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Sample records for energies composition isotopique

  1. Multifunctional composites for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuvo, Mohammad Arif I.; Karim, Hasanul; Rajib, Md; Delfin, Diego; Lin, Yirong

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical super-capacitors have become one of the most important topics in both academia and industry as novel energy storage devices because of their high power density, long life cycles, and high charge/discharge efficiency. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in the development of multifunctional structural energy storage devices such as structural super-capacitors for applications in aerospace, automobiles and portable electronics. These multifunctional structural super-capacitors provide lighter structures combining energy storage and load bearing functionalities. Due to their superior materials properties, carbon fiber composites have been widely used in structural applications for aerospace and automotive industries. Besides, carbon fiber has good electrical conductivity which will provide lower equivalent series resistance; therefore, it can be an excellent candidate for structural energy storage applications. Hence, this paper is focused on performing a pilot study for using nanowire/carbon fiber hybrids as building materials for structural energy storage materials; aiming at enhancing the charge/discharge rate and energy density. This hybrid material combines the high specific surface area of carbon fiber and pseudo-capacitive effect of metal oxide nanowires which were grown hydrothermally in an aligned fashion on carbon fibers. The aligned nanowire array could provide a higher specific surface area that leads to high electrode-electrolyte contact area and fast ion diffusion rates. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and XRay Diffraction (XRD) measurements were used for the initial characterization of this nanowire/carbon fiber hybrid material system. Electrochemical testing has been performed using a potentio-galvanostat. The results show that gold sputtered nanowire hybrid carbon fiber provides 65.9% better performance than bare carbon fiber cloth as super-capacitor.

  2. High-energy-density composite flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satchwell, D. L.; Towgood, D. A.

    1980-02-01

    A flywheel was designed and fabricated to demonstrate a high energy density of 80 w-h/kg in the rotor. The rotor design consists of a multiring, subcircular rim made of S-glass/epoxy composite and Kevlar/epoxy composite materials and mounted on a spoked hub made of graphite/epoxy composite materials.

  3. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 deg ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  4. Quantification of Energy Release in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2003-01-01

    Energy release rate is usually suggested as a quantifier for assessing structural damage tolerance. Computational prediction of energy release rate is based on composite mechanics with micro-stress level damage assessment, finite element structural analysis and damage progression tracking modules. This report examines several issues associated with energy release rates in composite structures as follows: Chapter I demonstrates computational simulation of an adhesively bonded composite joint and validates the computed energy release rates by comparison with acoustic emission signals in the overall sense. Chapter II investigates the effect of crack plane orientation with respect to fiber direction on the energy release rates. Chapter III quantifies the effects of contiguous constraint plies on the residual stiffness of a 90 ply subjected to transverse tensile fractures. Chapter IV compares ICAN and ICAN/JAVA solutions of composites. Chapter V examines the effects of composite structural geometry and boundary conditions on damage progression characteristics.

  5. Energy absorption of composite material and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a joint research program on helicopter crashworthiness conducted by the U.S. Army Aerostructures Directorate and NASA Langley. Through the ongoing research program an in-depth understanding has been developed on the cause/effect relationships between material and architectural variables and the energy-absorption capability of composite material and structure. Composite materials were found to be efficient energy absorbers. Graphite/epoxy subfloor structures were more efficient energy absorbers than comparable structures fabricated from Kevlar or aluminum. An accurate method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of beams was developed.

  6. Thermal energy storage composition comprising peat moss

    SciTech Connect

    Rueffel, P.G.

    1980-11-04

    Peat moss is used in a thermal energy storage composition to provide a network in which to trap an incongruently melting salt hydrate capable of storing thermal energy as latent heat of phase change. The peat moss network is effective in preventing the segregation of a dehydrated form of the salt between heating and cooling cycles. In a preferred embodiment that salt hydrate is the decahydrate of sodium sulphate. A nucleating agent such as sodium tetraborate decahydrate is included to prevent supercooling in the composition, and promote crystallization of the decahydrate of sodium sulphate.

  7. Energy curable compositions having improved cure speeds

    DOEpatents

    Halm, L.W.

    1993-05-18

    The composition and method provide improved physical properties and cure speed of polyurethane precursors, with or without free radical polymerizable monomers or oligomers present, by use of a two component catalyst system. The resin blend can be activated with a latent organometallic catalyst combined with an organic peroxide which can be a hydroperoxide or an acyl peroxide to decrease the cure time while increasing the break energy and tangent modulus of the system.

  8. Energy curable compositions having improved cure speeds

    DOEpatents

    Halm, Leo W.

    1993-01-01

    A composition and method provide improved physical properties and cure speed of polyurethane precursors, with or without free radical polymerizable monomers or oligomers present, by use of a two component catalyst system. The resin blend can be activated with a latent organometallic catalyst combined with an organic peroxide which can be a hydroperoxide or an acyl peroxide to decrease the cure time while increasing the break energy and tangent modulus of the system.

  9. Energy transport in crystalline DNA composites

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zaoli; Xu, Shen; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2014-01-15

    This work reports on the synthesis of crystalline DNA-composited films and microfibers, and details the study of thermal energy transport in them. The transient electro-thermal technique is used to characterize the thermal transport in DNA composite microfibers, and the photothermal technique is used to explore the thermal transport in the thickness direction of DNA films. Compared with microfibers, the DNA films are found to have a higher thermal transport capacity, largely due to the carefully controlled crystallization process in film synthesis. In high NaCl concentration solutions, the bond of the Na{sup +} ion and phosphate group aligns the DNA molecules with the NaCl crystal structure during crystallization. This results in significant enhancement of thermal transport in the DNA films with aligned structure.

  10. Composite Transport Coefficient for Electron Thermal Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, B.; Daughton, W.

    1996-11-01

    A series of experiments by the Alcator C-Mod machine over a range of heating conditions (ohmic to strongly r.f. heated) has led to the construction of a composite transport coefficient for the electron thermal energy. This is represented by the difference of two terms: one corresponding to an outflow of thermal energy and the other one corresponding to an inflow. There are theoretical arguments(B. Coppi and F. Pegoraro, Phys. Fluids B) 3 p. 2582 (1991) in support of a composite transport coefficient involving the elements of a transport matrix with an inflow term related for instance to the features of the current density profile relative to those of the electron temperature. In deriving the transport coefficient D_e^th that has been used to simulate the Alcator C-Mod plasmas, we have assumed that the driving factor of the underlying modes is the plasma pressure gradient. Thus D_e^th ∝ D_e^o [β_p* - C] where β_p* = (8π p* / B_p^2), p* ≡ -r(dp/dr) is evaluated at the point of maximum pressure gradient, C ≈ 3/16 is a positive numerical coefficient and D_e^o ∝ I_p/(nT)^5/6 is basically the Coppi-Mazzucato-Gruber diffusion coefficient introduced earlier to reproduce the results of experiments with ohmic heating. Supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy

  11. Galactic cosmic ray composition and energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Galactic cosmic ray nuclei represent a significant risk to long-duration spaceflight outside the magnetosphere. We review briefly existing measurements of the composition and energy spectra of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, pointing out which species and energy ranges are most critical to assessing cosmic ray risks for spaceflight. Key data sets are identified and a table of cosmic ray abundances is presented for elements from H to Ni (Z = 1 to 28). Because of the 22-year nature of the solar modulation cycle, data from the approaching 1998 solar minimum is especially important to reducing uncertainties in the cosmic ray radiation hazard. It is recommended that efforts to model this hazard take advantage of approaches that have been developed to model the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays.

  12. Solar flare particles - Energy-dependent composition and relationship to solar composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, H. J.; Price, P. B.; Cartwright, B. G.; Sullivan, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Plastic and glass track detectors on rockets and Apollo spacecraft have been used to determine the composition of particles from He to Ni at energies from 0.1 to 50 MeV per nucleon in several solar flares of widely varying intensities. At low energies the composition of solar particles is enriched in heavy elements by an amount, relative to the asymptotic high-energy composition, that increases with atomic number from Z = 2 up to at least Z = 50, that decreases with energy, and that varies from flare to flare. At high energies (usually beyond an energy of 5 to 20 MeV per nucleon) the composition becomes independent of energy and, though somewhat variable from flare to flare, approximates the composition of the solar atmosphere. A table of abundances of the even-Z elements from He to Ni (plus N) in solar particles is constructed by averaging the asymptotic high-energy abundances in several flares.

  13. Energy absorption in composite materials for crashworthy structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Crash energy-absorption processes in composite materials have been studied as part of a research program aimed at the development of energy absorbing subfloor beams for crashworthy military helicopters. Based on extensive tests on glass/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, and Kevlar/epoxy composites, it is shown that the energy-absorption characteristics and crushing modes of composite beams are similar to those exhibited by tubular specimens of similar material and architecture. The crushing mechanisms have been determined and related to the mechanical properties of the constituent materials and specimen architecture. A simple and accurate method for predicting the energy-absorption capability of composite beams has been developed.

  14. Absorption Of Crushing Energy In Square Composite Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes investigation of crash-energy-absorbing capabilities of square-cross-section tubes of two matrix/fiber composite materials. Both graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy tubes crushed in progressive and stable manner. Ratio between width of cross section and thickness of wall determined to affect energy-absorption significantly. As ratio decreases, energy-absorption capability increases non-linearly. Useful in building energy-absorbing composite structures.

  15. Scaling of energy absorbing composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen; Lavoie, J. Andre; Morton, John

    1994-01-01

    The energy absorption response and crushing characteristics of geometrically scaled graphite-Kevlar epoxy composite plates were investigated. Two different trigger mechanisms including notch, and steeple geometries were incorporated into the plate specimens to initiate crushing. Sustained crushing was achieved with a new test fixture which provided lateral support to prevent global buckling. Values of specific sustained crushing stress (SSCS) were obtained which were lower than values reported for tube specimens from previously published data. Two sizes of hybrid plates were fabricated; a baseline or model plate, and a full-scale plate with inplane dimensions scaled by a factor of two. The thickness dimension of the full-scale plates was increased using two different techniques: the ply-level method in which each ply orientation in the baseline laminate stacking sequence is doubled, and the sublaminate technique in which the baseline laminate stacking sequence is repeated as a group. Results indicated that the SSCS has a small dependence on trigger mechanism geometry. However, a reduction in the SSCS of 10-25% was observed for the full-scale plates as compared with the baseline specimens, indicating a scaling effect in the crushing response.

  16. Scaling of energy absorbing composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen; Morton, John; Traffanstedt, Catherine; Boitnott, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The energy absorption response and crushing characteristics of geometrically scaled graphite-Kevlar epoxy composite plates were investigated. Three different trigger mechanisms including chamfer, notch, and steeple geometries were incorporated into the plate specimens to initiate crushing. Sustained crushing was achieved with a simple test fixture which provided lateral support to prevent global buckling. Values of specific sustained crushing stress (SSCS) were obtained which were comparable to values reported for tube specimens from previously published data. Two sizes of hybrid plates were fabricated; a baseline or model plate, and a full-scale plate with in-plane dimensions scaled by a factor of two. The thickness dimension of the full-scale plates was increased using two different techniques; the ply-level method in which each ply orientation in the baseline laminate stacking sequence is doubled, and the sublaminate technique in which the baseline laminate stacking sequence is repeated as a group. Results indicated that the SSCS is independent of trigger mechanism geometry. However, a reduction in the SSCS of 10-25 percent was observed for the full-scale plates as compared with the baseline specimens, indicating a scaling effect in the crushing response.

  17. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

    1985-01-04

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  18. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Burrows, Richard W.; Shinton, Yvonne D.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention discloses composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These phase change materials do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions, such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  19. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, D. K.; Burrows, R. W.; Shinton, Y. D.

    1985-01-01

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations are discussed. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  20. Elemental composition and energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the major features of the elemental composition and energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays. The requirements for phenomenological models of cosmic ray composition and energy spectra are discussed, and possible improvements to an existing model are suggested.

  1. Vibration suppression of composite laminated plate with nonlinear energy sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye-Wei; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Shuai; Xu, Ke-Fan; Chen, Li-Qun

    2016-06-01

    The composite laminated plate is widely used in supersonic aircraft. So, there are many researches about the vibration suppression of composite laminated plate. In this paper, nonlinear energy sink (NES) as an effective method to suppress vibration is studied. The coupled partial differential governing equations of the composite laminated plate with the nonlinear energy sink (NES) are established by using the Hamilton principle. The fourth-order Galerkin discrete method is used to truncate the partial differential equations, which are solved by numerical integration method. Meanwhile study about the precise effectiveness of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) by discussing the different installation location of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) at the same speed. The results indicate that the nonlinear energy sink (NES) can significantly suppress the severe vibration of the composite laminated plate with speed wind loadings in to protect the composite laminated plate from excessive vibration.

  2. Place du repérage isotopique peropératoire dans la prise en charge de l'ostéome ostéoïde

    PubMed Central

    Boufettal, Monsef; Haddam, Amina; Lalya, Issam; El Zanati, Rachid; Mahfoud, Mustapha; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; Benraïs, Nouzha; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    L'ostéome ostéoïde est une tumeur osseuse bénigne. Le diagnostic est clinique et radiologique, et le traitement consiste en l'exérèse chirurgicale totale avec des marges saines. Nous rapportons 05 cas d'ostéome ostéoïde opérés avec succès à l'aide d'un repérage isotopique peropératoire. Nous précisons les avantages de cette technique dans l'orientation de l'exérèse chirurgicale ainsi que la confirmation de son caractère radical. PMID:25767676

  3. Energetic composites and method of providing chemical energy

    DOEpatents

    Danen, Wayne C.; Martin, Joe A.

    1997-01-01

    A method for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application.

  4. Energetic composites and method of providing chemical energy

    DOEpatents

    Danen, W.C.; Martin, J.A.

    1997-02-25

    A method is described for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application. 3 figs.

  5. Failure mechanisms in energy-absorbing composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alastair F.; David, Matthew

    2010-11-01

    Quasi-static tests are described for determination of the energy-absorption properties of composite crash energy-absorbing segment elements under axial loads. Detailed computer tomography scans of failed specimens were used to identify local compression crush failure mechanisms at the crush front. These mechanisms are important for selecting composite materials for energy-absorbing structures, such as helicopter and aircraft sub-floors. Finite element models of the failure processes are described that could be the basis for materials selection and future design procedures for crashworthy structures.

  6. ENERGY SPECTRUM AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ULTRAHIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS FROM SEMI-RELATIVISTIC HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu

    2012-02-10

    It has been suggested that hypernova remnants, with a substantial amount of energy in semi-relativistic ejecta, can accelerate intermediate mass or heavy nuclei to ultrahigh energies and provide a sufficient amount of energy in cosmic rays to account for the observed flux. We here calculate the expected energy spectrum and chemical composition of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from such semi-relativistic hypernovae. With a chemical composition equal to that of the hypernova ejecta and a flat or hard spectrum for cosmic rays at the sources, the spectrum and composition of the propagated cosmic rays observed at the Earth can be compatible with the measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  7. Composite materials for thermal energy storage: enhancing performance through microstructures.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhiwei; Ye, Feng; Ding, Yulong

    2014-05-01

    Chemical incompatibility and low thermal conductivity issues of molten-salt-based thermal energy storage materials can be addressed by using microstructured composites. Using a eutectic mixture of lithium and sodium carbonates as molten salt, magnesium oxide as supporting material, and graphite as thermal conductivity enhancer, the microstructural development, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of composite materials are investigated. The ceramic supporting material is essential for preventing salt leakage and hence provides a solution to the chemical incompatibility issue. The use of graphite gives a significant enhancement on the thermal conductivity of the composite. Analyses suggest that the experimentally observed microstructural development of the composite is associated with the wettability of the salt on the ceramic substrate and that on the thermal conduction enhancer. PMID:24591286

  8. Three-dimensional graphene-based composites for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua; Chen, Junhong

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based composites have drawn increasing attention for energy applications due to their unique structures and properties. By combining the merits of 3D graphene (3DG), e.g., a porous and interconnected network, a high electrical conductivity, a large accessible surface area, and excellent mechanical strength and thermal stability, with the high chemical/electrochemical activities of active materials, 3DG-based composites show great promise as high-performance electrode materials in various energy devices. This article reviews recent progress in 3DG-based composites and their applications in energy storage/conversion devices, i.e., supercapacitors, lithium-ion batteries, dye-sensitized solar cells, and fuel cells.

  9. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Starbuck, J.M.

    2001-07-20

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified.

  10. Low energy particle composition. [cosmic rays produced in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of current knowledge of low-energy cosmic ray particles produced in the solar system. It is argued that the notion that the sun alone can accelerate particles in the solar system must be abandoned in light of evidence that Jupiter and earth may be sources of observed low-energy particles. Measurements of the composition and energy spectra of low-energy particles during quiet times are examined, emphasizing the abundance of protons and helium and of anomalous N, O, and Ne. The abundance of heavy particles (B, C, N, O, Ne, Ca and Fe) of unknown origin in the earth magnetosphere is examined. Reported observations of Jovian electrons are discussed and solar particle events with anomalous compositions (He-3 rich events and Fe rich events) are treated in detail. Nuclear abundances of solar particles, emphasizing their temporal and spatial variations are considered together with the nature of nuclear reaction products in solar flares.

  11. Energy absorption characteristics of nano-composite conical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, F.; Sachse, S.; Njuguna, J.

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the filler material on the energy absorption capabilities of polyamide 6 composite structures is studied in details in the present paper. The axial dynamic and quasi-static collapse of conical structures was conducted using a high energy drop tower, as well as Instron 5500R electro-mechanical testing machine. The impact event was recorded using a high-speed camera and the fracture surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The obtained results indicate an important influence of filler material on the energy absorption capabilities of the polymer composites. A significant increase in specific energy absorption (SEA) is observed in polyamide 6 (PA6) reinforced with nano-silica particles (SiO2) and glass-spheres (GS), whereas addition of montmorillonite (MMT) did not change the SEA parameter.

  12. Innovative energy absorbing devices based on composite tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Chandrashekhar

    Analytical and experimental study of innovative load limiting and energy absorbing devices are presented here. The devices are based on composite tubes and can be categorized in to two groups based upon the energy absorbing mechanisms exhibited by them, namely: foam crushing and foam fracturing. The device based on foam crushing as the energy absorbing mechanism is composed of light weight elastic-plastic foam filling inside an angle ply composite tube. The tube is tailored to have a high Poisson’s ratio (>20). Upon being loaded the device experiences large transverse contraction resulting in rapid decrease in diameter. At a certain axial load the foam core begins to crush and energy is dissipated. This device is termed as crush tube device. The device based upon foam shear fracture as the energy absorbing mechanism involves an elastic-plastic core foam in annulus of two concentric extension-twist coupled composite tubes with opposite angles of fibers. The core foam is bonded to the inner and outer tube walls. Upon being loaded axially, the tubes twist in opposite directions and fracture the core foam in out of plane shear and thus dissipate the energy stored. The device is termed as sandwich core device (SCD). The devices exhibit variations in force-displacement characteristics with changes in design and material parameters, resulting in wide range of energy absorption capabilities. A flexible matrix composite system was selected, which was composed of high stiffness carbon fibers as reinforcements in relatively low stiffness polyurethane matrix, based upon large strain to failure capabilities and large beneficial elastic couplings. Linear and non-linear analytical models were developed encapsulating large deformation theory of the laminated composite shells (using non-linear strain energy formulation) to the fracture mechanics of core foam and elastic-plastic deformation theory of the foam filling. The non-linear model is capable of including material and

  13. Laminate composites with enhanced pyroelectric effects for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. H. S.; Huang, Z.

    2010-06-01

    A pyroelectric coefficient enhanced 2-2 connectivity laminate composites' energy harvesting credentials have been assessed. The use of the electrothermal coupling factor for laminate composites (kLam2) for such an assessment has been appraised while the experimental samples are evaluated to show a significant improvement in their performance via pyroelectric coefficient enhancement, demonstrative of their great potential in energy harvesting applications. A lead zirconate titanate and stainless steel laminate composite with an 88% pyroelectric coefficient enhancement is shown to increase its maximum power density, efficiency, and electrothermal coupling factor by 254%, while other material pairings have also been evaluated to exhibit great promise in this application owing to a large pyroelectric coefficient enhancement accompanied by a reduction in total thermal mass.

  14. Energy loss partitioning during ballistic impact of polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph H.; Hsieh, Chung Y.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the energy dissipation processes in polymer-matrix composites during impact of ballistic projectiles. These processes include heat, fiber deformation and breakage, matrix deformation and fracture, and interfacial delamination. In this study, experimental measurements were made, using specialized specimen designs and test methods, to isolate the energy consumed by each of these processes during impact in the ballistic range. Using these experiments, relationships between material parameters and energy dissipation were examined. Composites with the same matrix but reinforced with Kevlar, PE, and graphite fabric were included in this study. These fibers were selected based on the differences in their intrinsic properties. Matrix cracking was found to be one of the most important energy absorption mechanisms during impact, especially in ductile samples such as Spectra-900 PE and Kevlar-49 reinforced polymer. On the contrary, delamination dominated the energy dissipation in brittle composites such as graphite reinforced materials. The contribution from frictional forces was also investigated and the energy partitioning among the different processes evaluated.

  15. Composite rotor blades for large wind energy installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussmann, A.; Molly, J.; Muser, D.

    1980-04-01

    The design of large wind power systems in Germany is reviewed with attention given to elaboration of the total wind energy system, aerodynamic design of the rotor blade, and wind loading effects. Particular consideration is given to the development of composite glass fiber/plastic or carbon fiber/plastic rotor blades for such installations.

  16. Composite rotor blades for large wind energy installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussmann, A.; Molly, J.; Muser, D.

    1980-01-01

    The design of large wind power systems in Germany is reviewed with attention given to elaboration of the total wind energy system, aerodynamic design of the rotor blade, and wind loading effects. Particular consideration is given to the development of composite glass fiber/plastic or carbon fiber/plastic rotor blades for such installations.

  17. Advanced Nano-Composites for Increased Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to increase energy efficiency and operating lifetime of wear-intensive industrial components and systems by developing and commercializing a family of ceramic-based monolithic composites that have shown remarkable resistance to wear in laboratory tests.

  18. A vibration energy harvester using magnet/piezoelectric composite transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jing; Chen, Hengjia; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Yang, Jin; Li, Wenli

    2014-05-01

    In this research, a vibration energy harvester employing the magnet/piezoelectric composite transducer to convert mechanical vibration energy into electrical energy is presented. The electric output performance of a vibration energy harvester has been investigated. Compared to traditional magnetoelectric transducer, the proposed vibration energy harvester has some remarkable characteristic which do not need binder. The experimental results show that the presented vibration energy harvester can obtain an average power of 0.39 mW for an acceleration of 0.6g at frequency of 38 Hz. Remarkably, this power is a very encouraging power figure that gives the prospect of being able to power a widely range of wireless sensors in wireless sensor network.

  19. The composition of cosmic rays at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Dietrich

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the composition of the cosmic rays at high energies, and of the energy spectra of the individual components provide the basis for the understanding of the sources, of the acceleration mechanism, and of the galactic containment of these particles. A brief review of the presently available information and a recent measurement performed on the Space Shuttle to substantially extend the range of energies in which the elemental composition is known are described. Results, and recent data on the electron component of cosmic rays are discussed and summarized. The body of data now available contains several features that are difficult to explain within current models of galactic shock acceleration and 'leakly box' containment. The need for further measurements is emphasized and possible opportunities for future work are briefly discussed.

  20. Energy absorption capabilities of composite sandwich panels under blast loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Ray, Tirtha

    As blast threats on military and civilian structures continue to be a significant concern, there remains a need for improved design strategies to increase blast resistance capabilities. The approach to blast resistance proposed here is focused on dissipating the high levels of pressure induced during a blast through maximizing the potential for energy absorption of composite sandwich panels, which are a competitive structural member type due to the inherent energy absorption capabilities of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Furthermore, the middle core in the sandwich panels can be designed as a sacrificial layer allowing for a significant amount of deformation or progressive failure to maximize the potential for energy absorption. The research here is aimed at the optimization of composite sandwich panels for blast mitigation via energy absorption mechanisms. The energy absorption mechanisms considered include absorbed strain energy due to inelastic deformation as well as energy dissipation through progressive failure of the core of the sandwich panels. The methods employed in the research consist of a combination of experimentally-validated finite element analysis (FEA) and the derivation and use of a simplified analytical model. The key components of the scope of work then includes: establishment of quantified energy absorption criteria, validation of the selected FE modeling techniques, development of the simplified analytical model, investigation of influential core architectures and geometric parameters, and investigation of influential material properties. For the parameters that are identified as being most-influential, recommended values for these parameters are suggested in conceptual terms that are conducive to designing composite sandwich panels for various blast threats. Based on reviewing the energy response characteristic of the panel under blast loading, a non-dimensional parameter AET/ ET (absorbed energy, AET, normalized by total energy

  1. Compositional breast imaging using a dual-energy mammography protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Laidevant, Aurelie D.; Malkov, Serghei; Flowers, Chris I.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Mammography has a low sensitivity in dense breasts due to low contrast between malignant and normal tissue confounded by the predominant water density of the breast. Water is found in both adipose and fibroglandular tissue and constitutes most of the mass of a breast. However, significant protein mass is mainly found in the fibroglandular tissue where most cancers originate. If the protein compartment in a mammogram could be imaged without the influence of water, the sensitivity and specificity of the mammogram may be improved. This article describes a novel approach to dual-energy mammography, full-field digital compositional mammography (FFDCM), which can independently image the three compositional components of breast tissue: water, lipid, and protein. Methods: Dual-energy attenuation and breast shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional thicknesses. Dual-energy measurements were performed on breast-mimicking phantoms using a full-field digital mammography unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the compositional compartments. They were made of two main stacks of thicknesses around 2 and 4 cm. Twenty-six thickness and composition combinations were used to derive the compositional calibration using a least-squares fitting approach. Results: Very high accuracy was achieved with a simple cubic fitting function with root mean square errors of 0.023, 0.011, and 0.012 cm for the water, lipid, and protein thicknesses, respectively. The repeatability (percent coefficient of variation) of these measures was tested using sequential images and was found to be 0.5%, 0.5%, and 3.3% for water, lipid, and protein, respectively. However, swapping the location of the two stacks of the phantom on the imaging plate introduced further errors showing the need for more complete system uniformity corrections. Finally, a preliminary breast image is presented of each of the compositional

  2. Efficiency of energy utilization: effects of diet composition on body composition and mammary neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Boissonneault, G.A.; Elson, C.E.; Pariza, M.W.

    1986-03-05

    Multiple interactions between the efficiency of utilization of dietary fat and carbohydrate energy, energy intake changes in body composition and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis were examined using female F-344 rats. The rats were fed ad libitum a semipurified diet containing 5% corn oil (LF) from weaning to 50 d of age at which each was given, by gavage, 65 mg DMBA/kg body weight. The rats were randomly assigned to diets containing 5% 17.5% (MF) and 30% (HF) corn oil. All diets were balanced with respect per unit of energy in terms of protein, vitamins, minerals and fiber. For 28 d post-DMBA, the rats were fed 40 or 42 kcal daily and thereafter, diet was provided ad libitium. Daily energy intakes were recorded throughout the study. The mean energy intakes during the first 35 wk were: LF, 240 +/- 12.3 kcal/wk; MF, 237 +/- 11.7 kcal/wk; and HF, 237 +/- 11.1 kcal/wk. Body weight at 35 wk were: LF, 196 +/- 9.5 g; MF, 206 +/- 13.9 g; and HF, 210 +/- 20.6 g. No differences in tumor incidence (LF, 55%; MF, 46%; HF, 51%), tumors/group (LF, 24; MF, 28; HF, 25) and tumors/tumor-bearing rat (LF, 1.3 +/- 0.7; MF 1.6 +/- 1.0;p HF, 1.2 +/- 0.4) were noted. Within dietary groups tumor incidence was positively correlated with energy intake. However, there were no differences among the various parameters between dietary groups at any energy intake level. Body compositions were monitored during this study. The body fat mass and % carcass weight increased in parallel with the % dietary fat. Concomitantly, % lean body and, to a lesser extent lean body mass decreased. Both body size and body composition, influenced by energy intake and retention, affected the response to DMBA.

