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Sample records for energy detection threshold

  1. Detection threshold energy of high energy cascade showers using thermoluminescence PTFE-sheet and hot-gas reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kino, S.; Nakanishi, A.; Miono, S.; Kitajima, T.; Yanagita, T.; Nakatsuka, T.; Ohmori, N.; Hazama, M.

    1985-01-01

    A new thermoluminescence (TL) sheet was developed as a detector for high energy components in air showers. For the investigation of detection threshold energy for a cascade showeer, TL sheets were exposed at Mt. Fuji with X ray films in emulsion chambers and were scanned by a hot-gas reader. It is concluded that if a gamma ray whose energy is more than 6 TeV enters vertically into lead chambers, the resulting cascade shower is readily detectable at maximum development.

  2. Double Threshold Energy Detection Based Cooperative Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio Networks with QoS Guarantee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hang; Yu, Hong; Zhang, Yongzhi

    2013-03-01

    Cooperative spectrum sensing, which can greatly improve the ability of discovering the spectrum opportunities, is regarded as an enabling mechanism for cognitive radio (CR) networks. In this paper, we employ a double threshold detection method in energy detector to perform spectrum sensing, only the CR users with reliable sensing information are allowed to transmit one bit local decision to the fusion center. Simulation results will show that our proposed double threshold detection method could not only improve the sensing performance but also save the bandwidth of the reporting channel compared with the conventional detection method with one threshold. By weighting the sensing performance and the consumption of system resources in a utility function that is maximized with respect to the number of CR users, it has been shown that the optimal number of CR users is related to the price of these Quality-of-Service (QoS) requirements.

  3. Improvement of the Mutation-Discrimination Threshold for Rare Point Mutations by a Separation-Free Ligase Detection Reaction Assay Based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Kenta; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Nakajima, Chinami; Esaki, Shinsuke; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a separation-free ligase detection reaction assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer from a donor quantum dot to an acceptor fluorescent dye. This assay could successfully detect one cancer mutation among 10 wild-type templates. In the current study, the mutation-discrimination threshold was improved by one order of magnitude by replacing the original acceptor dye (Alexa Fluor 647) with another fluorescent dye (Cyanine 5) that was spectrally similar but more fluorescent. PMID:26960620

  4. Detection thresholds for small haptic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosher, Jesse A.; Hannaford, Blake

    2002-02-01

    We are interested in finding out whether or not haptic interfaces will be useful in portable and hand held devices. Such systems will have severe constraints on force output. Our first step is to investigate the lower limits at which haptic effects can be perceived. In this paper we report on experiments studying the effects of varying the amplitude, size, shape, and pulse-duration of a haptic feature. Using a specific haptic device we measure the smallest detectable haptics effects, with active exploration of saw-tooth shaped icons sized 3, 4 and 5 mm, a sine-shaped icon 5 mm wide, and static pulses 50, 100, and 150 ms in width. Smooth shaped icons resulted in a detection threshold of approximately 55 mN, almost twice that of saw-tooth shaped icons which had a threshold of 31 mN.

  5. Sputtering Threshold Energies of Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, Maris A.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter erosion in ion thrusters has been measured in lifetests at discharge voltages as low as 25 V. Thruster operation at this discharge voltage results in component erosion rates sufficiently low to satisfy most mission requirements. It has been recognized that most of the internal sputtering in ion thrusters is done by doubly charged ions. Knowledge of the sputtering threshold voltage of a xenon molybdenum system would be beneficial in understanding the sputtering process as well as making more accurate calculations of the sputtering rates of ion thruster components. Sputtering threshold energies calculated from various formulations found in the literature results in values ranging from 28 to 200 eV. It is evident that some of these formulations cannot be relied upon to provide sputtering thresholds with any degree of accuracy. This paper re-examines the threshold energies measurements made in the early sixties by Askerov and Sena, and Stuart and Wehner. The threshold voltages as derived by Askerov and au have been reevaluated by using a different extrapolation method of sputter yields at low ion energies. The resulting threshold energies are in general similar to those measured by Stuart and Wehner. An empirical relationship is derived,for mercury and xenon ions for the ratio of the sputtering threshold energy to the sublimation energy as a function of the ratio of target to ion atomic mass.

  6. Energy Switching Threshold for Climatic Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is one of the great challenges facing humanity currently and in the future. Its most severe impacts may still be avoided if efforts are made to transform current energy systems (1). A transition from the global system of high Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission electricity generation to low GHG emission energy technologies is required to mitigate climate change (2). Natural gas is increasingly seen as a choice for transitions to renewable sources. However, recent researches in energy and climate puzzled about the climate implications of relying more energy on natural gas. On one hand, a shift to natural gas is promoted as climate mitigation because it has lower carbon per unit energy than coal (3). On the other hand, the effect of switching to natural gas on nuclear-power and other renewable energies development may offset benefits from fuel-switching (4). Cheap natural gas is causing both coal plants and nuclear plants to close in the US. The objective of this study is to measure and evaluate the threshold of energy switching for climatic benefits. We hypothesized that the threshold ratio of energy switching for climatic benefits is related to GHGs emission factors of energy technologies, but the relation is not linear. A model was developed to study the fuel switching threshold for greenhouse gas emission reduction, and transition from coal and nuclear electricity generation to natural gas electricity generation was analyzed as a case study. The results showed that: (i) the threshold ratio of multi-energy switching for climatic benefits changes with GHGs emission factors of energy technologies. (ii)The mathematical relation between the threshold ratio of energy switching and GHGs emission factors of energies is a curved surface function. (iii) The analysis of energy switching threshold for climatic benefits can be used for energy and climate policy decision support.

  7. Experimental and environmental factors affect spurious detection of ecological thresholds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daily, Jonathan P.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Smith, David; Snyder, Craig D.

    2012-01-01

    Threshold detection methods are increasingly popular for assessing nonlinear responses to environmental change, but their statistical performance remains poorly understood. We simulated linear change in stream benthic macroinvertebrate communities and evaluated the performance of commonly used threshold detection methods based on model fitting (piecewise quantile regression [PQR]), data partitioning (nonparametric change point analysis [NCPA]), and a hybrid approach (significant zero crossings [SiZer]). We demonstrated that false detection of ecological thresholds (type I errors) and inferences on threshold locations are influenced by sample size, rate of linear change, and frequency of observations across the environmental gradient (i.e., sample-environment distribution, SED). However, the relative importance of these factors varied among statistical methods and between inference types. False detection rates were influenced primarily by user-selected parameters for PQR (τ) and SiZer (bandwidth) and secondarily by sample size (for PQR) and SED (for SiZer). In contrast, the location of reported thresholds was influenced primarily by SED. Bootstrapped confidence intervals for NCPA threshold locations revealed strong correspondence to SED. We conclude that the choice of statistical methods for threshold detection should be matched to experimental and environmental constraints to minimize false detection rates and avoid spurious inferences regarding threshold location.

  8. Effect of model uncertainty on failure detection - The threshold selector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emami-Naeini, Abbas; Akhter, Muhammad M.; Rock, Stephen M.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of all failure detection, isolation, and accomodation (DIA) algorithms is influenced by the presence of model uncertainty. A unique framework is presented to incorporate a knowledge of modeling error in the analysis and design of failure detection systems. The tools being used are very similar to those in robust control theory. A concept is introduced called the threshold selector, which is a nonlinear inequality whose solution defines the set of detectable sensor failure signals. The threshold selector represents an innovative tool for analysis and synthesis of DIA algorithms. It identifies the optimal threshold to be used in innovations-based DIA algorithms. The optimal threshold is shown to be a function of the bound on modeling errors, the noise properties, the speed of DIA filters, and the classes of reference and failure signals. The size of the smallest detectable failure is also determined. The results are applied to a multivariable turbofan jet engine example, which demonstrates improvements compared to previous studies.

  9. Energy Detector Using a Hybrid Threshold in Cognitive Radio Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Ho; Hwang, Seung-Hoon; Hwang, Deok-Kyu

    Cognitive radio systems offer the opportunity to improve the spectrum utilization by detecting unused frequency bands while avoiding interference to primary users. This paper proposes a new algorithm for spectrum sensing, which is an energy detector using a hybrid (adaptive and fixed) threshold, in order to compensate the weak points of the existing energy detector in the distorted communication channel environment. Simulation results are presented which show that the performance of the new proposed scheme is better than the existing scheme using a fixed threshold or an adaptive threshold. Additionally, the performance is investigated in terms of several parameters such as the mobile speed and the probability of false alarms. The simulation results also show that the proposed algorithm makes the detector highly robust against fading, shadowing, and interference.

  10. Threshold detection in generalized non-additive signals and noise

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, D., LLNL

    1997-12-22

    The classical theory of optimum (binary-on-off) threshold detection for additive signals and generalized (i.e. nongaussian) noise is extended to the canonical nonadditive threshold situation. In the important (and usual) applications where the noise is sampled independently, a canonical threshold optimum theory is outlined here, which is found formally to parallel the earlier additive theory, including the critical properties of locally optimum Bayes detection algorithms, which are asymptotically normal and optimum as well. The important Class A clutter model provides an explicit example of optimal threshold envelope detection, for the non-additive cases of signal and noise. Various extensions are noted in the concluding section, as are selected references.

  11. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A.; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L.; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M.; Swanbeck, Sonja N.; Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism. PMID:25027164

  12. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M; Swanbeck, Sonja N; Conway, Bevil R

    2014-01-01

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism. PMID:25027164

  13. Modeling threshold detection and search for point and extended sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Melvin

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with three separate topics. 1)The Berek extended object threshold detection model is described, calibrated against a portion of Blackwell's 1946 naked eye threshold detection data for extended objects against an unstructured background, and then the remainder of Blackwell's data is used to verify and validate the model. A range equation is derived from Berek's model which allows threshold detection range to be predicted for extended to point objects against an un-cluttered background as a function of target size and adapting luminance levels. The range equation is then used to model threshold detection of stationary reflective and self-luminous targets against an uncluttered background. 2) There is uncertainty whether Travnikova's search data for point source detection against an un-cluttered background is described by Rayleigh or exponential distributions. A model which explains the Rayleigh distribution for barely perceptible objects and the exponential distribution for brighter objects is given. 3) A technique is presented which allows a specific observer's target acquisition capability to be characterized. Then a model is presented which describes how individual target acquisition probability grows when a specific observer or combination of specific observers search for targets. Applications for the three topics are discussed.

  14. Mammographic calcification cluster detection and threshold gold thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Cooke, J.; Given-Wilson, R.; Wallis, M. G.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2012-03-01

    European Guidelines for quality control in digital mammography specify acceptable and achievable standards of image quality (IQ) in terms of threshold gold thickness using the CDMAM test object. However, there is little evidence relating such measurements to cancer detection. This work investigated the relationship between calcification detection and threshold gold thickness. An observer study was performed using a set of 162 amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) detector images (81 no cancer and 81 with 1-3 inserted calcification clusters). From these images four additional IQs were simulated: different digital detectors (computed radiography (CR) and DR) and dose levels. Seven observers marked and rated the locations of suspicious regions. DBM analysis of variances was performed on the JAFROC figure of merit (FoM) yielding 95% confidence intervals for IQ pairs. Automated threshold gold thickness (Tg) analysis was performed for the 0.25mm gold disc diameter on CDMAM images at the same IQs (16 images per IQ). Tg was plotted against FoM and a power law fitted to the data. There was a significant reduction in FoM for calcification detection for CR images compared with DR; FoM decreased from 0.83 to 0.63 (p<=0.0001). Detection was also sensitive to dose. There was a good correlation between FoM and Tg (R2=0.80, p<0.05), consequently threshold gold thickness was a good predictor of calcification detection at the same IQ. Since the majority of threshold gold thicknesses for the various IQs were above the acceptable standard despite large variations in calcification detection by radiologists, current EU guidelines may need revising.

  15. A novel method for determining target detection thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, S.

    2015-05-01

    Target detection is the act of isolating objects of interest from the surrounding clutter, generally using some form of test to include objects in the found class. However, the method of determining the threshold is overlooked relying on manual determination either through empirical observation or guesswork. The question remains: how does an analyst identify the detection threshold that will produce the optimum results? This work proposes the concept of a target detection sweet spot where the missed detection probability curve crosses the false detection curve; this represents the point at which missed detects are traded for false detects in order to effect positive or negative changes in the detection probability. ROC curves are used to characterize detection probabilities and false alarm rates based on empirically derived data. It identifies the relationship between the empirically derived results and the first moment statistic of the histogram of the pixel target value data and then proposes a new method of applying the histogram results in an automated fashion to predict the target detection sweet spot at which to begin automated target detection.

  16. Retronasal smell and detection thresholds of iron and copper salts.

    PubMed

    Epke, Effie M; Lawless, Harry T

    2007-10-22

    Iron and copper salts, when placed in the mouth, may give rise to odorous compounds which complicate their functioning as chemical stimuli. The contribution of retronasal smell to perception of these metal salts at threshold has not been determined. Detection thresholds of the sulfate and chloride salts of ferrous iron and copper, and sodium chloride (as a control) were determined using a modified forced-choice ascending method of limits, with and without nasal occlusion. Threshold values were calculated from geometric means of individual estimates, and from interpolation on logistic regression and percent correct plots. Nasal occlusion raised thresholds for iron salts and copper but not sodium. The geometric mean detection thresholds with the nose open were 30, 64, 7.8, and 8.2 microM for FeSO(4), FeCl(2), CuSO(4), CuCl(2), respectively but rose to 160, 227, 24.6 and 15.6 with the nose closed. Metal salts of both iron and copper create a retronasally perceived olfactory stimulus at low concentration levels, probably arising from lipid oxidation products generated in the mouth. PMID:17532013

  17. Retronasal Smell and Detection Thresholds of Iron and Copper Salts

    PubMed Central

    Epke, Effie M.; Lawless, Harry T.

    2016-01-01

    Iron and copper salts, when placed in the mouth, may give rise to odorous compounds which complicate their functioning as chemical stimuli. The contribution of retronasal smell to perception of these metal salts at threshold has not been determined. Detection thresholds of the sulfate and chloride salts of ferrous iron and copper, and sodium chloride (as a control) were determined using a modified forced-choice ascending method of limits, with and without nasal occlusion. Threshold values were calculated from geometric means of individual estimates, and from interpolation on logistic regression and percent correct plots. Nasal occlusion raised thresholds for iron salts and copper but not sodium. The geometric mean detection thresholds with the nose open were 30, 64, 7.8, and 8.2 μM for FeSO4, FeCl2, CuSO4, CuCl2, respectively but rose to 160, 227, 24.6 and 15.6 with the nose closed. Metal salts of both iron and copper create a retronasally perceived olfactory stimulus at low concentration levels, probably arising from lipid oxidation products generated in the mouth. PMID:17532013

  18. Variable threshold method for ECG R-peak detection.

    PubMed

    Kew, Hsein-Ping; Jeong, Do-Un

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, a wearable belt-type ECG electrode worn around the chest by measuring the real-time ECG is produced in order to minimize the inconvenient in wearing. ECG signal is detected using a potential instrument system. The measured ECG signal is transmits via an ultra low power consumption wireless data communications unit to personal computer using Zigbee-compatible wireless sensor node. ECG signals carry a lot of clinical information for a cardiologist especially the R-peak detection in ECG. R-peak detection generally uses the threshold value which is fixed. There will be errors in peak detection when the baseline changes due to motion artifacts and signal size changes. Preprocessing process which includes differentiation process and Hilbert transform is used as signal preprocessing algorithm. Thereafter, variable threshold method is used to detect the R-peak which is more accurate and efficient than fixed threshold value method. R-peak detection using MIT-BIH databases and Long Term Real-Time ECG is performed in this research in order to evaluate the performance analysis. PMID:21695499

  19. Detection thresholds for 60 Hz electric fields by nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    Because responses of animals to detection of the presence of an electric field (EF) are a possible mechanism for production of biological effects, it is important to know what EF intensities are detectable. Operant methods were used to train six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) to perform a psychophysical task involving detection of EF presence. During the response phase of a trial, a subject responded on one push button to report the presence of the EF and on a different push button to report the absence of the EF. Correct reports of EF presence or absence produced delivery of food rewards. The subjects became proficient at performing this psychophysical detection task; during 35 days of testing, false alarm rates averaged 9%. The average EF detection threshold was 12 kV/m; the range of means among subjects was 5--15 kV/m. Two special test procedures confirmed that the subjects were responding directly to EF presence or absence and not to artifacts that might be associated with EF generation. The EF detection threshold of nonhuman primates is similar to thresholds reported for rats and humans.

  20. Milagro: A low energy threshold extensive air shower array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnis, Gus

    1995-07-01

    Observations of gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and radio pulsars by CGRO have revolutionized our view of the cosmos. Sources may pop into existence for a few milliseconds never to appear again and galaxies can change their luminosity by an order of magnitude within a few days. In addition to these space-based measurements, there have been at least 2 sources detected at even higher energies, ~1 TeV, using earth-bound detectors. To date, ground-based detectors of high-energy gamma rays with energy thresholds low enough to make credible detections have all had narrow fields of view and low duty factors. While these detectors are well suited to perform detailed studies of selected sources, they can not perform surveys of the entire sky with adequate sensitivity in a reasonable amount of time. We have designed a new type of ground-based gamma-ray detector with a low energy threshold, ~250 GeV, large aperture (~1 sr), and a duty factor greater than 90%-Milagro.

  1. Pregnancy does not affect human olfactory detection thresholds.

    PubMed

    Cameron, E Leslie

    2014-02-01

    Hyperosmia is suspected in pregnancy; however, no empirical study using validated measures of olfactory function has clearly confirmed the anecdotal reports of this phenomenon. The goal of the current study is to compare the olfactory sensitivity of pregnant women to that of nonpregnant women and men. All participants rated their sense of smell and pregnant women listed the odors to which they were most sensitive. Detection thresholds were measured using a well-validated protocol. A group of pregnant and nonpregnant women was studied longitudinally using a signal detection procedure designed to detect small differences in sensitivity. Pregnant women, particularly in the 1st trimester, rated their sense of smell to be higher than nonpregnant women and men and indicated many (primarily unpleasant) odors to which they were more sensitive. Women rated their sense of smell higher than men. However, there was no sex difference in thresholds and neither thresholds nor signal detection measures of sensitivity were significantly affected by either sex or pregnancy status. The implications of the lack of relationship between self-report and measures of olfactory sensitivity, particularly in pregnancy, are discussed. PMID:24302690

  2. Orion MPCV Touchdown Detection Threshold Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daum, Jared; Gay, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A robust method of detecting Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) splashdown is necessary to ensure crew and hardware safety during descent and after touchdown. The proposed method uses a triple redundant system to inhibit Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster firings, detach parachute risers from the vehicle, and transition to the post-landing segment of the Flight Software (FSW). An in-depth trade study was completed to determine optimal characteristics of the touchdown detection method resulting in an algorithm monitoring filtered, lever-arm corrected, 200 Hz Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) vehicle acceleration magnitude data against a tunable threshold using persistence counter logic. Following the design of the algorithm, high fidelity environment and vehicle simulations, coupled with the actual vehicle FSW, were used to tune the acceleration threshold and persistence counter value to result in adequate performance in detecting touchdown and sufficient safety margin against early detection while descending under parachutes. An analytical approach including Kriging and adaptive sampling allowed for a sufficient number of finite element analysis (FEA) impact simulations to be completed using minimal computation time. The combination of a persistence counter of 10 and an acceleration threshold of approximately 57.3 ft/s2 resulted in an impact performance factor of safety (FOS) of 1.0 and a safety FOS of approximately 2.6 for touchdown declaration. An RCS termination acceleration threshold of approximately 53.1 ft/s(exp)2 with a persistence counter of 10 resulted in an increased impact performance FOS of 1.2 at the expense of a lowered under-parachutes safety factor of 2.2. The resulting tuned algorithm was then tested on data from eight Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) flight tests, showing an experimental minimum safety FOS of 6.1. The formulated touchdown detection algorithm will be flown on the Orion MPCV FSW during the Exploration Flight Test 1

  3. Trend of contrast detection threshold with and without localization.

    PubMed

    Leong, David L; Rainford, Louise; Haygood, Tamara Miner; Whitman, Gary J; Geiser, William R; Adrada, Beatriz E; Santiago, Lumarie; Brennan, Patrick C

    2013-12-01

    Published information on contrast detection threshold is based primarily on research using a location-known methodology. In previous work on testing the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Grayscale Standard Display Function (GSDF) for perceptual linearity, this research group used a location-unknown methodology to more closely reflect clinical practice. A high false-positive rate resulted in a high variance leading to the conclusion that the impact on results of employing a location-known methodology needed to be explored. Fourteen readers reviewed two sets of simulated mammographic background images, one with the location-unknown and one with the location-known methodology. The results of the reader study were analyzed using Reader Operating Characteristic (ROC) methodology and a paired t test. Contrast detection threshold was analyzed using contingency tables. No statistically significant difference was found in GSDF testing, but a highly statistical significant difference (p value <0.0001) was seen in the ROC (AUC) curve between the location-unknown and the location-known methodologies. Location-known methodology not only improved the power of the GSDF test but also affected the contrast detection threshold which changed from +3 when the location was unknown to +2 gray levels for the location-known images. The selection of location known versus unknown in experimental design must be carefully considered to ensure that the conclusions of the experiment reflect the study's objectives. PMID:23503988

  4. Individual Differences Among Children in Sucrose Detection Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Paule Valery; Reed, Danielle R.; Mennella, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little research has focused on whether there are individual differences among children in their sensitivity to sweet taste and, if so, the biological correlates of such differences. Objectives Our goal was to understand how variations in children’s sucrose detection thresholds relate to their age and gender, taste genotype, body composition, and dietary intake of added sugars. Methods Sucrose detection thresholds in 7- to 14-year-old children were tested individually using a validated, two-alternative, forced-choice, paired-comparison tracking method. Five genetic variants of taste genes were assayed: TAS1R3 and GNAT3 (sweet genes; one variant each) and the bitter receptor gene TAS2R38 (three variants). All children were measured for body weight and height. A subset of these children were measured for the percentage of body fat and waist circumference and provided added sugar intake by 24-hour dietary recall. Results Sucrose thresholds ranged from 0.23 to 153.8 mM with most of the children completing the threshold task (216/235; 92%). Some children were biologically related (i.e., siblings), and for the genetic analysis, one sibling from each family was studied. Variants in the bitter but not the sweet genes were related to sucrose threshold and sugar intake; children with two bitter-sensitive alleles could detect sucrose at lower concentrations (F(2,165) = 4.55, p = .01; rs1726866) and reported eating more added sugar (% kcal; F(2, 62) = 3.64, p = .03) than did children with less sensitive alleles. Age, gender, and indices of obesity also were related to child-to-child differences in sucrose threshold; girls were more sensitive than boys (t(214) = 2.0, p = .05), older children were more sensitive than younger children (r(214) = −.16, p = .02), and fatter (r(84) = −.22, p = .05) or more centrally obese children (r(84) = −.26, p = .02) were more sensitive relative to others. Discussion Inborn differences in bitter sensitivity may affect childhood

  5. Spatially Varying Spectrally Thresholds for MODIS Cloud Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, S. L.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Lafontaine, F.

    2004-01-01

    The EOS science team has developed an elaborate global MODIS cloud detection procedure, and the resulting MODIS product (MOD35) is used in the retrieval process of several geophysical parameters to mask out clouds. While the global application of the cloud detection approach appears quite robust, the product has some shortcomings on the regional scale, often over determining clouds in a variety of settings, particularly at night. This over-determination of clouds can cause a reduction in the spatial coverage of MODIS derived clear-sky products. To minimize this problem, a new regional cloud detection method for use with MODIS data has been developed at NASA's Global Hydrology and Climate Center (GHCC). The approach is similar to that used by the GHCC for GOES data over the continental United States. Several spatially varying thresholds are applied to MODIS spectral data to produce a set of tests for detecting clouds. The thresholds are valid for each MODIS orbital pass, and are derived from 20-day composites of GOES channels with similar wavelengths to MODIS. This paper and accompanying poster will introduce the GHCC MODIS cloud mask, provide some examples, and present some preliminary validation.

  6. Fault-tolerant adaptive FIR filters using variable detection threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L. K.; Redinbo, G. R.

    1994-10-01

    Adaptive filters are widely used in many digital signal processing applications, where tap weight of the filters are adjusted by stochastic gradient search methods. Block adaptive filtering techniques, such as block least mean square and block conjugate gradient algorithm, were developed to speed up the convergence as well as improve the tracking capability which are two important factors in designing real-time adaptive filter systems. Even though algorithm-based fault tolerance can be used as a low-cost high level fault-tolerant technique to protect the aforementioned systems from hardware failures with minimal hardware overhead, the issue of choosing a good detection threshold remains a challenging problem. First of all, the systems usually only have limited computational resources, i.e., concurrent error detection and correction is not feasible. Secondly, any prior knowledge of input data is very difficult to get in practical settings. We propose a checksum-based fault detection scheme using two-level variable detection thresholds that is dynamically dependent on the past syndromes. Simulations show that the proposed scheme reduces the possibility of false alarms and has a high degree of fault coverage in adaptive filter systems.

  7. Crossmodal Integration Improves Sensory Detection Thresholds in the Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Engler, Gerhard; König, Peter; Engel, Andreas K.

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades ferrets (Mustela putorius) have been established as a highly efficient animal model in different fields in neuroscience. Here we asked whether ferrets integrate sensory information according to the same principles established for other species. Since only few methods and protocols are available for behaving ferrets we developed a head-free, body-restrained approach allowing a standardized stimulation position and the utilization of the ferret’s natural response behavior. We established a behavioral paradigm to test audiovisual integration in the ferret. Animals had to detect a brief auditory and/or visual stimulus presented either left or right from their midline. We first determined detection thresholds for auditory amplitude and visual contrast. In a second step, we combined both modalities and compared psychometric fits and the reaction times between all conditions. We employed Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) to model bimodal psychometric curves and to investigate whether ferrets integrate modalities in an optimal manner. Furthermore, to test for a redundant signal effect we pooled the reaction times of all animals to calculate a race model. We observed that bimodal detection thresholds were reduced and reaction times were faster in the bimodal compared to unimodal conditions. The race model and MLE modeling showed that ferrets integrate modalities in a statistically optimal fashion. Taken together, the data indicate that principles of multisensory integration previously demonstrated in other species also apply to crossmodal processing in the ferret. PMID:25970327

  8. Determination of odor detection threshold in the Gottingen minipig.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Lene Vammen; Holm, Ida E; Herskin, Mette S; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Johansen, Marianne G; Jørgensen, Arne Lund; Ladewig, Jan

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the ability of Göttingen minipigs to acquire an olfaction-based operant conditioning task and to determine the detection threshold for ethyl acetate and ethanol. We used an automated olfactometer developed for rodents to train and test 14 pigs. Odor sampling and reliable responding were obtained after three to fifteen 160-trial sessions. Successful transfer of the task from ethyl acetate to ethanol was achieved in 1-4 sessions. Detection threshold for ethyl acetate varied between 10(-2)% and 10(-6)% v/v and for ethanol between 0.1% and 5 × 10(-6)% v/v. The results provide evidence that minipigs can successfully acquire 2-odorant discrimination using a food-rewarded instrumental conditioning paradigm for testing olfactory function. This olfactory discrimination paradigm provides reliable measures of olfactory sensitivity and thereby enables detection of changes in olfaction in a porcine model of Alzheimer's disease currently being developed. PMID:20693277

  9. Orion MPCV Touchdown Detection Threshold Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daum, Jared; Gay, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A robust method of detecting Orion Multi ]Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) splashdown is necessary to ensure crew and hardware safety during descent and after touchdown. The proposed method uses a triple redundant system to inhibit Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster firings, detach parachute risers from the vehicle, and transition to the post ]landing segment of the Flight Software (FSW). The vehicle crew is the prime input for touchdown detection, followed by an autonomous FSW algorithm, and finally a strictly time based backup timer. RCS thrusters must be inhibited before submersion in water to protect against possible damage due to firing these jets under water. In addition, neglecting to declare touchdown will not allow the vehicle to transition to post ]landing activities such as activating the Crew Module Up ]righting System (CMUS), resulting in possible loss of communication and difficult recovery. A previous AIAA paper gAssessment of an Automated Touchdown Detection Algorithm for the Orion Crew Module h concluded that a strictly Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) based detection method using an acceleration spike algorithm had the highest safety margins and shortest detection times of other methods considered. That study utilized finite element simulations of vehicle splashdown, generated by LS ]DYNA, which were expanded to a larger set of results using a Kriging surface fit. The study also used the Decelerator Systems Simulation (DSS) to generate flight dynamics during vehicle descent under parachutes. Proto ]type IMU and FSW MATLAB models provided the basis for initial algorithm development and testing. This paper documents an in ]depth trade study, using the same dynamics data and MATLAB simulations as the earlier work, to further develop the acceleration detection method. By studying the combined effects of data rate, filtering on the rotational acceleration correction, data persistence limits and values of acceleration thresholds, an optimal configuration

  10. Ultrasonic flaw detection using threshold modified S-transform.

    PubMed

    Benammar, Abdessalem; Drai, Redouane; Guessoum, Abderrezak

    2014-02-01

    Interference noising originating from the ultrasonic testing defect signal seriously influences the accuracy of the signal extraction and defect location. Time-frequency analysis methods are mainly used to improve the defects detection resolution. In fact, the S-transform, a hybrid of the Short time Fourier transform (STFT) and wavelet transform (WT), has a time frequency resolution which is far from ideal. In this paper, a new modified S-transform based on thresholding technique, which offers a better time frequency resolution compared to the original S-transform is proposed. The improvement is achieved by the introduction of a new scaling rule for the Gaussian window used in S-transform. Simulation results are presented and show correct time frequency information of multiple Gaussian echoes under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environment. In addition, experimental results demonstrate better and reliable detection of close echoes drowned in the noise. PMID:24120270

  11. Dynamic multiple thresholding breast boundary detection algorithm for mammograms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yi-Ta; Zhou Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Daly, Caroline Plowden; Douglas, Julie A.; Zhang Yiheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Shi Jiazheng; Wei Jun

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Automated detection of breast boundary is one of the fundamental steps for computer-aided analysis of mammograms. In this study, the authors developed a new dynamic multiple thresholding based breast boundary (MTBB) detection method for digitized mammograms. Methods: A large data set of 716 screen-film mammograms (442 CC view and 274 MLO view) obtained from consecutive cases of an Institutional Review Board approved project were used. An experienced breast radiologist manually traced the breast boundary on each digitized image using a graphical interface to provide a reference standard. The initial breast boundary (MTBB-Initial) was obtained by dynamically adapting the threshold to the gray level range in local regions of the breast periphery. The initial breast boundary was then refined by using gradient information from horizontal and vertical Sobel filtering to obtain the final breast boundary (MTBB-Final). The accuracy of the breast boundary detection algorithm was evaluated by comparison with the reference standard using three performance metrics: The Hausdorff distance (HDist), the average minimum Euclidean distance (AMinDist), and the area overlap measure (AOM). Results: In comparison with the authors' previously developed gradient-based breast boundary (GBB) algorithm, it was found that 68%, 85%, and 94% of images had HDist errors less than 6 pixels (4.8 mm) for GBB, MTBB-Initial, and MTBB-Final, respectively. 89%, 90%, and 96% of images had AMinDist errors less than 1.5 pixels (1.2 mm) for GBB, MTBB-Initial, and MTBB-Final, respectively. 96%, 98%, and 99% of images had AOM values larger than 0.9 for GBB, MTBB-Initial, and MTBB-Final, respectively. The improvement by the MTBB-Final method was statistically significant for all the evaluation measures by the Wilcoxon signed rank test (p<0.0001). Conclusions: The MTBB approach that combined dynamic multiple thresholding and gradient information provided better performance than the breast boundary

  12. Thresholding Based on Maximum Weighted Object Correlation for Rail Defect Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingyong; Huang, Yaping; Liang, Zhengping; Luo, Siwei

    Automatic thresholding is an important technique for rail defect detection, but traditional methods are not competent enough to fit the characteristics of this application. This paper proposes the Maximum Weighted Object Correlation (MWOC) thresholding method, fitting the features that rail images are unimodal and defect proportion is small. MWOC selects a threshold by optimizing the product of object correlation and the weight term that expresses the proportion of thresholded defects. Our experimental results demonstrate that MWOC achieves misclassification error of 0.85%, and outperforms the other well-established thresholding methods, including Otsu, maximum correlation thresholding, maximum entropy thresholding and valley-emphasis method, for the application of rail defect detection.

