Science.gov

Sample records for energikrav byggesystem lette

  1. Erratum to “Comment on “Geometry effect on the magnetic ordering of geometrically frustrated rectangular and triangular magnets” [Phys. Lett. A 375 (13) (2011) 1548]” [Phys. Lett. A 375 (27) (2011) 2680-2681

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, F. S.; Mól, L. A. S.; Pereira, A. R.; Moura-Melo, W. A.

    2012-10-01

    In a recent comment [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 2680] some of us argued that a misleading evaluation of dipolar interactions in spin ice systems studied by Li et al. [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 1548], does not lead to the ground-state transitions that they observed. However, a bug found in our computational code showed that there is indeed the predicted transitions even for a proper evaluation of dipolar interactions.

  2. Comment on ``On the tensile strength distribution of multiwalled carbon nanotubes'' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 203106 (2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunsheng

    2008-05-01

    In a recent letter, Barber, Andrews, Schadler, and Wagner, Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 203106 (2005). indicated that Weibull-Poisson statistics could accurately model the nanotube tensile strength data, and then concluded that the apparent strengthening mechanism in a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is most likely caused by an enhanced interaction between the walls of the nanotube. In this comment, we show that their conclusion seems to be inconsistent with the assumption introduced in the data analysis by using a two-parameter Weibull distribution. Further statistical analysis provides a new explanation on the scattered strengths of MWCNTs. The effectiveness of Weibull-Poisson statistics at nanoscales is also discussed.

  3. Comment on “Deterministic six states protocol for quantum communication” [Phys. Lett. A 358 (2006) 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Orany, Faisal A. A.

    2010-02-01

    In [J.S. Shaari, M. Lucamarini, M.R.B. Wahiddin, Phys. Lett. A 358 (2006) 85] the deterministic six states protocol (6DP) for quantum communication has been developed. This protocol is based on three mutually unbiased bases and four encoding operators. Information is transmitted between the users via two qubits from different bases. Three attacks have been studied; namely intercept-resend attack (IRA), double-CNOT attack (2CNOTA) and quantum man-in-the-middle attack. In this Letter, we show that the IRA and 2CNOTA are not properly addressed. For instance, we show that the probability of detecting Eve in the control mode of the IRA is 70% instead of 50% in the previous study. Moreover, in the 2CNOTA, Eve can only obtain 50% of the data not all of it as argued earlier.

  4. Response to 'Comment on 'Pinch current limitation effect in plasma focus'' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 076101 (2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Saw, S. H.

    2009-02-16

    The main point of the comment [Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 076101 (2009)] is that Eq. (2) and consequentially Eq. (3) of the commented paper [Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 021503 (2008)] require correction. The alternative equation suggested in the comment is derived using Kirchhoff's voltage rule. The comment consider only the energy distribution in the inductive components and the resultant equation confirms a progressive lowering of the I{sub pinch}/I{sub peak} ratio as the static inductance L{sub 0} is reduced, lowering from 0.87 to 0.31 as L{sub 0} is reduced from 100 to 5 nH according to the revised formula corresponding to Eq. (3), compared to 0.63-0.25 according to Eq. (3). This progressive lowering of the ratio I{sub pinch}/I{sub peak} due to the inductive energy distribution is one of two factors responsible for the pinch current limitation. The other factor is the progressive reduction in the L-C interaction time compared to the current dip duration denoted by {delta}{sub cap} in Eq. (2). The comment does not deal with {delta}{sub cap} at all; hence, its conclusion based on inductive energy distribution only is not useful, since in the low L{sub 0} region when pinch current limitation begins to manifest, {delta}{sub cap} becomes more and more the dominant factor. In any case, the results of the paper do not depend on Eqs. (2) and (3), which are used in the paper only for illustrative purposes.

  5. Reply to: “Comment on: ‘How much security does Y-00 protocol provide us?’ ” [Phys. Lett. A 346 (2005) 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Toshio; Ishizuka, Hirokazu; Imafuku, Kentaro; Imai, Hideki

    2005-10-01

    In a recent paper titled “Comment on: ‘How much security does the Y-00 protocol provide us?’ ” [H.P. Yuen, P. Kumar, E. Corndorf, Phys. Lett. A 346 (2005) 1 6], the authors critically examine our idea [T. Nishioka, T. Hasegawa, H. Ishizuka, K. Imafuku, H. Imai, Phys. Lett. A 327 (2004) 28 32] that the Y-00 protocol is essentially as secure as classical stream ciphers. We clarify our idea in more detail than our previous paper and show that the Y-00 protocol can be considered as a classical non-random stream cipher, as was claimed in [T. Nishioka, T. Hasegawa, H. Ishizuka, K. Imafuku, H. Imai, Phys. Lett. A 327 (2004) 28 32]. We also provide an analysis on key generation with the improved Y-00 protocol, which is implemented with weak coherent states.

  6. Erratum to: “Weak corrections to gluon-induced top antitop hadro-production” [Phys. Lett. B 639 (2006) 513

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, S.; Nolten, M. R.; Ross, D. A.

    2008-03-01

    This is an Erratum to a Letter of ours [S. Moretti, M.R. Nolten, D.A. Ross, Phys. Lett. B 639 (2006) 513]. After its publication, we have discovered a mistake in a numerical program that affects the results presented therein. We provide here the corrected version.

  7. Comment on "Propagation of a TE surface mode in a relativistic electron beam-quantum plasma system" [Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 169

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2016-07-01

    In a recent paper Abdel Aziz [Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 169] obtained the dispersion properties of TE surface modes propagating at the interface between a magnetized quantum plasma and vacuum in the Faraday configuration, where these TE surface waves are excited during the interaction of relativistic electron beam with magnetized quantum plasma. The present Comment points out that in the Faraday configuration the surface waves acquire both TM and TE components due to the cyclotron motion of electrons. Therefore, the TE surface waves cannot propagate on surface of the present system and the general dispersion relations for surface waves, derived by Abdel Aziz are incorrect.

  8. Comment on: ‘How much security does Y-00 protocol provide us?’ [Phys. Lett. A 327 (2004) 28

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Horace P.; Kumar, Prem; Corndorf, Eric; Nair, Ranjith

    2005-10-01

    It is claimed by T. Nishioka et al. in [T. Nishioka, T. Hasegawa, H. Ishiziuka, K. Imafuku, H. Imai, Phys. Lett. A 327 (2004) 28 32] that the security of Y-00 is equivalent to that of a classical stream cipher. In this Letter it is shown that the claim is false in either the use of Y-00 for direct encryption or key generation, in all the parameter ranges it is supposed to operate including those of the experiments reported thus far. The security of Y-00 type protocols is clarified.

  9. Comment on “A Quantum Network System of QSS-QDC Using χ-Type Entangled States" [Chin. Phys. Lett. 29 (2012) 050303

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Han-Wu; Liu, Wen-Jie; Xu, Juan

    2013-03-01

    Two quantum secret sharing (QSS) protocols in a multiuser quantum direct communication (QDC) network system were put forward by Hong et al. [Chin. Phys. Lett. 29 (2012) 050303]. However, we find that either agent (Bob or Charlie) alone can obtain half the information about the sender's secret without collaboration with the other, which does not satisfy the security requirement of QSS. Moreover, the secret message sent by Alice in the second protocol can be eavesdropped on or its communication can be disturbed by the builder of quantum channels (Trent).

  10. Comment on “Geometry effect on the magnetic ordering of geometrically frustrated rectangular and triangular magnets” [Phys. Lett. A 375 (13) (2011) 1548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mól, L. A. S.; Pereira, A. R.; Moura-Melo, W. A.

    2011-07-01

    In a recent letter Li et al. [Phys. Lett. A 375 (2011) 1548] have investigated some geometric effects on the ordering of artificial spin ice materials. They have argued that the system ground-state undergoes a transition when the lattice spacing in one direction is sufficiently larger than in the other. Their results were obtained by evaluating the dipolar interactions using a restrict set of spin pairs. In this comment we show that by taking into account all the dipolar interactions among the spins no ground-state transition is observed.

  11. Comment on “Magnetostratigraphic study of the Kuche Depression, Tarim Basin, and Cenozoic uplift of the Tian Shan Range, Western China” Baochun Huang, John D.A. Piper, Shoutao Peng, Tao Liu, Zhong Li, Qingchen Wang, Rixiang Zhu [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 2006, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2006.09.020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charreau, Julien; Chen, Yan; Gilder, Stuart; Barier, Laurie

    2008-04-01

    The recent publication of "Magnetostratigraphic study of the Kuche Depression, Tarim Basin, and Cenozoic uplift of the Tian Shan Range,Western China" by B.C. Huang, J.D.A. Piper, S.T. Peng, T. Liu, Z. Li, Q.C. Wang, R.X. Zhu [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 2006, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2006.09.020] discusses the Cenozoic uplift history of the Tianshan Mountains by studying the magnetostratigraphy of Paleogene to Neogene continental sediments from two sections located in the Kuche basin at the northern edge of the Tarim basin. To support their conclusion they reinterpreted a magnetostratigraphic study of the Yaha section, which lies ~ 10 km south of their sections, we previously published [J. Charreau, S. Gilder, Y. Chen, S. Dominguez, J.-P. Avouac, S. Sen, M. Jolivet, Y. Li and W. Wang, Magnetostratigraphy of the Yaha section, Tarim Basin (China): 11 Ma acceleration in erosion and uplift of the Tianshan Mountains, Geology 34(3), 2006, 181­184.]. Here, (1) we argue that the interpretations of the sedimentation rate changes they proposed for the Kuche sections are partially invalid, (2) we disagree with their reinterpretation of the age of the Yaha section, and (3) we think that the way they interpret their AMS data is incorrect.

  12. Addendum to "Updating neutrino magnetic moment constraints" [Phys. Lett. B 753 (2016) 191-198

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañas, B. C.; Miranda, O. G.; Parada, A.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2016-06-01

    After the publication of this work we noticed that the uncertainties in the considered backgrounds in Borexino may affect our reported limit on the neutrino magnetic moment from Borexino data. Indeed, we have found that a more precise treatment of the uncertainties in the total normalization of these backgrounds results in a weaker sensitivity on the neutrino magnetic moment. This point will be hopefully improved in the near future thanks to the purification processes carried out in the second phase of the Borexino experiment. Meanwhile, however, we think it would be more reliable to adopt the bound on the neutrino magnetic moment reported by Borexino: μν < 5.4 ×10-11μB[1].

  13. Reply to: “Comment on: ‘From classical to modern ether-drift experiments: the narrow window for a preferred frame’ [Phys. Lett. A 333 (2004) 355]” [Phys. Lett A 361 (2007) 509

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, M.; Costanzo, E.

    2007-02-01

    We present some arguments that should induce to re-consider from a new perspective the interference experiments in moving media (Michelson Morley, Fizeau, …). These considerations are useful to understand and appreciate the experimental test recently proposed by Guerra and de Abreu.

  14. Erratum: Measurement of Branching Fractions and Mass Spectra of B→Kππγ [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 211804 (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Morgan, S. E.; Watson, A. T.; Fritsch, M.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, A. E.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Andreassen, R.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Dickopp, M.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Petzold, A.; Schott, G.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Grenier, P.; Schrenk, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Bard, D. J.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Langenegger, U.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Taylor, G. P.; Vazquez, W. P.; Charles, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Mallik, U.; Mohapata, A. K.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Yi, J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Giroux, X.; Grosdidier, G.; Hocker, A.; Diberder, F. Le; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Petersen, T. C.; Pierini, M.; Plaszcynski, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Cormack, C. M.; Lodovico, F. Di; Sacco, R.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Green, M. G.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Chen, C.; Farbin, A.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote, D.; Taras, P.; Viaud, B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; Nardo, G. De; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M.; Bulten, H.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Wilden, L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Rahimi, A. M.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Lu, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Buono, L. Del; de La Vaissiere, Ch.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Malcles, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Pacetti, S.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Marco, E. Di; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Schroder, H.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Groot, N. De; Franek, B.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Graziani, G.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, W.; Wilson, J. R.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Abe, T.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Fan, S.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Libby, J.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Pavini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Tan, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2008-05-01

    We present a measurement of the partial branching fractions and mass spectra of the exclusive radiative penguin processes B -> K pi pi gamma in the range m_Kpipi < 1.8 GeV/c^2. We reconstruct four final states: K+ pi- pi+ gamma, K+ pi- pi0 gamma, Ks pi- pi+ gamma, and Ks pi+ pi- gamma, where Ks -> pi+ pi-. Using 232 million e+ e- -> B Bbar events recorded by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring, we measure the branching fractions BR(B+ -> K+ pi- pi+ gamma) = (2.95 +- 0.13 (stat.) +- 0.20 (syst.)) x 10^-5, BR(B0 -> K+ pi- pi0 gamma) = (4.07 +- 0.22 (stat.) +- 0.31 (syst.)) x 10^-5, BR(B0 -> K0 pi+ pi- gamma) = (1.85 +- 0.21 (stat.) +- 0.12 (syst.)) x 10^-5, and BR(B+ -> K0 pi+ pi0 gamma) = (4.56 +- 0.42 (stat.) +- 0.31 (syst.)) x 10^-5.

  15. Erratum to “The dimension formula for the Lorenz attractor” [Phys. Lett. A 375 (8) (2011) 1179

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, G. A.; Pogromsky, A. Yu.; Starkov, K. E.

    2012-10-01

    In our recent publication (G.A. Leonov et al., 2011 [1]) we formulated a result on Lyapunov dimension formula for the Lorenz system. The proof of this result contains a flaw which is corrected in this Erratum.

  16. Comments on “Thermal relic abundances of particles with velocity-dependent interactions” [Phys. Lett. B 687 (2010) 275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iminniyaz, Hoernisa

    2013-06-01

    We reexamine the effect of kinetic decoupling on the relic density of the non-relativistic particles whose annihilation rate is increased by Sommerfeld enhancement. I claim that the result in Dent et al. (2010) [1] is wrong in the case of kinetic decoupling for small coupling constant α.

  17. Comment on "Radicalicity: A scale to compare reactivities of radicals" (Chem. Phys. Lett. 618 (2015) 99-101)*

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poutsma, Marvin L.

    2016-04-21

    The recently proposed term radicalicity was described as a measure of the reactivity of a free radical Q*, i.e., a kinetic quantity. Here it is shown that in fact it is simply a frame-shifted version of the well-known bond dissociation energy, a thermodynamic quantity. Hence its use is discouraged.

  18. Corrigendum to "Wind as the primary driver of erosion in the Qaidam Basin, China" [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 374 (2013) 1-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, Alexander; Heermance, Richard; Kapp, Paul; Cai, Fulong

    2015-12-01

    The authors regret that the longitude coordinates are incorrect for some of the samples displayed in Table 1 (they are correct in Fig. 2). The corrected Table 1 appears below for the reader's convenience.

  19. Corrigendum to "Widespread occurrence of (per)chlorate in the Solar System" [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 430 (2015) 470-476

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Davila, Alfonso F.; Sears, Derek; Coates, John D.; McKay, Christopher P.; Brundrett, Maeghan; Estrada, Nubia; Böhlke, J. K.

    2016-02-01

    The authors regret that two sets of data (Atacama (Rao et al., 2010) and Mars Meteorite Range (Kounaves et al., 2014)) in Fig. 2 of our article were plotted in the wrong units. The correction does not change the relationship between ClO3- and ClO4- ; it only shifts the magnitude of the concentrations. The conclusions of the article are not affected. The corrected Fig. 2 appears below.

  20. Erratum: Evidence of b-jet quenching in PbPb collisions at sNN=2.76TeV [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 132301 (2014)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-07-10

    In our Letter, there was a component of the statistical uncertainty from the simulated PbPb Monte Carlo samples. This uncertainty was not propagated to all of the results. Figures 3 and 4 have been updated to reflect this source of uncertainty. In this case, the statistical uncertainties remain smaller than the systematic uncertainties in all cases such that the conclusions of the Letter are unaltered.

  1. Comment on "Compact envelope dark solitary wave in a discrete nonlinear electrical transmission line" [Phys. Lett. A 373 (2009) 3801-3809

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamgoué, Serge Bruno; Pelap, François Beceau

    2016-05-01

    We revisit the derivation of the equation modeling envelope waves in a discrete nonlinear electrical transmission line (NLTL) considered a few years back in Physics Letters A 373 (2009) 3801-3809. Using a combination of rotating wave approximation and the Gardner-Morikawa transformation, we show that the modulated waves are described by a new type of extended nonlinear Schrödinger equation. In addition the expressions of several coefficients of this equation are found to be strongly different from those given earlier. As a consequence, key relationships between these coefficients that sustained the previous analysis are broken.

  2. Retraction notice to "On a general class of regular rotating black holes based on a smeared mass distribution" [Phys. Lett. B 743 (2015) 492-502

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larranaga, Alexis; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro; Torres, Daniel Alexdy

    2015-07-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief. The authors have plagiarized part of a paper that had already appeared in Adv. High Energy Physics, P. Nicolini, A. Orlandi, E. Spallucci, The Final Stage of Gravitationally Collapsed Thick Matter Layers, Vol 2013 (2013), Article ID 812084 http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/812084. One of the conditions of submission of a paper for publication is that authors declare explicitly that their work is original and has not appeared in a publication elsewhere. Re-use of any data should be appropriately cited. As such this article represents a severe abuse of the scientific publishing system. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  3. Comment on: "The ascent of kimberlite: Insights from olivine" by Brett R.C. et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 424 (2015) 119-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetsky, Vadim S.

    2016-04-01

    Brett et al. (2015) proposed a kimberlite factory model that "…involves carbonatitic proto-kimberlite melts preferentially assimilating Opx xenocrysts as they transit the cratonic mantle lithosphere to evolve into silicic-hydrous melts that reach olivine saturation during ascent" (p. 130). A cornerstone of this model is a specific, carbonatitic composition of proto-kimberlite melts ascending through the subcratonic lithospheric mantle "…whereby parental carbonatitic magmas are progressively converted to kimberlite (e.g., Russell et al., 2012, 2013; Bussweiler et al., 2015)" (p. 120). The model by Brett et al. (2015) is based on observations of "the carbonate-sealed cracks" in olivine that "…strongly support to the hypothesis that all kimberlite magmas originate as carbonatitic-melts (e.g., Russell et al., 2012, 2013; Kamenetsky et al., 2013; Pilbeam et al., 2013; Kamenetsky and Yaxley, 2015; Bussweiler et al., 2015)." (p. 129). While the major thrust of the study by Brett et al. (2015) hinges on the premise that the parental kimberlite melt is carbonatitic, the overwhelming majority in the kimberlite community still prefers a carbonated ultramafic/ultrabasic composition for parental kimberlite melts. Thus the suggestion that kimberlites have an initial carbonatite composition is not less than "a paradigm shift" in the kimberlite petrology. It appears that a carbonatite origin for kimberlites has been proposed in many studies that significantly pre-date the publications starting from 2012 that they cite, but which unfortunately are overlooked by Brett et al. (2015). It is, therefore, worth acknowledging the research which has previously advanced this unorthodox idea.

  4. Reply on: "Comment on: The ascent of kimberlite: Insights from olivine" authored by Brett R.C. et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 424 (2015) 119-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, R. Curtis; Russell, J. K.; Andrews, G. D. M.; Jones, T. J.

    2016-04-01

    The Kamenetsky (2016) comment on the Kimberlite Factory model proposed by Brett et al. (2015) asserts, "A cornerstone of this model is a specific, carbonatitic composition of proto-kimberlite melts ascending through the sub-cratonic lithospheric mantle" and "… the major thrust of the study hinges on the premise that the parental kimberlite melt is carbonatitic". This is a clear misstatement of our central thesis, which is to utilize the attributes of olivine xenocrysts to constrain the physical ascent of kimberlite. Brett et al.'s study does not hinge on the premise that parental kimberlite melt is carbonatitic. Rather, our interpretation that kimberlite melt originates as near carbonatitic hinges on our novel observation that early "carbonate sealed cracks provide evidence of melt being drawn into decompression cracks and precipitating" (p. 129). Our connection between this observation and our interpretation is tied explicitly to earlier published works "in this regard, the carbonate-filled sealed cracks strongly support to the hypothesis that all kimberlite magmas originate as carbonatitic-melts (e.g.,Russell et al., 2012, 2013;Kamenetsky et al., 2013; Pilbeam et al., 2013; Kamenetsky and Yaxley, 2015; Bussweiler et al., 2015)" (p. 129). To state that our interpretation is based on a pre-existing bias towards a model of a carbonatitic origin of kimberlite magmas is incorrect. Rather, our new observational data independently demonstrates that the presence of carbonate-sealed cracks formed during kimberlite ascent.

  5. Corrigendum to "Inclusive J/ψ production in pp collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV" [Phys. Lett. B 718 (2012) 295

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    We have identified an issue in the calculation of the uncertainties of the mean transverse momentum and mean transverse momentum squared < pt2 > of inclusive J/ψ at forward rapidity in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √{ s} = 2.76 and at forward and mid-rapidity in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV[1]. Both statistical and systematic uncertainties, derived from a fit to the measured pt-differential cross section, were overestimated by about 50%. Moreover, for the results at mid-rapidity, the values quoted as systematic uncertainties were actually the total uncertainties, i.e. the quadratic sum of statistical and systematic uncertainties. The corrected numerical values for both and < pt2 > are quoted in Table 1. In Fig. 1 we have updated the total uncertainties of the three ALICE data points.

  6. Erratum to “Evolution of chirality from γ soft 108Ru to triaxial 110,112Ru” [Phys. Lett. B 670 (4-5) (2009) 307

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Joseph; Luo, Y. X.

    2010-08-01

    We have noticed that we made a typographical error on spelling of one of the author's names. “Z. Jang” should be changed to “Z. Jiang” and add the following address: AdValue Photonics, Inc., Tucson, AZ 85714, USA.

  7. Comment on 'Mapping of localized spin-wave excitations by near-field Brillouin light scattering' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 152502 (2010)].

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, L.; Montoncello, F.; Nizzoli, F.; Vavassori, P.; Grimsditch, M.

    2011-11-04

    The authors reported in their letter some outstanding experimental results of spin excitations in nano-particles investigated by near-field Brillouin scattering. They conclude from their observations that existing theories -- in particular micromagnetic simulations -- do not correctly describe the behavior of the spin modes. Since excellent agreement has been reported between spin-wave mode frequencies obtained from Brillouin scattering experiments and those obtained from micromagnetic-based simulations, it is somewhat surprising that the simulations should fail for the particles investigated in Ref. 1. In the literature, there is also evidence of various kinds and degrees of mode localization when exchange competes with dipolar interactions. When dipolar long-range interactions are taken into account, the eigenmodes can be seen as the superposition of plane waves, leading to different localizations and in particular to the appearence of bulk-dead modes. We have simulated the normal modes of the particles used in Ref. 1, with the dynamical matrix method; the results are shown in Fig. 1 for different values of the applied field. In addition to the lowest frequency non-localized mode (1-BA), several localized modes are present. Large particles exhibit modes with oscillations along the field direction;8 for such modes, we use the label n-BA-loc, with n the number of nodes. While the profile of the pure end-mode, i.e., 0-BA-loc, has its maximum at the edge with the amplitude monotonously decreasing toward the interior of the ellipse, as correctly described by the authors, the localized modes with n > 0, not considered by them, do not have this characteristic: see inset of Fig. 1. Based on Fig. 1, we believe that the assumption that the mode they observe is 'the' localized spin mode is not correct. Instead, we believe that the mode detected in the experiment at H > 700 Oe is a combinations (due to non-linear excitation conditions of the experiment) of several n-BA-loc modes, with n?>?0. In this picture, the sharp peaks of the n-BA-loc modes are smoothed in the experimental measurements, thanks to the superposition of modes with different nodal lines. Finally, at 350 Oe, the measured profile and frequency suggest that the mode seen in the experiment may be well due to the 1-BA mode. The observed change in mode profile at 350 Oe is substantiated by the frequency behavior shown in Fig. 3(b) of Ref. 1, where it can be observed that the frequency of the low-field point does not lie on the same curve as the high-field points. In summary, before concluding that micromagnetic-based simulations of spin wave modes in nano-particles are unreliable, we believe that it is necessary to await either the simulation of large particles using small cell sizes or for more exhaustive experiments reaching lower frequencies on particles of varying size. The comparison of calculations with experiment would greatly benefit if the authors were to provide the field dependence of all the modes detected in their experiment (in order to achieve a proper assignment).