  3. Energy trapping and shock disintegration in a composite granular medium.

    PubMed

    Daraio, C; Nesterenko, V F; Herbold, E B; Jin, S

    2006-02-10

    We report the first experimental observation of impulse confinement and the disintegration of shock and solitary waves in one-dimensional strongly nonlinear composite granular materials. The chains consist of alternating ensembles of beads with high and low elastic moduli (more than 2 orders of magnitude difference) of different masses. The trapped energy is contained within the "softer" sections of the composite chain and is slowly released in the form of weak, separated pulses over an extended period of time. This effect is enhanced by using a specific group assembly and precompression. PMID:16486993

  4. Microencapsulated Phase Change Composite Materials for Energy Efficient Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Alexander

    This study aims to elucidate how phase change material (PCM)-composite materials can be leveraged to reduce the energy consumption of buildings and to provide cost savings to ratepayers. Phase change materials (PCMs) can store thermal energy in the form of latent heat when subjected to temperatures exceeding their melting point by undergoing a phase transition from solid to liquid state. Reversibly, PCMs can release this thermal energy when the system temperature falls below their solidification point. The goal in implementing composite PCM walls is to significantly reduce and time-shift the maximum thermal load on the building in order to reduce and smooth out the electricity demand for heating and cooling. This Ph.D. thesis aims to develop a set of thermal design methods and tools for exploring the use of PCM-composite building envelopes and for providing design rules for their practical implementation. First, detailed numerical simulations were used to show that the effective thermal conductivity of core-shell-matrix composites depended only on the volume fraction and thermal conductivity of the constituent materials. The effective medium approximation reported by Felske (2004) was in very good agreement with numerical predictions of the effective thermal conductivity. Second, a carefully validated transient thermal model was used to simulate microencapsulated PCM-composite walls subjected to diurnal or annual outdoor temperature and solar radiation flux. It was established that adding microencapsulated PCM to concrete walls both substantially reduced and delayed the thermal load on the building. Several design rules were established, most notably, (i) increasing the volume fraction of microencapsulated PCM within the wall increases the energy savings but at the potential expense of mechanical properties [1], (ii) the phase change temperature leading to the maximum energy and cost savings should equal the desired indoor temperature regardless of the climate

  5. Low cost composite materials for wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Weingart, O.

    1980-01-01

    Structural Composites Industries, Inc. (SCI) is developing new composite filament winding technology for low cost production of wind turbine generators (WTG). During 1977 the SCI TFT process was used to fabricate a 9072 kg (20,000 lb) filament-wound D-spar for a NASA/DOE 46 m (150 ft) composite wind turbine blade. In 1978 SCI designed a composite blade for the 91 m (300 ft) dia. NASA/DOE MOD-2 WTG. For the past year SCI has been under contract to NASA-Lewis Research Center to design and build two low cost 18 m (60 ft) blades for the 38 m (125 ft) dia. MOD-OA and to assess the applicability of the techniques developed for larger and smaller blades. SCI is also developing and constructing a 4-kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) for Rockwell International using low cost composites for the 9 m (31 ft) dia. rotor blades, 15 m (50 ft) tower and nacelle.

  6. Homogenization and improvement in energy dissipation of nonlinear composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Luv; Sivakumar, Srinivasan M.; Vedantam, S.

    2016-04-01

    Due to their high strength to weight and stiffness to weight ratio, there is a huge shift towards the composite materials from the conventional metals, but composites have poor damage resistance in the transverse direction. Undergoing impact loads, they can fail in wide variety of modes which severely reduces the structural integrity of the component. This paper deals with the homogenization of glass-fibers and epoxy composite with a material introduced as an inelastic inclusion. This nonlinearity is being modelled by kinematic hardening procedure and homogenization is done by one of the mean field homogenization technique known as Mori-Tanaka method. The homogenization process consider two phases, one is the matrix and another is the inelastic inclusion, thus glass-fibers and epoxy are two phases which can be considered as one phase and act as a matrix while homogenizing non-linear composite. Homogenization results have been compared to the matrix at volume fraction zero of the inelastic inclusions and to the inelastic material at volume fraction one. After homogenization, increase of the energy dissipation into the composite due to addition of inelastic material and effects onto the same by changing the properties of the matrix material have been discussed.

  7. Joining of silicon carbide composites for fusion energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewinsohn, C. A.; Singh, M.; Shibayama, T.; Hinoki, T.; Ando, M.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.

    2000-12-01

    Joining of silicon carbide based materials has been recognized as one of the enabling technologies for the successful utilization of ceramic components in fusion energy systems. Sintered silicon carbide (Hexoloy SA) and silicon carbide (Hi-Nicalon™) fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites have been joined using reaction forming/bonding based joining technologies. The room- and high-temperature mechanical properties and fractography of ceramic joints have been reported.

  8. Prediction of the energy-absorption capability of composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    A method of predicting the crack-related energy-absorption capability of composite tubes is presented. The method is based upon a phenomenological model of the crushing process exhibited by continuous-fiber-reinforced tubes. A finite element method is used to model the crushing process. The analysis is compared with experiments on Kevlar-epoxy and graphite-epoxy tubes. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the analysis and experiment.

  9. Composites in energy generation and storage systems - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulmer, R. W.

    Applications of glass-fiber reinforced composites (GER) in renewable and high-efficiency energy systems which are being developed to replace interim, long-term unacceptable energy sources such as foreign oil are reviewed. GFR are noted to have design flexibility, high strength, and low cost, as well as featuring a choice of fiber orientation and type of reinforcement. Blades, hub covers, nacelles, and towers for large and small WECS are being fabricated and tested and are displaying satisfactory strength, resistance to corrosion and catastrophic failure, impact tolerance, and light weight. Promising results have also been shown in the use of GFR as flywheel material for kinetic energy storage in conjunction with solar and wind electric systems, in electric cars, and as load levellers. Other applications are for heliostats, geothermal power plant pipes, dam-atoll tidal wave energy systems, and intake pipes for OTECs.

  10. Energy composition of diet affects muscle fiber recruitment, body composition, and growth trajectory in rainbow trout (Oncorhnychus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy composition of diet affects muscle fiber recruitment, body composition, and growth trajectory in rainbow trout (Oncorhnychus mykiss) The cost and scarcity of key ingredients for aquaculture feed formulation call for a wise use of resources, especially dietary proteins and energy. For years t...

  11. Gender Differences in Insulin Resistance, Body Composition, and Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    Geer, Eliza B.; Shen, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Background Men and women differ substantially in regard to degrees of insulin resistance, body composition, and energy balance. Adipose tissue distribution, in particular the presence of elevated visceral and hepatic adiposity, plays a central role in the development of insulin resistance and obesity-related complications. Objective This review summarizes published data on gender differences in insulin resistance, body composition, and energy balance, to provide insight into novel gender-specific avenues of research as well as gender-tailored treatments of insulin resistance, visceral adiposity, and obesity. Methods English-language articles were identified from searches of the PubMed database through November 2008, and by reviewing the references cited in these reports. Searches included combinations of the following terms: gender, sex, insulin resistance, body composition, energy balance, and hepatic adipose tissue. Results For a given body mass index, men were reported to have more lean mass, women to have higher adiposity. Men were also found to have more visceral and hepatic adipose tissue, whereas women had more peripheral or subcutaneous adipose tissue. These differences, as well as differences in sex hormones and adipokines, may contribute to a more insulin-sensitive environment in women than in men. When normalized to kilograms of lean body mass, men and women had similar resting energy expenditure, but physical energy expenditure was more closely related to percent body fat in men than in women. Conclusion Greater amounts of visceral and hepatic adipose tissue, in conjunction with the lack of a possible protective effect of estrogen, may be related to higher insulin resistance in men compared with women. PMID:19318219

  12. Intake of energy and nutrients; harmonization of Food Composition Databases.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Victoria, Emilio; Martinez de Victoria, Ignacio; Martinez-Burgos, M Alba

    2015-01-01

    Food composition databases (FCDBs) provide detailed information about the nutritional composition of foods. The conversion of food consumption into nutrient intake need a Food composition database (FCDB) which lists the mean nutritional values for a given food portion. The limitations of FCDBs are sometimes little known by the users. Multicentre studies have raised several methodology challenges which allow to standardize nutritional assessments in different populations and geographical areas for food composition and nutrient intake. Differences between FCDBs include those attributed to technical matters, such as description of foods, calculation of energy and definition of nutrients, analytical methods, and principles for recipe calculation. Such differences need to be identified and eliminated before comparing data from different studies, especially when dietary data is related to a health outcome. There are ongoing efforts since 1984 to standardize FCDBs over the world (INFOODS, EPIC, EuroFIR, etc.). Food composition data can be gathered from different sources like private company analysis, universities, government laboratories and food industry. They can also be borrowed from scientific literature or even from the food labelling. There are different proposals to evaluate the quality of food composition data. For the development of a FCDB it is fundamental document in the most detailed way, each of the data values of the different components and nutrients of a food. The objective of AECOSAN (Agencia Española de Consumo Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutrición) and BEDCA (Base de Datos Española de Composición de Alimentos) association was the development and support of a reference FCDB in Spain according to the standards to be defined in Europe. BEDCA is currently the only FCDB developed in Spain with compiled and documented data following EuroFIR standards. PMID:25719784

  13. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and body composition.

    PubMed

    Laskey, M A

    1996-01-01

    This review describes the advantages and limitations of dual-energy absorptiometry (DXA), a technique that is widely used clinically to assess a patient's risk of osteoporosis and to monitor the effects of therapy. DXA is also increasingly used to measure body composition in terms of fat and fat-free mass. There are three commercial manufacturers of DXA instruments: Lunar, Hologic, and Norland. All systems generate X-rays at two different energies and make use of the differential attenuation of the X-ray beam at these two energies to calculate the bone mineral content and soft tissue composition in the scanned region. Most DXA instruments measure bone mineral in the clinically important sites of the spine, hip, and forearm. More specialized systems also perform whole-body scans and can be used to determine the bone and soft tissue composition of the whole body and subregions such as arms, legs, and trunk. The effective dose incurred during DXA scanning is very small, and, consequently, DXA is a simple and safe technique that can be used for children and the old and frail. Precision of all DXA measurements is excellent but varies with the region under investigation. Precision is best for young healthy subjects (coefficient of variation is about 1% for the spine and whole body bone measurements) but is less good for osteoporotic and obese subjects. The accuracy of DXA measurements, however, can be problematic. Marked systematic differences in bone and soft tissue values are found between the three commercial systems due to differences in calibration, bone edge detection, and other factors. In addition, differences in reference data provided by each manufacturer can lead to an individual appearing normal on one machine but at risk of osteoporosis on another. At present, DXA cannot be regarded as a "gold standard" for body composition. However, the continuing development of DXA and the introduction of new software is greatly improving the performance of this

  14. Energy-absorbing-beam design for composite aircraft subfloors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Kellas, Sotiris

    1993-01-01

    Data have been presented from the design support testing of composite energy absorbing (EA) aircraft subfloor structures. The focus of the current study is the design and testing of subfloor structural concepts that would limit the loads transmitted to occupants to less than 20 g at crush speeds of approximately 30 fps. The EA composite subfloor is being designed to replace an existing noncrashworthy metallic subfloor in a composite aircraft prior to a full-scale crash test. A sandwich spar construction of a sine wave beam was chosen for evaluation and was found to have excellent energy absorbing characteristics. The design objective of obtaining sustained crushing loads of the spar between 200-300 lbf/inch were achieved for potentially limiting occupants loads to around 20 g's. Stroke efficiency of up to 79 percent of the initial spar height under desired sustained crushing loads was obtained which is far greater than the level provided by metal structure. Additionally, a substantial residual spar stiffness was retained after impact, and the flange integrity, which is critical for seat retention, was maintained after crushing of the spars.

  15. Continuous fiber ceramic composites for energy related applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-07

    The US Department of Energy has established the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program to develop technology for the manufacture of CFCC`s for use in industrial applications where a reduction in energy usage or emissions could be realized. As part of this program, the Dow Chemical Company explored the manufacture of a fiber reinforced/self reinforced silicon nitride for use in industrial chemical processing. In Dow`s program, CFCC manufacturing technology was developed around traditional, cost effective, tape casting routes. Formulations were developed and coupled with unique processing procedures which enabled the manufacture of tubular green laminates of the dimension needed for the application. An evaluation of the effect of various fibers and fiber coatings on the properties of a fiber reinforced composites was also conducted. Results indicated that fiber coatings could provide composites exhibiting non-catastrophic failure and substantially improved toughness. However, an evaluation of these materials in industrial process environments showed that the material system chosen by Dow did not provide the required performance improvements to make replacement of current metallic components with CFCC components economically viable.

  16. Novel composite piezoelectric material for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janusas, Giedrius; Guobiene, Asta; Palevicius, Arvydas; Prosycevas, Igoris; Ponelyte, Sigita; Baltrusaitis, Valentinas; Sakalys, Rokas

    2015-04-01

    Past few decades were concentrated on researches related to effective energy harvesting applied in modern technologies, MEMS or MOEMS systems. There are many methods for harvesting energy as, for example, usage of electromagnetic devices, but most dramatic changes were noticed in the usage of piezoelectric materials in small scale devices. Major limitation faced was too small generated power by piezoelectric materials or high resonant frequencies of such smallscale harvesters. In this research, novel composite piezoelectric material was created by mixing PZT powder with 20% solution of polyvinyl butyral in benzyl alcohol. Obtained paste was screen printed on copper foil using 325 mesh stainless steel screen and dried for 30 min at 100 °C. Polyvinyl butyral ensures good adhesion and flexibility of a new material at the conditions that requires strong binding. Five types of a composite piezoelectric material with different concentrations of PZT (40%, 50%, 60%, 70% and 80 %) were produced. As the results showed, these harvesters were able to transform mechanical strain energy into electric potential and, v.v. In experimental setup, electromagnetic shaker was used to excite energy harvester that is fixed in the custom-built clamp, while generated electric potential were registered with USB oscilloscope PICO 3424. The designed devices generate up to 80 μV at 50 Hz excitation. This property can be applied to power microsystem devices or to use them in portable electronics and wireless sensors. However, the main advantage of the created composite piezoelectric material is possibility to apply it on any uniform or nonuniform vibrating surface and to transform low frequency vibrations into electricity.

  17. On the strain energy of laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atilgan, Ali R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1991-01-01

    The present effort to obtain the asymptotically correct form of the strain energy in inhomogeneous laminated composite plates proceeds from the geometrically nonlinear elastic theory-based three-dimensional strain energy by decomposing the nonlinear three-dimensional problem into a linear, through-the-thickness analysis and a nonlinear, two-dimensional analysis analyzing plate formation. Attention is given to the case in which each lamina exhibits material symmetry about its middle surface, deriving closed-form analytical expressions for the plate elastic constants and the displacement and strain distributions through the plate's thickness. Despite the simplicity of the plate strain energy's form, there are no restrictions on the magnitudes of displacement and rotation measures.

  18. Composite electron propagator methods for calculating ionization energies.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Tinoco, Manuel; Dolgounitcheva, O; Zakrzewski, V G; Ortiz, J V

    2016-06-14

    Accurate ionization energies of molecules may be determined efficiently with composite electron-propagator (CEP) techniques. These methods estimate the results of a calculation with an advanced correlation method and a large basis set by performing a series of more tractable calculations in which large basis sets are used with simpler approximations and small basis sets are paired with more demanding correlation techniques. The performance of several CEP methods, in which diagonal, second-order electron propagator results with large basis sets are combined with higher-order results obtained with smaller basis sets, has been tested for the ionization energies of closed-shell molecules from the G2 set. Useful compromises of accuracy and computational efficiency employ complete-basis-set extrapolation for second-order results and small basis sets in third-order, partial third-order, renormalized partial-third order, or outer valence Green's function calculations. Analysis of results for vertical as well as adiabatic ionization energies leads to specific recommendations on the best use of regular and composite methods. Results for 22 organic molecules of interest in the design of photovoltaic devices, benzo[a]pyrene, Mg-octaethylporphyrin, and C60 illustrate the capabilities of CEP methods for calculations on large molecules. PMID:27305999

  19. Composite electron propagator methods for calculating ionization energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Tinoco, Manuel; Dolgounitcheva, O.; Zakrzewski, V. G.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ionization energies of molecules may be determined efficiently with composite electron-propagator (CEP) techniques. These methods estimate the results of a calculation with an advanced correlation method and a large basis set by performing a series of more tractable calculations in which large basis sets are used with simpler approximations and small basis sets are paired with more demanding correlation techniques. The performance of several CEP methods, in which diagonal, second-order electron propagator results with large basis sets are combined with higher-order results obtained with smaller basis sets, has been tested for the ionization energies of closed-shell molecules from the G2 set. Useful compromises of accuracy and computational efficiency employ complete-basis-set extrapolation for second-order results and small basis sets in third-order, partial third-order, renormalized partial-third order, or outer valence Green's function calculations. Analysis of results for vertical as well as adiabatic ionization energies leads to specific recommendations on the best use of regular and composite methods. Results for 22 organic molecules of interest in the design of photovoltaic devices, benzo[a]pyrene, Mg-octaethylporphyrin, and C60 illustrate the capabilities of CEP methods for calculations on large molecules.

  20. Relation of ultrasonic energy loss factors and constituent properties in unidirectional composites. [graphite-epxoy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Nayebhashemi, H.

    1979-01-01

    A model is developed relating composite constituents properties with ultrasonic energy loss factors for longitudinal waves propagating in the principal directions of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy fiber composite. All the constituents are assumed to behave as linear viscoelastic materials with energy dissipation properties defined by loss factors. It is found that by introducing a new constituent called the interface material, the composite and constituent properties can be brought into consistency with simple series and parallel models. An expression relating the composite loss factors to the loss factors of the constituents is derived and its coefficients are evaluated.

  1. Mineral Composition and Nutritive Value of Isotonic and Energy Drinks.

    PubMed

    Leśniewicz, Anna; Grzesiak, Magdalena; Żyrnicki, Wiesław; Borkowska-Burnecka, Jolanta

    2016-04-01

    Several very popular brands of isotonic and energy drinks consumed for fluid and electrolyte supplementation and stimulation of mental or physical alertness were chosen for investigation. Liquid beverages available in polyethylene bottles and aluminum cans as well as products in the form of tablets and powder in sachets were studied. The total concentrations of 21 elements (Ag, Al, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn), both essential and toxic, were simultaneously determined in preconcentrated drink samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) equipped with pneumatic and ultrasonic nebulizers. Differences between the mineral compositions of isotonic and energy drinks were evaluated and discussed. The highest content of Na was found in both isotonic and energy drinks, whereas quite high concentrations of Mg were found in isotonic drinks, and the highest amount of calcium was quantified in energy drinks. The concentrations of B, Co, Cu, Ni, and P were higher in isotonic drinks, but energy drinks contained greater quantities of Ag, Cr, Zn, Mn, and Mo and toxic elements, as Cd and Pb. A comparison of element contents with micronutrient intake and tolerable levels was performed to evaluate contribution of the investigated beverages to the daily diet. The consumption of 250 cm(3) of an isotonic drink provides from 0.32 % (for Mn) up to 14.8 % (for Na) of the recommended daily intake. For the energy drinks, the maximum recommended daily intake fulfillment ranged from 0.02 % (for V) to 19.4 or 19.8 % (for Mg and Na). PMID:26286964

  2. Curing Composite Materials Using Lower-Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Catherine A.; Bykanov, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In an improved method of fabricating composite-material structures by laying up prepreg tapes (tapes of fiber reinforcement impregnated by uncured matrix materials) and then curing them, one cures the layups by use of beams of electrons having kinetic energies in the range of 200 to 300 keV. In contrast, in a prior method, one used electron beams characterized by kinetic energies up to 20 MeV. The improved method was first suggested by an Italian group in 1993, but had not been demonstrated until recently. With respect to both the prior method and the present improved method, the impetus for the use of electron- beam curing is a desire to avoid the high costs of autoclaves large enough to effect thermal curing of large composite-material structures. Unfortunately, in the prior method, the advantages of electron-beam curing are offset by the need for special walls and ceilings on curing chambers to shield personnel from x rays generated by impacts of energetic electrons. These shields must be thick [typically 2 to 3 ft (about 0.6 to 0.9 m) if made of concrete] and are therefore expensive. They also make it difficult to bring large structures into and out of the curing chambers. Currently, all major companies that fabricate composite-material spacecraft and aircraft structures form their layups by use of automated tape placement (ATP) machines. In the present improved method, an electron-beam gun is attached to an ATP head and used to irradiate the tape as it is pressed onto the workpiece. The electron kinetic energy between 200 and 300 keV is sufficient for penetration of the ply being laid plus one or two of the plies underneath it. Provided that the electron-beam gun is properly positioned, it is possible to administer the required electron dose and, at the same time, to protect personnel with less shielding than is needed in the prior method. Adequate shielding can be provided by concrete walls 6 ft (approximately equal to 1.8 m) high and 16 in. (approximately

  3. Anisotropy vs chemical composition at ultra-high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, Martin; Waxman, Eli E-mail: eli.waxman@weizmann.ac.il

    2009-11-01

    This paper proposes and discusses a test of the chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays that relies on the anisotropy patterns measured as a function of energy. In particular, we show that if one records an anisotropy signal produced by heavy nuclei of charge Z above an energy E{sub thr}, one should record an even stronger (possibly much stronger) anisotropy at energies >E{sub thr}/Z due to the proton component that is expected to be associated with the sources of the heavy nuclei. This conclusion remains robust with respect to the parameters characterizing the sources and it does not depend at all on the modelling of astrophysical magnetic fields. As a concrete example, we apply this test to the most recent data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. Assuming that the anisotropy reported above 55 EeV is not a statistical accident, and that no significant anisotropy has been observed at energies ∼<10 EeV, we show that the apparent clustering toward Cen A cannot be attributed to heavy nuclei. Similar conclusions are drawn regarding the apparent excess correlation with nearby active galactic nuclei. We then discuss a robust lower bound to the magnetic luminosity that a source must possess in order to be able to accelerate particles of charge Z up to 100 EeV, L{sub B} ∼> 10{sup 45} Z{sup −2} erg/s. Using this bound in conjunction with the above conclusions, we argue that the current PAO data does not support the model of cosmic ray origin in active radio-quiet or even radio-loud galaxies. Finally, we demonstrate that the apparent clustering in the direction of Cen A can be explained by the contribution of the last few gamma-ray bursts or magnetars in the host galaxy thanks to the scattering of the cosmic rays on the magnetized lobes.

  4. Achieving tunable sensitivity in composite high-energy density materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkeev, Sergey; Tsyshevsky, Roman; Kuklja, Maija

    2015-06-01

    Laser irradiation provides a unique opportunity for selective, predictive, and controlled initiation of energetic materials. We propose a consistent micro-scale mechanism of photoexcitation at the interface, formed by a molecular energetic material and a metal oxide. A specific PETN-MgO model composite is used to illustrate and explain seemingly puzzling experiments on selective laser initiation of energetic materials, which reported that the presence of metal oxide additives triggered the photoinitiation by an unusually low energy. We suggest that PETN photodecomposition is catalyzed by oxygen vacancies (F0 centers) at the MgO surface. The proposed model suggests ways to tune sensitivity of energetic molecular materials to photoinitiation. Our quantum-chemical calculations suggest that the structural defects (e.g., oxygen vacancies) strongly interact with the molecular material (e.g., adsorbed energetic molecules) by inducing a charge transfer at the interface and hence play an imperative role in governing both energy absorption and energy release in the system. Our approach and conclusions provide a solid basis for novel design of energetic interfaces with desired properties and offers a new perspective in the field of explosive materials and devices.

  5. [Lipids composition and speed of energy metabolism in gastropods].

    PubMed

    Arakelova, E S

    2008-01-01

    Lipid composition of digestive gland and pedal muscle of two northern freshwater pulmonate snails Lymnaea stagnalis and Lymnaea ovata and three marine prosobranch gastropods Littorina obtusata, Littorina littorea, Buccinum undatum from the White Sea was studied. The species differ in ecology, particularly in trophic nabits and motor activity. The content of triacilglycerides both in digestive gland and pedal was higher in littoral dwellers Littorina the activity of which depends on the tide level. The phospholipids content in digestive gland does not differ in quantity in all cases and does not relate to type of feeding or resource quality. In a pedal muscle of marine species the quantity of common phospholipids is higher in comparison with the freshwater ones. The amount of total phospholipids in pedal muscle correlates with mass of metabolic inert formation which constitutes a part of whole mass of snails. The presence of massive shell enhances demands in energy needed for supporting movement and activity. Because the intensity of energy metabolism is related to quantity of total phospholipids, mitochondria and activity of their oxidizing ferments, the presence of thick shell in marine snails together with motor activity costs more in terms of energy than in freshwater snails with thin shell. This hypothesis is supported by the higher specific rate of oxygen consumption in marine snails than in freshwaters. PMID:19140337

  6. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  7. The chemical composition and energy content of the energetic cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    A brief survey is made of our present knowledge of the composition and energy spectra of the primary cosmic radiation. The total energy carried by all forms of cosmic radiation that have appreciable penetrability into matter has been evaluated.

  8. Ripening influences banana and plantain peels composition and energy content.

    PubMed

    Emaga, Thomas Happi; Bindelle, Jérôme; Agneesens, Richard; Buldgen, André; Wathelet, Bernard; Paquot, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Musa sp. peels are widely used by smallholders as complementary feeds for cattle in the tropics. A study of the influence of the variety and the maturation stage of the fruit on fermentability and metabolisable energy (ME) content of the peels was performed using banana (Yangambi Km5) and plantain (Big Ebanga) peels at three stages of maturation in an in vitro model of the rumen. Peel samples were analysed for starch, free sugars and fibre composition. Samples were incubated in the presence of rumen fluid. Kinetics of gas production were modelled, ME content was calculated using prediction equation and short-chain fatty acids production and molar ratio were measured after 72 h of fermentation. Final gas production was higher in plantain (269-339 ml g(-1)) compared to banana (237-328 ml g(-1)) and plantain exhibited higher ME contents (8.9-9.7 MJ/kg of dry matter, DM) compared to banana (7.7-8.8 MJ/kg of DM). Butyrate molar ratio decreased with maturity of the peels. The main influence of the variety and the stage of maturation on all fermentation parameters as well as ME contents of the peels was correlated to changes in the carbohydrate fraction of the peels, including starch and fibre. PMID:20725857

  9. Effects of dietary composition of energy expenditure during weight-loss maintenance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced energy expenditure following weight loss is thought to contribute to weight gain. However, the effect of dietary composition on energy expenditure during weight-loss maintenance has not been studied. To examine the effects of 3 diets differing widely in macronutrient composition and glycemic...