  13. Detection Thresholds of Falling Snow from Satellite-Borne Active and Passive Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation, including rain and snow, is a critical part of the Earth's energy and hydrology cycles. In order to collect information on the complete global precipitation cycle and to understand the energy budget in terms of precipitation, uniform global estimates of both liquid and frozen precipitation must be collected. Active observations of falling snow are somewhat easier to estimate since the radar will detect the precipitation particles and one only needs to know surface temperature to determine if it is liquid rain or snow. The challenges of estimating falling snow from passive spaceborne observations still exist though progress is being made. While these challenges are still being addressed, knowledge of their impact on expected retrieval results is an important key for understanding falling snow retrieval estimations. Important information to assess falling snow retrievals includes knowing thresholds of detection for active and passive sensors, various sensor channel configurations, snow event system characteristics, snowflake particle assumptions, and surface types. For example, can a lake effect snow system with low (2.5 km) cloud tops having an ice water content (Iwe) at the surface of 0.25 g m-3 and dendrite snowflakes be detected? If this information is known, we can focus retrieval efforts on detectable storms and concentrate advances on achievable results. Here, the focus is to determine thresholds of detection for falling snow for various snow conditions over land and lake surfaces. The analysis relies on simulated Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) simulations of falling snow cases since simulations provide all the information to determine the measurements from space and the ground truth. Results are presented for active radar at Ku, Ka, and W-band and for passive radiometer channels from 10 to 183 GHz (Skofronick-Jackson, et al. submitted to IEEE TGRS, April 2012). The notable results show: (1) the W-Band radar has detection thresholds more

  14. The Impact of Thresholds in Cloud Detection Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Maddux, B. C.; Holz, R.; Frey, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites provides cloud properties with daily, global coverage from its broad spectral range (36 bands between 0.415-14.235 micron) at high spatial resolution (250 m for two bands, 500 m for 5 bands, 1000 m for 29 bands). These cloud properties are aggregated to produce climatologies and histograms that are used widely in observational studies, modeling applications, and further data production. Providing a measure of the cloud detection uncertainty is essential to its quality and proper use. The MODIS cloud mask algorithm includes several domains defined according to latitude, surface type, and solar illumination, including land, water, snow/ice, desert, and coast for both day and night. A series of spectral tests are applied to identify the presence of clouds. There are several groups of tests, with differing numbers of tests in each group depending on the domain. A clear-sky confidence level ranging from 1 (high) to 0 (low) is returned for each test. The minimum confidence from all tests within a group is taken to be representative of that group. The Nth root of the product of all the group confidences (Q) determines the final confidence, where N is the number of groups. Our objective is to quantify the sensitivity of the MODIS cloud detection to various factors included in the cloud mask algorithm- specifically surface type, seasonality and viewing geometry, as well as, traditional identified uncertainties like cloud cover heterogeneity. The challenge is that two or more of these factors frequently interact, producing combined uncertainties in the retrievals that cannot be quantified by calculating retrieval sensitivities to each factor separately. This presentation will present an assessment of uncertainty sources within the MODIS cloud mask products due to uncertainties in the cloud thresholding approach used in the algorithm. This is accomplished through statistical

  15. Enhancement of Visual Motion Detection Thresholds in Early Deaf People

    PubMed Central

    Shiell, Martha M.; Champoux, François; Zatorre, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    In deaf people, the auditory cortex can reorganize to support visual motion processing. Although this cross-modal reorganization has long been thought to subserve enhanced visual abilities, previous research has been unsuccessful at identifying behavioural enhancements specific to motion processing. Recently, research with congenitally deaf cats has uncovered an enhancement for visual motion detection. Our goal was to test for a similar difference between deaf and hearing people. We tested 16 early and profoundly deaf participants and 20 hearing controls. Participants completed a visual motion detection task, in which they were asked to determine which of two sinusoidal gratings was moving. The speed of the moving grating varied according to an adaptive staircase procedure, allowing us to determine the lowest speed necessary for participants to detect motion. Consistent with previous research in deaf cats, the deaf group had lower motion detection thresholds than the hearing. This finding supports the proposal that cross-modal reorganization after sensory deprivation will occur for supramodal sensory features and preserve the output functions. PMID:24587381

  16. Enhancement of visual motion detection thresholds in early deaf people.

    PubMed

    Shiell, Martha M; Champoux, François; Zatorre, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    In deaf people, the auditory cortex can reorganize to support visual motion processing. Although this cross-modal reorganization has long been thought to subserve enhanced visual abilities, previous research has been unsuccessful at identifying behavioural enhancements specific to motion processing. Recently, research with congenitally deaf cats has uncovered an enhancement for visual motion detection. Our goal was to test for a similar difference between deaf and hearing people. We tested 16 early and profoundly deaf participants and 20 hearing controls. Participants completed a visual motion detection task, in which they were asked to determine which of two sinusoidal gratings was moving. The speed of the moving grating varied according to an adaptive staircase procedure, allowing us to determine the lowest speed necessary for participants to detect motion. Consistent with previous research in deaf cats, the deaf group had lower motion detection thresholds than the hearing. This finding supports the proposal that cross-modal reorganization after sensory deprivation will occur for supramodal sensory features and preserve the output functions. PMID:24587381

  17. Signal Detection Theory Applied to Helicopter Transmission Diagnostic Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Keller, Jonathan A.; Wade, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) have potential for providing data to support increasing the service life of a dynamic mechanical component in the transmission of a helicopter. Data collected can demonstrate the HUMS condition indicator responds to a specific component fault with appropriate alert limits and minimal false alarms. Defining thresholds for specific faults requires a tradeoff between the sensitivity of the condition indicator (CI) limit to indicate damage and the number of false alarms. A method using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves to assess CI performance was demonstrated using CI data collected from accelerometers installed on several UH60 Black Hawk and AH64 Apache helicopters and an AH64 helicopter component test stand. Results of the analysis indicate ROC curves can be used to reliably assess the performance of commercial HUMS condition indicators to detect damaged gears and bearings in a helicopter transmission.

  18. Signal Detection Theory Applied to Helicopter Transmission Diagnostic Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Keller, Jonathan A.; Wade, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) have potential for providing data to support increasing the service life of a dynamic mechanical component in the transmission of a helicopter. Data collected can demonstrate the HUMS condition indicator responds to a specific component fault with appropriate alert limits and minimal false alarms. Defining thresholds for specific faults requires a tradeoff between the sensitivity of the condition indicator (CI) limit to indicate damage and the number of false alarms. A method using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves to assess CI performance was demonstrated using CI data collected from accelerometers installed on several UH60 Black Hawk and AH64 Apache helicopters and an AH64 helicopter component test stand. Results of the analysis indicate ROC curves can be used to reliably assess the performance of commercial HUMS condition indicators to detect damaged gears and bearings in a helicopter transmission.

  19. Research of adaptive threshold edge detection algorithm based on statistics canny operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Wang, Huaisuo; Huang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    The traditional Canny operator cannot get the optimal threshold in different scene, on this foundation, an improved Canny edge detection algorithm based on adaptive threshold is proposed. The result of the experiment pictures indicate that the improved algorithm can get responsible threshold, and has the better accuracy and precision in the edge detection.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of threshold displacement energies in zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Pedro A.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Yu, Jianguo; Weber, William J.

    2009-10-15

    Molecular-dynamics simulations were used to examine the displacement threshold energy (Ed) surface for Zr, Si and O in zircon using two different interatomic potentials. For each sublattice, the simulation was repeated from different initial conditions to estimate the uncertainty in the calculated value of Ed. The displacement threshold energies vary considerably with crystallographic direction and sublattice. The average displacement energy calculated with a recently developed transferable potential is about 120 and 60 eV for cations and anions, respectively. The oxygen displacement energy shows good agreement with experimental estimates in ceramics.

  1. Image boundaries detection: from thresholding to implicit curve evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balla-Arabé, Souleymane; Brost, Vincent; Yang, Fan

    2015-02-01

    The development of high dimensional large-scale imaging devices increases the need of fast, robust and accurate image segmentation methods. Due to its intrinsic advantages such as the ability to extract complex boundaries, while handling topological changes automatically, the level set method (LSM) has been widely used in boundaries detection. Nevertheless, their computational complexity limits their use for real time systems. Furthermore, most of the LSMs share the limit of leading very often to a local minimum, while the effectiveness of many computer vision applications depends on the whole image boundaries. In this paper, using the image thresholding and the implicit curve evolution frameworks, we design a novel boundaries detection model which handles the above related drawbacks of the LSMs. In order to accelerate the method using the graphics processing units, we use the explicit and highly parallelizable lattice Boltzmann method to solve the level set equation. The introduced algorithm is fast and achieves global image segmentation in a spectacular manner. Experimental results on various kinds of images demonstrate the effectiveness and the efficiency of the proposed method.

  2. Determination of the detection threshold for Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Nuclear Track Detector (NTD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, R.; Dey, S.; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Maulik, A.; Raha, Sibaji; Syam, D.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we investigated the detection threshold of the polymer material Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) intended to be used as Nuclear Track Detector (NTD) in the search for rare events (e.g. strangelets) in cosmic rays. 11 MeV 12C and 2 MeV proton beams from the accelerator at the Institute of Physics (IOP), Bhubaneswar were utilized for this study. The results show that the PET detector has a much higher detection threshold (Z / β ∼ 140) compared to many other commercially available and widely used detector materials like CR-39 (Z / β ∼ 6-20) or Makrofol (Z / β ∼ 57). This makes PET a particularly suitable detector material for testing certain phenomenological models which predict the presence of strangelets as low energy, heavily ionizing particles in cosmic radiation at high mountain altitudes.

  3. Threshold detection in an on-off binary communications channel with atmospheric scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    The optimum detection threshold in an on-off binary optical communications system operating in the presence of atmospheric turbulence was investigated assuming a poisson detection process and log normal scintillation. The dependence of the probability of bit error on log amplitude variance and received signal strength was analyzed and semi-empirical relationships to predict the optimum detection threshold derived. On the basis of this analysis a piecewise linear model for an adaptive threshold detection system is presented. The bit error probabilities for nonoptimum threshold detection systems were also investigated.

  4. Pooling optimal combinations of energy thresholds in spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Hamann, Elias; Runz, Armin; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2014-03-01

    Photon counting detectors used in spectroscopic CT are often based on small pixels and therefore offer only limited space to include energy discriminators and their associated counters in each pixel cell. For this reason, it is important to make efficient use of the available energy discriminators in order to achieve an optimized material contrast at a radiation dose as low as possible. Unfortunately, the complexity of evaluating every possible combination of energy thresholds, given a fixed number of counters, rapidly increases with the resolution at which this search is performed, and makes brute-force approaches to this problem infeasible. In this work, we introduce methods from machine learning, in particular sparse regression, to perform a feature selection to determine optimal combinations of energy thresholds. We will demonstrate how methods enforcing row-sparsity on a linear regression's coefficient matrix can be applied to the multiple response problem in spectroscopic CT, i.e. the case in which a single set of energy thresholds is sought to simultaneously retrieve concentrations pertaining to a multitude of materials in an optimal way. These methods are applied to CT images experimentally obtained with a Medipix3RX detector operated in charge summing mode and with a CdTe sensor at a pixel pitch of 110μm. We show that the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso), generalized to the multiple response case, chooses four out of 20 possible threshold positions that allow discriminating PMMA, iodine and gadolinium in a contrast agent phantom at a higher accuracy than with equally spaced thresholds. Finally, we illustrate why it might be unwise to use a higher number of energy thresholds than absolutely necessary.

  5. An Algorithm for 353 Odor Detection Thresholds in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Moreno, Ricardo; Cometto-Muñiz, J. Enrique; Cain, William S.

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and ninety three odor detection thresholds, ODTs, obtained by Nagata using the Japanese triangular bag method can be correlated as log (1/ODT) by a linear equation with R2 = 0.748 and a standard deviation, SD, of 0.830 log units; the latter may be compared with our estimate of 0.66 log units for the self-consistency of Nagata's data. Aldehydes, acids, unsaturated esters, and mercaptans were included in the equation through indicator variables that took into account the higher potency of these compounds. The ODTs obtained by Cometto-Muñiz and Cain, by Cometto-Muñiz and Abraham, and by Hellman and Small could be put on the same scale as those of Nagata to yield a linear equation for 353 ODTs with R2 = 0.759 and SD = 0.819 log units. The compound descriptors are available for several thousand compounds, and can be calculated from structure, so that further ODT values on the Nagata scale can be predicted for a host of volatile or semivolatile compounds. PMID:21976369

  6. Threshold energy for sub-barrier fusion hindrance phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.; Zhang, H. Q.

    2013-02-01

    The relationship between the threshold energy for a deep sub-barrier fusion hindrance phenomenon and the energy at which the regime of interaction changes (the turning-off of the nuclear forces and friction) in the sub-barrier capture process is studied within the quantum diffusion approach. The quasielastic barrier distribution is shown to be a useful tool to clarify whether the slope of capture cross section changes at sub-barrier energies.

  7. Lowering the Gamma Ray Energy Threshold at Thaemis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David A.; Fleury, Patrick; Parae, Eric; Quebert, Jean

    1994-12-01

    The power-law spectra of the 0.1 < E_gamma < 30 GeV point sources detected by EGRET on the Compton GRO have softened at the energies of the atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (E_gamma > 300 GeV), to the point that only one AGN and two pulsars are visible with current ground-based instruments. Measurement of the spectra in the roll-over range probes details of pulsar and AGN acceleration models, and probes extragalactic infrared photon densities through the absorption of gamma rays. Measurement requires lowering the ground-based energy thresholds to the Egret energy range, and several groups are studying the design of a very large area mirror or mirror array (few thousand M(2) ). Solar power plants built in the 1980's to focus sunlight on boilers in central receiver towers may provide the basic instrument at low cost. This talk describes efforts to use the solar farm at Th\\a'emis in the French Pyrenees for a proof-of-principle prototype for a large area Cherenkov telescope. (Similar feasibility studies are underway at the Solar One site in southern California.) Simulations show that cosmic ray backgrounds mostly vanish below 50 GeV. Electron backgrounds can be reduced by optimizing angular resolution. Excellent flux sensitivity should be obtainable. Secondary optics and electronic timing corrections have been studied and tests to measure Cherenkov pulses will be made this winter. The tests will complement data from the ASGAT and THEMISTOCLE experiments and from the CAT imaging telescope now under construction at Th\\a'emis.

  8. Colour detection thresholds in faces and colour patches.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok Wei; Stephen, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    Human facial skin colour reflects individuals' underlying health (Stephen et al 2011 Evolution & Human Behavior 32 216-227); and enhanced facial skin CIELab b* (yellowness), a* (redness), and L* (lightness) are perceived as healthy (also Stephen et al 2009a International Journal of Primatology 30 845-857). Here, we examine Malaysian Chinese participants' detection thresholds for CIELab L* (lightness), a* (redness), and b* (yellowness) colour changes in Asian, African, and Caucasian faces and skin coloured patches. Twelve face photos and three skin coloured patches were transformed to produce four pairs of images of each individual face and colour patch with different amounts of red, yellow, or lightness, from very subtle (deltaE = 1.2) to quite large differences (deltaE = 9.6). Participants were asked to decide which of sequentially displayed, paired same-face images or colour patches were lighter, redder, or yellower. Changes in facial redness, followed by changes in yellowness, were more easily discriminated than changes in luminance. However, visual sensitivity was not greater for redness and yellowness in nonface stimuli, suggesting red facial skin colour special salience. Participants were also significantly better at recognizing colour differences in own-race (Asian) and Caucasian faces than in African faces, suggesting the existence of cross-race effect in discriminating facial colours. Humans' colour vision may have been selected for skin colour signalling (Changizi et al 2006 Biology Letters 2 217-221), enabling individuals to perceive subtle changes in skin colour, reflecting health and emotional status. PMID:24344549

  9. Detection and Modeling of High-Dimensional Thresholds for Fault Detection and Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yuning

    2015-01-01

    Many Fault Detection and Diagnosis (FDD) systems use discrete models for detection and reasoning. To obtain categorical values like oil pressure too high, analog sensor values need to be discretized using a suitablethreshold. Time series of analog and discrete sensor readings are processed and discretized as they come in. This task isusually performed by the wrapper code'' of the FDD system, together with signal preprocessing and filtering. In practice,selecting the right threshold is very difficult, because it heavily influences the quality of diagnosis. If a threshold causesthe alarm trigger even in nominal situations, false alarms will be the consequence. On the other hand, if threshold settingdoes not trigger in case of an off-nominal condition, important alarms might be missed, potentially causing hazardoussituations. In this paper, we will in detail describe the underlying statistical modeling techniques and algorithm as well as the Bayesian method for selecting the most likely shape and its parameters. Our approach will be illustrated by several examples from the Aerospace domain.

  10. Optimizing the rapid measurement of detection thresholds in infants

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Pete R.; Kalwarowsky, Sarah; Braddick, Oliver J.; Atkinson, Janette; Nardini, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measures of perceptual threshold are difficult to obtain in infants. In a clinical context, the challenges are particularly acute because the methods must yield meaningful results quickly and within a single individual. The present work considers how best to maximize speed, accuracy, and reliability when testing infants behaviorally and suggests some simple principles for improving test efficiency. Monte Carlo simulations, together with empirical (visual acuity) data from 65 infants, are used to demonstrate how psychophysical methods developed with adults can produce misleading results when applied to infants. The statistical properties of an effective clinical infant test are characterized, and based on these, it is shown that (a) a reduced (false-positive) guessing rate can greatly increase test efficiency, (b) the ideal threshold to target is often below 50% correct, and (c) simply taking the max correct response can often provide the best measure of an infant's perceptual sensitivity. PMID:26237298

  11. Setting objective thresholds for rare event detection in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Richards, Adam J; Staats, Janet; Enzor, Jennifer; McKinnon, Katherine; Frelinger, Jacob; Denny, Thomas N; Weinhold, Kent J; Chan, Cliburn

    2014-07-01

    The accurate identification of rare antigen-specific cytokine positive cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after antigenic stimulation in an intracellular staining (ICS) flow cytometry assay is challenging, as cytokine positive events may be fairly diffusely distributed and lack an obvious separation from the negative population. Traditionally, the approach by flow operators has been to manually set a positivity threshold to partition events into cytokine-positive and cytokine-negative. This approach suffers from subjectivity and inconsistency across different flow operators. The use of statistical clustering methods does not remove the need to find an objective threshold between between positive and negative events since consistent identification of rare event subsets is highly challenging for automated algorithms, especially when there is distributional overlap between the positive and negative events ("smear"). We present a new approach, based on the Fβ measure, that is similar to manual thresholding in providing a hard cutoff, but has the advantage of being determined objectively. The performance of this algorithm is compared with results obtained by expert visual gating. Several ICS data sets from the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL) proficiency program were used to make the comparisons. We first show that visually determined thresholds are difficult to reproduce and pose a problem when comparing results across operators or laboratories, as well as problems that occur with the use of commonly employed clustering algorithms. In contrast, a single parameterization for the Fβ method performs consistently across different centers, samples, and instruments because it optimizes the precision/recall tradeoff by using both negative and positive controls. PMID:24727143

  12. Pressure Systems Stored-Energy Threshold Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Samuel S.

    2009-08-25

    Federal Regulation 10 CFR 851, which became effective February 2007, brought to light potential weaknesses regarding the Pressure Safety Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The definition of a pressure system in 10 CFR 851 does not contain a limit based upon pressure or any other criteria. Therefore, the need for a method to determine an appropriate risk-based hazard level for pressure safety was identified. The Laboratory has historically used a stored energy of 1000 lbf-ft to define a pressure hazard; however, an analytical basis for this value had not been documented. This document establishes the technical basis by evaluating the use of stored energy as an appropriate criterion to establish a pressure hazard, exploring a suitable risk threshold for pressure hazards, and reviewing the methods used to determine stored energy. The literature review and technical analysis concludes the use of stored energy as a method for determining a potential risk, the 1000 lbf-ft threshold, and the methods used by PNNL to calculate stored energy are all appropriate. Recommendations for further program improvements are also discussed

  13. Age-related changes in neural gap detection thresholds in the rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yin; Xu, Xiaoxiao; He, Juan; Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Jiping

    2015-02-01

    The ability of the auditory system to resolve sound temporal information is crucial for the understanding of human speech and other species-specific communications. Gap detection threshold, i.e. the ability to detect the shortest duration of a silent interval in a sound, is commonly used to study the auditory temporal resolution. Behavioral studies in humans and rats have shown that normal developing infants have higher gap detection thresholds than adults; however, the underlying neural mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, we determined and compared the neural gap detection thresholds in the primary auditory cortex of three age groups of rats: the juvenile group (postnatal day 20-30), adult group I (8-10 weeks), and adult group II (28-30 weeks). We found age-related changes in auditory temporal acuity in the auditory cortex, i.e. the proportion of cortical units with short neural gap detection thresholds (< 5 ms) was much lower in juvenile groups compared with that in both adult groups at a constant sound level, and no significant differences in neural gap detection thresholds were found between the two adult groups. In addition, units in the auditory cortex of each group generally showed better gap detection thresholds at higher sound levels than at lower sound levels, exhibiting a level-dependent temporal acuity. These results provided evidence for neural correlates of age-related changes in behavioral gap detection ability during postnatal hearing development. PMID:25388865

  14. Detection Thresholds of Falling Snow from Satellite-Borne Active and Passive Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Johnson, Benjamin T.; Munchak, S. Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation, including rain and snow, is a critical part of the Earth's energy and hydrology cycles. Precipitation impacts latent heating profiles locally while global circulation patterns distribute precipitation and energy from the equator to the poles. For the hydrological cycle, falling snow is a primary contributor in northern latitudes during the winter seasons. Falling snow is the source of snow pack accumulations that provide fresh water resources for many communities in the world. Furthermore, falling snow impacts society by causing transportation disruptions during severe snow events. In order to collect information on the complete global precipitation cycle, both liquid and frozen precipitation must be collected. The challenges of estimating falling snow from space still exist though progress is being made. These challenges include weak falling snow signatures with respect to background (surface, water vapor) signatures for passive sensors over land surfaces, unknowns about the spherical and non-spherical shapes of the snowflakes, their particle size distributions (PSDs) and how the assumptions about the unknowns impact observed brightness temperatures or radar reflectivities, differences in near surface snowfall and total column snow amounts, and limited ground truth to validate against. While these challenges remain, knowledge of their impact on expected retrieval results is an important key for understanding falling snow retrieval estimations. Since falling snow from space is the next precipitation measurement challenge from space, information must be determined in order to guide retrieval algorithm development for these current and future missions. This information includes thresholds of detection for various sensor channel configurations, snow event system characteristics, snowflake particle assumptions, and surface types. For example, can a lake effect snow system with low (approx 2.5 km) cloud tops having an ice water content (IWC) at the

  15. Determining the detection thresholds for harbor porpoise clicks of autonomous data loggers, the Timing Porpoise Detectors.

    PubMed

    Verfuß, Ursula K; Dähne, Michael; Gallus, Anja; Jabbusch, Martin; Benke, Harald

    2013-09-01

    Timing Porpoise Detectors (T-PODs, Chelonia Ltd.) are autonomous passive acoustic devices for monitoring odontocetes. They register the time of occurrence and duration of high frequency pulsed sounds as possible odontocetes echolocation clicks. Because of evolution, five T-POD versions exist. Although the manufacturer replaced those by a digital successor, the C-POD, T-PODs are still used, and data from many field studies exist. Characterizing the acoustic properties of T-PODs enables the interpretation of data obtained with different devices. Here, the detection thresholds of different T-POD versions for harbor porpoise clicks were determined. While thresholds among devices were quite variable in the first T-POD generations, they became more standardized in newer versions. Furthermore, the influence of user-controlled settings on the threshold was investigated. From version 3 on, the detection threshold was found to be easily adjustable with version-dependent setting options "minimum intensity" and "sensitivity," enabling the presetting of standard thresholds. In version 4, the setting "click bandwidth" had a strong influence on the detection threshold, while "selectivity" in version 3 and "noise adaptation = ON" or "OFF" in version 4 hardly influenced thresholds obtained in the tank tests. Nevertheless, the latter setting may influence thresholds in a complex acoustic environment like the sea. PMID:23968043

  16. A Bispectral Composite Threshold Approach for Automatic Cloud Detection in VIIRS Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaFontaine Frank J.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of clouds in satellite imagery has a number of important applications in weather and climate studies. The presence of clouds can alter the energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system through scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation and the absorption and re-emission of infrared radiation at longer wavelengths. The scattering and absorption characteristics of clouds vary with the microphysical properties of clouds, hence the cloud type. Thus, detecting the presence of clouds over a region in satellite imagery is important in order to derive atmospheric or surface parameters that give insight into weather and climate processes. For many applications however, clouds are a contaminant whose presence interferes with retrieving atmosphere or surface information. In these cases, is important to isolate cloud-free pixels, used to retrieve atmospheric thermodynamic information or surface geophysical parameters, from cloudy ones. This abstract describes an application of a two-channel bispectral composite threshold (BCT) approach applied to VIIRS imagery. The simplified BCT approach uses only the 10.76 and 3.75 micrometer spectral channels from VIIRS in two spectral tests; a straight-forward infrared threshold test with the longwave channel and a shortwave - longwave channel difference test. The key to the success of this approach as demonstrated in past applications to GOES and MODIS data is the generation of temporally and spatially dependent thresholds used in the tests from a previous number of days at similar observations to the current data. The paper and subsequent presentation will present an overview of the approach and intercomparison results with other satellites, methods, and against verification data.

  17. Threshold LET for SEU induced by low energy ions

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, P.J.; Roche, P.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J.

    1999-12-01

    Simulations to determine the threshold LET as a function of the length of the ion track are consistent with there being two regions of charge collection. In the top layer which contains the depletion region all the charge generated is collected in time to upset the device. In the next layer, 10% to 20% of the charge generated is collected and contributes to upsetting the device. This second layer of partial charge collection may significantly impact the accuracy of SEU predictions involving low-energy neutrons and protons. A simple method of including this contribution in calculations is proposed.

  18. Dependence of Nociceptive Detection Thresholds on Physiological Parameters and Capsaicin-Induced Neuroplasticity: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Meijer, Hil G. E.; Doll, Robert J.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; van Gils, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    Physiological properties of peripheral and central nociceptive subsystems can be altered over time due to medical interventions. The effective change for the whole nociceptive system can be reflected in changes of psychophysical characteristics, e.g., detection thresholds. However, it is challenging to separate contributions of distinct altered mechanisms with measurements of thresholds only. Here, we aim to understand how these alterations affect Aδ-fiber-mediated nociceptive detection of electrocutaneous stimuli. First, with a neurophysiology-based model, we study the effects of single-model parameters on detection thresholds. Second, we derive an expression of model parameters determining the functional relationship between detection thresholds and the interpulse interval for double-pulse stimuli. Third, in a case study with topical capsaicin treatment, we translate neuroplasticity into plausible changes of model parameters. Model simulations qualitatively agree with changes in experimental detection thresholds. The simulations with individual forms of neuroplasticity confirm that nerve degeneration is the dominant mechanism for capsaicin-induced increases in detection thresholds. In addition, our study suggests that capsaicin-induced central plasticity may last at least 1 month. PMID:27252644

  19. Dependence of Nociceptive Detection Thresholds on Physiological Parameters and Capsaicin-Induced Neuroplasticity: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Meijer, Hil G E; Doll, Robert J; Buitenweg, Jan R; van Gils, Stephan A

    2016-01-01

    Physiological properties of peripheral and central nociceptive subsystems can be altered over time due to medical interventions. The effective change for the whole nociceptive system can be reflected in changes of psychophysical characteristics, e.g., detection thresholds. However, it is challenging to separate contributions of distinct altered mechanisms with measurements of thresholds only. Here, we aim to understand how these alterations affect Aδ-fiber-mediated nociceptive detection of electrocutaneous stimuli. First, with a neurophysiology-based model, we study the effects of single-model parameters on detection thresholds. Second, we derive an expression of model parameters determining the functional relationship between detection thresholds and the interpulse interval for double-pulse stimuli. Third, in a case study with topical capsaicin treatment, we translate neuroplasticity into plausible changes of model parameters. Model simulations qualitatively agree with changes in experimental detection thresholds. The simulations with individual forms of neuroplasticity confirm that nerve degeneration is the dominant mechanism for capsaicin-induced increases in detection thresholds. In addition, our study suggests that capsaicin-induced central plasticity may last at least 1 month. PMID:27252644

  20. Quantification and threshold detection in real-time hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Richard D.

    2009-05-01

    The technical challenges of applying hyperspectral imaging techniques to on-line real-time food monitoring is discussed. System optimization must be applied to the design of the hyperspectral imaging spectrograph, the choice and operation of the imaging detector, the design of the illumination system and finally the development of software algorithms to correctly quantify the hyperspectral images. The signal to noise limitation of hyperspectral detection is discussed with particular emphasis on the detection of moving objects at high measurement bandwidths. An example is given of the development of a simple but accurate algorithm for the detection and discrimination of rust particles on leaves.

  1. Low energy response of the NICER detectors and "threshold efficiency" effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigozhin, Gregory; Doty, John; LaMarr, Beverly; Malonis, Andrew; Remillard, Ronald A.; Scholze, Frank; Laubis, Christian; Krumrey, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is an instrument that is planned to be installed on the International Space Station in 2016 to study time-resolved spectra of the rapidly changing celestial ojects. The focal plane of the instrument consists of 56 Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs). Signal from each SDD is fed to shaping amplifiers and triggering circuits that determine both amplitude and time of arrival for each "event".Zero crossing timing circuit is used in order to suppress energy dependent "time walk". That is done with a chain producing a derivative of the shaped signal, and the same chain detects threshold crossings marking the arrival of an X-ray photon. Higher noise of the differentiated signal leads to a somewhat extended band of signal amplitudes close to the threshold value, for which detection efficiency is less than 100%. Detection efficiency in this area affects the low energy portion of the detector response, and is very well described by an error function. We will present accurate measurements of this effect, show the consequences for the instrument quantum efficiency and the shape of the response function and will describe the calibration procedures that would allow selection of optimal threshold values for each observation.

  2. A method for detection of foreign body in cotton based on threshold segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Tao; Xie, Tingting; Wang, Mengxue; Yang, Chaoyu

    2013-10-01

    In order to extract foreign body from the complex channel background and cotton layers, a detection method which combined improved Otsu threshold with background estimation threshold is presented. Firstly, the original image which containing multiple foreign fibers is divided into two new images which containing only two substances by Otsu threshold. And then using the estimated value of the means and the standard deviations of the two new images a background estimation threshold was determined. The foreign fibers are extracted by the estimation threshold. Simulation results show that this method can overcome the effect which caused by the channel background interference and diversity of the foreign fibers in the actual working environment and can extract foreign bodies quickly and effectively.

  3. Ambient noise levels and detection threshold in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demuth, Andrea; Ottemöller, Lars; Keers, Henk

    2016-07-01

    Ambient seismic noise is caused by a number of sources in specific frequency bands. The quantification of ambient noise makes it possible to evaluate station and network performance. We evaluate noise levels in Norway from the 2013 data set of the Norwegian National Seismic Network as well as two temporary deployments. Apart from the station performance, we studied the geographical and temporal variations, and developed a local noise model for Norway. The microseism peaks related to the ocean are significant in Norway. We, therefore, investigated the relationship between oceanic weather conditions and noise levels. We find a correlation of low-frequency noise (0.125-0.25 Hz) with wave heights up to 900 km offshore. High (2-10 Hz) and intermediate (0.5-5 Hz) frequency noise correlates only up to 450 km offshore with wave heights. From a geographic perspective, stations in southern Norway show lower noise levels for low frequencies due to a larger distance to the dominant noise sources in the North Atlantic. Finally, we studied the influence of high-frequency noise levels on earthquake detectability and found that a noise level increase of 10 dB decreases the detectability by 0.5 magnitude units. This method provides a practical way to consider noise variations in detection maps.

  4. Ambient noise levels and detection threshold in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demuth, Andrea; Ottemöller, Lars; Keers, Henk

    2016-03-01

    Ambient seismic noise is caused by a number of sources in specific frequency bands. The quantification of ambient noise makes it possible to evaluate station and network performance. We evaluate noise levels in Norway from the 2013 data set of the Norwegian National Seismic Network as well as two temporary deployments. Apart from the station performance, we studied the geographical and temporal variations, and developed a local noise model for Norway. The microseism peaks related to the ocean are significant in Norway. We, therefore, investigated the relationship between oceanic weather conditions and noise levels. We find a correlation of low-frequency noise (0.125-0.25 Hz) with wave heights up to 900 km offshore. High (2-10 Hz) and intermediate (0.5-5 Hz) frequency noise correlates only up to 450 km offshore with wave heights. From a geographic perspective, stations in southern Norway show lower noise levels for low frequencies due to a larger distance to the dominant noise sources in the North Atlantic. Finally, we studied the influence of high-frequency noise levels on earthquake detectability and found that a noise level increase of 10 dB decreases the detectability by 0.5 magnitude units. This method provides a practical way to consider noise variations in detection maps.