  8. Comment on 'On Saltiel's isopolarizability approach and its applicability to diphenylpolyenes' by J. Catalán, Chem. Phys. Lett. 635 (2015) 56-59

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, Jack; Turek, Andrzej M.

    2015-10-01

    This is in response to Catalán's objection to our use of isopolarizability conditions in the resolution of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the s-cis and s-trans all-trans-1.6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (ttt-DPH) conformers and the resolution of the fluorescence spectrum of the s-trans conformer to 21Ag → 11Ag and 11Bu → 11Ag spectra. Contrary to Catalán's assertion, we did not assume identical solvatochromic and thermochromic responses of ttt-DPH to medium changes. Those responses depend on a complex combination of factors that can differ from molecule to molecule.

  9. Corrigendum to "In situ observation of contour currents in the northern South China Sea: Applications for deepwater sediment transport" [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 430 (2015) 477-485

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yulong; Liu, Zhifei; Zhang, Yanwei; Li, Jianru; Wang, Meng; Wang, Wenguang; Xu, Jingping

    2015-12-01

    The authors regret that the tick labels of Fig. 7d of our article were incorrect. Both the caption of the figure and the discussion in the text were correct, so the conclusions in the article were not affected. The corrected Fig. 7 appears on the next page for the readers' convenience.

  10. Comment on 'A computational study of the novel metastable compound HKrSH' [S.A.C. McDowell, Chem. Phys. Lett. 372 (2003) 553 556

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundell, J.; Khriachtchev, L.; Pettersson, M.; Räsänen, M.

    2004-04-01

    A recent computational study published in this journal suggests that a novel metastable molecule HKrSH exists and calculations at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level indicate a barrier high enough to trap this molecule in its local stable configuration. However, the report fails to present all factors influencing its stability and these inadequacies greatly affect the conclusions on the existence and experimental characterisation of such species.

  11. Comment on "Destabilization of the halogen bond in complexes of protonated NCX (X = F, Cl, Br) molecules" [Chem. Phys. Lett. 603 (2014) 37-40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Sean A. C.; Joseph, Jerelle A.; Buckingham, A. David

    2015-02-01

    A computational study at various levels of theory was undertaken for protonated NCX (X = F, Cl, Br) complexes, which were previously characterized using the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) procedure. It is shown that the apparent destabilization of the halogen bond in some of these complexes is due to a basis set deficiency. The protonated species were re-optimized at MP2/6-311++G(2df,2pd) and found to be more strongly bound than their unprotonated counterparts. These new results suggest that only H+NCF⋯F- may be considered to be destabilized, since no local minimum was found.

  12. Reply to: “Comment on: ‘Effects of including the counterrotating term and virtual photons on the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of a scalar photon collective emission theory’ [Phys. Lett. A 372 (2008) 2514]” [Phys. Lett. A 372 (2008) 5732

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2008-08-01

    We compute the emission amplitude for the collective emission from a sphere of identical atoms in the scalar photon theory for both the cases of the complex kernel (i.e. including virtual photons) and real kernel. We explicitly show that the single mode theory based on the real kernel neglects the effects of the different decay rates and frequency shifts associated with the eigenfunctions belonging to the same angular index but with different radial indices. We show that these effects modify, for kR≫1, both the time dependence of the emission amplitude and its angular distribution, in clear contradiction to the assertions made by the Comment's authors.

  13. Erratum to: “Search for first generation scalar leptoquarks in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector” [Phys. Lett. B 709 (2012) 158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; da Silva, P. V. M.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Daum, C.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Taille, C.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Lotto, B.; de Mora, L.; de Nooij, L.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; de Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dewilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Luise, S.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M. J.; Fischer, P.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fokitis, M.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaumer, O.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilbert, L. M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giunta, M.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Göttfert, T.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golovnia, S. N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; Gonidec, A.; Gonzalez, S.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gorokhov, S. A.; Goryachev, V. N.; Gosdzik, B.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guarino, V. J.; Guest, D.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guindon, S.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Guo, J.; Gupta, A.; Gusakov, Y.; Gushchin, V. N.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadley, D. R.; Haefner, P.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hall, D.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, H.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G. A.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, K.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Hatch, M.; Hauff, D.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawes, B. M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hawkins, D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Hazen, E.; He, M.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Hensel, C.; Henß, T.; Hernandez, C. M.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg, R.; Hershenhorn, A. D.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, D.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, N.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holder, M.; Holmgren, S. O.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Homma, Y.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Horazdovsky, T.; Horn, C.; Horner, S.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M. A.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Howell, D. F.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hruska, I.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huang, G. S.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huettmann, A.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Huhtinen, M.; Hurst, P.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibbotson, M.; Ibragimov, I.; Ichimiya, R.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Imbault, D.; Imori, M.; Ince, T.; Inigo-Golfin, J.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jana, D. K.; Jankowski, E.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jelen, K.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jenni, P.; Jeremie, A.; Jež, P.; Jézéquel, S.; Jha, M. K.; Ji, H.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, G.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, L. G.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. W.; Jones, T. J.; Jonsson, O.; Joram, C.; Jorge, P. M.; Joseph, J.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Jovin, T.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kabachenko, V. V.; Kabana, S.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kadlecik, P.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L. V.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kanno, T.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz, M.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karr, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M. S.; Kazanin, V. A.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Keller, J. S.; Kennedy, J.; Kenney, C. J.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Keung, J.; Khalil-Zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Kholodenko, A. G.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khoriauli, G.; Khoroshilov, A.; Khovanskiy, N.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, P. C.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, L. E.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiver, A. M.; Kladiva, E.; Klaiber-Lodewigs, J.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluge, T.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knecht, N. S.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Koenig, S.; Köpke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kokott, T.; Kolachev, G. M.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Kollar, D.; Kollefrath, M.; Kolya, S. D.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kono, T.; Kononov, A. I.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kootz, A.; Koperny, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Koreshev, V.; Korn, A.; Korol, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotamäki, M. J.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J.; Kraus, J. K.; Kreisel, A.; Krejci, F.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krieger, N.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Kruker, T.; Krumnack, N.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruth, A.; Kubota, T.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kuhn, D.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kummer, C.; Kuna, M.; Kundu, N.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurata, M.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwee, R.; La Rosa, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Labbe, J.; Lablak, S.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Laisne, E.; Lamanna, M.; Lambourne, L.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lancon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Landsman, H.; Lane, J. L.; Lange, C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Larionov, A. V.; Larner, A.; Lasseur, C.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavorini, V.; Lavrijsen, W.; Laycock, P.; Lazarev, A. B.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Maner, C.; Le Menedeu, E.; Lebel, C.; Lecompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Legendre, M.; Leger, A.; Legeyt, B. C.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Leltchouk, M.; Lemmer, B.; Lendermann, V.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leonhardt, K.; Leontsinis, S.; Lepold, F.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, J.-R.; Lesser, J.; Lester, C. G.; Lester, C. M.; Leung Fook Cheong, A.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levitski, M. S.; Lewis, A.; Lewis, G. H.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lichtnecker, M.; Lie, K.; Liebig, W.; Lifshitz, R.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Limper, M.; Lin, S. C.; Linde, F.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipinsky, L.; Lipniacka, A.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, C.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, M.; Liu, S.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Livermore, S. S. A.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J.; Lombardo, V. P.; Long, R. E.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Loureiro, K. F.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, F.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, D.; Ludwig, I.; Ludwig, J.; Luehring, F.; Luijckx, G.; Lukas, W.; Lumb, D.; Luminari, L.; Lund, E.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Lundberg, J.; Lundquist, J.; Lungwitz, M.; Lutz, G.; Lynn, D.; Lys, J.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Macana Goia, J. A.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Mackeprang, R.; Madaras, R. J.; Mader, W. F.; Maenner, R.; Maeno, T.; Mättig, P.; Mättig, S.; Magnoni, L.; Magradze, E.; Mahalalel, Y.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahmoud, S.; Mahout, G.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Malecki, P.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V.; Malyukov, S.; Mameghani, R.; Mamuzic, J.; Manabe, A.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Mangeard, P. S.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjavidze, I. D.; Mann, A.; Manning, P. M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Manz, A.; Mapelli, A.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J. F.; Marchese, F.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marin, A.; Marino, C. P.; Marroquim, F.; Marshall, R.; Marshall, Z.; Martens, F. K.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, F. F.; Martin, J. P.; Martin, Ph.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin Dit Latour, B.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martinez, M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massaro, G.; Massol, N.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathes, M.; Matricon, P.; Matsumoto, H.; Matsunaga, H.; Matsushita, T.; Mattravers, C.; Maugain, J. M.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; May, E. N.; Mayne, A.; Mazini, R.; Mazur, M.; Mazzaferro, L.; Mazzanti, M.; Mazzoni, E.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; McFayden, J. A.; McGlone, H.; McHedlidze, G.; McLaren, R. A.; McLaughlan, T.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meade, A.; Mechnich, J.; Mechtel, M.; Medinnis, M.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Meguro, T.; Mehdiyev, R.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mendoza Navas, L.; Meng, Z.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Menot, C.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Merritt, H.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, T. C.; Meyer, W. T.; Miao, J.; Michal, S.; Micu, L.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Miller, R. J.; Mills, W. J.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Milstein, D.; Minaenko, A. A.; Miñano Moya, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Miralles Verge, L.; Misiejuk, A.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitrofanov, G. Y.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mitsui, S.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Miyazaki, K.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mockett, P.; Moed, S.; Moeller, V.; Mönig, K.; Möser, N.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Mohrdieck-Möck, S.; Moisseev, A. M.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molina-Perez, J.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montesano, S.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Moorhead, G. F.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Morange, N.; Morel, J.; Morello, G.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Morin, J.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morozov, S. V.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Müller, T. A.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Muir, A.; Munwes, Y.; Murray, W. J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagel, M.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Narayan, R.; Nash, M.; Nation, N. R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Neal, H. A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, S.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen Thi Hong, V.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicolas, L.; Nicquevert, B.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Niinikoski, T.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolics, K.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nordberg, M.; Nordkvist, B.; Norton, P. R.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Nugent, I. M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.-E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nyman, T.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakes, L. B.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olcese, M.; Olchevski, A. G.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Otero Y Garzon, G.; Ottersbach, J. P.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Paleari, C. P.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadelis, A.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pashapour, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Pengo, R.; Penning, B.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Perus, A.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskach, A. V.; Plotnikova, E.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Poghosyan, T.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Posch, C.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Price, M. J.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Radloff, P.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reichold, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Renkel, P.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchez, A.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scallon, O.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schäfer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schneider, B.; Schöning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, S.; Schuler, G.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, Hs.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    The legend of the y-axis of both figures in http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physletb.2012.02.004 Fig. 4 should read σ (pp → LQLQbar) as shown in the corrected Fig. 4 attached, rather than σ × BR. This correction is purely presentational, and does not change any of the quoted results, nor the conclusions, of the original version of the Letter.

  14. Comment on "Hydrothermal preparation of analogous matrix minerals of CM carbonaceous chondrites from metal alloy particles" by Y. Peng and Y. Jing [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 408 (2014) 252-262

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatelli, Isabella; Vacher, Lionel G.; Marrocchi, Yves

    2015-10-01

    Peng and Jing (2014) recently reported the results of hydrothermal experiments designed to produce synthetic tochilinite/cronstedtite assemblages analogous to those found in the matrix of CM chondrites (Tomeoka and Buseck, 1982, 1983a, 1983b, 1985; Mackinnon and Zolensky, 1984; Zolensky and Mackinnon, 1986; Rubin et al., 2007; Bourot-Denise et al., 2010; Hewins et al., 2014; Marrocchi et al., 2014). The assemblage was obtained from an alloyed metal particle mixture of Fe, Mg, Al, Si, Cr and Ni under basic, reducing and S2--rich conditions. The hydrothermal syntheses were conducted in Teflon-lined stainless-steel autoclaves at temperature of 106-160 °C for short-duration runs and at 153 °C for long-duration runs. The phases in the assemblage were characterized by XRD and TEM, but only the analytical results of long-duration runs were reported in the article and in the Appendix as supplementary material. The phases identified were: cronstedtite and tochilinite (both present in all run products), tochilinite-cronstedtite intergrowths, polyhedral serpentine, a chrysotile-like phase, nanotube-like structures, and lizardite-like and brucite-like phases. Based on their experimental results, the authors put forward a hypothesis to explain the formation of matrix minerals in CM chondrites proposing that the precursors may be nanometer- to micrometer-sized particles of metal alloys that were altered at low temperatures by interaction with S-rich water under reducing and dynamic pressurized conditions.

  15. Addendum to "An update on the classical and quantum harmonic oscillators on the sphere and the hyperbolic plane in polar coordinates" [Phys. Lett. A 379 (26-27) (2015) 1589-1593

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesne, C.

    2016-02-01

    The classical and quantum solutions of a nonlinear model describing harmonic oscillators on the sphere and the hyperbolic plane, derived in polar coordinates in a recent paper (Quesne, 2015) [1], are extended by the inclusion of an isotonic term.

  16. Corrigendum to “Long-term valproic acid exposure increases the number of neocortical neurons in the developing rat brain" [Neurosci.Lett. 580 (2014) 12–16] A possible new animal model of autism.

    PubMed

    Sabers, Anne; Bertelsen, Freja C B; Scheel-Krüger, Jørgen; Nyengaard, Jens R; Møller, Arne

    2015-02-19

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that long-term fetal valproic acid (VPA) exposure at doses relevant to the human clinic interferes with normal brain development. Pregnant rats were given intraperitoneal injections of VPA (20 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg) continuously during the last 9–12 days of pregnancy and during the lactation period until sacrifice on the 23rd postnatal day. Total number of neocortical neurons was estimated using the optical fraction at or and frontal cortical thicknesses were sampled in VPA exposed pups compared with an unexposed control group. We found that pups exposed to 20 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg doses of VPA had statistically significant higher total number of neurons in neocortex by 15.8% and 12.3%, respectively, (p < 0.05) compared to controls amounting to 15.5??106 neocortical neurons (p < 0.01). There was no statistical difference between the two VPA groups. Pups exposed to 100 mg/kg, but not to 20 mg/kg VPA displayed a significant (p < 0.05) broader (7.5%) of frontal cortical thickness compared to controls. Our results support the hypothesis that fetal exposure of VPA may interfere with normal brain development by disturbing neocortical organization, resulting in overgrowth of frontal lobes and increased neuronal cell numbers. The results indirectly suggest that prenatal VPA may contribute as a causative factor in the brain developmental disturbances equivalent to those seen inhuman autism spectrum disorders. We therefore suggest that this version of the VPA model may provide a translational model of autism. PMID:26060869

  17. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  18. Corrigendum to "Measurement of the pp → ZZ production cross section and constraints on anomalous triple gauge couplings in four-lepton final states at √{ s} = 8TeV" [Phys. Lett. B 740 (2015) 250

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    An error was found in the published version in the right plot in Fig. 4. The bin-by-bin normalization for data and MC prediction in this plot is incorrect. The corrected figure is shown in Fig. 1. The physics conclusion of the paper remains unchanged.

  19. Corrigendum to “Laboratory studies of perchlorate phase transitions: Support for metastable aqueous perchlorate solutions on Mars” [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 312 (3-4) (2011) 371-377

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. V.; Chevrier, V. F.; Baustian, K. J.; Wise, M. E.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2014-02-01

    Perchlorate salts, recently discovered on Mars, are known to readily absorb water vapor from the atmosphere and deliquesce into the aqueous phase at room temperature. Here we study the deliquescence (crystalline solid to liquid transition) and efflorescence (liquid to crystalline solid transition) of perchlorate salts at low temperatures relevant to Mars. A Raman microscope and environmental cell were used to determine the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of NaClO4 and Mg(ClO4)2 as a function of temperature and hydration state. We find that the deliquescence of anhydrous NaClO4 is only slightly dependent on temperature and occurs at ∼38% RH. The DRH of NaClO4ṡH2O increases with decreasing temperature from 51% at 273 K to 64% at 228 K. The DRH of Mg(ClO4)2ṡ6H2O also increases with decreasing temperature from 42% at 273 K to 55% at 223 K. The efflorescence of both NaClO4 and Mg(ClO4)2 salt solutions occurs at a lower RH than deliquescence due to the kinetic inhibition of crystallization. For all temperatures studied, the ERH values of NaClO4 and Mg(ClO4)2 are 13% and 19%, respectively. These results indicate perchlorate salts can exist as metastable, supersaturated solutions over a wide range of RH and temperature conditions. Summer diurnal temperature and relative humidity cycles at low latitudes on Mars could allow the surface salts to be aqueous for several hours per day.

  20. Comment on "Paleomagnetic evidence for an inverse rotation history of Western Anatolia during the exhumation of Menderes core complex" by Uzel et al. (Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 415 (2015) 108-125)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoğlu, Özgür; Erkül, Fuat

    2015-10-01

    In a recent article published in EPSL, Uzel et al. (2015) reported a paleomagnetic evidence on various rock types from Western Anatolia. It has been suggested that vertical axis rotations driven by the differential stretching along the İzmir Balıkesir Transfer Zone (İBTZ) were caused by slab detachment and slab tear processes at the northern edge of subducting African slab. Although the paper supplies high quality data regarding the geological evolution of western Anatolia, some points need to clarified in light of recently published data.

  1. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore » rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  2. Comment on “40Ar / 39Ar dating of the Rajahmundry Traps, eastern India and their relationship to the Deccan Traps” by Knight et al. [Earth Planet Sci. Lett. 208 (2003) 85 99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, Ajoy K.

    2005-11-01

    Knight et al. presented age and chemical data on two (sets of) lava flows from the Rajahmundry area, on either bank of the Godavari River. The age and petrogenesis of these flows and their possible link to sections of the main Deccan Province are of importance to the understanding of many aspects of flood basalt volcanism. I comment on (a) the use of geochemical fingerprints for lava identification/correlation at Rajahmundry, superceding (apparent) field relations, (b) their 40Ar / 39Ar data and its refinement based on statistical tests and the alteration state of the samples (c) correlation of age data and the magnetic polarity of the lavas to the geomagnetic polarity time scale and (d) the possibility that both lavas at Rajahmundry were formed by intracanyon flows derived from ˜1000 km away.

  3. Comment on ``Measurements of the hydration numbers for halide ions by the mass spectrometric method of field evaporation of ions out of solution'' [Chem. Phys. Lett. 242 (1995) 390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Martyn C. R.

    2000-08-01

    It has been suggested by Dunsyuryun, Karpov and Morozov that two different terms should be used to describe the solvation of halide ions in aqueous solutions. The term co-ordination number gives the primary `solvation number' (ca. 6), whilst the term hydration number gives the number of water molecules that stay co-ordinated to the anions as they move through the liquid (ca. 2). Here it is suggested that since these two terms are widely used to mean the same thing, it is better not to change one of them. It is also suggested that the number of water molecules that move with ions is variable and ill defined and that it is not appropriate to specify a precise number for this.

  4. Erratum: Evidence of b-jet quenching in PbPb collisions at sNN=2.76TeV [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 132301 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-07-10

    In our Letter, there was a component of the statistical uncertainty from the simulated PbPb Monte Carlo samples. This uncertainty was not propagated to all of the results. Figures 3 and 4 have been updated to reflect this source of uncertainty. In this case, the statistical uncertainties remain smaller than the systematic uncertainties in all cases such that the conclusions of the Letter are unaltered.

  5. Comment on "A non-primitive origin of near-chondritic Ssbnd Sesbnd Te ratios in mantle peridotites: Implications for the Earth's late accretionary history" by König S. et al. [Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 385 (2014) 110-121

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry

    2015-05-01

    The abundances and ratios of S, Se and Te in rocks from the Earth's mantle may yield valuable constraints on the partitioning of these chalcophile elements between the mantle and basaltic magmas and on the compositions of these elements in the primitive mantle (PM) (e.g. Wang and Becker, 2013). Recently, König et al. (2014) proposed a model in which the CI chondrite-like Se/Te of mantle lherzolites (Se /Te = 8 ± 2, 1σ) are explained by mixing of sulfide melts with low Se/Te with harzburgites containing supposedly residual sulfides with high Se/Te. In this model sulfide melts and platinum group element (PGE) rich telluride phases with low Se/Te are assumed to have precipitated during refertilization of harzburgites by basic melts to form lherzolites. Because of the secondary nature of these re-enrichment processes, the authors state that abundances and ratios of S, Se and Te in fertile lherzolites cannot reflect the composition of the PM.

  6. Erratum: ``Multiple quantum well light modulators for the 1.06 µm range on InP substrates: InxGa1 - xAsyP1 - y/InP, InAsyP1 - y/InP, and coherently strained InAsyP1 - y/InxGa1 - xP'' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 60, 2846 (1992)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, T. K.; Chiu, T.-H.; Sizer, Theodore, II

    1992-12-01

    The last sentence in the paragraph at the top of the second column of the second page of the article should read: ``Since previously reported samples like B have been described with sharper excitonic features (HWHM of 6 meV at 300 K and 2 meV at 10 K) it is reasonable to expect that sample C could be further improved.4''

  7. Interpretation of the I-Regime and transport associated with relevant heavy particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Zhou, T.

    2012-01-15

    The excitation of a novel kind of heavy particle [B. Coppi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 17, 377 (1966); B. Coppi and T. Zhou, MIT(LNS) Report HEP 09/04, 2009, Cambridge, MA [Phys. Lett. A 375, 2916 (2011)

  8. Comment on ``Sodium Pyroxene NaTiSi2O6: Possible Haldane Spin-1 Chain System''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, S. V.; Popova, O. A.; Khomskii, D. I.

    2006-06-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Zoran S. Popović, Zeljko V. Šlijivančanin, and Filip R. Vukajlović, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 036401 (2004).PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.93.036401. The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  9. Strong monogamy of quantum entanglement for multiqubit W -class states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong San

    2014-12-01

    We provide strong evidence for the strong monogamy inequality of multiqubit entanglement recently proposed [B. Regula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 110501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.110501]. We consider a large class of multiqubit generalized W -class states and analytically show that the strong monogamy inequality of multiqubit entanglement is saturated by this class of states.

  10. Comment on ``Low-Dimensional Models for Vertically Falling Viscous Films''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruyer-Quil, Christian; Manneville, Paul

    2004-11-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Mohan K. R. Panga and Vemuri Balakotaiah,

    Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 154501 (2003)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.90.154501
    . The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  11. Walsh, Da Silva, and Wei Reply

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, A.; Da Silva, J. L. F.; Wei, S. H.

    2009-04-17

    This is a reply to Stefano Sanvito and Chaitanya Das Pemmaraju's, Comment on Theoretical Description of Carrier Mediated Magnetism in Cobalt Doped ZnO, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 159701 (2009); and the original article is Theoretical Description of Carrier Mediated Magnetism in Cobalt Doped ZnO, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 256401 (2008).