  10. Solar-thermal conversion and thermal energy storage of graphene foam-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianbin; Li, Renyuan; Tang, Bo; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-01

    Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy the continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a commonly used PCM, paraffin wax. The high macroporosity and low density of the graphene foam allow for high weight fraction of the PCM to be incorporated, which enhances the heat storage capacity of the composite. The interconnected graphene sheets in the composite provide (1) the solar-thermal conversion capability, (2) high thermal conductivity and (3) form stability of the composite. Under light irradiation, the composite effectively collects and converts the light energy into thermal energy, and the converted thermal energy is stored in the PCM and released in an elongated period of time for sustained utilization. This study provides a promising route for sustainable utilization of solar energy.Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy the continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a

  11. Thermal Energy in Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffres, Scott N.

    Low-dimensional materials, like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, possess extraordinary properties---higher thermal conductivity than any bulk material, mechanical strength 10-100 times greater than steel on a mass basis, and electrical current capacity 1000 times greater than copper. While composites incorporating these low-dimensional materials promise solutions to global sustainability challenges, significant transport barriers exist at the matrix interface that influence the composite properties. My PhD research sought to address this knowledge gap. I've experimentally explored how CNTs and graphene impact thermal conductivity when added in small volume fractions to gases, liquids and solids through the study of CNT aerogels (ultra lightweight, 8 kg/m3, 99.6% void space), and phase change nanocomposites (hexadecane-graphene). I measured the thermal conductivity of the CNT aerogel with various filling gases versus pressure using a novel technique that targeted ultralow thermal conductivity materials, called metal-coated 3o. I observed amplified energy transport length scales resulting from low gas accommodation, which is a general feature of carbon based nanoporous materials. Our evidence also shows that despite the high thermal conductivity of CNTs, thermal conduction through the CNT network is limited by the high thermal boundary resistance at van der Waals bonded CNT junctions. In the second system, I studied thermal and electrical conductivity of hexadecane- multi-layered-graphene (MLG) phase change nanocomposites to understand how morphology of the MLG network impacts transport. By adjusting the freezing rate, the electrical conductivity in the solid phase can be tuned between 1 and 5 orders-of-magnitude and the solid-liquid thermal conductivity ratio can be varied between 2.6 to 3.0. This research has yielded interesting insights into the tunability of nanocomposites and the physics underlying it, including evidence to indicate that the presence of

  12. Relationship between mechanical-property and energy-absorption trends for composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    U.S. Army helicopters are designed to dissipate prescribed levels of crash impact kinetic energy without compromising the integrity of the fuselage. Because of the complexity of the energy-absorption process it is imperative for designers of energy-absorbing structures to develop an in-depth understanding of how and why composite structures absorb energy. A description of the crushing modes and mechanisms of energy absorption for composite tubes and beams is presented. Three primary crushing modes of composite structures including transverse shearing, lamina bending, and local buckling are described. The experimental data presented show that fiber and matrix mechanical properties and laminate stiffness and strength mechanical properties cannot reliably predict the energy-absorption response of composite tubes.

  13. Feasibility of generating quantitative composition images in dual energy mammography: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. For years, mammography has been used as the gold standard for localizing breast cancer, despite its limitation in determining cancer composition. Therefore, the purpose of this simulation study is to confirm the feasibility of obtaining tumor composition using dual energy digital mammography. To generate X-ray sources for dual energy mammography, 26 kVp and 39 kVp voltages were generated for low and high energy beams, respectively. Additionally, the energy subtraction and inverse mapping functions were applied to provide compositional images. The resultant images showed that the breast composition obtained by the inverse mapping function with cubic fitting achieved the highest accuracy and least noise. Furthermore, breast density analysis with cubic fitting showed less than 10% error compare to true values. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the feasibility of creating individual compositional images and capability of analyzing breast density effectively.

  14. Solar-thermal conversion and thermal energy storage of graphene foam-based composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianbin; Li, Renyuan; Tang, Bo; Wang, Peng

    2016-08-14

    Among various utilizations of solar energy, solar-thermal conversion has recently gained renewed research interest due to its extremely high energy efficiency. However, one limiting factor common to all solar-based energy conversion technologies is the intermittent nature of solar irradiation, which makes them unable to stand-alone to satisfy the continuous energy need. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) graphene foam and phase change material (PCM) composite for the seamlessly combined solar-thermal conversion and thermal storage for sustained energy release. The composite is obtained by infiltrating the 3D graphene foam with a commonly used PCM, paraffin wax. The high macroporosity and low density of the graphene foam allow for high weight fraction of the PCM to be incorporated, which enhances the heat storage capacity of the composite. The interconnected graphene sheets in the composite provide (1) the solar-thermal conversion capability, (2) high thermal conductivity and (3) form stability of the composite. Under light irradiation, the composite effectively collects and converts the light energy into thermal energy, and the converted thermal energy is stored in the PCM and released in an elongated period of time for sustained utilization. This study provides a promising route for sustainable utilization of solar energy. PMID:27430282

  15. Energy-absorption capability and scalability of square cross section composite tube specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Static crushing tests were conducted on graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy square cross section tubes to study the influence of specimen geometry on the energy-absorption capability and scalability of composite materials. The tube inside width-to-wall thickness (W/t) ratio was determined to significantly affect the energy-absorption capability of composite materials. As W/t ratio decreases, the energy-absorption capability increases nonlinearly. The energy-absorption capability of Kevlar epoxy tubes was found to be geometrically scalable, but the energy-absorption capability of graphite/epoxy tubes was not geometrically scalable.

  16. Energy-absorption capability and scalability of square cross section composite tube specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    Static crushing tests were conducted on graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy square cross section tubes to study the influence of specimen geometry on the energy-absorption capability and scalability of composite materials. The tube inside width-to-wall thickness (W/t) ratio was determined to significantly affect the energy-absorption capability of composite materials. As W/t ratio decreases, the energy-absorption capability increases nonlinearly. The energy-absorption capability of Kevlar epoxy tubes was found to be geometrically scalable, but the energy-absorption capability of graphite/epoxy tubes was not geometrically scalable.

  17. Influence of source composition and particle energy on the determination of gross alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Timón, A Fernández; Vargas, M Jurado; Sánchez, A B Ruano; Pérez, J de la Torre; Sánchez, A Martín

    2013-12-01

    The influence of different source compositions and α-particle energies on the detection efficiency of a gas-flow proportional counter was examined using experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Efficiency variation with alpha-particle energy was very marked, being less significant with the substrate composition. These results show that the determination of gross alpha activity in an unknown sample must be carried out very carefully in order to give a correct estimation of its activity. PMID:24184741

  18. Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemanich, Donald, Ed.

    1974-01-01

    The articles in this special issue of the "Illinois English Bulletin" concern the state of composition instruction at the secondary and college levels. The titles and authors are "Monologues or Dialogues? A Plea for Literacy" by Dr. Alfred J. Lindsey, "Teaching Composition: Curiouser and Curiouser" by Denny Brandon, and "Teaching Writing to High…

  19. Energy spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Dietrich; Swordy, Simon P.; Meyer, Peter; L'Heureux, Jacques; Grunsfeld, John M.

    1991-06-01

    New results are described on the energy spectra and relative abundances of primary cosmic ray nuclei from carbon to iron. The measurement was performed on the Spacelab-2 mission of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1985, and extends to energies beyond 1 TeV per amu. The data indicate that the cosmic ray flux arriving near earth becomes enriched with heavier nuclei, most notably iron, as energy increases. Extrapolating to the source, with a simple leaky box model of galactic propagation with rigidity-dependent containment time, relative abundances of the elements are obtained that are quite similar to those reported at lower energy. In particular, the depletion of elements with high first ionization potential relative to the local galactic abundances, seems to persist in the cosmic ray source well up to TeV energies. A single power-law energy spectrum about E exp -2.1 provides a good description of the observed spectra of most elemental species.

  20. Impact behaviour of Napier/polyester composites under different energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, I.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Afendi, M.; Haslan, M.; Helmi E., A.; M. Haameem J., A.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of different energy levels on the impact behaviour of Napier fibre/polyester reinforced composites were investigated. Napier fibre was extracted using traditional water retting process to be utilized as reinforcing materials in polyester composite laminates. 25% fibre loading composite laminates were prepared and impacted at three different energy levels; 2.5,5 and 7.5 J using an instrumented drop weight impact testing machine (IMATEK IM10). The outcomes show that peak force and contact time increase with increased impact load. The energy absorption was then calculated from the force displacement curve. The results indicated that the energy absorption decreases with increasing energy levels of the impact. Impacted specimens were observed visually for fragmentation fracture using an optical camera to identify the failure mechanisms. Fracture fragmentation pattern from permanent dent to perforation with radial and circumferential was observed.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of material composition of composites using x-ray energy-dispersive NDE technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, J.

    1993-09-01

    This technique worked well for determining the thickness and densities for composite components having the higher linear attenuation coefficient; it accurately determined thickness of epoxy-resin and Al metal, and the denisty of bone, to {le} 4% in the graphite-epoxy, bone-plexiglas, and Al-Al corrosion composites. Accuracy is dictated by the magnitude and uncertainty of the linear attenuation coefficient. Use of Ge detector and multichannel analyzer are limited by inspection time (1 day for point measurement) and access limitation. Immediate development of a rapid in-service inspection tool is limited by the amplifier and MCA systems. The MCA should be replaced with a single-channel analyzer, and an electronic device should be built for monitoring the incoming signal for Pile-Up-Rejection.

  2. A new composite electrode architecture for energy storage devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferro, Richard E.; Swain, Greg M.; Tatarchuk, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    The research objective is to determine how the electrode microstructure (architecture) affect the performance of the nickel hydroxide electrochemical system. It was found that microstructure and additional surface area makes a difference. The best architectures are the FIBREX/nickel and nickel fiber composite electrodes. The conditioning time for full utilization was greatly reduced. The accelerated increase in capacity vs. cycling appears to be a good indicator of the condition of the electrode/active material microstructure and morphology. Conformal deposition of the active material may be indicated and important. Also higher utilizations were obtained; greater than 80 pct. after less than 5 cycles and greater than 300 pct. after more than 5 cycles using nickel fiber composite electrode assuming a 1 electron transfer per equivalent.

  3. Metal matrix composite fuel for space radioisotope energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. R.; Ning, H.; Reece, M. J.; Ambrosi, R. M.; Bannister, N. P.; Stephenson, K.

    2013-02-01

    Radioisotope fuels produce heat that can be used for spacecraft thermal control or converted to electricity. They must retain integrity in the event of destruction or atmospheric entry of the parent spacecraft. Addition of a metal matrix to the actinide oxide could yield a more robust fuel form. Neodymium (III) oxide (Nd2O3) - niobium metal matrix composites were produced using Spark Plasma Sintering; Nd2O3 is a non-radioactive surrogate for americium (III) oxide (Am2O3). Two compositions, 70 and 50 wt% Nd2O3, were mechanically tested under equibiaxial (ring-on-ring) flexure according to ASTM C1499. The addition of the niobium matrix increased the mean flexural strength by a factor of about 2 compared to typical ceramic nuclear fuels, and significantly increased the Weibull modulus to over 20. These improved mechanical properties could result in reduced fuel dispersion in severe accidents and improved safety of space radioisotope power systems.

  4. Composite latent/sensible energy storage media for high-temperature industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.

    1984-01-01

    An advanced thermal energy storage media concept is being developed for industrial process and reject heat applications. This composite medium consists of a phase-change carbonate salt, supported and immobilized within a submicron-sized capillary structure of a particulate ceramic matrix of porous sintered ceramic. Immobilization of the molten salt within the ceramic structure permits operation of the composite pellets, bricks or other shapes in direct contact with compatible fluids. Energy storage occurs in both sensible and latent forms with the composite providing higher energy storage densities than standard sensible heat storage systems. This paper describes the composite latent/sensible media concept and its potential advantage over state-ofthe-art systems. Current development activities concerning media stability and fabrication are described. Economic viability of the concept, especially in comparison to extant sensible heat storage systems, is also presented.

  5. Constraints on Energy Intake in Fish: The Link between Diet Composition, Energy Metabolism, and Energy Intake in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Subramanian; Schrama, Johan W.; Figueiredo-Silva, A. Claudia; Kaushik, Sadasivam J.; Verreth, Johan A. J.; Geurden, Inge

    2012-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that fish fed to satiation with iso-energetic diets differing in macronutrient composition will have different digestible energy intakes (DEI) but similar total heat production. Four iso-energetic diets (2×2 factorial design) were formulated having a contrast in i) the ratio of protein to energy (P/E): high (HP/E) vs. low (LP/E) and ii) the type of non-protein energy (NPE) source: fat vs. carbohydrate which were iso-energetically exchanged. Triplicate groups (35 fish/tank) of rainbow trout were hand-fed each diet twice daily to satiation for 6 weeks under non-limiting water oxygen conditions. Feed intake (FI), DEI (kJ kg−0.8 d−1) and growth (g kg−0.8 d−1) of trout were affected by the interaction between P/E ratio and NPE source of the diet (P<0.05). Regardless of dietary P/E ratio, the inclusion of carbohydrate compared to fat as main NPE source reduced DEI and growth of trout by ∼20%. The diet-induced differences in FI and DEI show that trout did not compensate for the dietary differences in digestible energy or digestible protein contents. Further, changes in body fat store and plasma glucose did not seem to exert a homeostatic feedback control on DEI. Independent of the diet composition, heat production of trout did not differ (P>0.05). Our data suggest that the control of DEI in trout might be a function of heat production, which in turn might reflect a physiological limit related with oxidative metabolism. PMID:22496852

  6. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) Predictions for a Floor-Equipped Composite Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2011-01-01

    Comet Enflow is a commercially available, high frequency vibroacoustic analysis software founded on Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) and Energy Boundary Element Analysis (EBEA). Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) was validated on a floor-equipped composite cylinder by comparing EFEA vibroacoustic response predictions with Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) and experimental results. Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) predictions were made using the commercial software program VA One 2009 from ESI Group. The frequency region of interest for this study covers the one-third octave bands with center frequencies from 100 Hz to 4000 Hz.

  7. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MAXIMUM ENERGY OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, M.; Katayose, Y.; Huang, J.; Chen, D.

    2010-06-20

    A model of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum is proposed that assumes various acceleration limits at multiple sources. The model describes the broken power-law energy spectrum of cosmic rays by superposition of multiple sources; a diffusive shock acceleration mechanism plays an essential role. The maximum energy of galactic cosmic rays is discussed based on a comparison of experimental data with calculations done using the proposed model. The model can describe the energy spectrum at very high energies of up to several times 10{sup 18} eV, but the observed highest-energy cosmic rays deviate from the model predictions, indicating a different origin, such as an extragalactic source. This model describes the steepening of the power index at the so-called knee. However, it was found that additional assumptions are needed to explain the sharpness of the knee. Two possible explanations for the structure of the knee are discussed in terms of nearby source(s) and the hard energy spectrum suggested by nonlinear effects of cosmic-ray acceleration mechanisms.

  8. Energy absorption capability and crashworthiness of composite material structures: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Carruthers, J.J.; Kettle, A.P.; Robinson, A.M.

    1998-10-01

    The controlled brittle failure of thermosetting fiber-reinforced polymer composites can provide a very efficient energy absorption mechanism. Consequently, the use of these materials in crashworthy vehicle designs has been the subject of considerable interest. In this respect, their more widespread application has been limited by the complexity of their collapse behavior. This article reviews the current level of understanding i this field, including the correlations between failure mode and energy absorption, the principal material, geometric, and physical parameters relevant to crashworthy design and methods of predicting the energy absorption capability of polymer composites. Areas which require further investigation are identified. This review article contains 70 references.

  9. The wear of composite drilling tools and its influence on the energy consumption in drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Mishnaevsky, L.L. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Theoretical investigations of wear of drilling tools from matrix composites and its influence on the energy consumption in drilling are presented. A formula for wear rate depending on the structure and properties of the tool material is obtained. Influence of drilling conditions and regimes on the composite tool wear is studied on the basis of mathematical model of wear. Relations between the energy consumption in drilling and tool wear are investigated. It is shown that the more heterogeneous are the physical properties of the tool material components, the less the tool wear, and, thus, the less the energy consumption in drilling.

  10. Energy spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D.; Swordy, S.P.; Meyer, P.; L'heureux, J.; Grunsfeld, J.M. )

    1991-06-01

    New results are described on the energy spectra and relative abundances of primary cosmic ray nuclei from carbon to iron. The measurement was performed on the Spacelab-2 mission of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1985, and extends to energies beyond 1 TeV per amu. The data indicate that the cosmic ray flux arriving near earth becomes enriched with heavier nuclei, most notably iron, as energy increases. Extrapolating to the source, with a simple leaky box model of galactic propagation with rigidity-dependent containment time, relative abundances of the elements are obtained that are quite similar to those reported at lower energy. In particular, the depletion of elements with high first ionization potential relative to the local galactic abundances, seems to persist in the cosmic ray source well up to TeV energies. A single power-law energy spectrum about E exp {minus}2.1 provides a good description of the observed spectra of most elemental species. 33 refs.

  11. Energy absorption mechanisms during crack propagation in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. P.; Adams, D. F.

    1979-01-01

    The stress distributions around individual fibers in a unidirectional boron/aluminum composite material subjected to axial and transverse loadings are being studied utilizing a generalized plane strain finite element analysis. This micromechanics analysis was modified to permit the analysis of longitudinal sections, and also to incorporate crack initiation and propagation. The analysis fully models the elastoplastic response of the aluminum matrix, as well as temperature dependent material properties and thermal stress effects. The micromechanics analysis modifications are described, and numerical results are given for both longitudinal and transverse models loaded into the inelastic range, to first failure. Included are initially cracked fiber models.

  12. Monolithic oxide-metal composite thermoelectric generators for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funahashi, Shuichi; Nakamura, Takanori; Kageyama, Keisuke; Ieki, Hideharu

    2011-06-01

    Monolithic oxide-metal composite thermoelectric generators (TEGs) were fabricated using multilayer co-fired ceramic technology. These devices consisted of Ni0.9Mo0.1 and La0.035Sr0.965TiO3 as p- and n-type thermoelectric materials, and Y0.03Zr0.97O2 was used as an insulator, sandwiched between p- and n-type layers. To co-fire dissimilar materials, p-type layers contained 20 wt. % La0.035Sr0.965TiO3; thus, these were oxide-metal composite layers. The fabricated device had 50 pairs of p-i-n junctions of 5.9 mm × 7.0 mm × 2.6 mm. The calculated maximum value of the electric power output from the device was 450 mW/cm2 at ΔT = 360 K. Furthermore, this device generated 100 μW at ΔT = 10 K and operated a radio frequency (RF) transmitter circuit module assumed to be a sensor network system.

  13. Capturing the Energy Absorbing Mechanisms of Composite Structures under Crash Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Bonnie

    As fiber reinforced composite material systems become increasingly utilized in primary aircraft and automotive structures, the need to understand their contribution to the crashworthiness of the structure is of great interest to meet safety certification requirements. The energy absorbing behavior of a composite structure, however, is not easily predicted due to the great complexity of the failure mechanisms that occur within the material. Challenges arise both in the experimental characterization and in the numerical modeling of the material/structure combination. At present, there is no standardized test method to characterize the energy absorbing capability of composite materials to aide crashworthy structural design. In addition, although many commercial finite element analysis codes exist and offer a means to simulate composite failure initiation and propagation, these models are still under development and refinement. As more metallic structures are replaced by composite structures, the need for both experimental guidelines to characterize the energy absorbing capability of a composite structure, as well as guidelines for using numerical tools to simulate composite materials in crash conditions has become a critical matter. This body of research addresses both the experimental characterization of the energy absorption mechanisms occurring in composite materials during crushing, as well as the numerical simulation of composite materials undergoing crushing. In the experimental investigation, the specific energy absorption (SEA) of a composite material system is measured using a variety of test element geometries, such as corrugated plates and tubes. Results from several crush experiments reveal that SEA is not a constant material property for laminated composites, and varies significantly with the geometry of the test specimen used. The variation of SEA measured for a single material system requires that crush test data must be generated for a range of

  14. Nonlinear Elastic Effects on the Energy Flux Deviation of Ultrasonic Waves in GR/EP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1992-01-01

    In isotropic materials, the direction of the energy flux (energy per unit time per unit area) of an ultrasonic plane wave is always along the same direction as the normal to the wave front. In anisotropic materials, however, this is true only along symmetry directions. Along other directions, the energy flux of the wave deviates from the intended direction of propagation. This phenomenon is known as energy flux deviation and is illustrated. The direction of the energy flux is dependent on the elastic coefficients of the material. This effect has been demonstrated in many anisotropic crystalline materials. In transparent quartz crystals, Schlieren photographs have been obtained which allow visualization of the ultrasonic waves and the energy flux deviation. The energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy (gr/ep) composite materials can be quite large because of their high anisotropy. The flux deviation angle has been calculated for unidirectional gr/ep composites as a function of both fiber orientation and fiber volume content. Experimental measurements have also been made in unidirectional composites. It has been further demonstrated that changes in composite materials which alter the elastic properties such as moisture absorption by the matrix or fiber degradation, can be detected nondestructively by measurements of the energy flux shift. In this research, the effects of nonlinear elasticity on energy flux deviation in unidirectional gr/ep composites were studied. Because of elastic nonlinearity, the angle of the energy flux deviation was shown to be a function of applied stress. This shift in flux deviation was modeled using acoustoelastic theory and the previously measured second and third order elastic stiffness coefficients for T300/5208 gr/ep. Two conditions of applied uniaxial stress were considered. In the first case, the direction of applied uniaxial stress was along the fiber axis (x3) while in the second case it was perpendicular to the fiber axis along the

  15. Composition of milk from pony mares fed various levels of digestible energy.

    PubMed

    Pagan, J D; Hintz, H F

    1986-04-01

    Twenty-two pony mares were fed one of three diets that provided 93.0, 74.8 or 57.2 kcal of digestible energy (DE) per kg body weight per day. Milk samples were taken at 14 day intervals. A total of five samples were taken from each mare. The samples were analyzed for total solids, crude protein, lactose, total lipids, ash, calcium and phosphorus. Gross energy was calculated from composition data. Increases in energy intake decreased the concentration of total solids, protein, fat and gross energy of mare's milk. Energy intake had a greater influence on the mare's body condition than on milk energy production. It was concluded the objective of a feeding program for a lactating mare should be to keep the mare in a desirable body condition rather than to influence milk composition or production. PMID:3698598

  16. An analysis of household energy use by racial/ethnic composition: Consumption, efficiency, and lifestyles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Carlos

    The goal of this dissertation is to provide the most recent household energy consumption analysis by racial/ethnic household composition. This dissertation found that significant differences in behavior, energy consumption, and energy efficiency exist by racial/ethnic household composition. The models suggest that behavioral energy intensity is lower among households led by racial/ethnic minorities. Energy consumption and efficiency models suggest that Hispanic households consume less energy and are more efficient, while Black households consume more energy and are less efficient, than White households. However, when stratifying the models by housing vintage, the differences between Hispanic and White households are not consistent. Differences between Black and White households are evident only among those in housing units built before 1980, indicating that Black households in older vintages live in less efficient housing units and could be at a disadvantage that could result in having to pay a higher share of household income on energy use. Results also point towards evidence that energy efficiency standards since the late 1970s could have actually mitigated potential inequality associated with excess energy use by race/ethnicity. Improving energy efficiency of housing units may be beneficial not only to reduce total energy consumption levels, but also have the potential to lessen the burden of energy costs that lower income households (irrespective of race/ethnicity) might experience otherwise.

  17. Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.; McCullough, R.L.; Pipes, R.B.

    1986-10-01

    The degree of control over material properties that is typified by hybrid composites is transforming engineering design. In part because homogeneous materials such as metals and alloys do not offer comparable control, specifying a material and designing a component have traditionally taken place separately. As composites begin to replace traditional materials in fields and such as aerospace, component design and the specification of a material are merging and becoming aspects of a single process. The controllable microstructure of a composite allows it to be tailored to match the distribution of stresses to which it will be subject. At the same time components must come to reflect the distinctive nature of composites: their directional properties and the intricate forms they can be given through processes such as injection molding, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. The complexity inherent in conceiving components and their materials at the same time suggests engineering design will grow increasingly dependent on computers and multidisciplinary teams. Such an approach will harness the full potential of composites for the technologies of the future. 10 figures.

  18. Energy Finite Element Analysis Developments for Vibration Analysis of Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Schiller, Noah H.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) has been utilized successfully for modeling complex structural-acoustic systems with isotropic structural material properties. In this paper, a formulation for modeling structures made out of composite materials is presented. An approach based on spectral finite element analysis is utilized first for developing the equivalent material properties for the composite material. These equivalent properties are employed in the EFEA governing differential equations for representing the composite materials and deriving the element level matrices. The power transmission characteristics at connections between members made out of non-isotropic composite material are considered for deriving suitable power transmission coefficients at junctions of interconnected members. These coefficients are utilized for computing the joint matrix that is needed to assemble the global system of EFEA equations. The global system of EFEA equations is solved numerically and the vibration levels within the entire system can be computed. The new EFEA formulation for modeling composite laminate structures is validated through comparison to test data collected from a representative composite aircraft fuselage that is made out of a composite outer shell and composite frames and stiffeners. NASA Langley constructed the composite cylinder and conducted the test measurements utilized in this work.

  19. Composition of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Observed by Telescope Array in Hybrid Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, William; Telescope Array Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays exhibits several important features such as the knee (E ~10 15 . 5 eV), ankle (E ~10 18 . 7 eV), and high energy suppression (E ~10 19 . 8 eV). Cosmic ray chemical composition is the key to understanding their galactic and extragalactic sources as well as the origin of particle production and acceleration mechanisms. Energy dependent chemical composition is a fundamental input for models of cosmic ray sources and interstellar transport which may lead to competing explanations of the observed spectral features. Understanding composition will therefore allow one to distinguish between the different scenarios of cosmic ray origin, a decades old problem in astrophysics. In this talk we will describe measurements of ultra high energy cosmic ray composition performed by Telescope Array (TA) using Xmax measured in extended air showers (EAS) simultaneously observed by the TA surface array and TA fluorescence stations (called hybrid mode). Showers with primary energies above 1018 eV will be considered. We will also discuss improved methods of comparing the measured composition to EAS models.

  20. Combining 3D optical imaging and dual energy absorptiometry to measure three compositional components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Serghei; Shepherd, John

    2014-02-01

    We report on the design of the technique combining 3D optical imaging and dual-energy absorptiometry body scanning to estimate local body area compositions of three compartments. Dual-energy attenuation and body shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional tissue thicknesses: water, lipid, and protein. We designed phantoms with tissue-like properties as our reference standards for calibration purposes. The calibration was created by fitting phantom values using non-linear regression of quadratic and truncated polynomials. Dual-energy measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms using a bone densitometer unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the biological compositional compartments. The components for the solid phantom were tested and their high energy/low energy attenuation ratios are in good correspondent to water, lipid, and protein for the densitometer x-ray region. The three-dimensional body shape was reconstructed from the depth maps generated by Microsoft Kinect for Windows. We used open-source Point Cloud Library and freeware software to produce dense point clouds. Accuracy and precision of compositional and thickness measures were calculated. The error contributions due to two modalities were estimated. The preliminary phantom composition and shape measurements are found to demonstrate the feasibility of the method proposed.

  1. Combining 3D optical imaging and dual energy absorptiometry to measure three compositional components

    PubMed Central

    Malkov, Serghei; Shepherd, John

    2014-01-01

    We report on the design of the technique combining 3D optical imaging and dual-energy absorptiometry body scanning to estimate local body area compositions of three compartments. Dual-energy attenuation and body shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional tissue thicknesses: water, lipid, and protein. We designed phantoms with tissue-like properties as our reference standards for calibration purposes. The calibration was created by fitting phantom values using non-linear regression of quadratic and truncated polynomials. Dual-energy measurements were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms using a bone densitometer unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the biological compositional compartments. The components for the solid phantom were tested and their high energy/low energy attenuation ratios are in good correspondent to water, lipid, and protein for the densitometer x-ray region. The three-dimensional body shape was reconstructed from the depth maps generated by Microsoft Kinect for Windows. We used open-source Point Cloud Library and freeware software to produce dense point clouds. Accuracy and precision of compositional and thickness measures were calculated. The error contributions due to two modalities were estimated. The preliminary phantom composition and shape measurements are found to demonstrate the feasibility of the method proposed. PMID:25083118

  2. Experimental development and control of magnetorheological damper towards smart energy absorption of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Shen Hin; Prusty, B. Gangadhara; Lee, Ann; Yeoh, Guan Heng

    2013-08-01

    Experimental investigation and efficient control of magnetorheological (MR) damper towards smart energy absorption of composite structures are presented in this paper. The evaluation of an existing MR damper based on the damping force presented in our earlier work is limited by the experiment configuration setup. Using two arms configuration, an experimental test rig is designed to overcome this limitation and enabled the MR damper to be investigated throughout its full velocity range capability. A controller is then developed based on the MR damper investigation to provide automated variable control of induced current with a set crushing force and available data of composite tube crushing force. The controller is assessed numerically and shows that MR damper is controlled to provide consistent crushing force despite oscillation from the composite tube crushing force. This, thus, shows promise of MR damper integration towards smart energy absorption of composite structures.