  5. Wavelet-based acoustic emission detection method with adaptive thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Sunil; Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Hamza, Rida; Busch, Darryl

    2000-06-01

    Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. One such technology, the use of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults, has been investigated by Honeywell Technology Center for its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS). This ambitious, 38-month, proof-of-concept effort, which was a part of the Naval Surface Warfare Center Air Vehicle Diagnostics System program, culminated in a successful three-week flight test of the RAMS system at Patuxent River Flight Test Center in September 1997. The flight test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. This paper presents the results of stress wave data analysis of the flight-test dataset using wavelet-based techniques to assess background operational noise vs. machinery failure detection results.

  6. Long-term deficits in motion detection thresholds and spike count variability after unilateral vestibular lesion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Thomassen, Jakob S.; Dickman, J. David; Newlands, Shawn D.

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system operates in a push-pull fashion using signals from both labyrinths and an intricate bilateral organization. Unilateral vestibular lesions cause well-characterized motor deficits that are partially compensated over time and whose neural correlates have been traced in the mean response modulation of vestibular nuclei cells. Here we compare both response gains and neural detection thresholds of vestibular nuclei and semicircular canal afferent neurons in intact vs. unilateral-lesioned macaques using three-dimensional rotation and translation stimuli. We found increased stimulus-driven spike count variability and detection thresholds in semicircular canal afferents, although mean responses were unchanged, after contralateral labyrinth lesion. Analysis of trial-by-trial spike count correlations of a limited number of simultaneously recorded pairs of canal afferents suggests increased noise correlations after lesion. In addition, we also found persistent, chronic deficits in rotation detection thresholds of vestibular nuclei neurons, which were larger in the ipsilesional than the contralesional brain stem. These deficits, which persisted several months after lesion, were due to lower rotational response gains, whereas spike count variability was similar in intact and lesioned animals. In contrast to persistent deficits in rotation threshold, translation detection thresholds were not different from those in intact animals. These findings suggest that, after compensation, a single labyrinth is sufficient to recover motion sensitivity and normal thresholds for the otolith, but not the semicircular canal, system. PMID:24848470

  7. Detection thresholds for 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine in Concord and Niagara grape juice.

    PubMed

    Pickering, G J; Karthik, A; Inglis, D; Sears, M; Ker, K

    2008-08-01

    2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IPMP) is the compound responsible for the off-flavor known as ladybug taint, which occurs when Harmnonia axyridis beetles become incorporated with the grapes during juice processing. It is also an important grape-derived component of juice flavor in some varieties. The main objective of this study was to determine the orthonasal (ON) and retronasal (RN) detection thresholds for IPMP in juice. The ASTM E679 ascending forced choice method of limits was used to determine detection thresholds for 26 individuals in Concord and Niagara juices. Group best estimate thresholds (BETs) averaged 0.93 ng/L and were 50% and 21% higher in Concord than in Niagara juices for ON and RN evaluation, respectively. Group BETs for IPMP (ng/L) for Concord were ON: 1.11; RN: 1.02 and for Niagara were ON: 0.74; RN: 0.84. Variation in individual detection thresholds was observed, although familiarity with ladybug taint was not associated with individual threshold values. We conclude that humans are very sensitive to IPMP in juice, and that detection thresholds are more strongly influenced by grape variety than evaluation mode. These results may assist juice producers in establishing tolerance levels for IPMP in juice affected by ladybug taint or derived from grapes of suboptimal ripeness. PMID:19241569

  8. Reliability of a Simple Method for Determining Salt Taste Detection and Recognition Thresholds.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Jean-François; de Moura Piovesana, Paula; Proulx-Belhumeur, Alexandra; Doré, Michel; de Lemos Sampaio, Karina; Gallani, Maria-Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of a rapid analytical method to determine salt taste detection and recognition thresholds based on the ASTM E679 method. Reliability was evaluated according to criterion of temporal stability with a 1-week interval test-retest, with 29 participants. Thresholds were assessed by using the 3-AFC technique with 15 ascending concentrations of salt solution (1-292mM, 1.5-fold steps) and estimated by 2 approaches: individual (geometric means) and group (graphical) thresholds. The proportion of agreement between the test and retest results was estimated using intraclass coefficient correlations. The detection and recognition thresholds calculated by the geometric mean were 2.8 and 18.6mM at session 1 and 2.3 and 14.5mM at session 2 and according to the graphical approach, 2.7 and 18.6mM at session 1 and 1.7 and 16.3mM at session 2. The proportion of agreement between test and retest for the detection and recognition thresholds was 0.430 (95% CI: 0.080-0.680) and 0.660 (95% CI: 0.400-0.830). This fast and simple method to assess salt taste detection and recognition thresholds demonstrated satisfactory evidence of reliability and it could be useful for large population studies. PMID:26733539

  9. Responsiveness of electrical nociceptive detection thresholds to capsaicin (8 %)-induced changes in nociceptive processing.

    PubMed

    Doll, Robert J; van Amerongen, Guido; Hay, Justin L; Groeneveld, Geert J; Veltink, Peter H; Buitenweg, Jan R

    2016-09-01

    Pain disorders can be initiated and maintained by malfunctioning of one or several mechanisms underlying the nociceptive function. Psychophysical procedures allow the estimation of nociceptive detection thresholds using intra-epidermal electrical stimuli. By varying the temporal properties of electrical stimuli, various contributions of nociceptive processes to stimulus processing can be observed. To observe the responsiveness of nociceptive thresholds to changes in nociceptive function, a model of capsaicin-induced nerve defunctionalization was used. Its effect on nociceptive detections thresholds was investigated over a period of 84 days. A cutaneous capsaicin (8 %) patch was applied for 60 min to the upper leg of eight healthy human participants. Single- and double-pulse electrical stimuli were presented in a pseudo-random order using an intra-epidermal electrode. Stimuli and corresponding responses were recorded on both treated and untreated skin areas prior to capsaicin application and on days 2, 7, 28, and 84. Increases in electrical detection thresholds at the capsaicin area were observed on days 2 and 7 for single-pulse stimuli. Detection thresholds corresponding to double-pulse stimuli were increased on days 7 and 28, suggesting a delayed and longer lasting effect on double-pulse stimuli. In the present study, it was demonstrated that the responsiveness of detection thresholds to capsaicin application depends on the temporal properties of electrical stimuli. The observation of capsaicin-induced changes by estimation of detection thresholds revealed different time patterns of contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to stimulus processing. PMID:27142052

  10. Neuronal detection thresholds during vestibular compensation: contributions of response variability and sensory substitution

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Mohsen; Mitchell, Diana E; Dale, Alexis; Carriot, Jerome; Sadeghi, Soroush G; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for processing self-motion, allowing normal subjects to discriminate the direction of rotational movements as slow as 1–2 deg s−1. After unilateral vestibular injury patients’ direction–discrimination thresholds worsen to ∼20 deg s−1, and despite some improvement thresholds remain substantially elevated following compensation. To date, however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this recovery have not been addressed. Here, we recorded from first-order central neurons in the macaque monkey that provide vestibular information to higher brain areas for self-motion perception. Immediately following unilateral labyrinthectomy, neuronal detection thresholds increased by more than two-fold (from 14 to 30 deg s−1). While thresholds showed slight improvement by week 3 (25 deg s−1), they never recovered to control values – a trend mirroring the time course of perceptual thresholds in patients. We further discovered that changes in neuronal response variability paralleled changes in sensitivity for vestibular stimulation during compensation, thereby causing detection thresholds to remain elevated over time. However, we found that in a subset of neurons, the emergence of neck proprioceptive responses combined with residual vestibular modulation during head-on-body motion led to better neuronal detection thresholds. Taken together, our results emphasize that increases in response variability to vestibular inputs ultimately constrain neural thresholds and provide evidence that sensory substitution with extravestibular (i.e. proprioceptive) inputs at the first central stage of vestibular processing is a neural substrate for improvements in self-motion perception following vestibular loss. Thus, our results provide a neural correlate for the patient benefits provided by rehabilitative strategies that take advantage of the convergence of these multisensory cues. PMID:24366259

  11. High-energy above-threshold detachment from negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Milosevic, D.B.; Becker, W.

    2004-11-01

    Above-threshold detachment of electrons from negative ions by an elliptically polarized laser field is analyzed within the strong-field approximation. The low-energy part of the spectrum, that is, its structure and its apparent cutoff, strongly depends on the orbital quantum number l of the initial ground state. The high-energy part is characterized by the usual extended plateau caused by rescattering, which is essentially independent of the ground state. The potential that the returning electron experiences during rescattering is modeled by the sum of a polarization potential and a static potential. This rescattering potential does not have much effect on the shape of the plateau, but it does on its height. For H{sup -} (l=0), the yield of rescattered electrons is five orders of magnitude below the direct electrons, while for I{sup -} (l=1) the yields only differ by a factor of 40. We also analyze the dependence of the angle-resolved energy spectrum on the ellipticity of the laser field and confirm general symmetry properties. An angle-integrated elliptic dichroism parameter is introduced and analyzed.

  12. Neurometric amplitude-modulation detection threshold in the guinea-pig ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sayles, Mark; Füllgrabe, Christian; Winter, Ian M

    2013-07-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is a pervasive feature of natural sounds. Neural detection and processing of modulation cues is behaviourally important across species. Although most ecologically relevant sounds are not fully modulated, physiological studies have usually concentrated on fully modulated (100% modulation depth) signals. Psychoacoustic experiments mainly operate at low modulation depths, around detection threshold (∼5% AM). We presented sinusoidal amplitude-modulated tones, systematically varying modulation depth between zero and 100%, at a range of modulation frequencies, to anaesthetised guinea-pigs while recording spikes from neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). The cochlear nucleus is the site of the first synapse in the central auditory system. At this locus significant signal processing occurs with respect to representation of AM signals. Spike trains were analysed in terms of the vector strength of spike synchrony to the amplitude envelope. Neurons showed either low-pass or band-pass temporal modulation transfer functions, with the proportion of band-pass responses increasing with increasing sound level. The proportion of units showing a band-pass response varies with unit type: sustained chopper (CS) > transient chopper (CT) > primary-like (PL). Spike synchrony increased with increasing modulation depth. At the lowest modulation depth (6%), significant spike synchrony was only observed near to the unit's best modulation frequency for all unit types tested. Modulation tuning therefore became sharper with decreasing modulation depth. AM detection threshold was calculated for each individual unit as a function of modulation frequency. Chopper units have significantly better AM detection thresholds than do primary-like units. AM detection threshold is significantly worse at 40 dB vs. 10 dB above pure-tone spike rate threshold. Mean modulation detection thresholds for sounds 10 dB above pure-tone spike rate threshold at best modulation

  13. Neurometric amplitude-modulation detection threshold in the guinea-pig ventral cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Sayles, Mark; Füllgrabe, Christian; Winter, Ian M

    2013-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is a pervasive feature of natural sounds. Neural detection and processing of modulation cues is behaviourally important across species. Although most ecologically relevant sounds are not fully modulated, physiological studies have usually concentrated on fully modulated (100% modulation depth) signals. Psychoacoustic experiments mainly operate at low modulation depths, around detection threshold (∼5% AM). We presented sinusoidal amplitude-modulated tones, systematically varying modulation depth between zero and 100%, at a range of modulation frequencies, to anaesthetised guinea-pigs while recording spikes from neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). The cochlear nucleus is the site of the first synapse in the central auditory system. At this locus significant signal processing occurs with respect to representation of AM signals. Spike trains were analysed in terms of the vector strength of spike synchrony to the amplitude envelope. Neurons showed either low-pass or band-pass temporal modulation transfer functions, with the proportion of band-pass responses increasing with increasing sound level. The proportion of units showing a band-pass response varies with unit type: sustained chopper (CS) > transient chopper (CT) > primary-like (PL). Spike synchrony increased with increasing modulation depth. At the lowest modulation depth (6%), significant spike synchrony was only observed near to the unit's best modulation frequency for all unit types tested. Modulation tuning therefore became sharper with decreasing modulation depth. AM detection threshold was calculated for each individual unit as a function of modulation frequency. Chopper units have significantly better AM detection thresholds than do primary-like units. AM detection threshold is significantly worse at 40 dB vs. 10 dB above pure-tone spike rate threshold. Mean modulation detection thresholds for sounds 10 dB above pure-tone spike rate threshold at best modulation

  14. An Optional Threshold with Svm Cloud Detection Algorithm and Dsp Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Zhou, Xiang; Yue, Tao; Liu, Yilong

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a method which combines the traditional threshold method and SVM method, to detect the cloud of Landsat-8 images. The proposed method is implemented using DSP for real-time cloud detection. The DSP platform connects with emulator and personal computer. The threshold method is firstly utilized to obtain a coarse cloud detection result, and then the SVM classifier is used to obtain high accuracy of cloud detection. More than 200 cloudy images from Lansat-8 were experimented to test the proposed method. Comparing the proposed method with SVM method, it is demonstrated that the cloud detection accuracy of each image using the proposed algorithm is higher than those of SVM algorithm. The results of the experiment demonstrate that the implementation of the proposed method on DSP can effectively realize the real-time cloud detection accurately.

  15. Thresholding for biological material detection in real-time multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung Chul; Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Windham, William R.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, hyperspectral image analysis has proved successful for a target detection problem encountered in remote sensing as well as near sensing utilizing in situ instrumentation. The conventional global bi-level thresholding for target detection, such as the clustering-based Otsu's method, has been inadequate for the detection of biologically harmful material on foods that has a large degree of variability in size, location, color, shape, texture, and occurrence time. This paper presents multistep-like thresholding based on kernel density estimation for the real-time detection of harmful contaminants on a food product presented in multispectral images. We are particularly concerned with the detection of fecal contaminants on poultry carcasses in real-time. In the past, we identified 2 optimal wavelength bands and developed a real-time multispectral imaging system using a common aperture camera and a globally optimized thresholding method from a ratio of the optimal bands. This work extends our previous study by introducing a new decision rule to detect fecal contaminants on a single bird level. The underlying idea is to search for statistical separability along the two directions defined by the global optimal threshold vector and its orthogonal vector. Experimental results with real birds and fecal samples in different amounts are provided.

  16. A temporary threshold shift for self-motion detection following sustained, oscillating linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Gulledge, W. L.; Tubbs, R. L.; Littlefield, V. M.

    1978-01-01

    Thresholds for detecting linear motion (self-motion) increased following exposure of human observers to sustained linear oscillation (fatiguing stimulus) at 0.26 Hz and approximately 0.5 G peak-to-peak for durations up to 30 min. Recovery to preexposure levels took place over a period of 10 to 15 min following the sustained oscillation termination. Differences in threshold shift magnitudes following sustained oscillation in various orientations support the interpretation that the observed threshold shifts resulted from fatigue of the utricular otolith receptors. Threshold shifts were not obtained following exposure of the human observers to sustained, unidirectional linear acceleration (2G) for durations up to 10 min with a centrifuge. The results of this study suggest a previously unobserved response property of the otolith organs, namely, that these organs can be fatigued in a manner analogous to other receptor systems.

  17. Stress lowers the detection threshold for foul-smelling 2-mercaptoethanol.

    PubMed

    Pacharra, Marlene; Schäper, Michael; Kleinbeck, Stefan; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Wolf, Oliver T; van Thriel, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported enhanced vigilance for threat-related information in response to acute stress. While it is known that acute stress modulates sensory systems in humans, its impact on olfaction and the olfactory detection of potential threats is less clear. Two psychophysical experiments examined, if acute stress lowers the detection threshold for foul-smelling 2-mercaptoethanol. Participants in Experiment 1 (N = 30) and Experiment 2 (N = 32) were randomly allocated to a control group or a stress group. Participants in the stress group underwent a purely psychosocial stressor (public mental arithmetic) in Experiment 1 and a stressor that combined a physically demanding task with social-evaluative threat in Experiment 2 (socially evaluated cold-pressor test). In both experiments, olfactory detection thresholds were repeatedly assessed by means of dynamic dilution olfactometry. Each threshold measurement consisted of three trials conducted using an ascending method of limits. Participants in the stress groups showed the expected changes in heart rate, salivary cortisol, and mood measures in response to stress. About 20 min after the stressor, participants in the stress groups could detect 2-mercaptoethanol at a lower concentration than participants in the corresponding control groups. Our results show that acute stress lowers the detection threshold for a malodor. PMID:26553419

  18. Selection of intrusion detection system threshold bounds for effective sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ciza; Balakrishnan, Narayanaswamy

    2007-04-01

    The motivation behind the fusion of Intrusion Detection Systems was the realization that with the increasing traffic and increasing complexity of attacks, none of the present day stand-alone Intrusion Detection Systems can meet the high demand for a very high detection rate and an extremely low false positive rate. Multi-sensor fusion can be used to meet these requirements by a refinement of the combined response of different Intrusion Detection Systems. In this paper, we show the design technique of sensor fusion to best utilize the useful response from multiple sensors by an appropriate adjustment of the fusion threshold. The threshold is generally chosen according to the past experiences or by an expert system. In this paper, we show that the choice of threshold bounds according to the Chebyshev inequality priciple performs better. This approach also helps to solve the problem of scalability and has the advantage of failsafe capability. This paper theoretically models the fusion of Intrusion Detection Systems for the purpose of proving the improvement in performance, supplemented with the empirical evaluation. The combination of complementary sensors is shown to detect more attacks than the individual components. Since the individual sensors chosen detect sufficiently different attacks, their result can be merged for improved performance. The combination is done in different ways like (i) taking all the alarms from each system and avoiding duplications, (ii) taking alarms from each system by fixing threshold bounds, and (iii) rule-based fusion with a priori knowledge of the individual sensor performance. A number of evaluation metrics are used, and the results indicate that there is an overall enhancement in the performance of the combined detector using sensor fusion incorporating the threshold bounds and significantly better performance using simple rule-based fusion.

  19. A threshold-based approach for muscle contraction detection from surface EMG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morantes, Gaudi; Fernández, Gerardo; Altuve, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    Surface electromyographic (SEMG) signals are commonly used as control signals in prosthetic and orthotic devices. Super cial electrodes are placed on the skin of the subject to acquire its muscular activity through this signal. The muscle contraction episode is then in charge of activating and deactivating these devices. Nevertheless, there is no gold standard" to detect muscle contraction, leading to delayed responses and false and missed detections. This fact motivated us to propose a new approach that compares a smoothed version of the SEMG signal with a xed threshold, in order to detect muscle contraction episodes. After preprocessing the SEMG signal, the smoothed version is obtained using a moving average lter, where three di erent window lengths has been evaluated. The detector was tuned by maximizing sensitivity and speci city and evaluated using SEMG signals obtained from the anterior tibial and gastrocnemius muscles, taken during the walking of ve subjects. Compared with traditional detection methods, we obtain a reduction of 3 ms in the detection delay, an increase of 8% in sensitivity but a decrease of 15% in speci city. Future work is directed to the inclusion of a temporal threshold (a double-threshold approach) to minimize false detections and reduce detection delays.

  20. Olfactory Detection Thresholds and Adaptation in Adults with Autism Spectrum Condition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavassoli, T.; Baron-Cohen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Sensory issues have been widely reported in Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Since olfaction is one of the least investigated senses in ASC, the current studies explore olfactory detection thresholds and adaptation to olfactory stimuli in adults with ASC. 80 participants took part, 38 (18 females, 20 males) with ASC and 42 control participants…

  1. Efficient Markov feature extraction method for image splicing detection using maximization and threshold expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jong Goo; Park, Tae Hee; Moon, Yong Ho; Eom, Il Kyu

    2016-03-01

    We propose an efficient Markov feature extraction method for color image splicing detection. The maximum value among the various directional difference values in the discrete cosine transform domain of three color channels is used to choose the Markov features. We show that the discriminability for slicing detection is increased through the maximization process from the point of view of the Kullback-Leibler divergence. In addition, we present a threshold expansion and Markov state decomposition algorithm. Threshold expansion reduces the information loss caused by the coefficient thresholding that is used to restrict the number of Markov features. To compensate the increased number of features due to the threshold expansion, we propose an even-odd Markov state decomposition algorithm. A fixed number of features, regardless of the difference directions, color channels and test datasets, are used in the proposed algorithm. We introduce three kinds of Markov feature vectors. The number of Markov features for splicing detection used in this paper is relatively small compared to the conventional methods, and our method does not require additional feature reduction algorithms. Through experimental simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed method achieves high performance in splicing detection.

  2. Thermal nociceptive threshold testing detects altered sensory processing in broiler chickens with spontaneous lameness.

    PubMed

    Hothersall, Becky; Caplen, Gina; Parker, Richard M A; Nicol, Christine J; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E; Weeks, Claire A; Murrell, Joanna C

    2014-01-01

    Lameness is common in commercially reared broiler chickens but relationships between lameness and pain (and thus bird welfare) have proved complex, partly because lameness is often partially confounded with factors such as bodyweight, sex and pathology. Thermal nociceptive threshold (TNT) testing explores the neural processing of noxious stimuli, and so can contribute to our understanding of pain. Using an acute model of experimentally induced articular pain, we recently demonstrated that TNT was reduced in lame broiler chickens, and was subsequently attenuated by administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). This study extended these findings to a large sample of commercial broilers. It examined factors affecting thermal threshold (Part 1) and the effect of an NSAID drug (meloxicam, 5 mg/kg) and of an opioid (butorphanol; 4 mg/kg) (Part 2). Spontaneously lame and matched non-lame birds (n=167) from commercial farms were exposed to ramped thermal stimulations via a probe attached to the lateral aspect of the tarsometatarsus. Baseline skin temperature and temperature at which a behavioural avoidance response occurred (threshold) were recorded. In Part 1 bird characteristics influencing threshold were modelled; In Part 2 the effect of subcutaneous administration of meloxicam or butorphanol was investigated. Unexpectedly, after accounting for other influences, lameness increased threshold significantly (Part 1). In Part 2, meloxicam affected threshold differentially: it increased further in lame birds and decreased in non-lame birds. No effect of butorphanol was detected. Baseline skin temperature was also consistently a significant predictor of threshold. Overall, lameness significantly influenced threshold after other bird characteristics were taken into account. This, and a differential effect of meloxicam on lame birds, suggests that nociceptive processing may be altered in lame birds, though mechanisms for this require further investigation

  3. Detection thresholds for amplitude modulations of tones in budgerigar, rabbit, and human.

    PubMed

    Carney, Laurel H; Ketterer, Angela D; Abrams, Kristina S; Schwarz, Douglas M; Idrobo, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Envelope fluctuations of complex sounds carry information that is -essential for many types of discrimination and for detection in noise. To study the neural representation of envelope information and mechanisms for processing of this temporal aspect of sounds, it is useful to identify an animal model that can -sensitively detect amplitude modulations (AM). Low modulation frequencies, which dominate speech sounds, are of particular interest. Yet, most animal -models studied previously are relatively insensitive to AM at low modulation -frequencies. Rabbits have high thresholds for low-frequency modulations, -especially for tone carriers. Rhesus macaques are less sensitive than humans to low-frequency -modulations of wideband noise (O'Conner et al. Hear Res 277, 37-43, 2011). Rats and -chinchilla also have higher thresholds than humans for amplitude -modulations of noise (Kelly et al. J Comp Psychol 120, 98-105, 2006; Henderson et al. J Acoust Soc Am 75, -1177-1183, 1984). In contrast, the budgerigar has thresholds for AM detection of wideband noise similar to those of human listeners at low -modulation frequencies (Dooling and Searcy. Percept Psychophys 46, 65-71, 1981). A -one-interval, two-alternative operant conditioning procedure was used to estimate AM -detection thresholds for 4-kHz tone carriers at low modulation -frequencies (4-256 Hz). Budgerigar thresholds are comparable to those of human subjects in a comparable task. Implications of these comparative results for temporal coding of complex sounds are discussed. Comparative results for masked AM detection are also presented. PMID:23716245

  4. Detection Thresholds for Amplitude Modulations of Tones in Budgerigar, Rabbit, and Human

    PubMed Central

    Ketterer, Angela D.; Abrams, Kristina S.; Schwarz, Douglas M.; Idrobo, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Envelope fluctuations of complex sounds carry information that is essential for many types of discrimination and for detection in noise. To study the neural representation of envelope information and mechanisms for processing of this temporal aspect of sounds, it is useful to identify an animal model that can sensitively detect amplitude modulations (AM). Low modulation frequencies, which dominate speech sounds, are of particular interest. Yet, most animal models studied previously are relatively insensitive to AM at low modulation frequencies. Rabbits have high thresholds for low-frequency modulations, especially for tone carriers. Rhesus macaques are less sensitive than humans to low-frequency modulations of wideband noise (O’Conner et al. Hear Res 277, 37–43, 2011). Rats and chinchilla also have higher thresholds than humans for amplitude modulations of noise (Kelly et al. J Comp Psychol 120, 98–105, 2006; Henderson et al. J Acoust Soc Am 75, 1177–1183, 1984). In contrast, the budgerigar has thresholds for AM detection of wideband noise similar to those of human listeners at low modulation frequencies (Dooling and Searcy. Percept Psychophys 46, 65–71, 1981). A one-interval, two-alternative operant conditioning procedure was used to estimate AM detection thresholds for 4-kHz tone carriers at low modulation frequencies (4–256 Hz). Budgerigar thresholds are comparable to those of human subjects in a comparable task. Implications of these comparative results for temporal coding of complex sounds are discussed. Comparative results for masked AM detection are also presented. PMID:23716245

  5. Detectability Thresholds and Optimal Algorithms for Community Structure in Dynamic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemian, Amir; Zhang, Pan; Clauset, Aaron; Moore, Cristopher; Peel, Leto

    2016-07-01

    The detection of communities within a dynamic network is a common means for obtaining a coarse-grained view of a complex system and for investigating its underlying processes. While a number of methods have been proposed in the machine learning and physics literature, we lack a theoretical analysis of their strengths and weaknesses, or of the ultimate limits on when communities can be detected. Here, we study the fundamental limits of detecting community structure in dynamic networks. Specifically, we analyze the limits of detectability for a dynamic stochastic block model where nodes change their community memberships over time, but where edges are generated independently at each time step. Using the cavity method, we derive a precise detectability threshold as a function of the rate of change and the strength of the communities. Below this sharp threshold, we claim that no efficient algorithm can identify the communities better than chance. We then give two algorithms that are optimal in the sense that they succeed all the way down to this threshold. The first uses belief propagation, which gives asymptotically optimal accuracy, and the second is a fast spectral clustering algorithm, based on linearizing the belief propagation equations. These results extend our understanding of the limits of community detection in an important direction, and introduce new mathematical tools for similar extensions to networks with other types of auxiliary information.

  6. Fusion of threshold rules for target detection in wireless sensor networks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mengxia; Ding, Shi-You; Brooks, Richard R; Wu, Qishi; Rao, Nageswara S

    2010-03-01

    We propose a binary decision fusion rule that reaches a global decision on the presence of a target by integrating local decisions made by multiple sensors. Without requiring a priori probability of target presence, the fusion threshold bounds derived using Chebyshev's inequality ensure a higher hit rate and lower false alarm rate compared to the weighted averages of individual sensors. The Monte Carlo-based simulation results show that the proposed approach significantly improves target detection performance, and can also be used to guide the actual threshold selection in practical sensor network implementation under certain error rate constraints.

  7. Cooperative Spectrum Sensing with Multiple Antennas Using Adaptive Double-Threshold Based Energy Detector in Cognitive Radio Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagwari, A.; Tomar, G. S.

    2014-04-01

    In Cognitive radio networks, spectrum sensing is used to sense the unused spectrum in an opportunistic manner. In this paper, multiple antennas based energy detector utilizing adaptive double-threshold for spectrum sensing is proposed, which enhances detection performance and overcomes sensing failure problem as well. The detection threshold is made adaptive to the fluctuation of the received signal power in each local detector of cognitive radio (CR) user. Numerical results show that by using multiple antennas at the CRs, it is possible to significantly improve detection performance at very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Further, the scheme was analyzed in conjunction with cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS), where CRs utilize selection combining of the decision statistics obtained by an adaptive double-threshold energy detector for making a binary decision of the presence or absence of a primary user. The decision of each CR is forwarded over error free orthogonal channels to the fusion centre, which takes the final decision of a spectrum hole. It is further found that CSS with multiple antenna-based energy detector with adaptive double-threshold improves detection performance around 26.8 % as compared to hierarchical with quantization method at -12 dB SNR, under the condition that a small number of sensing nodes are used in spectrum sensing.

  8. Molecular-dynamics simulation of threshold displacement energies in BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, E.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Piñera, I.; Leyva, A.

    2015-09-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations were used to calculate threshold displacement energies for each atom type in BaTiO3 perovskite. A primary knock-on atom with an energy range between 10 and 300 eV in principal crystallographic directions at 300 K was introduced. A statistical approach has been applied calculating displacement probability curves along main crystallographic directions. For each sublattice, the simulation was repeated from different initial conditions to estimate the uncertainty in the threshold displacement energy calculated values. The threshold displacement energies vary considerably with crystallographic direction and sublattice. The weighted average threshold displacement energies are 40 eV for oxygen, 64 eV for barium and 97 eV for titanium atoms. These values are comparable to ab initio calculated and experimentally derived values in perovskites. These results are proposed as threshold displacement energies, ideal for simulation programs that use atomic displacement calculation algorithms.

  9. Determination of ortho- and retronasal detection thresholds for 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine in wine.

    PubMed

    Pickering, G J; Karthik, A; Inglis, D; Sears, M; Ker, K

    2007-09-01

    2-Isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IPMP) is a grape-derived component of wine flavor in some wine varieties as well as the causal compound of the off-flavor known as ladybug taint (LBT), which occurs when Harmonia axyridis beetles are incorporated with the grapes during juice and wine processing. The main objective of this study was to obtain robust estimates of the orthonasal (ON) and retronasal (RN) detection thresholds (DTs) for IPMP in wines of differing styles. The ASTM E679 ascending forced choice method of limits was used to determine DTs for 47 individuals in 3 different wines--Chardonnay, Gewürztraminer, and a red wine blend of Baco Noir and Marechel Foch. The group best estimate thresholds (BETs) obtained for IPMP (ng/L) were Chardonnay, ON: 0.32; Gewürztraminer, ON: 1.56, RN: 1.15, and red wine blend, ON: 1.03, RN: 2.29. A large variation in individual DTs was observed. Familiarity with LBT was inversely correlated with DTs for Gewürztraminer, and no difference in thresholds was observed between winemakers and nonwinemakers. We conclude that the human DT for IPMP is extremely low and influenced significantly by wine style and evaluation mode. We recommend against the reporting of single-threshold values for wine flavor compounds, and encourage the determination of consumer rejection thresholds for IPMP in wine. PMID:17995659

  10. Simulated performance of an order statistic threshold strategy for detection of narrowband signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, E.; Brady, R.; Deich, W.; Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E.

    1988-01-01

    The application of order statistics to signal detection is becoming an increasingly active area of research. This is due to the inherent robustness of rank estimators in the presence of large outliers that would significantly degrade more conventional mean-level-based detection systems. A detection strategy is presented in which the threshold estimate is obtained using order statistics. The performance of this algorithm in the presence of simulated interference and broadband noise is evaluated. In this way, the robustness of the proposed strategy in the presence of the interference can be fully assessed as a function of the interference, noise, and detector parameters.

  11. Fisher's linear discriminant ratio based threshold for moving human detection in thermal video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Lavanya; Yadav, Dileep Kumar; Singh, Annapurna

    2016-09-01

    In video surveillance, the moving human detection in thermal video is a critical phase that filters out redundant information to extract relevant information. The moving object detection is applied on thermal video because it penetrate challenging problems such as dynamic issues of background and illumination variation. In this work, we have proposed a new background subtraction method using Fisher's linear discriminant ratio based threshold. This threshold is investigated automatically during run-time for each pixel of every sequential frame. Automatically means to avoid the involvement of external source such as programmer or user for threshold selection. This threshold provides better pixel classification at run-time. This method handles problems generated due to multiple behavior of background more accurately using Fisher's ratio. It maximizes the separation between object pixel and the background pixel. To check the efficacy, the performance of this work is observed in terms of various parameters depicted in analysis. The experimental results and their analysis demonstrated better performance of proposed method against considered peer methods.