  12. EDITORIAL: 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Dan; Wright, Guillaume

    2011-12-01

    To celebrate the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters (ERL) the publishers of the journal, IOP Publishing, have awarded a prize for the five best articles published in ERL since the journal began in 2006. The procedure for deciding the winning articles was as thorough as possible to ensure that the most outstanding articles would win the prize. A shortlist of 25 nominated research articles, five for each year since ERL was launched, which were chosen based on a range of criteria including novelty, scientific impact, readership, broad appeal and wider media coverage, was selected. The ERL Editorial Board then assessed and rated these 25 articles in order to choose a winning article for each year. We would like to announce that the following articles have been awarded ERL's 5th anniversary best article prize: 2006/7 The Bodélé depression: a single spot in the Sahara that provides most of the mineral dust to the Amazon forest Ilan Koren, Yoram J Kaufman, Richard Washington, Martin C Todd, Yinon Rudich, J Vanderlei Martins and Daniel Rosenfeld 2006 Environ. Res. Lett. 1 014005 2008 Causes and impacts of the 2005 Amazon drought Ning Zeng, Jin-Ho Yoon, Jose A Marengo, Ajit Subramaniam, Carlos A Nobre, Annarita Mariotti and J David Neelin 2008 Environ. Res. Lett. 3 014002 2009 How difficult is it to recover from dangerous levels of global warming? J A Lowe, C Huntingford, S C B Raper, C D Jones, S K Liddicoat and L K Gohar 2009 Environ. Res. Lett. 4 014012 2010 Is physical water scarcity a new phenomenon? Global assessment of water shortage over the last two millennia Matti Kummu, Philip J Ward, Hans de Moel and Olli Varis 2010 Environ. Res. Lett. 5 034006 2011 Implications of urban structure on carbon consumption in metropolitan areas Jukka Heinonen and Seppo Junnila 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 014018 Our congratulations go to these authors. In recognition of their outstanding work, we are delighted to offer all of the authors of the winning articles free

  13. EDITORIAL: 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters 'Best article' prize for the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Dan; Wright, Guillaume

    2011-12-01

    To celebrate the 5th anniversary of Environmental Research Letters (ERL) the publishers of the journal, IOP Publishing, have awarded a prize for the five best articles published in ERL since the journal began in 2006. The procedure for deciding the winning articles was as thorough as possible to ensure that the most outstanding articles would win the prize. A shortlist of 25 nominated research articles, five for each year since ERL was launched, which were chosen based on a range of criteria including novelty, scientific impact, readership, broad appeal and wider media coverage, was selected. The ERL Editorial Board then assessed and rated these 25 articles in order to choose a winning article for each year. We would like to announce that the following articles have been awarded ERL's 5th anniversary best article prize: 2006/7 The Bodélé depression: a single spot in the Sahara that provides most of the mineral dust to the Amazon forest Ilan Koren, Yoram J Kaufman, Richard Washington, Martin C Todd, Yinon Rudich, J Vanderlei Martins and Daniel Rosenfeld 2006 Environ. Res. Lett. 1 014005 2008 Causes and impacts of the 2005 Amazon drought Ning Zeng, Jin-Ho Yoon, Jose A Marengo, Ajit Subramaniam, Carlos A Nobre, Annarita Mariotti and J David Neelin 2008 Environ. Res. Lett. 3 014002 2009 How difficult is it to recover from dangerous levels of global warming? J A Lowe, C Huntingford, S C B Raper, C D Jones, S K Liddicoat and L K Gohar 2009 Environ. Res. Lett. 4 014012 2010 Is physical water scarcity a new phenomenon? Global assessment of water shortage over the last two millennia Matti Kummu, Philip J Ward, Hans de Moel and Olli Varis 2010 Environ. Res. Lett. 5 034006 2011 Implications of urban structure on carbon consumption in metropolitan areas Jukka Heinonen and Seppo Junnila 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 014018 Our congratulations go to these authors. In recognition of their outstanding work, we are delighted to offer all of the authors of the winning articles free

  14. Optimization of the split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm on a spectral optical coherence tomography system: erratum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Simon S; Liu, Gangjun; Huang, David; Jia, Yali

    2016-02-01

    An erratum is presented to include conflict of interest disclosures that were unintentionally left out of our recent Letter [Opt. Lett.40, 2305 (2015)10.1364/OL.40.002305OPLEDP0146-9592]. PMID:26907406

  15. Long-time dynamics of quantum chains: Transfer-matrix renormalization group and entanglement of the maximal eigenvector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Kun; Chen, Pochung; Kao, Ying-Jer; Xiang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    By using a different quantum-to-classical mapping from the Trotter-Suzuki decomposition, we identify the entanglement structure of the maximal eigenvectors for the associated quantum transfer matrix. This observation provides a deeper insight into the problem of linear growth of the entanglement entropy in time evolution using conventional methods. Based on this observation, we propose a general method for arbitrary temperatures using the biorthonormal transfer-matrix renormalization group. Our method exhibits a competitive accuracy with a much cheaper computational cost in comparison with two recently proposed methods for long-time dynamics based on a folding algorithm [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 240603 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.240603] and a modified time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 227206 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.227206].

  16. Comment on ``Electron Mass Operator in a Strong Magnetic Field and Dynamical Chiral Symmetry Breaking''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusynin, V. P.; Miransky, V. A.; Shovkovy, I. A.

    2003-02-01

    A Comment on the Letter by A. V. Kuznetsov and N. V. Mikheev,

    Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 89, 011601 (2002).
    The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  17. Entanglement under the renormalization-group transformations on quantum states and in quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    2010-06-01

    We consider quantum states under the renormalization-group (RG) transformations introduced by Verstraete [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.94.140601 94, 140601 (2005)] and propose a quantification of entanglement under such RGs (via the geometric measure of entanglement). We examine the resulting entanglement under RG transformations for the ground states of “matrix-product-state” Hamiltonians constructed by Wolf [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.97.110403 97, 110403 (2006)] that possess quantum phase transitions. We find that near critical points, the ground-state entanglement exhibits singular behavior. The singular behavior within finite steps of the RG obeys a scaling hypothesis and reveals the correlation length exponent. However, under the infinite steps of RG transformation, the singular behavior is rendered different and is universal only when there is an underlying conformal-field-theory description of the critical point.

  18. Comment on {open_quotes}Confirmation of the Sigma Meson{close_quote}{close_quote}

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, M.; Sannino, F.; Schechter, J.; Sannino, F.

    1997-02-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Nils A. Tornqvist and Matts Roos, Phys.Rev.Lett.{bold 76}, 1575 (1996). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Comment on {open_quote}{open_quote}Confirmation of the Sigma Meson{close_quote}{close_quote}

    SciTech Connect

    Isgur, N.; Speth, J.

    1996-09-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Nils A. T{umlt o}rnqvist and Matts Roos, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 76}, 1575 (1996). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Completeness of classical φ4 theory on two-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimipour, Vahid; Zarei, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-03-01

    We formulate a quantum formalism for the statistical mechanical models of discretized field theories on lattices and then show that the discrete version of φ4 theory on 2D square lattice is complete in the sense that the partition function of any other discretized scalar field theory on an arbitrary lattice with arbitrary interactions can be realized as a special case of the partition function of this model. To achieve this, we extend the recently proposed quantum formalism for the Ising model [M. Van den Nest, W. Dur, and H. J. Briegel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.117207 98, 117207 (2007)] and its completeness property [M. Van den Nest, W. Dur, and H. J. Briegel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.110501 100, 110501 (2008)] to the continuous variable case.

  1. Hosing instability in the blow-out regime for plasma-wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Lu, W; Zhou, M; Clayton, C E; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Deng, S; Oz, E; Katsouleas, T; Hogan, M J; Blumenfeld, I; Decker, F J; Ischebeck, R; Iverson, R H; Kirby, N A; Walz, D

    2007-12-21

    The electron hosing instability in the blow-out regime of plasma-wakefield acceleration is investigated using a linear perturbation theory about the electron blow-out trajectory in Lu et al. [in Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 165002 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.165002]. The growth of the instability is found to be affected by the beam parameters unlike in the standard theory Whittum et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 991 (1991)10.1103/PhysRevLett.67.991] which is strictly valid for preformed channels. Particle-in-cell simulations agree with this new theory, which predicts less hosing growth than found by the hosing theory of Whittum et al. PMID:18233526

  2. Ionic and electronic transport properties in dense plasmas by orbital-free density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    We validate the application of our recent orbital-free density functional theory (DFT) approach [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155006 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.155006;] for the calculation of ionic and electronic transport properties of dense plasmas. To this end, we calculate the self-diffusion coefficient, the viscosity coefficient, the electrical and thermal conductivities, and the reflectivity coefficient of hydrogen and aluminum plasmas. Very good agreement is found with orbital-based Kohn-Sham DFT calculations at lower temperatures. Because the computational costs of the method do not increase with temperature, we can produce results at much higher temperatures than is accessible by the Kohn-Sham method. Our results for warm dense aluminum at solid density are inconsistent with the recent experimental results reported by Sperling et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 115001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.115001].

  3. A Trio of Brownian Donkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeck, C.; Cleuren, B.; Kawai, R.; Kambon, M.

    A previously introduced model (B. Cleuren and C. Van den Broeck, Europhys. Lett. 54, 1 (2001)) is studied numerically. Pure negative mobility is found for the minimum number of three interacting walkers.

  4. Finite-key-size security of the Phoenix-Barnett-Chefles 2000 quantum-key-distribution protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafu, Mhlambululi; Garapo, Kevin; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    The postselection technique was introduced by Christandl, König, and Renner [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 020504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.020504] in order to simplify the security of quantum-key-distribution schemes. Here, we present how it can be applied to study the security of the Phoenix-Barnett-Chefles 2000 trine-state protocol, a symmetric version of the Bennett 1992 protocol.

  5. Note: Energy convexity and density matrices in molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochicchio, Roberto C.; Rial, Diego

    2012-12-01

    A novel appropriate definition for the density matrix for an interacting Coulombic driven atomic or molecular system with non-integer number of particles is given. Our approach leads to a direct derivation of the proposal reported by Perdew et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1691 (1982)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.49.1691 and points out its suitability and perspective advances.

  6. Towards a gauge-equivalent magnetic structure of the nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzhimuradov, T. A.; Agalarov, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that the nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation recently proposed by Ablowitz and Musslimani [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 064105 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.064105] is gauge equivalent to the unconventional system of coupled Landau-Lifshitz equations. The first integrals of motion and one-soliton solution of an obtained model are given. The physical and geometrical aspects of model and their effect on expected metamagnetic structures are studied.

  7. Binggeli and Chelikowsky reply

    SciTech Connect

    Binggeli, N. ); Chelikowsky, J.R. )

    1993-10-18

    This is a response to a comment (Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2674 (1993)) on the authors' previous work titled Elastic Instability in Alpha[minus] Quartz under Pressure (Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 2220 (1992)). The initiation mechanism for amorphous transition in alpha[minus]quartz under pressure being a soft optic phonon in the Brillouin zone boundary as suggested by the comment does not contradict the authors' early suggestion which is the transverse acoustic mode near the zone center. (AIP)

  8. Experimental demonstration of phase bistability in a broad-area optical oscillator with injected signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Lorente, R.; Esteban-Martín, A.; Roldán, E.; Staliunas, K.; de Valcárcel, G. J.; Silva, F.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that a broad-area laserlike optical oscillator (a nondegenerate photorefractive oscillator) with structured injected signal displays two-phase patterns. The technique [de Valcárcel and Staliunas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 054101 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.054101] consists in spatially modulating the injection, so that its phase alternates periodically between two opposite values, i.e., differing by π .

  9. Comment on {open_quotes}Experimental Fusion Barrier Distributions Reflecting Projectile Octupole State Coupling to Prolate and Oblate Target Nuclei{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C.H.; Dasso, C.H.; Fernandez-Niello, J.

    1997-05-01

    The authors comment on the Letter by J.D. Bierman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1587(1996), and show the method by which they have been constructed is not the most appropriate. A Comment on the Letter by J.D. Bierman, {ital et al. }, Phys.Rev.Lett.{bold 76}, 1587 (1996). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Eavesdropping on the quantum dialogue protocol in lossy channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Heng; Zhang, Xiu-Lan; Lü, Hui

    2011-07-01

    We present an improved eavesdropping scheme on the quantum dialogue protocol in lossy channel, which is based on the strategies of Wójcik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 157901 (2003)] and ZML [Phys. Lett. A 333 46 (2004)] attack schemes. We show that our attack scheme doubles the domain of Eve's eavesdropping and Eve can gain more information of the communication with less risk of being detected. Finally, a possible improvement for the dialogue protocol security is proposed.

  11. How to upload a physical quantum state into correlation space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2011-04-01

    In the framework of the computational tensor network [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.220503 98, 220503 (2007)], the quantum computation is performed in a virtual linear space called the correlation space. It was recently shown [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.050503 103, 050503 (2009)] that a state in a correlation space can be downloaded to the real physical space. In this paper, conversely, we study how to upload a state from a real physical space to the correlation space. After showing the impossibility of cloning a state between a real physical space and the correlation space, we propose a simple teleportation-like method of uploading. This method also enables the Gottesman-Chuang gate teleportation trick and entanglement swapping in the virtual-real hybrid setting. Furthermore, compared with the inverse of the downloading method by Cai [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.050503 103, 050503 (2009)], which also works to upload, the proposed uploading method has several advantages.

  12. Usefulness of entanglement-assisted quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zixin; Macchiavello, Chiara; Maccone, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Entanglement-assisted quantum communication employs preshared entanglement between sender and receiver as a resource. We apply the same framework to quantum metrology, introducing shared entanglement between the probe and the ancilla in the preparation stage and allowing entangling operations at the measurement stage, i.e., using some entangled ancillary system that does not interact with the system to be sampled. This is known to be useless in the noiseless case, but was recently shown to be useful in the presence of noise [R. Demkowicz-Dobrzanski and L. Maccone, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 250801 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.250801; W. Dür, M. Skotiniotis, F. Fröwis, and B. Kraus, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 080801 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.080801; E. M. Kessler, I. Lovchinsky, A. O. Sushkov, and M. D. Lukin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150802 (2014);, 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150802 R. Demkowicz-Dobrzański and J. Kolodynski, New J. Phys. 15, 073043 (2013), 10.1088/1367-2630/15/7/073043]. Here we detail how and when it can be of use. For example, surprisingly it is useful when two channels are randomly alternated, for both of which ancillas do not help (depolarizing). We show that it is useful for all levels of noise for many noise models and propose a simple optical experiment to test these results.

  13. Relativistically induced transparency acceleration of light ions by an ultrashort laser pulse interacting with a heavy-ion-plasma density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.; Tsung, Frank S.; Tableman, Adam R.; Mori, Warren B.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    2013-10-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency [Akhiezer and Polovin, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz 30, 915 (1956); Kaw and Dawson, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1692942 13, 472 (1970); Max and Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.27.1342 27, 1342 (1971)] to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively [Lindl and Kaw, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1693437 14, 371 (1971); Silva , Phys. Rev. E1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.59.2273 59, 2273 (1999)] driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma frequency is resonant with the laser frequency. In the snowplow frame, trace density protons reflect off the electrostatic potential and get snowplowed, while the heavier background ions are relatively unperturbed. Quasimonoenergetic bunches of velocity equal to twice the snowplow velocity can be obtained and tuned by controlling the snowplow velocity using laser-plasma parameters. An analytical model for the proton energy as a function of laser intensity, rise time, and plasma density gradient is developed and compared to 1D and 2D PIC OSIRIS [Fonseca , Lect. Note Comput. Sci.9783

  14. Quantum-Critical Dynamics of the Skyrmion Lattice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Andrew G.

    2002-03-01

    Slightly away from exact filling of the lowest Landau level, the quantum Hall ferromagnet contains a finite density of magnetic vortices or Skyrmions[1,2]. These Skyrmions are expected to form a square lattice[3], the low energy excitations of which (translation/phonon modes and rotation/breathing modes) lead to dramatically enhanced nuclear relaxation[4,5]. Upon changing the filling fraction, the rotational modes undergo a quantum phase transition where zero-point fluctuations destroy the orientational order of the Skyrmions[4,6]. I will discuss the effect of this quantum critical point upon nuclear spin relaxation[7]. [1]S. L. Sondhi et al., Phys. Rev. B47, 16419 (1993). [2]S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995), A. Schmeller et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 4290 (1995). [3]L. Brey et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2562 (1995). [4]R. Côté et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4825 (1997). [5]R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995). [6]Yu V. Nazarov and A. V. Khaetskii, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 576 (1998). [7]A. G. Green, Phys. Rev. B61, R16 299 (2000).

  15. Lifetime Measurements of Trapped ^232Th^3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalatis, Michael; Chapman, Michael

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the low lying nuclear isomer state of ^229Th which is only several eV above the nuclear ground state [1]. To date, several groups are taking a variety of approaches to finding and exciting this unique state [2], including the use of trapped Th^3+ ions. Despite this attention, few precise measurements have been made of atomic lifetimes. In this work we present experiments to measure the 6D3/2 and 6D5/2 states using laser cooled ^232Th^3+ confined in a linear Paul trap.[4pt] [1] E. Peik and Chr. Tamm, Europhys. Lett. 61, 181 (2003); V. V. Flambaum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 092502 (2006); B. R. Beck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 142501 (2007).[0pt] [2] W. G. Rellergert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 200802 (2010); S. G. Porsev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 182501 (2010); C. J. Campbell et al., Phys. Rev. Let. 106, 223001 (2011).

  16. Supercurrent Drag via the Coulomb Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ji-Min; Yip, Sungkit

    1996-03-01

    We predict a supercurrent drag effect due to the Coulomb interaction between two parallel superconducting wires/layers. In contrast to previously explored frictional drag effect between two semiconducting quantum wells, our nondissipative drag mechanism ( J.-M. Duan and S. K. Yip, Phys. Rev. Lett.70), 3647 (1993). is based on considerations of the free energy of collective charge fluctuations. Our prediction has been confirmed experimentally ( X. Huang et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett.74, 4051 (1995). This mechanism generally exists in other nondissipative systems, such as double-layer quantum Hall syatems ( J.-M. Duan, Europhys. Lett.29), 489 (1995)., or between the two edge channels of a Hall bar, and between one-dimensional Luttinger Liquids.

  17. COMMENT: Comment on 'Synthesis of nanowires and nanoparticles of cubic aluminium nitride'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondare, V. N.

    2004-09-01

    Contradictory claims about synthesized nanoscopic aluminium nitride material have been communicated in the same month to two different journals (Balasubramanian et al 2004 Nanotechnology 15 370; 2004 Chem. Phys. Lett. 383 188) when citing an article in Applied Physics Letters (Tondare et al 2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 80 4813). The contradiction arises because two different claims have been made about the synthesized nanoscopic material as aluminium nitride nanotubes and as aluminium nitride nanowires. The authors of the article published in Nanotechnology have re-interpreted the results of the field emission micrographs published in the article mentioned above (2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 80 4813). This comment explains in detail that their re-interpretation lacks a scientific basis. It also provides a few prominent articles for the reader to refer to on the synthesis of aluminium nitride nanotubes and nanowires, which have not been cited in the articles mentioned above by Balasubramanian and co-workers.

  18. Trojan-horse attacks on quantum key distribution with classical Bob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Sun, Si-Jia; Zhao, Qian-Qian

    2015-02-01

    Recently, Boyer et al. (Phys Rev Lett 99:140501, 2007) introduced a conceptually novel semi-quantum key distribution scheme (BKM07). Tan et al. (Phys Rev Lett 102:098901, 2009) showed that classical Bob is unable to detect Eve's eavesdropping by giving a special implementation of BKM07 protocol. In the reply, Boyer et al. (Phys Rev Lett 102:098902, 2009) gave a solution against the eavesdropping, i.e., Bob may place a filter that allows only photons with approximately specific frequency to pass just at the expected time . However, their improvement contradicts the descriptions about "classical." If the assumption of "classical" is not considered, we give a delay-photon Trojan-horse attack on BKM07 protocol and its improvement and further present a possible improvement.

  19. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-28

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  20. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-01

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  1. How to upload a physical quantum state into correlation space

    SciTech Connect

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2011-04-15

    In the framework of the computational tensor network [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 220503 (2007)], the quantum computation is performed in a virtual linear space called the correlation space. It was recently shown [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 050503 (2009)] that a state in a correlation space can be downloaded to the real physical space. In this paper, conversely, we study how to upload a state from a real physical space to the correlation space. After showing the impossibility of cloning a state between a real physical space and the correlation space, we propose a simple teleportation-like method of uploading. This method also enables the Gottesman-Chuang gate teleportation trick and entanglement swapping in the virtual-real hybrid setting. Furthermore, compared with the inverse of the downloading method by Cai et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 050503 (2009)], which also works to upload, the proposed uploading method has several advantages.

  2. Instability on the Free Surface of Superfluid He-II Induced by a Steady Heat Flow in Bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remizov, I. A.; Levchenko, A. A.; Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    We report observations of the onset of irregular motion on a free surface of superfluid He-II induced by a quasi-stationary heat flow in a rectangular container. The container open from the top is mounted inside an optical cell partly filled with superfluid He-II. Three holes in the container walls provide free circulation of the normal and superfluid components inside and outside the container. The results of measurements are discussed in terms of the Korshunov theory (Eurphys Lett 16:673, 1991; JETP Lett 75:423, 2002) of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on an initially flat He-II surface induced by a relative motion of superfluid and normal components of the liquid along the surface when the counterflow velocity exceeds the threshold value. The experimental data are qualitatively consistent with the theoretical predictions (Korshunov in JETP Lett 75:423, 2002) taking into account the finite viscosity of He-II.

  3. Analytic expressions of quantum correlations in qutrit Werner states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Biaoliang; Liu, Yimin; Chen, Jianlan; Liu, Xiansong; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2013-07-01

    Quantum correlations in qutrit Werner states are extensively investigated with five popular methods, namely, original quantum discord (OQD) (Ollivier and Zurek in Phys Rev Lett 88:017901, 2001), measurement-induced disturbance (MID) (Luo in Phys Rev A 77:022301, 2008), ameliorated MID (AMID) (Girolami et al. in J Phys A Math Theor 44:352002, 2011), relative entropy (RE) (Modi et al. in Phys Rev Lett 104:080501, 2010) and geometric discord (GD) (Dakić et al. in Phys Rev Lett 105:190502, 2010). Two different analytic expressions of quantum correlations are derived. Quantum correlations captured by the former four methods are same and bigger than those obtained via the GD method. Nonetheless, they all qualitatively characterize quantum correlations in the concerned states. Moreover, as same as the qubit case, there exist quantum correlations in separable qutrit Werner states, too.

  4. Complexity and white-dwarf structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sañudo, J.; Pacheco, A. F.

    2009-02-01

    From the low-mass non-relativistic case to the extreme relativistic limit, the density profile of a white dwarf is used to evaluate the C complexity measure [R. López-Ruiz, H.L. Mancini, X. Calbet, Phys. Lett. A 209 (1995) 321]. Similarly to the recently reported atomic case where, by averaging shell effects, complexity grows with the atomic number [C.P. Panos, K.Ch. Chatzisavvas, Ch.C. Moustakidis, E.G. Kyrkou, Phys. Lett. A 363 (2007) 78; A. Borgoo, F. De Proft, P. Geerlings, K.D. Sen, Chem. Phys. Lett. 444 (2007) 186; J. Sañudo, R. López-Ruiz, Int. Rev. Phys. 2 (2008) 223], here complexity grows as a function of the star mass reaching a maximum finite value in the Chandrasekhar limit.

  5. On different integrable systems sharing the same nondynamical r-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhijun; Strampp, Walter

    1998-06-01

    In a recent paper [Zhijun Qiao and Ruguang Zhou, Phys. Lett. A 235, 35 (1997)], the amazing fact was reported that a discrete and a continuous integrable system share the same r-matrix with the interesting property of being nondynamical. Now, we present three further pairs of different continuous integrable systems sharing the same r-matrix again being nondynamical. The first pair is the finite-dimensional constrained system (FDCS) of the famous AKNS hierarchy and the Dirac hierarchy; the second pair is the FDCS of the well-known geodesic flows on the ellipsoid and the Heisenberg spin chain hierarchy; and the third pair is the FDCS of one hierarchy studied by Xianguo Geng [Phys. Lett. A 162, 375 (1992)] and another hierarchy proposed by Zhijun Qiao [Phys. Lett. A 192, 316 (1994)]. All those FDCSs possess Lax representations and from the viewpoint of r-matrix can be shown to be completely integrable in Liouville's sense.