  3. High resolution energy loss research: Si compound ceramics and composites. [1990 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R W; Lin, S H

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses proposed work on silicon compound ceramics and composites. High resolution composition and structure analysis of interfaces in ceramic and metal matrix composites and certain grain boundaries in silicon and its interfaces with oxides and nitrides is proposed. Composition and bonding analysis will be done with high spatial resolution (20 Angstroms or better) parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy using a field emission analytical electron microscope. Structural analysis will be done at the 1.8 Angstrom resolution level at 200kV by HREM. Theoretical electron energy loss cross section computations will be used to interpret electronic structure of these materials. Both self-consistent field MO and multiple scattering computational methods are being done and evaluated.

  4. [Energy balance, body composition and the female athlete triad syndrome].

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Yitzhak; Weinstein, Ayelet

    2012-02-01

    With the rising participation of women in sports events, the prevalence of eating disorders and the female athlete triad (FTS), a syndrome of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis, have also increased in recent years. FTS is often seen in sports that emphasize thinness (e.g. gymnastics, figure skating and dancing) and also in endurance events. Elements of the FTS are pathophysiologically linked, leading to several disease risks and even to mortality. In spite of the considerable knowledge about sports nutrition, there is no consensus as to the correct nutrition regime for the female athlete. There is consensus that minimizing fluctuations in 'target-body-weight' is an indication of a long-term energy balance. Female athletes (e.g. in endurance events and gymnastics) are less likely to achieve the recommended carbohydrates (CHO) and fat consumption due to chronic or episodic constraints of total energy intake while struggling to achieve or maintain low levels of body fat. It is recommended that dietary CHO and fat content be increased to preserve fat-free mass thus enhancing health and performance. Energy balance should also be maintained during recesses. Furthermore, within-day episodes of energy deficits/surplus (measured by the frequency and/or magnitude of the episodes) should be monitored and treated closest to the time of the incidents. PMID:22741211

  5. A Composite of Energy Curriculum Guides and Enrichment Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnoli, Michael A.; Wert, Jonathan M.

    This bibliography was prepared to provide a listing of a variety of curriculum materials, instructional materials, and references related to energy. Each entry includes: (1) Source, (2) Title, and (3) Comments on grade level and price when available. Materials are primarily selected for relevance to grades K-12. (RH)

  6. Copper and Zinc Oxide Composite Nanostructures for Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fei

    Solar energy is a clean and sustainable energy source to counter global environmental issues of rising atmospheric CO2 levels and depletion of natural resources. To extract useful work from solar energy, silicon-based photovoltaic devices are extensively used. The technological maturity and the high quality of silicon (Si) make it a material of choice. However limitations in Si exist, ranging from its indirect band gap to low light absorption coefficient and energy and capital intensive crystal growth schemes. Therefore, alternate materials that are earth-abundant, benign and simpler to process are needed for developing new platforms for solar energy harvesting applications. In this study, we explore oxides of copper (CuO and Cu2O) in a nanowire morphology as alternate energy harvesting materials. CuO has a bandgap of 1.2 eV whereas Cu2O has a bandgap of 2.1 eV making them ideally suited for absorbing solar radiation. First, we develop a method to synthesize vertical, single crystalline CuO and Cu2O nanowires of ~50 microm length and aspect ratios of ~200. CuO nanowire arrays are synthesized by thermal oxidation of Cu foils. Cu2O nanowire arrays are synthesized by thermal reduction of CuO nanowires. Next, surface engineering of these nanowires is achieved using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO. By depositing 1.4 nm of ZnO, a highly defective surface is produced on the CuO nanowires. These defects are capable of trapping charge as is evident through persistent photoconductivity measurements of ZnO coated CuO nanowires. The same nanowires serve as efficient photocatalysts reducing CO2 to CO with a yield of 1.98 mmol/g-cat/hr. Finally, to develop a robust platform for flexible solar cells, a protocol to transfer vertical CuO nanowires inside flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is demonstrated. Embedded CuO nanowires-ZnO pn junctions show a VOC of 0.4 V and a JSC of 10.4 microA/cm2 under white light illumination of 5.7 mW/cm2. Thus, this research provides broad

  7. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  8. Biomimetic staggered composites with highly enhanced energy dissipation: Modeling, 3D printing, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pu; Heyne, Mary A.; To, Albert C.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the damping enhancement in a class of biomimetic staggered composites via a combination of design, modeling, and experiment. In total, three kinds of staggered composites are designed by mimicking the structure of bone and nacre. These composite designs are realized by 3D printing a rigid plastic and a viscous elastomer simultaneously. Greatly-enhanced energy dissipation in the designed composites is observed from both the experimental results and theoretical prediction. The designed polymer composites have loss modulus up to ~500 MPa, higher than most of the existing polymers. In addition, their specific loss modulus (up to 0.43 km2/s2) is among the highest of damping materials. The damping enhancement is attributed to the large shear deformation of the viscous soft matrix and the large strengthening effect from the rigid inclusion phase.

  9. Micro-Energy Rates for Damage Tolerance and Durability of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the adhesive bond strength of lap-jointed graphite/aluminum composites is examined by computational simulation. Computed micro-stress level energy release rates are used to identify the damage mechanisms associated with the corresponding acoustic emission (AE) signals. Computed damage regions are similarly correlated with ultrasonically scanned damage regions. Results show that computational simulation can be used with suitable NDE methods for credible in-service monitoring of composites.

  10. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, R. D.; Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on mechanical properties and on the molecular and structural properties of graphite fiber reinforced composites are assessed so that durability in space applications can be predicted. A listing of composite systems irradiated along with the maximum radiation dose applied and type of mechanical tests performed is shown. These samples were exposed to 1/2 MeV electrons.

  11. High-Energy Composite Permanent Magnets: High-Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing permanent magnets that contain less rare earth material and produce twice the energy of the strongest rare earth magnets currently available. The University of Delaware is creating these magnets by mixing existing permanent magnet materials with those that are more abundant, like iron. Both materials are first prepared in the form of nanoparticles via techniques ranging from wet chemistry to ball milling. After that, the nanoparticles must be assembled in a 3-D array and consolidated at low temperatures to form a magnet. With small size particles and good contact between these two materials, the best qualities of each allow for the development of exceptionally strong composite magnets.

  12. Heavy ion composition in solar flares at low energies, 1973-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1980-01-01

    The composition of solar flare particles near 1 MeV/nucleon has been surveyed for the major species between H and Fe over a four-year period using the IMP-8 ULET instrument. The average composition for the larger flares is found to be remarkably similar to that found by previous studies at energies greater than 10 MeV/nucleon. Variations in abundance are found to be well ordered by atomic number. It is suggested that such a smooth variation in abundances is due to an acceleration mechanism which preserves the main features of the ambient composition of the accelerated material, at least in the larger flares.

  13. Rate of energy release and crack initiation directions for laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Debasish

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the mechanical behavior of composite materials and structures under monotonic and dynamic loads for damage is a vast and complex area of research. The modeling of the physical phenomena of different characteristic behavior of a composite material during deformation plays an important role in the structural design. Our study aims to analyze numerically the energy release rate G of a composite laminated plate glass/epoxy cross [+α, α] in the presence of a crack between two circular notches in effect several parameters such as fiber orientation α, the orientation of the crack orientation β, γ considered two circular notches and the effects of several parameters.

  14. Theory of high-energy electron scattering by composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1988-01-01

    The emphasis of these expository lectures is on the role of relativistic invariance and the unity of the theory for medium and high energies. Sec. 2 introduces the kinematic notation and provides an elementary derivation of the general cross section. The relevant properties of the Poincare group and the transformation properties of current operators and target states are described in Sec 3. In Sec. 4 representations of target states with kinematic light-front symmetry are briefly discussed. The focus is on two applications. An impulse approximation of inclusive electron nucleus scattering at both medium and high energies. A parton model of the proton applied to deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons by polarized protons. 19 refs.

  15. Railgun Application for High Energy Impact Testing of Nano-Reinforced Kevlar-Based Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Vricella, A.; Pastore, R.; Morles, R. B.; Marchetti, M.

    2013-08-01

    An advanced electromagnetic accelerator, called railgun, has been assembled and tuned in order to perform high energy impact test on layered structures. Different types of layered composite materials have been manufactured and characterized in terms of energy absorbing capability upon impact of metallic bullets fired at high velocity. The composite materials under testing are manufactured by integrating several layers of Kevlar fabric and carbon fiber ply within a polymeric matrix reinforced by carbon nanotubes at 1% of weight percentage. The experimental results show that the railgun-device is a good candidate to perform impact testing of materials in the space debris energy range, and that carbon nanotubes may enhance, when suitably coupled to the composite's matrix, the excellent antiballistic properties of the Kevlar fabrics.

  16. Carbon nanofiber polymer composites: evaluation of life cycle energy use.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Vikas; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2009-03-15

    Holistic evaluation of emerging nanotechnologies using systems analysis is pivotal for guiding their safe and sustainable development. While toxicity studies of engineered nanomaterials are essential, understanding of the potential large scale impacts of nanotechnology is also critical for developing sustainable nanoproducts. This work evaluates the life cycle energetic impact associated with the production and use of carbon nanofiber (CNF) reinforced polymer nanocomposites (PNC). Specifically, both simple CNF and carbon nanofiber-glass fiber (CNF-GF) hybrid PNCs are evaluated and compared with steel for equal stiffness design. Life cycle inventory is developed based on published literature and best available engineering information. A cradle-to-gate comparison suggests that for equal stiffness design, CNF reinforced PNCs are 1.6-12 times more energy intensive than steel. It is anticipated that the product use phase may strongly influence whether any net savings in life cycle energy consumption can be realized. A case study involving the use of CNF and CNF-GF reinforced PNCs in the body panels of automobiles highlights that the use of PNCs with lower CNF loading ratios has the potential for net life cycle energy savings relative to steel owing to improved fuel economy benefits. Other factors such as cost, toxicity impact of CNF, and end-of-life issues specific to CNFs need to be considered to evaluate the final economic and environmental performance of CNF reinforced PNC materials. PMID:19368217

  17. Proximate body composition and energy content of plaice ( Pleuronectes platessa) in relation to the condition factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costopoulos, C. G.; Fonds, M.

    Length, wet weight, dry weight, and the content of lipid, ash and protein of young plaice were determined. The energy content of the fish was estimated by multiplying lipid and protein content by the commonly used calorific equivalents. The data were sorted from low to high condition factor of the fish and grouped according to condition factor (K = 100·W·L -3) into 8 condition groups. Mean values of percentage body composition and energy content were calculated for each condition group. Equations giving the best fit between condition factor and the parameters of body composition and energy content are presented. From the decrease in condition factor in fasting fish the relative losses of lipid and protein energy are calculated. The accuracy of equations for the calculation of energy content of plaice from condition factor is discussed.

  18. An Integrated, Layered-Spinel Composite Cathode for Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagh, Nader; Skandan, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    At low operating temperatures, commercially available electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries do not fully meet the energy and power requirements for NASA fs exploration activities. The composite cathode under development is projected to provide the required energy and power densities at low temperatures and its usage will considerably reduce the overall volume and weight of the battery pack. The newly developed composite electrode material can provide superior electrochemical performance relative to a commercially available lithium cobalt system. One advantage of using a composite cathode is its higher energy density, which can lead to smaller and lighter battery packs. In the current program, different series of layered-spinel composite materials with at least two different systems in an integrated structure were synthesized, and the volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were evaluated. In an integrated network of a composite electrode, the effect of the combined structures is to enhance the capacity and power capabilities of the material to levels greater than what is possible in current state-of-the-art cathode systems. The main objective of the current program is to implement a novel cathode material that meets NASA fs low temperature energy density requirements. An important feature of the composite cathode is that it has at least two components (e.g., layered and spinel) that are structurally integrated. The layered material by itself is electrochemically inactive; however, upon structural integration with a spinel material, the layered material can be electrochemically activated, thereby delivering a large amount of energy with stable cycling. A key aspect of the innovation has been the development of a scalable process to produce submicronand micron-scale particles of these composite materials. An additional advantage of using such a composite electrode material is its low irreversible loss (.5%), which is primarily due to the unique activation

  19. Energy-absorption capability of composite tubes and beams. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    In this study the objective was to develop a method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of composite subfloor beam structures. Before it is possible to develop such an analysis capability, an in-depth understanding of the crushing process of composite materials must be achieved. Many variables affect the crushing process of composite structures, such as the constituent materials' mechanical properties, specimen geometry, and crushing speed. A comprehensive experimental evaluation of tube specimens was conducted to develop insight into how composite structural elements crush and what are the controlling mechanisms. In this study the four characteristic crushing modes, transverse shearing, brittle fracturing, lamina bending, and local buckling were identified and the mechanisms that control the crushing process defined. An in-depth understanding was developed of how material properties affect energy-absorption capability. For example, an increase in fiber and matrix stiffness and failure strain can, depending upon the configuration of the tube, increase energy-absorption capability. An analysis to predict the energy-absorption capability of composite tube specimens was developed and verified. Good agreement between experiment and prediction was obtained.

  20. Properties of fiber composites for advanced flywheel energy storage devices

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Groves, S E

    2001-01-12

    The performance of commercial high-performance fibers is examined for application to flywheel power supplies. It is shown that actual delivered performance depends on multiple factors such as inherent fiber strength, strength translation and stress-rupture lifetime. Experimental results for recent stress-rupture studies of carbon fibers will be presented and compared with other candidate reinforcement materials. Based on an evaluation of all of the performance factors, it is concluded that carbon fibers are preferred for highest performance and E-glass fibers for lowest cost. The inferior performance of the low-cost E-glass fibers can be improved to some extent by retarding the stress-corrosion of the material due to moisture and practical approaches to mitigating this corrosion are discussed. Many flywheel designs are limited not by fiber failure, but by matrix-dominated failure modes. Unfortunately, very few experimental results for stress-rupture under transverse tensile loading are available. As a consequence, significant efforts are made in flywheel design to avoid generating any transverse tensile stresses. Recent results for stress-rupture of a carbon fiber/epoxy composite under transverse tensile load reveal that these materials are surprisingly durable under the transverse loading condition and that some radial tensile stress could be tolerated in flywheel applications.

  1. Effect of composition on antiphase boundary energy in Ni3Al based alloys: Ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatov, O. I.; Lomaev, I. L.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Ruban, A. V.; Furrer, D.; Venkatesh, V.; Novikov, D. L.; Burlatsky, S. F.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of composition on the antiphase boundary (APB) energy of Ni-based L 12-ordered alloys is investigated by ab initio calculations employing the coherent potential approximation. The calculated APB energies for the {111} and {001} planes reproduce experimental values of the APB energy. The APB energies for the nonstoichiometric γ' phase increase with Al concentration and are in line with the experiment. The magnitude of the alloying effect on the APB energy correlates with the variation of the ordering energy of the alloy according to the alloying element's position in the 3 d row. The elements from the left side of the 3 d row increase the APB energy of the Ni-based L 12-ordered alloys, while the elements from the right side slightly affect it except Ni. The way to predict the effect of an addition on the {111} APB energy in a multicomponent alloy is discussed.

  2. Crash-Energy Absorbing Composite Structure and Method of Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris (Inventor); Carden, Huey D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A stand-alone, crash-energy absorbing structure and fabrication method are provided. A plurality of adjoining rigid cells are each constructed of resin-cured fiber reinforcement and are arranged in a geometric configuration. The geometric configuration of cells is integrated by means of continuous fibers wrapped thereabout in order to maintain the cells in the geometric configuration. The cured part results in a net shape, stable structure that can function on its own with no additional reinforcement and can withstand combined loading while crushing in a desired direction.

  3. Low cost composite materials for wind energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingart, O.

    1980-01-01

    A winding process utilizing a low-cost E-glass fabric called transverse-filament tape for low-cost production of wind turbine generators (WTG) is described. The process can be carried out continuously at high speed to produce large one-piece parts with tapered wall thicknesses on a tapered mandrel. It is being used to manufacture blades for the NASA/DOE 200-ft-diameter MOD-1 WTG and Rockwell/DOE 40-kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS).

  4. Body composition in aquatic organisms — A global data bank of relationships between mass, elemental composition and energy content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, Thomas; Müller-Wiegmann, Corinna; Zittier, Zora M. C.; Hagen, Wilhelm

    2010-10-01

    We introduce a global data bank on body composition of aquatic organisms that is available at http://www.thomas-brey.de/science/virtualhandbook. It covers ratios between body mass (wet, dry, ash free dry mass), body composition (protein, lipid, carbohydrate), macro-elements (C, N, P) and energy content (J). Sofar, data for 3158 different taxa (animals, plants, bacteria) were collected from 725 different sources. The principal purpose of the data bank is mining for conversion factors, as necessary in ecological studies that require a common energetic currency. The data bank can be used to explore general ecological principles, too: among all animals, carnivorous swimmers have the highest energy density, presumably an across-taxon selection for propulsion power and handling force. Plants and animals do not only differ in their C/N and C/P ratios, but these ratios change with temperature in opposite directions. In plants, C/N and C/P increase with temperature, most likely a response to the higher levels of N and P in polar waters. In animals C/N and C/P decrease with temperature, an indicator for selection towards lower activity and larger lipid stores in polar animals.

  5. Rocky super-Earths: variety in composition and energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Solid exoplanets offer a unique opportunity for comparative planetology with the small solar system planets, and in particular with Earth. With more than 40 low-mass planets (with masses less than 10 earth-masses) with measured masses and radii, it is now possible to distinguish trends in the data. Although most of these planets have a substantial envelope that makes them closer in nature to Uranus and Neptune, there are about 10 low-mass exoplanets that are potentially rocky. Despite the uncertainties in the data (especially in the mass), it is becoming evident that there is variety in compositions expressed mostly in a wide range of Fe/Si ratios that may affect the interior dynamics and thermal evolution of these planets. In addition, numerous observing campaigns have targeted M stars to find super-Earths in the habitable zone, as this region is closer to the host star. It is well recognized that these planets may also be subjected to variable amounts of early and/or sustained tidal heating. This may in turn affect the mode of convection and outgassing of these planets. I will present results on the lessons learned from the super-Earth data and the implications of variable Fe/Si ratio and tidal heating for the dynamics of the interior using the model by [1] including a simple degassing model for water. [1] Tackley, P. J., M. Ammann, J. P. Brodholt, D. P. Dobson and D. Valencia (2013) Mantle dynamics in super-Earths: Post-perovskite rheology and self-regulation of viscosity, Icarus 225(1), 50-61

  6. Composite Fermion Spin Polarization Energy with Finite Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Mansour; Liu, Yang; Hasdemir, Sukret; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Baldwin, Kirk

    2014-03-01

    We study the spin polarization transitions of fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states in the filling range 1 < ν < 2 in symmetric quantum wells (QWs), as a function of density. Our results reveal a strong well-width dependence of the critical density nC and ratio between the Zeeman energy (EZ) normalized to the Coulomb energy (e2 / 4 πɛlB), above which a certain FQH state becomes spin polarized. For example, the ν = 7 / 5 FQH state becomes spin polarized at about 3 times higher density or 1.7 times larger EZ in the 31-nm-wide QW than in the 65-nm-wide QW. This well-width dependence of the spin polarization stems from by the finite electron layer thickness in these QWs and the resulting softening of the Coulomb interaction. We acknowledge support through the DOE BES (DE-FG02-00-ER45841) for measurements, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (Grant GBMF2719), Keck Foundation, and the NSF (DMR-0904117, DMR-1305691 and MRSEC DMR-0819860) for sample fabrication. Work at Arg.

  7. A multiscale-based approach for composite materials with embedded PZT filaments for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Etriby, Ahmed E.; Abdel-Meguid, Mohamed E.; Hatem, Tarek M.; Bahei-El-Din, Yehia A.

    2014-03-01

    Ambient vibrations are major source of wasted energy, exploiting properly such vibration can be converted to valuable energy and harvested to power up devices, i.e. electronic devices. Accordingly, energy harvesting using smart structures with active piezoelectric ceramics has gained wide interest over the past few years as a method for converting such wasted energy. This paper provides numerical and experimental analysis of piezoelectric fiber based composites for energy harvesting applications proposing a multi-scale modeling approach coupled with experimental verification. The multi-scale approach suggested to predict the behavior of piezoelectric fiber-based composites use micromechanical model based on Transformation Field Analysis (TFA) to calculate the overall material properties of electrically active composite structure. Capitalizing on the calculated properties, single-phase analysis of a homogeneous structure is conducted using finite element method. The experimental work approach involves running dynamic tests on piezoelectric fiber-based composites to simulate mechanical vibrations experienced by a subway train floor tiles. Experimental results agree well with the numerical results both for static and dynamic tests.

  8. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.

  9. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  10. Quantification of Urinary Stone Composition in Mixed Stones Using Dual-Energy CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuai; Huang, Alice; Montoya, Juan; Duan, Xinhui; Williams, James C.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using dual-energy computed tomography to accurately quantify uric acid and non-uric-acid components in urinary stones having mixed composition. Materials and Methods A total of 24 urinary stones were analyzed with microCT to serve as the reference standard for uric acid and non-uric-acid composition. These stones were placed in water phantoms to simulate body attenuation of slim to obese adults and scanned on a third-generation dual-source scanner using dual-energy modes adaptively selected based on phantom size. CT number ratio, which is distinct for different materials, was calculated for each pixel of the stones. Each pixel was then classified as uric acid and non-uric-acid by comparing the CT number ratio with preset thresholds ranging from 1.1 to 1.7. Minimal, maximal and root-mean-square errors were calculated by comparing composition to the reference standard and the threshold with the minimal root-mean-square-error was determined. A paired t-test was performed to compare the stone composition determined with dual-energy CT with the reference standard obtained with microCT. Results The optimal CT number ratio threshold ranged from 1.27 to 1.55, dependent on phantom size. The root-mean-square error ranged from 9.60% to 12.87% across all phantom sizes. Minimal and maximal absolute error ranged from 0.04% to 1.24% and from 22.05% to 35.46%, respectively. Dual-energy CT and the reference microCT did not differ significantly on uric acid and non-uric-acid composition (P from 0.20 to 0.96, paired t-test). Conclusion Accurate quantification of uric acid and non-uric-acid composition in mixed stones is possible using dual-energy CT. PMID:27224260

  11. Impact resistance of fiber composites: Energy absorbing mechanisms and environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Energy absorbing mechanisms were identified by several approaches. The energy absorbing mechanisms considered are those in unidirectional composite beams subjected to impact. The approaches used include: mechanic models, statistical models, transient finite element analysis, and simple beam theory. Predicted results are correlated with experimental data from Charpy impact tests. The environmental effects on impact resistance are evaluated. Working definitions for energy absorbing and energy releasing mechanisms are proposed and a dynamic fracture progression is outlined. Possible generalizations to angle-plied laminates are described.

  12. Impact resistance of fiber composites - Energy-absorbing mechanisms and environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Energy absorbing mechanisms were identified by several approaches. The energy absorbing mechanisms considered are those in unidirectional composite beams subjected to impact. The approaches used include: mechanic models, statistical models, transient finite element analysis, and simple beam theory. Predicted results are correlated with experimental data from Charpy impact tests. The environmental effects on impact resistance are evaluated. Working definitions for energy absorbing and energy releasing mechanisms are proposed and a dynamic fracture progression is outlined. Possible generalizations to angle-plied laminates are described.

  13. Low cost composite structures for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rix, C. ); McColskey, D. ); Acree, R. )

    1994-07-01

    As part of the Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage/Engineering Test Model (SMES-ETM) programs, design, analysis, fabrication and test programs were conducted to evaluate the low cost manufacturing of Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP) beams for usage as major components of the structural and electrical insulation systems. These studies utilized pultrusion process technologies and vinylester resins to produce large net sections at costs significantly below that of conventional materials. Demonstration articles incorporating laminate architectures and design details representative of SMES-ETM components were fabricated using the pultrusion process and epoxy, vinylester, and polyester resin systems. The mechanical and thermal properties of these articles were measured over the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K. The results of these tests showed that the pultruded, vinylester components have properties comparable to those of currently used materials, such as G-10, and are capable of meeting the design requirements for the SMES-ETM system.

  14. Low cost composite structures for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rix, Craig; McColskey, David; Acree, Robert

    1994-07-01

    As part of the Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage/Engineering Test Model (SMES-ETM) program, design, analysis, fabrication and test programs were conducted to evaluate the low cost manufacturing of Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP) beams for usage as major components of the structural and electrical insulation systems. These studies utilized pultrusion process technologies and vinylester resins to produce large net sections at costs significantly below that of conventional materials. Demonstration articles incorporating laminate architectures and design details representative of SMES-ETM components were fabricated using the pultrusion process and epoxy, vinylester, and polyester resin systems. The mechanical and thermal properties of these articles were measured over the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K. The results of these tests showed that the pultruded, vinylester components have properties comparable to those of currently used materials, such as G-10, and are capable of meeting the design requirements for the SMES-ETM system.

  15. Interfacial energy dissipation in a cellulose nanowhisker composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusli, Rafeadah; Eichhorn, Stephen J.

    2011-08-01

    Cyclic tensile and compressive deformation is applied to cellulose nanowhisker-epoxy resin based model nanocomposites. The molecular deformation of the cellulose nanowhiskers within the epoxy resin matrix is followed using a Raman spectroscopy technique, whereby shifts in the position of a band located at ~ 1095 cm - 1 are shown to correlate directly with a breakdown in the interfaces between the resin and the nanowhiskers and between nanowhiskers themselves. A theoretical model is used to determine the dissipation of energy at the interfaces between whiskers and at the whisker-matrix interface. This approach is shown to be useful for interpreting the local micromechanics of these materials by providing a quantitative measure of the quality of the interface.

  16. Household energy consumption in the United States, 1987 to 2009: Socioeconomic status, demographic composition, and energy services profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Robert J.

    This dissertation examines household energy consumption in the United States over the period of 1987 to 2009, specifically focusing on the role of socioeconomic status, demographic composition, and energy services profiles. The dissertation makes use of four cross-sections from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey data series to examine how household characteristics influence annual energy consumption overall, and by fuel type. Chapter 4 shows that household income is positively related to energy consumption, but more so for combustible fuel consumption than for electricity consumption. Additionally, results for educational attainment suggest a less cross-sectional association and more longitudinal importance as related to income. Demographic composition matters, as predicted by the literature; household size and householder age show predicted effects, but when considered together, income explains any interaction between age and household size. Combustible fuels showed a far greater relationship to housing unit size and income, whereas electricity consumption was more strongly related to educational attainment, showing important differences in the associations by fuel type. Taken together, these results suggest a life course-based model for understanding energy consumption that may be strongly linked to lifestyles. Chapter 5 extends the findings in Chapter 4 by examining the patterning of physical characteristics and behaviors within households. The chapter uses Latent Class Analysis to examine a broad set of energy significant behaviors and characteristics to discover five unique energy services profiles. These profiles are uniquely patterned across demographic and socioeconomic compositions of households and have important effects on energy consumption. These profiles are likely byproducts of the lifestyles in which the household takes part, due to factors such as their socioeconomic status and household demographic composition. Overall, the dissertation

  17. Correlation of high energy muons with primary composition in extensive air shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, C.; Higashi, S.; Hiraoka, N.; Ozaki, S.; Sato, T.; Suwada, T.; Takahasi, T.; Umeda, H.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation of high energy muons above 200 GeV in extensive air showers has been made for studying high energy interaction and primary composition of cosmic rays of energies in the range 10 to the 14th power approx. 10 to the 15th power eV. The muon energies are estimated from the burst sizes initiated by the muons in the rock, which are measured by four layers of proportional counters, each of area 5 x 2.6 sq m, placed at 30 m.w.e. deep, Funasaka tunnel vertically below the air shower array. These results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on the scaling model and the fireball model for two primary compositions, all proton and mixed.

  18. Composition and energy spectra of heavy nuclei of unknown origin detected on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, J. H.; Price, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    At the orbit of Skylab, steeply falling energy spectra of nuclei with atomic numbers of at least 8 and energies between about 10 and 40 MeV/amu at intensities much higher than seen outside the magnetosphere were observed. The composition is consistent with that of the solar corona. It is suggested that heavy solar-wind ions enter the magnetosphere, are accelerated, and populate the inner radiation belt.