  12. An energy efficient sub-threshold to above-threshold level shifter using a modified Wilson current mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroof, Naeem; Sohail, Muhammad; Shin, Hyunchul

    2016-07-01

    In this article, a new energy efficient level shifter circuit is described for robust sub-threshold to above-threshold voltage conversion. The design is based on a modification of the Wilson current mirror that minimizes the static current and improves the energy efficiency. The proposed level shifter is capable of converting a 200 mV signal into a 1 V signal and operates correctly across process corners. At the design target (? 200 mV, input signal frequency = 1 MHz), the proposed level shifter exhibits a propagation delay of 20.17 ns, a static power dissipation of 11.07 nW, and the total energy per transition of 113.2 fJ. We compare our results with the design proposed by Lutkemeier and Ruckert (2010). At the design target, the energy delay product of our design is 81.53% that of the reference design and, over all the voltage range of ? from 160 mV to 1 V, the proposed circuit shows an average energy reduction of 14.71% compared to the reference design. Thorough variability analysis was performed using HSPICE Monte Carlo simulations for different values of ?, which reveals the robustness of the proposed design.

  13. A Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a prior surface reflectance database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lin; Wei, Jing; Wang, Jian; Mi, Xueting; Guo, Yamin; Lv, Yang; Yang, Yikun; Gan, Ping; Zhou, Xueying; Jia, Chen; Tian, Xinpeng

    2016-06-01

    Conventional cloud detection methods are easily affected by mixed pixels, complex surface structures, and atmospheric factors, resulting in poor cloud detection results. To minimize these problems, a new Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a priori surface reflectance database is proposed in this paper. A monthly surface reflectance database is constructed using long-time-sequenced MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface reflectance product (MOD09A1) to provide the surface reflectance of the underlying surfaces. The relationships between the apparent reflectance changes and the surface reflectance are simulated under different observation and atmospheric conditions with the 6S (Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum) model, and the dynamic threshold cloud detection models are developed. Two typical remote sensing data with important application significance and different sensor parameters, MODIS and Landsat 8, are selected for cloud detection experiments. The results were validated against the visual interpretation of clouds and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation cloud measurements. The results showed that the UDTCDA can obtain a high precision in cloud detection, correctly identifying cloudy pixels and clear-sky pixels at rates greater than 80% with error rate and missing rate of less than 20%. The UDTCDA cloud product overall shows less estimation uncertainty than the current MODIS cloud mask products. Moreover, the UDTCDA can effectively reduce the effects of atmospheric factors and mixed pixels and can be applied to different satellite sensors to realize long-term, large-scale cloud detection operations.

  14. Fast microcalcification detection in ultrasound images using image enhancement and threshold adjacency statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Baek Hwan; Chang, Chuho; Lee, Jong-Ha; Ko, Eun Young; Seong, Yeong Kyeong; Woo, Kyoung-Gu

    2013-02-01

    The existence of microcalcifications (MCs) is an important marker of malignancy in breast cancer. In spite of the benefits in mass detection for dense breasts, ultrasonography is believed that it might not reliably detect MCs. For computer aided diagnosis systems, however, accurate detection of MCs has the possibility of improving the performance in both Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon description for calcifications and malignancy classification. We propose a new efficient and effective method for MC detection using image enhancement and threshold adjacency statistics (TAS). The main idea of TAS is to threshold an image and to count the number of white pixels with a given number of adjacent white pixels. Our contribution is to adopt TAS features and apply image enhancement to facilitate MC detection in ultrasound images. We employed fuzzy logic, tophat filter, and texture filter to enhance images for MCs. Using a total of 591 images, the classification accuracy of the proposed method in MC detection showed 82.75%, which is comparable to that of Haralick texture features (81.38%). When combined, the performance was as high as 85.11%. In addition, our method also showed the ability in mass classification when combined with existing features. In conclusion, the proposed method exploiting image enhancement and TAS features has the potential to deal with MC detection in ultrasound images efficiently and extend to the real-time localization and visualization of MCs.

  15. Reduced visual surround suppression in schizophrenia shown by measuring contrast detection thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Pedraza, Ignacio; Romero-Ferreiro, Verónica; Read, Jenny C. A.; Diéguez-Risco, Teresa; Bagney, Alexandra; Caballero-González, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Torresano, Javier; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Visual perception in schizophrenia is attracting a broad interest given the deep knowledge that we have about the visual system in healthy populations. One example is the class of effects known collectively as visual surround suppression. For example, the visibility of a grating located in the visual periphery is impaired by the presence of a surrounding grating of the same spatial frequency and orientation. Previous studies have suggested abnormal visual surround suppression in patients with schizophrenia. Given that schizophrenia patients have cortical alterations including hypofunction of NMDA receptors and reduced concentration of GABA neurotransmitter, which affect lateral inhibitory connections, then they should be relatively better than controls at detecting visual stimuli that are usually suppressed. We tested this hypothesis by measuring contrast detection thresholds using a new stimulus configuration. We tested two groups: 21 schizophrenia patients and 24 healthy subjects. Thresholds were obtained using Bayesian staircases in a four-alternative forced-choice detection task where the target was a grating within a 3∘ Butterworth window that appeared in one of four possible positions at 5∘ eccentricity. We compared three conditions, (a) target with no-surround, (b) target embedded within a surrounding grating of 20∘ diameter and 25% contrast with same spatial frequency and orthogonal orientation, and (c) target embedded within a surrounding grating with parallel (same) orientation. Previous results with healthy populations have shown that contrast thresholds are lower for orthogonal and no-surround (NS) conditions than for parallel surround (PS). The log-ratios between parallel and NS thresholds are used as an index quantifying visual surround suppression. Patients performed poorly compared to controls in the NS and orthogonal-surround conditions. However, they performed as well as controls when the surround was parallel, resulting in significantly

  16. Shape anomaly detection under strong measurement noise: An analytical approach to adaptive thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasichkov, Alexander S.; Grigoriev, Eugene B.; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Nifontov, Eugene M.

    2015-10-01

    We suggest an analytical approach to the adaptive thresholding in a shape anomaly detection problem. We find an analytical expression for the distribution of the cosine similarity score between a reference shape and an observational shape hindered by strong measurement noise that depends solely on the noise level and is independent of the particular shape analyzed. The analytical treatment is also confirmed by computer simulations and shows nearly perfect agreement. Using this analytical solution, we suggest an improved shape anomaly detection approach based on adaptive thresholding. We validate the noise robustness of our approach using typical shapes of normal and pathological electrocardiogram cycles hindered by additive white noise. We show explicitly that under high noise levels our approach considerably outperforms the conventional tactic that does not take into account variations in the noise level.

  17. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  18. Automated microcalcification detection in mammograms using statistical variable-box-threshold filter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Mark; Mitra, Sunanda; Roberson, Glenn H.; Shieh, Yao-Yang

    1997-10-01

    Currently early detection of breast cancer is primarily accomplished by mammography and suspicious findings may lead to a decision for performing a biopsy. Digital enhancement and pattern recognition techniques may aid in early detection of some patterns such as microcalcification clusters indicating onset of DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) that accounts for 20% of all mammographically detected breast cancers and could be treated when detected early. These individual calcifications are hard to detect due to size and shape variability and inhomogeneous background texture. Our study addresses only early detection of microcalcifications that allows the radiologist to interpret the x-ray findings in computer-aided enhanced form easier than evaluating the x-ray film directly. We present an algorithm which locates microcalcifications based on local grayscale variability and of tissue structures and image statistics. Threshold filters with lower and upper bounds computed from the image statistics of the entire image and selected subimages were designed to enhance the entire image. This enhanced image was used as the initial image for identifying the micro-calcifications based on the variable box threshold filters at different resolutions. The test images came from the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and the MIAS mammographic database, which are classified into various categories including microcalcifications. Classification of other types of abnormalities in mammograms based on their characteristic features is addressed in later studies.

  19. Innovative qPCR using interfacial effects to enable low threshold cycle detection and inhibition relief

    PubMed Central

    Harshman, Dustin K.; Rao, Brianna M.; McLain, Jean E.; Watts, George S.; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics offers quick access to information but fails to operate at a speed required for clinical decision-making. Our novel methodology, droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette real-time polymerase chain reaction (DOTS qPCR), uses interfacial effects for droplet actuation, inhibition relief, and amplification sensing. DOTS qPCR has sample-to-answer times as short as 3 min 30 s. In infective endocarditis diagnosis, DOTS qPCR demonstrates reproducibility, differentiation of antibiotic susceptibility, subpicogram limit of detection, and thermocycling speeds of up to 28 s/cycle in the presence of tissue contaminants. Langmuir and Gibbs adsorption isotherms are used to describe the decreasing interfacial tension upon amplification. Moreover, a log-linear relationship with low threshold cycles is presented for real-time quantification by imaging the droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette with a smartphone. DOTS qPCR resolves several limitations of commercially available real-time PCR systems, which rely on fluorescence detection, have substantially higher threshold cycles, and require expensive optical components and extensive sample preparation. Due to the advantages of low threshold cycle detection, we anticipate extending this technology to biological research applications such as single cell, single nucleus, and single DNA molecule analyses. Our work is the first demonstrated use of interfacial effects for sensing reaction progress, and it will enable point-of-care molecular diagnosis of infections. PMID:26601245

  20. Innovative qPCR using interfacial effects to enable low threshold cycle detection and inhibition relief.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Dustin K; Rao, Brianna M; McLain, Jean E; Watts, George S; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-09-01

    Molecular diagnostics offers quick access to information but fails to operate at a speed required for clinical decision-making. Our novel methodology, droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette real-time polymerase chain reaction (DOTS qPCR), uses interfacial effects for droplet actuation, inhibition relief, and amplification sensing. DOTS qPCR has sample-to-answer times as short as 3 min 30 s. In infective endocarditis diagnosis, DOTS qPCR demonstrates reproducibility, differentiation of antibiotic susceptibility, subpicogram limit of detection, and thermocycling speeds of up to 28 s/cycle in the presence of tissue contaminants. Langmuir and Gibbs adsorption isotherms are used to describe the decreasing interfacial tension upon amplification. Moreover, a log-linear relationship with low threshold cycles is presented for real-time quantification by imaging the droplet-on-thermocouple silhouette with a smartphone. DOTS qPCR resolves several limitations of commercially available real-time PCR systems, which rely on fluorescence detection, have substantially higher threshold cycles, and require expensive optical components and extensive sample preparation. Due to the advantages of low threshold cycle detection, we anticipate extending this technology to biological research applications such as single cell, single nucleus, and single DNA molecule analyses. Our work is the first demonstrated use of interfacial effects for sensing reaction progress, and it will enable point-of-care molecular diagnosis of infections. PMID:26601245

  1. Verification of threshold activation detection (TAD) technique in prompt fission neutron detection using scintillators containing 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibczynski, P.; Kownacki, J.; Moszyński, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Gójska, A.; Gierlik, M.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Jakubowska, E.; Kędzierski, G.; Kujawiński, Ł.; Wojnarowicz, J.; Carrel, F.; Ledieu, M.; Lainé, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study ⌀ 5''× 3'' and ⌀ 2''× 2'' EJ-313 liquid fluorocarbon as well as ⌀ 2'' × 3'' BaF2 scintillators were exposed to neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source and a Sodern Genie 16GT deuterium-tritium (D+T) neutron generator. The scintillators responses to β- particles with maximum endpoint energy of 10.4 MeV from the n+19F reactions were studied. Response of a ⌀ 5'' × 3'' BC-408 plastic scintillator was also studied as a reference. The β- particles are the products of interaction of fast neutrons with 19F which is a component of the EJ-313 and BaF2 scintillators. The method of fast neutron detection via fluorine activation is already known as Threshold Activation Detection (TAD) and was proposed for photofission prompt neutron detection from fissionable and Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in the field of Homeland Security and Border Monitoring. Measurements of the number of counts between 6.0 and 10.5 MeV with a 252Cf source showed that the relative neutron detection efficiency ratio, defined as epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'', is 32.0% ± 2.3% and 44.6% ± 3.4% for front-on and side-on orientation of the BaF2, respectively. Moreover, the ⌀ 5'' EJ-313 and side-on oriented BaF2 were also exposed to neutrons from the D+T neutron generator, and the relative efficiency epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'' was estimated to be 39.3%. Measurements of prompt photofission neutrons with the BaF2 detector by means of data acquisition after irradiation (out-of-beam) of nuclear material and between the beam pulses (beam-off) techniques were also conducted on the 9 MeV LINAC of the SAPHIR facility.

  2. Ischemia detection using Isoelectric Energy Function.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Mandeep

    2016-01-01

    A novel method has been proposed for the detection of ischemia using an isoelectric energy function (IEEF) resulting from ST segment deviations in ECG signals. The method consists of five stages: pre-processing, delineation, measurement of isoelectric energy, a beat characterization algorithm and detection of ischemia. The isoelectric energy threshold is used to differentiate ischemic beats from normal beats for ischemic episode detection. Then, ischemic episodes are classified as transmural or subendocardial. The method is validated for recordings of the annotated European ST-T database (EDB). The results show 98.12% average sensitivity (SE) and 98.16% average specificity (SP). These results are significantly better than those of existing methods cited in the literature. The advantage of the proposed method includes simplicity, ruggedness and automatic discarding of noisy beats. PMID:26623944

  3. Voice-related modulation of mechanosensory detection thresholds in the human larynx.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Michael J; Krueger, Mallory A

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors within the laryngeal mucosa provide the central nervous system with perceptual and proprioceptive afference for a variety of essential yet diverse human functions including voice sound production and airway protection. It is unknown why mechanosensory information that yields a defensive response when an individual breathes may go largely unnoticed when the individual voices. Therefore, a central question is whether there is voice-related modulation of laryngeal mechanosensory detection. Such modulation would be consistent with current models of afferent laryngeal control, and may be important to maintain fluent voice in the presence of potentially distracting sensory input. Therefore, we employed endoscopic assessment of laryngeal mechanosensory detection thresholds in ten healthy adults during tidal breathing and a voice task. We tested the hypothesis that laryngeal mechanosensory detection thresholds would be higher during the voice task. We found that thresholds were significantly higher for all participants during the voice task and that these changes were significantly more modest in women. Our findings suggest that the laryngeal sensorium may modulate mechanosensory afference to attenuate the potentially distracting influence of sensory input during voice. The finding that women maintain a greater sensitivity during the voice task than men (lower thresholds) may have important implications for the higher prevalence of sensorimotor voice disturbances in women. Our results are consistent with the presence of mechanosensory modulation in other motor systems and with observed sensory differences between women and men. Such modulation has important implications for understanding the underlying neural mechanisms of laryngeal control and how these mechanisms may operate in individuals with laryngeal disturbances. PMID:24217976

  4. Sonar gain control and echo detection thresholds in the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A; Moffat, A J; Masters, W M

    1992-02-01

    The echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus, detects sonar echoes with a sensitivity that changes according to the time elapsed between broadcasting of each sonar signal and reception of echoes. When tested in an electronic target simulator on a two-choice echo-detection task, the bat's threshold improved by 11.5 dB as echo delay changed from 2.3 to 4.6 ms (target ranges of 40 and 80 cm). Earlier experiments measured the change in detection threshold for delays from 1 to 6.4 ms (target ranges from about 17 to 110 cm) and obtained about 11 dB of improvement per doubling of delay. The new experiments used electronic delay lines to simulate echo delay, thus avoiding movement of loudspeakers to different distances and the possible creation of delay-dependent backward masking between stimulus echoes and cluttering echoes from the loudspeaker surfaces. The slope of the threshold shift defines an echo gain control that keeps echoes from point targets at a fixed sensation level--reducing sensitivity by 11 to 12 dB as echo amplitude increases by 12 dB per halving of range during the bat's approach to the target. A recent experiment using loudness discrimination of echoes at 70 to 80 dB SPL (roughly 50 dB above threshold) found a slope of about 6 dB per halving of range, so the gain-control effect may be level dependent. The observed effect is operationally equivalent to forward masking of echoes by the transmission, but any events correlated with vocalization which impair hearing sensitivity for a short interval following transmissions could cause a decline in sensitivity to echoes. Contractions of the bat's middle-ear muscles synchronized to transmissions may account for the observed threshold shift, at least for a span of echo delays associated with the most critical portion of the approach stage of pursuit. Forward masking by the sonar transmissions may contribute to the threshold shift, too, but middle-ear muscle contractions do occur and must be a significant part of the

  5. Application of new advanced CNN structure with adaptive thresholds to color edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shaojiang; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Xipeng; Wei, Pengcheng; Qin, Mingfu

    2012-04-01

    Color edge detection is much more efficient than gray scale detection when edges exist at the boundary between regions of different colors with no change in intensity. This paper presents adaptive templates, which are capable of detecting various color and intensity changes in color image. To avoid conception of multilayer proposed in literatures, modification has been done to the CNN structure. This modified structure allows a matrix C, which carries the change information of pixels, to replace the control parts in the basic CNN equation. This modification is necessary because in multilayer structure, it faces the challenge of how to represent the intrinsic relationship among each primary layer. Additionally, in order to enhance the accuracy of edge detection, adaptive detection threshold is employed. The adaptive thresholds are considered to be alterable criteria in designing matrix C. The proposed synthetic system not only avoids the problem which is engendered by multi-layers but also exploits full information of pixels themselves. Experimental results prove that the proposed method is efficient.

  6. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na+ and K+ currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism. PMID:26074810

  7. Simulating electrical modulation detection thresholds using a biophysical model of the auditory nerve.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Gabrielle E; Imennov, Nikita S; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2016-05-01

    Modulation detection thresholds (MDTs) assess listeners' sensitivity to changes in the temporal envelope of a signal and have been shown to strongly correlate with speech perception in cochlear implant users. MDTs are simulated with a stochastic model of a population of auditory nerve fibers that has been verified to accurately simulate a number of physiologically important temporal response properties. The procedure to estimate detection thresholds has previously been applied to stimulus discrimination tasks. The population model simulates the MDT-stimulus intensity relationship measured in cochlear implant users. The model also recreates the shape of the modulation transfer function and the relationship between MDTs and carrier rate. Discrimination based on fluctuations in synchronous firing activity predicts better performance at low carrier rates, but quantitative measures of modulation coding predict better neural representation of high carrier rate stimuli. Manipulating the number of fibers and a temporal integration parameter, the width of a sliding temporal integration window, varies properties of the MDTs, such as cutoff frequency and peak threshold. These results demonstrate the importance of using a multi-diameter fiber population in modeling the MDTs and demonstrate a wider applicability of this model to simulating behavioral performance in cochlear implant listeners. PMID:27250141

  8. Threshold tracking pacing based on beat by beat evoked response detection: clinical benefits and potential problems.

    PubMed

    Duru, F; Bauersfeld, U; Schüller, H; Candinas, R

    2000-10-01

    Continuous monitoring of pacemaker stimulation thresholds and automatic adjustment of pacemaker outputs were among the longstanding goals of the pacing community. The first clinically successful implementation of threshold tracking pacing was the Autocapture feature which has accomplished automatic ventricular capture verification for every single stimulus by monitoring the Evoked Response (ER) signal resulting from myocardial depolarization. The Autocapture feature not only decreases energy consumption by keeping the stimulation output slightly above the actual threshold, but also increases patient safety by access to high-output back-up pulses if there is loss of capture. Furthermore, it provides valuable documentation of stimulation thresholds over time and serves as a valuable research tool. Current limitations for its widespread use include the requirements for implantation of bipolar low polarization leads and unipolar pacing in the ventricle. Fusion/pseudofusion beats with resultant insufficient or even non-existent ER signal amplitudes followed by unnecessary delivery of back-up pulses and a possible increase in pacemaker output is not an uncommon observation unique to the Autocapture feature. The recent incorporation of the Autocapture algorithm in dual chamber pacemakers has been challenging because of more frequent occurrence of fusion/pseudofusion beats in the presence of normal AV conduction. Along with a review of the previously published studies and our clinical experience, this article discusses the clinical advantages and potential problems of Autocapture. PMID:11046190

  9. Saltation threshold detection in a wind tunnel by the measurement of the net electrostatic charge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Rodman N.

    1991-01-01

    The Mars surface wind tunnel (MARSWIT) is an open circuit wind tunnel used for aeolian studies and is located inside a large vacuum chamber allowing testing at Martian surface atmospheric pressure. Since direct access is not available to the tunnel during operation at low pressure, a remote method of saltation detection is needed. The bed is observed by means of closed circuit video, but it is often difficult to determine the initiation of threshold. The measurement by means of an electrometer of the net electric charge produced by the saltating particles has provided a reliable means of saltation threshold detection. Saltating particles become charged several ways, both in wind tunnels and in a natural environment. The most significant of these methods are tribo-charging and contact charging, which always occur. Fracture charging may also occur under the high velocities associated with particle transport on Mars or under simulated Martian conditions. Detection in MARSWIT is achieved by allowing the saltating particles to impinge on a planar conducting surface normal to the flow that is connected to ground through a Keithly electrometer. The signal from the electrometer is connected to a strip chart recorder along with the analog signal from the pitot tube transducer that is used to determine the wind velocity in the tunnel. Thus, a record of wind velocity and the initiation of particle saltation is conveniently displayed together. While both positive and negative charges are produced during saltation, this method measures only the net charge; thus the charge may be either positive or negative depending upon the particles being tested, the size and size distribution of the test material, and the wind velocity. This has proven to be a very trustworthy and sensitive method of saltation threshold detection, being especially useful with the smaller sized particles which are the most difficult to observe visually.

  10. Electron-nuclear energy sharing in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Kunitski, M; Pitzer, M; Trinter, F; Schmidt, L Ph H; Jahnke, T; Magrakvelidze, M; Madsen, C B; Madsen, L B; Thumm, U; Dörner, R

    2013-07-12

    We report experimental observation of the energy sharing between electron and nuclei in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2 by strong laser fields. The absorbed photon energy is shared between the ejected electron and nuclei in a correlated fashion, resulting in multiple diagonal lines in their joint energy spectrum governed by the energy conservation of all fragment particles. PMID:23889391

  11. Influence of ion beam energy on SEGR failure thresholds of vertical power MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J.L.; Wheatley, C.F.; Allenspach, M.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Brews, J.R.; Galloway, K.F.; Burton, D.I.; Pease, R.L.

    1996-12-01

    For the first time, experimental observations and numerical simulations show that the impact energy of the test ion influences the single-event gate rupture (SEGR) failure thresholds of vertical power MOSFETs. Current testing methodology may produce false hardness assurance.

  12. Energy threshold effects in the collisionless dissociation of polyatomic molecules by ir laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gower, M. C.; Billman, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    The threshold for collisionless dissociation of SF6, SiF4, and CF2Cl2 by focused CO2 laser radiation has been measured. This threshold is a laser pulse energy effect and, within experimental error, is found to be the same for all three gases. Provided collisions cannot occur during the laser pulse, the degree of dissociation produced depends only on the energy in the pulse, which is consistent with simple adiabatic vibrational heating of the molecules by the laser.

  13. Detection of Near-Threshold Sounds is Independent of EEG Phase in Common Frequency Bands

    PubMed Central

    Zoefel, Benedikt; Heil, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Low-frequency oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) are thought to reflect periodic excitability changes of large neural networks. Consistent with this notion, detection probability of near-threshold somatosensory, visual, and auditory targets has been reported to co-vary with the phase of oscillations in the EEG. In audition, entrainment of δ-oscillations to the periodic occurrence of sounds has been suggested to function as a mechanism of attentional selection. Here, we examine in humans whether the detection of brief near-threshold sounds in quiet depends on the phase of EEG oscillations. When stimuli were presented at irregular intervals, we did not find a systematic relationship between detection probability and phase. When stimuli were presented at regular intervals (2-s), reaction times were significantly shorter and we observed phase entrainment of EEG oscillations corresponding to the frequency of stimulus presentation (0.5 Hz), revealing an adjustment of the system to the regular stimulation. The amplitude of the entrained oscillation was higher for hits than for misses, suggesting a link between entrainment and stimulus detection. However, detection was independent of phase at frequencies ≥1 Hz. Furthermore, we show that when the data are analyzed using acausal, though common, algorithms, an apparent “entrainment” of the δ-phase to presented stimuli emerges and detection probability appears to depend on δ-phase, similar to reports in the literature. We show that these effects are artifacts from phase distortion at stimulus onset by contamination with the event-related potential, which differs markedly for hits and misses. This highlights the need to carefully deal with this common problem, since otherwise it might bias and mislead this exciting field of research. PMID:23717293

  14. Detection of fiducial points in ECG waves using iteration based adaptive thresholds.

    PubMed

    Wonjune Kang; Kyunguen Byun; Hong-Goo Kang

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for the detection of fiducial points in electrocardiogram (ECG) waves using iteration based adaptive thresholds. By setting the search range of the processing frame to the interval between two consecutive R peaks, the peaks of T and P waves are used as reference salient points (RSPs) to detect the fiducial points. The RSPs are selected from candidates whose slope variation factors are larger than iteratively defined adaptive thresholds. Considering the fact that the number of RSPs varies depending on whether the ECG wave is normal or not, the proposed algorithm proceeds with a different methodology for determining fiducial points based on the number of detected RSPs. Testing was performed using twelve records from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database that were manually marked for comparison with the estimated locations of the fiducial points. The means of absolute distances between the true locations and the points estimated by the algorithm are 12.2 ms and 7.9 ms for the starting points of P and Q waves, and 9.3 ms and 13.9 ms for the ending points of S and T waves. Since the computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is very low, it is feasible for use in mobile devices. PMID:26736854

  15. Determination of Odor Detection Threshold in the Göttingen Minipig

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Ida E.; Herskin, Mette S.; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Johansen, Marianne G.; Jørgensen, Arne Lund; Ladewig, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the ability of Göttingen minipigs to acquire an olfaction-based operant conditioning task and to determine the detection threshold for ethyl acetate and ethanol. We used an automated olfactometer developed for rodents to train and test 14 pigs. Odor sampling and reliable responding were obtained after three to fifteen 160-trial sessions. Successful transfer of the task from ethyl acetate to ethanol was achieved in 1–4 sessions. Detection threshold for ethyl acetate varied between 10−2% and 10−6% v/v and for ethanol between 0.1% and 5 × 10−6% v/v. The results provide evidence that minipigs can successfully acquire 2-odorant discrimination using a food-rewarded instrumental conditioning paradigm for testing olfactory function. This olfactory discrimination paradigm provides reliable measures of olfactory sensitivity and thereby enables detection of changes in olfaction in a porcine model of Alzheimer's disease currently being developed. PMID:20693277

  16. Perceptual thresholds for detecting modifications applied to the acoustical properties of a violin.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Claudia; Cross, Ian; Moore, Brian C J; Woodhouse, Jim

    2007-12-01

    This study is the first step in the psychoacoustic exploration of perceptual differences between the sounds of different violins. A method was used which enabled the same performance to be replayed on different "virtual violins," so that the relationships between acoustical characteristics of violins and perceived qualities could be explored. Recordings of real performances were made using a bridge-mounted force transducer, giving an accurate representation of the signal from the violin string. These were then played through filters corresponding to the admittance curves of different violins. Initially, limits of listener performance in detecting changes in acoustical characteristics were characterized. These consisted of shifts in frequency or increases in amplitude of single modes or frequency bands that have been proposed previously to be significant in the perception of violin sound quality. Thresholds were significantly lower for musically trained than for nontrained subjects but were not significantly affected by the violin used as a baseline. Thresholds for the musicians typically ranged from 3 to 6 dB for amplitude changes and 1.5%-20% for frequency changes. Interpretation of the results using excitation patterns showed that thresholds for the best subjects were quite well predicted by a multichannel model based on optimal processing. PMID:18247771

  17. Critical review and hydrologic application of threshold detection methods for the generalized Pareto (GP) distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamalakis, Antonios; Langousis, Andreas; Deidda, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of extreme rainfall from data constitutes one of the most important issues in statistical hydrology, as it is associated with the design of hydraulic structures and flood water management. To that extent, based on asymptotic arguments from Extreme Excess (EE) theory, several studies have focused on developing new, or improving existing methods to fit a generalized Pareto (GP) distribution model to rainfall excesses above a properly selected threshold u. The latter is generally determined using various approaches, such as non-parametric methods that are intended to locate the changing point between extreme and non-extreme regions of the data, graphical methods where one studies the dependence of GP distribution parameters (or related metrics) on the threshold level u, and Goodness of Fit (GoF) metrics that, for a certain level of significance, locate the lowest threshold u that a GP distribution model is applicable. In this work, we review representative methods for GP threshold detection, discuss fundamental differences in their theoretical bases, and apply them to 1714 daily rainfall records from the NOAA-NCDC open-access database, with more than 110 years of data. We find that non-parametric methods that are intended to locate the changing point between extreme and non-extreme regions of the data are generally not reliable, while methods that are based on asymptotic properties of the upper distribution tail lead to unrealistically high threshold and shape parameter estimates. The latter is justified by theoretical arguments, and it is especially the case in rainfall applications, where the shape parameter of the GP distribution is low; i.e. on the order of 0.1 ÷ 0.2. Better performance is demonstrated by graphical methods and GoF metrics that rely on pre-asymptotic properties of the GP distribution. For daily rainfall, we find that GP threshold estimates range between 2÷12 mm/d with a mean value of 6.5 mm/d, while the existence of quantization in the

  18. Milagro: A low energy threshold extensive air shower array

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnis, C.

    1994-12-31

    Observations of high-energy gamma rays from astronomical sources have revolutionized our view of the cosmos. Gamma rays with energies up to {approximately}10 GeV can be observed directly with space-based instruments. Above 100 GeV the low flux of gamma rays requires one to utilize ground-based instruments. Milagro is a new type of gamma-ray detector based on water Cerenkov technology. This new design will enable to continuously observe the entire overhead sky, and be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above {approximately}250 GeV. These attributes make Milagro an ideal detector for the study of high-energy transient phenomenon.

  19. MOA-2010-BLG-311: A PLANETARY CANDIDATE BELOW THE THRESHOLD OF RELIABLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, J. C.; Hung, L.-W.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Bond, I. A.; Allen, W.; Monard, L. A. G.; Albrow, M. D.; Fouque, P.; Dominik, M.; Tsapras, Y.; Udalski, A.; Zellem, R.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Drummond, J.; Gorbikov, E.; Han, C. E-mail: rzellem@lpl.arizona.edu; Collaboration: muFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2013-05-20

    We analyze MOA-2010-BLG-311, a high magnification (A{sub max} > 600) microlensing event with complete data coverage over the peak, making it very sensitive to planetary signals. We fit this event with both a point lens and a two-body lens model and find that the two-body lens model is a better fit but with only {Delta}{chi}{sup 2} {approx} 80. The preferred mass ratio between the lens star and its companion is q = 10{sup -3.7{+-}0.1}, placing the candidate companion in the planetary regime. Despite the formal significance of the planet, we show that because of systematics in the data the evidence for a planetary companion to the lens is too tenuous to claim a secure detection. When combined with analyses of other high-magnification events, this event helps empirically define the threshold for reliable planet detection in high-magnification events, which remains an open question.

  20. The relationship between intelligence and creativity: New support for the threshold hypothesis by means of empirical breakpoint detection.

    PubMed

    Jauk, Emanuel; Benedek, Mathias; Dunst, Beate; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2013-07-01

    The relationship between intelligence and creativity has been subject to empirical research for decades. Nevertheless, there is yet no consensus on how these constructs are related. One of the most prominent notions concerning the interplay between intelligence and creativity is the threshold hypothesis, which assumes that above-average intelligence represents a necessary condition for high-level creativity. While earlier research mostly supported the threshold hypothesis, it has come under fire in recent investigations. The threshold hypothesis is commonly investigated by splitting a sample at a given threshold (e.g., at 120 IQ points) and estimating separate correlations for lower and upper IQ ranges. However, there is no compelling reason why the threshold should be fixed at an IQ of 120, and to date, no attempts have been made to detect the threshold empirically. Therefore, this study examined the relationship between intelligence and different indicators of creative potential and of creative achievement by means of segmented regression analysis in a sample of 297 participants. Segmented regression allows for the detection of a threshold in continuous data by means of iterative computational algorithms. We found thresholds only for measures of creative potential but not for creative achievement. For the former the thresholds varied as a function of criteria: When investigating a liberal criterion of ideational originality (i.e., two original ideas), a threshold was detected at around 100 IQ points. In contrast, a threshold of 120 IQ points emerged when the criterion was more demanding (i.e., many original ideas). Moreover, an IQ of around 85 IQ points was found to form the threshold for a purely quantitative measure of creative potential (i.e., ideational fluency). These results confirm the threshold hypothesis for qualitative indicators of creative potential and may explain some of the observed discrepancies in previous research. In addition, we obtained

  1. P wave detection thresholds, Pn velocity estimates, and T wave location uncertainty from oceanic hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Philip D.; Fox, Christopher G.; Dziak, Robert P.