  6. Determination of the 3He+α→7Be asymptotic normalization coefficients, the nuclear vertex constants, and their application for the extrapolation of the 3He(α,γ)7Be astrophysical S factors to the solar energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tursunmahatov, Q. I.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2012-04-01

    A new analysis of the modern astrophysical S factors for the direct-capture 3He(α,γ)7Be reaction, precisely measured in recent works [B.S. Nara Singh , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.93.262503 93, 262503 (2004); D. Bemmerer , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.97.122502 97, 122502 (2006);F. Confortola , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.75.065803 75, 065803 (2007), Gy. Gyürky , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.75.035805 75, 035805 (2007), T. A. D. Brown , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.76.055801 76, 055801 (2007), and A. Di Leva, , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.232502 102, 232502 (2009)], has been carried out within the modified two-body potential approach. New estimates are obtained for the “indirectly determined” values of the asymptotic normalization constants and the respective nuclear vertex constants for 3He+α→7Be(g.s.) and 3He+α→7Be(0.429 MeV) as well as the astrophysical S factors S34(E) at E≤90 keV, including E=0. The values of asymptotic normalization constants have been used to obtain the values of the ratio of the α-particle spectroscopic factors for the mirror (7Li7Be) pair.

  7. Understanding the dependence of transport parameters on carrier concentration within a Gaussian density of states in molecular organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Kumar, P.; Rani, V.; Ray, N.; Ghosh, S.

    2016-06-01

    We study charge transport in molecular organic semiconductors using two terminal and three terminal field effect transistor devices. Using phthalocyanines as examples, we achieve unification of carrier mobility between the different configurations in a Gaussian density of states. We find that the current density–voltage characteristics for two terminal devices can be understood by introducing a concentration dependence of the carrier mobility, as described by Oelerich et al (2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 226403, 2010 Appl. Phys. Lett. 97 143302). Studying the evolution of the activation energy with the carrier density, we find results consistent with a percolation picture and a density dependent transport energy.

  8. Stochastic model of nanomechanical electron shuttles and symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mo; Blick, Robert H.

    2016-06-01

    Nanomechanical electron shuttles can work as ratchets for radio-frequency rectification. We develop a full stochastic model of coupled shuttles, where the mechanical motion of nanopillars and the incoherent electronic tunneling are modeled by a Markov chain. In particular, the interaction of their randomness is taken into account, so that a linear master equation is constructed. Numerical solutions from our fast approximate method and analytical derivation reveal the symmetry breaking, which results in the direct current observed in earlier measurements [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 067204 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.067204]. Additionally, the method can facilitate device simulation of more complex designs such as shuttle arrays.

  9. Angular momentum in spin-phonon processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, D. A.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum theory of spin relaxation in the elastic environment is revised with account of the concept of a phonon spin recently introduced by Zhang and Niu [L. Zhang and Q. Niu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 085503 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.085503]. Similar to the case of the electromagnetic field, the division of the angular momentum associated with elastic deformations into the orbital part and the part due to phonon spins proves to be useful for the analysis of the balance of the angular momentum. Such analysis sheds important light on microscopic processes leading to the Einstein-de Haas effect.

  10. Measuring and manipulating the temperature of cold molecules trapped on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, S.; Adu Smith, D.; Insero, G.; Meek, S. A.; Sartakov, B. G.; Meijer, G.; Santambrogio, G.

    2015-12-01

    Following Marx et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 243007 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.243007], we discuss the measurement and manipulation of the temperature of cold CO molecules in a microchip environment. In particular, we present a model to explain the observed and calculated velocity distributions. We also show that a translational temperature can be extracted directly from the measurements. Finally, we discuss the conditions needed for an effective adiabatic cooling of the molecular ensemble trapped on the microchip.

  11. Disturbing the random-energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpin-Healy, Timothy; Herbert, Devorah

    1993-09-01

    We examine the effects of correlated perturbations upon globally optimal paths through a random-energy landscape. Motivated by Zhang's early numerical investigations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 2125 (1987)] into ground-state instabilities of disordered systems, as well as the work of Shapir [Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 1473 (1991)] on random perturbations of roughened manifolds, we have studied the specific case of random bond interfaces unsettled by small random fields, confirming recent predictions for the instability exponents. Implications for disordered magnets and growing surfaces are discussed.

  12. Manipulation of collective quantum states in Bose-Einstein condensates by continuous imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Andrew C. J.; Sherson, Jacob F.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We develop a Gaussian state treatment that allows a transparent quantum description of the continuous, nondestructive imaging of and feedback on a Bose-Einstein condensate. We have previously demonstrated [A. C. J. Wade et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 060401 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.060401] that the measurement backaction of stroboscopic imaging leads to selective squeezing and entanglement of quantized density oscillations. Here, we investigate how the squeezing and entanglement are affected by the finite spatial resolution and geometry of the probe laser beam and of the detector and how they can be optimized.

  13. Cellular ability to sense spatial gradients in the presence of multiple competitive ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Shu-Hao; Chen, Chia-Chu

    2012-01-01

    Many eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells can exhibit remarkable sensing ability under small gradients of chemical compounds. In this study, we approach this phenomenon by considering the contribution of multiple ligands to the chemical kinetics within the Michaelis-Menten model. This work was inspired by the recent theoretical findings of Hu [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.105.048104 105, 048104 (2010)]. Our treatment with practical binding energies and chemical potentials provides results that are consistent with experimental observations.

  14. Radial distribution function for hard spheres in fractal dimensions: A heuristic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Andrés; de Haro, Mariano López

    2016-06-01

    Analytic approximations for the radial distribution function, the structure factor, and the equation of state of hard-core fluids in fractal dimension d (1 ≤d ≤3 ) are developed as heuristic interpolations from the knowledge of the exact and Percus-Yevick results for the hard-rod and hard-sphere fluids, respectively. In order to assess their value, such approximate results are compared with those of recent Monte Carlo simulations and numerical solutions of the Percus-Yevick equation for a fractal dimension [M. Heinen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 097801 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.097801], a good agreement being observed.

  15. Electronic structure of III-V zinc-blende semiconductors from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Yin, Haitao; Cao, Ronggen; Zahid, Ferdows; Zhu, Yu; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2013-06-01

    For analyzing quantum transport in semiconductor devices, accurate electronic structures are critical for quantitative predictions. Here we report theoretical analysis of electronic structures of all III-V zinc-blende semiconductor compounds. Our calculations are from density functional theory with the semilocal exchange proposed recently [Tran and Blaha, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.226401 102, 226401 (2009)], within the linear muffin tin orbital scheme. The calculated band gaps and effective masses are compared to experimental data and good quantitative agreement is obtained. Using the theoretical scheme presented here, quantum transport in nanostructures of III-V compounds can be confidently predicted.

  16. Black hole constraints on varying fundamental constants.

    PubMed

    MacGibbon, Jane H

    2007-08-10

    We apply the generalized second law of thermodynamics and derive upper limits on the variation in the fundamental constants. The maximum variation in the electronic charge permitted for black holes accreting and emitting in the present cosmic microwave background corresponds to a variation in the fine-structure constant of Deltaalpha/alpha approximately 2 x 10(-23) per second. This value matches the variation measured by Webb et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 884 (1999); Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 091301 (2001)] using absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars and suggests the variation mechanism may be a coupling between the electron and the cosmic photon background. PMID:17930813

  17. Infinite randomness fixed point of the superconductor-metal quantum phase transition.

    PubMed

    Del Maestro, Adrian; Rosenow, Bernd; Müller, Markus; Sachdev, Subir

    2008-07-18

    We examine the influence of quenched disorder on the superconductor-metal transition, as described by a theory of overdamped Cooper pairs which repel each other. The self-consistent pairing eigenmodes of a quasi-one-dimensional wire are determined numerically. Our results support the recent proposal by Hoyos et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 230601 (2007)10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.230601] that the transition is characterized by the same strong-disorder fixed point describing the onset of ferromagnetism in the random quantum Ising chain in a transverse field. PMID:18764263

  18. Khinchin Theorem and Anomalous Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Morgado, Rafael; Vainstein, Mendeli H.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2008-12-01

    A recent Letter [M. H. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 190601 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.190601] has called attention to the fact that irreversibility is a broader concept than ergodicity, and that therefore the Khinchin theorem [A. I. Khinchin, Mathematical Foundations of Statistical Mechanics (Dover, New York, 1949)] may fail in some systems. In this Letter we show that for all ranges of normal and anomalous diffusion described by a generalized Langevin equation the Khinchin theorem holds.

  19. Survival of Rydberg atoms in intense laser fields and the role of nondipole effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber, Michael; Dimitrovski, Darko

    2015-02-01

    We consider the interaction of Rydberg atoms with strong infrared laser pulses using an approach based on the Magnus expansion of the time evolution operator. First-order corrections beyond the electric dipole approximation are also included in the theory. We illustrate the dynamics of the interaction at the parameters of the experiment [Eichmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 203002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.203002]. It emerges that the depletion of Rydberg atoms in this regime comes predominantly from the nondipole effects.

  20. Infinite Randomness Fixed Point of the Superconductor-Metal Quantum Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Maestro, Adrian; Rosenow, Bernd; Müller, Markus; Sachdev, Subir

    2008-07-01

    We examine the influence of quenched disorder on the superconductor-metal transition, as described by a theory of overdamped Cooper pairs which repel each other. The self-consistent pairing eigenmodes of a quasi-one-dimensional wire are determined numerically. Our results support the recent proposal by Hoyos et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 230601 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.99.230601] that the transition is characterized by the same strong-disorder fixed point describing the onset of ferromagnetism in the random quantum Ising chain in a transverse field.

  1. Sub- and Superluminal Propagation of Intense Pulses in Media with Saturated and Reverse Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, G. S.; Dey, Tarak Nath

    2004-05-01

    We develop models for the propagation of intense pulses in solid state media which can have either saturated absorption or reverse absorption. We model subluminal propagation in ruby and superluminal propagation in alexandrite as three and four level systems, respectively, coupled to Maxwell's equations. We present results well beyond the traditional pump-probe approach and explain the experiments of Bigelow et al. [

    Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 90, 113903 (2003); 10.1103/PhysRevLett.90.113903
    ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 301, 200 (2003)
    ] on solid state materials.

  2. Measurement of the ion drag force on free falling microspheres in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hirt, Markus; Block, Dietmar; Piel, Alexander

    2004-12-01

    Experiments on the quantitative determination of the ion drag force on free-falling dust particles in a collisionless regime are presented. The ion drag forces are measured for ion energies up to 40 eV and the obtained results are compared in detail with theories. Good agreement is found with the Barnes model [Barnes et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 313 (1992)] of the ion drag force for high ion energies (E>3 eV). At lower ion energies the model of Khrapak [Khrapak et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 225002 (2003)] is found to give a better description of the capture of slowly streaming ions by highly charged particles.

  3. Experimental observation of lasing shutdown via asymmetric gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitsazi, M.; Factor, S.; Schindler, J.; Ramezani, H.; Ellis, F. M.; Kottos, T.

    2014-04-01

    Using a pair of coupled RLC cavities we experimentally demonstrate that amplification action can be tamed by a spatially inhomogeneous gain. Under specific conditions we observe the counterintuitive phenomenon of stabilization of the system even when the overall gain provided is increased. This behavior is directly related to lasing shutdown via asymmetric pumping, recently proposed in M. Liertzer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 173901 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.173901]. The analysis of other simple systems reveals the universal nature of the lasing shutdown phenomenon as having its roots in managing impedance matching.

  4. Difference Between Far-Infrared Photoconductivity Spectroscopy and Absorption Spectroscopy: Theoretical Evidence of the Electron Reservoir Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Tadashi; Fujita, Maho; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hiraiwa, Nobuyoshi; Fukuda, Taturo; Koizumi, Hideki; Zhang, Chao

    2013-08-01

    The intriguing difference between far-infrared photoconductivity spectroscopy and absorption spectroscopy in the measurement of the magnetoplasmon frequency in GaAs quantum wells reported by Holland et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 186804 (2004)] remains unexplained to date. This Letter provides a consistent mechanism to solve this puzzle. The mechanism is based on the electron reservoir model for the integer quantum Hall effect in graphene [Phys. Lett. A 376, 616 (2012)]. We predict sharp kinks to appear in the magnetic induction dependence of the magnetoplasmon frequency at very low temperatures such as 14 mK in the same GaAs quantum well sample used by Holland et al..

  5. Classical model for measurements of an entanglement witness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Sudarshan, E. C. George

    2015-09-01

    We describe a classical model that may serve as an analog for joint and local measurements of an entanglement witness. The analogous experimental procedure and data analysis protocol of the model follow those of a previous experiment to measure an entanglement witness with polarized photons prepared in a mixed state [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 227901 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.91.227901]. Numerical simulations show excellent agreement with both experimental results and quantum-mechanical predictions. This agreement is made possible by the fact that the model exhibits contextuality due to the postselection of coincident detection events.

  6. Calculation of fully differential cross sections for the near threshold double ionization of helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prithvi; Purohit, Ghanshyam; Dorn, Alexander; Ren, Xueguang; Patidar, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Fully differential cross sectional (FDCS) results are reported for the electron-impact double ionization of helium atoms at 5 and 27 eV excess energy. The present attempt to calculate the FDCS in the second Born approximation and treating the postcollision interaction is helpful to analyze the measurements of Ren et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 093201) and Durr et al (2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 193201). The second-order processes and postcollision interaction have been found to be significant in describing the trends of the FDCS. More theoretical effort is required to describe the collision dynamics of electron-impact double ionization of helium atoms at near threshold.

  7. Realization of geometric Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Jingning; Zhang, Xiang; Kim, Kihwan

    2014-01-01

    We report an experimental realization of the geometric Landau-Zener-Stückelberg (LZS) interferometry proposed by Gasparinetti et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 207002 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.207002] in a single-trapped-ion system. Unlike those in a conventional LZS interferometer, the interference fringes of our geometric interferometer originate solely from a geometric phase. We also observe the robustness of the interference contrast against noise or fluctuations in the experimental parameters. Our scheme can be applied to other complex systems subject to relatively large errors in system control.

  8. Family of continuous-variable entanglement criteria using general entropy functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboia, A.; Toscano, F.; Walborn, S. P.

    2011-03-01

    We derive a family of entanglement criteria for continuous-variable systems based on the Rényi entropy of complementary distributions. We show that these entanglement witnesses can be more sensitive than those based on second-order moments, as well as previous tests involving the Shannon entropy [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.160505 103, 160505 (2009)]. We extend our results to include the case of discrete sampling. We provide several numerical results which show that our criteria can be used to identify entanglement in a number of experimentally relevant quantum states.

  9. Advances in time-dependent current-density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Arjan

    In this work we solve the problem of the gauge dependence of molecular magnetic properties (magnetizabilities, circular dichroism) using time-dependent current-density functional theory [1]. We also present a new functional that accurately describes the optical absorption spectra of insulators, semiconductors and metals [2] N. Raimbault, P.L. de Boeij, P. Romaniello, and J.A. Berger Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 066404 (2015) J.A. Berger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 137402 (2015) This study has been partially supported through the Grant NEXT No. ANR-10-LABX-0037 in the framework of the Programme des Investissements d'Avenir.

  10. Mutated hybrid inflation in f(R,squareR)-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iihoshi, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A new hybrid inflationary scenario in the context of f(R,squareR)-gravity is proposed. Demanding the waterfall field to `support the potential from below' [unlike the original proposal by Stewart in Phys. Lett. B 345, 414 (1995)], we demonstrate that the scalar potential is similar to that of the large-field chaotic inflation model proposed by Linde in Phys. Lett. B 129, 177 (1983). Inflationary observables are used to constrain the parameter space of our model; in the process, an interesting limit on the number of e-folds N is found.

  11. Warm-white light-emitting diodes integrated with colloidal quantum dots for high luminous efficacy and color rendering: reply to comment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizamoglu, Sedat; Erdem, Talha; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2011-08-01

    The correlated color temperatures and the corresponding color rendering indices calculated using actual experimental data (and not any prediction) in the original Letter [Opt. Lett. 35, 3372 (2010)] are correct. In addition, here the color rendering of our white LEDs integrated with nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) is provided for all test samples. Also, a new NQD-LED design with both high luminous efficacy of optical radiation and CRI is presented to have a chromaticity point in the quadrangle stated in the comment Letter [Opt. Lett. 36, 2851 (2011)]. The points made in the original Letter and all the calculation results provided therein are valid.

  12. Scaling of a collapsed polymer globule in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Baiesi, Marco; Orlandini, Enzo; Stella, Attilio L

    2006-02-01

    Extensive Monte Carlo data analysis gives clear evidence that collapsed linear polymers in two dimensions fall in the universality class of athermal, dense self-avoiding walks, as conjectured by Duplantier [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 4274 (1993)].10.1103/PhysRevLett.71.4274 However, the boundary of the globule has self-affine roughness and does not determine the anticipated nonzero topological boundary contribution to entropic exponents. Scaling corrections are due to subleading contributions to the partition function corresponding to polymer configurations with one end located on the globule-solvent interface. PMID:16486799

  13. Comment on "A new integrable two-parameter model of strongly correlated electrons in one dimension"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibberd, K. E.

    1996-06-01

    In a recent letter [Bariev R. Z., Klümper A. and Zittartz J., Europhys. Lett. bf 32, 1995, 85.], a Hamiltonian for a system of correlated electrons in one-dimension was presented. (...) The objective of this comment is to make it apparent that the above model, with appropriate modifications, is the quantum analogue of the supersymmetric U model of ref.[2]. [2] Bracken A. J., Gould M. D., Links J. R. and Zhang Y.-Z., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1994, 2768.

  14. Thermopower signatures and spectroscopy of the canyon of conductance suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiršanskas, G.; Hammarberg, S.; Karlström, O.; Wacker, A.

    2016-07-01

    Interference effects in quantum dots between different transport channels can lead to a strong suppression of conductance, which cuts like a canyon through the common conductance plot [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 186804 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.186804]. In the present work we consider the thermoelectric transport properties of the canyon of conductance suppression using the second-order von Neumann approach. We observe a characteristic signal for the zeros of the thermopower. This demonstrates that thermoelectric measurements are an interesting complimentary tool to study complex phenomena for transport through confined systems.

  15. Rotational Spectroscopy Unveils Eleven Conformers of Adrenaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Cortijo, V.; Mata, S.; Lopez, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Recent improvements in our LA-MB-FTMW instrumentation have allowed the characterization of eleven and eight conformers for the neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline respectively. The observation of this rich conformational behavior is in accordance with the recent observation of seven conformers for dopamine and in sharp contrast with the conformational reduction proposed for catecholamines. C. Cabezas, I. Peña, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 486. H. Mitsuda, M. Miyazaki, I. B. Nielsen, P. Carcabal,C. Dedonder, C. Jouvet, S. Ishiuchi, M. Fujii J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, 1, 1130.

  16. Hawking radiation, effective actions and covariant boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-01-01

    From an appropriate expression for the effective action, the Hawking radiation from charged black holes is derived, using only covariant boundary conditions at the event horizon. The connection of our approach with the Unruh vacuum and the recent analysis [S.P. Robinson, F. Wilczek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 (2005) 011303, arxiv:gr-qc/0502074; S. Iso, H. Umetsu, F. Wilczek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 151302, arxiv:hep-th/0602146; R. Banerjee, S. Kulkarni, arxiv:arXiv: 0707.2449 [hep-th

  17. Metal Nanoparticles as Optical Nano-Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Jochen

    2003-03-01

    When molecules approach metal nanoparticles their fluorescent properties are drastically changed [1]. In addition, the optical scattering spectra of individual nanoparticles [2] are shifted in energy. Potential biophotonic applications for resonant energy transfer (RET) studies and for molecular recognition are discussed. [1] E. Dulkeith, A.C. Morteani, T. Niedereichholz, T.A. Klar, J. Feldmann, S. Levi, F.C. van Veggel, D.N. Reinhoudt, and M. Moeller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 203002 (2002). [2] C. Soennichsen, T. Franzl, T. Wilk, G. von Plessen, J. Feldmann, O. Wilson, and P. Mulvaney, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 077402 (2002).

  18. Mutated hybrid inflation in f(R,□R)-gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Iihoshi, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A new hybrid inflationary scenario in the context of f(R,□R)-gravity is proposed. Demanding the waterfall field to 'support the potential from below' [unlike the original proposal by Stewart in Phys. Lett. B 345, 414 (1995)], we demonstrate that the scalar potential is similar to that of the large-field chaotic inflation model proposed by Linde in Phys. Lett. B 129, 177 (1983). Inflationary observables are used to constrain the parameter space of our model; in the process, an interesting limit on the number of e-folds N is found.

  19. Temporally resolved plasma composition measurements by collective Thomson scattering in TEXTOR (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stejner, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Bindslev, H.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Meo, F.; Moseev, D.; Bürger, A.; Kantor, M.; de Baar, M.

    2012-10-01

    Fusion plasma composition measurements by collective Thomson scattering (CTS) were demonstrated in recent proof-of-principle measurements in TEXTOR [S. B. Korsholm et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165004 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.165004]. Such measurements rely on the ability to resolve and interpret ion cyclotron structure in CTS spectra. Here, we extend these techniques to enable temporally resolved plasma composition measurements by CTS in TEXTOR, and we discuss the prospect for such measurements with newly installed hardware upgrades for the CTS system on ASDEX Upgrade.

  20. Exact coupling threshold for structural transition reveals diversified behaviors in interconnected networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi Sahneh, Faryad; Scoglio, Caterina; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2015-10-01

    An interconnected network features a structural transition between two regimes [F. Radicchi and A. Arenas, Nat. Phys. 9, 717 (2013), 10.1038/nphys2761]: one where the network components are structurally distinguishable and one where the interconnected network functions as a whole. Our exact solution for the coupling threshold uncovers network topologies with unexpected behaviors. Specifically, we show conditions that superdiffusion, introduced by Gómez et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 028701 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.028701], can occur despite the network components functioning distinctly. Moreover, we find that components of certain interconnected network topologies are indistinguishable despite very weak coupling between them.

  1. Complete positivity, finite-temperature effects, and additivity of noise for time-local qubit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankinen, Juho; Lyyra, Henri; Sokolov, Boris; Teittinen, Jose; Ziaei, Babak; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    We present a general model of qubit dynamics which entails pure dephasing and dissipative time-local master equations. This allows us to describe the combined effect of thermalization and dephasing beyond the usual Markovian approximation. We investigate the complete positivity conditions and introduce a heuristic model that is always physical and provides the correct Markovian limit. We study the effects of temperature on the non-Markovian behavior of the system and show that the noise additivity property discussed by Yu and Eberly [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 140403 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.140403] holds beyond the Markovian limit.

  2. The experimental observation on Lyapunov exponent in type V intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingmei; He, Da-Ren; Hou, Yuqing

    1998-03-01

    We have obtained the first experimental proof for the scaling law of Lyapunov exponent in type V intermittency[1] in an electronic relaxation oscillator[2]. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction obtained by a simplified model[1], and with numerical computations conducted with the theoretical model of the oscillator. [1]: S.Wu,E.J.Ding,D.-R.He, Phys.Lett.A, 197(1995)287. [2]: F.Ji and D.-R.He, Phys.Lett.A, 177(1993)125.

  3. Understanding the dependence of transport parameters on carrier concentration within a Gaussian density of states in molecular organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Kumar, P; Rani, V; Ray, N; Ghosh, S

    2016-06-15

    We study charge transport in molecular organic semiconductors using two terminal and three terminal field effect transistor devices. Using phthalocyanines as examples, we achieve unification of carrier mobility between the different configurations in a Gaussian density of states. We find that the current density-voltage characteristics for two terminal devices can be understood by introducing a concentration dependence of the carrier mobility, as described by Oelerich et al (2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 226403, 2010 Appl. Phys. Lett. 97 143302). Studying the evolution of the activation energy with the carrier density, we find results consistent with a percolation picture and a density dependent transport energy. PMID:27160656

  4. Bloch-Landau-Zener dynamics in single-particle Wannier-Zeeman systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yongguan; Qin, Xizhou; Zhong, Honghua; Huang, Jiahao; He, Chunshan; Lee, Chaohong

    2015-05-01

    Stimulated by the experimental realization of spin-dependent tunneling via a gradient magnetic field [C. J. Kennedy et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 225301 (2013);, 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.225301 M. Aidelsburger et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 185301 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.185301], we investigate the dynamics of Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling of single spin-half particles in a periodic potential under the influence of a spin-dependent constant force. In analogy to the Wannier-Stark system, we call our system the Wannier-Zeeman system. If there is no coupling between the two spin states, the system can be described by two crossing Wannier-Stark ladders with opposite tilts. The spatial crossing between two Wannier-Stark ladders becomes a spatial anticrossing if the two spin states are coupled by external fields. For a wave packet away from the spatial anticrossing, due to the spin-dependent constant force, it will undergo spatial Landau-Zener transitions assisted by the intrinsic intraband Bloch oscillations, which we call the Bloch-Landau-Zener dynamics. If the interspin coupling is sufficiently strong, the system undergoes adiabatic Bloch-Landau-Zener dynamics, in which the spin dynamics follows the local dressed states. Otherwise, for nonstrong interspin couplings, the system undergoes nonadiabatic Bloch-Landau-Zener dynamics.