  19. Study of the ultrahigh-energy primary-cosmic-ray composition with the MACRO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlen, S.; Ambrosio, M.; Antolini, R.; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, A.; Bam, B.B.; Barbarino, G.C.; Barish, B.C.; Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bemporad, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bilokon, H.; Bisi, V.; Bloise, C.; Bussino, S.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Campana, P.; Campana, D.; Carboni, M.; Cecchini, S.; Cei, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiera, C.; Cobis, A.; Cormack, R.; Corona, A.; Coutu, S.; DeCataldo, G.; DeMarzo, C.; De Vincenzi, M.; Di Credico, A.; Diehl, E.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Ficenec, D.; Forti, C.; Foti, L.; Fusco, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giannini, G.; Giglietto, N.; Giubellino, P.; Grassi, M.; Green, P.; Grillo, A.; Guarino, F.; Gustavino, C.; Habig, A.; Heinz, R.; Hong, J.T.; Iarocci, E.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kearns, E.; Klein, S.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Lamanna, E.; Lane, C.; Lee, C.; Levin, D.; Lipari, P.; Liu, G.; Liu, R.; Longo, M.J.; Ludlam, G.; Mancarella, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Margiotta-Neri, A.; Marin, A.; Marini, A.; Martello, D.; Martellotti, G.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Matteuzzi

    1992-08-01

    We present the analysis of multiple-muon events collected with one supermodule (1013 h live time) and two supermodules (1195 h live time) of the MACRO detector at Gran Sasso, Italy. Multimuon rates are shown to be sensitive to primary-cosmic-ray energies between {similar to}50 TeV and several thousand TeV. Experimental data are compared with the expected rates from two composition models: a light (i.e., proton-rich) and a heavy (i.e., Fe-rich) composition. The predictions are based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the hadronic interactions of cosmic-ray nuclei, followed by a detailed tracking of the muons through the rock and the experimental apparatus. The results show good sensitivity of the MACRO detector to primary composition. The data exhibit a preference towards the light composition model.

  20. Ultra-low-energy analog straintronics using multiferroic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kuntal

    2014-03-01

    Multiferroic devices, i.e., a magnetostrictive nanomagnet strain-coupled with a piezoelectric layer, are promising as binary switches for ultra-low-energy digital computing in beyond Moore's law era [Roy, K. Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 173110 (2013), Roy, K. et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 063108 (2011), Phys. Rev. B 83, 224412 (2011), Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group) 3, 3038 (2013), J. Appl. Phys. 112, 023914 (2012)]. We show here that such multiferroic devices, apart from performing digital computation, can be also utilized for analog computing purposes, e.g., voltage amplification, filter etc. The analog computing capability is conceived by considering that magnetization's mean orientation shifts gradually although nanomagnet's potential minima changes abruptly. Using tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) measurement, a continuous output voltage while varying the input voltage can be produced. Stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation in the presence of room-temperature (300 K) thermal fluctuations is solved to demonstrate the analog computing capability of such multiferroic devices. This work was supported in part by FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  1. Multiphase Nano-Composite Coatings for Achieving Energy Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Nainaparampil, Jose

    2012-03-26

    UES Inc. and ANL teamed in this work to develop novel coating systems for the protection of surfaces from thermal degradation mainly in two applications; Machining and Die casting. These coatings were specifically designed for the purpose by incorporating required material phases and the overall architecture, which led to reduce the energy usage and increase efficiency of the operations. Following the UES/ANL's feasibility work, the coatings were developed utilizing High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPMS) and Large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) techniques. Toughness, hardness and oxidation resistance: contrasting qualities have been mixed in the right proportion to attain the suitable material characteristic for the cause. Hafnium diboride (HfB2) based materials provided such a system and its properties were tamed to attain the right combination of toughness and hardness by working on the microstructure and architecture of coatings. An effective interfacing material (graded concentrations of topcoat) was also achieved in this work to provide the required adhesion between the substrate and the coating. Combination of an appropriate bond coat and a functional top coat provided the present thermal degradation resistant coating for cutting tools and die-casting applications. Laboratory level performance tests and industrial level application tests by partner companies (Beta Site Testing) were used for the development of these coatings.

  2. Yields and composition of syrups resulting from the flash pyrolysis of cellulosic materials using radiant energy

    SciTech Connect

    De Jenga, C.I.; Antal, M.J. Jr.; Jones, M. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    Cellulosic materials have been flash pyrolyzed using concentrated solar energy. The syrups obtained were composed mainly of levoglucosan. Radiant flash pyrolysis has thus been identified as a potentially attractive means of selectively degrading biomass material into good yields of relatively few products. The techniques and equipment employed to determine the composition of the pyrolyzates are described.

  3. Energy balance and the composition of weight loss during prolonged space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1982-01-01

    Integrated metabolic balance analysis, Skylab integrated metabolic balance analysis and computer simulation of fluid-electrolyte responses to zero-g, overall mission weight and tissue losses, energy balance, diet and exercise, continuous changes, electrolyte losses, caloric and exercise requirements, and body composition are discussed.

  4. Modeling and simulations of diphasic composites for development of high energy density dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sandeep Kesharsingh

    This doctoral research is focused on analytical and numerical modeling of diphasic composites for use in high energy density capacitors for pulsed power applications. An analytical model is presented based on an equivalent capacitance/impedance circuit used to express the effective permittivity of a composite dielectric with complex-shaped inclusions as functions of frequency and inclusion volume fraction. Zero-three (0-3) types of composites are investigated using this model. The results of this model are compared with different known effective medium theories (Maxwell Garnett, logarithmic, Bruggeman, series, and parallel mixing rules). Model predictions are also compared with published experimental data and are found to be in good agreement. Electrostatic field distribution characteristics and energy storage magnitudes for diphasic dielectrics containing high-permittivity inclusions in a low permittivity host phase (0-3 composite) have been evaluated analytically and numerically. Field distribution and energy storage were studied as a function of dielectric contrast (ratio of inclusion to host permittivity) and inclusion volume fraction. Information obtained from these studies was used to consider optimized diphasic dielectric traits that would lead to increases in energy density and breakdown behavior. Results of these simulations were also compared to the Maxwell Garnett (MG) mixing rule and the upper limit of applicability of the MG formulation in terms of inclusion volume fraction was established. It was determined that this limit was a function of the dielectric contrast.

  5. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Pietrzak, K.; Rojek, J.; Strojny-Nędza, A.; Mackiewicz, S.; Dutkiewicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    It is commonly known that the properties of sintered materials are strongly related to technological conditions of the densification process. This paper shows the sintering behavior of a NiAl-Al2O3 composite, and its individual components sintered separately. Each kind of material was processed via the powder metallurgy route (hot pressing). The progress of sintering at different stages of the process was tested. Changes in the microstructure were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Metal-ceramics interface was clean and no additional phases were detected. Correlation between the microstructure, density, and mechanical properties of the sintered materials was analyzed. The values of elastic constants of NiAl/Al2O3 were close to intermetallic ones due to the volume content of the NiAl phase particularly at low densities, where small alumina particles had no impact on the composite's stiffness. The influence of the external pressure of 30 MPa seemed crucial for obtaining satisfactory stiffness for three kinds of the studied materials which were characterized by a high dense microstructure with a low number of isolated spherical pores.

  6. Relationships among Egg Size, Composition, and Energy: A Comparative Study of Geminate Sea Urchins

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Justin S.; Moran, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    Egg size is one of the fundamental parameters in the life histories of marine organisms. However, few studies have examined the relationships among egg size, composition, and energetic content in a phylogenetically controlled context. We investigated the associations among egg size, composition, and energy using a comparative system, geminate species formed by the closure of the Central American Seaway. We examined western Atlantic (WA) and eastern Pacific (EP) species in three echinoid genera, Echinometra, Eucidaris, and Diadema. In the genus with the largest difference in egg size between geminates (Echinometra), the eggs of WA species were larger, lipid rich and protein poor compared to the smaller eggs of their EP geminate. In addition, the larger WA eggs had significantly greater total egg energy and summed biochemical constituents yet significantly lower egg energy density (energy-per-unit-volume). However, the genera with smaller (Eucidaris) or no (Diadema) differences in egg size were not significantly different in summed biochemical constituents, total egg energy, or energy density. Theoretical models generally assume a strong tradeoff between egg size and fecundity that limits energetic investment and constrains life history evolution. We show that even among closely-related taxa, large eggs cannot be assumed to be scaled-up small eggs either in terms of energy or composition. Although our data comes exclusively from echinoid echinoderms, this pattern may be generalizable to other marine invertebrate taxa. Because egg composition and egg size do not necessarily evolve in lockstep, selective factors such as sperm limitation could act on egg volume without necessarily affecting maternal or larval energetics. PMID:22911821

  7. Insensitive high-energy energetic structural material of tungsten-polytetrafluoroethylene-aluminum composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liu; Liu, Jinxu; Li, Shukui; Zhang, Xinbo

    2015-11-01

    Energetic structural material is a kind of materials that are inert under normal conditions but could produce exothermic chemical reaction when subjected to impact. This report shows a kind of energetic structural material of tungsten (W)-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-aluminum (Al) with density of 4.12 g/cm3, excellent ductility and dynamic compressive strength of 96 MPa. Moreover, 50W-35PTFE-15Al (wt%) can exhibit a high reaction energy value of more than 2 times of TNT per unit mass and 5 times of TNT per unit volume, respectively, but with excellent insensitivity compared with traditional explosives. Under thermal conditions, the W-PTFE-Al composite can keep stable at 773 K. Under impact loading, when the strain rate up to ˜4820 s-1 coupled with the absorbed energy per unit volume of 120 J/cm3, deflagration occurs and combustion lasts for 500 μs. During impact compressive deformation, the PTFE matrix is elongated into nano-fibers, thus significantly increases the reaction activity of W-PTFE-Al composites. The nano-fiber structure is necessary for the reaction of W-PTFE-Al composites. The formation of PTFE nano-fibers must undergo severe plastic deformation, and therefore the W-PTFE-Al composites exhibit excellent insensitivity and safety. Furthermore, the reaction mechanisms of W-PTFE-Al composites in argon and in air are revealed.

  8. Spray-Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Composite Electrodes for Thermal Energy Scavenging Electrochemical Cells.

    PubMed

    Holubowitch, Nicolas E; Landon, James; Lippert, Cameron A; Craddock, John D; Weisenberger, Matthew C; Liu, Kunlei

    2016-08-31

    Spray-coated multiwalled carbon nanotube/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (MWCNT/PVDF) composite electrodes, scCNTs, with varying CNT compositions (2 to 70 wt %) are presented for use in a simple thermal energy-scavenging cell (thermocell) based on the ferro/ferricyanide redox couple. Their utility for direct thermal-to-electrical energy conversion is explored at various temperature differentials and cell orientations. Performance is compared to that of buckypaper, a 100% CNT sheet material used as a benchmark electrode in thermocell research. The 30 to 70 wt % scCNT composites give the highest power output by electrode area-seven times greater than buckypaper at ΔT = 50 °C. CNT utilization is drastically enhanced in our electrodes, reaching 1 W gCNT(-1) compared to 0.036 W gCNT(-1) for buckypaper. Superior performance of our spray-coated electrodes is attributed to both wettability with better use of a large portion of electrochemically active CNTs and minimization of ohmic and thermal contact resistances. Even composites with as low as 2 wt % CNTs are still competitive with prior art. The MWCNT/PVDF composites developed herein are inexpensive, scalable, and serve a general need for CNT electrode optimization in next-generation devices. PMID:27510029

  9. Insensitive high-energy energetic structural material of tungsten-polytetrafluoroethylene-aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liu; Liu, Jinxu Zhang, Xinbo; Li, Shukui

    2015-11-15

    Energetic structural material is a kind of materials that are inert under normal conditions but could produce exothermic chemical reaction when subjected to impact. This report shows a kind of energetic structural material of tungsten (W)-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-aluminum (Al) with density of 4.12 g/cm{sup 3}, excellent ductility and dynamic compressive strength of 96 MPa. Moreover, 50W-35PTFE-15Al (wt%) can exhibit a high reaction energy value of more than 2 times of TNT per unit mass and 5 times of TNT per unit volume, respectively, but with excellent insensitivity compared with traditional explosives. Under thermal conditions, the W-PTFE-Al composite can keep stable at 773 K. Under impact loading, when the strain rate up to ∼4820 s{sup −1} coupled with the absorbed energy per unit volume of 120 J/cm{sup 3}, deflagration occurs and combustion lasts for 500 μs. During impact compressive deformation, the PTFE matrix is elongated into nano-fibers, thus significantly increases the reaction activity of W-PTFE-Al composites. The nano-fiber structure is necessary for the reaction of W-PTFE-Al composites. The formation of PTFE nano-fibers must undergo severe plastic deformation, and therefore the W-PTFE-Al composites exhibit excellent insensitivity and safety. Furthermore, the reaction mechanisms of W-PTFE-Al composites in argon and in air are revealed.

  10. A carbon-carbon composite materials development program for fusion energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P. ); Engle, G.B. ); Hollenberg, G.W. )

    1992-10-01

    Carbon-carbon composites increasingly are being used for plasma-facing component (PFC) applications in magnetic-confinement plasma-fusion devices. They offer substantial advantages such as enhanced physical and mechanical properties and superior thermal shock resistance compared to the previously favored bulk graphite. Next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), will require advanced carbon-carbon composites possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated extreme thermal heat loads. This report outlines a program that will facilitate the development of advanced carbon-carbon composites specifically tailored to meet the requirements of ITER and BPX. A strategy for developing the necessary associated design data base is described. Materials property needs, i.e., high thermal conductivity, radiation stability, tritium retention, etc., are assessed and prioritized through a systems analysis of the functional, operational, and component requirements for plasma-facing applications. The current Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Program on carbon-carbon composites is summarized. Realistic property goals are set based upon our current understanding. The architectures of candidate PFC carbon-carbon composite materials are outlined, and architectural features considered desirable for maximum irradiation stability are described. The European and Japanese carbon-carbon composite development and irradiation programs are described. The Working Group conclusions and recommendations are listed. It is recommended that developmental carbon-carbon composite materials from the commercial sector be procured via request for proposal/request for quotation (RFP/RFQ) as soon as possible.

  11. Effects of Levothyroxine Replacement or Suppressive Therapy on Energy Expenditure and Body Composition

    PubMed Central

    Kolobova, Irina; Smeraglio, Anne; Peters, Dawn; Purnell, Jonathan Q.; Schuff, Kathryn G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thyrotropin (TSH)-suppressive doses of levothyroxine (LT4) have adverse effects on bone and cardiac function, but it is unclear whether metabolic function is also affected. The objective of this study was to determine whether women receiving TSH-suppressive LT4 doses have alterations in energy expenditure or body composition. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional comparison between three groups of women: 26 women receiving chronic TSH-suppressive LT4 doses, 80 women receiving chronic replacement LT4 doses, and 16 untreated euthyroid control women. Subjects underwent measurements of resting energy expenditure (REE), substrate oxidation, and thermic effect of food by indirect calorimetry; physical activity energy expenditure by accelerometer; caloric intake by 24-hour diet recall; and body composition by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Results: REE per kilogram lean body mass in the LT4 euthyroid women was 6% lower than that of the LT4-suppressed group, and 4% lower than that of the healthy control group (p = 0.04). Free triiodothyronine (fT3) levels were directly correlated with REE, and were 10% lower in the LT4 euthyroid women compared with the other two groups (p = 0.007). The groups of subjects did not differ in other measures of energy expenditure, caloric intake, or body composition. Conclusions: LT4 suppression therapy does not adversely affect energy expenditure or body composition in women. However, LT4 replacement therapy is associated with a lower REE, despite TSH levels within the reference range. This may be due to lower fT3 levels, suggesting relative tissue hypothyroidism may contribute to impaired energy expenditure in LT4 therapy. PMID:26700485

  12. Determination of composition and energy gaps of GaInNAsSb layers grown by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, A.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Isoaho, R.; Malinen, P.; Tukiainen, A.; Honkanen, M.; Guina, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to accurately determine the composition of GaInNAsSb heterostructures and a modified band anti-crossing model to calculate the corresponding bandgaps. The composition determination method is based on combining x-ray diffractometry and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements. The modified band anti-crossing model was derived from the model known for GaInNAs and using band-gap composition relations for GaInAs, GaInSb, InAsSb and GaAsSb. The model parameters were defined by fitting with experimental bandgap data retrieved from photoluminescence. For validation and data fitting we used experimental samples with N composition in the range of 0-0.06, In composition from 0 to 0.17, and Sb composition in the range of 0-0.08. All samples were thermally annealed to minimize the band gap shift caused by the short range ordering effects in GaInNAsSb crystal. The modified model yields an excellent fit to the experimental band gap data with an accuracy of ~20 meV, and is a practical tool for designing, fabricating and analyzing optoelectronics devices.

  13. Novel graphene/carbon nanotube composite fibers for efficient wire-shaped miniature energy devices.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; You, Xiao; Deng, Jue; Chen, Xuli; Yang, Zhibin; Ren, Jing; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-05-01

    Novel nanostructured composite fibers based on graphene and carbon nanotubes are developed with high tensile strength, electrical conductivity, and electrocatalytic activity. As two application demonstrations, these composite fibers are used to fabricate flexible, wire-shaped dye-sensitized solar cells and electrochemical supercapacitors, both with high performances, for example, a maximal energy conversion efficiency of 8.50% and a specific capacitance of ca. 31.50 F g(-1). These miniature wire-shaped devices are further shown to be promising for flexible and portable electronic facilities. PMID:24464762

  14. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy-graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties and on the molecular and structural properties of graphite fiber reinforced composites were assessed so that the durability of such composites in space applications could be predicted. Investigative techniques including ESR and infrared spectroscopy, ESCA, contact angle measurements, and dynamic and static mechanical testing (3-point bending and interlaminar shear) were employed. The results using these different techniques are individually described, and the implications of the data are discussed. The proposed plan of work for the next fiscal year is outlined.

  15. Temperature rise due to mechanical energy dissipation in undirectional thermoplastic composites(AS4/PEEK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgious, I. T.; Sun, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The history of temperature rise due to internal dissipation of mechanical energy in insulated off-axis uniaxial specimens of the unidirectional thermoplastic composite (AS4/PEEK) has been measured. The experiment reveals that the rate of temperature rise is a polynomial function of stress amplitude: It consists of a quadratic term and a sixth power term. This fact implies that the specific heat of the composite depends on the stretching its microstructure undergoes during deformation. The Einstein theory for specific heat is used to explain the dependence of the specific heat on the stretching of the microstructure.

  16. Changes in body composition and energy expenditure after six weeks' growth hormone treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, J W; Greene, S A; Jung, R T; Scrimgeour, C M; Rennie, M J

    1991-01-01

    Changes in body composition and energy expenditure were assessed in 15 children after six weeks of human growth hormone (hGH) treatment. Body composition measurements were made by stable isotope labelled water (H2(18)O) dilution, bioelectrical impedance, and skinfold thickness techniques. Energy expenditure was assessed both by indirect ventilated hood calorimetry (resting energy expenditure) and the stable isotope doubly labelled water (2H2(18)O) technique (free living daily total energy expenditure). Mean increases in weight of 0.96 kg and fat free mass of 1.37 kg and a mean decrease in fat mass of 0.41 kg were observed. Significant increases both in resting energy expenditure and free living daily energy expenditure were detected. Absolute changes in fat mass and resting energy expenditure were correlated. The data suggest (i) that the increase in the fat free mass is the most significant early clinical measure of hGH response and (ii) that hGH increases the metabolic activity of the fat free mass. Monitoring such changes may be predictive of the efficacy of hGH in promoting growth. PMID:2039249

  17. Nanotube liquid crystal elastomers: photomechanical response and flexible energy conversion of layered polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoming; King, Benjamin C.; Loomis, James; Campo, Eva M.; Hegseth, John; Cohn, Robert W.; Terentjev, Eugene; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-09-01

    Elastomeric composites based on nanotube liquid crystals (LCs) that preserve the internal orientation of nanotubes could lead to anisotropic physical properties and flexible energy conversion. Using a simple vacuum filtration technique of fabricating nanotube LC films and utilizing a transfer process to poly (dimethyl) siloxane wherein the LC arrangement is preserved, here we demonstrate unique and reversible photomechanical response of this layered composite to excitation by near infra-red (NIR) light at ultra-low nanotube mass fractions. On excitation by NIR photons, with application of small or large pre-strains, significant expansion or contraction of the sample occurs, respectively, that is continuously reversible and three orders of magnitude larger than in pristine polymer. Schlieren textures were noted in these LC composites confirming long range macroscopic nematic order of nanotubes within the composites. Order parameters of LC films ranged from Soptical = 0.51-0.58 from dichroic measurements. Film concentrations, elastic modulus and photomechanical stress were all seen to be related to the nematic order parameter. For the same nanotube concentration, the photomechanical stress was almost three times larger for the self-assembled LC nanotube actuator compared to actuator based on randomly oriented carbon nanotubes. Investigation into the kinetics of photomechanical actuation showed variation in stretching exponent β with pre-strains, concentration and orientation of nanotubes. Maximum photomechanical stress of ˜0.5 MPa W-1 and energy conversion of ˜0.0045% was achieved for these layered composites. The combination of properties, namely, optical anisotropy, reversible mechanical response to NIR excitation and flexible energy conversion all in one system accompanied with low cost makes nanotube LC elastomers important for soft photochromic actuation, energy conversion and photo-origami applications.

  18. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites: Processing, microstructure, and application as a kinetic energy penetrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandliker, Richard B.

    The development of alloys with high glass forming ability allows fabrication of bulk samples of amorphous metal. This capability makes these materials available for applications which require significant material thickness in all three dimensions. Superior mechanical properties and advantages in processing make metallic glass a choice candidate as a matrix material for composites. This study reports techniques for making composites by melt-infiltration casting using the alloy Zrsb{41.2}Tisb{13.8}Cusb{12.5}Nisb{10.0}Besb{22.5} (VitreloyspTM 1) as a matrix material. Composite rods 5 cm in length and 7 mm in diameter were made and found to have a nearly fully amorphous matrix; there was less than 3 volume percent crystallized matrix material. The samples were reinforced by continuous metal wires, tungsten powder, or silicon carbide particulate preforms. The most easily processed samples were made with uniaxially aligned tungsten and carbon steel continuous wire reinforcement; the majority of the analysis presented is of these samples. The measured porosity was typically less than 3%. The results also indicate necessary guidelines for developing processing techniques for large scale production, new reinforcement materials, and other metallic glass compositions. Analysis of the microstructure of the tungsten wire and steel wire reinforced composites was performed by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The most common phase in the crystallized matrix is most likely a Laves phase with the approximate formula Besb{12}Zrsb3TiNiCu. In tungsten-reinforced composites, a crystalline reaction layer 240 nm thick of tungsten nanocrystals in an amorphous matrix formed. In the steel reinforced composites, the reaction layer was primarily composed of a mixed metal carbide, mainly ZrC. One promising application of the metallic glass matrix composite is as a kinetic

  19. Effect of excitation energy on dentine bond strength and composite properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Greener, E H

    1994-06-01

    A number of available dentine adhesives and dental composites require light activation for polymerization. There are many variables which affect the light absorbing properties (e.g. bond strength) of these materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of excitation energy (EE) on the dentine shear bond strength (SBS) of two lengths (2.1 mm and 3.25 mm) of light-cured (or dual-cured) dentine adhesives/dental composites. Diametral tensile (DTS) and compressive (CS) strengths of the same composites were also studied as a function of EE. Three resin composites with their respective adhesives (Marathon One/Tenure, Z100/Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Herculite XRV/Optibond) were used. Five commercial curing lights were used to produce spectra of 100-650 mW cm-2. The data were analysed using ANOVA and the Tukey LSD test. No significant correlation was observed at the P > 0.05 level between EE and SBS in the shorter specimens. The SBS of Optibond is independent of EE and composite length. The SBS data were also analysed with Weibull statistics. The characteristic strengths calculated varied between 14 and 27 MPa. For the composites tested, mean values of DTS varied between 33 and 54 MPa and CS varied between 167 and 414 MPa. The DTS and CS of Z100 were significantly greater than those of the other materials. Intensities > or = 250 mW cm-2 produced equivalent mechanical properties within all composite materials and equivalent bond strengths in systems which included dentine, adhesive and composite resin. PMID:8027461

  20. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry body composition in patients with secondary osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Messina, Carmelo; Monaco, Cristian Giuseppe; Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-08-01

    Due to the tight relationship between bone and soft tissues, there has been an increased interest in body composition assessment in patients with secondary osteoporosis as well as other pathological conditions. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is primarily devoted to the evaluation of bone mineral status, but continuous scientific advances of body composition software made DXA a rapid and easily available technique to assess body composition in terms of fat mass and lean mass. As a result, the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) recently developed Official Positions regarding the use of this technique for body composition analysis. According to ISCD paper, indications are mainly limited to three conditions: HIV patients treated with antiretroviral agents associated with a risk of lipoatrophy; obese patients undergoing treatment for high weight loss; patients with sarcopenia or muscle weakness. Nevertheless, there are several other interesting clinical applications that were not included in the ISCD position paper, such as body composition assessment in patients undergoing organ transplantation, pulmonary disease as well as all those chronic condition that may lead to malnutrition. In conclusion, DXA body composition offers new diagnostic and research possibilities for a variety of diseases; due to its high reproducibility, DXA has also the potential to monitor body composition changes with pharmacological, nutritional or physic therapeutic interventions. ISCD addressed and recommended a list of clinical condition, but the crescent availability of DXA scans and software improvements may open the use of DXA to other indication in the next future. This article provides an overview of DXA body composition indications in the management of secondary osteoporosis and other clinical indications in adults. PMID:27048946

  1. Traçage des apports anthropiques sur un petit bassin versant: utilisation des rapports isotopiques du strontium, des éléments majeurs et traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Négrel, Philippe

    1997-06-01

    The chemical composition of river water is influenced by both the lithology of the basins drained by the river and anthropogenic influences (villages, salting of roads, agriculture, atmospheric pollution, etc.) along its banks. The fluxes of chemical elements were studied along a river valley stretching W-E from the headwaters of the various affluents to the outlet of the river. Strontium isotope differences enabled identification of potential sources (rocks, atmosphere, pollution).

  2. Energy harvesting in pavement from passing vehicles with piezoelectric composite plate for ice melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Farjana; Wu, Nan; Kapoor, Kartik

    2016-04-01

    An energy harvester in the road pavement made from a piezoelectric composite plate is designed and studied to collect energy from the passing vehicles for the ice melting aim. Piezoelectric material has the ability to produce electric charge on its surface when strain takes place due to any external loading. Based on this property, a rectangular composite plate harvester is developed consisting of piezoelectric material as the energy generation coating layer and A514 steel as the substrate layer to realize the energy harvesting process from the variable pressure generated in the road pavement by passing vehicles. Based on Westergaards stress model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the three dimensional stress distribution in the pavement. Numerical simulations are conducted to study the optimization of various parameters of the harvester, such as depth of the harvester in the pavement, length and width as well as thicknesses of piezoelectric layer and the substrate. By taking in to consideration the maximum stress that can be sustained by both of the piezoelectric material and also the substrate material, an optimum design of the piezoelectric couple composite plate energy harvester is suggested. It is seen that the maximum output power, which can be generated by a single patch of 0.2m*0.2m*0.0026m dimension with a vehicle passing at 22.2 m/s, can reach up to 23.36 W. With the well-designed pavement energy harvesters, it is feasible to collect enough energy to rise the temperature of the ice with the thickness of 1cm covering a 5m width road by 20 degree Celsius within 2.5 hours. This technique can be applied to melt the ice on the roads and bridges especially in cold countries.