    1999-06-01

    P wave arrivals recorded by the U.S. Navy's SOund SUrveillance System (SOSUS) hydrophone arrays were used to estimate earthquake detection thresholds and Pn velocities in the northeast Pacific Ocean. The Navy hydrophones have been used successfully to detect and locate oceanic earthquakes using their waterborne acoustic tertiary (T) waves; however, use of these hydrophones for seismic body wave detection allows regional seismic analyses to be extended to the oceanic environment. The P wave detection threshold of the SOSUS hydrophones was quantified using the epicentral distance and magnitude of 250 northeast Pacific Ocean earthquakes. Earthquakes with body wave magnitudes as low as 2 have detectable P wave arrivals at epicentral distances of ≤500 km. Earthquakes with mb between 3.5 and 5 were detected ˜50% of the time at distances of 100-1500 km, while events with mb > 5 were all detected, even out to distances of 1000-1500 km. Both P and T wave hydrophone arrival times were used to estimate the epicenters of 100 earthquakes. The peak amplitude of the T wave coda and the onset of the P wave were used as the earthquake arrival times to estimate event locations. T wave arrival time residuals have a Gaussian distribution with zero mean, which implies that using T wave peak amplitude is consistent with using the P wave onset as the arrival time. There are typically ≤6 stations used to derive a T wave based location, hence location error ellipses are not well constrained. A Monte Carlo technique was employed to estimate T wave event location uncertainty. T wave locations have error bars of ˜1 km in latitude and longitude when >3 hydrophones are used for a location estimate. The detected P wave arrivals and earthquake locations were used to measure Pn velocities. Pn velocity values of 7.9 ± 0.1 and 8.0 ± 0.1 km/s were found for the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates, respectively. A Pn velocity of 7.5 ± 0.1 km/s was measured for rays traveling northward from the

  2. Adaptive Thresholding Technique for Retinal Vessel Segmentation Based on GLCM-Energy Information

    PubMed Central

    Mapayi, Temitope; Viriri, Serestina; Tapamo, Jules-Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Although retinal vessel segmentation has been extensively researched, a robust and time efficient segmentation method is highly needed. This paper presents a local adaptive thresholding technique based on gray level cooccurrence matrix- (GLCM-) energy information for retinal vessel segmentation. Different thresholds were computed using GLCM-energy information. An experimental evaluation on DRIVE database using the grayscale intensity and Green Channel of the retinal image demonstrates the high performance of the proposed local adaptive thresholding technique. The maximum average accuracy rates of 0.9511 and 0.9510 with maximum average sensitivity rates of 0.7650 and 0.7641 were achieved on DRIVE and STARE databases, respectively. When compared to the widely previously used techniques on the databases, the proposed adaptive thresholding technique is time efficient with a higher average sensitivity and average accuracy rates in the same range of very good specificity. PMID:25802550

  3. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Thomas James

    2014-10-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed effective fiducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection sufficient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125--128 were analyzed for the first time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel "mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have significant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them difficult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent fiducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for

  4. Spatial and Temporal Varying Thresholds for Cloud Detection in Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Haines, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    A new cloud detection technique has been developed and applied to both geostationary and polar orbiting satellite imagery having channels in the thermal infrared and short wave infrared spectral regions. The bispectral composite threshold (BCT) technique uses only the 11 micron and 3.9 micron channels, and composite imagery generated from these channels, in a four-step cloud detection procedure to produce a binary cloud mask at single pixel resolution. A unique aspect of this algorithm is the use of 20-day composites of the 11 micron and the 11 - 3.9 micron channel difference imagery to represent spatially and temporally varying clear-sky thresholds for the bispectral cloud tests. The BCT cloud detection algorithm has been applied to GOES and MODIS data over the continental United States over the last three years with good success. The resulting products have been validated against "truth" datasets (generated by the manual determination of the sky conditions from available satellite imagery) for various seasons from the 2003-2005 periods. The day and night algorithm has been shown to determine the correct sky conditions 80-90% of the time (on average) over land and ocean areas. Only a small variation in algorithm performance occurs between day-night, land-ocean, and between seasons. The algorithm performs least well. during he winter season with only 80% of the sky conditions determined correctly. The algorithm was found to under-determine clouds at night and during times of low sun angle (in geostationary satellite data) and tends to over-determine the presence of clouds during the day, particularly in the summertime. Since the spectral tests use only the short- and long-wave channels common to most multispectral scanners; the application of the BCT technique to a variety of satellite sensors including SEVERI should be straightforward and produce similar performance results.

  5. Flood Extent Mapping for Namibia Using Change Detection and Thresholding with SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Stephanie; Fatoyinbo, Temilola E.; Policelli, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    A new method for flood detection change detection and thresholding (CDAT) was used with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to delineate the extent of flooding for the Chobe floodplain in the Caprivi region of Namibia. This region experiences annual seasonal flooding and has seen a recent renewal of severe flooding after a long dry period in the 1990s. Flooding in this area has caused loss of life and livelihoods for the surrounding communities and has caught the attention of disaster relief agencies. There is a need for flood extent mapping techniques that can be used to process images quickly, providing near real-time flooding information to relief agencies. ENVISAT/ASAR and Radarsat-2 images were acquired for several flooding seasons from February 2008 to March 2013. The CDAT method was used to determine flooding from these images and includes the use of image subtraction, decision based classification with threshold values, and segmentation of SAR images. The total extent of flooding determined for 2009, 2011 and 2012 was about 542 km2, 720 km2, and 673 km2 respectively. Pixels determined to be flooded in vegetation were typically <0.5 % of the entire scene, with the exception of 2009 where the detection of flooding in vegetation was much greater (almost one third of the total flooded area). The time to maximum flooding for the 2013 flood season was determined to be about 27 days. Landsat water classification was used to compare the results from the new CDAT with SAR method; the results show good spatial agreement with Landsat scenes.

  6. An adaptive threshold based image processing technique for improved glaucoma detection and classification.

    PubMed

    Issac, Ashish; Partha Sarathi, M; Dutta, Malay Kishore

    2015-11-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy which is one of the main causes of permanent blindness worldwide. This paper presents an automatic image processing based method for detection of glaucoma from the digital fundus images. In this proposed work, the discriminatory parameters of glaucoma infection, such as cup to disc ratio (CDR), neuro retinal rim (NRR) area and blood vessels in different regions of the optic disc has been used as features and fed as inputs to learning algorithms for glaucoma diagnosis. These features which have discriminatory changes with the occurrence of glaucoma are strategically used for training the classifiers to improve the accuracy of identification. The segmentation of optic disc and cup based on adaptive threshold of the pixel intensities lying in the optic nerve head region. Unlike existing methods the proposed algorithm is based on an adaptive threshold that uses local features from the fundus image for segmentation of optic cup and optic disc making it invariant to the quality of the image and noise content which may find wider acceptability. The experimental results indicate that such features are more significant in comparison to the statistical or textural features as considered in existing works. The proposed work achieves an accuracy of 94.11% with a sensitivity of 100%. A comparison of the proposed work with the existing methods indicates that the proposed approach has improved accuracy of classification glaucoma from a digital fundus which may be considered clinically significant. PMID:26321351

  7. Validation of efficiency tracing and zero detection threshold techniques using liquid scintillation analyser TriCarb.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P J; Bhade, S P D; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2011-11-01

    Efficiency tracing with unquenched 14C and zero detection threshold with unquenched 3H as tracers are practical and simple techniques which have been implemented to quantify the activity of various beta emitters using liquid scintillation analyser. These techniques are used to study the influence of quench level on activity quantification and the activity levels up to which these techniques are applicable. The results indicate that, for an activity level of 166.67 Bq, both the techniques are in good agreement with the reference activity with a relative discrepancy of ≤4.6 %. The relative discrepancy of ~10 % is observed for extreme quench values of ~111. For all the radionuclides with the activity level of 1.67 Bq, the uncertainty in activity quantification raises to ~8 % and for the activity level from 8.33 to 100 Bq, the uncertainty reduces to 1 %. PMID:21196460

  8. Signal detection and threshold modeling of confidence-rating ROCs: A critical test with minimal assumptions.

    PubMed

    Kellen, David; Klauer, Karl Christoph

    2015-07-01

    An ongoing discussion in the recognition-memory literature concerns the question of whether recognition judgments reflect a direct mapping of graded memory representations (a notion that is instantiated by signal detection theory) or whether they are mediated by a discrete-state representation with the possibility of complete information loss (a notion that is instantiated by threshold models). These 2 accounts are usually evaluated by comparing their (penalized) fits to receiver operating characteristic data, a procedure that is predicated on substantial auxiliary assumptions, which if violated can invalidate results. We show that the 2 accounts can be compared on the basis of critical tests that invoke only minimal assumptions. Using previously published receiver operating characteristic data, we show that confidence-rating judgments are consistent with a discrete-state account. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26120910

  9. Discrimination and detection thresholds: the effect of observer criterion on the spatial properties of chromatic and achromatic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Moorhead, I R; Saunders, J E

    1982-01-01

    Spectral sensitivity functions were determined for structured test targets presented on a white background field. Data obtained for threshold detection of the targets are consistent with results obtained from previous studies which used unstructured test fields showing functions, with three maxima, dependent on opponent colour mechanisms. Data obtained from threshold discrimination measurements show a marked reduction in the blue sensitivity when 1 degree test targets are used. This effect decreases significantly when larger targets are used. A change of the observer's criterion can significantly alter the relative contributions of the achromatic and chromatic channels at threshold. PMID:7135843

  10. Evaluation of a Change Detection Methodology by Means of Binary Thresholding Algorithms and Informational Fusion Processes

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Iñigo; Martinez, Estibaliz; Arquero, Agueda; Pajares, Gonzalo; Sanchez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Landcover is subject to continuous changes on a wide variety of temporal and spatial scales. Those changes produce significant effects in human and natural activities. Maintaining an updated spatial database with the occurred changes allows a better monitoring of the Earth’s resources and management of the environment. Change detection (CD) techniques using images from different sensors, such as satellite imagery, aerial photographs, etc., have proven to be suitable and secure data sources from which updated information can be extracted efficiently, so that changes can also be inventoried and monitored. In this paper, a multisource CD methodology for multiresolution datasets is applied. First, different change indices are processed, then different thresholding algorithms for change/no_change are applied to these indices in order to better estimate the statistical parameters of these categories, finally the indices are integrated into a change detection multisource fusion process, which allows generating a single CD result from several combination of indices. This methodology has been applied to datasets with different spectral and spatial resolution properties. Then, the obtained results are evaluated by means of a quality control analysis, as well as with complementary graphical representations. The suggested methodology has also been proved efficiently for identifying the change detection index with the higher contribution. PMID:22737023

  11. CAMS verification of single-linked high-threshold D-criterion detected meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Nénon, Quentin

    2016-03-01

    From preliminary 2010-2011 results of the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) meteoroid orbit survey, which were combined with published 2007-2009 SonotaCo video meteor network data, 55 new meteor showers (##448-502) were identified and added to the IAU Working List on Meteor Showers in 2012. These showers were identified based on an automated single-linked DSH-criterion analysis of a combined 105,000 orbits with high-threshold (a low DSH < 0.05), but low acceptable sample size (⩾6 members). Three more years of CAMS and four more years of SonotaCo observations have now increased the meteoroid orbit database four fold. The earlier detections are verified by searching for number density enhancements in drift-corrected radiant and orbital element maps. Twenty showers are detected in both surveys and are now certain to exist. Median orbital elements are presented. Not detected in this manner were 19% of the fast Vg > 40 km/s showers, 54% of the Vg = 18-40 km/s showers, and 90% of the slow Vg < 18 km/s showers.

  12. Mass Detection in Mammographic Images Using Wavelet Processing and Adaptive Threshold Technique.

    PubMed

    Vikhe, P S; Thool, V R

    2016-04-01

    Detection of mass in mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is a significant assignment in the reduction of the mortality rate. However, in some cases, screening of mass is difficult task for radiologist, due to variation in contrast, fuzzy edges and noisy mammograms. Masses and micro-calcifications are the distinctive signs for diagnosis of breast cancer. This paper presents, a method for mass enhancement using piecewise linear operator in combination with wavelet processing from mammographic images. The method includes, artifact suppression and pectoral muscle removal based on morphological operations. Finally, mass segmentation for detection using adaptive threshold technique is carried out to separate the mass from background. The proposed method has been tested on 130 (45 + 85) images with 90.9 and 91 % True Positive Fraction (TPF) at 2.35 and 2.1 average False Positive Per Image(FP/I) from two different databases, namely Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS) and Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). The obtained results show that, the proposed technique gives improved diagnosis in the early breast cancer detection. PMID:26811073

  13. Threshold displacement energies and defect formation energies in Y2Ti2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haiyan; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J

    2010-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to determine the threshold displacement energies Ed and the corresponding defect configurations, and ab initio methods have been used to accurately determine their formation energies in Y2Ti2O7. The minimum Ed is found to be 27 eV for a Y recoil along the <100> direction, 31.5 eV for Ti atoms along the <100> direction, 14.5 eV for O48f atoms along the <110> direction and 13 eV for O8b atoms along the <111> direction. The average Ed value determined is 32.7, 34.2, 14.2 and 16.1 eV for yttrium, titanium, O48f and O8b atoms, respectively. Cation interstitials at vacant 8a sites, which are generally occupied by oxygen anions, and at the bridge sites between two neighboring cations along the <010> direction are observed after low energy recoil events. A systematic study of defect formation energies suggests that cation interstitials, which are located at 8a sites and bridge sites along the <010> direction, and in split configurations along the <010>, <110> or <111> direction, are all stable with low defect formation energies. It is suggested that the relative stability of cation interstitials may provide a pathway of driving ion-irradiation induced amorphization in Y2Ti2O7.

  14. Macroscopic detection of the strong stochasticity threshold in Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chainsof oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Bastida, M.

    2004-05-01

    The largest Lyapunov exponent of a system composed by a heavy impurity embedded in a chain of anharmonic nearest-neighbor Fermi-Pasta-Ulam oscillators is numerically computed for various values of the impurity mass M . A crossover between weak and strong chaos is obtained at the same value ɛT of the energy density ɛ (energy per degree of freedom) for all the considered values of the impurity mass M . The threshold ɛT coincides with the value of the energy density ɛ at which a change of scaling of the relaxation time of the momentum autocorrelation function of the impurity occurs and that was obtained in a previous work [

    M. Romero-Bastida and E. Braun, Phys. Rev. E 65, 036228 (2002)
    ]. The complete Lyapunov spectrum does not depend significantly on the impurity mass M . These results suggest that the impurity does not contribute significantly to the dynamical instability (chaos) of the chain and can be considered as a probe for the dynamics of the system to which the impurity is coupled. Finally, it is shown that the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of the chain has a crossover from weak to strong chaos at the same value of the energy density as the crossover value ɛT of largest Lyapunov exponent. Implications of this result are discussed.

  15. Location Performance and Detection Threshold of the Spanish National Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; Badal, José; D'Anna, Giuseppe; Papanastassiou, Dimitris; Baskoutas, Ioannis; Özel, Nurcan M.

    2013-11-01

    Spain is a low-to-moderate seismicity area with relatively low seismic hazard. However, several strong shallow earthquakes have shaken the country causing casualties and extensive damage. Regional seismicity is monitored and surveyed by means of the Spanish National Seismic Network, maintenance and control of which are entrusted to the Instituto Geográfico Nacional. This array currently comprises 120 seismic stations distributed throughout Spanish territory (mainland and islands). Basically, we are interested in checking the noise conditions, reliability, and seismic detection capability of the Spanish network by analyzing the background noise level affecting the array stations, errors in hypocentral location, and detection threshold, which provides knowledge about network performance. It also enables testing of the suitability of the velocity model used in the routine process of earthquake location. To perform this study we use a method that relies on P and S wave travel times, which are computed by simulation of seismic rays from virtual seismic sources placed at the nodes of a regular grid covering the study area. Given the characteristics of the seismicity of Spain, we drew maps for M L magnitudes 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0, at a focal depth of 10 km and a confidence level 95 %. The results relate to the number of stations involved in the hypocentral location process, how these stations are distributed spatially, and the uncertainties of focal data (errors in origin time, longitude, latitude, and depth). To assess the extent to which principal seismogenic areas are well monitored by the network, we estimated the average error in the location of a seismic source from the semiaxes of the ellipsoid of confidence by calculating the radius of the equivalent sphere. Finally, the detection threshold was determined as the magnitude of the smallest seismic event detected at least by four stations. The northwest of the peninsula, the Pyrenees, especially the westernmost segment

  16. Development Of An Electronic Nose For Environmental Monitoring: Detection Of Specific Environmentally Important Gases At Their Odor Detection Threshold Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentoni, Licinia; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Del Rosso, Renato; Centola, Paolo; Della Torre, Matteo; Demattè, Fabrizio

    2011-09-01

    The use of a sensor array is demonstrated to be an effective approach to evaluate hazardous odor (or gas) emissions from industrial sites1. Therefore the possibility to use electronic noses for the prolonged survey of odor emissions from industrial sites is of particular interest for environmental monitoring purposes2. At the Olfactometric Laboratory of the Politecnico di Milano, in collaboration with Sacmi Group, Imola, an innovative electronic nose for the continuous monitoring of environmental odors is being developed. The aim of this work is to show the laboratory tests conducted to evaluate the capability of the electronic nose to recognize some specific environmentally important gases at their odor detection threshold concentration. The laboratory studies up to now focused on ammonia and butyric acid, those being compounds that can typically be found in the emissions from waste treatment plants, that may cause health effects when they exceed a given concentration level. The laboratory tests proved the sensors to be sensitive towards the considered compounds and the system to be capable of discriminating between odorous or non-odorous air, with a detection limit comparable with the detection limit of human nose.

  17. Threshold displacement energies and defect formation energies in Y2Ti2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2010-10-20

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to determine both the threshold displacement energies Ed and corresponding defect configurations, and ab initio methods have been used to accurately determine the formation energies in Y2Ti2O7. The minimum Ed is found to be 27 eV for a Y recoil along the <100> direction, 31.5 eV for Ti atoms along the <100> direction, 14.5 eV for O48f atoms along the <110> direction and 13 eV for O8b atoms along the <111> direction. The average Ed value along three directions determined is 35.1, 35.4, 17.0 and 16.2 eV for yttrium, titanium, O48f and O8b atoms, respectively. Cation interstitials at vacant 8a sites, which are generally occupied by oxygen anions, and at the bridge sites between two neighboring cations along the <010> direction are observed after low energy recoil events. A systematic study of the defect formation energies suggests that cation interstitials, which are located at 8a sites and bridge sites along the <010> direction, and in split configurations along the <010>, <110> or <111> direction, are all stable in these configurations. It is suggested that the relative stability of cation interstitials may provide a pathway of driving ion-irradiation induced amorphization in Y2Ti2O7.

  18. Automatic Detection of Masses in Mammograms Using Quality Threshold Clustering, Correlogram Function, and SVM.

    PubMed

    de Nazaré Silva, Joberth; de Carvalho Filho, Antonio Oseas; Corrêa Silva, Aristófanes; Cardoso de Paiva, Anselmo; Gattass, Marcelo

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world. Several computer-aided detection and diagnosis systems have been used to assist health experts and to indicate suspect areas that would be difficult to perceive by the human eye; this approach has aided in the detection and diagnosis of cancer. The present work proposes a method for the automatic detection of masses in digital mammograms by using quality threshold (QT), a correlogram function, and the support vector machine (SVM). This methodology comprises the following steps: The first step is to perform preprocessing with a low-pass filter, which increases the scale of the contrast, and the next step is to use an enhancement to the wavelet transform with a linear function. After the preprocessing is segmentation using QT; then, we perform post-processing, which involves the selection of the best mass candidates. This step is performed by analyzing the shape descriptors through the SVM. For the stage that involves the extraction of texture features, we used Haralick descriptors and a correlogram function. In the classification stage, the SVM was again used for training, validation, and final test. The results were as follows: sensitivity 92.31 %, specificity 82.2 %, accuracy 83.53 %, mean rate of false positives per image 1.12, and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve 0.8033. Breast cancer is notable for presenting the highest mortality rate in addition to one of the smallest survival rates after diagnosis. An early diagnosis means a considerable increase in the survival chance of the patients. The methodology proposed herein contributes to the early diagnosis and survival rate and, thus, proves to be a useful tool for specialists who attempt to anticipate the detection of masses. PMID:25277539

  19. Evaluation of pre-processing, thresholding and post-processing steps for very small target detection in infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardımcı, Ozan; Ulusoy, Ä.°lkay

    2016-05-01

    Pre-processing, thresholding and post-processing stages are very important especially for very small target detection from infrared images. The effects of these stages to the final detection performance are measured in this study. Various methods for each stage are compared based on the final detection performance, which is defined by precision and recall values. Among various methods, the best method for each stage is selected and proved. For the pre-processing stage, local block based methods perform the best, nearly for all thresholding methods. The best thresholding method is chosen as the one, which does not need any user defined parameter. Finally, the post processing method, which is suitable for the best performing pre-processing and thesholding methods is selected.

  20. The intrapleural volume threshold for ultrasound detection of pneumothoraces: An experimental study on porcine models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Small pneumothoraxes (PTXs) may not impart an immediate threat to trauma patients after chest injuries. However, the amount of pleural air may increase and become a concern for patients who require positive pressure ventilation or air ambulance transport. Lung ultrasonography (US) is a reliable tool in finding intrapleural air, but the performance characteristics regarding the detection of small PTXs need to be defined. The study aimed to define the volume threshold of intrapleural air when PTXs are accurately diagnosed with US and compare this volume with that for chest x-ray (CXR). Methods Air was insufflated into a unilateral pleural catheter in seven incremental steps (10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 350 and 500 mL) in 20 intubated porcine models, followed by a diagnostic evaluation with US and a supine anteroposterior CXR. The sonographers continued the US scanning until the PTXs could be ruled in, based on the pathognomonic US “lung point” sign. The corresponding threshold volume was noted. A senior radiologist interpreted the CXR images. Results The mean threshold volume to confirm the diagnosis of PTX using US was 18 mL (standard deviation of 13 mL). Sixty-five percent of the PTXs were already diagnosed at 10 mL of intrapleural air; 25%, at 25 mL; and the last 10%, at 50 mL. At an air volume of 50 mL, the radiologist only identified four out of 20 PTXs in the CXR pictures; i.e., a sensitivity of 20% (95% CI: 7%, 44%). The sensitivity of CXR increased as a function of volume but leveled off at 67%, leaving one-third (1/3) of the PTXs unidentified after 500 mL of insufflated air. Conclusion Lung US is very accurate in diagnosing even small amounts of intrapleural air and should be performed by clinicians treating chest trauma patients when PTX is among the differential diagnoses. PMID:23453044

  1. Different thresholds for detection and discrimination of odors in the honey bee (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Wright, Geraldine A; Smith, Brian H

    2004-02-01

    Naturally occurring odors used by animals for mate recognition, food identification and other purposes must be detected at concentrations that vary across several orders of magnitude. Olfactory systems must therefore have the capacity to represent odors over a large range of concentrations regardless of dramatic changes in the salience, or perceived intensity, of a stimulus. The stability of the representation of an odor relative to other odors across concentration has not been extensively evaluated. We tested the ability of honey bees to discriminate pure odorants across a range of concentrations at and above their detection threshold. Our study showed that pure odorant compounds became progressively easier for honey bees to discriminate with increasing concentration. Discrimination is, therefore, a function of odorant concentration. We hypothesize that the recruitment of sensory cell populations across a range of concentrations may be important for odor coding, perhaps by changing its perceptual qualities or by increasing its salience against background stimuli, and that this mechanism is a general property of olfactory systems. PMID:14977809

  2. Image overlay solution based on threshold detection for a compact near infrared fluorescence goggle system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shengkui; Mondal, Suman B; Zhu, Nan; Liang, RongGuang; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has shown great potential for various clinical procedures, including intraoperative image guidance. However, existing NIR fluorescence imaging systems either have a large footprint or are handheld, which limits their usage in intraoperative applications. We present a compact NIR fluorescence imaging system (NFIS) with an image overlay solution based on threshold detection, which can be easily integrated with a goggle display system for intraoperative guidance. The proposed NFIS achieves compactness, light weight, hands-free operation, high-precision superimposition, and a real-time frame rate. In addition, the miniature and ultra-lightweight light-emitting diode tracking pod is easy to incorporate with NIR fluorescence imaging. Based on experimental evaluation, the proposed NFIS solution has a lower detection limit of 25 nM of indocyanine green at 27 fps and realizes a highly precise image overlay of NIR and visible images of mice in vivo. The overlay error is limited within a 2-mm scale at a 65-cm working distance, which is highly reliable for clinical study and surgical use. PMID:25607724

  3. Image overlay solution based on threshold detection for a compact near infrared fluorescence goggle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shengkui; Mondal, Suman B.; Zhu, Nan; Liang, RongGuang; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has shown great potential for various clinical procedures, including intraoperative image guidance. However, existing NIR fluorescence imaging systems either have a large footprint or are handheld, which limits their usage in intraoperative applications. We present a compact NIR fluorescence imaging system (NFIS) with an image overlay solution based on threshold detection, which can be easily integrated with a goggle display system for intraoperative guidance. The proposed NFIS achieves compactness, light weight, hands-free operation, high-precision superimposition, and a real-time frame rate. In addition, the miniature and ultra-lightweight light-emitting diode tracking pod is easy to incorporate with NIR fluorescence imaging. Based on experimental evaluation, the proposed NFIS solution has a lower detection limit of 25 nM of indocyanine green at 27 fps and realizes a highly precise image overlay of NIR and visible images of mice in vivo. The overlay error is limited within a 2-mm scale at a 65-cm working distance, which is highly reliable for clinical study and surgical use.

  4. Image overlay solution based on threshold detection for a compact near infrared fluorescence goggle system

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shengkui; Mondal, Suman B.; Zhu, Nan; Liang, RongGuang; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has shown great potential for various clinical procedures, including intraoperative image guidance. However, existing NIR fluorescence imaging systems either have a large footprint or are handheld, which limits their usage in intraoperative applications. We present a compact NIR fluorescence imaging system (NFIS) with an image overlay solution based on threshold detection, which can be easily integrated with a goggle display system for intraoperative guidance. The proposed NFIS achieves compactness, light weight, hands-free operation, high-precision superimposition, and a real-time frame rate. In addition, the miniature and ultra-lightweight light-emitting diode tracking pod is easy to incorporate with NIR fluorescence imaging. Based on experimental evaluation, the proposed NFIS solution has a lower detection limit of 25 nM of indocyanine green at 27 fps and realizes a highly precise image overlay of NIR and visible images of mice in vivo. The overlay error is limited within a 2-mm scale at a 65-cm working distance, which is highly reliable for clinical study and surgical use. PMID:25607724

  5. Audiograms, gap detection thresholds, and frequency difference limens in cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Toal, Katrina L; Radziwon, Kelly E; Holfoth, David P; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A; Dent, Micheal L

    2016-02-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is found at several stages in the auditory pathway, but its role in hearing is unknown. Hearing abilities were measured in CB1R knockout mice and compared to those of wild-type mice. Operant conditioning and the psychophysical Method of Constant Stimuli were used to measure audiograms, gap detection thresholds, and frequency difference limens in trained mice using the same methods and stimuli as in previous experiments. CB1R knockout mice showed deficits at frequencies above 8 kHz in their audiograms relative to wild-type mice. CB1R knockouts showed enhancements for detecting gaps in low-pass noisebursts relative to wild-type mice, but were similar for other noise conditions. Finally, the two groups of mice did not differ in their frequency discrimination abilities as measured by the frequency difference limens task. These experiments suggest that the CB1R is involved in auditory processing and lay the groundwork for future physiological experiments. PMID:26427583

  6. Quantitative prediction of perceptual decisions during near-threshold fear detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessoa, Luiz; Padmala, Srikanth

    2005-04-01

    A fundamental goal of cognitive neuroscience is to explain how mental decisions originate from basic neural mechanisms. The goal of the present study was to investigate the neural correlates of perceptual decisions in the context of emotional perception. To probe this question, we investigated how fluctuations in functional MRI (fMRI) signals were correlated with behavioral choice during a near-threshold fear detection task. fMRI signals predicted behavioral choice independently of stimulus properties and task accuracy in a network of brain regions linked to emotional processing: posterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, and left insula. We quantified the link between fMRI signals and behavioral choice in a whole-brain analysis by determining choice probabilities by means of signal-detection theory methods. Our results demonstrate that voxel-wise fMRI signals can reliably predict behavioral choice in a quantitative fashion (choice probabilities ranged from 0.63 to 0.78) at levels comparable to neuronal data. We suggest that the conscious decision that a fearful face has been seen is represented across a network of interconnected brain regions that prepare the organism to appropriately handle emotionally challenging stimuli and that regulate the associated emotional response. decision making | emotion | functional MRI

  7. Noisy decision thresholds can account for suboptimal detection of low coherence motion.

    PubMed

    Price, Nicholas S C; VanCuylenberg, John B

    2016-01-01

    Noise in sensory signals can vary over both space and time. Moving random dot stimuli are commonly used to quantify how the visual system accounts for spatial noise. In these stimuli, a fixed proportion of "signal" dots move in the same direction and the remaining "noise" dots are randomly replotted. The spatial coherence, or proportion of signal versus noise dots, is fixed across time; however, this means that little is known about how temporally-noisy signals are integrated. Here we use a stimulus with low temporal coherence; the signal direction is only presented on a fraction of frames. Human observers are able to reliably detect and discriminate the direction of a 200 ms motion pulse, even when just 25% of frames within the pulse move in the signal direction. Using psychophysical reverse-correlation analyses, we show that observers are strongly influenced by the number of near-target directions spread throughout the pulse, and that consecutive signal frames have only a small additional influence on perception. Finally, we develop a model inspired by the leaky integration of the responses of direction-selective neurons, which reliably represents motion direction, and which can account for observers' sub-optimal detection of motion pulses by incorporating a noisy decision threshold. PMID:26726736

  8. Noisy decision thresholds can account for suboptimal detection of low coherence motion

    PubMed Central

    Price, Nicholas S. C.; VanCuylenberg, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Noise in sensory signals can vary over both space and time. Moving random dot stimuli are commonly used to quantify how the visual system accounts for spatial noise. In these stimuli, a fixed proportion of “signal” dots move in the same direction and the remaining “noise” dots are randomly replotted. The spatial coherence, or proportion of signal versus noise dots, is fixed across time; however, this means that little is known about how temporally-noisy signals are integrated. Here we use a stimulus with low temporal coherence; the signal direction is only presented on a fraction of frames. Human observers are able to reliably detect and discriminate the direction of a 200 ms motion pulse, even when just 25% of frames within the pulse move in the signal direction. Using psychophysical reverse-correlation analyses, we show that observers are strongly influenced by the number of near-target directions spread throughout the pulse, and that consecutive signal frames have only a small additional influence on perception. Finally, we develop a model inspired by the leaky integration of the responses of direction-selective neurons, which reliably represents motion direction, and which can account for observers’ sub-optimal detection of motion pulses by incorporating a noisy decision threshold. PMID:26726736

  9. Electrodynamic model of the field effect transistor application for THz/subTHz radiation detection: Subthreshold and above threshold operation

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrovolsky, V.

    2014-10-21

    Developed in this work is an electrodynamic model of field effect transistor (FET) application for THz/subTHz radiation detection. It is based on solution of the Maxwell equations in the gate dielectric, expression for current in the channel, which takes into account both the drift and diffusion current components, and the equation of current continuity. For the regimes under and above threshold at the strong inversion the response voltage, responsivity, wave impedance, power of ohmic loss in the gate and channel have been found, and the electrical noise equivalent power (ENEP) has been estimated. The responsivity is orders of magnitude higher and ENEP under threshold is orders of magnitude less than these values above threshold. Under the threshold, the electromagnetic field in the gate oxide is identical to field of the plane waves in free-space. At the same time, for strong inversion the charging of the gate capacitance through the resistance of channel determines the electric field in oxide.