  5. Energy conservation equation for a radiating pointlike charge in the context of the Abraham-Lorentz versus the Abraham-Becker radiation-reaction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, U.; Bornatici, M.

    1997-12-01

    With reference to a radiating pointlike charge, the energy conservation equation comprising the effect of the Abraham-Lorentz radiation-reaction force is contrasted with the incorrect energy conservation equation obtained by Hartemann and Luhmann [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1107 (1995)] on considering instead the Abraham-Becker force that accounts only for a part of the instantaneous radiation-reaction force.

  6. Quantum-tomographic cryptography with a semiconductor single-photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Kaszlikowski, D.; Yang, L.J.; Yong, L.S.; Willeboordse, F.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2005-09-15

    We analyze the security of so-called quantum-tomographic cryptography with the source producing entangled photons via an experimental scheme proposed by Fattal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 37903 (2004)]. We determine the range of the experimental parameters for which the protocol is secure against the most general incoherent attacks.

  7. Turning intractable counting into sampling: Computing the configurational entropy of three-dimensional jammed packings.

    PubMed

    Martiniani, Stefano; Schrenk, K Julian; Stevenson, Jacob D; Wales, David J; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical calculation of the total number of disordered jammed configurations Ω of N repulsive, three-dimensional spheres in a fixed volume V. To make these calculations tractable, we increase the computational efficiency of the approach of Xu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 245502 (2011)10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.245502] and Asenjo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 098002 (2014)10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.098002] and we extend the method to allow computation of the configurational entropy as a function of pressure. The approach that we use computes the configurational entropy by sampling the absolute volume of basins of attraction of the stable packings in the potential energy landscape. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the pressure of a configuration and the volume of its basin of attraction in the potential energy landscape. This relation is well described by a power law. Our methodology to compute the number of minima in the potential energy landscape should be applicable to a wide range of other enumeration problems in statistical physics, string theory, cosmology, and machine learning that aim to find the distribution of the extrema of a scalar cost function that depends on many degrees of freedom. PMID:26871142

  8. Influence of shape resonances on minima in cross sections for photoionization of excited atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Felfli, Z.; Manson, S.T. Department of Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 )

    1990-02-01

    A relationship between the location of Cooper minima and the difference between the quantum defect of the initial state and the threshold phase shift (in units of {pi}) of the final state in excited photoionization has been suggested earlier (Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 473 (1982)). The existence of a shape resonance in the final state is shown to modify this relationship.

  9. Colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization. I

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, F.J.; Garcia D., A.; Hauser, I.

    1987-09-01

    An Ehlers transformation on the Ernst potential for the Nutku--Halil solution (Phys. Rev. Lett. 39, 1379 (1977)) provides a new solution of the Einstein field equations describing colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization, the first of an infinite sequence of solutions that can be generated using techniques described in this paper.

  10. Colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Frederick J.; García D., Alberto; Hauser, Isidore

    1987-09-01

    An Ehlers transformation on the Ernst potential for the Nutku-Halil solution [Phys. Rev. Lett. 39, 1379 (1977)] provides a new solution of the Einstein field equations describing colliding gravitational plane waves with noncollinear polarization, the first of an infinite sequence of solutions that can be generated using techniques described in this paper.

  11. Comment on ``Nature of the Collapse Transition for Polymers''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretti, Marco

    2002-09-01

    A Comment on the Letter by

    Jurgen F. Stilck, Kleber D. Machado, and Pablo Serra, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 76, 2734 (1996).
    The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  12. Turning intractable counting into sampling: Computing the configurational entropy of three-dimensional jammed packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiniani, Stefano; Schrenk, K. Julian; Stevenson, Jacob D.; Wales, David J.; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical calculation of the total number of disordered jammed configurations Ω of N repulsive, three-dimensional spheres in a fixed volume V . To make these calculations tractable, we increase the computational efficiency of the approach of Xu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 245502 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.245502] and Asenjo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 098002 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.098002] and we extend the method to allow computation of the configurational entropy as a function of pressure. The approach that we use computes the configurational entropy by sampling the absolute volume of basins of attraction of the stable packings in the potential energy landscape. We find a surprisingly strong correlation between the pressure of a configuration and the volume of its basin of attraction in the potential energy landscape. This relation is well described by a power law. Our methodology to compute the number of minima in the potential energy landscape should be applicable to a wide range of other enumeration problems in statistical physics, string theory, cosmology, and machine learning that aim to find the distribution of the extrema of a scalar cost function that depends on many degrees of freedom.

  13. Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves in relativistic cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Verma, Prabal; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2012-03-01

    We construct the longitudinal traveling wave solution [Akhiezer and Polovin, Sov. Phys. JETP 3, 696 (1956)] from the exact space and time dependent solution of relativistic cold electron fluid equations [Infeld and Rowlands, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 1122 (1989)]. Ions are assumed to be static. We also suggest an alternative derivation of the Akhiezer Polovin solution after making the standard traveling wave Ansatz.

  14. Has dark energy really been discovered in the Lab?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Straumann, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    We show that dark energy contributions can not be determined from noise measurements of Josephson junctions, as was recently suggested in a paper by C. Beck and M.C. Mackey [Phys. Lett. B 605 (2005) 295, http://arXiv.org/astro-ph/0406504].

  15. Impact of the valence band structure of Cu2O on excitonic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweiner, Frank; Main, Jörg; Feldmaier, Matthias; Wunner, Günter; Uihlein, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    We present a method to calculate the excitonic spectra of all direct semiconductors with a complex valence band structure. The Schrödinger equation is solved using a complete basis set with Coulomb-Sturmian functions. This method also allows for the computation of oscillator strengths. Here we apply this method to investigate the impact of the valence band structure of cuprous oxide (Cu2O ) on the yellow exciton spectrum. Results differ from those of J. Thewes et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 027402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.027402]; the differences are discussed and explained. The difference between the second and third Luttinger parameter can be determined by comparisons with experiments; however, the evaluation of all three Luttinger parameters is not uniquely possible. Our results are consistent with band structure calculations. Considering also a finite momentum ℏ K of the center of mass, we show that the large K -dependent line splitting observed for the 1 S exciton state by G. Dasbach et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 107401 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.91.107401] is not related to an exchange interaction but rather to the complex valence band structure of Cu2O .

  16. Universal behavior of the spin-echo decay rate in La2CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubukov, Andrey V.; Sachdev, Subir; Sokol, Alexander

    1994-04-01

    We present a theoretical expression for the spin-echo decay rate 1/T2G in the quantum-critical regime of square-lattice quantum antiferromagnets. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental data by Imai et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 1254 (1993)] for La2CuO4.

  17. Superconductivity and other collective phenomena in a hybrid Bose-Fermi mixture formed by a polariton condensate and an electron system in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CotleÅ£, Ovidiu; Zeytinoǧlu, Sina; Sigrist, Manfred; Demler, Eugene; Imamoǧlu, Ataç

    2016-02-01

    Interacting Bose-Fermi systems play a central role in condensed matter physics. Here, we analyze a novel Bose-Fermi mixture formed by a cavity exciton-polariton condensate interacting with a two-dimensional electron system. We show that that previous predictions of superconductivity [F. P. Laussy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 106402 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.106402] and excitonic supersolid formation [I. A. Shelykh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 140402 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.140402] in this system are closely intertwined, resembling the predictions for strongly correlated electron systems such as high-temperature superconductors. In stark contrast to a large majority of Bose-Fermi systems analyzed in solids and ultracold atomic gases, the renormalized interaction between the polaritons and electrons in our system is long-ranged and strongly peaked at a tunable wave vector, which can be rendered incommensurate with the Fermi momentum. We analyze the prospects for experimental observation of superconductivity and find that critical temperatures on the order of a few kelvins can be achieved in heterostructures consisting of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers that are embedded in an open cavity structure. All-optical control of superconductivity in semiconductor heterostructures could enable the realization of new device concepts compatible with semiconductor nanotechnology. In addition the possibility to interface quantum Hall physics, superconductivity, and nonequilibrium polariton condensates is likely to provide fertile ground for investigation of completely new physical phenomena.

  18. Statistics of polymer extensions in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Faranggis; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Perlekar, Prasad; Brandt, Luca

    2012-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow with passive Lagrangian polymers. To understand the polymer behavior we investigate the behavior of infinitesimal line elements and calculate the probability distribution function (PDF) of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and from them the corresponding Cramer's function for the channel flow. We study the statistics of polymer elongation for both the Oldroyd-B model (for Weissenberg number Wi<1) and the FENE model. We use the location of the minima of the Cramer's function to define the Weissenberg number precisely such that we observe coil-stretch transition at Wi ≈1. We find agreement with earlier analytical predictions for PDF of polymer extensions made by Balkovsky, Fouxon, and Lebedev [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4765 84, 4765 (2000)] for linear polymers (Oldroyd-B model) with Wi <1 and by Chertkov [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4761 84, 4761 (2000)] for nonlinear FENE-P model of polymers. For Wi >1 (FENE model) the polymer are significantly more stretched near the wall than at the center of the channel where the flow is closer to homogenous isotropic turbulence. Furthermore near the wall the polymers show a strong tendency to orient along the streamwise direction of the flow, but near the center line the statistics of orientation of the polymers is consistent with analogous results obtained recently in homogeneous and isotropic flows.

  19. Quantum vacuum radiation in optical glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberati, Stefano; Prain, Angus; Visser, Matt

    2012-04-01

    A recent experimental claim of the detection of analogue Hawking radiation in an optical system [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 203901 (2010)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.105.203901] has led to some controversy [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 149401 (2011)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.149401]. While this experiment strongly suggests some form of particle creation from the quantum vacuum (and hence it is per se very interesting), it is also true that it seems difficult to completely explain all features of the observations by adopting the perspective of a Hawking-like mechanism for the radiation. For instance, the observed photons are emitted parallel to the optical horizon, and the relevant optical horizon is itself defined in an unusual manner by combining group and phase velocities. This raises the question: Is this really Hawking radiation, or some other form of quantum vacuum radiation? Naive estimates of the amount of quantum vacuum radiation generated due to the rapidly changing refractive index—sometimes called the dynamical Casimir effect—are not encouraging. However we feel that naive estimates could be misleading depending on the quantitative magnitude of two specific physical effects: “pulse steepening” and “pulse cresting”. Plausible bounds on the maximum size of these two effects results in estimates much closer to the experimental observations, and we argue that the dynamical Casimir effect is now worth additional investigation.

  20. Cosmic-ray Tests of Lorentz Invariance Violations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowsik, Ramanath; Nussinov, Shmuel; Sarkar, Utpal

    2012-07-01

    The recent report of superluminal velocities for muon neutrinos by the OPERA collaboration working at the particle accelerators at CERN has stimulated considerable interest amongst cosmic ray scientists. The violations of Lorentz Invariance is studied within the context of the model due to Coleman and Glashow that allows for the possibility of different terminal velocities for different particles, some of which may exceed the speed of light in vacuum. We review the data on cosmic ray neutrinos and muons and on neutrinos of astrophysical origins to show that these imply very strict bounds on any such violations of Lorentz Invariance. The observations of GZK neutrinos with instruments such as ANITA will push these bounds to extremely small values. References: S. Coleman & S. Glashow, Phys. Lett. B405, 249 (1997), Phys. Rev, D 59, 116008 (1999); R. Cowsik * B.V. Sreekantan, Phys. Lett. B 449, 219 (1999), T Adam et al., arXiv:1109.4897v1 [hep-ex]; A.G. Cohen & S. Glashow, Phys Rev. Lett, 107, 181803 (2011); R. Cowsik et al., Phys Rev Lett. 107, 251801 (2011).

  1. Comment on ‘Dengue viral infection monitoring from diagnostic to recovery using Raman spectroscopy’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Lademann, Juergen; Brandt, Nikolay N.

    2016-04-01

    The results of the letter ‘Dengue viral infection monitoring from diagnostic to recovery using Raman spectroscopy’ authored by Firdous and Anwar (2015 Laser Phys. Lett. 12 085601) are discussed. We show that the original interpretation of the results is not correct and does not correspond to data in the literature.

  2. Folding catastrophes due to viscosity in multiferroic domains: implications for room-temperature multiferroic switching.

    PubMed

    Scott, J F

    2015-12-16

    Unusual domains with curved walls and failure to satisfy the Landau-Lifshitz-Kittel Law are modeled as folding catastrophes (saddle-node bifurcations). This description of ballistic motion in a viscous medium is based upon early work by Dawber et al 2003 Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 436. It suggests that ferroelectric films can exhibit folds or vortex patterns but not both. PMID:26575273

  3. Axially Symmetric Cosmological Model with Bulk Stress in Saez-Ballester Theory of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mete, V. G.; Nimkar, A. S.; Elkar, V. D.

    2016-01-01

    An Axially symmetric non-static space time is considered in presence of bulk stress in scalar tensor theory formulated by Saez and Ballester (Phys. Lett. A113, 467 1985). For solving the field equations, relation between metric potential and shear velocity is proportional to scale expansion are used. Also various physical and geometrical properties of the model have been discussed.

  4. Observing spin excitations in 3 d transition-metal adatoms on Pt(111) with inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy: A first-principles perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweflinghaus, Benedikt; dos Santos Dias, Manuel; Lounis, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Spin excitations in atomic-scale nanostructures have been investigated with inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy, sometimes with conflicting results. In this work, we present a theoretical viewpoint on a recent experimental controversy regarding the spin excitations of Co adatoms on Pt(111). While one group [Balashov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 257203 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.257203] claims to have detected them, another group reported their observation only after the hydrogenation of the Co adatom [Dubout et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 106807 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.106807]. Utilizing time-dependent density functional theory in combination with many-body perturbation theory, we demonstrate that, although inelastic spin excitations are possible for Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co adatoms, their efficiency differs. While the excitation signature is less pronounced for Mn and Co adatoms, it is larger for Cr and Fe adatoms. We find that the tunneling matrix elements or the tunneling cross-section related to the nature and symmetry of the relevant electronic states are more favorable for triggering the spin excitations in Fe than in Co. An enhancement of the tunneling and of the inelastic spectra is possible by attaching hydrogen to the adatom at the appropriate position.

  5. Relativistic calculation of the electron-momentum shift in tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. A.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a procedure for the solution of the time-dependent Dirac equation. The procedure is based on the relativistic generalization of the matrix iteration method. We use this procedure to study electron-momentum distribution along the laser-beam propagation direction for the process of the tunneling ionization of a hydrogen atom. We found, in agreement with the experimental observations [C. T. L. Smeenk, L. Arissian, B. Zhou, A. Mysyrowicz, D. M. Villeneuve, A. Staudte, and P. B. Corkum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 193002 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.193002], that relativistic effects lead to appreciable deviation of the distribution from the strict left-right symmetry present in the nonrelativistic case. The expectation value of the momentum along the laser-beam propagation direction grows linearly with intensity and follows closely the behavior of the expectation value of the kinetic energy divided by the speed of light. These features agree with the experimental results [C. T. L. Smeenk, L. Arissian, B. Zhou, A. Mysyrowicz, D. M. Villeneuve, A. Staudte, and P. B. Corkum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 193002 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.193002].

  6. Comment on "Searching for Topological Defect Dark Matter via Nongravitational Signatures"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, P. P.; Sousa, L.; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2016-04-01

    In the letter by Stadnik and Flambaum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 151301 (2014)] it is claimed that topological defects passing through pulsars could be responsible for the observed pulsar glitches. Here, we show that, independently of the detailed network dynamics and defect dimensionality, such proposal is faced with serious difficulties.

  7. Scaling of the conductance distribution near the Anderson transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slevin, Keith; Markoš, Peter; Ohtsuki, Tomi

    2003-04-01

    The scaling hypothesis is the foundation of our understanding of the Anderson transition. We present a direct numerical demonstration of the scaling of the conductance distribution of a disordered system in the critical regime. This complements a previous demonstration of the scaling of certain averages of the conductance distribution [K. Slevin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3594 (2001)].

  8. Tilted Bianchi Type III Wet Dark Fluid Cosmological Model in Saez and Ballester Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Subrata Kumar; Kantila, Endale Nigatu; Gebru, Dawit Melese

    2016-01-01

    Tilted Bianchi-III wet dark fluid cosmological model is investigated in the frame work of Saez and Ballester theory (Phys. Lett. A. 113:467, 1986). Exact solutions to the field equations are derived when the metric potentials are functions of cosmic time only. Some physical and geometrical properties of the solutions are also discussed.

  9. 77 FR 67381 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... Functionalized with siRNAs. Nano Lett. 2012 Oct 10;12(10):5192-5. 2. Grabow WW, et al. ``RNA Nanotechnology in... emerging field of RNA nanotechnology. ACS Nano. 2011 May 24;5(5):3405-18. 4. Afonin KA, et al. Design and... nanostructure design including pseudoknots. ACS Nano. 2011 Dec 27;5(12):9542-51. 6. Grabow WW, et al....

  10. 78 FR 43216 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... modified RNA nanoparticles functionalized with siRNAs. Nano Lett. 2012 Oct 10;12(10):5192-5. . 2. Grabow WW.... . 3. Shukla GC, et al. A boost for the emerging field of RNA nanotechnology. ACS Nano. 2011 May 24;5(5.... Multistrand RNA secondary structure prediction and nanostructure design including pseudoknots. ACS Nano....

  11. Scaling theory of depinning in the Sneppen model

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, S.; Paczuski, M. Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11790 The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge CB4 0EH )

    1994-08-01

    We develop a scaling theory for the critical depinning behavior of the Sneppen interface model [Phys. Rev. Lett. [bold 69], 3539 (1992)]. This theory is based on a gap'' equation that describes the self-organization process to a critical state of the depinning transition. All of the critical exponents can be expressed in terms of two independent exponents, [nu][sub [parallel

  12. Review of particle properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl; Cahn, R.N.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Porter, F.; Hernandez, J.J.; Montanet, L.; Hendrick, R.E.; Crawford, R.L.

    1984-04-01

    This review of the properties of leptons, mesons, and baryons is an updating of the Review of Particle Properties, Particle Data Group (Phys. Lett. 111B (1982)). Data are evaluated, listed, averaged, and summarized in tables. Numerous tables, figures, and formulae of interest to particle physicists are also included. A data booklet is available.

  13. Relativistic calculations of cross sections for ionization of U90+ and U91+ ions by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Christopher J.; Sampson, Douglas H.; Zhang, Hong Lin

    1995-01-01

    Relativistic distorted-wave calculations have been made of the cross sections for electron-impact ionization of U90+ and U91+ ions with the generalized Breit interaction included between bound and free electrons. Good agreement is obtained with recent electron-beam ion-trap experiments [R. E. Marrs, S. R. Elliott, and D. A. Knapp, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 4082 (1994)].

  14. Theory of enhanced performance emerging in a sparsely connected competitive population.

    PubMed

    Lo, T S; Chan, K P; Hui, P M; Johnson, N F

    2005-05-01

    We provide an analytic theory to explain Anghel et al's recent numerical finding whereby a maximum in the global performance emerges for a sparsely connected competitive population [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 058701 (2004)]. We show that the effect originates in the highly correlated dynamics of strategy choice, and can be significantly enhanced using a simple modification to the model. PMID:16089509

  15. Minimally interacting holographic dark energy model in a five dimensional spherically symmetric space-time in Saez-Ballester theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, P.; Sobhanbabu, K.; Reddy, D. R. K.

    2016-02-01

    Five-dimensional spherically symmetric space-time filled with two minimally interacting fields, matter and holographic dark energy components, is investigated in a scalar tensor theory of gravitation proposed by Saez and Ballester (Phys. Lett. A 113:467, 1986). An explicit solution of the field equations is obtained. Some physical and kinematic properties of the model are also studied.

  16. Mathematics in Literature and Cinema: An Interdisciplinary Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabrán, H. Rafael; Kozek, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We describe our team-taught, interdisciplinary course "Numb3rs in Lett3rs & Fi1ms: Mathematics in Literature and Cinema," which explores mathematics in the context of modern literature and cinema. Our goal with this course is to advance collaborations between mathematics and the written/theatre-based creative arts.

  17. Intermittently Decreased Beat-To-Beat Variability in Congestive Heart Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Niels; Schirdewan, Alexander; Kurths, Jürgen

    2003-09-01

    A Comment on the Letter by

    Madalena Costa, Ary L. Goldberger, and C.-K. Peng, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 89, 068102 (2002)
    . The authors of the Letter offer a Reply.

  18. Theoretical analysis and modeling of a photonic integrated circuit for frequency 8-tupled and 24-tupled millimeter wave signal generation: erratum.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mehedi; Guemri, Rabiaa; Maldonado-Basilio, Ramón; Lucarz, Frédéric; de Bougrenet de la Tocnaye, Jean-Louis; Hall, Trevor

    2015-12-15

    A novel photonic circuit design for implementing frequency 8-tupling and 24-tupling was presented [Opt. Lett.39, 6950 (2014)10.1364/OL.39.006950OPLEDP0146-9592], and although its key message remains unaltered, there were typographical errors in the equations that are corrected in this erratum. PMID:26670492

  19. Verification of bifurcation diagrams for polynomial-like equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, Philip; Li, Yi; Ouyang, Tiancheng

    2008-03-01

    The results of our recent paper [P. Korman, Y. Li, T. Ouyang, Computing the location and the direction of bifurcation, Math. Res. Lett. 12 (2005) 933-944] appear to be sufficient to justify computer-generated bifurcation diagram for any autonomous two-point Dirichlet problem. Here we apply our results to polynomial-like nonlinearities.

  20. Raman-dressed spin-1 spin-orbit-coupled quantum gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhihao; Öhberg, Patrik

    2014-02-01

    The recently realized spin-orbit-coupled quantum gases [Lin et al., Nature (London) 471, 83 (2011), 10.1038/nature09887; Wang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 095301 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.095301; Cheuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 095302 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.095302] mark a breakthrough in the cold atom community. In these experiments, two hyperfine states are selected from a hyperfine manifold to mimic a pseudospin-1/2 spin-orbit-coupled system by the method of Raman dressing, which is applicable to both bosonic and fermionic gases. In this paper, we show that the method used in these experiments can be generalized to create any large pseudospin spin-orbit-coupled gas if more hyperfine states are coupled equally by the Raman lasers. As an example, we study, in detail, a quantum gas with three hyperfine states coupled by the Raman lasers and show, when the state-dependent energy shifts of the three states are comparable, triple-degenerate minima will appear at the bottom of the band dispersions, thus, realizing a spin-1 spin-orbit-coupled quantum gas. A novel feature of this three-minima regime is that there can be two different kinds of stripe phases with different wavelengths, which has an interesting connection to the ferromagnetic and polar phases of spin-1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensates without spin-orbit coupling.

  1. Is Bare Band Description of Carrier Transport Appropriate in Pentacene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, John D.; Giuggioli, Luca; Kenkre, V. M.

    2002-03-01

    Experiments on injected charges in pentacene single crystals reveal mobilities typical of inorganic semiconductors and temperature dependence (for T<430K) suggesting bandlike behavior.(J. H. Schon, C. Kloc, and B. Batlogg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3843 (2001)) Polaronic bands, particularly their narrowing with increasing temperature, were invoked(V. M. Kenkre, John D. Andersen, D.H. Dunlap, and C.B. Duke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 1165 (1989)) in the related naphthalene problem.(L. B. Schein, C. B. Duke, and A.R. McGhie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 197 (1978); L. B. Schein, W. Warta, and N. Karl, Chem. Phys. Lett. 100, 34 (1983)) Because the low temperature mobility values in pentacene suggest moderately large bandwidths, we address two questions. Does a bare wide (effectively infinite) band description work for pentacene for T<400K? And, is a bare finite band description compatible with those data? These questions are answered by modifications of a theory originally constructed for inorganic materials and a newly developed mobility theory.