  3. Dry period plane of energy: Effects on feed intake, energy balance, milk production, and composition in transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Mann, S; Yepes, F A Leal; Overton, T R; Wakshlag, J J; Lock, A L; Ryan, C M; Nydam, D V

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to investigate the effect of different dry cow feeding strategies on the degree of ketonemia postpartum. Epidemiologic studies provide evidence of an association between elevated β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentrations in postpartum dairy cows and a decreased risk for reproductive success as well as increased risk for several diseases in early lactation, such as displacement of the abomasum and metritis. The plane of energy fed to cows in the prepartum period has been shown to influence ketogenesis and the degree of negative energy balance postpartum. Our hypothesis was that a high-fiber, controlled-energy diet (C) fed during the dry period would lead to a lower degree of hyperketonemia in the first weeks postpartum compared with either a high-energy diet (H), or a diet where an intermediate level of energy would only be fed in the close-up period (starting at 28d before expected parturition), following the same controlled-energy diet in the far-off period. Hyperketonemia in this study was defined as a blood BHBA concentration of ≥1.2mmol/L. Holstein cows (n=84) entering parity 2 or greater were enrolled using a randomized block design and housed in individual tiestalls. All treatment diets were fed for ad libitum intake and contained monensin. Cows received the same fresh cow ration after calving. Blood samples were obtained 3 times weekly before and after calving and analyzed for BHBA and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA). Milk components, production, and dry matter intake were recorded and energy balance was calculated. Repeated measures ANOVA was conducted for the outcomes dry matter intake, energy balance, BHBA and NEFA concentrations, milk and energy-corrected milk yield, as well as milk composition. Predicted energy balance tended to be less negative postpartum in group C and cows in this group had fewer episodes of hyperketonemia compared with both the intermediate group and group H in the first 3 wk after calving. Postpartum BHBA and

  4. Energy and momentum management of the Space Station using magnetically suspended composite rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhaure, D. B.; Oglevie, R. E.; Keckler, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    The research addresses the feasibility of using magnetically suspended composite rotors to jointly perform the energy and momentum management functions of an advanced manned Space Station. Recent advancements in composite materials, magnetic suspensions, and power conversion electronics have given flywheel concepts the potential to simultaneously perform these functions for large, long duration spacecraft, while offering significant weight, volume, and cost savings over conventional approaches. The Space Station flywheel concept arising out of this study consists of a composite-material rotor, a large-angle magnetic suspension (LAMS) system, an ironless armature motor/generator, and high-efficiency power conversion electronics. The LAMS design permits the application of appropriate spacecraft control torques without the use of conventional mechanical gimbals. In addition, flywheel systems have the growth potential and modularity needed to play a key role in many future system developments.

  5. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    Publications and theses generated on composite research are listed. Surface energy changes of an epoxy based on tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM)/diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), T-300 graphite fiber and T-300/5208 (graphite fiber/epoxy) composites were investigated after irradiation with 0.5 MeV electrons. Electron spin resonance (ESR) investigations of line shapes and the radical decay behavior were made of an epoxy based on tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM)/diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), T-300 graphite fiber, and T-300/5208 (graphite fiber/epoxy) composites after irradiation with Co(60) gamma-radiation or 0.5 MeV electrons. The results of the experiments are discussed.

  6. Tuning of wettability of PANI-GNP composites using keV energy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, G. B. V. S.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2016-07-01

    Polyaniline nanofiber composites with various nanomaterials have several applications in electrochemical biosensors. The surface properties of these composites coated electrodes play crucial role in enzyme absorption and analyte detection process. In the present study, Polyaniline-Graphene nanopowder (PANI-GNP) composites were prepared by rapid-mixing polymerization method. The films were prepared on ITO coated glass substrates and irradiated with 42 keV He+ ions produced by indigenously fabricated accelerator at IUAC, New Delhi. The films were characterized before and after irradiation by SEM, Raman spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The as-prepared films show superhydrophilic nature and after irradiation the films show highly hydrophobic nature with water contact angle (135°). The surface morphology was studied by SEM and structural changes were studied by Raman spectra. The surface morphological modifications induced by keV energy ions helps in tuning the wettability at different ion fluences.

  7. Graphene/heparin template-controlled polyaniline nanofibers composite for high energy density supercapacitor electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniruzzaman Sk, Md; Yue, Chee Yoon; Jena, Rajeeb Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Graphene/PANI nanofibers composites are prepared for the first time using a novel in situ polymerization method based on the chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline using heparin as a soft template. The even dispersion of individual graphene sheet within the polymer nanofibers matrix enhances the kinetics for both charge transfer and ion transport throughout the electrode. This novel G25PNF75 composite (weight ratio of GO:PANI = 25:75) shows a high specific capacitance of 890.79 F g-1 and an excellent energy density of 123.81 Wh kg-1 at a constant discharge current of 0.5 mA. The composite exhibits excellent cycle life with 88.78% specific capacitance retention after 1000 charge-discharge cycles. The excellent performance of the composite is due to the synergistic combination of graphene which provides good electrical conductivity and mechanical stability, and PANI nanofiber which provides good redox activity that consequently contributed such high energy density.

  8. α MnMoO₄/graphene hybrid composite: high energy density supercapacitor electrode material.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debasis; Giri, Soumen; Moniruzzaman, Md; Basu, Tanya; Mandal, Manas; Das, Chapal Kumar

    2014-07-28

    A unique and cost effective hydrothermal procedure has been carried out for the synthesis of hexahedron shaped α MnMoO4 and its hybrid composite with graphene using three different weight percentages of graphene. Characterization techniques, such as XRD, Raman and FTIR analysis, established the phase and formation of the composite. The electrochemical characterization of the pseudocapacitive MnMoO4 and the MnMoO4/graphene composites in 1 M Na2SO4 displayed highest specific capacitances of 234 F g(-1) and 364 F g(-1), respectively at a current density of 2 A g(-1). Unlike many other pseudocapacitive electrode materials our prepared materials responded in a wide range of working potentials of (-)1 V to (+)1 V, which indeed resulted in a high energy density without substantial loss of power density. The highest energy densities of 130 Wh kg(-1) and 202.2 Wh kg(-1) were achieved, respectively for the MnMoO4 and the MnMoO4/graphene composite at a constant power delivery rate of 2000 W kg(-1). The synergistic effect of the graphene with the pseudocapacitive MnMoO4 caused an increased cycle stability of 88% specific capacitance retention after 1000 consecutive charge discharge cycles at 8 A g(-1) constant current density, which was higher than the virgin MnMoO4 with 84% specific capacitance retention. PMID:24921461

  9. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and graphene composite structures for energy and catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Jun; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Lee, Ju Min; Lim, Joonwon; Han, Tae Hee; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2014-07-01

    Substitutional heteroatom doping is a promising route to modulate the outstanding material properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene for customized applications. Recently, (nitrogen-) N-doping has been introduced to ensure tunable work-function, enhanced n-type carrier concentration, diminished surface energy, and manageable polarization. Along with the promising assessment of N-doping effects, research on the N-doped carbon based composite structures is emerging for the synergistic integration with various functional materials. This invited feature article reviews the current research progress, emerging trends, and opening opportunities in N-doped carbon based composite structures. Underlying basic principles are introduced for the effective modulation of material properties of graphitic carbons by N-doping. Composite structures of N-doped graphitic carbons with various functional materials, including (i) polymers, (ii) transition metals, (iii) metal oxides, nitrides, sulphides, and (iv) semiconducting quantum dots are highlighted. Practical benefits of the synergistic composite structures are investigated in energy and catalytic applications, such as organic photovoltaics, photo/electro-catalysts, lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors, with a particular emphasis on the optimized interfacial structures and properties. PMID:24710592

  10. Optimization of piezoelectric bistable composite plates for broadband vibrational energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, David N.; Kim, H. Alicia; Bowen, Christopher R.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a unique arrangement of bistable composite plates with piezoelectric patches bonded to its surface to perform broadband vibration-based energy harvesting from ambient mechanical vibrations. These bistable nonlinear devices have been shown to have improved power generation compared to conventional resonant systems and can be designed to occupy smaller volumes than bistable magnetic cantilever systems. This paper presents the results of an optimization study of bistable composites that are capable of generating greater electrical power from a smaller space by discovering the correct geometric configuration for energy harvesting. Optimum solutions are investigated in a series of design parameter studies intended to reveal the complex interactions of the physical constraints and design requirements. The proposed approach considers the optimal choice of device aspect ratio, thickness, laminate stacking sequence, and piezoelectric surface area. Increased electrical output is found for geometries and piezoelectric configurations which have not been considered previously.

  11. A silver-nanoparticle-catalyzed graphite composite for electrochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xingliang; Hubble, Dion; Calzada, Raul; Ashtamkar, Aalap; Bhatia, Deepak; Cartagena, Sergio; Mukherjee, Partha; Liang, Hong

    2015-02-01

    A new composite containing silver nanoparticles and graphite is developed in order to improve electrochemical energy storage. The nanocomposite uses silver (Ag) nanoparticles as a catalyst to enhance the electrochemical performance. Results indicate that the graphite composite decorated with Ag shows up to a six-fold improvement in specific capacitance. Electron/charge transfer is enhanced through a shift from double-layer to pseudocapacitive behavior, mediated by Li+ intercalation. Decoration with Ag nanoparticles allows for improvements in electrochemical impedance response, ease of electronic/ionic charging, and overall energy storage capability. This research provides a promising alternative solution for the next generation of safe and cost-effective lithium-ion devices.

  12. The puzzle of the ankle in the Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Ray Spectrum, and composition indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Glennys

    2015-08-01

    The sharp change in slope of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray spectrum around 10^18.6 eV (the ankle), combined with evidence of a light but extragalactic component near and below the ankle and intermediate composition above, has proved exceedingly challenging to understand theoretically. In this talk I discuss two possible solutions to the puzzle and how they can be (in)validated.First, I present a new mechanism whereby photo-disintegration of ultra-high energy nuclei in the region surrounding a UHECR accelerator naturally accounts for the observed spectrum and inferred composition (using LHC-tuned models extrapolated to UHE) at Earth. We discuss the conditions required to reproduce the spectrum above 10^17.5 eV and the composition, which -- in our model -- consists below the ankle of extragalactic protons and the high energy tail of Galactic Cosmic Rays, and above the ankle of surviving nuclei from the extended source. Predictions for the spectrum and flavors of neutrinos resulting from this process will be presented, and also implications for candidate sources.The other possible explanation is that in actuality UHECRs are entirely or almost entirely protons, and the cross-section for p-Air scattering increases more rapidly above center-of-mass energy of 70 TeV (10 times the current LHC cm energy) than predicted in conventional models. This gives an equally good fit to the depth-of-shower maximum behavior obverved by Auger, while being an intriguing sign of new state in QCD at extremely high energy density.

  13. Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays: Composition, Early Air Shower Interactions, and Xmax Skewness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, James

    The composition of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) is still not completely understood, and must be inferred from Extended Air Shower (EAS), particle cascades which they initiate upon entering the atmosphere. The atmospheric depth at which the shower contains the maximum number of particles ( Xmax) is the most composition-sensitive property of the air shower, but its interpretation is hindered by intrinsic statistical fluctuations in EAS development which cause distinct compositions to produce overlapping Xmax distributions as well as our limited knowledge at these energies of hadronic physics which strongly impacts the Xmax distribution's shape. These issues ultimately necessitate a variety of complementary approaches to interpreting UHECR composition from Xmax data. The current work advances these approaches by connecting X max skewness to the uncertainties above. The study of X max has historically focused only on the mean and standard deviation of its distribution, but skewness is shown here to be strongly related to both the statistical fluctuations in EAS development as well as the least-understood hadronic cross-sections in the air shower. This leads into a treatment of the Exponentially-Modified Gaussian (EMG) distribution, whose little-known properties make it very useful for Xmax analysis and for data analysis in general. A powerful method emerges which uses only descriptive statistics in a robust check for energy-dependent changes in UHECR mass or EAS development. The application of these analyses to X max data provides tantalizing clues concerning issues of critical importance, such as the relationship between Xmax and the 'ankle' break in the UHECR energy spectrum, or the inferred properties of the UHECR mass distribution and its strong dependence on hadronic model systematics.

  14. Radiographic Spectroscopy of Atomic Composition of Materials: a Multi-Energy Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Naydenov, S V; Ryzhikov, V D; Smith, C F

    2004-06-16

    A theoretical model of multi-energy radiography (MER) for reconstruction of the atomic structure is proposed. It is shown that, using multi-channel absorption and detection of radiation, effective atomic number and quantitative chemical composition of the materials can be readily reconstructed. This approach opens prospects for improvement of efficiency of X-ray techniques in non-destructive testing, nuclear and safety monitoring, security customs control, and others.

  15. Mass Composition of Cosmic Rays at Ultra High Energies by Yakutsk Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knurenko, Stanislav; Petrov, Igor

    2015-08-01

    The paper describes methods for the analysis of cosmic rays mass composition and results for over a large time span. The data were obtained at Small Cherenkov array over 20 year period of continuous observation and 40 - years of observations at the main Yakutsk array. The experimental data indicates changes in the MC in the energy range 1016 - 1018 eV which confirmed by results obtained by other EAS arrays.

  16. Sulfur-based composite cathode materials for high-energy rechargeable lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiulin; He, Yu-Shi; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-21

    There is currently an urgent demand for highly efficient energy storage and conversion systems. Due to its high theoretical energy density, low cost, and environmental compatibility, the lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has become a typical representative of the next generation of electrochemical power sources. Various approaches have been explored to design and prepare sulfur cathode materials to enhance their electrochemical performance. This Research News article summarizes and compares different sulfur materials for Li-S batteries and particularly focuses on the fine structures, electrochemical performance, and electrode reaction mechanisms of pyrolyzed polyacrylo-nitrile sulfur (pPAN@S) and microporous-carbon/small-sulfur composite materials. PMID:25256595

  17. Experimental analysis of energy harvesting from self-induced flutter of a composite beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Mohamed Y.; Al-Haik, Mohammad Y.; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    2015-07-01

    Previous attempts to harvest energy from aeroelastic vibrations have been based on attaching a beam to a moving wing or structure. Here, we exploit self-excited oscillations of a fluttering composite beam to harvest energy using piezoelectric transduction. Details of the beam properties and experimental setup are presented. The effects of preset angle of attack, wind speed, and load resistance on the levels of harvested power are determined. The results point to a complex relation between the aerodynamic loading and its impact on the static deflection and amplitudes of the limit cycle oscillations on one hand and the load resistance and level of power harvested on the other hand.

  18. Determination of thickness and composition of high-k dielectrics using high-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grande, P. L.; Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS ; Vos, M.; Venkatachalam, D. K.; Elliman, R. G.; Nandi, S. K.; Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2611; Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331

    2013-08-12

    We demonstrate the application of high-energy elastic electron backscattering to the analysis of thin (2–20 nm) HfO{sub 2} overlayers on oxidized Si substrates. The film composition and thickness are determined directly from elastic scattering peaks characteristic of each element. The stoichiometry of the films is determined with an accuracy of 5%–10%. The experimental results are corroborated by medium energy ions scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry measurements, and clearly demonstrate the applicability of the technique for thin-film analysis. Significantly, the presented technique opens new possibilities for nm depth profiling with high spatial resolution in scanning electron microscopes.

  19. Experimental analysis of energy harvesting from self-induced flutter of a composite beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zakaria, Mohamed Y. Al-Haik, Mohammad Y.; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    2015-07-13

    Previous attempts to harvest energy from aeroelastic vibrations have been based on attaching a beam to a moving wing or structure. Here, we exploit self-excited oscillations of a fluttering composite beam to harvest energy using piezoelectric transduction. Details of the beam properties and experimental setup are presented. The effects of preset angle of attack, wind speed, and load resistance on the levels of harvested power are determined. The results point to a complex relation between the aerodynamic loading and its impact on the static deflection and amplitudes of the limit cycle oscillations on one hand and the load resistance and level of power harvested on the other hand.

  20. Ignition dynamics and activation energies of metallic thermites: From nano- to micron-scale particulate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Emily M.; Pantoya, Michelle L.

    2005-08-01

    Ignition behaviors associated with nano- and micron-scale particulate composite thermites were studied experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experimental analysis utilized a CO{sub 2} laser ignition apparatus to ignite the front surface of compacted nickel (Ni) and aluminum (Al) pellets at varying heating rates. Ignition delay time and ignition temperature as a function of both Ni and Al particle size were measured using high-speed imaging and microthermocouples. The apparent activation energy was determined from this data using a Kissinger isoconversion method. This study shows that the activation energy is significantly lower for nano- compared with micron-scale particulate media (i.e., as low as 17.4 compared with 162.5 kJ/mol, respectively). Two separate Arrhenius-type mathematical models were developed that describe ignition in the nano- and the micron-composite thermites. The micron-composite model is based on a heat balance while the nanocomposite model incorporates the energy of phase transformation in the alumina shell theorized to be an initiating step in the solid-solid diffusion reaction and uniquely appreciable in nanoparticle media. These models were found to describe the ignition of the Ni/Al alloy for a wide range of heating rates.

  1. Ignition dynamics and activation energies of metallic thermites: From nano- to micron-scale particulate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Emily M.; Pantoya, Michelle L.

    2005-08-01

    Ignition behaviors associated with nano- and micron-scale particulate composite thermites were studied experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experimental analysis utilized a CO2 laser ignition apparatus to ignite the front surface of compacted nickel (Ni) and aluminum (Al) pellets at varying heating rates. Ignition delay time and ignition temperature as a function of both Ni and Al particle size were measured using high-speed imaging and microthermocouples. The apparent activation energy was determined from this data using a Kissinger isoconversion method. This study shows that the activation energy is significantly lower for nano- compared with micron-scale particulate media (i.e., as low as 17.4 compared with 162.5kJ /mol, respectively). Two separate Arrhenius-type mathematical models were developed that describe ignition in the nano- and the micron-composite thermites. The micron-composite model is based on a heat balance while the nanocomposite model incorporates the energy of phase transformation in the alumina shell theorized to be an initiating step in the solid-solid diffusion reaction and uniquely appreciable in nanoparticle media. These models were found to describe the ignition of the Ni /Al alloy for a wide range of heating rates.

  2. Possibility of deriving the Hermean surface composition through low energy neutral atom detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, A.; Orsini, S.; Massetti, S.; Mura, A.; de Angelis, E.; Lammer, H.; Wurz, P.; di Lellis, A. M.

    2003-04-01

    The release processes induced by ion sputtering and/or micrometeoroids impacts induces erosion of the Mercury surface. The sputtered neutrals exhibit spectra peaked at low energies (few eV). Nevertheless, a high-energy neutral signal also emerges, due to these release processes. In principle, the directional neutral signal can be detected, providing information on the local surface composition. In this study, we simulate the neutral signal due to ion sputtering below the cusp regions, assuming a highly anisotropic surface composition. The NPA SERENA / ELENA instrument proposed on board the ESA mission BepiColombo is a nadir-pointing 1-D sensor, able to detect neutral atoms, form tens of eV to about 5 keV with a capability of resolving the major species. The ELENA field-of-view (FOV) is ~ 60 degrees, with the FOV plane perpendicular to the MPO orbital plane. Here, we speculate on the possibility of discriminating composition anisotropies by detecting the high-energy portion of the sputtered signal.

  3. Response Surface Energy Modeling of an Electric Vehicle over a Reduced Composite Drive Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jehlik, Forrest; LaClair, Tim J.

    2014-04-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) techniques were applied to develop a predictive model of electric vehicle (EV) energy consumption over the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standardized drive cycles. The model is based on measurements from a synthetic composite drive cycle. The synthetic drive cycle is a minimized statistical composite of the standardized urban (UDDS), highway (HWFET), and US06 cycles. The composite synthetic drive cycle is 20 minutes in length thereby reducing testing time of the three standard EPA cycles by over 55%. Vehicle speed and acceleration were used as model inputs for a third order least squared regression model predicting vehicle battery power output as a function of the drive cycle. The approach reduced three cycles and 46 minutes of drive time to a single test of 20 minutes. Application of response surface modeling to the synthetic drive cycle is shown to predict energy consumption of the three EPA cycles within 2.6% of the actual measured values. Additionally, the response model may be used to predict energy consumption of any cycle within the speed/acceleration envelope of the synthetic cycle. This technique results in reducing test time, which additionally provides a model that may be used to expand the analysis and understanding of the vehicle under consideration.

  4. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si–carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs. PMID:27311811

  5. Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Program sponsored the experimental and analytical evaluation of an externally deployable composite honeycomb structure that is designed to attenuate impact energy during helicopter crashes. The concept, which is designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), utilizes an expandable Kevlar honeycomb structure to dissipate kinetic energy through crushing. The DEA incorporates a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and stowed flat until needed for deployment. A variety of deployment options such as linear, radial, and/or hybrid methods can be used. Experimental evaluation of the DEA utilized a building block approach that included material characterization testing of its constituent, Kevlar -129 fabric/epoxy, and flexural testing of single hexagonal cells. In addition, the energy attenuation capabilities of the DEA were demonstrated through multi-cell component dynamic crush tests, and vertical drop tests of a composite fuselage section, retrofitted with DEA blocks, onto concrete, water, and soft soil. During each stage of the DEA evaluation process, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the explicit, nonlinear transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. This report documents the results of the experimental evaluation that was conducted to assess the energy absorption capabilities of the DEA.

  6. Electrochemical energy storage in montmorillonite K10 clay based composite as supercapacitor using ionic liquid electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sandipan; Pramanik, Atin; Chattopadhyay, Shreyasi; De, Goutam; Mahanty, Sourindra

    2016-02-15

    Exploring new electrode materials is the key to realize high performance energy storage devices for effective utilization of renewable energy. Natural clays with layered structure and high surface area are prospective materials for electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC). In this work, a novel hybrid composite based on acid-leached montmorillonite (K10), multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and manganese dioxide (MnO2) was prepared and its electrochemical properties were investigated by fabricating two-electrode asymmetric supercapacitor cells against activated carbon (AC) using 1.0M tetraethylammonium tetrafluroborate (Et4NBF4) in acetonitrile (AN) as electrolyte. The asymmetric supercapacitors, capable of operating in a wide potential window of 0.0-2.7V, showed a high energy density of 171Whkg(-1) at a power density of ∼1.98kWkg(-1). Such high EDLC performance could possibly be linked to the acid-base interaction of K10 through its surface hydroxyl groups with the tetraethylammonium cation [(C2H5)4N(+) or TEA(+)] of the ionic liquid electrolyte. Even at a very high power density of 96.4kWkg(-1), the cells could still deliver an energy density of 91.1Whkg(-1) exhibiting an outstanding rate capability. The present study demonstrates for the first time, the excellent potential of clay-based composites for high power energy storage device applications. PMID:26609925

  7. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si-carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs. PMID:27311811

  8. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-06-01

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si–carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs.

  9. Study of energy transfer between molecules placed in the vicinity of a bimetal composite nanoparticle

    SciTech Connect

    Daneshfar, Nader E-mail: ndaneshfar@razi.ac.ir

    2015-10-15

    In this study, the problem of energy transfer between two molecules near a bimetallic composite nanoparticle is investigated. The influence of the interaction between metal particles on the intermolecular energy is studied, because when two metal nanoparticles are placed close to each other, their plasmons coupling giving rise to new features. On the other hand, we discuss the transfer of resonance energy between donor and acceptor molecules (a single donor and a single acceptor) in the presence of a nanocomposite containing gold and silver nanoparticles based on the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory and within the quasistatic limit. We show that the interaction energy strongly depends on the particle size, the filling factor of metal particles, the intermolecular distance (the distance between the donor and acceptor molecules), and the dielectric constant of host matrix.

  10. Composition and energy spectra of heavy nuclei of unknown origin detected on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, J. H.; Price, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    Lexan track detectors with large collecting power were exposed inside and outside Skylab during late 1973 and early 1974. Steeply falling energy spectra of nuclei with Z greater than or equal to 8 and energies between 10 and 40 MeV were observed at intensities much higher than those observed outside the magnetosphere. Four possible sources (solar flare particles; low-energy cosmic rays; the anomalous component of low-energy cosmic rays; particles trapped in the inner Van Allen belt) are examined using Skylab particle flux data outside the magnetosphere and other measurements. The composition is found to be most consistent with that of the solar corona. It is suggested that heavy solar wind ions enter the magnetosphere, are accelerated, and populate the inner radiation belt.

  11. Electronic energy transfer: Localized operator partitioning of electronic energy in composite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yaser; Brumer, Paul

    2012-11-01

    A Hamiltonian based approach using spatially localized projection operators is introduced to give precise meaning to the chemically intuitive idea of the electronic energy on a quantum subsystem. This definition facilitates the study of electronic energy transfer in arbitrarily coupled quantum systems. In particular, the decomposition scheme can be applied to molecular components that are strongly interacting (with significant orbital overlap) as well as to isolated fragments. The result defines a consistent electronic energy at all internuclear distances, including the case of separated fragments, and reduces to the well-known Förster and Dexter results in their respective limits. Numerical calculations of coherent energy and charge transfer dynamics in simple model systems are presented and the effect of collisionally induced decoherence is examined.

  12. Note: Enhanced energy harvesting from low-frequency magnetic fields utilizing magneto-mechano-electric composite tuning-fork.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Yang, Chao; Wang, Decai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-06-01

    A magnetic-field energy harvester using a low-frequency magneto-mechano-electric (MME) composite tuning-fork is proposed. This MME composite tuning-fork consists of a copper tuning fork with piezoelectric Pb(Zr(1-x)Ti(x))O3 (PZT) plates bonded near its fixed end and with NdFeB magnets attached at its free ends. Due to the resonance coupling between fork prongs, the MME composite tuning-fork owns strong vibration and high Q value. Experimental results show that the proposed magnetic-field energy harvester using the MME composite tuning-fork exhibits approximately 4 times larger maximum output voltage and 7.2 times higher maximum power than the conventional magnetic-field energy harvester using the MME composite cantilever. PMID:26133877

  13. Note: Enhanced energy harvesting from low-frequency magnetic fields utilizing magneto-mechano-electric composite tuning-fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Yang, Chao; Wang, Decai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-06-01

    A magnetic-field energy harvester using a low-frequency magneto-mechano-electric (MME) composite tuning-fork is proposed. This MME composite tuning-fork consists of a copper tuning fork with piezoelectric Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 (PZT) plates bonded near its fixed end and with NdFeB magnets attached at its free ends. Due to the resonance coupling between fork prongs, the MME composite tuning-fork owns strong vibration and high Q value. Experimental results show that the proposed magnetic-field energy harvester using the MME composite tuning-fork exhibits approximately 4 times larger maximum output voltage and 7.2 times higher maximum power than the conventional magnetic-field energy harvester using the MME composite cantilever.

  14. Structured block copolymer thin film composites for ultra-high energy density capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samant, Saumil; Hailu, Shimelis; Grabowski, Christopher; Durstock, Michael; Raghavan, Dharmaraj; Karim, Alamgir

    2014-03-01

    Development of high energy density capacitors is essential for future applications like hybrid vehicles and directed energy weaponry. Fundamentally, energy density is governed by product of dielectric permittivity ɛ and breakdown strength Vbd. Hence, improvements in energy density are greatly reliant on improving either ɛ or Vbd or a combination of both. Polymer films are widely used in capacitors due to high Vbd and low loss but they suffer from very low permittivities. Composite dielectrics offer a unique opportunity to combine the high ɛ of inorganic fillers with the high Vbd of a polymer matrix. For enhancement of dielectric properties, it is essential to improve matrix-filler interaction and control the spatial distribution of fillers for which nanostructured block copolymers BCP act as ideal templates. We use Directed Self-assembly of block copolymers to rapidly fabricate highly aligned BCP-TiO2 composite nanostructures in thin films under dynamic thermal gradient field to synergistically combine the high ɛ of functionalized TiO2 and high Vbd of BCP matrix. The results of impact of BCP morphology, processing conditions and concentration of TiO2 on capacitor performance will be reported. U.S. Air Force of Scientific Research under contract FA9550-12-1-0306

  15. Composition variations of low energy heavy ions during large solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, George C.; Mason, Glenn M.

    2016-03-01

    The time-intensity profile of large solar energetic particle (SEP) event is well organized by solar longitude as observed at Earth orbit. This is mostly due to different magnetic connection to the shock that is associated with large SEP event propagates from the Sun to the heliosphere. Earlier studies have shown event averaged heavy ion abundance ratios can also vary as a function of solar longitude. It was found that the Fe/O ratio for high energy particle (>10 MeV/nucleon) is higher for those western magnetically well connected events compare to the eastern events as observed at L1 by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft. In this paper, we examined the low energy (˜1 MeV/nucleon) heavy ions in 110 isolated SEP events from 2009 to the end of 2014. In addition, the optical and radio signatures for all of our events are identified and when data are available we also located the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) data. Our survey shows a higher Fe/O ratio at events in the well-connected region, while there are no corrections between the event averaged elemental composition with the associated coronal mass ejection speed. This is inconsistent with the higher energy results, but inline with other recent low-energy measurements.