  10. Threshold Energy Density of Lower Hybrid Waves in the Freja Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Popel, S. I.

    2001-05-15

    Data from the Freja satellite experiment on the lower hybrid turbulence in the Earth's magnetosphere are analyzed. It is shown that the observed threshold energy density of lower hybrid waves required for the excitation of localized wave packets is in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  11. A vertical-energy-thresholding procedure for data reduction with multiple complex curves.

    PubMed

    Jung, Uk; Jeong, Myong K; Lu, Jye-Chyi

    2006-10-01

    Due to the development of sensing and computer technology, measurements of many process variables are available in current manufacturing processes. It is very challenging, however, to process a large amount of information in a limited time in order to make decisions about the health of the processes and products. This paper develops a "preprocessing" procedure for multiple sets of complicated functional data in order to reduce the data size for supporting timely decision analyses. The data type studied has been used for fault detection, root-cause analysis, and quality improvement in such engineering applications as automobile and semiconductor manufacturing and nanomachining processes. The proposed vertical-energy-thresholding (VET) procedure balances the reconstruction error against data-reduction efficiency so that it is effective in capturing key patterns in the multiple data signals. The selected wavelet coefficients are treated as the "reduced-size" data in subsequent analyses for decision making. This enhances the ability of the existing statistical and machine-learning procedures to handle high-dimensional functional data. A few real-life examples demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed procedure compared to several ad hoc techniques extended from single-curve-based data modeling and denoising procedures. PMID:17036818

  12. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, Thomas James

    2014-12-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed e ective ducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection su cient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125 - 128 were analyzed for the rst time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel \\mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have signi cant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them di cult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent ducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for mid- to low

  13. Silicon threshold displacement energy determined by photoluminescence in electron-irradiated cubic silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Jeremie; Esnouf, Stephane; Petite, Guillaume; Costantini, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-15

    In view of the potential use of silicon carbide (SiC) in the nuclear industry, it is of major interest to understand point defect formation in this material. This work is a contribution to the determination of the silicon threshold displacement energy in the cubic polytype of SiC using electron irradiations with increasing energies from 275 to 680 keV. The photoluminescence signal of the silicon vacancy was related to the number of displacements per atom in the silicon sublattice. This quantity was calculated taking into account the energy loss and angular dispersion of electrons in the target. A best fit of experimental data was obtained for a displacement cross section using a threshold displacement energy of 25 eV along the [100] lattice direction. We checked the relevance of this result by comparing the experimental concentration of silicon single vacancies measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with the theoretical number of displaced silicon atoms.

  14. A Novel Thresholding Based Algorithm for Detection of Vertical Root Fracture in Nonendodontically Treated Premolar Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Johari, Masume; Esmaeili, Farzad; Andalib, Alireza; Garjani, Shabnam; Saberkari, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an efficient algorithm is proposed for detection of vertical root fractures (VRFs) in periapical (PA), and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) radiographs of nonendodontically treated premolar teeth. PA and CBCT images are divided into some sub-categories based on the fracture space between the two fragments as small, medium, and large for PAs and large for CBCTs. These graphics are first denoised using the combination of block matching 3-D filtering, and principle component analysis model. Then, we proposed an adaptive thresholding algorithm based on the modified Wellner model to segment the fracture and canal. Finally, VRFs are identified with a high accuracy through applying continuous wavelet transform on the segmented radiographs and choosing the most optimal value for sub-images based on the lowest interclass variance. Performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated utilizing the different tested criteria. Results illustrate that the range of specificity deviations for PA and CBCT radiographs are 99.69 ± 0.22 and 99.02 ± 0.77, respectively. Furthermore, the sensitivity changes from 61.90 to 77.39 in the case of PA and from 79.54 to 100 in the case of CBCT. Based on our statistical evaluation, the CBCT imaging has the better performance in comparison with PA ones, so this technique could be a useful tool for clinical applications in determining the VRFs. PMID:27186535

  15. Enhanced detection threshold for in vivo cortical stimulation produced by Hebbian conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebesco, James M.; Miller, Lee E.

    2011-02-01

    Normal brain function requires constant adaptation, as an organism learns to associate important sensory stimuli with the appropriate motor actions. Neurological disorders may disrupt these learned associations and require the nervous system to reorganize itself. As a consequence, neural plasticity is a crucial component of normal brain function and a critical mechanism for recovery from injury. Associative, or Hebbian, pairing of pre- and post-synaptic activity has been shown to alter stimulus-evoked responses in vivo; however, to date, such protocols have not been shown to affect the animal's subsequent behavior. We paired stimulus trains separated by a brief time delay to two electrodes in rat sensorimotor cortex, which changed the statistical pattern of spikes during subsequent behavior. These changes were consistent with strengthened functional connections from the leading electrode to the lagging electrode. We then trained rats to respond to a microstimulation cue, and repeated the paradigm using the cue electrode as the leading electrode. This pairing lowered the rat's ICMS-detection threshold, with the same dependence on intra-electrode time lag that we found for the functional connectivity changes. The timecourse of the behavioral effects was very similar to that of the connectivity changes. We propose that the behavioral changes were a consequence of strengthened functional connections from the cue electrode to other regions of sensorimotor cortex. Such paradigms might be used to augment recovery from a stroke, or to promote adaptation in a bidirectional brain-machine interface.

  16. A Novel Thresholding Based Algorithm for Detection of Vertical Root Fracture in Nonendodontically Treated Premolar Teeth.

    PubMed

    Johari, Masume; Esmaeili, Farzad; Andalib, Alireza; Garjani, Shabnam; Saberkari, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an efficient algorithm is proposed for detection of vertical root fractures (VRFs) in periapical (PA), and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) radiographs of nonendodontically treated premolar teeth. PA and CBCT images are divided into some sub-categories based on the fracture space between the two fragments as small, medium, and large for PAs and large for CBCTs. These graphics are first denoised using the combination of block matching 3-D filtering, and principle component analysis model. Then, we proposed an adaptive thresholding algorithm based on the modified Wellner model to segment the fracture and canal. Finally, VRFs are identified with a high accuracy through applying continuous wavelet transform on the segmented radiographs and choosing the most optimal value for sub-images based on the lowest interclass variance. Performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated utilizing the different tested criteria. Results illustrate that the range of specificity deviations for PA and CBCT radiographs are 99.69 ± 0.22 and 99.02 ± 0.77, respectively. Furthermore, the sensitivity changes from 61.90 to 77.39 in the case of PA and from 79.54 to 100 in the case of CBCT. Based on our statistical evaluation, the CBCT imaging has the better performance in comparison with PA ones, so this technique could be a useful tool for clinical applications in determining the VRFs. PMID:27186535

  17. Vibrationally resolved electron-nuclear energy sharing in above-threshold multiphoton dissociation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xufei; Li, Min; Shao, Yun; Liu, Ming-Ming; Xie, Xiguo; Deng, Yongkai; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan

    2016-07-01

    We study the photon energy sharing between the photoelectron and the nuclei in the process of above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of CO molecules by measuring the joint energy spectra. The experimental observation shows that the electron-nuclear energy sharing strongly depends on the vibrational state. The experimental observation shows that both the energy deposited to the nuclei of C O+ and the emitted photoelectron decrease with increasing the vibrational level. Through studying the vibrationally resolved nuclear kinetic energy release and photoelectron energy spectra at different laser intensities, for each vibrational level of C O+ , the nuclei always tend to take the same amount of energy in every vibrational level regardless of the laser intensity, while the energy deposited to the photoelectron varies with respect to the laser intensity because of the ponderomotive shifted energy and the distinct dissociative ionization mechanisms.

  18. Sputtering of cobalt and chromium by argon and xenon ions near the threshold energy region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handoo, A. K.; Ray, P. K.

    1993-01-01

    Sputtering yields of cobalt and chromium by argon and xenon ions with energies below 50 eV are reported. The targets were electroplated on copper substrates. Measurable sputtering yields were obtained from cobalt with ion energies as low as 10 eV. The ion beams were produced by an ion gun. A radioactive tracer technique was used for the quantitative measurement of the sputtering yield. Co-57 and Cr-51 were used as tracers. The yield-energy curves are observed to be concave, which brings into question the practice of finding threshold energies by linear extrapolation.

  19. The energy distribution cross section in threshold electron-atom impact ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.

    1974-01-01

    The flatness of the energy differential cross section in impact ionization is derived analytically in the Wannier theory. However it is shown that the Wannier zone is confined to a region of the order E/5 is less than or equal to epsilon is less than or equal to 4E/5, where E is the available energy and epsilon is the energy of the electrons. By contrasting the known results of photoionization and photodetachment, one can cogently argue that in the complementary region where electrons share their energy very unequally the cross section rises to a value independent of E, and that this region determines the form of the threshold law.

  20. 30 CFR 62.174 - Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected. 62.174 Section 62.174 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.174 Follow-up...

  1. 30 CFR 62.174 - Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected. 62.174 Section 62.174 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.174 Follow-up...

  2. 30 CFR 62.174 - Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected. 62.174 Section 62.174 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.174 Follow-up...

  3. 30 CFR 62.174 - Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Follow-up corrective measures when a standard threshold shift is detected. 62.174 Section 62.174 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.174 Follow-up...

  4. Effect of strain and temperature on the threshold displacement energy in body-centered cubic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeler, Benjamin; Asta, Mark; Hosemann, Peter; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2016-06-01

    The threshold displacement energy (TDE) is the minimum amount of kinetic energy required to displace an atom from its lattice site. The magnitude of the TDE displays significant variance as a function of the crystallographic direction, system temperature and applied strain, among a variety of other factors. It is critically important to determine an accurate value of the TDE in order to calculate the total number of displacements due to a given irradiation condition, and thus to understand the materials response to irradiation. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to calculate the threshold displacement energy in body-centered cubic iron as a function of strain and temperature. With applied strain, a decrease of the TDE of up to approximately 14 eV was observed. A temperature increase from 300 K to 500 K can result in an increase of the TDE of up to approximately 9 eV.

  5. Energy conservation using face detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deotale, Nilesh T.; Kalbande, Dhananjay R.; Mishra, Akassh A.

    2011-10-01

    Computerized Face Detection, is concerned with the difficult task of converting a video signal of a person to written text. It has several applications like face recognition, simultaneous multiple face processing, biometrics, security, video surveillance, human computer interface, image database management, digital cameras use face detection for autofocus, selecting regions of interest in photo slideshows that use a pan-and-scale and The Present Paper deals with energy conservation using face detection. Automating the process to a computer requires the use of various image processing techniques. There are various methods that can be used for Face Detection such as Contour tracking methods, Template matching, Controlled background, Model based, Motion based and color based. Basically, the video of the subject are converted into images are further selected manually for processing. However, several factors like poor illumination, movement of face, viewpoint-dependent Physical appearance, Acquisition geometry, Imaging conditions, Compression artifacts makes Face detection difficult. This paper reports an algorithm for conservation of energy using face detection for various devices. The present paper suggests Energy Conservation can be done by Detecting the Face and reducing the brightness of complete image and then adjusting the brightness of the particular area of an image where the face is located using histogram equalization.

  6. Pyrolysis of 3-Methoxypyridine. Detection and Characterization of the Pyrrolyl Radical by Threshold Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Holzmeier, Fabian; Wagner, Isabella; Fischer, Ingo; Bodi, Andras; Hemberger, Patrick

    2016-07-14

    Pyrolysis of 3-methoxypyridine in a heated pyrolysis reactor was found to be an efficient way to generate the pyrrolyl radical, c-C4H4N, in the gas phase. The threshold photoelectron (TPE) spectrum of this radical was recorded using vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The spectrum revealed a singlet ground state at 9.11 ± 0.02 eV (X̃(+ 1)A) and an excited triplet state (ã(+ 3)A) at 9.43 ± 0.05 eV. Vibrational structure was observed for both cationic states and could be assigned to ring deformation modes. Furthermore, (E)- and (Z)-1-cyanoallyl radicals were found to contribute to the TPE spectrum below 8.9 eV. In addition, we have identified two parallel decomposition channels of the pyrrolyl radical, yielding either hydrogen cyanide and propargyl radical or acetylene and cyanomethyl radical. The reaction energy profiles have also been calculated for these reactions. In addition, the dissociative photoionization of the precursor 3-methoxypyridine is reported. PMID:26698131

  7. An objective method for measuring face detection thresholds using the sweep steady-state visual evoked response.

    PubMed

    Ales, Justin M; Farzin, Faraz; Rossion, Bruno; Norcia, Anthony M

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a sensitive method for measuring face detection thresholds rapidly, objectively, and independently of low-level visual cues. The method is based on the swept parameter steady-state visual evoked potential (ssVEP), in which a stimulus is presented at a specific temporal frequency while parametrically varying ("sweeping") the detectability of the stimulus. Here, the visibility of a face image was increased by progressive derandomization of the phase spectra of the image in a series of equally spaced steps. Alternations between face and fully randomized images at a constant rate (3/s) elicit a robust first harmonic response at 3 Hz specific to the structure of the face. High-density EEG was recorded from 10 human adult participants, who were asked to respond with a button-press as soon as they detected a face. The majority of participants produced an evoked response at the first harmonic (3 Hz) that emerged abruptly between 30% and 35% phase-coherence of the face, which was most prominent on right occipito-temporal sites. Thresholds for face detection were estimated reliably in single participants from 15 trials, or on each of the 15 individual face trials. The ssVEP-derived thresholds correlated with the concurrently measured perceptual face detection thresholds. This first application of the sweep VEP approach to high-level vision provides a sensitive and objective method that could be used to measure and compare visual perception thresholds for various object shapes and levels of categorization in different human populations, including infants and individuals with developmental delay. PMID:23024355

  8. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for threshold detection of stimulus-response curves.

    PubMed

    Duc, Luu Hoang; Chávez, Joseph Páez; Son, Doan Thai; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In biochemical networks transient dynamics plays a fundamental role, since the activation of signalling pathways is determined by thresholds encountered during the transition from an initial state (e.g. an initial concentration of a certain protein) to a steady-state. These thresholds can be defined in terms of the inflection points of the stimulus-response curves associated to the activation processes in the biochemical network. In the present work, we present a rigorous discussion as to the suitability of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for the detection of inflection points of stimulus-response curves with sigmoidal shape. PMID:27416142

  9. Congenital hypothyroidism with neurological and respiratory alterations: a case detected using a variable diagnostic threshold for TSH.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Jesús; Alonso-Fernández, Jóse Ramón; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Colón, Cristóbal; Cabanas, Paloma; Heredia, Claudia; Castaño, Luis Antonio; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Couce, M Luz; Pombo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) with neurological and respiratory alterations due to a heterozygotic c.374-1G > A mutation of TITF1/NKX2-1. The hypothyroidism was detected using a neonatal screening protocol in which the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) threshold is re-set each day on the basis of within-day variability and between-day variation. In this case, the threshold on the day of the initial analysis was 8.2 mIU/L, and the measured TSH level in heel-prick blood was 8.3 mIU/L. PMID:22155464

  10. Congenital Hypothyroidism with Neurological and Respiratory Alterations: A Case Detected Using a Variable Diagnostic Threshold for TSH

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Jesús; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Colón, Cristóbal; Cabanas, Paloma; Heredia, Claudia; Castaño, Luis Antonio; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Couce, M.Luz; Pombo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) with neurological and respiratory alterations due to a heterozygotic c.374-1G > A mutation of TITF1/NKX2-1. The hypothyroidism was detected using a neonatal screening protocol in which the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) threshold is re-set each day on the basis of within-day variability and between-day variation. In this case, the threshold on the day of the initial analysis was 8.2 mIU/L, and the measured TSH level in heel-prick blood was 8.3 mIU/L. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22155464

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of threshold displacement energies in SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Xiao, Haiyan; Zhang, Yanwen; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to study low-energy recoil events in SrTiO3. The threshold displacement energies are shown to be strongly dependent on both the orientation and the corresponding atomic arrangement. The minimum threshold displacement energies are 13 eV for an O recoil along the <100> O-O chain, 25 eV for a Sr recoil along the <100> Sr-Sr chain and 38 eV for a Ti recoil along the <110> Ti-Ti chain. The weighted average threshold displacement energies along the primary crystallographic directions are 35.7, 53.5 and > 64.9 eV for O, Sr and Ti, respectively. The interstitial configurations produced by the recoil events are <100> and <111> split-interstitials for O and Sr, respectively, together with a Ti interstitial occupying a distorted bridge position between two Sr sites. It is found that the recoil events in SrTiO3 are partial- charge transfer assisted processes, and the partial- charge transfer plays an important role in these recoil events.

  12. Ground truth and detection threshold from WWII naval clean-up in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Tine B.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine; Voss, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The sea bed below the Danish territorial waters is still littered with unexploded mines and other ammunition from World War II. The mines were air dropped by the RAF and the positions of the mines are unknown. As the mines still pose a potential threat to fishery and other marine activities, the Admiral Danish Fleet under the Danish Navy searches for the mines and destroy them by detonation, where they are found. The largest mines destroyed in this manner in 2012 are equivalent to 800 kg TNT each. The Seismological Service at the National Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland is notified by the navy when ammunition in excess of 100 kg TNT is detonated. The notifications include information about position, detonation time and the estimated amount of explosives. The larger explosions are clearly registered not only on the Danish seismographs, but also on seismographs in the neighbouring countries. This includes the large seismograph arrays in Norway, Sweden, and Finland. Until recently the information from the Danish navy was only utilized to rid the Danish earthquake catalogue of explosions. But the high quality information provided by the navy enables us to use these ground truth events to assess the quality of our earthquake catalogue. The mines are scattered though out the Danish territorial waters, thus we can use the explosions to test the accuracy of the determined epicentres in all parts of the country. E.g. a detonation of 135 kg in Begstrup Vig in the central part of Denmark was located using Danish, Norwegian and Swedish stations with an accuracy of less than 2 km from ground truth. A systematic study of the explosions will sharpen our understanding of the seismicity in Denmark, and result in a more detailed understanding of the detection threshold. Furthermore the study will shed light on the sensitivity of the network to various seismograph outages.

  13. The photodetachment cross-section and threshold energy of negative ions in carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmy, E. M.; Woo, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    Threshold energy and sunlight photodetachment measurements on negative carbon dioxide ions, using a 2.5 kw light pressure xenon lamp, show that: (1) Electron affinity of CO3(+) is larger than 2.7 e.V. and that an isomeric form of CO3(+) is likely an error; (2) The photodetachment cross section of CO3(-) will roughly be like a step function across the range of 4250 to 2500A, having its threshold energy at 4250A; (3) Sunlight photodetachment rate for CO3(-) is probably much smaller than elsewhere reported; and (4) The probability of having photodetached electrons re-attach to form negative ions is less than 1%. Mass identifying drift tube tests confirm that the slower ion is CO3(-), formed through the O(-) + 2CO2 yields CO3(-) + CO2 reaction.

  14. Neutrino floor at ultralow threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strigari, Louis E.

    2016-05-01

    By lowering their energy threshold, direct dark matter searches can reach the neutrino floor with experimental technology that is now in development. The 7Be flux can be detected with ˜10 eV nuclear recoil energy threshold and 50 kg/yr exposure. The p e p flux can be detected with ˜3 ton/yr exposure, and the first detection of the CNO flux is possible with similar exposure. The p p flux can be detected with threshold of ˜eV and only ˜ kg /yr exposure. These can be the first pure neutral current measurements of the low-energy solar neutrino flux. Measuring this flux is important for low mass dark matter searches and for understanding the solar interior.

  15. Probability-based particle detection that enables threshold-free and robust in vivo single-molecule tracking

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carlas S.; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Lidke, Keith A.; Rieger, Bernd; Grunwald, David

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule detection in fluorescence nanoscopy has become a powerful tool in cell biology but can present vexing issues in image analysis, such as limited signal, unspecific background, empirically set thresholds, image filtering, and false-positive detection limiting overall detection efficiency. Here we present a framework in which expert knowledge and parameter tweaking are replaced with a probability-based hypothesis test. Our method delivers robust and threshold-free signal detection with a defined error estimate and improved detection of weaker signals. The probability value has consequences for downstream data analysis, such as weighing a series of detections and corresponding probabilities, Bayesian propagation of probability, or defining metrics in tracking applications. We show that the method outperforms all current approaches, yielding a detection efficiency of >70% and a false-positive detection rate of <5% under conditions down to 17 photons/pixel background and 180 photons/molecule signal, which is beneficial for any kind of photon-limited application. Examples include limited brightness and photostability, phototoxicity in live-cell single-molecule imaging, and use of new labels for nanoscopy. We present simulations, experimental data, and tracking of low-signal mRNAs in yeast cells. PMID:26424801

  16. Threshold conditions, energy spectrum and bands generated by locally periodic Dirac comb potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharani, M.; Shastry, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    We derive expressions for polynomials governing the threshold conditions for different types of locally periodic Dirac comb potentials comprising of attractive and combination of attractive and repulsive delta potential terms confined symmetrically inside a one dimensional box of fixed length. The roots of these polynomials specify the conditions on the potential parameters in order to generate threshold energy bound states. The mathematical and numerical methods used by us were first formulated in our earlier works and it is also very briefly summarized in this paper. We report a number of mathematical results pertaining to the threshold conditions and these are useful in controlling the number of negative energy states as desired. We further demonstrate the correlation between the distribution of roots of these polynomials and negative energy eigenvalues. Using these results as basis, we investigate the energy bands in the positive energy spectrum for the above specified Dirac comb potentials and also for the corresponding repulsive case. In the case of attractive Dirac comb the base energy of the each band excluding the first band coincides with specific eigenvalue of the confining box whereas in the repulsive case it coincides with the band top. We deduce systematic correlation between band gaps, band spreads and box eigenvalues and explain the physical reason for the vanishing of band pattern at higher energies. In the case of Dirac comb comprising of orderly arranged attractive and repulsive delta potentials, specific box eigenvalues occur in the middle of each band excluding the first band. From our study we find that by controlling the number and strength parameters of delta terms in the Dirac comb and the size of confining box it is possible to generate desired types of band formations. We believe the results from our systematic analysis are useful and relevant in the study of various one dimensional systems of physical interest in areas like nanoscience.

  17. Formation of liquid crystal multi-domains with different threshold voltages by varying the surface anchoring energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Jin, Huillian; Kim, Jung-Wook; Kim, Ki-Han; Park, Byung Wok; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Hoon; Shin, Ki-Chul; Kim, Hee Seop

    2012-09-01

    We propose methods to obtain multi-domains with different threshold voltages for vertically aligned liquid crystal displays without additional transistors or capacitors. We exposed an ultraviolet light through a photomask and spatially varied the surface anchoring energy by partially decomposing the polyimide or inducing the adsorption of reactive monomers. The threshold voltage was reduced with smaller surface anchoring, and the reduction of the threshold could be qualitatively interpreted using a model describing a weak anchoring condition.

  18. A prior-knowledge-based threshold segmentation method of forward-looking sonar images for underwater linear object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixin; Bian, Hongyu; Yagi, Shin-ichi; Yang, Xiaodong

    2016-07-01

    Raw sonar images may not be used for underwater detection or recognition directly because disturbances such as the grating-lobe and multi-path disturbance affect the gray-level distribution of sonar images and cause phantom echoes. To search for a more robust segmentation method with a reasonable computational cost, a prior-knowledge-based threshold segmentation method of underwater linear object detection is discussed. The possibility of guiding the segmentation threshold evolution of forward-looking sonar images using prior knowledge is verified by experiment. During the threshold evolution, the collinear relation of two lines that correspond to double peaks in the voting space of the edged image is used as the criterion of termination. The interaction is reflected in the sense that the Hough transform contributes to the basis of the collinear relation of lines, while the binary image generated from the current threshold provides the resource of the Hough transform. The experimental results show that the proposed method could maintain a good tradeoff between the segmentation quality and the computational time in comparison with conventional segmentation methods. The proposed method redounds to a further process for unsupervised underwater visual understanding.

  19. Threshold anomaly for the 7Be +58Ni system at near-Coulomb-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Camacho, A.; Aguilera, E. F.

    2014-12-01

    By using recent fusion cross section measurements for the weakly bound system 7Be+58Ni around the Coulomb barrier, a simultaneous χ2 analysis of elastic scattering and fusion cross section data is performed. The analysis is carried out with optical polarization potentials for the fusion and direct reaction processes. That is, the nuclear polarization potential UN is split into a volume part UF which accounts for fusion reactions and a surface part UD R that is responsible for direct reactions. The parameters of fusion and direct reaction Woods-Saxon polarization potentials are determined by the analysis of the data. The presence of the threshold anomaly is investigated from the energy dependence of these polarization potentials. It is found that, contrary to other weakly bound systems, the 7Be+58Ni reaction presents the usual threshold anomaly.

  20. Threshold detection for the generalized Pareto distribution: Review of representative methods and application to the NOAA NCDC daily rainfall database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langousis, Andreas; Mamalakis, Antonios; Puliga, Michelangelo; Deidda, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    In extreme excess modeling, one fits a generalized Pareto (GP) distribution to rainfall excesses above a properly selected threshold u. The latter is generally determined using various approaches, such as nonparametric methods that are intended to locate the changing point between extreme and nonextreme regions of the data, graphical methods where one studies the dependence of GP-related metrics on the threshold level u, and Goodness-of-Fit (GoF) metrics that, for a certain level of significance, locate the lowest threshold u that a GP distribution model is applicable. Here we review representative methods for GP threshold detection, discuss fundamental differences in their theoretical bases, and apply them to 1714 overcentennial daily rainfall records from the NOAA-NCDC database. We find that nonparametric methods are generally not reliable, while methods that are based on GP asymptotic properties lead to unrealistically high threshold and shape parameter estimates. The latter is justified by theoretical arguments, and it is especially the case in rainfall applications, where the shape parameter of the GP distribution is low; i.e., on the order of 0.1-0.2. Better performance is demonstrated by graphical methods and GoF metrics that rely on preasymptotic properties of the GP distribution. For daily rainfall, we find that GP threshold estimates range between 2 and 12 mm/d with a mean value of 6.5 mm/d, while the existence of quantization in the empirical records, as well as variations in their size, constitute the two most important factors that may significantly affect the accuracy of the obtained results.

  1. Determination of energy density threshold for laser ablation of bacteria. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, D W; Cobb, C M; MacNeill, S; Rapley, J W; Killoy, W J

    1997-01-01

    The Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers have been shown to be bactericidal at relative low energy densities. However, at energy densities exceeding 120 J/cm2 (CO2) and 200 J/cm2 (Nd:YAG), laser irradiation also causes irreparable root surface damage. The purpose of this study was to determine, in vitro, the energy density threshold at which microbial ablation could be achieved while inflicting the least amount of damage to the root surfaces of human teeth. Pairs of Escherichia coli colonies cultured on broth agar were treated with a CO2 laser using a pulsed waveform at approximate energy densities ranging from 3 to 110 J/cm2. One of each colony-pair was then examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the other subcultured for viable microbes. Roots of extracted teeth were lightly scaled and treated by CO2 laser, again with pulsed beam using approximate energy densities of 3 to 110 J/cm2: and examined by SEM. Regardless of the level of energy density, residual bacteria could be subcultured from all laser treated microbial colonies. The inability of the laser to completely obliterate microbial colonies was likely due to: depth of energy penetration, difficulty in precisely overlapping beam focal spots, irregular beam profile, and presence of microbes at the periphery of the beam focal spot. The threshold energy density for bacterial obliteration was determined to be 11 J/cm2 and that for root damage was 41 J/cm2. Root damage was evident by charring, crater formation, melt-down and resolidification surface mineral, and increasing surface porosity. The results of this in vitro study indicate that when used at an energy density between 11 and 41 J/cm2 the CO2 laser may destroy microbial colonies without inflicting undue damage to the tooth root surface. PMID:9049791

  2. A STATISTICAL MODELING METHODOLOGY FOR THE DETECTION, QUANTIFICATION, AND PREDICTION OF ECOLOGICAL THRESHOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will provide a general methodology for integrating threshold information from multiple species ecological metrics, allow for prediction of changes of alternative stable states, and provide a risk assessment tool that can be applied to adaptive management. The integr...

  3. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION THRESHOLD VALUES FOR KEY FLAVOR COMPONENTS IN AN ORANGE JUICE MATRIX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the complex nature of orange juice, threshold values for key flavor components could differ significantly from those values reported in simpler systems, like water. In order to provide the citrus industry with reference values closer to the real situation in orange juice, different orange ju...

  4. Determination of navigation FDI thresholds using a Markov model. [Failure Detection and Identification in triplex inertial platform systems for Shuttle entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, B. K.; Gai, E.

    1978-01-01

    A method for determining time-varying Failure Detection and Identification (FDI) thresholds for single sample decision functions is described in the context of a triplex system of inertial platforms. A cost function consisting of the probability of vehicle loss due to FDI decision errors is minimized. A discrete Markov model is constructed from which this cost can be determined as a function of the decision thresholds employed to detect and identify the first and second failures. Optimal thresholds are determined through the use of parameter optimization techniques. The application of this approach to threshold determination is illustrated for the Space Shuttle's inertial measurement instruments.

  5. Consideration of 120-Mbit/s burst-mode adaptive threshold detection with estimated sequence processor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, D.; Kato, K.; Lei, R.

    The adaptive threshold detection with estimated sequence (ATDES) processor is a practical version of maximum-likelihood-sequence detection (MLSD). A 60-Mbit/s continuous-mode ATDES processor has been developed and tested via an Intelsat IV F-4 and Paumalu earth station link. Experimental data obtained to date from Intelsat V 120-Mbit/s QPSK channel transmission tests and 60-Mbit/s ATDES testing indicate that an improvement of about 2 dB in Eb/No at a BER of 10 to the -6th could be achieved by a 120-Mbit/s burst-mode ATDES processor.

  6. Photo-Double Ionization: Threshold Law and Low-Energy Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand

    2008-01-01

    The threshold law for photoejection of two electrons from atoms (PDI) is derived from a modification of the Coulomb-dipole (C-D) theory. The C-D theory applies to two-electron ejection from negative ions (photo-double detachment:PDD). The modification consists of correctly accounting for the fact that in PDI that the two escaping electrons see a Coulomb field, asymptotically no matter what their relative distances from the residual ion are. We find in the contralinear spherically symmetric model that the analytic threshold law Q(E),i. e. the yield of residual ions, to be Qf(E)approaches E + CwE(sup gamma(w)) + CE(sup 5/4)sin[1/2 ln(E + theta)]/ln(E). The first and third terms are beyond the Wannier law. Our threshold law can only be rigorously justified for residual energies less than or equal to 10(exp -3) eV. Nevertheless in the present experimental range (0.1 - 4 eV), the form, even without the second term, can be fitted to experimental results of PDI for He, Li, and Be, in contrast to the Wannier law which has a larger deviation from the data for Li and Be, for both of which the data show signs of modulation.

  7. Photo-Double Ionization: Threshold Law and Low-Energy Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.

    2007-01-01

    The threshold law for photoejection of two electrons from atoms (PDI) is derived from a modification of the Coulomb-dipole (C-D) theory. The C-D theory applies to two-electron ejection from negative ions (photo-double detachment:PDD). The modification consists of correctly accounting for the fact that in PDI that the two escaping electrons see a Coulomb field, asymptotically no matter what their relative distances from the residual ion are. We find in the contralinear spherically symmetric model that the analytic threshold law Q(E), i.e. the yield of residual ions, to be Q Integral of (E) varies as E + (C(sub w) E(sup gamma W)) +CE(sup 5/4) sin [1/2 ln E + phi]/ln(E). The first and third terms are beyond the Wannier law. Our threshold law can only be rigorously justified for residual energies <= 10(exp -3) eV. Nevertheless in the present experimental range (0.1 - 4 eV), the form, even without the second term, can be fitted to experimental results of PDI for He, Li, and Be, in contrast to the Wannier law which has a larger deviation from the data for Li and Be.

  8. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Moiz; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 10{sup 6} per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton

  9. Direct Measurement of the Bubble Nucleation Energy Threshold in a CF3I Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, E.; Benjamin, T.; Brice, S. J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, P. S.; Crisler, M.; Dahl, C. E.; Fustin, D.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harnish, C.; Levine, I.; Lippincott, W. H.; Moan, T.; Nania, T.; Neilson, R.; Ramberg, E.; Robinson, A. E.; Ruschman, M.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; RIvera, R. A.; Uplegger, L.