  2. Bierman {ital et al.}Reply:

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, J.D.; Chan, P.; Liang, J.F.; Kelly, M.P.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Vandenbosch, R.

    1997-05-01

    reply to the Comment by C.H.Dasso et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78,XXX(1997). A Reply to the Comment by C.H. Dasso and J. Fern{acute a}ndez-Niello. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Public Data Set: High Confinement Mode and Edge Localized Mode Characteristics in a Near-Unity Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    DOE Data Explorer

    Thome, Kathreen E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000248013922); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Barr, Jayson L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177685931); Bodner, Grant M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000324979172); Burke, Marcus G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000176193724); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Kriete, David M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000236572911); Perry, Justin M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000171228609); Schlossberg, David J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000287139448)

    2016-04-27

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in K.E. Thome et al., 'High Confinement Mode and Edge Localized Mode Characteristics in a Near-Unity Aspect Ratio Tokamak,' Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 175001 (2016).

  4. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the uniform electron gas without fixed nodes: The unpolarized case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornheim, T.; Groth, S.; Schoof, T.; Hann, C.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-05-01

    In a recent publication [S. Groth et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 085102 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.085102], we have shown that the combination of two complementary quantum Monte Carlo approaches, namely configuration path integral Monte Carlo [T. Schoof et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 130402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.130402] and permutation blocking path integral Monte Carlo [T. Dornheim et al., New J. Phys. 17, 073017 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/7/073017], allows for the accurate computation of thermodynamic properties of the spin-polarized uniform electron gas over a wide range of temperatures and densities without the fixed-node approximation. In the present work, we extend this concept to the unpolarized case, which requires nontrivial enhancements that we describe in detail. We compare our simulation results with recent restricted path integral Monte Carlo data [E. W. Brown et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.146405] for different energy contributions and pair distribution functions and find, for the exchange correlation energy, overall better agreement than for the spin-polarized case, while the separate kinetic and potential contributions substantially deviate.

  5. Recent Results for the Bak-Sneppen Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Paczuski, Maya

    2001-03-01

    We discuss our recent result that determines the upper critical dimension of the Bak-Sneppen model to be d_c=4 [see Phys. Rev. Lett. /bf 84, 2267-2270 (2000)], and the theoretical arguments supporting it. Also, we review other aspects of recent interest, such as the aging behavior of the model.

  6. Spin orbit torques and chiral spin textures in ultrathin magnetic films (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Geoffrey S.

    2015-09-01

    Spin orbit coupling at interfaces can give rise to chiral magnetic textures such as homochiral domain walls and skyrmions, as well as current-induced torques that can effectively manipulate them [1-3]. This talk will describe interface-driven spin-orbit torques and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMIs) in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets adjacent to nonmagnetic heavy metals. We show that the DMI depends strongly on the heavy metal, differing by a factor of ~20 between Pt and Ta [4], and describe the influence of strong DMI on domain wall dynamics and spin Hall effect switching [5]. We present high-resolution magnetic force microscopy imaging of static magnetic textures that directly reveal the role of DMI and allow its strength to be quantified. Finally, we will describe how SOTs can be enhanced through interface engineering [6] and tuned by a gate voltage [7] by directly controlling the interfacial oxygen coordination at a ferromagnet/oxide interface [8]. [1] A. Thiaville, et al., Europhys. Lett. 100, 57002 (2012). [2] S. Emori, et al., Nature Mater. 12, 611 (2013). [3] J. Sampaio, V. Cros, S. Rohart, A. Thiaville, and A. Fert, Nature Nano. 8, 839 (2013). [4] S. Emori, et al., Phys. Rev. B 90, 184427 (2014). [5] N. Perez, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 092403 (2014). [6] S. Woo, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 212404 (2014). [7] S. Emori, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 222401 (2014). [8] U. Bauer, et al., Nature Mater. 14, 174 (2015).

  7. Comment on {open_quotes}Multicritical Behavior in Coupled Directed Percolation Processes{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Goldschmidt, Y.Y.

    1998-09-01

    A Comment on the Letter by Uwe C. T{umlt a}uber, Martin J. Howard, and Haye Hinrichsen, Phys.thinspthinspRev.thinspthinspLett.thinspthinsp{bold 80}, 2165 (1998). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Structure of the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, universal existence of the cyclic quantum evolution, and geometric phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lian-Ao

    1994-12-01

    It is shown that the cyclic evolution posed by Aharonov and Anandan [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1593 (1987)] universally exists in any quantum system: cyclic evolution occurs for special initial wave functions, whatever the concrete form of the Hamiltonian. The above results are illustrated and some specific geometric phases are given.

  9. Electromagnetic thermal corrections to Casimir energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Borzoo

    2016-07-01

    In [B. Nazari, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 31, 1650007 (2016)], we calculated finite temperature corrections to the energy of the Casimir effect of two conducting parallel plates in a general weak gravitational field. The calculations was done for the case a scalar field was present between the plates. Here we find the same results in the presence of an electromagnetic field.

  10. Excitations in the chiral spin liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeter, Darrell

    2009-03-01

    Recently, a spin-Hamiltonian was presented [Schroeter et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 097202 (2007)] for which the chiral spin liquid is the exact ground state. This poster will present a numerical study of the excitations of the model, including results obtained by exact diagonalization of the model on 16 and 25-site lattices.

  11. Comment on 'Quantum teleportation of an arbitrary two-qubit state and its relation to multipartite entanglement'

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Fuguo

    2005-09-15

    The multipartite state in the Rigolin's protocol [Phys. Rev. A 71, 032303 (2005)] for teleporting an arbitrary two-qubit state is just a product state of N Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs in essence, not a genuine multipartite entangled state, and this protocol in principle is equivalent to the Yang-Guo protocol [Chin. Phys. Lett. 17, 162 (2000)].

  12. Stochastic Schroedinger equations with general complex Gaussian noises

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, Angelo

    2003-06-01

    Within the framework of non-Markovian stochastic Schroedinger equations, we generalize the results of [W. T. Strunz, Phys. Lett. A 224, 25 (1996)] to the case of general complex Gaussian noises; we analyze the two important cases of purely real and purely imaginary stochastic processes.

  13. Magnetic detonation structure in crystals of nanomagnets controlled by thermal conduction and volume viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukimenko, O.; Modestov, M.; Marklund, M.; Bychkov, V.

    2015-03-01

    Experimentally detected ultrafast spin avalanches spreading in crystals of molecular (nano)magnets [Decelle et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 027203 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.027203] have recently been explained in terms of magnetic detonation [Modestov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 207208 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.207208]. Here magnetic detonation structure is investigated by taking into account transport processes of the crystals such as thermal conduction and volume viscosity. The transport processes result in smooth profiles of the most important thermodynamical crystal parameters, temperature, density, and pressure, all over the magnetic detonation front, including the leading shock, which is one of the key regions of magnetic detonation. In the case of zero volume viscosity, thermal conduction leads to an isothermal discontinuity instead of the shock, for which temperature is continuous while density and pressure experience jump. It is also demonstrated that the thickness of the magnetic detonation front may be controlled by applying the transverse-magnetic field, which is important for possible experimental observations of magnetic detonation.

  14. Bounds on the Number and Size of Extra Dimensions from Molecular Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salumbides, Edcel John; Schellekens, Bert; Gato-Rivera, Beatriz; Ubachs, Wim

    2015-06-01

    Modern string theories, which seek to produce a consistent description of physics beyond the Standard Model that also includes the gravitational interaction, appear to be most consistent if a large number of dimensions are postulated. For example the mysterious M-theory, which generalizes all consistent versions of superstring theories, require 11 dimensions. We demonstrate that investigations of quantum level energies in simple molecular systems provide a testing ground to constrain the size of compactified extra dimensions, for example those proposed in the ADD [1] and RS scenarios [2]. This is made possible by the recent progress in precision metrology with ultrastable lasers on energy levels in neutral molecular hydrogen (H_2, HD and D_2) [3] and the molecular hydrogen ions (H_2^+, HD^+ and D_2^+) [4]. Comparisons between experiment and quantum electrodynamics calculations for these molecular systems can be interpreted in terms of probing large extra dimensions, under which conditions gravity will become much stronger. Molecules are a probe of space-time geometry at typical distances where chemical bonds are effective, i.e. at length scales of an Å. [1] N. Arkani-Hamed, S. Dimopoulos and G. Dvali, Phys. Lett. B 429, 263 (1998) [2] L. Randall and R. Sundrum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 3370 (1999). [3] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [4] J. C. J. Koelemeij et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 173002 (2007).

  15. Charging time for dust grain on surface exposed to plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, T. E.

    2013-04-01

    We consider the charging of a dust grain sitting on a surface exposed to plasma. The stochastic model of Sheridan and Hayes [Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 091501 (2011)] is solved analytically for the charging time, which is found to be directly proportional to the square root of the electron temperature and inversely proportional to both the grain radius and plasma density.

  16. Hawking fluxes, back reaction and covariant anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-11-01

    Starting from the chiral covariant effective action approach of Banerjee and Kulkarni (2008 Phys. Lett. B 659 827), we provide a derivation of the Hawking radiation from a charged black hole in the presence of gravitational back reaction. The modified expressions for charge and energy flux, due to the effect of one-loop back reaction are obtained.

  17. Oscillator strengths for a Li I 207-A laser.

    PubMed

    Nussbaumer, H

    1980-06-01

    Atomic data crucial for a proposed 207-A lithium laser have been calculated in a multiconfiguration approximation. The values obtained for the intercombination oscillator strengths ls2s2p 4 P(o)-1s2p2 2P are approximately a factor of 15 smaller than those assumed in the proposal of Harris [Opt. Lett. 5,1 (1980)]. PMID:19693180

  18. Crystal-structure prediction via the Floppy-Box Monte Carlo algorithm: Method and application to hard (non)convex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Joost; Filion, Laura; Marechal, Matthieu; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the way to set up the floppy-box Monte Carlo (FBMC) method [L. Filion, M. Marechal, B. van Oorschot, D. Pelt, F. Smallenburg, and M. Dijkstra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 188302 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.188302] to predict crystal-structure candidates for colloidal particles. The algorithm is explained in detail to ensure that it can be straightforwardly implemented on the basis of this text. The handling of hard-particle interactions in the FBMC algorithm is given special attention, as (soft) short-range and semi-long-range interactions can be treated in an analogous way. We also discuss two types of algorithms for checking for overlaps between polyhedra, the method of separating axes and a triangular-tessellation based technique. These can be combined with the FBMC method to enable crystal-structure prediction for systems composed of highly shape-anisotropic particles. Moreover, we present the results for the dense crystal structures predicted using the FBMC method for 159 (non)convex faceted particles, on which the findings in [J. de Graaf, R. van Roij, and M. Dijkstra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 155501 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.155501] were based. Finally, we comment on the process of crystal-structure prediction itself and the choices that can be made in these simulations.

  19. B80 and B101-103 clusters: Remarkable stability of the core-shell structures established by validated density functionalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengyu; Jin, Peng; Jiang, De-en; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Shengbai B.; Zhao, Jijun; Chen, Zhongfang

    2012-02-01

    Prompted by the very recent claim that the volleyball-shaped B80 fullerene [X. Wang, Phys. Rev. B 82, 153409 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.153409] is lower in energy than the B80 buckyball [N. G. Szwacki, A. Sadrzadeh, and B. I. Yakobson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 166804 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.166804] and core-shell structure [J. Zhao, L. Wang, F. Li, and Z. Chen, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 9969 (2010), 10.1021/jp1018873], and inspired by the most recent finding of another core-shell isomer as the lowest energy B80 isomer [S. De, A. Willand, M. Amsler, P. Pochet, L. Genovese, and S. Goedecher, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 225502 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.225502], we carefully evaluated the performance of the density functional methods in the energetics of boron clusters and confirmed that the core-shell construction (stuffed fullerene) is thermodynamically the most favorable structural pattern for B80. Our global minimum search showed that both B101 and B103 also prefer a core-shell structure and that B103 can reach the complete core-shell configuration. We called for great attention to the theoretical community when using density functionals to investigate boron-related nanomaterials.

  20. Security of quantum key distribution with a laser reference coherent state, resistant to loss in the communication channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.; Potapova, T. A.

    2015-06-01

    The problem of quantum key distribution security in channels with large losses is still open. Quasi-single-photon sources of quantum states with losses in the quantum communication channel open up the possibility of attacking with unambiguous state discrimination (USD) measurements, resulting in a loss of privacy. In this letter, the problem is solved by counting the classic reference pulses. Conservation of the number of counts of intense coherent pulses makes it impossible to conduct USD measurements. Moreover, the losses in the communication channel are considered to be unknown in advance and are subject to change throughout the series parcels. Unlike other protocols, differential phase shift (Inoue et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 037902, Inoue et al 2003 Phys. Rev. A 68 022317, Takesue et al 2007 Nat. Photon. 1 343, Wen et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 170503) and coherent one way (Stucki et al 2005 Appl. Phys. Lett. 87 194108, Branciard et al 2005 Appl. Phys. Lett. 87 194108, Branciard et al 2008 New J. Phys. 10 013031, Stucki et al 2008 Opt. Express 17 13326), the simplicity of the protocol makes it possible to carry out a complete analysis of its security.

  1. Theoretical study of Fourier-transform acousto-optic imaging.

    PubMed

    Barjean, Kinia; Ramaz, François; Tualle, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    We propose a full theoretical study of Fourier-transform acousto-optic imaging, which we recently introduced and experimentally assessed in [Opt. Lett.40, 705-708 (2015)OPLEDP0146-959210.1364/OL.40.000705] as an alternative to achieve axial resolution in acousto-optic imaging with a higher signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27140883

  2. Abrupt changes in the dynamics of quantum disentanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Lastra, F.; Romero, G.; Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C.; Franca Santos, M.

    2007-06-15

    The evolution of the lower bound of entanglement proposed by Chen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 210501 (2005)] in high-dimensional bipartite systems under dissipation is studied. Discontinuities for the time derivative of this bound are found depending on the initial conditions for entangled states. These abrupt changes along the evolution of the entanglement bound appear as precursors of sudden death.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance implementation of a quantum clock synchronization algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jingfu; Long, G.C; Liu Wenzhang; Deng Zhiwei; Lu Zhiheng

    2004-12-01

    The quantum clock synchronization (QCS) algorithm proposed by Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2006 (2000)] has been implemented in a three qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum system. The time difference between two separated clocks can be determined by measuring the output states. The experimental realization of the QCS algorithm also demonstrates an application of the quantum phase estimation.

  4. Self-truncation and scaling in Euler-Voigt-α and related fluid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Molfetta, Giuseppe; Krstlulovic, Giorgio; Brachet, Marc

    2015-07-01

    A generalization of the 3D Euler-Voigt-α model is obtained by introducing derivatives of arbitrary order β (instead of 2) in the Helmholtz operator. The β →∞ limit is shown to correspond to Galerkin truncation of the Euler equation. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the model are performed with resolutions up to 20483 and Taylor-Green initial data. DNS performed at large β demonstrate that this simple classical hydrodynamical model presents a self-truncation behavior, similar to that previously observed for the Gross-Pitaeveskii equation in Krstulovic and Brachet [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 115303 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.115303]. The self-truncation regime of the generalized model is shown to reproduce the behavior of the truncated Euler equation demonstrated in Cichowlas et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 264502 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.95.264502]. The long-time growth of the self-truncation wave number kst appears to be self-similar. Two related α -Voigt versions of the eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian model and the Leith model are introduced. These simplified theoretical models are shown to reasonably reproduce intermediate time DNS results. The values of the self-similar exponents of these models are found analytically.

  5. On Barut's proposal for eliminating both the preacceleration and the runaway solution of the Lorentz-Dirac equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, R.

    1992-09-01

    I show the incorrectness of a hypothetical new solution of the Lorentz-Dirac equation (LDE) recently proposed by Barut [Phys. Lett. A 145 (1990) 387] having neither preaccelaration nor runaway behaviour. I recover the well-known result that the cited unphysical features of the LDE cannot be simultaneously eliminated.

  6. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2013-04-01

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E10.1103/PhysRevE.75.036304 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.074301 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.034501 109, 034501 (2012)].

  7. a Mean-Field Version of the Ssb Model for X-Chromosome Inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeta, Giuseppe

    Nicodemi and Prisco recently proposed a model for X-chromosome inactivation in mammals, explaining this phenomenon in terms of a spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism [{\\it Phys. Rev. Lett.} 99 (2007), 108104]. Here we provide a mean-field version of their model.

  8. Optimal eavesdropping on quantum key distribution without quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, Aurélien; Alléaume, Romain; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    We consider the security of the BB84 (Bennett and Brassard 1984 Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. on Computers, Systems, and Signal Processing pp 175-9), six-state (Bruß 1998 Phys. Rev. Lett. http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.81.3018) and SARG04 (Scarani et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.057901) quantum key distribution protocols when the eavesdropper does not have access to a quantum memory. In this case, Eve’s most general strategy is to measure her ancilla with an appropriate positive operator-valued measure designed to take advantage of the post-measurement information that will be released during the sifting phase of the protocol. After an optimization on all the parameters accessible to Eve, our method provides us with new bounds for the security of six-state and SARG04 against a memoryless adversary. In particular, for the six-state protocol we show that the maximum quantum bit error ratio for which a secure key can be extracted is increased from 12.6% (for collective attacks) to 20.4% with the memoryless assumption.

  9. Developments in Laser and Plasma-Based Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downer, Michael

    2001-04-01

    -based injection technologies to meet this challenge [4]. The talk will focus on these and other recent developments. 1. E. Esarey et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 24, 252 (1996). 2. T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979). 3. C. G. Durfee and H. M. Milchberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2409 (1993); Ehrlich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4186 (1996); S. P. Nikitin et al., Phys. Rev. E 59, R3839 (1999); P. Volfbeyn et al., Phys.of Plasmas 6, 2269 (1999); D. Kaganovich et al., Phys. Rev. E 59, R4769 (1999); F. Dorchies et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4655 (1999); T. Hosokai et al., Opt. Lett. 25, 10 (2000); E. W. Gaul et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 77, 4112 (2000). 4. D. Umstadter et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2073 (1996); E. Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997); C. I. Moore et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1688 (1999); S. Y. Tochitsky et al. Opt. Lett. 24, 1717 (1999).

  10. I. I. Rabi Prize Lecture: Paradox Lost and Paradox Regained: Recent Experimental Results in Dilute-Gas Bose-Einstein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, Eric A.

    1997-04-01

    In the two years since Bose-Einstein condensation was first observed [1,2,3] in dilute vapors of the alkali metals, a wide variety of experimental studies has been performed on these exotic systems. Some of the recent results out of JILA (for instance a critical temperature measurement [4]) have been in excellent agreement with theeoretical expectations. Others (for instance the behavior of low-lying condensate excitations at finite-T [5]) have been more puzzling. I will discuss the recently observed two-component condensates [6] and provide also an overview of recent studies [7] of the coherence properties of condensates. ([1] M. H. Anderson, J. R. Ensher, M. R. Matthews, C. E. Wieman and E. A. Cornell, Science 269, 198 (1995). [2] K. B. Davis, M.-O. Mewes, M. R. Andrews, N. J. van Druten, D. S. Durfee, D. M. Kurn, W. Kettle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3696 (1995). [3] C. C. Bradley, C. A. Sackett, and R. G. Hulet, Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press). [4] J. R. Ensher, D. S. Jin, M. R. Matthews, C. E. Wieman and E. A. Cornell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4984 (1996). [5] D. S. Jin, M. R. Matthews, J. R. Ensher, C. E. Wieman and E. A. Cornell, Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press). [6] C. J. Myatt, E. A. Burt, R. W. Ghrist, E. A. Cornell and C. E. Wieman, Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press). [7] M. R. Andrews, C. G. Townsend, H.-J. Miesner, D. S. Durfee, D. M. Kurn and W. Ketterle, Science (in press).)

  11. Physics Beyond the Standard Model from Molecular Hydrogen Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, Wim; Salumbides, Edcel John; Bagdonaite, Julija

    2015-06-01

    The spectrum of molecular hydrogen can be measured in the laboratory to very high precision using advanced laser and molecular beam techniques, as well as frequency-comb based calibration [1,2]. The quantum level structure of this smallest neutral molecule can now be calculated to very high precision, based on a very accurate (10-15 precision) Born-Oppenheimer potential [3] and including subtle non-adiabatic, relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects [4]. Comparison between theory and experiment yields a test of QED, and in fact of the Standard Model of Physics, since the weak, strong and gravitational forces have a negligible effect. Even fifth forces beyond the Standard Model can be searched for [5]. Astronomical observation of molecular hydrogen spectra, using the largest telescopes on Earth and in space, may reveal possible variations of fundamental constants on a cosmological time scale [6]. A study has been performed at a 'look-back' time of 12.5 billion years [7]. In addition the possible dependence of a fundamental constant on a gravitational field has been investigated from observation of molecular hydrogen in the photospheres of white dwarfs [8]. The latter involves a test of the Einsteins equivalence principle. [1] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 143005 (2011). [2] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [3] K. Pachucki, Phys. Rev. A82, 032509 (2010). [4] J. Komasa et al., J. Chem. Theory Comp. 7, 3105 (2011). [5] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. D87, 112008 (2013). [6] F. van Weerdenburg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). [7] J. Badonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 071301 (2015). [8] J. Bagdonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 123002 (2014).

  12. Fault-tolerant logical gates in quantum error-correcting codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastawski, Fernando; Yoshida, Beni

    2015-01-01

    Recently, S. Bravyi and R. König [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 170503 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.170503] have shown that there is a trade-off between fault-tolerantly implementable logical gates and geometric locality of stabilizer codes. They consider locality-preserving operations which are implemented by a constant-depth geometrically local circuit and are thus fault tolerant by construction. In particular, they show that, for local stabilizer codes in D spatial dimensions, locality-preserving gates are restricted to a set of unitary gates known as the D th level of the Clifford hierarchy. In this paper, we explore this idea further by providing several extensions and applications of their characterization to qubit stabilizer and subsystem codes. First, we present a no-go theorem for self-correcting quantum memory. Namely, we prove that a three-dimensional stabilizer Hamiltonian with a locality-preserving implementation of a non-Clifford gate cannot have a macroscopic energy barrier. This result implies that non-Clifford gates do not admit such implementations in Haah's cubic code and Michnicki's welded code. Second, we prove that the code distance of a D -dimensional local stabilizer code with a nontrivial locality-preserving m th -level Clifford logical gate is upper bounded by O (LD +1 -m) . For codes with non-Clifford gates (m >2 ), this improves the previous best bound by S. Bravyi and B. Terhal [New. J. Phys. 11, 043029 (2009), 10.1088/1367-2630/11/4/043029]. Topological color codes, introduced by H. Bombin and M. A. Martin-Delgado [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 180501 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.180501; Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 160502 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.160502; Phys. Rev. B 75, 075103 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.75.075103], saturate the bound for m =D . Third, we prove that the qubit erasure threshold for codes with a nontrivial transversal m th -level Clifford logical gate is upper bounded by 1 /m . This implies that no family of fault-tolerant codes with

  13. Phase diagram of fractional quantum Hall effect of composite fermions in multicomponent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Tőke, Csaba; Wójs, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-01-01

    While the integer quantum Hall effect of composite fermions manifests as the prominent fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) of electrons, the FQHE of composite fermions produces further, more delicate states, arising from a weak residual interaction between composite fermions. We study the spin phase diagram of these states, motivated by the recent experimental observation by Liu and co-workers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 246803 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.246803 and private communication] of several spin-polarization transitions at 4/5, 5/7, 6/5, 9/7, 7/9, 8/11, and 10/13 in GaAs systems. We show that the FQHE of composite fermions is much more prevalent in multicomponent systems, and consider the feasibility of such states for systems with N components for an SU(N ) symmetric interaction. Our results apply to GaAs quantum wells, wherein electrons have two components, to AlAs quantum wells and graphene, wherein electrons have four components (two spins and two valleys), and to an H-terminated Si(111) surface, which can have six components. The aim of this paper is to provide a fairly comprehensive list of possible incompressible fractional quantum Hall states of composite fermions, their SU(N ) spin content, their energies, and their phase diagram as a function of the generalized "Zeeman" energy. We obtain results at three levels of approximation: from ground-state wave functions of the composite fermion theory, from composite fermion diagonalization, and, whenever possible, from exact diagonalization. Effects of finite quantum well thickness and Landau-level mixing are neglected in this study. We compare our theoretical results with the experiments of Liu and co-workers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 246803 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.246803 and private communication] as well as of Yeh et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 592 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.592] for a two-component system.