  16. Pore structure modified diatomite-supported PEG composites for thermal energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Tingting; Li, Jinhong; Deng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel composite phase change materials (PCMs) were tailored by blending PEG and five kinds of diatomite via a vacuum impregnation method. To enlarge its pore size and specific surface area, different modification approaches including calcination, acid treatment, alkali leaching and nano-silica decoration on the microstructure of diatomite were outlined. Among them, 8 min of 5 wt% NaOH dissolution at 70 °C has been proven to be the most effective and facile. While PEG melted during phase transformation, the maximum load of PEG could reach 70 wt.%, which was 46% higher than that of the raw diatomite. The apparent activation energy of PEG in the composite was 1031.85 kJ·mol−1, which was twice higher than that of the pristine PEG. Moreover, using the nano-silica decorated diatomite as carrier, the maximum PEG load was 66 wt%. The composite PCM was stable in terms of thermal and chemical manners even after 200 cycles of melting and freezing. All results indicated that the obtained composite PCMs were promising candidate materials for building applications due to its large latent heat, suitable phase change temperature, excellent chemical compatibility, improved supercooling extent, high thermal stability and long-term reliability. PMID:27580677

  17. Pore structure modified diatomite-supported PEG composites for thermal energy storage.

    PubMed

    Qian, Tingting; Li, Jinhong; Deng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel composite phase change materials (PCMs) were tailored by blending PEG and five kinds of diatomite via a vacuum impregnation method. To enlarge its pore size and specific surface area, different modification approaches including calcination, acid treatment, alkali leaching and nano-silica decoration on the microstructure of diatomite were outlined. Among them, 8 min of 5 wt% NaOH dissolution at 70 °C has been proven to be the most effective and facile. While PEG melted during phase transformation, the maximum load of PEG could reach 70 wt.%, which was 46% higher than that of the raw diatomite. The apparent activation energy of PEG in the composite was 1031.85 kJ·mol(-1), which was twice higher than that of the pristine PEG. Moreover, using the nano-silica decorated diatomite as carrier, the maximum PEG load was 66 wt%. The composite PCM was stable in terms of thermal and chemical manners even after 200 cycles of melting and freezing. All results indicated that the obtained composite PCMs were promising candidate materials for building applications due to its large latent heat, suitable phase change temperature, excellent chemical compatibility, improved supercooling extent, high thermal stability and long-term reliability. PMID:27580677

  18. Composite Piezoelectric Rubber Band for Energy Harvesting from Breathing and Limb Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jhih-Jhe; Su, Huan-Jan; Hsu, Chang-I.; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2014-11-01

    We have successfully demonstrated the design and microfabrication of piezoelectric rubber bands and their application in energy harvesting from human motions. Composite polymeric and metallic microstructures with embedded bipolar charges are employed to realize the desired stretchability and electromechanical sensitivity. In the prototype demonstration, multilayer PDMS cellular structures coated with PTFE films and stretchable gold electrodes are fabricated and implanted with bipolar charges. The composite structures show elasticity of 300~600 kPa and extreme piezoelectricity of d33 >2000 pC/N and d31 >200 pC/N. For a working volume of 2.5cm×2.5cm×0.3mm, 10% (or 2.5mm) stretch results in effective d31 of >17000 pC/N. It is estimated that electric charge of >0.2 μC can be collected and stored per breath (or 2.5cm deformation). As such, the composite piezoelectric rubber bands (with spring constants of ~200 N/m) can be mounted on elastic waistbands to harvest the circumferential stretch during breathing, or on pads around joints to harvest the elongation during limb motion. Furthermore, the wearable piezoelectric structures can be spread, stacked and connected to charge energy storages and power micro devices.

  19. Phase evolution in carbide dispersion strengthened nanostructured copper composite by high energy ball milling

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zuhailawati; Nur Hawadah, M. S.

    2012-09-06

    In this study, high-energy ball milling was applied to synthesis in situ nanostructured copper based composite reinforced with metal carbides. Cu, M (M=W or Ti) and graphite powder mixture were mechanically alloyed for various milling time in a planetary ball mill with composition of Cu-20vol%WC and Cu-20vol%TiC. Then the as-milled powder were compacted at 200 to 400 MPa and sintered in a vacuum furnace at 900 Degree-Sign C. The results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that formation of tungsten carbides (W{sub 2}C and WC phases) was observed after sintering of Cu-W-C mixture while TiC precipitated in as-milled powder of Cu-Ti-C composite after 5 h and become amorphous with longer milling. Mechanism of MA explained the cold welding and fracturing event during milling. Cu-W-C system shows fracturing event is more dominant at early stage of milling and W particle still existed after milling up to 60 h. While in Cu-Ti-C system, cold welding is more dominant and all Ti particles dissolved into Cu matrix.

  20. Phase evolution in carbide dispersion strengthened nanostructured copper composite by high energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Zuhailawati; Nur Hawadah, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    In this study, high-energy ball milling was applied to synthesis in situ nanostructured copper based composite reinforced with metal carbides. Cu, M (M=W or Ti) and graphite powder mixture were mechanically alloyed for various milling time in a planetary ball mill with composition of Cu-20vol%WC and Cu-20vol%TiC. Then the as-milled powder were compacted at 200 to 400 MPa and sintered in a vacuum furnace at 900°C. The results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that formation of tungsten carbides (W2C and WC phases) was observed after sintering of Cu-W-C mixture while TiC precipitated in as-milled powder of Cu-Ti-C composite after 5 h and become amorphous with longer milling. Mechanism of MA explained the cold welding and fracturing event during milling. Cu-W-C system shows fracturing event is more dominant at early stage of milling and W particle still existed after milling up to 60 h. While in Cu-Ti-C system, cold welding is more dominant and all Ti particles dissolved into Cu matrix.

  1. Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

    2012-02-01

    This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

  2. Design of energy absorbing materials and composite structures based on porous shape memory alloys (SE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying

    Recently, attention has been paid to porous shape memory alloys. This is because the alloys show large and recoverable deformation, i.e. superelasticity and shape memory effect. Due to their light weight and potential large deformations, porous shape memory alloys have been considered as excellent candidates for energy absorption materials. In the present study, porous NiTi alloy with several different porosities are processed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The compression behavior of the porous NiTi is examined with an aim of using it for a possible high energy absorbing material. Two models for the macroscopic compression behavior of porous shape memory alloy (SMA) are presented in this work, where Eshelby's inhomogeneous inclusion method is used to predict the effective elastic and superelastic behavior of a porous SMA based on the assumption of stress-strain curve. The analytical results are compared with experimental data for porous NiTi with 13% porosity, resulting in a reasonably good agreement. Based on the study upon porous NiTi, an energy absorbing composite structure made of a concentric NiTi spring and a porous NiTi rod is presented in this PhD dissertation. Both NiTi spring and porous NiTi rod are of superelastic grade. Ductile porous NiTi cylindrical specimens are fabricated by spark plasma sintering. The composite structure exhibits not only high reversible force-displacement behavior for small to intermediate loading but also high energy absorbing property when subjected to large compressive loads. A model for the compressive force-displacement curve of the composite structure is presented. The predicted curve is compared to the experimental data, resulting in a reasonably good agreement.

  3. Effects of chemical fuel composition on energy generation from thermopower waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Taehan; Hwang, Hayoung; Jeong, Dong-Cheol; Lee, Kang Yeol; Hong, Jongsup; Song, Changsik; Choi, Wonjoon

    2014-11-01

    Thermopower waves, which occur during combustion within hybrid structures formed from nanomaterials and chemical fuels, result in a self-propagating thermal reaction and concomitantly generate electrical energy from the acceleration of charge carriers along the nanostructures. The hybrid structures for thermopower waves are composed of two primary components: the core thermoelectric material and the combustible fuel. So far, most studies have focused on investigating various nanomaterials for improving energy generation. Herein, we report that the composition of the chemical fuel used has a significant effect on the power generated by thermopower waves. Hybrid nanostructures consisting of mixtures of picric acid and picramide with sodium azide were synthesized and used to generate thermopower waves. A maximum voltage of ˜2 V and an average peak specific power as high as 15 kW kg-1 were obtained using the picric acid/sodium azide/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) array composite. The average reaction velocity and the output voltage in the case of the picric acid/sodium azide were 25 cm s-1 and 157 mV, while they were 2 cm s-1 and 3 mV, in the case of the picramide/sodium azide. These marked differences are attributable to the chemical and structural differences of the mixtures. Mixing picric acid and sodium azide in deionized water resulted in the formation of 2,4,6-trinitro sodium phenoxide and hydrogen azide (H-N3), owing to the exchange of H+ and Na+ ions, as well as the formation of fiber-like structures, because of benzene π stacking. The negative enthalpy of formation of the new compounds and the fiber-like structures accelerate the reaction and increase the output voltage. Elucidating the effects of the composition of the chemical fuel used in the hybrid nanostructures will allow for the control of the combustion process and help optimize the energy generated from thermopower waves, furthering the development of thermopower waves as an energy source.

  4. Dependence of Seebeck coefficient on a load resistance and energy conversion efficiency in a thermoelectric composite

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Osamu Odahara, Hirotaka; Ochi, Takahiro; Satou, Kouji

    2007-10-02

    The thermo-emf {delta}V and current {delta}I generated by imposing the alternating temperature gradients (ATG) at a period of T and the steady temperature gradient (STG) on a thermoelectric (TE) composite were measured as a function of t, where t is the lapsed time and T was varied from 60 to or {infinity} s. The STG and ATG were produced by imposing steadily and alternatively a source voltage V in the range from 1.0 to 4.0 V on two Peltier modules sandwiching a composite. {delta}T, {delta}V, {delta}I and V{sub P} oscillate at a period T and their waveforms vary significantly with a change of T, where {delta}V and V{sub P} are the voltage drops in a load resistance R{sub L} and in resistance R{sub P} of two modules. The resultant Seebeck coefficient |{alpha}| = |{delta}V|/{delta}T of a composite under the STG was found to be expressed as |{alpha}| = |{alpha}{sub 0}|(1 - R{sub comp}/R{sub T}), where R{sub T} is the total resistance of a circuit for measuring the output signals and R{sub comp} is the resistance of a composite. The effective generating power {delta}W{sub eff} has a local maximum at T = 960 s for the p-type composite and at T = 480 s for the n-type one. The maximum energy conversion efficiency {eta} of the p- and n-type composites under the ATG produced by imposing a voltage of 4.0 V at an optimum period were 0.22 and 0.23% at {delta}T{sub eff} = 50 K, respectively, which are 42 and 43% higher than those at {delta}T = 42 K under the STG. These maximum {eta} for a TE composite sandwiched between two Peltier modules, were found to be expressed theoretically in terms of R{sub P}, R{sub T}, R{sub L}, {alpha}{sub P} and {alpha}, where {alpha}{sub P} and {alpha} are the resultant Seebeck coefficients of Peltier modules and a TE composite.

  5. An electrically switchable surface free energy on a liquid crystal and polymer composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsin; Chu, Ting-Yu; Tsou, Yu-Shih; Chang, Kai-Han; Chiu, Ya-Ping

    2012-12-01

    An electrically switchable surface free energy on a liquid crystal and polymer composite film (LCPCF) resulting from the orientations of liquid crystal molecules is investigated. By modification of Cassie's model and the measurement based on the Chibowski's film pressure model (E. Chibowski, Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 103, 149 (2003)), the surface free energy of LCPCF is electrically switchable from 36×10-3J/ m2 to 51×10-3J/ m2 while the average tilt angle of LC molecules changes from 0° to 32° with the applied pulsed voltage. The switchable surface free energy of LCPCF can help us to design biosensors and photonics devices, such as electro-optical switches, blood sensors, and sperm testers.

  6. The nutrient composition of European ready meals: protein, fat, total carbohydrates and energy.

    PubMed

    Kanzler, Sonja; Manschein, Martin; Lammer, Guido; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2015-04-01

    Despite the increasing social importance of ready meals, only few studies have been conducted on their nutrient composition. Therefore, 32 chilled, frozen and heat-treated ready meals (only main dishes) from the continental European market were analysed for protein, fat, total carbohydrate and energy. Half of the meals were nutritionally imbalanced by providing elevated fat (>30% of energy) and low carbohydrate levels (<50% of energy). Protein was generally above recommendations and ranged from 8.0 to 47.2g per serving. The inter-package variation was high, reaching 19.04 ± 2.90 g/package for fat. After proposing understandable guidelines to improve nutritional quality for the food industry, seven "nutritionally optimised" ready meals were created at the European level and analysed, however success was limited. If product labelling is to be useful for consumers, our results also indicate a need for better quality control to reduce the differences between content and labelling. PMID:25442542

  7. Manufacturing and testing of a magnetically suspended composite flywheel energy storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Stephen; Pang, Da-Chen

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the work performed to develop a multiring composite material flywheel and improvements of a magnetically suspended energy storage system. The flywheel is constructed of filament would graphite/epoxy and is interference assembled for better stress distribution to obtain higher speeds. The stationary stack in the center of the disk supports the flywheel with two magnetic bearings and provides power transfer to the flywheel with a motor/generator. The system operates under a 10(exp -4) torr environment and has been demonstrated to 20,000 rpm with a total stored energy of 15.9 Wh. When this flywheel cycles between its design speeds (45,000 to 90,000 rpm), it will deliver 242 Wh and have a usable specific energy density of 42.6 Wh/kg.

  8. Observations of low-energy plasma composition from the ISEE-1 and SCATHA satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Reasoner, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Green, J. L.; Baugher, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    This brief review is concerned with some of the initial measurements of low-energy ion properties conducted with the aid of ion composition detectors aboard the ISEE-1 and SCATHA satellites. ISEE-1 was launched in October 1977 into a highly elliptical orbit, while SCATHA was launched in January 1979 into a near geosynchronous orbit. Attention is given to the origin of low-energy plasma, the energization of ionospheric ions, the transport of ionospheric ions, and the loss of low-energy plasma from the magnetosphere. According to results obtained during the past several years, including the present ISEE-1 and SCATHA results, there are significant, and occasionally dominant, concentrations of He(+) and O(+) in various locations within the magnetosphere.

  9. Intermediate energy electron impact excitation of composite vibrational modes in phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L.; Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Silva, G. B. da; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-05-21

    We report differential cross section results from an experimental investigation into the electron impact excitation of a number of the low-lying composite (unresolved) vibrational modes in phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The measurements were carried out at incident electron energies in the range 15–40 eV and for scattered-electron angles in the range 10–90°. The energy resolution of those measurements was typically ∼80 meV. Calculations, using the GAMESS code, were also undertaken with a B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level model chemistry, in order to enable us to assign vibrational modes to the features observed in our energy loss spectra. To the best of our knowledge, the present cross sections are the first to be reported for vibrational excitation of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH molecule by electron impact.

  10. Underwater energy harvesting from a turbine hosting ionic polymer metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellini, Filippo; Pounds, Jason; Peterson, Sean D.; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we explore the possibility of energy harvesting from fluid flow through a turbine hosting ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs). Specifically, IPMC harvesters are embedded in the blades of a small-scale vertical axis water turbine to convert flow kinetics into electrical power via low-frequency flow-induced IPMC deformations. An in-house fabricated Savonius-Darrieus hybrid active turbine with three IPMCs is tested in a laboratory water tunnel to estimate the energy harvesting capabilities of the device as a function of the shunting electrical load. The turbine is shown to harvest a few nanowatt from a mean flow of 0.43\\;m\\;{{s}^{-1}} for shunting resistances in the range 100-1000\\;\\Omega . To establish a first understanding of the energy harvesting device, we propose a quasi-static hydroelastic model for the bending of the IPMCs and we utilize a black-box model to study their electromechanical response.

  11. Structural optimization of structured carbon-based energy-storing composite materials used in space vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Yu, Zhichao; Tang, Chenlong

    2016-01-01

    The hot work environment of electronic components in the instrument cabin of spacecraft was researched, and a new thermal protection structure, namely graphite carbon foam, which is an impregnated phase-transition material, was adopted to implement the thermal control on the electronic components. We used the optimized parameters obtained from ANSYS to conduct 2D optimization, 3-D modeling and simulation, as well as the strength check. Finally, the optimization results were verified by experiments. The results showed that after optimization, the structured carbon-based energy-storing composite material could reduce the mass and realize the thermal control over electronic components. This phase-transition composite material still possesses excellent temperature control performance after its repeated melting and solidifying. PMID:27387673

  12. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Studies on the effects of high energy radiation on graphite fiber reinforced composites are summarized. Studies of T300/5208 and C6000/PMR15 composites, T300 fibers and the resin system MY720/DDS (tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone) are included. Radiation dose levels up to 8000 Mrads were obtained with no deleterious effects on the breaking stress or modulus. The effects on the structure and morphology were investigated using mechanical tests, electron spin resonance, X-ray diffraction, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA or X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Details of the experiments and results are given. Studies of the fracture surfaces of irradiated samples were studied with scanning electron microscopy; current results indicate no differences in the morphology of irradiated and control samples.

  13. High energy density composite flywheel program. Final report Jun 76-May 80 on phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sapowith, A.D.; Gurson, A.L.; McElman, J.A.

    1980-05-30

    A bi-directional composite flywheel was instrumented with strain gages and tested to destruction. The flywheel was designed to exhibit constant stress in both radial and circumferential directions for all radial positions. Strain gage data verified this design. The burst speed was 38,741 rpm representing a specific energy level of 32.3 Wh/lb. The flywheel was constructed of Kevlar composite, had an outside diameter of 19.5 in., an axial thickness of 1.5 in and weighed 18.6 lbs. Premature failure was initiated at the inside diameter by excessive pressure exerted by a metal hub. A polyarylate hub design, with test data, is presented to solve this problem.

  14. Joining Carbon-Carbon Composites and High-Temperature Materials with High Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Daniel; Singler, Robert

    1998-01-01

    1. Program goals addressed during this period. Experimental work was directed at formation of a low-stress bond between carbon- carbon and aluminum, with the objective of minimizing the heating of the aluminum substrate, thereby minimizing stresses resulting from the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) difference between the aluminum and carbon-carbon. A second objective was to form a bond between carbon-carbon and aluminum with good thermal conductivity for electronic thermal management (SEM-E) application. 2. Substrates and joining materials selected during this period. Carbon-Carbon Composite (CCC) to Aluminum. CCC (Cu coated) to Aluminum. Soldering compounds based on Sn/Pb and Sn/Ag/Cu/Bi compositions. 3. Soldering experiments performed. Conventional techniques. High Energy Electron Beam (HEEB) process.

  15. Topical report to Morgantown Energy Technology Center for the interfacial coatings for ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-09

    This report summarizes the task conducted to examine various activities on interface development for ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) intended for high-temperature applications. While several articles have been published on the subject of CMC interfaces, the purpose of this report is to describe the various ongoing efforts on interface concepts, material selection, and issues related to processing methods employed for developing interface coatings. The most exciting and new development in the field is the discovery of monazite as a potential interface material for mullite- and alumina-based composites. Monazite offers two critical properties to the CMC system; a weakly bonded layer due to its non-wetting behavior and chemical compatibility with both alumina and mullite up to very high temperatures (> 1,600 C). A description of the Department of Energy-related activities and some thoughts on processing issues, interface testing, and effects of processing on fiber strength are given.

  16. Characterizing energy dissipation in single-walled carbon nanotube polycarbonate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koratkar, Nikhil A.; Suhr, Jonghwan; Joshi, Amit; Kane, Ravi S.; Schadler, Linda S.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Bartolucci, Steve

    2005-08-01

    In this study, single-walled carbon nanotube and bisphenol-A-polycarbonate composite beams were fabricated by a solution mixing process and dynamic (cyclic) load tests were performed to characterize energy dissipation. We report up to an order of magnitude (>1000%) increase in loss modulus of the polycarbonate system with the addition of 2% weight fraction of oxidized single-walled nanotube fillers. We show that the increase in damping is derived from frictional sliding at the nanotube-polymer interfaces. The nanoscale dimensions of the tubes not only result in large interfacial contact area, thereby generating high damping efficiency, but also enable seamless integration of the filler materials into the composite structure.

  17. Flavor composition of ultrahigh energy neutrinos at source and at neutrino telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Choubey, Sandhya; Rodejohann, Werner

    2009-12-01

    We parametrize the initial flux composition of high energy astrophysical neutrinos as ({phi}{sub e}{sup 0} ratio {phi}{sub {mu}}{sup 0} ratio {phi}{sub {tau}}{sup 0})=(1 ratio n ratio 0), where n characterizes the source. All usually assumed neutrino sources appear as limits of this simple parametrization. We investigate how precise neutrino telescopes can pin down the value of n. We furthermore show that there is a neutrino mixing scenario in which the ratio of muon neutrinos to the other neutrinos takes a constant value regardless of the initial flux composition. This occurs when the muon neutrino survival probability takes its minimal allowed value. The phenomenological consequences of this very predictive neutrino mixing scenario are given.

  18. Energy efficient engine pin fin and ceramic composite segmented liner combustor sector rig test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubiel, D. J.; Lohmann, R. P.; Tanrikut, S.; Morris, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Energy Efficient Engine program, Pratt and Whitney has successfully completed a comprehensive test program using a 90-degree sector combustor rig that featured an advanced two-stage combustor with a succession of advanced segmented liners. Building on the successful characteristics of the first generation counter-parallel Finwall cooled segmented liner, design features of an improved performance metallic segmented liner were substantiated through representative high pressure and temperature testing in a combustor atmosphere. This second generation liner was substantially lighter and lower in cost than the predecessor configuration. The final test in this series provided an evaluation of ceramic composite liner segments in a representative combustor environment. It was demonstrated that the unique properties of ceramic composites, low density, high fracture toughness, and thermal fatigue resistance can be advantageously exploited in high temperature components. Overall, this Combustor Section Rig Test program has provided a firm basis for the design of advanced combustor liners.

  19. Static and dynamic strain energy release rates in toughened thermosetting composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Douglas S.

    1992-01-01

    In this work, the static and dynamic fracture properties of several thermosetting resin based composite laminates are presented. Two classes of materials are explored. These are homogeneous, thermosetting resins and toughened, multi-phase, thermosetting resin systems. Multi-phase resin materials have shown enhancement over homogenous materials with respect to damage resistance. The development of new dynamic tests are presented for composite laminates based on Width Tapered Double Cantilevered Beam (WTDCB) for Mode 1 fracture and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) specimen. The WTDCB sample was loaded via a low inertia, pneumatic cylinder to produce rapid cross-head displacements. A high rate, piezo-electric load cell and an accelerometer were mounted on the specimen. A digital oscilloscope was used for data acquisition. Typical static and dynamic load versus displacement plots are presented. The ENF specimen was impacted in three point bending with an instrumented impact tower. Fracture initiation and propagation energies under static and dynamic conditions were determined analytically and experimentally. The test results for Mode 1 fracture are relatively insensitive to strain rate effects for the laminates tested in this study. The test results from Mode 2 fracture indicate that the toughened systems provide superior fracture initiation and higher resistance to propagation under dynamic conditions. While the static fracture properties of the homogeneous systems may be relatively high, the apparent Mode 2 dynamic critical strain energy release rate drops significantly. The results indicate that static Mode 2 fracture testing is inadequate for determining the fracture performance of composite structures subjected to conditions such as low velocity impact. A good correlation between the basic Mode 2 dynamic fracture properties and the performance is a combined material/structural Compression After Impact (CAI) test is found. These results underscore the importance of

  20. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SOURCE OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS USING ANISOTROPY VERSUS CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Taylor, Andrew M.; Lemoine, Martin; Waxman, Eli

    2013-10-20

    The joint analysis of anisotropy signals and chemical composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays offers strong potential for shedding light on the sources of these particles. Following up on an earlier idea, this paper studies the anisotropies produced by protons of energy >E/Z, assuming that anisotropies at energy >E have been produced by nuclei of charge Z, which share the same magnetic rigidity. We calculate the number of secondary protons produced through photodisintegration of the primary heavy nuclei. Making the extreme assumption that the source does not inject any proton, we find that the source(s) responsible for anisotropies such as reported by the Pierre Auger Observatory should lie closer than ∼20-30, 80-100, and 180-200 Mpc if the anisotropy signal is mainly composed of oxygen, silicon, and iron nuclei, respectively. A violation of this constraint would otherwise result in the secondary protons forming a more significant anisotropy signal at lower energies. Even if the source were located closer than this distance, it would require an extraordinary metallicity ∼> 120, 1600, and 1100 times solar metallicity in the acceleration zone of the source, for oxygen, silicon, and iron, respectively, to ensure that the concomitantly injected protons do not produce a more significant low-energy anisotropy. This offers interesting prospects for constraining the nature and the source of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays with the increase in statistics expected from next-generation detectors.

  1. Modeling and characterization of the mechanoelectric response of ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Rashi

    2009-12-01

    Electroactive Polymers (EAPs) have gained momentum in the past few years. An especially promising material, Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC), was the subject of the reported research. IPMCs are capable of electromechanical and mechanoelectrical transduction (i.e conversion of energy from one form to another) on application of electric field and mechanical deformation, respectively. There are three key aspects of the research reported in this dissertation: develop a framework on the mechanoelectric model, evaluate the capability of IPMC as energy harvester in natural bender configuration and assess the feasibility of non-conventional configurations including disc shaped IPMC for energy harvesting applications. First of all, a framework on mechanoelectric model based on electrostatic effect and ion transport inside the membrane was developed. The model gives an insight into the mechanoelectric principle in IPMC, along with the role played by different material parameters like Young's modulus, cluster dimension, permittivity and diffusivity. Secondly, IPMC was analyzed for energy harvesting applications. The research demonstrates applicability of IPMC as energy harvester in lower frequency regions (<50 Hz) with an average efficiency of around 2% or less. Instantaneous power output from a 10 mm (width) x 50mm (length) x 0.2mm (thickness) was measured to be around 4 muW. The effect of different parameters in mechanical domain (stiffness and scalability) and electrical domain (electrode property like resistance and capacitance) was studied, both experimentally and through a formulated Grey-box model. Lastly, non-traditional configurations were tested for energy harvesting applications.

  2. Convergence of strain energy release rate components for edge-delaminated composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    Strain energy release rates for edge delaminated composite laminates were obtained using quasi 3 dimensional finite element analysis. The problem of edge delamination at the -35/90 interfaces of an 8-ply composite laminate subjected to uniform axial strain was studied. The individual components of the strain energy release rates did not show convergence as the delamination tip elements were made smaller. In contrast, the total strain energy release rate converged and remained unchanged as the delamination tip elements were made smaller and agreed with that calculated using a classical laminated plate theory. The studies of the near field solutions for a delamination at an interface between two dissimilar isotropic or orthotropic plates showed that the imaginary part of the singularity is the cause of the nonconvergent behavior of the individual components. To evaluate the accuracy of the results, an 8-ply laminate with the delamination modeled in a thin resin layer, that exists between the -35 and 90 plies, was analyzed. Because the delamination exists in a homogeneous isotropic material, the oscillatory component of the singularity vanishes.

  3. Ferroelectric polymer-ceramic composite thick films for energy storage applications

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Paritosh; Borkar, Hitesh; Singh, B. P.; Singh, V. N.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-08-15

    We have successfully fabricated large area free standing polyvinylidene fluoride -Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} (PVDF-PZT) ferroelectric polymer-ceramic composite (wt% 80–20, respectively) thick films with an average diameter (d) ∼0.1 meter and thickness (t) ∼50 μm. Inclusion of PZT in PVDF matrix significantly enhanced dielectric constant (from 10 to 25 at 5 kHz) and energy storage capacity (from 11 to 14 J/cm{sup 3}, using polarization loops), respectively, and almost similar leakage current and mechanical strength. Microstructural analysis revealed the presence of α and β crystalline phases and homogeneous distribution of PZT crystals in PVDF matrix. It was also found that apart from the microcrystals, well defined naturally developed PZT nanocrystals were embedded in PVDF matrix. The observed energy density indicates immense potential in PVDF-PZT composites for possible applications as green energy and power density electronic elements.