    2013-07-30

    Here, we measured the energy threshold and efficiency for bubble nucleation from iodine recoils in a CF3I bubble chamber in the energy range of interest for a dark matter search. These interactions cannot be probed by standard neutron calibration methods, so we develop a new technique by observing the elastic scattering of 12 GeV/c negative pions. The pions are tracked with a silicon pixel telescope and the reconstructed scattering angle provides a measure of the nuclear recoil kinetic energy. The bubble chamber was operated with a nominal threshold of (13.6±0.6) keV. Interpretation of the results depends on the response to fluorine and carbon recoils, but in general we find agreement with the predictions of the classical bubble-nucleation theory. Moreover, this measurement confirms the applicability of CF3I as a target for spin-independent dark matter interactions and represents a novel technique for calibration of superheated fluid detectors.

  10. A Nonparametric Method for Detecting Fixations and Saccades Using Cluster Analysis: Removing the Need for Arbitrary Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    König, Seth D.; Buffalo, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Eye tracking is an important component of many human and non-human primate behavioral experiments. As behavioral paradigms have become more complex, including unconstrained viewing of natural images, eye movements measured in these paradigms have become more variable and complex as well. Accordingly, the common practice of using acceleration, dispersion, or velocity thresholds to segment viewing behavior into periods of fixations and saccades may be insufficient. New Method Here we propose a novel algorithm, called Cluster Fix, which uses k-means cluster analysis to take advantage of the qualitative differences between fixations and saccades. The algorithm finds natural divisions in 4 state space parameters—distance, velocity, acceleration, and angular velocity—to separate scan paths into periods of fixations and saccades. The number and size of clusters adjusts to the variability of individual scan paths. Results Cluster Fix can detect small saccades that were often indistinguishable from noisy fixations. Local analysis of fixations helped determine the transition times between fixations and saccades. Comparison with Existing Methods Because Cluster Fix detects natural divisions in the data, predefined thresholds are not needed. Conclusions A major advantage of Cluster Fix is the ability to precisely identify the beginning and end of saccades, which is essential for studying neural activity that is modulated by or time-locked to saccades. Our data suggest that Cluster Fix is more sensitive than threshold-based algorithms but comes at the cost of an increase in computational time. PMID:24509130

  11. Evaluation of somatic cell count thresholds to detect subclinical mastitis in Gyr cows.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, C B Malek; Barreiro, J R; Moreno, J F G; Porcionato, M A F; Santos, M V

    2011-09-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of somatic cell count (SCC) thresholds to identify subclinical mastitis in Gyr cows caused by major and minor pathogens; (2) to study the effects of month of sampling, rear or front mammary quarters, herd, intramammary infection (IMI), and bacterial species on SCC at quarter level; and (3) to describe the prevalence of IMI in Gyr cows in commercial dairy herds. In total, 221 lactating Gyr cows from 3 commercial dairy farms were selected. Milk samples were collected from individual quarters once a month for 1 yr from all lactating cows for SCC and bacteriological analysis. Mammary quarters were considered the experimental units and the SCC results were log(10)-transformed. Four SCC thresholds (100, 200, 300 and 400 × 10(3) cells/mL) were used to determine Se and Sp to identify infected mammary quarters. The overall prevalence of IMI in quarter milk samples of Gyr cows was 49.8%, and the prevalence of minor pathogens was higher (31.9%) than that of major pathogens (17.8%). Quarter samples with microbial isolation presented higher SCC compared with negative samples. Sensitivity and Sp of selected SCC thresholds varied according to the group of pathogen (major and minor) involved in the IMI definition. Sensitivity increased and Sp decreased when mammary quarters with only major pathogens isolation were considered positive. The use of a single SCC analysis to classify quarters as uninfected or infected in Gyr cows may not be a useful test for this breed because Se and Sp of SCC at the studied thresholds were low. The occurrence of IMI and the bacterial species are the main factors responsible for SCC variation in mammary quarters of Gyr cows. Milk samples with major pathogens isolation elicited higher SCC than those with minor pathogens. PMID:21854914

  12. Precipitation thresholds and debris flow warning: comparing gauge versus weather radar detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco; Borga, Marco; Creutin, Jean-Dominique

    2013-04-01

    Methods relying on rainfall thresholds for debris-flow warning have a long tradition in geomorphology. Usually, the precipitation thresholds are developed based on rain gauge and debris flows data. However, it is well known that extreme rainfall sampling errors over rugged topography may lead to biased precipitation thresholds. At least two reasons contribute to such sampling errors: i) the regions of complex topography have low rain gauge densities; ii) orography may enhance intense precipitation at very localized places. We studied six storm events that triggered several debris flows each over the Trentino-Alto Adige Region, in the central Italian Alps, between 2005 and 2010. The region is monitored by i) a rain gauge network with an average density of 1/100 km2 and ii) a C-band radar instrument. Radar data have been accurately corrected for errors due to ground clutter contamination, beam blockages, vertical profile of reflectivity, attenuation and wet radome in order to obtain a high quality set of radar-based rainfall fields. We characterized the variability of each rainfall event using space (horizontal) and time variograms and we investigated the altitude (vertical) distribution of rainfall using hypsometric rainfall moments. We also defined the local severity of the rainfall accumulations over the debris flow areas for different time accumulations. We used the radar precipitation fields to represent space-time rainfall variability and we simulated gauge sampling with a stochastic model accounting for sub-grid variability of precipitation and for gauge measurement errors. We show that rain gauges systematically underestimate the local severity over the proven debris flow triggering locations. This leads to biased precipitation thresholds. In this respect gauge spatial sampling appears inappropriate both in the horizontal and in the vertical dimensions while the usual gauge time sampling looks appropriate. Moreover, this shows the potential of rainfall

  13. The threshold photoelectron spectrum of cyanovinylacetylene leads to an upward revision of the ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzmeier, Fabian; Lang, Melanie; Fischer, Ingo; Hemberger, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Cyanovinylacetylene C5H3N was investigated by threshold photoelectron spectroscopy. The ionization energy (IE) was determined to be 10.04 eV. This value constitutes an upward revision of the earlier value of 9.33 eV. For both stereoisomers (trans and cis) computations predict very similar IEs and spectra. At 11.08 eV and 11.17 eV excited cationic states are observed. For the precursor 3-bromopyridine an IE of 9.34 eV was obtained. The appearance energy AE0K (3-bromopyridine, 3-pyridyl+) was determined to be 11.71 eV and a bond dissociation energy of the Csbnd Br bond in the 3-bromopyridine cation of 229 kJ mol-1 was derived.

  14. Threshold displacement energy in GaN; Ab initio molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H. Y.; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Weber, William J.

    2009-06-25

    Large-scale ab initio molecular dynamics method has been used to determine the threshold displacement energies, Ed, along five specific directions and to determine the defect configurations created during low energy events. The Ed shows a significant dependence on direction. The minimum Ed is determined to be 39 eV along the <-1010> direction for a gallium atom and 17.0 eV along the <-1010> direction for a nitrogen atom, which are in reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements. The average Ed values determined are 73.2 and 32.4 eV for gallium and nitrogen atoms, respectively. The N defects created at low energy events along different crystallographic directions have a similar configuration (a N-N dumbbell configuration), but various configurations for Ga defects are formed in GaN.

  15. Defining ploidy-specific thresholds in array comparative genomic hybridization to improve the sensitivity of detection of single copy alterations in cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ng, Grace; Huang, Jingxiang; Roberts, Ian; Coleman, Nicholas

    2006-09-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is being widely used to screen for recurrent genomic copy number alterations in neoplasms, with imbalances typically detected through the application of gain and loss thresholds. Review of array CGH publications for the year 2005 showed that a wide range of thresholds are used. However, the effect of sample ploidy on the sensitivity of these thresholds for single copy alterations (SCAs) has not been evaluated. Here, we describe a method to evaluate the detection accuracy of thresholds for detecting SCAs in cell line array CGH data. By applying a hidden Markov model-based method, we segmented array CGH data from well-karyotyped cell lines and generated ploidy-specific sensitivity-specificity plots, from which we identified optimum thresholds relevant to sample ploidy. We demonstrate that commonly used nonploidy-specific thresholds are suboptimal in their ability to call SCAs, particularly when applied to hypertriploid or tetraploid cell lines. We conclude that the use of ploidy-specific thresholds improves the sensitivity of thres-hold-based array CGH for detecting SCAs in cell lines. Because polyploidy is a common feature of cancer cells, the application of ploidy-specific thresholds to cell lines (and potentially to clinical samples) may improve the detection sensitivity of SCAs of biological significance. PMID:16931585

  16. ML-PMHT track detection threshold determination for K-distributed clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenecker, Steven; Willett, Peter; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    2014-06-01

    Recentwork developed a novelmethod for determining tracking thresholds for theMaximumLikelihood ProbabilisticMulti- Hypothesis Tracker (ML-PMHT). Under certain "ideal" conditions, probability density functions (PDFs) for the peak points in the ML-PMHT log-likelihood ratio (LLR) due to just clutter measurements could be calculated. Analysis of these clutter-induced peak PDFs allowed for the calculation of tracking thresholds, which previously had to be donewith time-consumingMonte Carlo simulations. However, this work was done for a very specific case: the amplitudes of both target and cluttermeasurements followed Rayleigh distributions. The Rayleigh distribution is a very light-tailed distribution, and it can be overly optimistic in predicting that high-SNR measurements are target-originated. This work examines the case where the clutter amplitudes do not follow a Rayleigh distribution at all, but instead follow a K-distribution, which more accurately describes active acoustic clutter. This will provide a framework for determining accurate tracking thresholds for the ML-PMHT algorithm.

  17. Nonconstant ponderomotive energy in above-threshold ionization by intense short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Picca, R.; Gramajo, A. A.; Garibotti, C. R.; López, S. D.; Arbó, D. G.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the contribution of the quiver kinetic energy acquired by an electron in an oscillating electric field of a short laser pulse to the energy balance in atomic ionization processes. Due to the time dependence of this additional kinetic energy, a temporal average is assumed to preserve a stationary energy conservation rule, which is used to predict the position of the energy peaks observed in the photoelectron (PE) spectra. For a plane wave and a flattop pulse, the mean value of the quiver energy over the whole pulse leads to the concept of ponderomotive energy Up. However, for a short pulse with a fast changing intensity, the stationary approximation loses its validity. We check these concepts by studying first the PE spectrum within the semiclassical model (SCM) for multiple-step pulses. The SCM offers the possibility to establish a connection between emission times and the PE spectrum in the energy domain. We show that PE substructures stem from ionization at different times mapping the pulse envelope. We also analyze the PE spectrum for a realistic sine-squared envelope within the Coulomb-Volkov and ab initio calculations solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We found that the electron emission amplitudes produced at different times interfere with each other producing, in this way, a new additional pattern that modulates the above-threshold ionization (ATI) peaks.

  18. A simple but efficient voice activity detection algorithm through Hilbert transform and dynamic threshold for speech pathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz P., D.; Villa, Luisa F.; Salazar, Carlos; Quintero, O. L.

    2016-04-01

    A simple but efficient voice activity detector based on the Hilbert transform and a dynamic threshold is presented to be used on the pre-processing of audio signals. The algorithm to define the dynamic threshold is a modification of a convex combination found in literature. This scheme allows the detection of prosodic and silence segments on a speech in presence of non-ideal conditions like a spectral overlapped noise. The present work shows preliminary results over a database built with some political speech. The tests were performed adding artificial noise to natural noises over the audio signals, and some algorithms are compared. Results will be extrapolated to the field of adaptive filtering on monophonic signals and the analysis of speech pathologies on futures works.

  19. Non-constant ponderomotive energy in above threshold ionization by intense few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Picca, Renata; Gramajo, Ana A.; Arbó, Diego G.; López, Sebastián D.; Garibotti, Carlos R.

    2015-09-01

    We analyze the contribution of the quiver kinetic energy acquired by an electron in an oscillating electric field to the energy balance in atomic ionization processes by a short laser pulse. Due to the time dependence of this additional kinetic energy, a temporal average is assumed to maintain a stationary energy conservation rule. This rule is used to predict the position of the peaks observed in the photo electron spectra (PE). For a flat top pulse envelope, the mean value of the quiver energy over the whole pulse leads to the concept of ponderomotive energy $U_{p}$. However for a short pulse with a fast changing field intensity a stationarity approximation could not be precise. We check these concepts by studying first the photoelectron (PE) spectrum within the Semiclassical Model (SCM) for a multiple steps pulses. The SCM offers the possibility to establish a connection between emission times and the PE spectrum in the energy domain. We show that PE substructures stem from ionization at different times mapping the pulse envelope. We also present the analysis of the PE spectrum for a realistic sine-squared envelope within the Coulomb-Volkov and \\textit{ab initio} calculations solving the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation. We found that the electron emission amplitudes produced at different times interfere with each other and produce a new additional pattern, that overlap the above-threshold ionization (ATI) peaks.

  20. Detecting fragmentation extinction thresholds for forest understory plant species in peninsular Spain.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Marta; Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos; Morales-Castilla, Ignacio; Albuquerque, Fabio S; Ferrero, Mila; Rodríguez, Miguel Á

    2015-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that fragmentation aggravates the effects of habitat loss, yet empirical results show mixed evidences, which fail to support the theory instead reinforcing the primary importance of habitat loss. Fragmentation hypotheses have received much attention due to their potential implications for biodiversity conservation, however, animal studies have traditionally been their main focus. Here we assess variation in species sensitivity to forest amount and fragmentation and evaluate if fragmentation is related to extinction thresholds in forest understory herbs and ferns. Our expectation was that forest herbs would be more sensitive to fragmentation than ferns due to their lower dispersal capabilities. Using forest cover percentage and the proportion of this percentage occurring in the largest patch within UTM cells of 10-km resolution covering Peninsular Spain, we partitioned the effects of forest amount versus fragmentation and applied logistic regression to model occurrences of 16 species. For nine models showing robustness according to a set of quality criteria we subsequently defined two empirical fragmentation scenarios, minimum and maximum, and quantified species' sensitivity to forest contraction with no fragmentation, and to fragmentation under constant forest cover. We finally assessed how the extinction threshold of each species (the habitat amount below which it cannot persist) varies under no and maximum fragmentation. Consistent with their preference for forest habitats probability occurrences of all species decreased as forest cover contracted. On average, herbs did not show significant sensitivity to fragmentation whereas ferns were favored. In line with theory, fragmentation yielded higher extinction thresholds for two species. For the remaining species, fragmentation had either positive or non-significant effects. We interpret these differences as reflecting species-specific traits and conclude that although forest amount is of

  1. Detecting Fragmentation Extinction Thresholds for Forest Understory Plant Species in Peninsular Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Marta; Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos; Morales-Castilla, Ignacio; Albuquerque, Fabio S.; Ferrero, Mila; Rodríguez, Miguel Á.

    2015-01-01

    Ecological theory predicts that fragmentation aggravates the effects of habitat loss, yet empirical results show mixed evidences, which fail to support the theory instead reinforcing the primary importance of habitat loss. Fragmentation hypotheses have received much attention due to their potential implications for biodiversity conservation, however, animal studies have traditionally been their main focus. Here we assess variation in species sensitivity to forest amount and fragmentation and evaluate if fragmentation is related to extinction thresholds in forest understory herbs and ferns. Our expectation was that forest herbs would be more sensitive to fragmentation than ferns due to their lower dispersal capabilities. Using forest cover percentage and the proportion of this percentage occurring in the largest patch within UTM cells of 10-km resolution covering Peninsular Spain, we partitioned the effects of forest amount versus fragmentation and applied logistic regression to model occurrences of 16 species. For nine models showing robustness according to a set of quality criteria we subsequently defined two empirical fragmentation scenarios, minimum and maximum, and quantified species’ sensitivity to forest contraction with no fragmentation, and to fragmentation under constant forest cover. We finally assessed how the extinction threshold of each species (the habitat amount below which it cannot persist) varies under no and maximum fragmentation. Consistent with their preference for forest habitats probability occurrences of all species decreased as forest cover contracted. On average, herbs did not show significant sensitivity to fragmentation whereas ferns were favored. In line with theory, fragmentation yielded higher extinction thresholds for two species. For the remaining species, fragmentation had either positive or non-significant effects. We interpret these differences as reflecting species-specific traits and conclude that although forest amount is of

  2. {phi}-Meson Photoproduction with Linearly Polarized Photons at Threshold Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Salamanca, Julian; Cole, Philip L.

    2007-10-26

    The observables provided by linearly-polarized photons are of interest in delineating the contributions of the various hadronic processes giving rise to vector meson photoproduction. In particular, we describe how {phi}-meson production affords an incisive tool for exploring the nature of the parity exchange at threshold energies, the strangeness content of proton, as well as extracting signatures for the violation of Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka observation (OZI rule). Our goal is to study the {gamma}-vectorp{yields}{phi}p reaction, with {phi}{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}, in the photon energy range of 1.7 to 2.1 GeV by using the Coherent Linear Bremsstrahlung Facility in Hall B of Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, VA. The data were collected during the g8b run in the summer of 2005.

  3. Breakup threshold anomaly for the 8B + 58Ni system at near-Coulomb barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Camacho, A.; Aguilera, E. F.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.

    2011-09-01

    By using recent fusion cross section measurements for the system 8B + 58Ni, a simultaneous analysis of elastic scattering, fusion, and total reaction cross sections is performed for the weakly bound system 8B + 58Ni at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. The analysis is carried out with an optical potential with fusion and direct reaction parts (i.e., the nuclear polarization potential U is split into a volume part UF, which accounts for fusion reactions and a surface part UDR, responsible for direct reactions). The parameters of the Woods-Saxon potentials are determined by a χ2 analysis of the data. The presence of the threshold anomaly is investigated from the energy dependence of both the fusion and direct reaction parts of the polarization potential.

  4. Φ-Meson Photoproduction with Linearly Polarized Photons at Threshold Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Salamanca, Julian; Cole, Philip L

    2007-10-01

    The observables provided by linearly-polarized photons are of interest in delineating the contributions of the various hadronic processes giving rise to vector meson photoproduction. In particular, we describe how Φ-meson production affords an incisive tool for exploring the nature of the parity exchange at threshold energies, the strangeness content of proton, as well as extracting signatures for the violation of Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka observation (OZI rule). Our goal is to study the γp → Φp reaction, with Φ → K+K-, in the photon energy range of 1.7 to 2.1 GeV by using the Coherent Linear Bremsstrahlung Facility in Hall B of Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, VA. The data were collected during the g8b run in the summer of 2005.

  5. Dynamics of strangeness production in heavy-ion collisions near threshold energies

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming

    2010-11-15

    Within the framework of the improved isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model, the dynamics of strangeness (K{sup 0,+}, {Lambda}, and {Sigma}{sup -,0,+}) production in heavy-ion collisions near threshold energies is investigated systematically, with the strange particles considered to be produced mainly by inelastic collisions of baryon-baryon and pion-baryon. Collisions in the region of suprasaturation densities of the dense baryonic matter formed in heavy-ion collisions dominate the yields of strangeness production. Total multiplicities as functions of incident energies and collision centralities are calculated with the Skyrme parameter SLy6. The excitation function of strangeness production is analyzed and also compared with the KaoS data for K{sup +} production in the reactions {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C and {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au.

  6. Comparison of Threshold Detection Methods for the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD): Application to the NOAA-NCDC Daily Rainfall Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deidda, Roberto; Mamalakis, Antonis; Langousis, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    One of the most crucial issues in statistical hydrology is the estimation of extreme rainfall from data. To that extent, based on asymptotic arguments from Extreme Excess (EE) theory, several studies have focused on developing new, or improving existing methods to fit a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) model to rainfall excesses above a properly selected threshold u. The latter is generally determined using various approaches that can be grouped into three basic classes: a) non-parametric methods that locate the changing point between extreme and non-extreme regions of the data, b) graphical methods where one studies the dependence of the GPD parameters (or related metrics) to the threshold level u, and c) Goodness of Fit (GoF) metrics that, for a certain level of significance, locate the lowest threshold u that a GPD model is applicable. In this work, we review representative methods for GPD threshold detection, discuss fundamental differences in their theoretical bases, and apply them to daily rainfall records from the NOAA-NCDC open-access database (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/ghcn-daily/). We find that non-parametric methods that locate the changing point between extreme and non-extreme regions of the data are generally not reliable, while graphical methods and GoF metrics that rely on limiting arguments for the upper distribution tail lead to unrealistically high thresholds u. The latter is expected, since one checks the validity of the limiting arguments rather than the applicability of a GPD distribution model. Better performance is demonstrated by graphical methods and GoF metrics that rely on GPD properties. Finally, we discuss the effects of data quantization (common in hydrologic applications) on the estimated thresholds. Acknowledgments: The research project is implemented within the framework of the Action «Supporting Postdoctoral Researchers» of the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" (Action's Beneficiary: General

  7. Toward perpetual wireless networks: Opportunistic large arrays with transmission thresholds and energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailas, Aravind

    Solving the key issue of sustainability of battery-powered sensors continues to attract significant research attention. The prevailing theme of this research is to address this concern using energy-efficient protocols based on a form of simple cooperative transmission (CT) called the opportunistic large arrays (OLAs), and intelligent exploitation of energy harvesting and hybrid energy storage systems (HESSs). The two key contributions of this research, namely, OLA with transmission threshold (OLA-T) and alternating OLA-T (A-OLA-T), offer an signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) advantage (i.e., benefits of diversity and array (power) gains) in a multi-path fading environment, thereby reducing transmit powers or extending range. Because these protocols do not address nodes individually, the network overhead remains constant for high density networks or nodes with mobility. During broadcasting across energy-constrained networks, while OLA-T saves energy by limiting node participation within a single broadcast, A-OLA-T optimizes over multiple broadcasts and drains the nodes in an equitable fashion. A major bottleneck for network sustainability is the ability of a rechargeable battery (RB) to store energy, which is limited by the number of charge-discharge cycles. Energy harvesting using a HESS that comprises a RB and a supercapacitor (SC) will minimize the RB usage, thereby preserving the charge-discharge cycles. Studying the HESS is important, rather than the SC-alone because while an SC with harvested energy may be sufficient for routine monitoring, if there is an alert, the RB could be used as necessary to support the heavier reporting requirements. Therefore, another key contribution of this research is the design and analysis of a novel routing metric called communications using HESS (CHESS), which extends the RB-life by relaying exclusively with SC energy.

  8. Pressure and particle motion detection thresholds in fish: a re-examination of salient auditory cues in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Radford, Craig A; Montgomery, John C; Caiger, Paul; Higgs, Dennis M

    2012-10-01

    The auditory evoked potential technique has been used for the past 30 years to evaluate the hearing ability of fish. The resulting audiograms are typically presented in terms of sound pressure (dB re. 1 μPa) with the particle motion (dB re. 1 m s(-2)) component largely ignored until recently. When audiograms have been presented in terms of particle acceleration, one of two approaches has been used for stimulus characterisation: measuring the pressure gradient between two hydrophones or using accelerometers. With rare exceptions these values are presented from experiments using a speaker as the stimulus, thus making it impossible to truly separate the contribution of direct particle motion and pressure detection in the response. Here, we compared the particle acceleration and pressure auditory thresholds of three species of fish with differing hearing specialisations, goldfish (Carassius auratus, weberian ossicles), bigeye (Pempheris adspersus, ligamentous hearing specialisation) and a third species with no swim bladder, the common triplefin (Forstergyian lappillum), using three different methods of determining particle acceleration. In terms of particle acceleration, all three fish species have similar hearing thresholds, but when expressed as pressure thresholds goldfish are the most sensitive, followed by bigeye, with triplefin the least sensitive. It is suggested here that all fish have a similar ability to detect the particle motion component of the sound field and it is their ability to transduce the pressure component of the sound field to the inner ear via ancillary hearing structures that provides the differences in hearing ability. Therefore, care is needed in stimuli presentation and measurement when determining hearing ability of fish and when interpreting comparative hearing abilities between species. PMID:22693030

  9. Temporal variation in spectral detection thresholds of substrate and vegetation in AVIRIS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabol, Donald E., Jr.; Roberts, Dar A.; Smith, Milton O.; Adams, John B.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to map changes over large surface areas over time is one of the advantages in using remote sensing as a monitoring tool. Temporal changes in the surface may be gradual, making them difficult to detect in the short-term, and because they commonly occur at the subpixel scale, they may be difficult to detect in the long-term as well. Also, subtle changes may be real or merely an artifact of image noise. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the factors that limit the detection of surface materials in evaluating temporal data. The spectral detectability of vegetation and soil in the 1990 July and October Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data of Jasper Ridge, CA was evaluated and compared.

  10. Fall detection algorithm in energy efficient multistate sensor system.

    PubMed

    Korats, Gundars; Hofmanis, Janis; Skorodumovs, Aleksejs; Avots, Egils

    2015-01-01

    Health issues for elderly people may lead to different injuries obtained during simple activities of daily living (ADL). Potentially the most dangerous are unintentional falls that may be critical or even lethal to some patients due to the heavy injury risk. Many fall detection systems are proposed but only recently such health care systems became available. Nevertheless sensor design, accuracy as well as energy consumption efficiency can be improved. In this paper we present a single 3-axial accelerometer energy-efficient sensor system. Power saving is achieved by selective event processing triggered by fall detection procedure. The results in our simulations show 100% accuracy when the threshold parameters are chosen correctly. Estimated energy consumption seems to extend battery life significantly. PMID:26737408

  11. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  12. Automatic threshold-setting method for iris detection for brown eyes in an eye-gaze interface system with a visible light camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Kohichi; Niino, Shingo

    2015-03-01

    This study describes the improvement of an eye-gaze interface system with a visible light camera. The current system detects the center of the iris from a captured eye image using image processing. During the initial stages of system use, a display window is provided to set the threshold values of the image's saturation and intensity, which is used to manually adjust the appearance of the iris region. In this study, we propose an automatic threshold setting method. The optimum threshold value for the saturation is obtained by discriminant analysis and that for the intensity is determined by finding the value that yields the same number of accumulated pixels in the detected region as threshold processing of the saturation. In our experiments with subjects with brown eyes, the automatic method obtained good threshold values in most cases. Furthermore, an adjustment function to overcome under- or over-estimated saturation threshold values is also proposed. This function provides a more robust automatic threshold setting. In experiments, we compared our automatic setting method with conventional manual techniques, which showed that the automatic method is useful for reducing the time required for threshold setting and its pointing accuracy is comparable to that of the manual approach.

  13. Displacement Threshold Energy and Recovery in an Al-Ti Nanolayered System with Intrinsic Point Defect Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Gerboth, Matthew D.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Henager, Charles H.

    2014-01-07

    A method is established and validated using molecular dynamics (MD) to determine the displacement threshold energies as Ed in nanolayered, multilayered systems of dissimilar metals. The method is applied to specifically oriented nanolayered films of Al-Ti where the crystal structure and interface orientations are varied in atomic models and Ed is calculated. Methods for defect detection are developed and discussed based on prior research in the literature and based on specific crystallographic directions available in the nanolayered systems. These are compared and contrasted to similar calculations in corresponding bulk materials, including fcc Al, fcc Ti, hcp Al, and hcp Ti. In all cases, the calculated Ed in the multilayers are intermediate to the corresponding bulk values but exhibit some important directionality. In the nanolayer, defect detection demonstrated systematic differences in the behavior of Ed in each layer. Importantly, collision cascade damage exhibits significant defect partitioning within the Al and Ti layers that is hypothesized to be an intrinsic property of dissimilar nanolayered systems. This type of partitioning could be partly responsible for observed asymmetric radiation damage responses in many multilayered systems. In addition, a pseudo-random direction was introduced to approximate the average Ed without performing numerous simulations with random directions.

  14. Unconstrained Respiration Measurement and Respiratory Arrest Detection Method by Dynamic Threshold in Transferring Patients by Stretchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Yosuke; Watanabe, Kajiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    General anesthesia used for surgical operations may cause unstable conditions of the patients after the operations, which could lead to respiratory arrests. Under such circumstances, nurses could fail in finding the change of the conditions, and other malpractices could also occur. It is highly possible that such malpractices may occur while transferring a patient from ICU to the room using a stretcher. Monitoring the change in the blood oxygen saturation concentration and other vital signs to detect a respiratory arrest is not easy when transferring a patient on a stretcher. Here we present several noise reduction system and algorithm to detect respiratory arrests in transferring a patient, based on the unconstrained air pressure method that the authors presented previously. As the result, when the acceleration level of the stretcher noise was 0.5G, the respiratory arrest detection ratio using this novel method was 65%, while that with the conventional method was 0%.

  15. Proton and Electron Threshold Energy Measurements for Extravehicular Activity Space Suits. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. D.; Saganti, P. B.

    2003-01-01

    Construction of ISS will require more than 1000 hours of EVA. Outside of ISS during EVA, astronauts and cosmonauts are likely to be exposed to a large fluence of electrons and protons. Development of radiation protection guidelines requires the determination of the minimum energy of electrons and protons that penetrate the suits at various locations. Measurements of the water-equivalent thickness of both US. and Russian EVA suits were obtained by performing CT scans. Specific regions of interest of the suits were further evaluated using a differential range shift technique. This technique involved measuring thickness ionization curves for 6-MeV electron and 155-MeV proton beams with ionization chambers using a constant source-to-detector distance. The thicknesses were obtained by stacking polystyrene slabs immediately upstream of the detector. The thicknesses of the 50% ionizations relative to the maximum ionizations were determined. The detectors were then placed within the suit and the stack thickness adjusted until the 50% ionization was reestablished. The difference in thickness between the 50% thicknesses was then used with standard range-energy tables to determine the threshold energy for penetration. This report provides a detailed description of the experimental arrangement and results.

  16. Lowering IceCube's Energy Threshold for Point Source Searches in the Southern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Burgman, A.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Krüger, C.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schimp, M.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Rossem, M.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Observation of a point source of astrophysical neutrinos would be a “smoking gun” signature of a cosmic-ray accelerator. While IceCube has recently discovered a diffuse flux of astrophysical neutrinos, no localized point source has been observed. Previous IceCube searches for point sources in the southern sky were restricted by either an energy threshold above a few hundred TeV or poor neutrino angular resolution. Here we present a search for southern sky point sources with greatly improved sensitivities to neutrinos with energies below 100 TeV. By selecting charged-current ν μ interacting inside the detector, we reduce the atmospheric background while retaining efficiency for astrophysical neutrino-induced events reconstructed with sub-degree angular resolution. The new event sample covers three years of detector data and leads to a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity to point sources emitting below 100 TeV in the southern sky. No statistically significant evidence of point sources was found, and upper limits are set on neutrino emission from individual sources. A posteriori analysis of the highest-energy (˜100 TeV) starting event in the sample found that this event alone represents a 2.8σ deviation from the hypothesis that the data consists only of atmospheric background.

  17. Lowering IceCube's Energy Threshold for Point Source Searches in the Southern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Burgman, A.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Krüger, C.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schimp, M.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Rossem, M.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Observation of a point source of astrophysical neutrinos would be a “smoking gun” signature of a cosmic-ray accelerator. While IceCube has recently discovered a diffuse flux of astrophysical neutrinos, no localized point source has been observed. Previous IceCube searches for point sources in the southern sky were restricted by either an energy threshold above a few hundred TeV or poor neutrino angular resolution. Here we present a search for southern sky point sources with greatly improved sensitivities to neutrinos with energies below 100 TeV. By selecting charged-current ν μ interacting inside the detector, we reduce the atmospheric background while retaining efficiency for astrophysical neutrino-induced events reconstructed with sub-degree angular resolution. The new event sample covers three years of detector data and leads to a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity to point sources emitting below 100 TeV in the southern sky. No statistically significant evidence of point sources was found, and upper limits are set on neutrino emission from individual sources. A posteriori analysis of the highest-energy (∼100 TeV) starting event in the sample found that this event alone represents a 2.8σ deviation from the hypothesis that the data consists only of atmospheric background.