  14. Impact of Duality Violations on Spectral Sum Rule analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catà, Oscar

    2007-02-01

    Recent sum rule analyses on the two-point correlator have led to significant discrepancies in the values found for the OPE condensates, most dramatically in the dimension eight condensate and to a lesser extent in the dimension six one [R. Barate et al., ALEPH Collaboration, Eur. Phys. J. C 4 (1998) 409; K. Ackerstaff et al., OPAL Collaboration, Eur. Phys. J. C 7 (1999) 571, arXiv:hep-ex/9808019; S. Peris, B. Phily and E. de Rafael, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 (2001) 14, arXiv:hep-ph/0007338; S. Friot, D. Greynat and E. de Rafael, JHEP 0410 (2004) 043, arXiv:hep-ph/0408281; M. Davier, L. Girlanda, A. Hocker and J. Stern, Phys. Rev. D 58 (1998) 096014, arXiv:hep-ph/9802447; B.L. Ioffe and K.N. Zyablyuk, Nucl. Phys. A 687 (2001) 437, arXiv:hep-ph/0010089. K.N. Zyablyuk, Eur. Phys. J. C 38 (2004) 215, arXiv:hep-ph/0404230; J. Bijnens, E. Gamiz and J. Prades, JHEP 0110 (2001) 009, arXiv:hep-ph/0108240; C.A. Dominguez and K. Schilcher, Phys. Lett. B 581 (2004) 193, arXiv:hep-ph/0309285; J. Rojo and J. I. Latorre, JHEP 0401 (2004) 055, arXiv:hep-ph/0401047; V. Cirigliano, E. Golowich and K. Maltman, Phys. Rev. D 68 (2003) 054013, arXiv:hep-ph/0305118; S. Ciulli, C. Sebu, K. Schilcher and H. Spiesberger, Phys. Lett. B 595 (2004) 359, arXiv:hep-ph/0312212. S. Narison, arXiv:hep-ph/0412152]. Precise knowledge of these condensates is of relevance in kaon decays [M. Knecht, S. Peris and E. de Rafael, Phys. Lett. B 457 (1999) 227, arXiv:hep-ph/9812471; J.F. Donoghue and E. Golowich, Phys. Lett. B 478 (2000) 172, arXiv:hep-ph/9911309; M. Knecht, S. Peris and E. de Rafael, Phys. Lett. B 508 (2001) 117, arXiv:hep-ph/0102017] and therefore it seems mandatory to assess the actual impact of what is commonly neglected in spectral sum rules, most prominently the issue of duality violations. We will explicitly compute them in a toy model and show that they are a priori non-negligible.

  15. Quantum-key-distribution protocols without sifting that are resistant to photon-number-splitting attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioso, Fabio; Grosshans, Frédéric

    2013-11-01

    We propose a family of sifting-less quantum-key-distribution protocols which use reverse reconciliation, and are based on weak coherent pulses (WCPs) polarized along m different directions. When m=4, the physical part of the protocol is identical to most experimental implementations of BB84 [Bennett and Brassard, in Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Computers, Systems, and Signal Processing (IEEE, New York, 1984)] and SARG04 [Scarani, Acín, Ribordy, and Gisin, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.92.057901 92, 057901 (2004); Acín, Gisin, and Scarani, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.69.012309 69, 012309 (2004)] protocols and they differ only in classical communications and data processing. We compute their total key rate as a function of the channel transmission T, using general information theoretical arguments, and we show that they have a higher key rate than the more standard protocols, both for fixed and optimized average photon number of the WCPs. When no decoy-state protocols (DSPs) [Hwang, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.91.057901 91, 057901 (2003); Lo, Ma, and Chen, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.94.230504 94, 230504 (2005); Wang, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.72.012322 72, 012322 (2005)] are applied, the scaling of the key rate with transmission is improved from T2 for BB84 to T1+(1)/(m-2). If a DSP is applied, we show how the key rates scale linearly with T, with an improvement of the prefactor by 75.96% for m=4. High values of m allow one to asymptotically approach the key rate obtained with ideal single-photon pulses. The fact that the key rates of these sifting-less protocols are higher compared to those of the aforementioned more standard protocols show that the latter are not optimal, since they do not extract all the available secret keys from the experimental correlations.

  16. Generalization of the time-dependent numerical renormalization group method to finite temperatures and general pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, H. T. M.; Costi, T. A.

    2014-02-01

    The time-dependent numerical renormalization group (TDNRG) method [Anders et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 196801 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.95.196801] offers the prospect of investigating in a nonperturbative manner the time dependence of local observables of interacting quantum impurity models at all time scales following a quantum quench. Here, we present a generalization of this method to arbitrary finite temperature by making use of the full density matrix approach [Weichselbaum et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 076402 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.076402]. We show that all terms in the projected full density matrix ρi →f=ρ+++ρ--+ρ+-+ρ-+ appearing in the time evolution of a local observable may be evaluated in closed form at finite temperature, with ρ+-=ρ-+=0. The expression for ρ-- is shown to be finite at finite temperature, becoming negligible only in the limit of vanishing temperatures. We prove that this approach recovers the short-time limit for the expectation value of a local observable exactly at arbitrary temperatures. In contrast, the corresponding long-time limit is recovered exactly only for a continuous bath, i.e., when the logarithmic discretization parameter Λ →1+. Since the numerical renormalization group approach breaks down in this limit, and calculations have to be carried out at Λ >1, the long-time behavior following an arbitrary quantum quench has a finite error, which poses an obstacle for the method, e.g., in its application to the scattering-states numerical renormalization group method for describing steady-state nonequilibrium transport through correlated impurities [Anders, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 066804 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.066804]. We suggest a way to overcome this problem by noting that the time dependence, in general, and the long-time limit, in particular, become increasingly more accurate on reducing the size of the quantum quench. This suggests an improved generalized TDNRG approach in which the system is time

  17. Electron-phonon superconductivity in APt3P (A=Sr, Ca, La) compounds: From weak to strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Alaska; Ortenzi, Luciano; Boeri, Lilia

    2013-04-01

    We study the newly discovered Pt phosphides APt3P (A=Sr, Ca, La) [T. Takayama , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.237001 108, 237001 (2012)] using first-principles calculations and Migdal-Eliashberg theory. Given the remarkable agreement with the experiment, we exclude the charge-density wave scenario proposed by previous first-principles calculations, and give conclusive answers concerning the superconducting state in these materials. The pairing increases from La to Ca and Sr due to changes in the electron-phonon matrix elements and low-frequency phonons. Although we find that all three compounds are well described by conventional s-wave superconductivity and spin-orbit coupling of Pt plays a marginal role, we show that it could be possible to tune the structure from centrosymmetric to noncentrosymmetric opening new perspectives towards the understanding of unconventional superconductivity.

  18. Experimental system design for the integration of trapped-ion and superconducting qubit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Motte, D.; Grounds, A. R.; Rehák, M.; Rodriguez Blanco, A.; Lekitsch, B.; Giri, G. S.; Neilinger, P.; Oelsner, G.; Il'ichev, E.; Grajcar, M.; Hensinger, W. K.

    2016-07-01

    We present a design for the experimental integration of ion trapping and superconducting qubit systems as a step towards the realization of a quantum hybrid system. The scheme addresses two key difficulties in realizing such a system: a combined microfabricated ion trap and superconducting qubit architecture, and the experimental infrastructure to facilitate both technologies. Developing upon work by Kielpinski et al. (Phys Rev Lett 108(13):130504, 2012. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.130504), we describe the design, simulation and fabrication process for a microfabricated ion trap capable of coupling an ion to a superconducting microwave LC circuit with a coupling strength in the tens of kHz. We also describe existing difficulties in combining the experimental infrastructure of an ion trapping set-up into a dilution refrigerator with superconducting qubits and present solutions that can be immediately implemented using current technology.

  19. Cellular senescence in the Penna model of aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periwal, Avikar

    2013-11-01

    Cellular senescence is thought to play a major role in age-related diseases, which cause nearly 67% of all human deaths worldwide. Recent research in mice showed that exercising mice had higher levels of telomerase, an enzyme that helps maintain telomere length, than nonexercising mice. A commonly used model for biological aging was proposed by Penna. I propose a modification of the Penna model that incorporates cellular senescence and find an analytical steady-state solution following Coe, Mao, and Cates [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.89.288103 89, 288103 (2002)]. I find that models corresponding to delayed cellular senescence have younger populations that live longer. I fit the model to the United Kingdom's death distribution, which the original Penna model cannot do.

  20. OPNMR measurements of electron spin polarization as a function of Landau filling factor around ν=1/3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Khandelwal, P.; Barrett, S. E.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1998-03-01

    Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements of the Knight Shift(S.E.Barrett et al.,Phys.Rev.Lett.72),1368(1994).^,footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995)^,footnote R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995) (K_S) of ^71Ga in two different electron doped multiple quantum well samples are presented. These are the first direct measurements of the electron spin magnetization around Landau Level ν=1/3. The talk will focus on the electron spin polarization in the range of filling factors around ν=1/3 and compare these results with existing models(Kamilla,Wu,Jain,Solid State Comm.99),283(1996). for quasiparticle excitations. First evidence for the breakdown of motional narrowing regime, probed by NMR, will be presented. The onset of such breakdown may be a result of localization of quasiparticles below ν=1/3. No evidence for a sharp phase transition is observed.

  1. Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance near Landau level fillings ν = 1/2 and ν = 2/3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Khandelwal, P.; Barrett, S. E.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1997-03-01

    Optical pumping enables the direct detection of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal of ^71Ga nuclei located in an electron doped GaAs quantum well.footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1368 (1994) Using this technique, measurements of the Knight shift (K_S)footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995) and spin-lattice relaxation time (T_1)footnote R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995) have been carried out in the Quantum Hall regimes. In this talk will present our recent measurements of KS and T1 near Landau level fillings ν = 1/2 and ν = 2/3, which were carried out in high magnetic fields (up to 12 Tesla) and at low temperatures (T < 1 Kelvin). We will discuss these results in light of our current understanding of the data obtained near ν = 1.

  2. Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance near Landau level filling ν = 1/3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, P.; Kuzma, N. N.; Barrett, S. E.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1997-03-01

    Optical pumping enables the direct detection of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal of ^71Ga nuclei located in an electron doped GaAs quantum well.footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1368 (1994) Using this technique, measurements of the Knight shift (K_S)footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995) and spin-lattice relaxation time (T_1)footnote R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995) have been carried out in the Quantum Hall regimes. In this talk will present our recent measurements of KS and T1 near Landau level filling ν = 1/3, which were carried out in high magnetic fields (up to 12 Tesla) and at low temperatures (T < 1 Kelvin). We will compare these results to the data obtained near ν = 1 and ν = 2/3.

  3. Two-Dimensional Ferromagnet: 1/N Expansion for SU(N) and O(N) Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Carsten; Henelius, Patrik; Girvin, Steven M.

    1997-03-01

    In the quantum Hall system the Zeeman interaction between electronic spins and the external magnetic field is typically weak compared to both the Landau-level splitting and the exchange interaction. Therefore, quantum Hall systems at integer filling factors can be ferromagnets. The magnetization and, recently, the nuclear magnetic relaxation rate 1/T1 have been measured for these magnets.(S.E. Barrett et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1368 (1994); 74, 5112 (1995) These quantities have been calculated in a Schwinger-boson mean-field approach.(N. Read and S. Sachdev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 3509 (1995) Going one step further, we calculate the 1/N corrections for these results, for both the SU(N) and the O(N) generalization of the SU \\cong O(3) ferromagnetic symmetry group. The results are compared with Monte Carlo results of our group and with experiment.

  4. Optically Pumped NMR in the Fractional Quantum Hall Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, S. E.; Kuzma, N. N.; Khandelwal, P.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    1998-03-01

    Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements are a local probe of the electron spin degree of freedom in n-type GaAs quantum wells.(S.E.Barrett et al.,Phys.Rev.Lett.72),1368(1994).^, footnote S. E. Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 5112 (1995)^, footnote R. Tycko et al., Science 268, 1460 (1995). We have recently shown that this OPNMR technique can be carried out in fields up to B=12 Tesla and temperatures down to T=0.3 K, making this technique a viable new probe of the Fractional Quantum Hall regime. We will discuss our latest measurements in these conditions, and compare our new results with previous measurements and the existing theoretical models for this regime.

  5. Two-Dimensional Ferromagnet: Quantum Monte Carlo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henelius, Patrik; Timm, Carsten; Girvin, Steven M.; Sandvik, Anders

    1997-03-01

    In the quantum Hall system the Zeeman interaction between electronic spins and the external magnetic field is typically weak compared to both the Landau-level splitting and the exchange interaction. Therefore, quantum Hall systems at integer filling factors can be ferromagnets. The magnetization and, recently, the nuclear magnetic relaxation rate 1/T1 have been measured for these magnets.(S.E. Barrett et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1368 (1994); 74, 5112 (1995) These quantities have been calculated in a Schwinger-boson mean-field approach.(N. Read and S. Sachdev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 3509 (1995) We have calculated these same quantities using a Stochastic Series Expansion Monte Carlo Method. The results are compared with the experimental data, the mean-field results and with 1/N corrections for the mean-field results, calculated by our group.

  6. Quantum RLC circuits: Charge discreteness and resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utreras-Díaz, Constantino A.

    2008-10-01

    In a recent article [C.A. Utreras-Díaz, Phys. Lett. A 372 (2008) 5059], we have advanced a semiclassical theory of quantum circuits with discrete charge and electrical resistance. In this work, we present a few elementary applications of this theory. For the zero resistance inductive circuit, we obtain the Stark ladder energies in yet another way; for the circuit driven by a combination d.c. plus a.c. electromotive force (emf) we generalize earlier results by Chandía et al. [K. Chandía, J.C. Flores, E. Lazo, Phys. Lett. A 359 (2006) 693]. As a second application, we investigate the effect of electrical resistance and charge discreteness, in the resonance conditions of a series RLC quantum circuit.

  7. Eavesdropping on quantum secure direct communication in quantum channels with arbitrarily low loss rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Quantum attacks that provide an undetectable eavesdropping of the ping-pong protocol operating over lossy quantum channels have already been demonstrated by Wójcik (Phys Rev Lett 90(15):157901, 2003) and Zhang et al. (Phys Lett A 333(12):46-50, 2004). These attacks provide a maximum information gain of 0.311 bits per protocol cycle as long as the induced loss rate remains acceptable. Otherwise, the skipping of some protocol cycles is advised to stay within an accepted loss limit. Such policy leads to a reduction in information gain proportional to the number of skipped cycles. The attack transformation parametrized by the induced loss ratio is proposed. It provides smaller reduction in information gain when the losses accepted by the communicating parties are too low to mount the most effective attack. Other properties of the attack remain the same.

  8. A simplified implementation of van der Waals density functionals for first-principles molecular dynamics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Gygi, François

    2012-06-01

    We present a simplified implementation of the non-local van der Waals correlation functional introduced by Dion et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)] and reformulated by Román-Pérez et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 096102 (2009)]. The proposed numerical approach removes the logarithmic singularity of the kernel function. Complete expressions of the self-consistent correlation potential and of the stress tensor are given. Combined with various choices of exchange functionals, five versions of van der Waals density functionals are implemented. Applications to the computation of the interaction energy of the benzene-water complex and to the computation of the equilibrium cell parameters of the benzene crystal are presented. As an example of crystal structure calculation involving a mixture of hydrogen bonding and dispersion interactions, we compute the equilibrium structure of two polymorphs of aspirin (2-acetoxybenzoic acid, C9H8O4) in the P21/c monoclinic structure.

  9. Loading a fountain clock with an enhanced low-velocity intense source of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, G.; Gerginov, V.; Weyers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present experimental work for improved atom loading in the optical molasses of a cesium fountain clock, employing a low-velocity intense source of atoms [Lu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 77, 3331 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3331], which we modify by adding a dark-state pump laser. With this modification the atom source has a mean flux of 4 ×108 atoms/s at a mean atom velocity of 8.6 m/s. Compared to fountain operation using background gas loading, we achieve a significant increase of the loaded and detected atom number by a factor of 40. Operating the fountain clock with a total number of detected atoms Nat=2.9 ×106 in the quantum projection noise-limited regime, a frequency instability σy(1 s ) =2.7 ×10-14 is demonstrated.

  10. Reconstruction of a neural network from a time series of firing rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikovsky, A.

    2016-06-01

    Randomly coupled neural fields demonstrate irregular variation of firing rates, if the coupling is strong enough, as has been shown by Sompolinsky et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 259 (1988)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.61.259. We present a method for reconstruction of the coupling matrix from a time series of irregular firing rates. The approach is based on the particular property of the nonlinearity in the coupling, as the latter is determined by a sigmoidal gain function. We demonstrate that for a large enough data set and a small measurement noise, the method gives an accurate estimation of the coupling matrix and of other parameters of the system, including the gain function.

  11. Pair neutron transfer in 60Ni+116Sn probed via γ -particle coincidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, D.; Corradi, L.; Szilner, S.; Pollarolo, G.; Goasduff, A.; Mijatović, T.; Bazzacco, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Bracco, A.; Charles, L.; Courtin, S.; Désesquelles, P.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Haas, F.; Hess, H.; Jelavić Malenica, D.; Jungclaus, A.; Karolak, M.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Montagnoli, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Salsac, M. D.; Scarlassara, F.; Söderström, P.-A.; Soić, N.; Stefanini, A. M.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C. A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Varga Pajtler, M.

    2016-05-01

    We performed a γ -particle coincidence experiment for the 60Ni + 116Sn system to investigate whether the population of the two-neutron pickup channel leading to 62Ni is mainly concentrated in the ground-state transition, as has been found in a previous work [D. Montanari et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 052501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.052501]. The experiment has been performed by employing the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer coupled to the Advanced Gamma Tracking Array (AGATA) demonstrator. The strength distribution of excited states corresponding to the inelastic, one- and two-neutron transfer channels has been extracted. We found that in the two-neutron transfer channel the strength to excited states corresponds to a fraction (less than 24%) of the total, consistent with the previously obtained results that the 2 n channel is dominated by the ground-state to ground-state transition.

  12. Random pinning limits the size of membrane adhesion domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Thomas; Vink, Richard L. C.

    2012-09-01

    Theoretical models describing specific adhesion of membranes predict (for certain parameters) a macroscopic phase separation of bonds into adhesion domains. We show that this behavior is fundamentally altered if the membrane is pinned randomly due to, e.g., proteins that anchor the membrane to the cytoskeleton. Perturbations which locally restrict membrane height fluctuations induce quenched disorder of the random-field type. This rigorously prevents the formation of macroscopic adhesion domains following the Imry-Ma argument [Imry and Ma, Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.35.1399 35, 1399 (1975)]. Our prediction of random-field disorder follows from analytical calculations and is strikingly confirmed in large-scale Monte Carlo simulations. These simulations are based on an efficient composite Monte Carlo move, whereby membrane height and bond degrees of freedom are updated simultaneously in a single move. The application of this move should prove rewarding for other systems also.

  13. Quantum Optics Theory of Electronic Noise in Coherent Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimsmo, Arne L.; Qassemi, Farzad; Reulet, Bertrand; Blais, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We consider the electromagnetic field generated by a coherent conductor in which electron transport is described quantum mechanically. We obtain an input-output relation linking the quantum current in the conductor to the measured electromagnetic field. This allows us to compute the outcome of measurements on the field in terms of the statistical properties of the current. We moreover show how under ac bias the conductor acts as a tunable medium for the field, allowing for the generation of single- and two-mode squeezing through fermionic reservoir engineering. These results explain the recently observed squeezing using normal tunnel junctions [G. Gasse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 136601 (2013); J.-C. Forgues et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 130403 (2015)].

  14. Variational method for nonconservative field theories: Formulation and two PT-symmetric case examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent publication [5 Galley, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 174301 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.174301], Galley proposed an initial value problem formulation of Hamilton's principle that enables consideration of dissipative systems. Here we explore this formulation at the level of field theories with infinite degrees of freedom. In particular, we illustrate that it affords a previously unwarranted and appealing as well as broadly relevant possibility, namely, to generalize the popular collective coordinate or variational method to open systems, i.e., nonconservative ones. To showcase the relevance or validity of the method we explore two case examples from the timely area of PT-symmetric variants of field theories, in this case for a sine-Gordon and for a ϕ4 model.

  15. Matching and funneling light at the plasmonic Brewster angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyropoulos, Christos; D'Aguanno, Giuseppe; Mattiucci, Nadia; Akozbek, Neset; Bloemer, Mark J.; Alù, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The ultrabroadband impedance matching of metallic gratings at the plasmonic Brewster angle [A. Alù , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.106.123902 106, 123902 (2011)] is analyzed here in several realistic scenarios and configurations, and in the case of nonmonochromatic excitation. This phenomenon is the analogy of the well-known Brewster transmission for dielectric slabs but, when applied to plasmonic gratings, has the remarkable property of funneling and concentrating light within subwavelength slits. We analyze here how the presence of absorption and of realistic substrates and/or superstrates may influence the phenomenon, its beamwidth and angular selectivity, and its overall performance in the case of broadband, ultrashort incident pulses in the time domain. We prove that broadband signals may be concentrated and transmitted almost unaffected through narrow apertures, even in the presence of absorption, very different from conventional extraordinary optical transmission based on resonant phenomena.

  16. Double sided surface stress cantilever sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, P. A.; Grigorov, A. V.; Boisen, A.

    2005-05-01

    Micromachined cantilevers, originally developed for use in atomic force microscopy, are gaining more and more interest as biochemical sensors, where the way in which the binding of chemical species changes the mechanical properties of the cantilever is utilized. Mass and stiffness changes are measured on resonating structures (Cherian and Thundat 2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 80 2219-21 Gupta et al 2004 Appl. Phys. Lett. 84 1976-8), whereas changes in surface energy from the binding event are measured as static deflections of cantilevers (Savran et al 2004 Anal. Chem. 76 3194-8). The latter measurement type is referred to as a surface stress sensor and it is the description of a new and more sensitive cantilever surface stress measurement technique that is the topic of this paper.

  17. Evidence for Nanoparticles in Microwave-Generated Fireballs Observed by Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. B. A.; Legarrec, J. L.; Sztucki, M.; Narayanan, T.; Dikhtyar, V.; Jerby, E.

    2008-02-01

    The small-angle x-ray scattering method has been applied to study fireballs ejected into the air from molten hot spots in borosilicate glass by localized microwaves [V. Dikhtyar and E. Jerby, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 96 045002 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.045002]. The fireball’s particle size distribution, density, and decay rate in atmospheric pressure were measured. The results show that the fireballs contain particles with a mean size of ˜50nm with average number densities on the order of ˜109. Hence, fireballs can be considered as a dusty plasma which consists of an ensemble of charged nanoparticles in the plasma volume. This finding is likened to the ball-lightning phenomenon explained by the formation of an oxidizing particle network liberated by lightning striking the ground [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 403, 519 (2000)10.1038/35000525].

  18. Evidence for nanoparticles in microwave-generated fireballs observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J B A; LeGarrec, J L; Sztucki, M; Narayanan, T; Dikhtyar, V; Jerby, E

    2008-02-15

    The small-angle x-ray scattering method has been applied to study fireballs ejected into the air from molten hot spots in borosilicate glass by localized microwaves [V. Dikhtyar and E. Jerby, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 045002 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.045002]. The fireball's particle size distribution, density, and decay rate in atmospheric pressure were measured. The results show that the fireballs contain particles with a mean size of approximately 50 nm with average number densities on the order of approximately 10(9). Hence, fireballs can be considered as a dusty plasma which consists of an ensemble of charged nanoparticles in the plasma volume. This finding is likened to the ball-lightning phenomenon explained by the formation of an oxidizing particle network liberated by lightning striking the ground [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)10.1038/35000525]. PMID:18352481

  19. Analysis of photon count data from single-molecule fluorescence experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzykowski, T.; Szubiakowski, J.; Rydén, T.