  4. The KASCADE-Grande observatory and the composition of very high-energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Apel, W. D.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Fuchs, B.; Fuhrmann, D.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.

    2015-11-01

    KASCADE-Grande is an air-shower observatory devoted to the detection of cosmic rays with energies in the range of 1016 to 1018 eV. This energy region is of particular interest for the cosmic ray astrophysics, since it is the place where some models predict the existence of a transition from galactic to extragalactic origin of cosmic rays and the presence of a break in the flux of its heavy component. The detection of these features requires detailed and simultaneous measurements of the energy and composition of cosmic rays with sufficient statistics. These kinds of studies are possible for the first time in KASCADE-Grande due to the accurate measurements of several air-shower observables, i.e., the number of charged particles, electrons and muons in the shower, using the different detector systems of the observatory. In this contribution, a detailed look into the composition of 1016 — 1018 eV cosmic rays with KASCADE-Grande is presented.

  5. Galactic Cosmic-Ray Energy Spectra and Composition during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Israel, M. H..; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; VonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2013-01-01

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 <= Z <= 28 in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV / nucleon. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than approx. 7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than approx. 4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2sigma, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  6. Measurement of key compositional parameters in two species of energy grass by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allison, Gordon G; Morris, Catherine; Hodgson, Edward; Jones, Jenny; Kubacki, Michal; Barraclough, Tim; Yates, Nicola; Shield, Ian; Bridgwater, Anthony V; Donnison, Iain S

    2009-12-01

    Two energy grass species, switch grass, a North American tuft grass, and reed canary grass, a European native, are likely to be important sources of biomass in Western Europe for the production of biorenewable energy. Matching chemical composition to conversion efficiency is a primary goal for improvement programmes and for determining the quality of biomass feed-stocks prior to use and there is a need for methods which allow cost effective characterisation of chemical composition at high rates of sample through-put. In this paper we demonstrate that nitrogen content and alkali index, parameters greatly influencing thermal conversion efficiency, can be accurately predicted in dried samples of these species grown under a range of agronomic conditions by partial least square regression of Fourier transform infrared spectra (R(2) values for plots of predicted vs. measured values of 0.938 and 0.937, respectively). We also discuss the prediction of carbon and ash content in these samples and the application of infrared based predictive methods for the breeding improvement of energy grasses. PMID:19660936

  7. Extreme Variation of Nutritional Composition and Osmolality of Commercially Available Carbohydrate Energy Gels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuguang; O'Kennedy, Niamh; Morton, James P

    2015-10-01

    The provision of exogenous carbohydrate (CHO) in the form of energy gels is regularly practiced among endurance and team sport athletes. However, in those instances where athletes ingest suboptimal fluid intake, consuming gels during exercise may lead to gastrointestinal (GI) problems when the nutritional composition of the gel is not aligned with promoting gastric emptying. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to quantify the degree of diversity in nutritional composition of commercially available CHO gels intended for use in the global sports nutrition market. We surveyed 31 product ranges (incorporating 51 flavor variants) from 23 brands (Accelerade, CNP, High5, GU, Hammer, Maxim, Clif, USN, Mule, Multipower, Nectar, Carb- Boom, Power Bar, Lucozade, Shotz, TORQ, Dextro, Kinetica, SiS, Zipvit, Maxifuel, Gatorade and Squeezy). Gels differed markedly in serving size (50 ± 22 g: 29-120), energy density (2.34 ± 0.7 kcal/g: 0.83-3.40), energy content (105 ± 24 kcal: 78-204), CHO content (26 ± 6 g: 18-51) and free sugar content (9.3 ± 7.0 g: 0.6-26.8). Most notably, gels displayed extreme variation in osmolality (4424 ± 2883 mmol/kg: 303-10,135) thereby having obvious implications for both GI discomfort and the total fluid intake likely required to optimize CHO delivery and oxidation. The large diversity of nutritional composition of commercially available CHO gels illustrate that not all gels should be considered the same. Sports nutrition practitioners should therefore consider the aforementioned variables to make better-informed decisions regarding which gel product best suits the athlete's specific fueling and hydration requirements. PMID:25997181

  8. Evaluation of various feedstuffs of ruminants in terms of chemical composition and metabolisable energy content

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dinesh; Datt, Chander; Das, L. K.; Kundu, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the chemical composition and metabolisable energy (ME) content of feedstuffs used in ruminant animals using in vitro method. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 feedstuffs used for ruminant feeding including cultivated non-leguminous fodders like maize, sorghum, pearl millet, and oat; leguminous fodders like cowpea and berseem; agro-industrial by-products such as wheat bran, deoiled rice bran, rice polish, wheat straw, and concentrates such as mustard oil cake, groundnut cake, soybean meal, cotton seed cake, grains like maize, oat, wheat, and barley were taken for this study. Chemical compositions and cell wall constituents of test feeds were determined in triplicate. The crude protein (CP) content was calculated as nitrogen (N) × 6.25. True dry matter digestibility (TDMD), true organic matter digestibility (TOMD), ME, and partitioning factor (PF) values were determined by in vitro gas production technique (IVGPT). Results: The CP content of non-leguminous fodders varied from 7.29% (sorghum) to 9.51% (maize), but leguminous fodders had less variation in CP. Oilseed cakes/meals had high CP and ether extract (EE) content than other feedstuffs except rice polish, which had 12.80% EE. Wheat straw contained highest fiber fractions than the other ingredients. ME content was highest in grains (wheat-12.02 MJ/kg) and lowest in wheat straw (4.65 MJ/kg) and other roughages. TDMD of grains and oilseed cakes/meals were higher than the fodders and agro-industrial by-products. The same trend was observed for TOMD. Conclusions: It was concluded that the energy feeds showed a great variation in chemical composition and ME content. The results of this study demonstrated that the kinetics of gas production of energy feed sources differed among themselves. Evaluation of various feedstuffs is helpful in balanced ration formulation for field animals and under farm conditions for better utilization of these commonly available feed resources. PMID:27047142

  9. Energy harvesting from the tail beating of a carangiform swimmer using ionic polymer-metal composites.

    PubMed

    Cha, Youngsu; Verotti, Matteo; Walcott, Horace; Peterson, Sean D; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we study energy harvesting from the beating of a biomimetic fish tail using ionic polymer-metal composites. The design of the biomimetic tail is based on carangiform swimmers and is specifically inspired by the morphology of the heterocercal tail of thresher sharks. The tail is constituted of a soft silicone matrix molded in the form of the heterocercal tail and reinforced by a steel beam of rectangular cross section. We propose a modeling framework for the underwater vibration of the biomimetic tail, wherein the tail is assimilated to a cantilever beam with rectangular cross section and heterogeneous physical properties. We focus on base excitation in the form of a superimposed rotation about a fixed axis and we consider the regime of moderately large-amplitude vibrations. In this context, the effect of the encompassing fluid is described through a hydrodynamic function, which accounts for inertial, viscous and convective phenomena. The model is validated through experiments in which the base excitation is systematically varied and the motion of selected points on the biomimetic tail tracked in time. The feasibility of harvesting energy from an ionic polymer-metal composite attached to the vibrating structure is experimentally and theoretically assessed. The response of the transducer is described using a black-box model, where the voltage output is controlled by the rate of change of the mean curvature. Experiments are performed to elucidate the impact of the shunting resistance, the frequency of the base excitation and the placement of the ionic polymer-metal composite on energy harvesting from the considered biomimetic tail. PMID:23793023

  10. Strain measurements and imaging of metal matrix composites using high-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Marcus L.

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are of technological importance for a variety of applications [1, 2]. One important aspect of MMCs is their unique mechanical behavior, which is controlled by the load transfer occurring between matrix and reinforcement. Load transfer is affected by the mismatch in stiffness between matrix and reinforcement, by plastic deformation of the metallic matrix and by damage of the ceramic reinforcement or its interface with the matrix. The goal of this thesis is to study the micromechanics of load transfer in MMC by a combination of x-ray diffraction and imaging, using high-energy synchrotron x-rays in conjunction with in-situ mechanical loading. Diffraction was used for direct measurements of internal elastic strains of all phases within the bulk (rather than near surface) of MMCs during in-situ mechanical loading. Imaging was done using an edge-enhanced, phase-contrast technique providing high spatial resolution radiographic images providing insight into the macro- and micro-mechanical evolution of damage. Three MMC systems with widely different architectures, composition, and end-use were studied: ultrahigh-carbon steels, superconducting fiber composites, and co-continuous composites. First, ultrahigh-carbon steels exhibiting spherical Fe3C particles in a Fe matrix are characterized by no load transfer in the elastic range, followed by marked load transfer in the plastic range of the matrix. Second, superconducting composites consisting of continuous MgB2 fibers in a Mg matrix show mostly elastic (and somewhat plastic) load transfer from matrix to reinforcement, which is complicated by the presence of cracks and a WB4 core in the fibers. Finally, a complex three-dimensional (3-D) Al2O3 preform infiltrated with an Al matrix, like the superconducting composites, show mostly elastic load transfer from matrix to reinforcement. For the latter two composites, differences were found between average bulk measurements and spatially

  11. Prediction of nutrient digestibility and energy concentrations in fresh grass using nutrient composition.

    PubMed

    Stergiadis, S; Allen, M; Chen, X J; Wills, D; Yan, T

    2015-05-01

    Improved nutrient utilization efficiency is strongly related to enhanced economic performance and reduced environmental footprint of dairy farms. Pasture-based systems are widely used for dairy production in certain areas of the world, but prediction equations of fresh grass nutritive value (nutrient digestibility and energy concentrations) are limited. Equations to predict digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) used for grazing cattle have been either developed with cattle fed conserved forage and concentrate diets or sheep fed previously frozen grass, and the majority of them require measurements less commonly available to producers, such as nutrient digestibility. The aim of the present study was therefore to develop prediction equations more suitable to grazing cattle for nutrient digestibility and energy concentrations, which are routinely available at farm level by using grass nutrient contents as predictors. A study with 33 nonpregnant, nonlactating cows fed solely fresh-cut grass at maintenance energy level for 50 wk was carried out over 3 consecutive grazing seasons. Freshly harvested grass of 3 cuts (primary growth and first and second regrowth), 9 fertilizer input levels, and contrasting stage of maturity (3 to 9 wk after harvest) was used, thus ensuring a wide representation of nutritional quality. As a result, a large variation existed in digestibility of dry matter (0.642-0.900) and digestible organic matter in dry matter (0.636-0.851) and in concentrations of DE (11.8-16.7 MJ/kg of dry matter) and ME (9.0-14.1 MJ/kg of dry matter). Nutrient digestibilities and DE and ME concentrations were negatively related to grass neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) contents but positively related to nitrogen (N), gross energy, and ether extract (EE) contents. For each predicted variable (nutrient digestibilities or energy concentrations), different combinations of predictors (grass chemical composition) were found to be

  12. LEICA - A low energy ion composition analyzer for the study of solar and magnetospheric heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Glenn M.; Hamilton, Douglas C.; Walpole, Peter H.; Heuerman, Karl F.; James, Tommy L.; Lennard, Michael H.; Mazur, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    The SAMPEX LEICA instrument is designed to measure about 0.5-5 MeV/nucleon solar and magnetospheric ions over the range from He to Ni. The instrument is a time-of-flight mass spectrometer which measures particle time-of-flight over an about 0.5 m path, and the residual energy deposited in an array of Si solid state detectors. Large area microchannel plates are used, resulting in a large geometrical factor for the instrument (0.6 sq cm sr) which is essential for accurate compositional measurements in small solar flares, and in studies of precipitating magnetospheric heavy ions.

  13. Harvesting energy from a water flow through ionic polymer metal composites' buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellini, Filippo; Cha, Youngsu; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-03-01

    This study seeks to investigate the feasibility of energy harvesting from mechanical buckling of ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) induced by a steady fluid flow. In particular, we propose a harvesting device composed of a paddle wheel, a slider-crank mechanism, and two IPMCs clamped at both their ends. We test the system in a water tunnel to estimate the effects of the flow speed and the shunting resistance on power harvesting. The classical post-buckling theory of inextensible rods is utilized, in conjunction with a black-box model for IPMC sensing, to interpret experimental results.

  14. Cryogenic Yb:YAG composite-thin-disk for high energy and average power amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Luis E; Lin, Hua; Calendron, Anne-Laure; Cankaya, Huseyin; Hemmer, Michael; Reichert, Fabian; Huang, W Ronny; Granados, Eduardo; Hong, Kyung-Han; Kärtner, Franz X

    2015-06-01

    A cryogenic composite-thin-disk amplifier with amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) rejection is implemented that overcomes traditional laser system problems in high-energy pulsed laser drivers of high average power. A small signal gain of 8 dB was compared to a 1.5 dB gain for an uncapped thin-disk without ASE mitigation under identical pumping conditions. A strict image relayed 12-pass architecture using an off-axis vacuum telescope and polarization switching extracted 100 mJ at 250 Hz in high beam quality stretched 700 ps pulses of 0.6-nm bandwidth. PMID:26030570

  15. Evaluation of energy absorption of new concepts of aircraft composite subfloor intersections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa E.; Carden, Huey D.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-one composite aircraft subfloor intersection specimens were tested to determine the effects of geometry and material on the energy absorbing behavior, failure characteristics, and post-crush structural integrity of the specimens. The intersections were constructed of twelve ply + or - 45 sub 6 laminates of either Kevlar 49/934 or AS-4/934 graphite-epoxy in heights of 4, 8, and 12 inches. The geometry of the specimens varied in the designs of the intersection attachment angle. Four different geometries were tested.

  16. Compliant Electrode and Composite Material for Piezoelectric Wind and Mechanical Energy Conversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thin film device for harvesting energy from wind. The thin film device includes one or more layers of a compliant piezoelectric material formed from a composite of a polymer and an inorganic material, such as a ceramic. Electrodes are disposed on a first side and a second side of the piezoelectric material. The electrodes are formed from a compliant material, such as carbon nanotubes or graphene. The thin film device exhibits improved resistance to structural fatigue upon application of large strains and repeated cyclic loadings.

  17. Energy Spectra and Mass Composition of Cosmic Rays in the Fractal-Like Galactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagutin, A. A.; Tyumentsev, A. G.; Yushkov, A. V.

    We consider the problem of the cosmic ray spectrum formation assuming that cosmic rays are produced by galactic sources. The fractional diffusion equation proposed in our recent papers is used to describe the cosmic rays propagation in interstellar medium. We show that in the framework of this approach it is possible to explain the locally observed basic features of the cosmic rays in the energy region 1010 ÷ 1020 eV: difference between spectral exponents of protons and other nuclei, mass composition variation, "knee" problem, flattening of the primary spectrum for E ≥ 1018 ÷ 1019 eV.

  18. Spherically shaped micron-size particle-reinforced PMMA and PC composites for improving energy absorption capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung-ick; Kang, Eung-Chun; Jang, Jae-Soon; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2011-04-01

    The focus of this study was to experimentally investigate spherically shaped micron-size particles reinforced polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate (PC) polymer composites for improving energy absorbing capabilities such as toughness and low-velocity impact resistance. In this study, a solution mixing method was developed to fabricate both PMMA and PC polymer composites with spherically shaped micron-size polyamide- nylon 6 (PA6) particles inclusions. The morphology of the fracture surfaces of polymer composites was examined by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Strain-rate dependent response of both PMMA and PC polymer composites was investigated by characterizing tensile and flexural properties. Low-velocity penetration testing was performed for both polymer composites and the key results observed for energy absorption capabilities are discussed in this study.

  19. Influence of resin system on the energy absorption capability and morphological properties of plain woven kenaf composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, S. D.; Leman, Z.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Ishak, M. R.; Cardona, F.

    2015-12-01

    Due to both environmental and technical advantages, natural fibers are being used as reinforcement of polymeric composite in many industries. The flexibility of the most natural fibers is one of the important technical characteristic which allows them to resist impact forces. An investigation was carried out to compare the energy absorption capability of kenaf/PVB film and kenaf/epoxy composites. The hot and cold press techniques were used to fabricate the specimens with 35% kenaf fibre weight fraction. The charpy impact test was performed on forty notched specimens using a pendulum impact tester with different hammer energy. The results showed that the kenaf/PVB film composite has the highest energy absorption, strength and toughness compared with the epoxy composite. At high energy levels, the impact strength and toughness of the kenaf/PVB film was six times of kenaf/epoxy composite. In addition, the scanning electron microscopy was assessed to demonstrate the different failure in fracture surfaces. It was found that the kenaf/PVB film composite failed by fibre fracture while kenaf/epoxy composite failed by a combination of fibre pull-out and fibre fracture as well as crack propagations through the matrix.

  20. Results on the energy dependence of cosmic-ray charge composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Results of measurements by a balloon-borne ionization spectrometer of the energy dependence of high-energy cosmic-ray charge composition. The results presented are greatly improved over those obtained earlier by Ormes et al. (1971) by the use of a multidimensional charge analysis with more efficient background rejection, and a more accurate energy determination. Complex couplings between the charge, energy, and trajectory information were taken into account and are discussed. The spectra of individual elements up to oxygen and of groups of nuclei up through iron were measured up to almost 100 GeV per nucleon. The energy spectrum of the secondary nuclei, B + N, is found to be steeper than that of the primary nuclei, C + O, in agreement with Smith et al. (1973). The most dramatic finding is that the spectrum of the iron nuclei is flatter than that of the carbon and oxygen nuclei by 0.57 plus or minus 0.14 of a power.

  1. The effects of crushing speed on the energy-absorption capability of composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    The energy-absorption capability as a function of crushing speed was determined for Thornel 300-Fiberite 934 (Gr-E) and Kevlar-49-Fiberite 934 (K-E) composite material. Circular cross section tube specimens were crushed at speeds ranging from 0.01 to 12 m/sec. Ply orientations of the tube specimens were (0/ +/- theta)2 and (+/- theta)2 where theta = 15, 45, and 75 deg. Based upon the results of these tests, the energy-absorption capability of Gr-E and K-E was determined to be a function of crushing speed. The magnitude of the effects of crushing speed on energy-absorption capability was determined to be a function of the mechanisms that control the crushing process. The effects of crushing speed on the energy-absorption capability is related to whether the mechanical response of the crushing mechanism that controls the crushing process is a function of strain rate. Energy-absorption capability of Gr-E and K-E tubes ranged between 0 and 35 percent and 20 and 45 percent, respectively, depending upon ply orientation.

  2. Nonlinear elastic effects on the energy flux deviation of ultrasonic waves in gr/ep composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of nonlinear elasticity on energy flux deviation in undirectional gr/ep composites are examined. The shift in the flux deviation is modeled using acoustoelasticity theory and the second- and third-order elastic stiffness coefficients for T300/5208 gr/ep. Two conditions of applied uniaxial stress are considered. In the first case, the direction of applied uniaxial stress was along the fiber axis (x3), while in the second case it was perpendicular to the fiber axis along the laminate stacking direction (x1). For both conditions, the change in the energy flux deviation angle from the condition of zero applied stress is computed over the range of propagation directions of 0 to 60 deg from the fiber axis at two-degree intervals. A positive flux deviation angle implies the energy deviates away from the fiber direction toward the x1 axis, while a negative deviation means that the energy deviates toward the fibers. Over this range of fiber orientation angles, the energy of the quasi-longitudinal and pure mode transverse waves deviates toward the fibers, while that of the quasi-transverse mode deviates away from the fibers.

  3. Measurement of body composition as a surrogate evaluation of energy balance in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Rotella, Carlo Maria; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-03-26

    In clinical practice obesity is primarily diagnosed through the body mass index. In order to characterize patients affected by obesity the use of traditional anthropometric measures appears misleading. Beyond the body mass index, there are overwhelming evidences towards the relevance of a more detailed description of the individual phenotype by characterizing the main body components as free-fat mass, muscle mass, and fat mass. Among the numerous techniques actually available, bioelectrical impedance analysis seems to be the most suitable in a clinical setting because it is simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and highly reproducible. To date, there is no consensus concerning the use of one preferred equation for the resting energy expenditure in overweight and/or obese population. Energy restriction alone is an effective strategy to achieve an early and significant weight loss, however it results in a reduction of both fat and lean mass therefore promoting or aggravating an unfavourable body composition (as sarcobesity) in terms of mortality and comorbidities. Therefore the implementation of daily levels of physical activity should be simultaneously promoted. The major role of muscle mass in the energy balance has been recently established by the rising prevalence of the combination of two condition as sarcopenia and obesity. Physical exercise stimulates energy expenditure, thereby directly improving energy balance, and also promotes adaptations such as fiber type, mitochondrial biogenesis, improvement of insulin resistance, and release of myokines, which may influence different tissues, including muscle. PMID:25825693

  4. Measurement of body composition as a surrogate evaluation of energy balance in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Rotella, Carlo Maria; Dicembrini, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice obesity is primarily diagnosed through the body mass index. In order to characterize patients affected by obesity the use of traditional anthropometric measures appears misleading. Beyond the body mass index, there are overwhelming evidences towards the relevance of a more detailed description of the individual phenotype by characterizing the main body components as free-fat mass, muscle mass, and fat mass. Among the numerous techniques actually available, bioelectrical impedance analysis seems to be the most suitable in a clinical setting because it is simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and highly reproducible. To date, there is no consensus concerning the use of one preferred equation for the resting energy expenditure in overweight and/or obese population. Energy restriction alone is an effective strategy to achieve an early and significant weight loss, however it results in a reduction of both fat and lean mass therefore promoting or aggravating an unfavourable body composition (as sarcobesity) in terms of mortality and comorbidities. Therefore the implementation of daily levels of physical activity should be simultaneously promoted. The major role of muscle mass in the energy balance has been recently established by the rising prevalence of the combination of two condition as sarcopenia and obesity. Physical exercise stimulates energy expenditure, thereby directly improving energy balance, and also promotes adaptations such as fiber type, mitochondrial biogenesis, improvement of insulin resistance, and release of myokines, which may influence different tissues, including muscle. PMID:25825693

  5. Graphene decorated with MoS2 nanosheets: a synergetic energy storage composite electrode for supercapacitor applications.

    PubMed

    Thangappan, R; Kalaiselvam, S; Elayaperumal, A; Jayavel, R; Arivanandhan, M; Karthikeyan, R; Hayakawa, Y

    2016-02-14

    The two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheet-carbon composite is an attractive material for energy storage because of its high Faradaic activity, unique nanoconstruction and electronic properties. In this work, a facile one step preparation of a molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheet-graphene (MoS2/G) composite with the in situ reduction of graphene oxide is reported. The structure, morphology and composition of the pure MoS2 and composites were comparatively analyzed by various characterization techniques. The electrochemical performance of the pure MoS2, graphene oxide and the MoS2/G composite electrode materials was evaluated by cyclic voltammogram, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The MoS2/G composite showed a higher specific capacitance (270 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.1 A g(-1)) compared to the pure MoS2 (162 F g(-1)) in a neutral aqueous electrolyte. Moreover, the energy density of the composite electrode is also higher (12.5 Wh kg(-1)) with a high power density (2500 W kg(-1)) compared to the pure MoS2. In addition, the MoS2/G composite electrode showed excellent cyclic stability even after 1000 cycles. The enhancement in specific capacitance, excellent cyclic stability and high energy density of the composite electrode are mainly due to the interconnected conductive network of the composite as well as the synergetic effect of the pure MoS2 and graphene. The experimental results demonstrated that the MoS2/G composite is a promising electrode material for high-performance supercapacitors. PMID:26732466

  6. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.2: UV Degradation Prevention on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Janet M. Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Use of wind energy has expanded very quickly because of the energy prices, environmental concerns and improved efficiency of wind generators. Rather than using metal and alloy based wind turbine blades, larger size fiber (glass and carbon) reinforced composite blades have been recently utilized to increase the efficiency of the wind energy in both high and low wind potential areas. In the current composite manufacturing, pre-preg and vacuum-assisted/heat sensitive resin transfer molding and resin infusion methods are employed. However, these lighter, stiffer and stronger composite blades experience ultraviolet (UV) light degradation where polymers (epoxies and hardeners) used for the blades manufacturing absorb solar UV lights, and cause photolytic, thermo-oxidative and photo-oxidative reactions resulting in breaking of carbon-hydrogen bonds, polymer degradation and internal and external stresses. One of the main reasons is the weak protective coatings/paints on the composite blades. This process accelerates the aging and fatigue cracks, and reduces the overall mechanical properties of the blades. Thus, the lack of technology on coatings for blade manufacturing is forcing many government agencies and private companies (local and national windmill companies) to find a better solution for the composite wind blades. Kansas has a great wind potential for the future energy demand, so efficient wind generators can be an option for continuous energy production. The research goal of the present project was to develop nanocomposite coatings using various inclusions against UV degradation and corrosion, and advance the fundamental understanding of degradation (i.e., physical, chemical and physiochemical property changes) on those coatings. In pursuit of the research goal, the research objective of the present program was to investigate the effects of UV light and duration on various nanocomposites made mainly of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoflakes

  7. The effects of crushing speed on the energy-absorption capability of composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    The energy-absorption capability as a function of crushing speed was determined for Thornel 300/Fiberite 934 (Gr/E) and Kevlar-49/Fiberite 934 (K/E) composite material. Circular cross section tube specimens were crushed at quasi-static, 6 m/sec, and 12 m/sec speeds. Ply orientations of the tube specimens were (0/+ or - theta) sub 2 and (+ or - theta) sub 3 where theta=15, 45, and 75 degress. Based on the results of these tests the energy-absortion capability of Gr/E and K/E was determined to be a function of crushing speed. The crushing modes based on exterior appearance of the crushed tubes were unchanged for either material. However, the interlaminar crushing behavior changed with crushing speed.

  8. Effect of stress on energy flux deviation of ultrasonic waves in GR/EP composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves suffer energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy because of the large anisotropy. The angle of deviation is a function of the elastic coefficients. For nonlinear solids, these coefficients and thus the angle of deviation is a function of stress. Acoustoelastic theory was used to model the effect of stress on flux deviation for unidirectional T300/5208 using previously measured elastic coefficients. Computations were made for uniaxial stress along the x3 axis (fiber axis) and the x1 for waves propagating in the x1x3 plane. These results predict a shift as large as three degrees for the quasi-transverse wave. The shift in energy flux offers a new nondestructive technique of evaluating stress in composites.

  9. The ISPM experiment for spectral, composition and anistropy measurements of charged particles at low energie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gold, R. E.; Anderson, K. A.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lin, R. P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Pick, M.; Roelof, E. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Simnett, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    The Heliosphere Instrument for Spectral, Composition, and Anisotropy at Low Energies (HI-SCALE) designed to measure interplanetary ions and electrons is described. Ions and electrons are detected by five separate solid-state detector telescopes oriented to give complete pitch angle coverage from the spinning spacecraft. Ion elemental abundances are determined by a telescope using a thin front detector element in a three-element telescope. Experiment operation is controlled by a microprocessor-based data system. Inflight calibration is provided by radioactive sources mounted on closable telescope covers. Ion and electron spectral information is determined using broad-energy-range rate channels, and a pulse-height analyzer for more detailed spectra. The instrument weighs 5.775 kg and uses 4.0 W power.

  10. Flexible nano-ZnO/polyvinylidene difluoride piezoelectric composite films as energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Ritamay; Das, Shirsendu; Dalui, Saikat; Hussain, Shamima; Paul, Rajib; Bhar, Radhaballav; Pal, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Nanogenerators (NGs) which harvest energy from mechanical vibration have attracted more attention in the past decade. Piezoelectric materials are the most promising candidates for developing NGs. Flexible free-standing nano-ZnO/PVDF composite films are prepared by incorporating different amounts of nano-ZnO fillers in PVDF matrix using sol-gel technique. Poled films show enhanced dielectric constant. The above free-standing films, with appropriate contacts, are subjected to energy harvesting studies. The output voltage increases with nano-ZnO loading in the PVDF matrix and shows enhanced effect for the poled films. Piezoelectric properties are investigated by measuring the piezoelectric charge constant ( d 33) and piezoelectric voltage constant ( g 33). A maximum AC output voltage ~4 V and output power of the order of few nanowatts are recorded for the nanogenerator which is used to light a red LED using a rectifying circuit through the discharging of a capacitor.