm with a Si cap layer with a different thickness deposited onto the Si surface with a thin silicon oxide buffer is applied to investigate the formation of CoSi 2 by ex situ rapid thermal annealing. It was found that a 13 nm thick Si cap layer could significantly improve the crystal quality of oxide-mediated CoSi 2 film. Setting the Si cap thickness at 13 nm, we revealed that introduction of Ni can further improve the crystal quality of the silicide film in comparison to the pure Co silicide, and a ratio of Ni to Co at round 1:8 causes the lowest sheet resistance, ∼5 Ω/sq.

  8. Overexpressed neuroglobin raises threshold for nitric oxide-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiratory activities and stress signaling in primary cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shilpee; Zhuo, Ming; Gorgun, Murat; Englander, Ella W.

    2013-01-01

    Surges of nitric oxide compromise mitochondrial respiration primarily by competitive inhibition of oxygen binding to cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and are particularly injurious in neurons, which rely on oxidative phosphorylation for all their energy needs. Here, we show that transgenic overexpression of the neuronal globin protein, neuroglobin, helps diminish protein nitration, preserve mitochondrial function and sustain ATP content of primary cortical neurons challenged by extended nitric oxide exposure. Specifically, in transgenic neurons, elevated neuroglobin curtailed nitric oxide-induced alterations in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, including baseline oxygen consumption, consumption coupled with ATP synthesis, proton leak and spare respiratory capacity. Concomitantly, activation of genes involved in sensing and responding to oxidative/nitrosative stress, including the early-immediate c-Fos gene and the phase II antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1, was diminished in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons. Taken together, these differences reflect a lesser insult produced by similar concentrations of nitric oxide in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons, suggesting that abundant neuroglobin buffers nitric oxide and raises the threshold of nitric oxide-mediated injury in neurons. PMID:23587847

  9. Overexpressed neuroglobin raises threshold for nitric oxide-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiratory activities and stress signaling in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shilpee; Zhuo, Ming; Gorgun, Falih M; Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    Surges of nitric oxide compromise mitochondrial respiration primarily by competitive inhibition of oxygen binding to cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and are particularly injurious in neurons, which rely on oxidative phosphorylation for all their energy needs. Here, we show that transgenic overexpression of the neuronal globin protein, neuroglobin, helps diminish protein nitration, preserve mitochondrial function and sustain ATP content of primary cortical neurons challenged by extended nitric oxide exposure. Specifically, in transgenic neurons, elevated neuroglobin curtailed nitric oxide-induced alterations in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, including baseline oxygen consumption, consumption coupled with ATP synthesis, proton leak and spare respiratory capacity. Concomitantly, activation of genes involved in sensing and responding to oxidative/nitrosative stress, including the early-immediate c-Fos gene and the phase II antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1, was diminished in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons. Taken together, these differences reflect a lesser insult produced by similar concentrations of nitric oxide in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons, suggesting that abundant neuroglobin buffers nitric oxide and raises the threshold of nitric oxide-mediated injury in neurons. PMID:23587847

  10. Nitric oxide induces cotyledon senescence involving co-operation of the NES1/MAD1 and EIN2-associated ORE1 signalling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Li, Manli; Kong, Dongdong; Wang, Lei; Lv, Qiang; Wang, Jinzheng; Bao, Fang; Gong, Qingqiu; Xia, Jinchan; He, Yikun

    2014-01-01

    After germination, cotyledons undertake the major role in supplying nutrients to the pre-photoautorophy angiosperm seedlings until they senesce. Like other senescence processes, cotyledon senescence is a programmed degenerative process. Nitric oxide can induce premature cotyledon senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana, yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. A screen for genetic mutants identified the nes1 mutant, in which cotyledon senescence was accelerated by nitric oxide. Map-based cloning revealed that NES1 is allelic to a previously reported mitotic checkpoint family gene, MAD1. The nes1/mad1 mutants were restored to the wild type, in response to nitric oxide, by transforming them with pNES1::NES1. Ectopic expression of NES1 in the wild type delayed nitric oxide-mediated cotyledon senescence, confirming the repressive role of NES1. Moreover, two positive regulators of leaf senescence, the ethylene signalling component EIN2 and the transcription factor ORE1/AtNAC2/ANAC092, were found to function during nitric oxide-induced senescence in cotyledons. The block of ORE1 function delayed senescence and ectopic expression induced the process, revealing the positive role of ORE1. EIN2 was required to induce ORE1. Furthermore, the genetic interaction analysis between NES1 and ORE1 showed that the ore1 loss-of-function mutants were epistatic to nes1, suggesting the dominant role of ORE1 and the antagonistic role of NES1 during nitric oxide-induced cotyledon senescence in Arabidopsis. PMID:24336389