    2003-03-01

    We consider single-molecule fluorescence experiments with data in the form of counts of photons registered over multiple time-intervals. Based on the observation schemes, linking back to works by Dehmelt [Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 20 (1975) 60] and Cook and Kimble [Phys. Rev. Lett. 54 (1985) 1023], we propose an analytical approach to the data based on the theory of Markov-modulated Poisson processes (MMPP). In particular, we consider maximum-likelihood estimation. The method is illustrated using a real-life dataset. Additionally, the properties of the proposed method are investigated through simulations and compared to two other approaches developed by Yip et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 102 (1998) 7564] and Molski [Chem. Phys. Lett. 324 (2000) 301].

  20. Optimal-path cracks in correlated and uncorrelated lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, E. A.; Schrenk, K. J.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.

    2011-04-01

    The optimal path crack model on uncorrelated surfaces, recently introduced by Andrade [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.225503 103, 225503 (2009).], is studied in detail and its main percolation exponents computed. In addition to β/ν=0.46±0.03, we report γ/ν=1.3±0.2 and τ=2.3±0.2. The analysis is extended to surfaces with spatial long-range power-law correlations, where nonuniversal fractal dimensions are obtained when the degree of correlation is varied. The model is also considered on a three-dimensional lattice, where the main crack is found to be a surface with a fractal dimension of 2.46±0.05.

  1. Electronic Griffiths Phases and Quantum Criticality at Disordered Mott Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir

    2012-02-01

    The effects of disorder are investigated in strongly correlated electronic systems near the Mott metal-insulator transition. Correlation effects are foundootnotetextE. C. Andrade, E. Miranda, and V. Dobrosavljevic, Phys. Rev. Lett., 102, 206403 (2009). to lead to strong disorder screening, a mechanism restricted to low-lying electronic states, very similar to what is observed in underdoped cuprates. These results suggest, however, that this effect is not specific to disordered d-wave superconductors, but is a generic feature of all disordered Mott systems. In addition, the resulting spatial inhomogeneity rapidly increasesootnotetextE. C. Andrade, E. Miranda, and V. Dobrosavljevic, Phys. Rev. Lett., 104 (23), 236401 (2010). as the Mott insulator is approached at fixed disorder strength. This behavior, which can be described as an Electronic Griffiths Phase, displays all the features expected for disorder-dominated Infinite-Randomness Fixed Point scenario of quantum criticality.

  2. Quantum control of spin correlations in ultracold lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauke, P.; Sewell, R. J.; Mitchell, M. W.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a technique for the preparation of quantum spin correlations in a lattice gas of ultracold atoms using an atom-light interaction of the kind routinely employed in quantum spin polarization spectroscopy. Our method is based on entropic cooling via quantum nondemolition measurement and feedback, and allows the creation and detection of quantum spin correlations, as well as a certain degree of multipartite entanglement which we verify using a generalization of the entanglement witness described previously M. Cramer , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.106.020401 106, 020401 (2011). We illustrate the procedure with examples drawn from the bilinear-biquadratic Hamiltonian, which can be modeled by a one-dimensional chain of spin-1 atoms.

  3. Information flow during the quantum-classical transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, A. M.; Martin, M. T.; Plastino, A.; Zunino, L.

    2010-04-01

    We have exhaustively investigated the classical limit of the semi-classical evolution with reference to a well-known model that represents the interaction between matter and a given field. In this Letter we approach this issue by recourse to a new statistical quantifier called the “symbolic transfer entropy” [T. Schreiber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 (2000) 461; M. Staniek, K. Lehnertz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 (2008) 158101]. We encounter that the quantum-classical transition gets thereby described as the sign reversal of the dominating direction of the information flow between classical and quantal variables. This can be considered as an evidence of the physical useful of this new statistical quantifier.

  4. Experimental quantum error correction with high fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingfu; Gangloff, Dorian; Moussa, Osama; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-09-01

    More than ten years ago a first step toward quantum error correction (QEC) was implemented [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.81.2152 81, 2152 (1998)]. The work showed there was sufficient control in nuclear magnetic resonance to implement QEC, and demonstrated that the error rate changed from ɛ to ˜ɛ2. In the current work we reproduce a similar experiment using control techniques that have been since developed, such as the pulses generated by gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm. We show that the fidelity of the QEC gate sequence and the comparative advantage of QEC are appreciably improved. This advantage is maintained despite the errors introduced by the additional operations needed to protect the quantum states.

  5. Two-center approach to fully differential positron-impact ionization of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrov, A. S.; Bailey, J. J.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2014-01-01

    The two-center approach to positron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen is shown to follow from the exact post form of the breakup amplitude [Kadyrov, Bray, Mukhamedzhanov, and Stelbovics, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 230405 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.230405]. In such approaches distinct ionization amplitudes arise from each center for the same ionization process. The fully differential cross section for the positron-impact breakup of atomic hydrogen is calculated including direct ionization of the target and electron capture into the positronium continuum. We show that the coherent combination of the amplitudes leads to oscillations in the differential cross sections, whereas the incoherent combination does not. The latter has also the advantage of being consistent with the unitary close-coupling formalism.

  6. Short granular chain under vibration: Spontaneous switching of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.-C.; Fei, H.-T.; Huang, P.-C.; Juan, W.-T.; Huang, J.-R.; Tsai, J.-C.

    2016-03-01

    We study experimentally a short chain of N (≤8 ) loosely connected spheres bouncing against a horizontal surface that vibrates sinusoidally at intensity Γ . Distinct states are identified: a base state of uniform bouncing in-sync with the substrate prevails at low values of Γ , whereas increasing Γ can induce transitions to two excited states with appreciable storage of energy around one or both ends of the chain. We find that, in a transitional window of Γ , the chain can even switch spontaneously among states, resolving the mystery why different modes of motion can be initiated at the same position in our previous work along a gradient of vibration [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 058001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.058001]. Preliminary interpretations on the parametric dependences and the optimal frequency window for seeing these transitions are offered, based on the microscopic and statistical evidence in our experiments up to date.

  7. Nematic and blue phase liquid crystals for temperature stabilization and active optical tuning of silicon photonic devices (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna N.; Khoo, Iam Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-10-01

    We describe the underlying theories and experimental demonstrations of passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic devices clad in nematic liquid crystal mixtures, and active optical tuning of silicon photonic resonant structures combined with dye-doped nematic and blue phase liquid crystals. We show how modifications to the resonator device geometry allow for not only enhanced tuning of the resonator response, but also aid in achieving complete athermal operations of silicon photonic circuits. [Ref.: I.C. Khoo, "DC-field-assisted grating formation and nonlinear diffractions in methyl-red dye-doped blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 40, 60-63 (2015); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Enhanced optical tuning of modified-geometry resonators clad in blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 39, 5435-5438 (2014); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals," Materials 7(3), 2229-2241 (2014)].

  8. Simulating atomic force microscope images with density functional theory: The role of nonclassical contributions to the force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffhauser, Philipp; Kümmel, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    We discuss a scheme for calculating atomic force microscope images within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). As in earlier works [T. L. Chan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 176101 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.176101; M. Kim and J. R. Chelikowsky, Appl. Surf. Sci. 303, 163 (2014), 10.1016/j.apsusc.2014.02.127] we do not simulate the cantilever explicitly, but consider it as a polarizable object. We go beyond previous studies by discussing the role of exchange and correlation effects; i.e., we approximately take into account the Pauli interaction between sample and cantilever. The good agreement that we find when comparing our calculated images to experimental images for the difficult case of the 8-hydroxyquinoline molecule demonstrates that exchange-correlation effects can play an important role in the DFT-based interpretation of AFM images.

  9. Inner-shell electron effects in strong-field double ionization of Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zongqiang; Ye, Difa; Liu, Jie; Fu, Libin

    2016-06-01

    We investigate theoretically the inner-shell electron effects in strong-field double ionization of Xe by a comparative study with two different three-dimensional semiclassical models, i.e., the widely used helium-like model and an improved Green-Sellin-Zachor (GSZ) model. The enhanced double-ionization signals through sequential ionization and recollision-induced excitation with subsequent field ionization are identified as two origins of the nonstructured pattern in the correlated electron momentum spectrum observed in a recent experiment [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 103001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.103001]. The relationship between these enhancements and the inner-shell electrons is revealed by back analysis of the classical trajectories.

  10. Optimal control of the power adiabatic stroke of an optomechanical heat engine.

    PubMed

    Bathaee, M; Bahrampour, A R

    2016-08-01

    We consider the power adiabatic stroke of the Otto optomechanical heat engine introduced in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150602 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150602. We derive the maximum extractable work of both optomechanical normal modes in the minimum time while the system experiences quantum friction effects. We show that the total work done by the system in the power adiabatic stroke is optimized by a bang-bang control. The time duration of the power adiabatic stroke is of the order of the inverse of the effective optomechanical-coupling coefficient. The optimal phase-space trajectory of the Otto cycle for both optomechanical normal modes is also obtained. PMID:27627280

  11. Hierarchy of multipartite nonlocality in the nonsignaling scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Chengjie; Chen, Qing; Yu, Sixia; Yuan, Haidong; Oh, C. H.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a hierarchy of Bell-type inequalities for arbitrary n -partite systems that identifies the different degrees of nonlocality ranging from standard to genuine multipartite nonlocality. After introducing the definition of nonsignaling m locality, we show that the observed joint probabilities in any nonsignaling m -local realistic models should satisfy the (m -1 )th Bell-type inequality. When m =2 , the corresponding inequality reduces to the one shown earlier [Q. Chen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 140404 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.140404] whose violation indicates genuine multipartite nonlocality, and when m =n , the corresponding inequality is just Hardy's inequality whose violation indicates standard multipartite nonlocality. Furthermore, several examples are provided to demonstrate their hierarchy of multipartite nonlocality.

  12. Quantum correlations of identical particles subject to classical environmental noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggi, Andrea; Buscemi, Fabrizio; Bordone, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we propose a measure for the quantum discord of indistinguishable particles, based on the definition of entanglement of particles given in Wiseman and Vaccaro (Phys Rev Lett 91:097902, 2003. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.91.097902). This discord of particles is then used to evaluate the quantum correlations in a system of two identical bosons (fermions), where the particles perform a quantum random walk described by the Hubbard Hamiltonian in a 1D lattice. The dynamics of the particles is either unperturbed or subject to a classical environmental noise—such as random telegraph, pink or brown noise. The observed results are consistent with those for the entanglement of particles, and we observe that on-site interaction between particles have an important protective effect on correlations against the decoherence of the system.

  13. Classical simulation of infinite-size quantum lattice systems in two spatial dimensions.

    PubMed

    Jordan, J; Orús, R; Vidal, G; Verstraete, F; Cirac, J I

    2008-12-19

    We present an algorithm to simulate two-dimensional quantum lattice systems in the thermodynamic limit. Our approach builds on the projected entangled-pair state algorithm for finite lattice systems [F. Verstraete and J. I. Cirac, arxiv:cond-mat/0407066] and the infinite time-evolving block decimation algorithm for infinite one-dimensional lattice systems [G. Vidal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 070201 (2007)10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.070201]. The present algorithm allows for the computation of the ground state and the simulation of time evolution in infinite two-dimensional systems that are invariant under translations. We demonstrate its performance by obtaining the ground state of the quantum Ising model and analyzing its second order quantum phase transition. PMID:19113687

  14. Virtual topological insulators with real quantized physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodan, Emil

    2015-06-01

    A concrete strategy is presented for generating strong topological insulators in d +d' dimensions which have quantized physics in d dimensions. Here, d counts the physical and d' the virtual dimensions. It consists of seeking d -dimensional representations of operator algebras which are usually defined in d +d' dimensions where topological elements display strong topological invariants. The invariants are shown, however, to be fully determined by the physical dimensions, in the sense that their measurement can be done at fixed virtual coordinates. We solve the bulk-boundary correspondence and show that the boundary invariants are also fully determined by the physical coordinates. We analyze the virtual Chern insulator in 1 +1 dimensions realized in Y. E. Kraus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 106402 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.106402 and predict quantized forces at the edges. We generate a topological system in (3 +1 ) dimensions, which is predicted to have quantized magnetoelectric response.

  15. Parameter Space of Fixed Points of the Damped Driven Pendulum Susceptible to Control of Chaos Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmore, Andrew; Trail, Collin; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard J.

    2003-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated the experimental control of chaos in a Modified Taylor-Couette system with hourglass geometry( Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2340 (1999).. Identifying fixed points susceptible to algorithms for the control of chaos is key. We seek to learn about this process in the accessible numerical model of the damped, driven pendulum. Following Baker(Gregory L. Baker, Am. J. Phys. 63), 832 (1995)., we seek points susceptible to the OGY(E. Ott, C. Grebogi, and J. A. Yorke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64), 1196 (1990). algorithm. We automate the search for fixed points that are candidates for control. We present comparisons of the space of candidate fixed points with the bifurcation diagrams and Poincare sections of the system. We demonstrate control at fixed points which do not appear on the attractor. We also show that the control algorithm may be employed to shift the system between non-communicating branches of the attractor.

  16. Exact path integral for 3D quantum gravity. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Masazumi; Iizuka, Norihiro; Tanaka, Akinori; Terashima, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Continuing the work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 161304 (2015)], we discuss various aspects of three-dimensional quantum gravity partition function in anti-de Sitter spacetime in the semiclassical limit. The partition function is holomorphic and is the one which we obtained by using the localization technique of Chern-Simons theory in Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 161304 (2015). We obtain a good expression for it in the summation form over Virasoro characters for the vacuum and primaries. A key ingredient for that is an interpretation of boundary-localized fermion. We also check that the coefficients in the summation form over Virasoro characters of the partition function are positive integers and satisfy the Cardy formula. These give a physical interpretation that these coefficients represent the number of primary fields in the dual conformal field theory in the large k limit.

  17. Nonlocality of orthogonal product basis quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Gao, Fei; Tian, Guo-Jing; Cao, Tian-Qing; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we mainly study the local indistinguishability of mutually orthogonal product basis quantum states in the high-dimensional quantum systems. In the Hilbert space of 3⊗3, Walgate and Hardy [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 147901 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.89.147901] presented a very simple proof for nonlocality of nine orthogonal product basis quantum states which are given by Bennett et al. [Phys. Rev. A 59, 1070 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevA.59.1070]. In the quantum system of d⊗d, where d is odd, we construct d2 orthogonal product basis quantum states and prove these states are locally indistinguishable. Then we are able to construct some locally indistinguishable product basis quantum states in the multipartite systems. All these results reveal the phenomenon of "nonlocality without entanglement."

  18. Steady-state spin squeezing generation in diamond nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Xue-Feng

    2014-04-01

    As one kind of many body entangled states, spin squeezed states can be used to implement the high precise measurement beyond the standard quantum limit. Inspired by the novel spin squeezing scheme based on phonon-induced spin-spin interactions [S. D. Bennett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 156402 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.156402], we reexamine the steady-state behaviors for the spin ensemble in diamond nanostructures by exerting a controllable microwave field. By using the phase-space approach we calculate analytically fluctuations of collective spin operators. We find that there is bistability and spin squeezing for the steady-state spin ensemble, despite the mechanical damping considered. Moreover, our work shows that bistability and spin squeezing can be controlled by microwave field and Zeeman splitting. The present scheme can be used to increase the stability of spin clocks, magnetometers, and other measurements based on spin-spin interaction in diamond nanostructures.

  19. Electronic structure of assembled graphene nanoribbons: Substrate and many-body effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liangbo; Meunier, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    Experimentally measured electronic band gaps of atomically sharp straight and chevronlike armchair graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) adsorbed on a gold substrate are smaller than theoretically predicted quasiparticle band gaps of their free-standing counterparts [Linden , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.216801 108, 216801 (2012)]. The influence of the substrate on electronic properties of both straight and chevronlike GNRs is here investigated including many-body effects beyond semilocal density-functional theory. The predicted small electron transfer from a straight or chevronlike GNR to the gold surface is found to lead to a surface polarization at the GNR-metal interface responsible for a significant reduction of the quasiparticle band gap of the GNR. This reduction is quantified using a semiclassical image charge model. By considering both quasiparticle and surface polarization corrections, we obtain theoretical band gaps that are consistent with experimental ones for gold-supported GNRs.

  20. Doubly infinite separation of quantum information and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Wen; Perry, Christopher; Zhu, Yechao; Koh, Dax Enshan; Aaronson, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We prove the existence of (one-way) communication tasks with a subconstant versus superconstant asymptotic gap, which we call "doubly infinite," between their quantum information and communication complexities. We do so by studying the exclusion game [C. Perry et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 030504 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.030504] for which there exist instances where the quantum information complexity tends to zero as the size of the input n increases. By showing that the quantum communication complexity of these games scales at least logarithmically in n , we obtain our result. We further show that the established lower bounds and gaps still hold even if we allow a small probability of error. However in this case, the n -qubit quantum message of the zero-error strategy can be compressed polynomially.

  1. Photocatalytic Solar Fuel Generation on Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-03-01

    I will review our scientific work on photocatalytic solar fuel generation utilizing colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals decorated with catalytic metal clusters. In particular, nanocrystals made of CdS, TiO2 and organo-metal halide perovskites will be discussed. Key issues are the role of hole scavangers (M. Berr et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 223903 (2012)), the size and density of catalytic clusters (M. Berr et al.: Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 093108 (2010) and Nano Letters 12, 5903 (2012) , and dependencies on external parameters such as pH (T. Simon et al., Nature Mat. 13, 1013 (2014)). Financially supported by the Bavarian Research Cluster ``Solar Technologies Go Hybrid: SolTech''.

  2. Of bulk and boundaries: Generalized transfer matrices for tight-binding models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Vatsal; Chua, Victor

    2016-04-01

    We construct a generalized transfer matrix corresponding to noninteracting tight-binding lattice models, which can subsequently be used to compute the bulk bands as well as the edge states. Crucially, our formalism works even in cases where the hopping matrix is noninvertible. Following Hatsugai [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 3697 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.71.3697], we explicitly construct the energy Riemann surfaces associated with the band structure for a specific class of systems which includes systems such as Chern insulator, Dirac semimetal, and graphene. The edge states can then be interpreted as noncontractible loops, with the winding number equal to the bulk Chern number. For these systems, the transfer matrix is symplectic, and hence we also describe the windings associated with the edge states on Sp (2 ,R ) and interpret the corresponding winding number as a Maslov index.

  3. Measurement of High-Pressure Shock Waves in Cryogenic Deuterium-Tritium Ice Layered Capsule Implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Moody, J. D.; Celliers, P. M.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Parham, T.; Sater, J.; Mapoles, E. R.; Holunga, D. M.; Walters, C. F.; Haid, B. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Krauter, K. G.; Frieders, G.; Ross, G.; Bowers, M. W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Dzenitis, B.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Young, B.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Atherton, L. J.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Boehly, T. R.

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  4. Impact of microphysics on the growth of one-dimensional breath figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stricker, L.; Vollmer, J.

    2015-10-01

    Droplet patterns condensing on solid substrates (breath figures) tend to evolve into a self-similar regime, characterized by a bimodal droplet size distribution. The distributions comprise a bell-shaped peak of monodisperse large droplets and a broad range of smaller droplets. The size distribution of the latter follows a scaling law characterized by a nontrivial polydispersity exponent. We present here a numerical model for three-dimensional droplets on a one-dimensional substrate (fiber) that accounts for droplet nucleation, growth, and merging. The polydispersity exponent retrieved using this model is not universal. Rather it depends on the microscopic details of droplet nucleation and merging. In addition, its values consistently differ from the theoretical prediction by Blackman and Brochard [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4409 (2000), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4409]. Possible causes of this discrepancy are pointed out.

  5. Metamaterial-based lossy anisotropic epsilon-near-zero medium for energy collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Nian-Hai; Zhang, Peng; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2016-06-01

    A lossy anisotropic epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) medium may lead to a counterintuitive phenomenon of omnidirectional bending-to-normal refraction [S. Feng, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 193904 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.193904], which offers a fabulous strategy for energy collimation and energy harvesting. Here, in the scope of effective medium theory, we systematically investigate two simple metamaterial configurations, i.e., metal-dielectric-layered structures and the wire medium, to explore the possibility of fulfilling the conditions of such an anisotropic lossy ENZ medium by playing with materials' parameters. Both realistic metamaterial structures and their effective medium equivalences have been numerically simulated, and the results are in excellent agreement with each other. Our study provides clear guidance and therefore paves the way towards the search for proper designs of anisotropic metamaterials for a decent effect of energy collimation and wave-front manipulation.

  6. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    PubMed

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. PMID:23971581

  7. Landau-like states in neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Ågren, Hans; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We show the emergence of a new type of dispersion relation for neutral atoms with an interesting similarity to the spectrum of two-dimensional electrons in an applied perpendicular constant magnetic field. These neutral atoms can be confined in toroidal optical traps and give quasi-Landau spectra. In strong contrast to the equidistant infinitely degenerate Landau levels for charged particles, the spectral gap for such two-dimensional neutral particles increases in particular electric-field configurations. The idea in the paper is motivated by the development in cold atom experiments and builds on the seminal paper of Aharonov and Casher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 319 (1984), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.53.319].

  8. Rim instability of bursting thin smectic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trittel, Torsten; John, Thomas; Tsuji, Kinko; Stannarius, Ralf

    2013-05-01

    The rupture of thin smectic bubbles is studied by means of high speed video imaging. Bubbles of centimeter diameter and film thicknesses in the nanometer range are pierced, and the instabilities of the moving rim around the opening hole are described. Scaling laws describe the relation between film thickness and features of the filamentation process of the rim. A flapping motion of the retracting smectic film is assumed as the origin of the observed filamentation instability. A comparison with similar phenomena in soap bubbles is made. The present experiments extend studies on soap films [H. Lhuissier and E. Villermaux, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 054501 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.054501] to much thinner, uniform films of thermotropic liquid crystals.

  9. Dissociation dynamics of noble-gas dimers in intense two-color IR laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, M.; Thumm, U.

    2013-07-01

    We numerically model the dissociation dynamics of the noble-gas dimer ions He2+, Ne2+, Ar2+, Kr2+, and Xe2+ in ultrashort pump and probe laser pulses of different wavelengths. Our calculations reveal a distinguished “gap” in the kinetic energy spectra, observed experimentally for the Ar2 dimer [J. Wu , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.110.033005 110, 033005 (2013)], for all noble-gas dimers for appropriate wavelength combinations. This striking phenomenon can be explained by the dissociation of dimer ions on dipole-coupled Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic potential curves. Comparing pump-probe-pulse-delay-dependent kinetic-energy-release spectra for different noble-gas dimer cations of increasing mass, we discuss increasingly prominent (i) fine-structure effects in and (ii) classical aspects of the nuclear vibrational motion.

  10. Competition between α decay and cluster radioactivity for superheavy nuclei with a universal decay-law formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Hai Fei; Dong, Jian Min; Li, Jun Qing; Zhang, Hong Fei

    2014-06-01

    A recent proposed universal decay law (UDL) for α-decay and cluster radioactivity (CR) half-lives [C. Qi, F. R. Xu, R. J. Liotta, and R. Wyss, Phys. Rev. Lett 103, 072501 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.072501] that can accurately reproduce the experimental data was introduced starting from α-like R-matrix theory. The UDL formula depends only on the mass and charge numbers of the charged particle and the Q value. The new mass table AME2012 and the theoretical FRDM95, KTUY05, and WS2011 masses are used to determine the Q values. We systematically investigate the branching ratios of cluster radioactivity with respect to α decay for even-even superheavy nuclei (SHN) with Z =104-120 using the UDL formula. It is found that cluster radioactivity can be compared to α decay in neutron-rich SHN.