  18. Acetic Acid Detection Threshold in Synthetic Wine Samples of a Portable Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Macías, Miguel Macías; Manso, Antonio García; Orellana, Carlos Javier García; Velasco, Horacio Manuel González; Caballero, Ramón Gallardo; Chamizo, Juan Carlos Peguero

    2013-01-01

    Wine quality is related to its intrinsic visual, taste, or aroma characteristics and is reflected in the price paid for that wine. One of the most important wine faults is the excessive concentration of acetic acid which can cause a wine to take on vinegar aromas and reduce its varietal character. Thereby it is very important for the wine industry to have methods, like electronic noses, for real-time monitoring the excessive concentration of acetic acid in wines. However, aroma characterization of alcoholic beverages with sensor array electronic noses is a difficult challenge due to the masking effect of ethanol. In this work, in order to detect the presence of acetic acid in synthetic wine samples (aqueous ethanol solution at 10% v/v) we use a detection unit which consists of a commercial electronic nose and a HSS32 auto sampler, in combination with a neural network classifier (MLP). To find the characteristic vector representative of the sample that we want to classify, first we select the sensors, and the section of the sensors response curves, where the probability of detecting the presence of acetic acid will be higher, and then we apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA) such that each sensor response curve is represented by the coefficients of its first principal components. Results show that the PEN3 electronic nose is able to detect and discriminate wine samples doped with acetic acid in concentrations equal or greater than 2 g/L. PMID:23262483

  19. Rational Manual and Automated Scoring Thresholds for the Immunohistochemical Detection of TP53 Missense Mutations in Human Breast Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Midkiff, Bentley R; Conway, Kathleen; Millikan, Robert C; Geradts, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Missense mutations in TP53 are common in human breast cancer, have been associated with worse prognosis, and may predict therapy effect. TP53 missense mutations are associated with aberrant accumulation of p53 protein in tumor cell nuclei. Previous studies have used relatively arbitrary cutoffs to characterize breast tumors as positive for p53 staining by immunohistochemical assays. This study aimed to objectively determine optimal thresholds for p53 positivity by manual and automated scoring methods using whole tissue sections from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. p53-immunostained slides were available for 564 breast tumors previously assayed for TP53 mutations. Average nuclear p53 staining intensity was manually scored as negative, borderline, weak, moderate, or strong and percentage of positive tumor cells was estimated. Automated p53 signal intensity was measured using the Aperio nuclear v9 algorithm combined with the Genie histology pattern recognition tool and tuned to achieve optimal nuclear segmentation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine optimal cutoffs for average staining intensity and percent cells positive to distinguish between tumors with and without a missense mutation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated a threshold of moderate average nuclear staining intensity as a good surrogate for TP53 missense mutations in both manual (area under the curve=0.87) and automated (area under the curve=0.84) scoring systems. Both manual and automated immunohistochemical scoring methods predicted missense mutations in breast carcinomas with high accuracy. Validation of the automated intensity scoring threshold suggests a role for such algorithms in detecting TP53 missense mutations in high throughput studies. PMID:26200835

  20. Threshold energies for filamentation and spectral characteristics of supercontinuum generation in THEOS-based nanocomposite organosilicon media

    SciTech Connect

    Kul'chin, Yu N; Mayor, A Yu; Proschenko, D Yu; Chekhlenok, A A; Golik, S S; Postnova, I V; Shchipunov, Yu A; Bukin, O A

    2014-08-31

    We have experimentally determined the threshold energy for filamentation in THEOS-based hybrid silicate nanocomposite materials containing polysaccharides and hyperbranched polyglycidols and the conversion efficiency from the 800-nm femtosecond Ti : sapphire laser output to a supercontinuum in the range 420 – 700 nm. The addition of sodium hyaluronate (polysaccharide) and low concentrations of Au nanoparticles or CdS quantum dots with an average diameter of 3 – 5 nm has been shown to considerably reduce the threshold energy for filamentation and improve the laser output to supercontinuum conversion efficiency. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  1. Abort Trigger False Positive and False Negative Analysis Methodology for Threshold-Based Abort Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Cruz, Jose A.; Johnson Stephen B.; Lo, Yunnhon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a quantitative methodology for bounding the false positive (FP) and false negative (FN) probabilities associated with a human-rated launch vehicle abort trigger (AT) that includes sensor data qualification (SDQ). In this context, an AT is a hardware and software mechanism designed to detect the existence of a specific abort condition. Also, SDQ is an algorithmic approach used to identify sensor data suspected of being corrupt so that suspect data does not adversely affect an AT's detection capability. The FP and FN methodologies presented here were developed to support estimation of the probabilities of loss of crew and loss of mission for the Space Launch System (SLS) which is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The paper provides a brief overview of system health management as being an extension of control theory; and describes how ATs and the calculation of FP and FN probabilities relate to this theory. The discussion leads to a detailed presentation of the FP and FN methodology and an example showing how the FP and FN calculations are performed. This detailed presentation includes a methodology for calculating the change in FP and FN probabilities that result from including SDQ in the AT architecture. To avoid proprietary and sensitive data issues, the example incorporates a mixture of open literature and fictitious reliability data. Results presented in the paper demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in providing quantitative estimates that bound the probability of a FP or FN abort determination.

  2. Modifications of the pion-production threshold in the nuclear medium in heavy ion collisions and the nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taesoo; Ko, Che Ming

    2015-01-01

    Using the relativistic Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (RVUU) equation based on mean fields from the nonlinear relativistic NLρ and NLρ δ models, which have same nuclear equation of state and symmetry energy but different symmetry energy slope parameters, we study the effect of medium modification of the pion-production threshold on the total pion yield and the π-/π+ ratio in Au+Au collisions. We find that the in-medium threshold effect enhances both the total pion yield and the π-/π+ ratio, compared to those without this effect. Furthermore, including the medium modification of the pion-production threshold leads to a larger π-/π+ ratio for the NLρ δ model with a larger symmetry energy parameter than the NLρ model with a smaller symmetry energy parameter, opposite to that found without the in-medium threshold effect. To reproduce the total pion yield measured by the FOPI Collaboration, we introduce a density-dependent cross section for Δ baryon production from nucleon-nucleon collisions, which suppresses the total pion yield but hardly changes the π-/π+ ratio. Because of the small difference in the stiffness of their symmetry energies, the π-/π+ ratios obtained from both the NLρ and NLρ δ models are consistent with the FOPI data within the experimental errors.

  3. Sodium along with low-threshold potassium currents enhance coincidence detection of subthreshold noisy signals in MSO neurons.

    PubMed

    Svirskis, Gytis; Kotak, Vibhakar; Sanes, Dan H; Rinzel, John

    2004-06-01

    Voltage-dependent membrane conductances support specific neurophysiological properties. To investigate the mechanisms of coincidence detection, we activated gerbil medial superior olivary (MSO) neurons with dynamic current-clamp stimuli in vitro. Spike-triggered reverse-correlation analysis for injected current was used to evaluate the integration of subthreshold noisy signals. Consistent with previous reports, the partial blockade of low-threshold potassium channels (I(KLT)) reduced coincidence detection by slowing the rise of current needed on average to evoke a spike. However, two factors point toward the involvement of a second mechanism. First, the reverse correlation currents revealed that spike generation was associated with a preceding hyperpolarization. Second, rebound action potentials are 45% larger compared to depolarization-evoked spikes in the presence of an I(KLT) antagonist. These observations suggest that the sodium current (I(Na)) was substantially inactivated at rest. To test this idea, I(Na) was enhanced by increasing extracellular sodium concentration. This manipulation reduced coincidence detection, as reflected by slower spike-triggering current, and diminished the hyperpolarization phase in the reverse-correlation currents. As expected, a small outward bias current decreased the pre-spike hyperpolarization phase, and TTX blockade of I(Na) nearly eliminated the hyperpolarization phase in the reverse correlation current. A computer model including Hodgkin-Huxley type conductances for spike generation and for I(KLT) showed reduction in coincidence detection when I(KLT) was reduced or when I(Na) was increased. We hypothesize that desirable synaptic signals first remove some inactivation of I(Na) and reduce activation of I(KLT) to create a brief temporal window for coincidence detection of subthreshold noisy signals. PMID:14749317

  4. Evaluation of the psychophysical detection threshold level for vibrotactile and pressure stimulation of prosthetic limbs using bone anchorage or soft tissue support.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R; Brånemark, R; Olmarker, K; Rydevik, B; Van Steenberghe, D; Brånemark, P I

    2000-08-01

    In the present study the psychophysical detection threshold levels mechanical stimulation of 32 prosthetic limbs were determined. Prosthetic limbs were anchored to the bone by means of an implant (n=17) or supported by a socket enclosing the amputation stump (n=15). Detection threshold levels were assessed for pressure and vibratory stimulation of the prosthesis and the limb at the contralateral side (control). Following vibratory stimulation, thresholds were increased on an average 20% for socket prostheses. but approached those of the control for bone-anchored prostheses. For pressure stimulation, thresholds were increased up to 60% for socket prostheses and 40% for bone-anchored prostheses compared to the control. While bone-anchored prostheses yielded significantly lower threshold levels than socket prostheses, there was no significant difference between both treatments regarding pressure stimulation. Results were applicable to both upper and lower limb amputees. It could be concluded that detection thresholds for pressure and especially vibratory stimulation of prosthetic limbs were generally higher than for control limbs. The outcome was related to the prosthetic limb design with bone-anchored prostheses yielding better perception than socket prostheses. PMID:11061200

  5. Keplerian periodogram for Doppler exoplanet detection: optimized computation and analytic significance thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the so-called Keplerian periodogram, in which the putative detectable signal is modelled by a highly non-linear Keplerian radial velocity function, appearing in Doppler exoplanetary surveys. We demonstrate that for planets on high-eccentricity orbits the Keplerian periodogram is far more efficient than the classic Lomb-Scargle periodogram and even the multiharmonic periodograms, in which the periodic signal is approximated by a truncated Fourier series. We provide a new numerical algorithm for computation of the Keplerian periodogram. This algorithm adaptively increases the parametric resolution where necessary, in order to uniformly cover all local optima of the Keplerian fit. Thanks to this improvement, the algorithm provides more smooth and reliable results with minimized computing demands. We also derive a fast analytic approximation to the false alarm probability levels of the Keplerian periodogram. This approximation has the form (Pz3/2 + Qz)Wexp ( - z), where z is the observed periodogram maximum, W is proportional to the settled frequency range, and the coefficients P and Q depend on the maximum eccentricity to scan.

  6. Threshold displacement energies in graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Andrew; Cress, Cory D.; Rossi, Jamie E.; Cox, Nathanael D.; Landi, Brian J.

    2015-08-01

    The threshold displacement energy Ed has been determined for graphene and 216 different (n , m ) single-walled carbon nanotube chiralities, with 5 ≤n ≤20 and 0 ≤m ≤n , under several model conditions using classical molecular dynamics. The model conditions vary by particle (electron or carbon ion), empirical potential (two parametrizations of Tersoff [J. Tersoff, Phys. Rev. B 39, 5566 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevB.39.5566; L. Lindsay and D. A. Broido, Phys. Rev. B 81, 205441 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.205441] and one of Brenner et al. [D. W. Brenner, O. A. Shenderova, J. A. Harrison, S. J. Stuart, B. Ni, and S. B. Sinnott, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 14, 783 (2002), 10.1088/0953-8984/14/4/312]), and momentum transfer direction (towards or away from the nanotube axis). For electron irradiation simulations, Ed exhibits a smoothly varying chirality dependence and a characteristic curvature influenced by the momentum transfer direction. Changing the empirical potential shifts the magnitude of Ed, but the trend is preserved for electron simulations. However, the perturbation in the knock-on dynamics introduced by the carbon ion leads to Ed trends that diverge from the equivalent electron simulation. Thus, the ion interaction has a non-negligible effect on the dynamics of the collision and leads to Ed values that can distinctly vary depending on the selected carbon nanostructure.

  7. Non-human primate skull effects on the cavitation detection threshold of FUS-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Marquet, Fabrice; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-11-01

    Microbubble (MB)-assisted focused ultrasound is a promising technique for delivering drugs to the brain by noninvasively and transiently opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and monitoring BBB opening using passive cavitation detection (PCD) is critical in detecting its occurrence, extent as well as assessing its mechanism. One of the main obstacles in achieving those objectives in large animals is the transcranial attenuation. To study the effects, the cavitation response through the in-vitro non-human primate (NHP) skull was investigated. In-house manufactured lipid-shelled MB (medium diameter: 4-5 um) were injected into a 4-mm channel of a phantom below a degassed monkey skull. A hydrophone confocally aligned with the FUS transducer served as PCD during sonication (frequency: 0.50 MHz, peak rarefactional pressures: 0.05-0.60 MPa, pulse length: 100 cycles, PRF: 10 Hz, duration: 2 s) for four cases: water without skull, water with skull, MB without skull and MB with skull. A 5.1-MHz linear-array transducer was also used to monitor the MB disruption. The frequency spectra, spectrograms, stable cavitation dose (SCD) and inertial cavitation dose (ICD) were quantified. Results showed that the onset of stable cavitation and inertial cavitation in the experiments occurred at 50 kPa, and was detectable throught the NHP skull since the both the detection thresholds for stable cavitation and inertial cavitation remained unchanged compared to the non-skull case, and the SCD and ICD acquired transcranially may not adequately represent the true extent of stable and inertial cavitation due to the skull attenuation.

  8. Energy Detection Based on Undecimated Discrete Wavelet Transform and Its Application in Magnetic Anomaly Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xinhua; Pan, Zhongming; Zhang, Dasha; Zhou, Han; Chen, Min; Zhang, Wenna

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) is a passive approach for detection of a ferromagnetic target, and its performance is often limited by external noises. In consideration of one major noise source is the fractal noise (or called 1/f noise) with a power spectral density of 1/fa (0energy detection method based on undecimated discrete wavelet transform (UDWT) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the foundations of magnetic anomaly detection and UDWT are introduced in brief, while a possible detection system based on giant magneto-impedance (GMI) magnetic sensor is also given out. Then our proposed energy detection based on UDWT is described in detail, and the probabilities of false alarm and detection for given the detection threshold in theory are presented. It is noticeable that no a priori assumptions regarding the ferromagnetic target or the magnetic noise probability are necessary for our method, and different from the discrete wavelet transform (DWT), the UDWT is shift invariant. Finally, some simulations are performed and the results show that the detection performance of our proposed detector is better than that of the conventional energy detector even utilized in the Gaussian white noise, especially when the spectral parameter α is less than 1.0. In addition, a real-world experiment was done to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method. PMID:25343484

  9. Thresholds for igniting exothermic reactions in Al/Ni multilayers using pulses of electrical, mechanical, and thermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Spey, Stephen J.; Grapes, Michael D.; Weihs, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    We use pulses of electrical, mechanical, and thermal energy to determine the ignition thresholds of self-propagating reactions in Al/(Ni-7 V) and Al/Inconel multilayers. The energy density and power density required to initiate reactions in a Al/(Ni-7 V) foil with a 50 nm bilayer is compared for all three techniques to demonstrate the importance of heat loss on ignition thresholds and its dependence on the test volume and the surrounding thermal resistance. In addition, ignition is shown to occur at temperatures as low as 232 °C when heat losses are very small suggesting that ignition can be controlled by atomic mixing in the solid state. The experiments demonstrate that the ignition threshold drops with increasing ignition volume, and it rises with increasing bilayer spacing and with increasing intermixed thickness. These trends are also supported by an analytical model we derive to predict the effects of ignition volume, multilayer microstructure, and physical properties on the ignition threshold. We calculate an activation energy of 77.3 ± 1.3 kJ/mol for solid state mixing based on measured ignition temperatures.

  10. Quantitative measurement of odor detection thresholds using an air dilution olfactometer, and association with genetic variants in a sample of diverse ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gillian R.; Krithika, S; Edwards, Melissa; Kavanagh, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies require a quantitative and reliable method for odor threshold assessment in order to examine the contribution of genetic variants to complex olfactory phenotypes. Our main goal was to assess the feasibility of a portable Scentroid air dilution olfactometer for use in such studies. Using the Scentroid SM110C and the SK5 n-butanol Sensitivity Kit (IDES Canada Inc.), n-butanol odor thresholds were determined for 182 individuals of diverse ancestry (mean age: 20.4 ± 2.5 years; n = 128 female; n = 54 male). Threshold scores from repeat participants were used to calculate a test–retest reliability coefficient, which was statistically significant (r = 0.754, p < 0.001, n = 29), indicating that the Scentroid provides reliable estimates of odor thresholds. In addition, we performed a preliminary genetic analysis evaluating the potential association of n-butanol odor thresholds to six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) putatively involved in general olfactory sensitivity (GOS). The results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed no significant association between the SNPs tested and threshold scores. However, our sample size was relatively small, and our study was only powered to identify genetic markers with strong effects on olfactory sensitivity. Overall, we find that the Scentroid provides reliable quantitative measures of odor detection threshold and is well suited for genetic studies of olfactory sensitivity. PMID:25392755

  11. Visible Contrast Energy Metrics for Detection and Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert; Watson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Contrast energy was proposed by Watson, Robson, & Barlow as a useful metric for representing luminance contrast target stimuli because it represents the detectability of the stimulus in photon noise for an ideal observer. Like the eye, the ear is a complex transducer system, but relatively simple sound level meters are used to characterize sounds. These meters provide a range of frequency sensitivity functions and integration times depending on the intended use. We propose here the use of a range of contrast energy measures with different spatial frequency contrast sensitivity weightings, eccentricity sensitivity weightings, and temporal integration times. When detection threshold are plotting using such measures, the results show what the eye sees best when these variables are taken into account in a standard way. The suggested weighting functions revise the Standard Spatial Observer for luminance contrast detection and extend it into the near periphery. Under the assumption that the detection is limited only by internal noise, discrimination performance can be predicted by metrics based on the visible energy of the difference images

  12. Energy Detection Based Estimation of Channel Occupancy Rate with Adaptive Noise Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtomäki, Janne J.; Vuohtoniemi, Risto; Umebayashi, Kenta; Mäkelä, Juha-Pekka

    Recently, there has been growing interest in opportunistically utilizing the 2.4GHz ISM-band. Numerous spectrum occupancy measurements covering the ISM-band have been performed to analyze the spectrum usage. However, in these campaigns the verification of the correctness of the obtained occupancy values for the highly dynamic ISM-band has not been presented. In this paper, we propose and verify channel occupancy rate (COR) estimation utilizing energy detection mechanism with a novel adaptive energy detection threshold setting method. The results are compared with the true reference COR values. Several different types of verification measurements showed that our setup can estimate the COR values of 802.11 traffic well, with negligible overestimation. The results from real-time real-life measurements also confirm that the proposed adaptive threshold setting method enables accurate thresholds even in the situations where multiple interferers are present in the received signal.

  13. Amplitude-modulation detection by recreational-noise-exposed humans with near-normal hearing thresholds and its medium-term progression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael A; Moore, Brian C J

    2014-11-01

    Noise exposure can affect the functioning of cochlear inner and outer hair cells (IHC/OHC), leading to multiple perceptual changes. This work explored possible changes in detection of amplitude modulation (AM) at three Sensation Levels (SL) for carrier frequencies of 3, 4 and 6 kHz. There were two groups of participants, aged 19 to 24 (Young) and 26 to 35 (Older) years. All had near-normal audiometric thresholds. Participants self-assessed exposure to high-level noise in recreational settings. Each group was sub-grouped into low-noise (LN) or high-noise (HN) exposure. AM detection thresholds were worse for the HN than for the LN sub-group at the lowest SL, for the males only of the Young group and for both genders for the Older group, despite no significant difference in absolute threshold at 3 and 4 kHz between sub-groups. AM detection at the lowest SL, at both 3 and 4 kHz, generally improved with increasing age and increasing absolute threshold, consistent with a recruitment-like process. However, poorer AM detection was correlated with increasing exposure at 3 kHz in the Older group. It is suggested that high-level noise exposure produces both IHC- and OHC-related damage, the balance between the two varying across frequency. However, the use of AM detection offers poor sensitivity as a measure of the effects. PMID:25260433

  14. Amplitude-modulation detection by recreational-noise-exposed humans with near-normal hearing thresholds and its medium-term progression

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Michael A.; Moore, Brian C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Noise exposure can affect the functioning of cochlear inner and outer hair cells (IHC/OHC), leading to multiple perceptual changes. This work explored possible changes in detection of amplitude modulation (AM) at three Sensation Levels (SL) for carrier frequencies of 3, 4 and 6 kHz. There were two groups of participants, aged 19 to 24 (Young) and 26 to 35 (Older) years. All had near-normal audiometric thresholds. Participants self-assessed exposure to high-level noise in recreational settings. Each group was sub-grouped into low-noise (LN) or high-noise (HN) exposure. AM detection thresholds were worse for the HN than for the LN sub-group at the lowest SL, for the males only of the Young group and for both genders for the Older group, despite no significant difference in absolute threshold at 3 and 4 kHz between sub-groups. AM detection at the lowest SL, at both 3 and 4 kHz, generally improved with increasing age and increasing absolute threshold, consistent with a recruitment-like process. However, poorer AM detection was correlated with increasing exposure at 3 kHz in the Older group. It is suggested that high-level noise exposure produces both IHC- and OHC-related damage, the balance between the two varying across frequency. However, the use of AM detection offers poor sensitivity as a measure of the effects. PMID:25260433

  15. Tunnel effect wave energy detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Waltman, Steven B. (Inventor); Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for measuring gravitational and inertial forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on an object or fluid in space provide an electric tunneling current through a gap between an electrode and that object or fluid in space and vary that gap with any selected one of such forces, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy acting on that object or fluid. These methods and apparatus sense a corresponding variation in an electric property of that gap and determine the latter force, magnetic fields, or wave or radiant energy in response to that corresponding variation, and thereby sense or measure such parameters as acceleration, position, particle mass, velocity, magnetic field strength, presence or direction, or wave or radiant energy intensity, presence or direction.

  16. Multiple-Threshold Event Detection and Other Enhancements to the Virtual Seismologist (VS) Earthquake Early Warning Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M.; Caprio, M.; Cua, G. B.; Heaton, T. H.; Clinton, J. F.; Wiemer, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Virtual Seismologist (VS) algorithm is a Bayesian approach to earthquake early warning (EEW) being implemented by the Swiss Seismological Service at ETH Zurich. The application of Bayes’ theorem in earthquake early warning states that the most probable source estimate at any given time is a combination of contributions from a likelihood function that evolves in response to incoming data from the on-going earthquake, and selected prior information, which can include factors such as network topology, the Gutenberg-Richter relationship or previously observed seismicity. The VS algorithm was one of three EEW algorithms involved in the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) real-time EEW testing and performance evaluation effort. Its compelling real-time performance in California over the last three years has led to its inclusion in the new USGS-funded effort to develop key components of CISN ShakeAlert, a prototype EEW system that could potentially be implemented in California. A significant portion of VS code development was supported by the SAFER EEW project in Europe. We discuss recent enhancements to the VS EEW algorithm. We developed and continue to test a multiple-threshold event detection scheme, which uses different association / location approaches depending on the peak amplitudes associated with an incoming P pick. With this scheme, an event with sufficiently high initial amplitudes can be declared on the basis of a single station, maximizing warning times for damaging events for which EEW is most relevant. Smaller, non-damaging events, which will have lower initial amplitudes, will require more picks to be declared an event to reduce false alarms. This transforms the VS codes from a regional EEW approach reliant on traditional location estimation (and it requirement of at least 4 picks as implemented by the Binder Earthworm phase associator) to a hybrid on-site/regional approach capable of providing a continuously evolving stream of EEW

  17. Influence of high pressure on the threshold displacement energies in silicon carbide: A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shijun; Xue, Jianming; Lan, Chune; Sun, Lixin; Wang, Yugang; Yan, Sha

    2012-09-01

    The threshold displacement energies in silicon carbide under different pressures are determined with ab initio molecular dynamics. The results show that the threshold displacement energies change anisotropically in different crystallographic directions when high pressure is applied. However, the weighted average values for both the C and Si sublattice, which determine the defect production in a material under irradiation, are found to increase significantly with increasing external pressures. Besides, we have observed some new defect structures under high pressures which are not observed at ambient conditions. Our results show that irradiation under high pressures could decrease the production rate of point defects in SiC, thus greatly enhancing its resistivity against radiation damage. The combination of irradiation and high pressure technique hence provides a pathway to obtain new structure materials.

  18. A Threshold-Minimization Scheme for Exploring the Energy Landscape of Biomolecules: Application to a Cyclic Peptide and a Disaccharide.

    PubMed

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Johnston, Roy L; Schön, J Christian

    2016-05-10

    We present a scheme, called the threshold-minimization method, for globally exploring the energy landscapes of small systems of biomolecular interest where typical exploration moves always require a certain degree of subsequent structural relaxation in order to be efficient, e.g., systems containing small or large circular carbon chains such as cyclic peptides or carbohydrates. We show that using this threshold-minimization method we can not only reproduce the global minimum and relevant local minima but also overcome energetic barriers associated with different types of isomerism for the example of a cyclic peptide, cyclo-(Gly)4. We then apply the new method to the disaccharide α-d-glucopyranose-1-2-β-d-fructofuranose, report energetically preferred configurations and barriers to boat-chair isomerization in the glucopyranosyl ring, and discuss the energy landscape. PMID:27049524

  19. Measurement of inclusive radiative B-meson decays with a photon energy threshold of 1.7 GeV.

    PubMed

    Limosani, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Belous, K; Bischofberger, M; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Drutskoy, A; Dungel, W; Eidelman, S; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Ha, H; Hayashii, H; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W-S; Hyun, H J; Inami, K; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Julius, T; Kah, D H; Kim, H O; Kim, S K; Kim, Y I; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Korpar, S; Kreps, M; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kwon, Y-J; Kyeong, S-H; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Liu, C; Liventsev, D; Louvot, R; Matyja, A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mori, T; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Ozaki, H; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Piilonen, L E; Rozanska, M; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shiu, J-G; Singh, J B; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uehara, S; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamamoto, H; Yamashita, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zivko, T; Zupanc, A

    2009-12-11

    Using 605 fb(-1) of data collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance we present a measurement of the inclusive radiative B-meson decay channel, B-->X(s)gamma. For the lower photon energy thresholds of 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, and 2.0 GeV, as defined in the rest frame of the B meson, we measure the partial branching fraction and the mean and variance of the photon energy spectrum. At the 1.7 GeV threshold we obtain the partial branching fraction BF(B-->X(s)}gamma)=(3.45+/-0.15+/-0.40)x10(-4), where the errors are statistical and systematic. PMID:20366195

  20. Internal energy distribution of the NCO fragment from near-threshold photolysis of isocyanic acid, HNCO

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.S.; Berghout, H.L.; Crim, F.F.

    1996-05-09

    We report the first measurement of the vibrational- and rotational-state distributions in the NCO fragment resulting from photolysis of HNCO. Recent studies have drawn conclusions about the photochemistry of HNCO and the vibrational distribution in the NCO fragment from observations of kinetic energy distribution of the H atom produced in this photolysis; however, there has been no direct observation of the NCO fragment itself. We use laser-induced fluorescence to detect the nascent NCO photoproducts and spectral simulations to extract vibrational-state populations. The rotational distributions, where we can measure them, show little excitation, and the vibrational energy preferentially appears in the bending mode. The vibrational-state distribution results directly from the excited-state geometry of the HNCO parent, in which the NCO group is bent. The dissociation proceeds from this bent NCO group to a linear NCO fragment, strongly exciting the bending mode. We find about 65% of the total energy in relative translation of the fragments, while 30% goes into vibration and 5% into rotation of NCO. 49 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Energy sorghum biomass harvest thresholds and tillage effects on soil organic carbon and bulk density

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioenergy feedstock production systems face many challenges, among which is the lack of guidelines on sustainable biomass harvest thresholds, and tillage cropping systems that minimize the potential cumulative effects of fresh biomass harvesting equipment-induced soil compaction. We used the ALMANAC...

  2. Resonances and threshold effects in low-energy electron collisions with methyl halides

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, Gordon A.; Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2007-03-15

    Cross sections for elastic and inelastic electron collisions with CH{sub 3}X (X=Cl,Br,I) molecules are calculated. For the lowest partial wave, the resonance R-matrix theory, and for the higher partial waves, the theory of scattering by dipolar plus polarization potential, are used. It is shown that the rotationally elastic scattering amplitude for a polar molecule in the fixed-nuclei approximation is logarithmically divergent for the forward direction, and a closure formula is derived to speed up the convergence at small angles. In treating the nuclear motion, only C-X stretch vibrations are taken into account. The dipole moment as a function of the C-X distance is modeled by a function incorporating the experimental value of the molecular dipole moments at the equilibrium distance and the derivatives of the dipole moments extracted from the experimental data on infrared intensities. This is supplemented by ab initio calculations of the dipole moment function for CH{sub 3}Br using the multiconfigurational valence bond method. The results for scattering cross sections show pronounced features caused by vibrational Feshbach resonances and threshold cusps. The features are most noticeable at the v=6, 7, and 8 thresholds in CH{sub 3}Cl, at the v=3 and 4 thresholds in CH{sub 3}Br, and at the v=1 threshold in CH{sub 3}I.

  3. Efficiency of BRCAPRO and Myriad II mutation probability thresholds versus cancer history criteria alone for BRCA1/2 mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    van Harssel, J. J. T.; van Roozendaal, C. E. P.; Detisch, Y.; Brandão, R. D.; Paulussen, A. D. C.; Zeegers, M.; Blok, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable differences exist amongst countries in the mutation probability methods and thresholds used to select patients for BRCA1/2 genetic screening. In order to assess the added value of mutation probability methods, we have retrospectively calculated the BRCAPRO and Myriad II probabilities in 306 probands who had previously been selected for DNA-analysis according to criteria based on familial history of cancer. DNA-analysis identified 52 mutations (16.9%) and 11 unclassified variants (UVs, 3.6%). Compared to cancer history, a threshold ≥10% with BRCAPRO or with Myriad II excluded about 40% of the patients from analysis, including four with a mutation and probabilities <10% with both programs. All four probands had a BRCA2 mutation. BRCAPRO and Myriad II showed similar specificity at 10% threshold, overall BRCAPRO was more sensitive than Myriad II for the detection of mutations. Only two of the probands with an UV had probabilities >20% with BRCAPRO and Myriad II. In summary, BRCAPRO and Myriad II are more efficient than cancer history alone to exclude patients without a mutation. BRCAPRO performs better for the detection of BRCA1 mutations than of BRCA2 mutations. The Myriad II scores provided no additional information than the BRCAPRO scores alone for the detection of patients with a mutation. The use of thresholds excluded from analysis the majority of patients carrying an UV. PMID:19949876

  4. Sensory detection and pain thresholds in spinal cord injury patients with and without dysesthetic pain, and in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M J; Song, Z K; Schandler, S L; Ho, W H; Vulpe, M

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to understand the mechanisms involved in dysesthetic pain syndrome (DPS) in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, four groups of 13 subjects each--SCI subjects with DPS, SCI subjects without pain, chronic low back pain subjects, and control subjects--were examined for sensory detection and pain thresholds at forearm, neck, and rostral trunk areas. Results indicated that the SCI pain group had significantly lower pain thresholds at all skin sites, compared to the SCI no-pain and chronic low back pain groups, and at the rostral trunk skin site, compared to the control group. The SCI pain group also showed a lower sensory detection threshold at the rostral trunk skin site than did the SCI no-pain group. Equally important, the SCI no-pain group had detection and pain thresholds significantly higher than those of the control group. The results suggest fundamental differences in somatosensory processing when DPS is or is not a consequence of SCI. PMID:8725646

  5. Critical study of photodetachment of H- at energies up to the n=4 threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jian-Zhi; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Matsuzawa, Michio; Watanabe, Shinichi; Shimamura, Isao

    1994-02-01

    We apply the close-coupling method in terms of the hyperspherical coordinates to the two-electron system H-. A two-dimensional matching procedure is used to connect the close-coupling wave function to an independent-electron wave function in the asymptotic region. The latter is described as the wave function of a detached electron moving in a dipole potential field of the neutral hydrogen atom. The total phbotodetachment cross sections and the partial cross sections for the production of the H atoms in different states n are calculated up to the n=4 hydrogenic threshold. The results obtained in the length and acceleration forms agree within about three significant figures. The magnitude and shape of the 1Po shape resonance just above the n=2 threshold are found to depend sensitively on the initial-state wave function. This appears to be one of the reasons for a disparity among the cross sections in the literature. The present result improves greatly on the existing computational results. The relative magnitudes of the partial cross sections for the production of H (n=1,2,3) atoms below the n=4 threshold are substantially different from the only previous results of the eigenchannel R-matrix calculations [H. R. Sadeghpour, C. H. Greene, and M. Cavagnero, Phys. Rev. A 45, 1587 (1992)]. The present results on both partial and total cross sections are in excellent agreement with experiments.

  6. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ˜400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  7. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H. W. Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  8. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Young, C S; Fatherley, V E; Lopez, F E; Oertel, J A; Malone, R M; Rubery, M S; Horsfield, C J; Stoeffl, W; Zylstra, A B; Shmayda, W T; Batha, S H

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds. PMID:25430303

  9. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  10. High Energy Polarization of Blazars: Detection Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.